WorldWideScience

Sample records for sahara seawater textile

  1. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel; Bolonkin, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with...

  2. Sahara en mouvement

    OpenAIRE

    Casajus, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    On peut dire du Sahara ce que Fernand Braudel disait naguère de la Méditerranée : lui assigner des bornages est une tâche malaisée. Des géographes s’y sont cependant essayés, et leurs tentatives participent de ce qu’on peut appeler l’« invention » du Sahara. La présente introduction évoque quelques figures marquantes de cette invention (Léon l’Africain, Eugène Daumas, Émile Carette, Henri Duveyrier, Robert Capot-Rey…) puis présente brièvement les diverses contributions du dossier, en les repl...

  3. Smart textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Langenhove, Lieva; Hertleer, Carla; Catrysse, Michael; Puers, Robert; Van Egmond, Harko; Matthijs, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    After technical textiles and functional textiles, also smart textiles came into force a few years ago. The term 'smart textiles' covers a broad range. The application possibilities are only limited by our imagination and creativity. In this presentation, it is further explored what smart textiles precisely mean. In a second part, an analysis is made of the possibilities, the state of affairs and the needs for further research.

  4. [Malaria in Algerian Sahara].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammadi, D; Boubidi, S C; Chaib, S E; Saber, A; Khechache, Y; Gasmi, M; Harrat, Z

    2009-08-01

    Thanks to the malaria eradication campaign launched in Algeria in 1968, the number of malaria cases fell down significantly from 95,424 cases in 1960 to 30 cases in 1978. At that time the northern part of the country was declared free of Plasmodium falciparum. Only few cases belonging to P. vivax persisted in residual foci in the middle part of the country. In the beginning of the eighties, the south of the country was marked by an increase of imported malaria cases. The resurgence of the disease in the oases coincided with the opening of the Trans-Saharan road and the booming trade with the neighbouring southern countries. Several authors insisted on the risk of introduction of malaria or its exotic potential vectors in Algeria via this new road. Now, the totality of malaria autochthonous cases in Algeria are located in the south of the country where 300 cases were declared during the period (1980-2007). The recent outbreak recorded in 2007 at the borders with Mall and the introduction of Anopheles gambiae into the Algerian territory show the vulnerability of this area to malaria which is probably emphasized by the local environmental changes. The authors assess the evolution of malaria in the Sahara region and draw up the distribution of the anopheles in this area.

  5. Textile dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Guaratini, Cláudia C. I. [UNESP; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin [UNESP

    2000-01-01

    A dye is a colored substance used to impart permanent color to other substances. Its most important use is in coloring textile fibers and fabrics. The removal of colour from dyehouse waste waters is currently a major problem in the textile sector. This paper provides an overview of the treatment technologies that can currently be used by the textile processor and the developments over the past decade with respect to the toxicological and ecotoxicological properties of synthetic organic dyes.

  6. The Western Sahara conflict I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Politica; Analyst. Munich. The history of the Western Sahara has seen many developments familiar to Africa: • the drawing of artificial boundaries in foreign European capitals at the tum of the century,. • clandestine agreements between colonial and regional powers without proper consultation with the territory's population,.

  7. Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    Textiles can be used as building skins, adding new aesthetic and functional qualities to architecture. Just like we as humans can put on a coat, buildings can also get dressed. Depending on our mood, or on the weather, we can change coat, and so can the building. But the idea of using textiles...

  8. Antibacterial textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Usha

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the antibacterial functionalization of textiles and its application in professional laundries. The antibacterial functionalization was meant for the various textile packages lent out by the laundry companies to their customers from hotels, hospital or food industries. The

  9. Future Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Louise Degn; Jensen, Hanne Troels Fusvad; Hansen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Magasinet Future Textiles samler resultaterne fra projektet Future Textiles, der markedsfører området intelligente tekstiler. I magasinet kan man læse om trends, drivkræfter, udfordringer samt få ideer til nye produkter inden for intelligente tekstiler. Områder som bæredygtighed og kundetilpasning...

  10. Textile Tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2008-01-01

    The meeting of architecture and textiles is a continuous but too often forgotten story of intimate exchange. However, the 2nd Ventulett Symposium hosted by the College of Architecture, within Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, was one of these precious moments celebrating such a marriage....... Organized by Lars Spuybroeck, principal of Nox, Rotterdam, and current Thomas W. Ventulett III distinguished chair of Architectural Design, the event was embracing the textile tectonics as a core topic, praising textiles as the key component of architecture, relying on Gottfried Semper’s understanding...... of the discipline. Inspiring time gathering some of the most exciting architects of the moment, Lars Spuybroeck, Mark Burry, Evan Douglis, Michael Hensel and Cecil Balmond were invited to discuss their understanding of tectonics. Full text available at http://textilefutures.co.uk/exchange/bin/view/TextileFutures/TextileTectonics...

  11. Textile Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Kristy Alana

    Innovative and interdisciplinary solutions to wearable textile energy storage are explored as power sources for wearable electronics and smart textiles. Due to their long cycle life, non-toxic and inexpensive materials, supercapacitors were converted into textiles. Textile supercapacitors were developed using scalable fabrication methods including screen-printing, yarn making, and 3D computerized knitting. The electrode materials reported in this thesis undergo thorough electrochemical analysis, and are capable of storing up to 0.5 F/cm2 which is on par with conventionally solid supercapacitors (0.6 F/cm2). Capacitive yarns are capable of storing up to 37 mF/cm and are shown to be knittable on industrial knitting equipment. Both are some of the highest reported capacitance for all-carbon systems in the field. Yet both are the only systems composed of inexpensive and non-toxic activated carbon, the most commonly used electrode material used in supercapacitors, opposed to carbon nanotubes or graphene, which are typically more 10-100 times more expensive. However, all of the fabrication techniques reported here are also capable of incorporating a wide variety of materials, ultimately broadening the applications of textile energy storage as a whole. Fully machine knitted supercapacitors are also explored and electrochemically characterized in order to determine how the textile structure affects the capacitance. In conclusion, a wide variety of fabrication techniques for making textile supercapacitors were successfully explored.

  12. Going under the radar in Western Sahara

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Alice

    2016-01-01

    At the level of formal attempts at conflict resolution, the Western Sahara conflict has been locked in a political stalemate for years. One consequence is that the people of Western Sahara are often overlooked in their own conflict – despite the fact that the very case for decolonization in Western Sahara hinges upon the right of the people of the territory to self-determination. This essay examines how, despite the ongoing formal stalemate, under the radar of formal politics in recent years ...

  13. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  14. Textile terminologies

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Cécile; Nosch, Marie Louise Bech

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Written sources from the ancient Near East and eastern Mediterranean, from the third to the first millennia BC, provide a wealth of terms for textiles. The twenty-two chapters in the present volume offer the first comprehensive survey of this important material, with special attention to evidence for significant interconnections in textile terminology among languages and cultures, across space and time. For example, the Greek word for a long shirt, khiton , ki-to in Li...

  15. Textile Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Maurin, Bernard; Motro, René

    2013-01-01

    The basic idea for a textile architecture project originates during early meetings between the architect and the engineer. The morphologic richness of such projects is provided by the varying curvatures of shapes, in contradiction with a classical straight line and orthogonal architecture. However the rules of construction are quite different in terms of realisation and of mechanical behaviour: textile membranes are subjected to a pre-stress conferring them their rigidity, and a major objecti...

  16. Textile Dampfbremse

    OpenAIRE

    Saur, A.; Holm, A.

    2006-01-01

    DE 102005020295 A1 UPAB: 20061218 NOVELTY - Manufactured from a textile membrane and made airtight and wind-proof, a vapor barrier seal is attached as an outermost layer on a room side and/or external side of walls, ceilings or floors. It is designed as a carpet or is integrated in a carpet. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - An INDEPENDENT CLAIM is also included for a means of transport with a vapor barrier seal. USE - As a vapor barrier seal manufactured from textile for an interior space/indoors to be...

  17. Cretaceous Crocodyliforms from the Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sereno

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Diverse crocodyliforms have been discovered in recent years in Cretaceous rocks on southern landmasses formerly composing Gondwana.  We report here on six species from the Sahara with an array of trophic adaptations that significantly deepen our current understanding of African crocodyliform diversity during the Cretaceous period.  We describe two of these species (Anatosuchus minor, Araripesuchus wegeneri from nearly complete skulls and partial articulated skeletons from the Lower Cretaceous Elrhaz Formation (Aptian-Albian of Niger. The remaining four species (Araripesuchus rattoides sp. n., Kaprosuchus saharicus gen. n. sp. n., Laganosuchus thaumastos gen. n. sp. n., Laganosuchus maghrebensis gen. n. sp. n. come from contemporaneous Upper Cretaceous formations (Cenomanian in Niger and Morocco.

  18. TEXTILE SALVAGE

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2002-01-01

    Readers are reminded that Geneva's agency for salvaging used clothing, other textiles and old shoes (Coordination d'oeuvres d'entraide pour la récupération de vêtements, textiles et chaussures usagés dans le canton de Genève) has a container in the car park outside CERN's Meyrin site. In 2001, 1000 tonnes of such items were collected in the Canton of Geneva (as compared with 840 tonnes in 2000), of which 4460 kg came from the container outside the Meyrin site. The operation's organisers (Caritas, Centre Social Protestant, the Geneva Section of the Swiss Red Cross, Terre des Hommes, the Geneva branch of Terre des Hommes Suisse and Emmaüs, Geneva) would like to thank all those who have donated clothing or otherwise supported their campaign. Relations with the Host States Service Tel. 72848 http://www.cern.ch/relations/

  19. Textile Technology Analysis Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textile Analysis Labis built for evaluating and characterizing the physical properties of an array of textile materials, but specifically those used in aircrew...

  20. Murzuk Sand Sea, Sahara Desert, Libya, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This near vertical view of the Murzuk Sand Sea, Sahara Desert, Libya (22.5N, 13.0E) shows the very diverse landscape that is part of the great Sahara Desert of North Africa. The vast expanse of sand dunes known as the Murzuk sand Sea of Libya and the adjacent rock outcrops support little human habitation. In fact, the tiny village of Murzuk with its center pivot, swing arm irrigated agriculture complex is the only sign of life in the region.

  1. Cenozoic stratigraphy of the Sahara, Northern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cenozoic stratigraphic record in the Sahara, and shows that the strata display some remarkably similar characteristics across much of the region. In fact, some lithologies of certain ages are exceptionally widespread and persistent, and many of the changes from one lithology to another appear to have been relatively synchronous across the Sahara. The general stratigraphic succession is that of a transition from early Cenozoic carbonate strata to late Cenozoic siliciclastic strata. This transition in lithology coincides with a long-term eustatic fall in sea level since the middle Cretaceous and with a global climate transition from a Late Cretaceous–Early Eocene “warm mode” to a Late Eocene–Quaternary “cool mode”. Much of the shorter-term stratigraphic variability in the Sahara (and even the regional unconformities) also can be correlated with specific changes in sea level, climate, and tectonic activity during the Cenozoic. Specifically, Paleocene and Eocene carbonate strata and phosphate are suggestive of a warm and humid climate, whereas latest Eocene evaporitic strata (and an end-Eocene regional unconformity) are correlated with a eustatic fall in sea level, the build-up of ice in Antarctica, and the appearance of relatively arid climates in the Sahara. The absence of Oligocene strata throughout much of the Sahara is attributed to the effects of generally low eustatic sea level during the Oligocene and tectonic uplift in certain areas during the Late Eocene and Oligocene. Miocene sandstone and conglomerate are attributed to the effects of continued tectonic uplift around the Sahara, generally low eustatic sea level, and enough rainfall to support the development of extensive fluvial systems. Middle–Upper Miocene carbonate strata accumulated in northern Libya in response to a eustatic rise in sea level, whereas Upper Miocene mudstone accumulated along the south side of the Atlas Mountains because uplift of the

  2. Eghindi among Sahrawi refugees of Western Sahara

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volpato, G.

    2014-01-01

    Eghindi is an illness built around a set of pathological states experienced by Sahrawi in the desert environment of Western Sahara. Its core symptoms are caused by osmotic imbalances related to salt consumption. In 1975, many Sahrawi were exiled into refugee camps, and they have since experienced

  3. Seawater predesalination with electrodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, A.H.; Saakes, M.; Bruning, H.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.; Post, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of ED for seawater desalination was investigated and we quantified the energy losses that play a role in electrodialysis. The combination of electrodialysis (ED) and brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) is presented as an alternative desalination strategy for seawater reverse

  4. Nature/culture/seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place in anthropological categories of "nature" and "culture." Seawater as nature appears as potentiality of form and uncontainable flux; it moves faster than culture - with culture frequently figured through land-based metaphors - even as culture seeks to channel water's (nature's) flow. Seawater as culture manifests as a medium of pleasure, sustenance, travel, disaster. I argue that, although seawater's qualities in early anthropology were portrayed impressionistically, today technical, scientific descriptions of water's form prevail. For example, processes of globalization - which may also be called "oceanization" - are often described as "currents," "flows," and "circulations." Examining sea-set ethnography, maritime anthropologies, and contemporary social theory, I propose that seawater has operated as a “theory machine” for generating insights about human cultural organization. I develop this argument with ethnography from the Sargasso Sea and in the Sea Islands. I conclude with a critique of appeals to water's form in social theory.

  5. Textiles and clothing sustainability sustainable textile chemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the challenges in sustainable wet processing of textiles, natural dyes, enzymatic textiles and sustainable textile finishes. Textile industry is known for its chemical processing issues and many NGO’s are behind the textile sector to streamline its chemical processing, which is the black face of clothing and fashion sector. Sustainable textile chemical processes are crucial for attaining sustainability in the clothing sector. Seven comprehensive chapters are aimed to highlight these issues in the book.

  6. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  7. Smart Electronic Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei; Chen, Peining; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-05-17

    This Review describes the state-of-the-art of wearable electronics (smart textiles). The unique and promising advantages of smart electronic textiles are highlighted by comparing them with the conventional planar counterparts. The main kinds of smart electronic textiles based on different functionalities, namely the generation, storage, and utilization of electricity, are then discussed with an emphasis on the use of functional materials. The remaining challenges are summarized together with important new directions to provide some useful clues for the future development of smart electronic textiles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Uranium from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-09-21

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10/sup 5/, which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10/sup 3/ in seawater instead of the reported values of 10/sup 5/. However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10/sup 5/ in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater.

  9. Accelerated decolorization of reactive azo dyes under saline conditions by bacteria isolated from Arabian seawater sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Azeem; Kausar, Farzana; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Ahmed, Iftikhar

    2012-12-01

    Presence of huge amount of salts in the wastewater of textile dyeing industry is one of the major limiting factors in the development of an effective biotreatment system for the removal of azo dyes from textile effluents. Bacterial spp. capable of thriving under high salt conditions could be employed for the treatment of saline dyecontaminated textile wastewaters. The present study was aimed at isolating the most efficient bacterial strains capable of decolorizing azo dyes under high saline conditions. Fiftyeight bacterial strains were isolated from seawater, seawater sediment, and saline soil, using mineral salt medium enriched with 100 mg l−1 Reactive Black-5 azo dye and 50 g NaCl l−1 salt concentration. Bacterial strains KS23 (Psychrobacter alimentarius) and KS26 (Staphylococcus equorum) isolated from seawater sediment were able to decolorize three reactive dyes including Reactive Black 5, Reactive Golden Ovifix, and Reactive Blue BRS very efficiently in liquid medium over a wide range of salt concentration (0-100 g NaCl l)⁻¹. Time required for complete decolorization of 100 mg dye l ⁻¹ varied with the type of dye and salt concentration. In general, there was an inverse linear relationship between the velocity of the decolorization reaction (V) and salt concentration. This study suggested that bacteria isolated from saline conditions such as seawater sediment could be used in designing a bioreactor for the treatment of textile effluent containing high concentration of salts.

  10. South of Sahara | Page 5 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Youth Employment and Migration in West Africa. Language English. Read more about Évolution démographique asymétrique et gouvernance financière mondiale. Language French. Read more about Asymmetric Demography and Global Financial Governance.

  11. South of Sahara | Page 34 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Women's Access to Land and Natural Resources in Pastoralist and Forest Communities in East Africa. Language English. Read more about Pratiques foncières et droit des femmes à la terre : répercussions sur l'accès aux ressources naturelles (Cameroun anglophone).

  12. South of Sahara | Page 55 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Strengthening the Health System through a Maternal Death Review (Kenya and Zimbabwe). Language English. Read more about Taxes sur les cigarettes en Tanzanie. Language French. Read more about Cigarette Taxation in Tanzania. Language English. Read more ...

  13. South of Sahara | Page 32 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Pauvreté et vulnérabilité environnementale dans les bidonvilles en pleine croissance en Angola. Language French. Read more about Bamboo Production : Livelihood Diversification for Smallholder Tobacco Farmers in South Nyanza, Kenya - Phase II. Language English.

  14. South of Sahara | Page 49 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Livelihood Diversification for Smallholder Tobacco Farmers in South Nyanza, Kenya - Phase I. Language English. Read more about Initiative de renforcement des capacités de recherche en santé au Kenya et au Malawi - phase de démarrage. Language French.

  15. South of Sahara | Page 90 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Strengthening the Legal and Regulatory Framework of the Tobacco Control Campaign in Sénégal. Language English. Read more about Bamboo Production : Livelihood Diversification for Smallholder Tobacco Farmers in South Nyanza, Kenya - Phase II. Language ...

  16. Daytime passerine migrants over the Sahara — are these diurnal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When crossing the Sahara it was expected that nocturnal migrants would continue their flight into the day. We investigated whether migration taking place in the Sahara during daytime comprises the normal diurnal migrant species or the nocturnal ones prolonging their flight into the day. Birds departing from the Sahel in ...

  17. South of Sahara | Page 50 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Interdépendance des zones urbaines et rurales et répercussions des changements climatiques au Malawi et en Tanzanie. Language French. Read more about Urban-Rural Interdependence and the Impact of Climate Change in Malawi and Tanzania. Language English.

  18. South of Sahara | Page 100 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Institutional Support : Centre for Research and Technology Development (RESTECH). Language English. Read more about Soutien institutionnel au Centre for Research and Technology Development (RESTECH Centre). Language French. Read more about Economic ...

  19. South of Sahara | Page 61 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Rainwater and Greywater Harvesting in Urban and Periurban Agriculture in Ariana-Soukra (Tunisia). Language English. Read more about Récupération des eaux grises et des eaux pluviales pour l'agriculture urbaine et périurbaine à La Soukra, dans le gouvernorat ...

  20. South of Sahara | Page 35 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Approfondissement des connaissances et renforcement des capacités en matière de sexospécificités au sein du programme ACACIA. Language French. Read more about Acacia Gender Learning and Capacity Strengthening. Language English. Read more about Soutien ...

  1. South of Sahara | Page 137 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Transition de Bellanet. Language French. Read more about Le coût des conflits dans la zone du Marché commun de l'Afrique orientale et australe (COMESA). Language French. Read more about Cost of Conflicts in the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa ...

  2. South of Sahara | Page 65 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Economic Research Forum - Core Support 2012-2014. Language English. Read more about Forum de recherche économique - Financement de base 2012-2014. Language French. Read more about Reducing Vulnerability to Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in ...

  3. South of Sahara | Page 101 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Compliance with Private Food Safety Standards among Smallholders in Kenya. Language English. Read more about Respect des normes de salubrité des aliments privées chez les petits exploitants agricoles du Kenya. Language French. Read more about Stimulation de ...

  4. South of Sahara | Page 14 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Renforcement des connaissances économiques et de la capacité d'adaptation face aux changements climatiques au Bénin. Language French. Read more about Strengthening Economic Skills and Climate Change Adaptive Capacity in Bénin. Language English.

  5. South of Sahara | Page 18 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Changements climatiques et santé des autochtones. Language French. Read more about Strengthening Equity through Applied Research Capacity Building in e-Health. Language English. Read more about La législation sur le salaire minimum, son application et la ...

  6. South of Sahara | Page 136 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Nouveau télécentre de Manhiça (Mozambique). Language French. Read more about New Premises Assistance : Manhica Telecentre Association (Mozambique). Language English. Read more about Health Risk Analysis of Cryptosporidiosis and other Hazards in Urban ...

  7. South of Sahara | Page 87 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Suivi de structures criminelles dans des villes africaines. Language French. Read more about Universities in Innovation for Inclusive Development: Africa. Language English. Read more about How to access funding for non-communicable disease prevention in Africa?

  8. South of Sahara | Page 138 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Savoir émergent - suivi de la progression vers la société de l'information. Language French. Read more about Monitoring Progress Toward the Information Society : Digital Divide Index. Language English. Read more about Lake Naivasha Sustainability : Ecosystem ...

  9. South of Sahara | Page 64 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about La protection des renseignements personnels dans l'hémisphère sud (Protecting Privacy in the Global South) - Phase 2. Language French. Read more about Doctoral Awards to Strengthen Sub-Saharan Africa Leadership in HIV Prevention Research. Language English.

  10. South of Sahara | Page 46 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Open Architecture, Standards and Information Systems (OASIS) for Healthcare in Africa. Language English. Read more about Gestion intégrée de l'eau, de l'assainissement et des déchets solides dans de petits centres urbains autour du lac Victoria (Kenya). Language ...

  11. South of Sahara | Page 133 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Cigarette Taxation in Tanzania. Language English. Read more about Vers une structure de sécurité régionale dans la Corne de l'Afrique - phase II. Language French. Read more about Toward a Regional Security Architecture for the Horn of Africa - Phase II. Language ...

  12. South of Sahara | Page 38 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Integrated Intervention for Diabetes Risk After Gestational Diabetes in South Africa. Language English. Read more about Essais cliniques d'un vaccin expérimental contre le virus Ebola : une intervention canadienne dans la recherche. Language French. Read more about ...

  13. South of Sahara | Page 6 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Tobacco Taxation, Smuggling, and Street Tobacco Vendors in Eritrea. Language English. Read more about Taxes sur le tabac, contrebande et vendeurs de rue en Érythrée. Language French. Read more about The Role of Militia, Predatory State Authorities, and Rogue ...

  14. South of Sahara | Page 103 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Innovation pharmaceutique, délivrance de brevets sur des variantes mineures et licences obligatoires. Language French. Read more about Pharmaceutical Innovation, Incremental Patenting and Compulsory Licensing. Language English. Read more about Vers une ...

  15. South of Sahara | Page 18 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Renforcement des stratégies locales de gestion des zones sylvo-pastorales inter villageoises dans le basin arachidier du Sénégal. Language French. Read more about Strengthening Local Strategies for Managing Inter Village Agro-pastoral Resources in the Groundnut ...

  16. South of Sahara | Page 24 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Gestion des milieux humides en vue d'une plus grande sécurité alimentaire en Ouganda. Language French. Read more about Minimum Wage Legislation, Enforcement and Labour Outcomes in Argentina, Costa Rica and South Africa. Language English. Read more ...

  17. South of Sahara | Page 50 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Managing Climate Risk to Agriculture and Water Resources in South Africa. Language English. Read more about Études par pays dans le cadre du HIV/AIDS Monitor. Language French. Read more about HIV/AIDS Monitor Country Studies. Language English. Read more ...

  18. South of Sahara | Page 19 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Renforcement des capacités en Afrique en matière d'indicateurs de S-T et d'innovation. Language French. Read more about Building African Capacity in Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators. Language English. Read more about Transfert du modèle prédictif ...

  19. South of Sahara | Page 30 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about La protection sociale et les collectivités vulnérables en Afrique de l'Est - retombées sur le bien-être des ménages. Language French. Read more about Social Protection and Vulnerable Communities in East Africa: Implications for Household Welfare. Language English.

  20. South of Sahara | Page 54 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Building a Community ICT Network in Mozambique. Language English. Read more about Appui au réseautage et au renforcement des télécentres communautaires au Mali. Language French. Read more about Support for Community Telecentres and Networks in Mali.

  1. South of Sahara | Page 20 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Reducing Vulnerability to Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in Kenya. Language English. Read more about Gestion des risques, réduction de la vulnérabilité et accroissement de la productivité dans un contexte de changements climatiques. Language French.

  2. South of Sahara | Page 29 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Five-City Network to Pioneer Climate Change Adaptation in sub-Saharan Africa. Language English. Read more about Protection de la communauté urbaine de Cotonou face aux changements climatiques (Bénin). Language French. Read more about Protecting the Urban ...

  3. South of Sahara | Page 35 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Acacia Gender Learning and Capacity Strengthening. Language English. Read more about Approfondissement des connaissances et renforcement des capacités en matière de sexospécificités au sein du programme ACACIA. Language French. Read more about Soutien ...

  4. No Otters in the Tassili Mountains (Sahara)

    OpenAIRE

    Smet K. de

    1987-01-01

    The Tassill Mountains are situated in the centre of the Sahara Desert and as they are rather high (summits over 2,000 m), they have a rainfall of more than 50 mm/year. There are many rivers in these mountains and although they only flow after the occasional rains, a great number of small lakes (locally called Guelta) remain in the deep canyons. Some river systems always have running water (Oued Imirhou, Oued Iherir) and most of them contain large quantities of fish (Barbus sp., Tilapia sp.) ...

  5. CONTAINER FOR USED TEXTILES

    CERN Document Server

    Relation with the Host States

    2001-01-01

    We should like to remind you that a special container for textiles for the Association 'Réalise/Rapid Service' of Geneva is located in the car park outside the Meyrin site. The Association has informed us that 3 306 kg of textiles were deposited in the container in 2000 and wishes to convey its warm gratitude to all donors.

  6. NIR Analysis for Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been found to be a useful technique to characterize raw materials and finished textile products, and NIR methods and techniques continue to find increasingly diverse and wide-ranging quantitative and qualitative applications in the textile industry. NIR methods ...

  7. The Textile Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    2010-01-01

    Textile has within the last decade increasingly been regarded as an architectural material. Many new textiles have been developed and this has increased its applications in architecture. But how do textile and space meet and which spatial qualities can arise in this meeting? The paper describes...... a series of practical studies of the spatial qualities that can be established through the design of three very different fabrics. The topic is part of an ongoing Ph.D. project at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. The main theme of the Ph.D. is the inter-play between textile, space and sound. Space...... and it has a special poetry which is not to be found in any other material. Which spatial qualities can be obtained with these textile properties? Contemporary conception of space in architecture can be said still to rely on the modernist conception. In practical experiments it is investigated how...

  8. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on a small part of the research taking place in the textile field. The article describes an ongoing PhD research project on textiles and sound and outlines the project's two main questions: how sound can be shaped by textiles and conversely how textiles can...

  9. Smart textiles: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenack, Kunigunde; van Pieterson, Liesbeth

    2012-11-01

    Smart textiles research represents a new model for generating creative and novel solutions for integrating electronics into unusual environments and will result in new discoveries that push the boundaries of science forward. A key driver for smart textiles research is the fact that both textile and electronics fabrication processes are capable of functionalizing large-area surfaces at very high speeds. In this article we review the history of smart textiles development, introducing the main trends and technological challenges faced in this field. Then, we identify key challenges that are the focus of ongoing research. We then proceed to discuss fundamentals of smart textiles: textile fabrication methods and textile interconnect lines, textile sensor, and output device components and integration of commercial components into textile architectures. Next we discuss representative smart textile systems and finally provide our outlook over the field and a prediction for the future.

  10. The Late Miocene climate response to a modern Sahara desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheels, Arne; Eronen, Jussi; Mosbrugger, Volker

    2009-06-01

    The climate cooling and vegetation changes in the Miocene/Pliocene are generally well documented by various proxy data. Some important ecosystem changes occurred at that time. Palaeobotanical evidence suggests that the Sahara desert first appeared in the Pliocene, whereas in the Miocene North Africa was green. In the present study, we investigate the Late Miocene climate response to the appearance of the Sahara desert from a climate modelling sensitivity experiment. We compare a model experiment, which includes a full set of Late Miocene boundary conditions, with another one using the same boundary conditions except that the North African vegetation refers to the present-day situation. Our sensitivity study demonstrates that the introduction of the Sahara desert leads to a cooling and an aridification in Africa. In addition, we observe teleconnection patterns related to the North African desertification at around the Miocene/Pliocene boundary. From our sensitivity experiment, we observe that the Sahara contributes to a cooling in Central Asia and in North America. As compared to hypsodonty data for Central Asia, an increased aridity is underestimated in the Sahara experiment. Finally, we observe that the introduction of the Sahara leads to a cooling in the northern high latitudes. Hence, our sensitivity experiment indicates that the appearance of the Sahara desert is one piece to better understand Late Cenozoic climate cooling being most pronounced in the high latitudes.

  11. Eghindi among Sahrawi refugees of Western Sahara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Gabriele; Waldstein, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Eghindi is an illness built around a set of pathological states experienced by Sahrawi in the desert environment of Western Sahara. Its core symptoms are caused by osmotic imbalances related to salt consumption. In 1975, many Sahrawi were exiled into refugee camps, and they have since experienced radical sociocultural changes, which are reflected in changing explanatory models of eghindi. Older and conservative refugees, attached to traditional Sahrawi culture, have expanded its conceptualization to include new pathogenic factors, while younger and progressive refugees, acculturated with Western culture, began challenging its existence. Eghindi became embodied within a broader process of negotiation of Sahrawi cultural identity. Our findings provide a framework for thinking about the evolution of illness in response to displacement, and highlight that when explanatory models evolve, intracultural tensions can arise within a population.

  12. Book Review: The writings of Mauritania and the western Sahara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Book Title: The writings of Mauritania and the western Sahara: Arabic Literature of Africa vol. 5. Book Authors: compiled by Charles C. Stewart with Sidi Ahmed Wuld Ahmed Salim. (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2016), 2 vols ...

  13. CONTAINER FOR USED TEXTILES

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations avec les Pays hôtes

    2000-01-01

    We should like to remind you that a special container for textiles for the Association 'Réalise/Rapid Service' of Geneva is located in the car park outside the Meyrin site.The Association has informed us that 2 530 kg of textiles were deposited in the container in 1998 and wishes to convey its warm gratitude to all donors.Relations with the Host StatesTel. 75152

  14. South of Sahara | Page 25 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Catalyzing Broadband Internet in Africa. Language English. Read more about Mobilisation du financement privé aux fins de l'adaptation. Language French. Read more about Une approche des politiques et de la gouvernance en matière d'Internet axée sur le progrès des ...

  15. South of Sahara | Page 121 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    South of Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Internet Backbone in the Democratic Republic of Congo : Feasibility Study and Advocacy. Language English. Read more about Citoyens du monde : les répercussions des programmes de travail rémunéré et de travail bénévole à l'étranger. Language French. Read more ...

  16. Paleohydrology and paleoenvironments at Bir Sahara: Pleistocene lithostratigraphy and sedimentology in the southern Egyptian Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christopher L.; Schild, Romuald

    2017-12-01

    The Bir Sahara area contains a remarkable record of Middle and Late Pleistocene hydrologic and environmental conditions for Saharan North Africa, based on lithostratigraphic and sedimentologic evidence from basin-fill deposits. Some of the deposits contain Lower Paleolithic (Acheulean) or Middle Paleolithic artifacts that help to constrain their age, since Acheulian artifacts are assigned to the Middle Pleistocene, while Middle Paleolithic artifacts are limited to either the Middle or Late Pleistocene. Locality BS-14 is in the southern part of Bir Sahara, while localities E-88-15, E-88-2, BS-13, and BS-16 are situated in the south-central part of the deflational basin, closer to the present-day water-hole. Lowered groundwater conditions during arid intervals resulted in erosional topographic basins. These deflational basins were later filled with sediments associated with wetter hydrologic conditions. The oldest studied sedimentary sequence in the Bir Sahara depression (BS-14) contains in situ Acheulian artifacts. Acheulian handaxes are found in sands underlying carbonates that are interpreted as evidence of spring-fed pond and marsh environments during a Middle Pleistocene wet interval. At the E-88-15 locality, the stratigraphic sequence documents deposition in a possible perennial pond or small lake that varied in extent and depth and is associated with Middle Paleolithic artifacts. At E-88-12 and BS-13, lateral and vertical variations in the lithofacies of the basin-fill sediments provide additional records of changing hydrologic conditions during the Late Pleistocene. These hydrologic conditions appear to reflect variations in water-table levels related to groundwater recharge and, at times, local rains.

  17. Synergy of Uli Symbols and Textiles: An Exploration in Textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study explorative experiments were carried out in sculptural form using textile and textile related materials (Textile Sculpture) in order to invigorate these symbols adopting their meanings but giving them different place through innovative and creative process. Uli, a symbolic painting of female body provides unique ...

  18. Sustainability in the textile industry

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book examines in detail key aspects of sustainability in the textile industry, especially environmental, social and economic sustainability in the textiles and clothing sector. It highlights the various faces and facets of sustainability and their implications for textiles and the clothing sector.

  19. The evolution of the 87Sr/86Sr in the Dead Sea brine: from the Sedom lagoon to Sahara dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Mordechai

    2016-04-01

    The history of water-bodies in the Dead Sea brines commenced with the intrusion of the Sedom lagoon, possibly in the late Neogene and continued with the development of hypersaline and freshwater lakes (e.g. the modern Dead Sea and Sea of Galilee). 87Sr/86Sr ratios in these water-bodies decreased over the past ~ 5-6 Ma from 0.7087-0.7084 in salts deposited in the Sedom lagoon to ~ 0.7080 in modern Dead Sea brine. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the salts deposited from Sedom lagoon are significantly lower than those of the contemporaneous late Miocene seawater (~0.709). This difference was attributed to modification of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the Sedom lagoon solution by influx of Ca-chloride brines. The brines, in turn were formed by dolomitization of marine limestones of the DSR Cretaceous wall rocks (87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.7075) by the ingressing evaporated seawaters (Stein et al., 2000). After the disconnection of the Sedom lagoon from the open sea freshwater filled the lakes that occupied the Dead Sea basin. The freshwater influx modified the strontium isotope and chemical composition of the brine and provided bicarbonate and sulfate to the lake that led the precipitation of primary aragonite and gypsum. Freshwater that currently enter the lake are characterize by 87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.7081, significantly higher than the Cretaceous carbonates. Settled dust that deposits on the Judea Mountains is composed of calcite and quartz grains and is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratios ~ 0.7084. It appears that significant amounts of the strontium that entered the lakes with the freshwater originated from dissolution of the dust calcites. Large amounts of dust were transported from the Sahara desert to the Dead Sea watershed during glacial periods when the Sahara was dry and sea-level was low. The source of the detrital calcites however, is not known. They could be derived from dry paleo-lakes in the Sahara that were previously filled by waters that retained the required strontium isotope

  20. Innovation, entrepreneurship and textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton Godfrey, A.; Pourmojib, S.

    2017-10-01

    Innovation and entrepreneurship have become increasingly important parts of economic development in almost every country, region, and community. In this research we investigate the reasons people become entrepreneurs in the textile and apparel industries and compare entrepreneurship in these industries with other industries looking also at the success factors for start up companies. During our research we found many disrupters, people entering the textile and apparel industries from outside often having no prior experience in textiles or apparel. We also investigate the impact of government intervention on entrepreneurship. In recognition of the large economic impact entrepreneurial companies have on economic development and job growth, almost all federal governments, regional governments, and community governments have created support for innovation and entrepreneurship.

  1. Perchlorate in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelango, P. Kalyani [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States); Tian Kang [Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Dasgupta, Purnendu K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States)]. E-mail: Sandyd@ttu.edu

    2006-05-10

    There has been no reliable published data on the presence of perchlorate in seawater. Seaweeds are among the most important plant life in the ocean and are good sources of iodine and have been widely used as food and nutritional supplement. Perchlorate is known to inhibit the transport of iodide by the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), present e.g., in the thyroid and mammary glands. With perchlorate being increasingly detected in drinking water, milk and various other foods, increasing the iodide intake through inexpensive natural supplements may be an attractive solution for maintaining iodine assimilation. We report here measurable concentrations of perchlorate in several samples of seawater (detectable in about half the samples analyzed). We also report the iodide and perchlorate concentrations of 11 different species of seaweed and the corresponding bioconcentration factors (BCF) for perchlorate and iodide, relative to the seawater from which they were harvested. All seaweed samples came from the same region, off the coast of Northeastern Maine. Concentrations of iodide and perchlorate in four seawater samples collected from the region near harvest time were 30 {+-} 11 and 0.16 {+-} 0.084 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. Concentrations of both iodide and perchlorate varied over a wide range for different seaweed species; iodide ranging from 16 to 3134 mg kg{sup -1} and perchlorate from 0.077 to 3.2 mg kg{sup -1}. The Laminaria species had the highest iodide concentration; Laminaria digitata is the seaweed species most commonly used in the kelp tablets sold in health food stores. Our sample of L. digitata contained 3134 {+-} 15 mg iodide/kg dry weight. The BCF varied widely for different species, with Laminaria species concentrating iodide preferentially over perchlorate. The iodide BCF (BCF{sub i}) to perchlorate BCF (BCF{sub p}) quotient ranged from 0.66 to 53; L. digitata and L. saccarina having a BCF{sub i}/BCF{sub p} value of 45 and 53, respectively, far

  2. Spain and the Western Sahara: the Political Party Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Vaquer i Fanés

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the Spanish army’s hasty withdrawal from Western Sahara in 1975, the two main parties since Spain acquired its democracy have differed over what stance should be taken with respect to the Sahara issue. The aim of this article is to establish to what extentthis is the result of the opposing government/opposition dynamic and how far it is a result of the parties’ own stances, by analysing the evolution of their attitudes and approaches with respect to the Sahara issue. The hypothesis is that the Spanish parties’ position with respect to Algeria and Morocco was initially very much determined by their view of the Sahara issue, but that there has been an inversion of this attitude. Thus at present, opposing stances on the Sahara issue are mainly the result of different views on Spain’s interests in the Maghreb region and, above all, of different ideas about which country Morocco or Algeria should benefit most from bilateral relations.

  3. Hemp for textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Key words: Cannabis sativa L., day length sensitivity, fibre hemp, genotype, harvest time, plant density, plant weight, primary fibres, secondary fibres, sowing date, textiles. Westerhuis, W. (2016)

  4. Novel antimicrobial textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Unchin

    2003-10-01

    Many microorganisms can survive, and perhaps proliferate on textiles, generating adverse effects such as: disease transmission, odor generation, pH changes, staining, discoloration and loss of performance. These adverse effects may threaten users' health, deteriorate textile properties and degrade service quality. It may, therefore, be desirable to incorporate antimicrobials on textiles for controlling the growth of microorganisms. This dissertation focuses on the development of antimicrobial fibers and fabrics by integration of antimicrobials with these textiles. The applications of hydantoin-based halamines were mainly investigated in the research. The typical process is that hydantoin containing compounds are grafted onto textiles and transformed to halamine by chlorination. Hydantoin-based halamines are usually chloramines that release chlorine (Cl+) via cleavage of the -NCl functional group which attacks and kills microbes. The antimicrobial behavior is rechargeable many times by rinsing the fiber or fabric with chlorine-containing solution. Some quaternary ammonium type antimicrobials were also investigated in this research. The choice of integrating techniques is dependant on both the textile and antimicrobial compounds. In this dissertation, the nine approaches were studied for incorporating antimicrobial with various textiles: (1) co-extrusion of fibers with halamine precursor additive; (2) grafting of the quaternary ammonium compounds onto ethylene-co-acrylic acid fiber for creating quaternary ammonium type antimicrobial fiber; (3) entrapment of the additives in thermally bonded bicomponent nonwoven fabrics; (4) attaching antimicrobial additives to surfaces with latex adhesive coating; (5) grafting of antimicrobial compounds onto rubber latex via UV exposure; (6) reaction of halamine with needle-punched melamine formaldehyde nonwoven fabric and laminates; (7) coating melamine resin onto tent fabrics and laminates; (8) synthesis of super absorbent polymer

  5. Frontières et nationalisme autour du Sahara Occidental (Borders and Nationalism in Western Sahara)

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Le conflit du Sahara Occidental apparaît comme le principal facteur de blocage dans la construction d'une intégration régionale. Pour la monarchie marocaine, il lui a permis de s'approprier le sentiment nationaliste alors porté par le mouvement de l'Istiqlal qui faisait de la cause du grand Maroc l'un de ses combats politiques. Pour le régime algérien, il a représenté un moyen de justifier le pouvoir d'une armée et d'entretenir le sentiment nationaliste. L'avantage du conflit saharien était é...

  6. Textile industry and occupational cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Zorawar; Chadha, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of workers are engaged in textile industry worldwide. Textile industry involves the use of different kinds of dyes which are known to possess carcinogenic properties. Solvents used in these industries are also associated with different health related hazards including cancer. In previous studies on textile and iron industries, the authors have reported genotoxicity among them and observed occurrence of cancer deaths among textile industry workers. Thus, an attempt has been made to compile the studies on the prevalence of different types of cancers among textile industry workers. A wide literature search has been done for compiling the present paper. Papers on cancer occurrence among textile industry workers have been taken from 1976 to 2015. A variety of textile dyes and solvents, many of them being carcinogenic, are being used worldwide in the textile industry. The textile industry workers are therefore, in continuous exposure to these dyes, solvents, fibre dusts and various other toxic chemicals. The present study evaluates the potential of different chemicals and physical factors to be carcinogenic agents among occupationally exposed workers by going through various available reports and researches. Papers were collected using different databases and a number of studies report the association of textile industry and different types of cancer including lung, bladder, colorectal and breast cancer. After going through the available reports, it can be concluded that workers under varied job categories in textile industries are at a higher risk of developing cancer as various chemicals used in the textile industry are toxic and can act as potential health risk in inducing cancer among them. Assessing the cancer risk at different job levels in textile industries may be found useful in assessing the overall risk to the workers and formulating the future cancer preventive strategies.

  7. Fuel Production from Seawater and Fuel Cells Using Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2017-11-23

    Seawater is the most abundant resource on our planet and fuel production from seawater has the notable advantage that it would not compete with growing demands for pure water. This Review focuses on the production of fuels from seawater and their direct use in fuel cells. Electrolysis of seawater under appropriate conditions affords hydrogen and dioxygen with 100 % faradaic efficiency without oxidation of chloride. Photoelectrocatalytic production of hydrogen from seawater provides a promising way to produce hydrogen with low cost and high efficiency. Microbial solar cells (MSCs) that use biofilms produced in seawater can generate electricity from sunlight without additional fuel because the products of photosynthesis can be utilized as electrode reactants, whereas the electrode products can be utilized as photosynthetic reactants. Another important source for hydrogen is hydrogen sulfide, which is abundantly found in Black Sea deep water. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis of Black Sea deep water can also be used in hydrogen fuel cells. Production of a fuel and its direct use in a fuel cell has been made possible for the first time by a combination of photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from seawater and dioxygen in the air and its direct use in one-compartment hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to obtain electric power. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Emotional Value of Applied Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2011-01-01

    textiles. 2) Understanding and exploring emotional value related to design of applied textiles. In chapter four I argue – based on Jesse Prinz’s and Antonio Damasio’s emotion research – for a perception of emotional value of applied textiles which acknowledges bodily feedback as a core concept...... at Gabriel face while trying to implement an innovative and process-oriented business strategy. The focal point has been the section of the strategy which aims at developing Blue Ocean products, which have a functional and an emotional value for the user. The thesis examines and explores emotional value...... of applied textiles. The objective is to operationalise the strategic term ‘emotional value’ as it relates to applied textiles. The procedure includes the development of user- and stakeholder-centred approaches, which are valuable for the textile designer in the design process. The research approach...

  9. South of Sahara | Page 9 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    flexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layout. Sud du Sahara. Pages. « first · ‹ previous … 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8; 9; 10 · next › · last » · What we do · Funding · Resources · About IDRC. Knowledge. Innovation. Solutions.

  10. South of Sahara | Page 125 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Read more about Exemption communautaire du paiement des services de santé au Burkina Faso. Language French. Read more about Études par pays dans le cadre du HIV/AIDS Monitor. Language French. Read more about HIV/AIDS Monitor Country Studies. Language English. Read more about Gestion ...

  11. Modeling non-monotone risk aversion using SAHARA utility functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, A.; Pelsser, A.; Vellekoop, M.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a new class of utility functions, SAHARA utility, with the distinguishing feature that it allows absolute risk aversion to be non-monotone and implements the assumption that agents may become less risk averse for very low values of wealth. The class contains the well-known exponential and

  12. South of Sahara | Page 118 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Read more about National Innovation Systems in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS). Language English. Read more about Strengthening the Capacity to Adapt to Climate Change in Rural Bénin. Language English. Read more about Renforcement des capacités d'adaptation des acteurs ...

  13. South of Sahara | Page 33 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Read more about Hybrid Security Arrangements in Africa: Exploring the Implications for State-building. Language English. Read more about Chiffrer le travail des femmes - économie sexiste sur le marché et au foyer. Language French. Read more about Implications des mécanismes de sécurité hybrides ...

  14. South of Sahara | Page 31 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Read more about Action multisectorielle en matière de prévention des maladies non transmissibles en Afrique subsaharienne. Language French. Read more about Safe and Inclusive Cities: Research to Reduce Urban Violence, Poverty, and Inequalities. Language English. Read more about Analyse des ...

  15. The Sources Of Protracted Conflict In The Western Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    increasing unrest, the French and Spanish divided the Sherifian Empire into three territories in (1912). France promoted colonization to secure its...opinions on two questions: 1. Was Western Sahara a territory belonging to no one (terra nullius) at the time of Spanish colonization ? 2. What were the...1. History Leading up to the Occupation .......................................16 2. Spanish Decolonization (1956–1976

  16. Treatment of textile wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Krsteva, Silvana; Golomeova, Saska

    2013-01-01

    The production of a textile requires several stages of mechanical processing such as spinning, weaving, knitting, and garment production, which seem to be insulated from the wet treatment processes like pretreatment, dyeing, printing, and finishing operations. Тhere is a strong interrelation between treatment processes in the dry state and consecutive wet treatments. Most of the processes and products have a negative impact on the environment. Laws and standards for environmental protection a...

  17. Atmospheric feedbacks in North Africa from an irrigated, afforested Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemena, Tronje Peer; Matthes, Katja; Martin, Thomas; Wahl, Sebastian; Oschlies, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Afforestation of the Sahara has been proposed as a climate engineering method to sequester a substantial amount of carbon dioxide, potentially effective to mitigate climate change. Earlier studies predicted changes in the atmospheric circulation system. These atmospheric feedbacks raise questions about the self-sustainability of such an intervention, but have not been investigated in detail. Here, we investigate changes in precipitation and circulation in response to Saharan large-scale afforestation and irrigation with NCAR's CESM-WACCM Earth system model. Our model results show a Saharan temperature reduction by 6 K and weak precipitation enhancement by 267 mm/year over the Sahara. Only 26% of the evapotranspirated water re-precipitates over the Saharan Desert, considerably large amounts are advected southward to the Sahel zone and enhance the West African monsoon (WAM). Different processes cause circulation and precipitation changes over North Africa. The increase in atmospheric moisture leads to radiative cooling above the Sahara and increased high-level cloud coverage as well as atmospheric warming above the Sahel zone. Both lead to a circulation anomaly with descending air over the Sahara and ascending air over the Sahel zone. Together with changes in the meridional temperature gradient, this results in a southward shift of the inner-tropical front. The strengthening of the Tropical easterly jet and the northward displacement of the African easterly jet is associated with a northward displacement and strengthening of the WAM precipitation. Our results suggest complex atmospheric circulation feedbacks, which reduce the precipitation potential over an afforested Sahara and enhance WAM precipitation.

  18. 21 CFR 177.2800 - Textiles and textile fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Textiles and textile fibers. 177.2800 Section 177.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use...

  19. Textiles and clothing sustainability recycled and upcycled textiles and fashion

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the concepts of recycling and upcycling and their implications for the textiles and fashion sector. In addition to the theoretical concepts, the book also presents various options for recycling and upcycling in textiles and fashion. Although recycling is a much-developed and widely used concept, upcycling is also gaining popularity in the sector.

  20. Greening textile industry in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen Thi Phuong, L.

    2011-01-01

        The textile and garment industry has made a remarkable contribution to the economic development of Vietnam and employs currently a large labor force of 2.5 million people.However, the textile industry is also seen as a most polluting and unsustainable industry due to the use of

  1. Physical tools for textile creativity and invention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen; Lenau, Torben Anker

    2010-01-01

    Two textile research projects (one completed and one ongoing) are described, where physical inspirational tools are developed and tested with the aim of stimulating textile creativity and invention, i.e. the use of textile materials in new kinds of products, thus bringing textiles into new contexts...

  2. The Mycenaean Palace-Organised Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of the textile production in af tekstilprodutionen in Linear B archives. The administration of the textile prodution is compared to the administration of land holdings.......Investigation of the textile production in af tekstilprodutionen in Linear B archives. The administration of the textile prodution is compared to the administration of land holdings....

  3. Fennec dust forecast intercomparison over the Sahara in June 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Chaboureau

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the Fennec international programme, a field campaign was conducted in June 2011 over the western Sahara. It led to the first observational data set ever obtained that documents the dynamics, thermodynamics and composition of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL under the influence of the heat low. In support to the aircraft operation, four dust forecasts were run daily at low and high resolutions with convection-parameterizing and convection-permitting models, respectively. The unique airborne and ground-based data sets allowed the first ever intercomparison of dust forecasts over the western Sahara. At monthly scale, large aerosol optical depths (AODs were forecast over the Sahara, a feature observed by satellite retrievals but with different magnitudes. The AOD intensity was correctly predicted by the high-resolution models, while it was underestimated by the low-resolution models. This was partly because of the generation of strong near-surface wind associated with thunderstorm-related density currents that could only be reproduced by models representing convection explicitly. Such models yield emissions mainly in the afternoon that dominate the total emission over the western fringes of the Adrar des Iforas and the Aïr Mountains in the high-resolution forecasts. Over the western Sahara, where the harmattan contributes up to 80 % of dust emission, all the models were successful in forecasting the deep well-mixed SABL. Some of them, however, missed the large near-surface dust concentration generated by density currents and low-level winds. This feature, observed repeatedly by the airborne lidar, was partly forecast by one high-resolution model only.

  4. The Green Sahara: Climate Change, Hydrologic History and Human Occupation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Ronald G.; Farr, Tom G.; Feynmann, Joan; Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Paillou, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Archaeology can provide insight into interactions of climate change and human activities in sensitive areas such as the Sahara, to the benefit of both disciplines. Such analyses can help set bounds on climate change projections, perhaps identify elements of tipping points, and provide constraints on models. The opportunity exists to more precisely constrain the relationship of natural solar and climate interactions, improving understanding of present and future anthropogenic forcing. We are beginning to explore the relationship of human occupation of the Sahara and long-term solar irradiance variations synergetic with changes in atmospheric-ocean circulation patterns. Archaeological and climate records for the last 12 K years are gaining adequate precision to make such comparisons possible. We employ a range of climate records taken over the globe (e.g. Antarctica, Greenland, Cariaco Basin, West African Ocean cores, records from caves) to identify the timing and spatial patterns affecting Saharan climate to compare with archaeological records. We see correlation in changing ocean temperature patterns approx. contemporaneous with drying of the Sahara approx. 6K years BP. The role of radar images and other remote sensing in this work includes providing a geographically comprehensive geomorphic overview of this key area. Such coverage is becoming available from the Japanese PALSAR radar system, which can guide field work to collect archaeological and climatic data to further constrain the climate change chronology and link to models. Our initial remote sensing efforts concentrate on the Gilf Kebir area of Egypt.

  5. Textile production in Quartier Mu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutler, Joanne Elisabeth; Andersson Strand, Eva Birgitta; Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2013-01-01

    , geographical and chronological factors.  In contrast, recent research has considered some aspects of shape as an expression of loom weight function. This new approach, which draws on experimental archaeology, has made it possible to render textile craft visible, even if the textiles themselves...... are not preserved (Mårtensson et al. 2009). It is this approach that has been adopted in the following analysis of the loom weights from Quartier Mu. The chapter divided into four parts. The first part gives an outline of general textile techniques and presents the methodology. The second part consists...

  6. Auxetic warp knit textile structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderson, Kim; Alderson, Andrew; Anand, Subhash; Simkins, Virginia; Nazare, Shonali; Ravirala, Naveen [Institute for Materials Research and Innovation, The University of Bolton, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5AB (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    The design, manufacturing and characterization of warp knit textile structures with enhanced drapeability and energy absorption is reported in this paper. Four textile structures were produced, all based on a triangular or double arrowhead structure, which is known to lead to a negative Poisson's ratio {nu}. Mechanical testing has confirmed that textile structures can be produced which are auxetic at {+-} 45 to the warp direction, with {nu} of up to -0.22 {+-} 0.03. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. TEXTILE IMPACT PLATES FOR NANOPARTICLES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    VISILEANU Emilia; DUMITRESCU Iuliana; VARZARU Elena; MITRAN Cornelia; CHIRIAC Laura

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents textile materials with destination impact plates, having different surface architectures and active treatments for functionalization, with influence upon the aging process of nano-Ag and nano-CeO2...

  8. Textile Manufacturing Sector (NAICS 313)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for the textile and leather manufacturing sector, including NESHAPs for leather tanning and fabric printing, and small business guidance for RCRA hazardous waste requirements.

  9. Faraday's Law and Seawater Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, R.

    2010-01-01

    Using Faraday's law, one can illustrate how an electromotive force generator, directly utilizing seawater motion, works. The conceptual device proposed is rather simple in its components and can be built in any high school or college laboratory. The description of the way in which the device generates an electromotive force can be instructive not…

  10. Seawater/Saline Agriculture for Energy, Warming, Water, Rainfall, Land, Food and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The combination of the incipient demise of cheap oil and increasing evidence of Global Warming due to anthropogenic fossil carbon release has reinvigorated the need for and efforts on Renewable energy sources, especially for transportation applications. Biomass/Bio-diesel appears to have many benefits compared to Hydrogen, the only other major renewable transportation fuel candidate. Biomass Production is currently limited by available arable land and fresh water. Halophyte Plants and seawater irrigation proffer a wholly new biomass production mantra using wastelands and very plentiful seawater. Such an approach addresses many-to-most of the major emerging Societal Problems including Land, Water, Food, Warming and Energy. For many reasons, including seawater agriculture, portions of the Sahara appear to be viable candidates for future Biomass Production. The apparent nonlinearity between vegetation cover and atmospheric conditions over North Africa necessitates serious coupled boundary layer Meteorology and Global Circulation Modeling to ensure that this form of Terra Forming is Favorable and to avoid adverse Unintended Consequences.

  11. Characteristics of active seawater intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaruddin, Sugiarto; Werner, Adrian D.; Morgan, Leanne K.

    2017-08-01

    The inland migration of seawater in coastal aquifers, known as seawater intrusion (SWI), can be categorised as passive or active, depending on whether the hydraulic gradient slopes downwards towards the sea or the land, respectively. Despite active SWI occurring in many locations, it has received considerably less attention than passive SWI. In this study, active SWI caused by an inland freshwater head decline (FHD) is characterised using numerical modelling of various idealised unconfined coastal aquifer settings. Relationships between key features of active SWI (e.g., interface characteristics and SWI response time-scales) and the parameters of the problem (e.g., inland FHD, freshwater-seawater density contrast, dispersivity, hydraulic conductivity, porosity and aquifer thickness) are explored for the first time. Sensitivity analyses show that the SWI response time-scales under active SWI situations are influenced by both the initial and final boundary head differences. The interface is found to be steeper under stronger advection (i.e., caused by the inland FHD), higher dispersivity and hydraulic conductivity, and lower aquifer thickness, seawater density and porosity. The interface movement is faster and the mixing zone is wider with larger hydraulic conductivity, seawater-freshwater density difference, and aquifer thickness, and with lower porosity. Dimensionless parameters (Peclet number and mixed convection ratio) from previous steady-state analyses offer only limited application to the controlling factors of passive SWI, and are not applicable to active SWI. The current study of active SWI highlights important functional relationships that improve the general understanding of SWI, which has otherwise been founded primarily on steady-state and passive SWI.

  12. Sud du Sahara | Page 5 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Youth Employment and Migration in West Africa. Langue English. Read more about Évolution démographique asymétrique et gouvernance financière mondiale. Langue French. Read more about Asymmetric Demography and Global Financial Governance. Langue English.

  13. Conflict resolution in Western Sahara | Solà-Martín | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the democratisation agenda laid out by Western governments for the North African region vis-à-vis their Realpolitik conflict containment approach towards the Western Sahara conflict. Western policymakers conceive the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara as a safety net that ...

  14. Sud du Sahara | Page 95 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Modèle d'édition et autre modèle d'octroi de licences (PALM Africa). Langue French. Read more about Publishing and Alternative Licensing Model of Africa (PALM Africa). Langue English. Read more about Strategic Action Plan for ERNWACA - 2007-2011. Langue English.

  15. Sud du Sahara | Page 96 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Implementation of an Electronic Strategy in Bénin. Langue English. Read more about E-Stratégie du Bénin : programme de recherches multidisciplinaires d'appui à sa mise en oeuvre. Langue French. Read more about Libéralisation du commerce des biens et services TIC ...

  16. Sud du Sahara | Page 108 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Understanding Obstacles to Peace in the Great Lakes Region : Actors, Interests and Strategies. Langue English. Read more about Comprendre les obstacles à la paix dans la région des Grands Lacs : acteurs, intérêts et stratégies. Langue French. Read more about ...

  17. Sud du Sahara | Page 55 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Strengthening the Health System through a Maternal Death Review (Kenya and Zimbabwe). Langue English. Read more about Taxes sur les cigarettes en Tanzanie. Langue French. Read more about Cigarette Taxation in Tanzania. Langue English. Read more about AIDS ...

  18. Sud du Sahara | Page 74 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Bamboo Production : Livelihood Diversification for Smallholder Tobacco Farmers in South Nyanza, Kenya - Phase II. Langue English. Read more about Culture du bambou : diversification des moyens de subsistance des petits producteurs de tabac du sud de la province ...

  19. Optimal investment and indifference pricing when risk aversion is not monotone: SAHARA utility functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, A.; Pelsser, A.; Vellekoop, M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. We develop a new class of utility functions, SAHARA utility, with the dis- tinguishing feature that they implement the assumption that agents may become less risk-averse for very low values of wealth. This means that SAHARA utility can be used to characterize risk gambling behavior of an

  20. Regime shifts in the Sahara and Sahel: interactions between ecological and climatic systems in northern Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foley, J.A.; Coe, M.T.; Scheffer, M.; Wang, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Sahara and Sahel regions of northern Africa have complex environmental histories punctuated by sudden and dramatic "regime shifts" in climate and ecological conditions. Here we review the current understanding of the causes and consequences of two environmental regime shifts in the Sahara and

  1. Sud du Sahara | Page 93 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sud du Sahara. Sud du Sahara. Read more about Renouvellement des modes de gouvernance : industries extractives et réduction de la pauvreté en Afrique. Langue French. Read more about Renewing Modes of Governance : Extractive Industries and the Reduction of Poverty in Africa. Langue English. Read more about ...

  2. Wars and conflicts in the Sahara-Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier

    the traditional lines between what is local and global, military and civilian, domestic and international, politics and identity. The purpose of this paper is to analyse these patterns of violence. The first section presents the geographic distribution and development over time of the main sources of violence...... in North and West Africa before examining the events behind the increase in political violence in the Sahel and the Sahara. The second section analyses the patterns of violence, and focuses on the geographic scales thereof and the strategies of the warring parties. In its conclusion, the paper highlights...

  3. EXERGY OF TEXTILE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents solution for the task of evaluating exergy of the substance in the flow for textile and woven fabrics based on thermodynamic analysis of the corresponding technical systems. The exergy method allows estimating the energy effectiveness for the most problematic heat-technological systems of substance transformation and thus outlining the ways for decreasing the electric-power component in the production prime cost. The actuality of the issue stems from the renowned scenario alteration on the world energy market and is aggravated by necessity of retaining and building up the export potential of the light industry as an important component of the republic national-economic complex. The exergy method has been here for quite a long time and saw the interest fading and appearing again with periodicity of the research-generations alternation. Cooling down of every new generation towards the specified method is explained mostly by unresolved problem of the exergy evaluation for diverse materials, which poses a problem in the course of analysis of the substance transformation systems. The specified problem as a general rule does not create obstacles for energyconversion systems. However, the situation with substance-transformation systems is by far more complicated primarily due to diversity of the materials and respectively of the specification peculiarities of such component of the substance exergy in the flow as chemical component. Abeyance of conclusion in finding the chemical component of the substance exergy does not allow performing thermodynamic valuation of the energy provision for the heat-technological process in full measure. Which complicates the matters of decision-making and finding a medium for reduction of their energy consumption. All stated above relates to the textile industry and in the first instance to the finishing production departments.The authors present the exergy-evaluation problem solution for the

  4. North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proceedings of the Tenth North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles, held in Copenhagen, 14-17 May 2008......Proceedings of the Tenth North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles, held in Copenhagen, 14-17 May 2008...

  5. Scope of nanotechnology in modern textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review article demonstrates the scope and applications of nanotechnology towards modification and development of advanced textile fibers, yarns and fabrics and their processing techniques. Basically, it summarizes the recent advances made in nanotechnology and its applications to cotton textil...

  6. Optical sensor for seawater salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, C; Klimant, I; Krause, C; Werner, T; Mayr, T; Wolfbeis, O S

    2000-01-01

    An optical sensor for the measurement of salinity in seawater has been developed. It is based on a chloride-quenchable fluorescent probe (lucigenin) immobilized on a Nafion film. Two approaches for measuring salinity via chloride concentration are presented. In the first, a change in salinity corresponds to a change in the fluorescence intensity of lucigenin. In the second, the fluorescence intensity information is converted into a phase angle information by adding an inert phosphorescent reference luminophore (a ruthenium complex entrapped in poly(acrylonitrile) beads). Under these conditions, the chloride-dependent fluorescence intensity of lucigenin can be converted into a chloride-dependent fluorescence phase shift which serves as the analytical information. This scheme is referred to as dual lifetime referencing (DLR). The sensor was used to determine the salinity in seawater and brackish water of the North Sea.

  7. Textile paper as a circular material

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Increasing resource efficiency by utilising secondary raw material is one of the key characteristics of a circular economy. Textile dust fibre, a waste generated from textile mechanical recycling has the prospect to be utilised as secondary raw material for producing novel material: textile paper suitable for packaging and other applications. A comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of carrier bags made from one ton of virgin paper, recycled paper and novel textile paper (~22584paper bags wi...

  8. Textiles for protection against microorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauperl, O.

    2016-04-01

    Concerning micro-organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, there is a huge progress in the development of textile materials and procedures which should effectively protect against these various pathogens. In this sense there is especially problematic hospital environment, where it is necessary to take into account properly designed textile material which, when good selected and composed, act as a good barrier against transfer of micro-organisms through material mainly in its wet state. Respect to this it is necessary to be familiar with the rules regarding selection of the input material, the choice of proper yarn construction, the choice of the proper weaving mode, the rules regarding selection of antimicrobial-active compound suitable for (eco-friendly) treatment, and the choice of the most appropriate test method by which it is possible objectively to conclude on the reduction of selected microorganism. As is well known, fabrics are three-dimensional structures with void and non-void areas. Therefore, the physical-chemical properties of the textile material/fabric, the surface characteristics together with the shape of microorganism, and the carriers' characteristics contribute to control the transfer of microorganism through textile material. Therefore, careful planning of textile materials and treatment procedure with the compound which is able to reduce micro-organism satisfactory is particularly important, especially due to the fact that in hospital environment population with impaired immune system is mainly presented.

  9. Bioremediation of textile effluent using Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enormous volumes of effluent are generated at different stages of textile manufacturing, as a result of the use of copious amounts of chemicals and dyes. Several tons of textiles required to meet up with societal demands are produced daily in this industry. Effluent derived from the textile and dyestuff activities can provoke ...

  10. Emerging research trends in medical textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Gokarneshan, N; Rajendran, V; Lavanya, B; Ghoshal, Arundhathi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant researches reported during the recent years in the field of medical textiles. It also highlights the use of new types of fibres in developing medical textile products and their promising role in the respective areas of application. Considerable developments have taken place in the development of medical textiles for varied applications.

  11. Electrical Conductivity in Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Copper is the most widely used electrical conductor. Like most metals, though, it has several drawbacks: it is heavy, expensive, and can break. Fibers that conduct electricity could be the solutions to these problems, and they are of great interest to NASA. Conductive fibers provide lightweight alternatives to heavy copper wiring in a variety of settings, including aerospace, where weight is always a chief concern. This is an area where NASA is always seeking improved materials. The fibers are also more cost-effective than metals. Expenditure is another area where NASA is always looking to make improvements. In the case of electronics that are confined to small spaces and subject to severe stress, copper is prone to breaking and losing connection over time. Flexible conductive fibers eliminate that problem. They are more supple and stronger than brittle copper and, thus, find good use in these and similar situations. While clearly a much-needed material, electrically conductive fibers are not readily available. The cost of new technology development, with all the pitfalls of troubleshooting production and the years of testing, and without the guarantee of an immediate market, is often too much of a financial hazard for companies to risk. NASA, however, saw the need for electrical fibers in its many projects and sought out a high-tech textile company that was already experimenting in this field, Syscom Technology, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio. Syscom was founded in 1993 to provide computer software engineering services and basic materials research in the areas of high-performance polymer fibers and films. In 1999, Syscom decided to focus its business and technical efforts on development of high-strength, high-performance, and electrically conductive polymer fibers. The company developed AmberStrand, an electrically conductive, low-weight, strong-yet-flexible hybrid metal-polymer YARN.

  12. Design Management in the Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore textile design activities and textile design management from an industrial network perspective. The textile industry is probably one of the most globalized manufacturing industries in the world and thus one of the most dispersed industries on the globe. Most studies...... on design management are framed inside the organisational context of the firm. In this study the role and practice of textile design is addressed in perspective of the global textile production network. The empirical data stems from six case studies exploring how different types of enterprises are organised...

  13. Los textiles rituales de Nasca en Cahuachi

    OpenAIRE

    Bastiand Atto, María Soledad

    2010-01-01

    El estudio de los textiles arqueológicos nos conduce a entender a una de las actividades productivas de mayor antigüedad en nuestro país, la actividad productiva textil, desarrollada durante 5 000 años. Tal es el caso, de la producción textil de la cultura Nasca desarrollada en el período Intermedio Temprano, de la época prehispánica. Una de las culturas más conocidas por su cerámica polícroma y sus complejos textiles. El presente estudio muestra una Colección Textil de Nasca Temprano,...

  14. Textile effluent biodegradation potentials of textile effluent-adapted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental pollution has been recognized as one of the major problems of the modern world. The increasing demand for water and the dwindling supply has made the treatment and reuse of industrial effluents an attractive option. Textile effluents are of concern because they colour the drains and ultimately the water ...

  15. Freshwater to seawater transitions in migratory fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydlewski, Joseph D.; Michael P. Wilkie,

    2012-01-01

    The transition from freshwater to seawater is integral to the life history of many fishes. Diverse migratory fishes express anadromous, catadromous, and amphidromous life histories, while others make incomplete transits between freshwater and seawater. The physiological mechanisms of osmoregulation are widely conserved among phylogenetically diverse species. Diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater develop osmoregulatory mechanisms for different environmental salinities. Freshwater to seawater transition involves hormonally mediated changes in gill ionocytes and the transport proteins associated with hypoosmoregulation, increased seawater ingestion and water absorption in the intestine, and reduced urinary water losses. Fishes attain salinity tolerance through early development, gradual acclimation, or environmentally or developmentally cued adaptations. This chapter describes adaptations in diverse taxa and the effects of salinity on growth. Identifying common strategies in diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater will reveal the ecological and physiological basis for maintaining homeostasis in different salinities, and inform efforts to conserve and manage migratory euryhaline fishes.

  16. TEXTILE STRUCTURES FOR AERONAUTICS (PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOLER Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D textile structures with better delamination resistance and damage impact tolerance to be applied in composites for structural components is one of the main goals of the aeronautical industry. Textile Research Centre in Canet de Mar has been working since 2008 in this field. Our staff has been designing, developing and producing different textile structures using different production methods and machinery to improve three-dimensional textile structures as fiber reinforcement for composites. This paper describes different tests done in our textile labs from unidirectional structures to woven, knitted or braided 3 D textile structures. Advantages and disadvantages of each textile structure are summarized. The second part of this paper deals with our know-how in the manufacturing and assessing of three-dimensional textile structures during this last five years in the field of textile structures for composites but also in the development of structures for other applications. In the field of composites for aeronautic sector we have developed textile structures using the main methods of textile production, that is to say, weaving, warp knitting, weft knitting and braiding. Comparing the advantages and disadvantages it could be said that braided fabrics, with a structure in the three space axes are the most suitable for fittings and frames.

  17. Textile allergic contact dermatitis: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Garrett; Blattner, Collin M; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Andersen, Rosa; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a thorough review of Pubmed search results for "textile percutaneous penetration" and "textile absorption". We also determined relevant articles that discussed percutaneous penetration of textiles into the skin and their associated disease states. Due to limitations in current and past publications, we are uncertain of the extent of the clinical problem; however, for patients allergic to textile dye, it is of practical importance, both clinically and in their everyday life. There are many challenges to correctly identifying the offending textile products in a patient with suspected textile dye dermatitis. Different populations may exhibit varying degrees of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), but more studies must be done to draw further conclusions. This is further complicated when counseling the patient on how to avoid the textile products most likely to cause a recurrence of ACD skin lesions.

  18. Eastern Sahara Geology from Orbital Radar: Potential Analog to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Paillou, P.; Heggy, E.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the surface of Mars has been intensely reworked by aeolian processes and key evidence about the history of the Martian environment seems to be hidden beneath a widespread layer of debris (paleo lakes and rivers, faults, impact craters). In the same way, the recent geological and hydrological history of the eastern Sahara is still mainly hidden under large regions of wind-blown sand which represent a possible terrestrial analog to Mars. The subsurface geology there is generally invisible to optical remote sensing techniques, but radar images obtained from the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) missions were able to penetrate the superficial sand layer to reveal parts of paleohydrological networks in southern Egypt.

  19. Shock veins in the Sahara 02500 ordinary chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owocki, Krzysztof; Muszyński, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    A specimen of the Sahara 02500 ordinary chondrite contains shock-produced veins consisting of recrystallised fine-grained pyroxenes that include small droplets of Ni-rich metal. Non-melted olivines and pyroxenes show planar deformations filled by shock-melted and -polluted metal and troilite. Shock-melted feldspathic glass is present close to the shock veins. Geothermometric estimations indicate that the meteorite locally experienced moderate shock metamorphism with a minimum local peak temperature above 1400°C, resulting in partial melting of Ca-poor pyroxene and full melting of feldspars, metal and sulphides. The mineral assemblage in the shock veins suggests a pressure during melt recrystallisation below 10 GPa.

  20. Dry Deposition from Sahara Sources Regions of Western Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Douaiba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sahara dust storms during March 2004 have attracted much attention from the dust-research community due to their intensity, wide coverage, and endurance. In the present work, the dry deposition mechanisms of mineral dust are analysed during an event on the 3 March 2004 over the Northwest African coast. This particular case was chosen based on the strong dry removal that occurred, rendering it ideal for examining the deposition processes. The simulation of synoptic conditions and dry deposition of four dust particles including clay, small silt, large silt, and sand was performed with Eta model, coupled with a desert dust cycle module. The results have been compared with surface data from weather stations in North Africa, data of dry metals from stations located in Gran Canaria, and various satellite images such as European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer for the period in question.

  1. Notes on Old Stone Constructions of West and Central Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark MILBURN

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: El presente trabajo trata acerca de la tumba de TIN-HUMAN, HOGGAR, y la describe presentándola en relacón con los «monumentos en capilla» de Négrine, Tafilalet y Oeste del Sahara. Además, incluye comentarios sobre la rareza de las tumbas rectangulares con habitaciones interiores. Se hace una razonable exposición de los «monumentos fusiformes», conectados con la tradición del tránsito por barco a la vida futura. La tumba de TIN-HINAN combina características de los monumentos en capilla o habitación con aquellas otras de «monumentos de deambulatorio complejo».ABSTRACT: This work deals with the tomb of Tin-Hinan, Hoggar, and describes it as presenting a relationship with the «monuments à chapelle» of Négrine, Tafilalet and West Sahara which also have very large chambers. It also includes a commentarity on the rarity of rectangular tombs with interior chambers. It proposes a reasonable explanation of the «fusiformes monuments» as being connected with a tradition of a journey by ship to the after-life (this being suggested by their very shape. The tomb of Tin-Hinan combines characteristics of the «monument à chapelle ou à chambre» with those of a «monument à déambulatoire complexe».

  2. Perception of naturalness in textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvliet, Krista E.; Karana, Elvin; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    In many daily contexts, we prefer natural 'materials' over un-natural ones. Textiles embodied in garments that are worn on the body all day, or in bed sheets slept under every night touch us literally, on a daily basis. Hence among all other materials, 'naturalness perception' has a strong impact on

  3. NICE3: Textile Brine Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the significant energy and waste savings that can be realized by using nanofiltration technology to reuse textile dyebath brines. Read this new fact sheet to learn how this new membrane technology can benefit your business.

  4. Stalled ERP at Random Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Robert; Kops, Eric; Little, Elizabeth; Gamble, George; Underbakke, Jesse; Havelka, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Andre Raymond, Executive Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Random Textiles Co. Inc. (RTC), stood in front of the podium to address his team of 70 sales consultants in Las Vegas, NV. The organization had increased market share and achieved record sales over the past three years; however, in the shadow of this success lurked an obstacle that…

  5. Durable and Rechargeable Antimicrobial Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    textiles, to achieve powerful antimicrobial effiacy (see the following tasks). Reaction conditions have significant effects on grafting yields and...efficacy tests, all the microbial species were provided by the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis...non-resistant bacteria. Candida albicans (C. albicans, ATCC 10231, fungi), a diploid fungus , was used as a representative example of fungi. As shown

  6. Textiles and Training in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrez, Jaime Serrao; Dias, Mario Caldeira

    Analyzing the role of vocational training in an economic sector that is declining in Portugal, this document consists of five chapters, a bibliography, and a list of training organizations. An introduction tells why the study is important and explains that the major obstacles to development of the Portuguese textile and clothing sector are the…

  7. Integrated microelectronics for smart textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Christl; Glaser, Rupert; Savio, Domnic; Schnell, Markus; Weber, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The combination of textile fabrics with microelectronics will lead to completely new applications, thus achieving elements of ambient intelligence. The integration of sensor or actuator networks, using fabrics with conductive fibres as a textile motherboard enable the fabrication of large active areas. In this paper we describe an integration technology for the fabrication of a "smart textile" based on a wired peer-to-peer network of microcontrollers with integrated sensors or actuators. A self-organizing and fault-tolerant architecture is accomplished which detects the physical shape of the network. Routing paths are formed for data transmission, automatically circumventing defective or missing areas. The network architecture allows the smart textiles to be produced by reel-to-reel processes, cut into arbitrary shapes subsequently and implemented in systems at low installation costs. The possible applications are manifold, ranging from alarm systems to intelligent guidance systems, passenger recognition in car seats, air conditioning control in interior lining and smart wallpaper with software-defined light switches.

  8. Crystallization of Wadsleyite and Ringwoodite in Sahara 98222, 00293, and 00350: Constraints on Shock Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudge, C.; Hu, J.; Sharp, T. G.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the coexistence of wadsleyite and ringwoodite in transformed clasts within three ordinary chondrites: Sahara 98222, 00293 and 00350. High-pressure mineralogy is used to constrain conditions of the impact event on the parent body.

  9. TEXTILE STRUCTURES FOR AERONAUTICS (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOLER Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D textile structures with better delamination resistance and damage impact tolerance to be applied in composites for structural components is one of the main goals of the aeronautical industry. Textile Research Centre in Canet de Mar has been working since 2008 in this field. Our staff has been designing, developing and producing different textile structures using different production methods and machinery to improve three-dimensional textile structures as fiber reinforcement for composites. This paper describes different tests done in our textile labs from unidirectional structures to woven, knitted or braided 3 D textile structures. Advantages and disadvantages of each textile structure are summarized. The first part of this paper deals with the introduction of our Textile Research Centre in the field of composites and carbon fiber as a main material to produce three – dimensional textile structures. The use of composite materials in aerospace structures has increased over the past decades. Our contribution related to this field consists of the development of three- dimensional textile structures and even the adaptation and improvement of machinery to do it possible. Carbon fiber provides advantages as volumetric fraction and minimum fault occurrence. However carbon fiber has also disadvantages as uncomfortable handling delamination and high cost of material and processing.

  10. Comment on "Climate-driven ecosystem succession in the Sahara: the past 6000 years".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovkin, Victor; Claussen, Martin

    2008-11-28

    Kröpelin et al. (Research Articles, 9 May 2008, p. 765) interpreted a sediment record from Lake Yoa in the east-central part of North Africa as support for a weak biogeophysical climate-vegetation feedback in the Sahara during the mid-Holocene. We argue that the new data do not invalidate earlier modeling results on strong land-atmosphere coupling in the Western Sahara for which the Lake Yoa record is far less representative.

  11. Building Fit-for-Purpose Spatial Frameworks for Sustainable Land Governaqnce in Sub-Sahara Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2013-01-01

    countries this countrywide spatial framework has been developed over centuries. In contrast, most developing countries have a cadastral coverage of less than 30 per cent of the country. This means that over 70 per cent of the land in many developing countries, such as the sub-Sahara region, is generally......, economic, legal, and social issues related to building such fit-for purpose spatial frameworks as a means of paving the way towards sustainable and land governance in Sub-Sahara Africa...

  12. The Textile Industry at Thebes in the Light of the Textile Industries at Pylos and Knossos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2001-01-01

    The paper investigates the textile production at Thebes, Greece, according to the Linear B tablets......The paper investigates the textile production at Thebes, Greece, according to the Linear B tablets...

  13. Thermoset composites reinforced with recycled cotton textile residues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zonatti, Welton Fernando; Guimarães, Bárbara Maria Gama; Duleba, Wânia; Ramos, Júlia Baruque

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of textiles is an issue that requires immediate attention in order to address the management of textiles derived from household waste, as well as scraps generated throughout manufacturing textile processes...

  14. Textile electrodes and integrated smart textile for reliable biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, R; Pacelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Since birth the first and the most natural interface for the body is fabric, a soft, warm and reassuring material. Cloth is usually covering more than 80 % of the skin; which leads us to consider textile material as the most appropriate interface where new sensorial and interactive functions can be implemented. The new generation of personalised monitoring systems is based on this paradigm: functions like sensing, transmission and elaboration are implementable in the materials through the textile technology. Functional yarns and fibres are usable to realise garments where electrical and computing properties are combined with the traditional mechanical characteristics, giving rise to textile platforms that are comparable with the cloths that are normally used to produce our garments. The feel of the fabric is the same, but the functionality is augmented. Nowadays, consumers demand user-friendly connectivity and interactivity; sensing clothes are the most natural and ordinary interface able to follow us, everywhere in a non-intrusive way, in natural harmony with our body.

  15. Superhydrophobic surfaces for applications in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michele; Benedetti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    Technological fields in which seawater is implied are numerorus, working in seawater (shipping, oil industry, marine aquaculture,..), and exploiting seawater in plants (cooling heat-exchange, desalination, power plants,..). All suffer from detrimental effects induced by biofouling mainly enhancing material failures and limiting energetic efficiencies. Among the remediation solutions, technologies coniugating economical, green and efficiency criteria should represent the direction. With the aim to meet these criteria, superhydrophobic (SH) technology attracted many researches for the protection of materials operating in contact with seawater. In this work, the literature focusing on such technology for the protection of surfaces in contact with seawater has been reviewed, mainly focusing on boat and ship hull protection. Despite the growing interest around SH technology in seawater for fouling control and friction drag reduction of hulls, to date literature shows that superhydrophobicity in seawater is still limited if compared with a time window compatible with technological needs (set on years). An evaluation of the causes of early superhydrophobicity loss under operative conditions clearly indicates that, to the best of present knowledge, a SH surface cannot preserve this feature by itself alone (especially in real seawater). Hence, we have considered to highlight the behaviour of SH surfaces in seawater in relation to early stages of biocolonization (conditioning film and pioneering bioslime formation). Considering the annual costs sustained for the biofouling impact control, advantages coming from SH surfaces, in terms of foul control and friction drag reduction, would allow economical savings allowing to cover both the appliance of longevity keeping strategies of the SH surfaces and investments in green technologies of SH coating life cycle (production, storing). In addition a brief outlook is provided on technological fields exploiting seawater in pipelines

  16. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  17. Textiles and clothing sustainability nanotextiles and sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the sustainability aspects of textiles and clothing sector in light of nanomaterials and technologies. The invasion of nano in every industrial sector has been important and has made remarkable changes as well as posed new challenges, including the textiles and clothing sector. There is quite a great deal of research happening in terms of nano materials for textiles across the globe, some of which are covered in this book. .

  18. Bespoke Materials For Bespoke Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Baranovskaya, Yuliya; Holden Deleuran, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Membrane architecture uses currently off the shelf materials and produces the shapes and details through cutting and laborsome joining of textile patterns. This paper discusses investigations into an alternative material practice - knit - which engages bespoke membrane materials. A practice which...... how design and engineering practices change, when material properties move from given and constant into the area of design and gradient. Bespoke materials for bespoke textile architecture. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/306401612_Bespoke_materials_for_bespoke_textile...

  19. Treatment of effluent textiles with ultraviolet light

    OpenAIRE

    Tinoco Gómez, Oscar Rafael; UNMSM; Medina Escudero, Ana María; UNMSM; Zapata Gamarra, Hernán

    2014-01-01

    The use of clean technologies for the treatment of textile effluents is essential to achieve a significant contribution by the textile industry, environmental treatment of them. According to the literature, the dyes used in textile industry are hardly degradable and have strong opposition to biological treatments are subjected to appropriate wastewater. At lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (oxygenated water) leads to better dye fading. It also shows that lower concentrations of titani...

  20. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    of sound. This issue is a part of a Ph.D. study at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. Sound diffusion in architecture is a complex phenomenon. From the sound source the sound spreads in all directions as a sphere of wave fronts. When the sound is reflected from room boundaries or furniture, complex...... goemetry by analysing the sound pattern at a specific spot. This analysis is done theoretically with algorithmic systems and practical with waves in water. The paper describes the experiments and the findings, and explains how an analysis of sound can be catched in a textile form.......Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...

  1. [When textiles help your recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Bernard; Campagne, Christine; Behary Massika, Nemeshwaree

    2017-01-01

    Textiles are widely used in the biomedical domain, particularly in wound dressings or as implantable devices for strengthening or even replacing some damaged organs. Nowadays they present more and more sophisticated functionalities contributing to the healing process, to the organs regeneration, and fight against infection or thrombosis. Advanced spinning technologies of biostable or bioresorbable polymers and surface treatment technologies are often used, as well as nanotechnologies, to implement two main strategies for development of bio-active textiles. A long or medium term technology is obtained by grafting the bio-active molecule through stable chemical bonds while a short term activity is produced by using "reservoir" systems such as hydrogels and cyclodextrins that release the active agents in situ. ‡. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  2. On-line inspection of textile geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahners, Thomas; Ringens, Werner; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    1993-02-01

    Two examples of specific design philosophies for low-cost on-line inspection systems for textiles are described in this paper: The application of the moire-technique can heavily enhance the imaging of textile surfaces as a filter for the assessment of geometric variations of the textile `grating' with extremely simple algorithms for image analysis. Blinded for color shades triangulation sensors have been developed into powerful tools for fast profiling of textile surfaces. Curtailed for certain applications fiber optical modifications of the basic triangulation principle have been developed for aereal inspection.

  3. STAGE OF TEXTILE RECYCLE WASTE IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRIPA Simona

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this article is to examine the stage of textile recycle waste in Romania. For this purpose were analyzed the main sources of textile waste from Romania (industry of manufacture of textiles, wearing apparel, leather and related products, imports of textiles, clothing and footwear and imports of second hand clothing and also evolution of the quantity of textile waste in Romania. The benefits (economic and environmental of the collection and recycling of waste and the legislation on the waste management, have determined the diversification and increasing the number and the capacity of recovery and disposal of waste in Romania. We found the most textile waste in Romania was deposited in deposits onto or into land, in the proportion of 18.51%. This proportion is under the EU average of 34.03%, but is much higher than in other European country. Also, has been an increase in the number of incinerators, in the last years. With all of this, the interest in textile waste management in Romania is far from being to the level of European, where are associations who dealing with the collection and recycling of textiles and is achieved a selective collection of textile waste in the points especially designed for this thing. The information for this paper was gathered from literature, from the EUROSTAT database and INSSE database analysis and by Internet.

  4. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1 μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3 μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4 months storage at 25 °C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8 °C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32 °C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. NANOTECHNOLOGY IN TEXTILE INDUSTRY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RATIU Mariana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and nanotechnology are the study and application of extremely small things and can be used across all the other science fields, such as chemistry, biology, physics, materials science, and engineering. Nanotechnology overcomes the limitation of applying conventional methods to impart certain properties to textile materials. There is no doubt that in the next few years nanotechnology will penetrate into every area of the textile industry. Nanotextiles are nanoscale fibrous materials that can be fictionalized with a vast array of novel properties, including antibiotic activity, self-cleaning and the ability to increase reaction rates by providing large surface areas to potential reactants. These materials are used not only as cloth fabric, but as filter materials, wound-healing gauzes and antibacterial food packaging agents in food industry. World demand for nano-materials will rise more than two-and-a-half times to $5.5 billion in 2016 driven by a combination of increased market penetration of existing materials, and ongoing development of new materials and applications. In recent years was demonstrated that nanotechnology can be used to enhance textile attributes, such as fabric softness, durability and breathability, water repellency, fire retardancy, antimicrobial properties in fibers, yarns and fabrics. The development of smart nanotextiles has the potential to revolutionize the production of fibers, fabrics or nonwovens and functionality of our clothing and all types of textile products and applications. Nanotechnology is considered one of the most promising technologies for the 21st century. Today is said that if the IT is the wave of the present, the nanotechnology is the wave of the present, the nanotechnology is the wave of the future.

  6. [Seroepidemiological study of malaria in the Algerian Sahara].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerroug, E H; Janssens, P G; Ambroise-Thomas, P

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of geoclimatic characteristics, the Saharan region of Algeria (area, 2 million km2) is made up of several subregions; analysis of the historical data on malaria in this region seems to show that the epidemiological situation is closely linked to climatic and hydrographic conditions. A longitudinal sero-epidemiological study was conducted in this vast region from September 1983 to April 1985. The general findings do not appear to support the existence of active foci of transmission, but analysis of the data for certain oases and localities leads to a quite different assessment of the epidemiological situation. At Ouargla, for example, the serological results obtained by indirect immunofluorescence show prevalence of under 5% in the four successive surveys, whereas in Heïha oasis over 50% of subjects over 30 years of age were found to be seropositive. The results of the longitudinal seroepidemiological surveys conducted in a number of localities and oases in the Saharan region reflect the diversity of epidemiological settings and provide evidence that there is low-level malaria transmission in some oases such as Heïha, Yakou, Ihérir and probably in In-Salah. These surveys confirm that malaria transmission has been halted in the former foci such as Ouargla and Timimoune. Finally, the longitudinal sero-epidemiological study shows there are movements of potential parasite carriers from countries south of the Sahara and therefore that oases associated with trans-Saharan trade are vulnerable.

  7. The Geologic History of Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, H. D.

    2003-12-01

    Aristotle proposed that the saltness of the sea was due to the effect of sunlight on water. Robert Boyle took strong exception to this view and - in the manner of the Royal Society - laid out a program of research in the opening paragraph of his Observations and Experiments about the Saltness of the Sea (1674) (Figure 1): (20K)Figure 1. Title page of Robert Boyle's Tracts consisting of Observations about the Saltness of the Sea and other essays (1674). The Cause of the Saltness of the Sea appears by Aristotle's Writings to have busied the Curiosity of Naturalists before his time; since which, his Authority, perhaps much more than his Reasons, did for divers Ages make the Schools and the generality of Naturalists of his Opinion, till towards the end of the last Century, and the beginning of ours, some Learned Men took the boldness to question the common Opinion; since when the Controversie has been kept on foot, and, for ought I know, will be so, as long as ‘tis argued on both sides but by Dialectical Arguments, which may be probable on both sides, but are not convincing on either. Wherefore I shall here briefly deliver some particulars about the Saltness of the Sea, obtained by my own trials, where I was able; and where I was not, by the best Relations I could procure, especially from Navigators.Boyle measured and compiled a considerable set of data for variations in the saltness of surface seawater. He also designed an improved piece of equipment for sampling seawater at depth, but the depths at which it was used were modest: 30 m with his own instrument, 80 m with another, similar sampler. However, the younger John Winthrop (1606-1676), an early member of the Royal Society, an important Governor of Connecticut, and a benefactor of Harvard College, was asked to collect seawater from the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean during his crossing from England to New England in the spring of 1663. The minutes of the Royal Society's meeting on July 20, 1663, give the

  8. A Wearable All-Solid Photovoltaic Textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nannan; Chen, Jun; Huang, Yi; Guo, Wanwan; Yang, Jin; Du, Jun; Fan, Xing; Tao, Changyuan

    2016-01-13

    A solution is developed to power portable electronics in a wearable manner by fabricating an all-solid photovoltaic textile. In a similar way to plants absorbing solar energy for photosynthesis, humans can wear the as-fabricated photovoltaic textile to harness solar energy for powering small electronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Berg River Textiles - Cleaner Production Option Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Schneider, Zsig

    In October and November 2002 meetings were held between Berg River Textiles, Mr. Juan Laubscher, and external consultants from the South African – Danish Cleaner Textile Production Project, Mr. Zsig Schneider and Mr. Henrik Wenzel. This team of people collected information on recipes and flow...

  10. Environmental Considerations for Flame Resistant Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtually all common textiles will ignite and burn. There are mandatory and voluntary cigarette and open-flame ignition regulations to address unreasonable fire risks associated with textile products that require them to be treated with and/or contain flame retardant chemicals to make them flame res...

  11. Textiles and clothing sustainability sustainable technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book to deal with the innovative technologies in the field of textiles and clothing sustainability. It details a number of sustainable and innovative technologies and highlights their implications in the clothing sector. There are currently various measures to achieve sustainability in the textiles and the clothing industry, including innovations in the manufacturing stage, which is the crux of this book.

  12. New Research on Bronze Age Textile Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Eva Birgitta; Mårtensson, Linda; Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    2008-01-01

    presentation of the results from the systematic tests with Bronze Age textile tools. results concerning mesurements of lenght and time consumed.......presentation of the results from the systematic tests with Bronze Age textile tools. results concerning mesurements of lenght and time consumed....

  13. The Organization of the Mycenaean Textile Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech

    Analysis of thewritten documentation for the organiztion of the Mycenaean textile industri at Pylos, Knossos, Mycenae and Thebes......Analysis of thewritten documentation for the organiztion of the Mycenaean textile industri at Pylos, Knossos, Mycenae and Thebes...

  14. Tips for Teaching Textiles and Clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    This guide was prepared to help instructors of adult textiles and clothing programs improve their teaching; it is designed to be used with other department publications: Clothing Services Training Guide, Resource Courses for Planning Local Adult Homemaking Programs, and Resource Kit Tips for Teaching Textiles and Clothing (see AC 008 741). Each…

  15. Multi-Layer E-Textile Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lucy E.; Bibeau, Kaila; Mulligan, Lucie; Frith, Ashton; Simon, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Stitched e-textile circuits facilitate wearable, flexible, comfortable wearable technology. However, while stitched methods of e-textile circuits are common, multi-layer circuit creation remains a challenge. Here, we present methods of stitched multi-layer circuit creation using accessible tools and techniques.

  16. Seawater carbonate chemistry, Kahekili, west Maui

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Time-series of seawater carbonate chemistry variables, including salinity, dissolved inorganic nutrients, pH, total alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon from...

  17. Seawater circulating system in an aquaculture laboratory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    The note gives an account, for the first time in India, of an Aquaculture Laboratory with open type seawater circulating system developed at the National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India. Besides describing the details of the system...

  18. Simulation of magnetic coatings on textile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachowicz, T.; Ehrmann, A.

    2016-08-01

    While the properties of conductive fibres and coatings on textiles can easily be measured and calculated, magnetic coatings of fibres, yarns and fabrics still lack descriptions of their physical properties. Since magnetic textiles can be used for a variety of applications, from magnetic filters to invisible water-marks to magnetic coils and sensors, simulations would be supportive to understand and utilize their properties. The article gives an overview of different coatings on textile fibres, varying the magnetic materials as well as the fibre composition, giving rise to the interactions between neighbouring coated fibres. In this way, it is possible to understand the strong shape anisotropy which must be taken into account when the magnetic properties of textiles are to be tailored. Additionally, the differences between several possible magnetic coating materials become visible. This study can help adjusting the magnetic properties of textile fabrics to a desired application.

  19. LOW {sup 60}FE ABUNDANCE IN SEMARKONA AND SAHARA 99555

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Haolan; Dauphas, Nicolas, E-mail: haolantang@ucla.edu [Origins Lab, Department of the Geophysical Sciences and Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Iron-60 (t{sub 1/2} = 2.62 Myr) is a short-lived nuclide that can help constrain the astrophysical context of Solar System formation and date early Solar System events. A high abundance of {sup 60}Fe({sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ≈ 4 × 10{sup −7}) was reported by in situ techniques in some chondrules from the LL3.00 Semarkona meteorite, which was taken as evidence that a supernova exploded in the vicinity of the birthplace of the Sun. However, our previous multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) measurements of a wide range of meteoritic materials, including chondrules, showed that {sup 60}Fe was present in the early Solar System at a much lower level ({sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ≈ 10{sup −8}). The reason for the discrepancy is unknown but only two Semarkona chondrules were measured by MC-ICPMS and these had Fe/Ni ratios below ∼2× chondritic. Here, we show that the initial {sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratio in Semarkona chondrules with Fe/Ni ratios up to ∼24× chondritic is (5.39 ± 3.27) × 10{sup −9}. We also establish the initial {sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratio at the time of crystallization of the Sahara 99555 angrite, a chronological anchor, to be (1.97 ± 0.77) × 10{sup −9}. These results demonstrate that the initial abundance of {sup 60}Fe at Solar System birth was low, corresponding to an initial {sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratio of (1.01 ± 0.27) × 10{sup −8}.

  20. 16 CFR 1610.4 - Requirements for classifying textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for classifying textiles. 1610... REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.4 Requirements for classifying textiles. (a) Class 1, Normal Flammability. Class 1 textiles exhibit normal flammability and are...

  1. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel goods...

  2. Cost benefit of patch testing with textile finish resins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1982-01-01

    Eleven years experience of textile finish resin patch testing of suspected textile dermatitis patients revealed 15 cases of allergic textile dermatitis among 428 patients tested. Ten of the 15 patients had a relevant positive patch test to one or more of a limited series of textile finishes; 1 wa...

  3. TEXTILE IMPACT PLATES FOR NANOPARTICLES

    OpenAIRE

    VISILEANU Emilia; Dumitrescu, Iuliana; Varzaru, Elena; MITRAN Cornelia; CHIRIAC Laura

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents textile materials with destination impact plates, having different surface architectures and active treatments for functionalization, with influence upon the aging process of nano-Ag and nano-CeO2. The woven and knitted samples from 100% cotton, cotton/PES blend and 100% PES were treated by impregnation on the laboratory padding machine, drying and condensing on the machine for drying-condensing-heat setting, with the following recipes: 50g/l RUCOSTAR EEE6+20 ml 5% nano-A...

  4. Functional textiles in hospital interiors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe

    is overall related to the construction of new Danish hospitals, where the design concept healing architecture is introduced in a national context, representing the vision of a promoted healing process of hospitalised patients, supported by design related influence. Past research studies provides evidence...... that the physical environments affect the patients’ level of stress and influence their process of recovery and healing. However, although research in this field of hospital design has increased substantially in recent years, knowledge on the use of new materials and textiles in hospital interiors is still rather...

  5. Efficiency and Import Penetrationon the Productivity of Textile Industry and Textile Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Basuki Rakhmawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although textile industry and textile products belong to the strategic sub-sector of manufacturing industry in Indonesia, they are facing problems on the availability of energy, old production machines, and the flooding of imported products into the domestic market. This study is aimed to analyze the efficiency and productivity as performance indicators and how the efficiency and import penetration affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The methods of data analysis used in this research are divided in two phases. The first phase, the non-metric approach of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is applied to measure the efficiency and productivity. Secondly, the fixed effect model of econometric regression approach is used to find out the effects of efficiency and import penetration on the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The result shows that the ave-rage level of efficiency of textile industry and textile products during the period of 2004 – 2008 is about 40 percent with a growth rate of average productivity increases 2.4 percent. Whereas, the econometric estimation results indicate that the increase of efficiency will positively and significantly affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. On the other hand, the increase of import penetration will negatively affect the productivity of this industry.

  6. Efficiency And Import Penetration On The Productivity Of Textile Industry And Textile Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur B Rakhmawan, Djoni Hartono, Agni A Awirya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although textile industry and textile products belong to the strategic sub sector of manufacturing industry in Indonesia, they are facing pro-blems on the availability of energy, old production machines, and the flooding of imported products into the domestic market. This study is aimed to analyze the efficiency and productivity as performance indicators and how the efficiency and import penetration affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The methods of data analysis used in this research are divided in two phases. The first phase, the non-metric approach of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is applied to measure the efficiency and productivity. Secondly, the fixed effect model of econometric regression approach is used to find out the effects of efficiency and import penetration on the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The result shows that the average level of efficiency of textile industry and textile products during the period of 2004 – 2008 is about 40 percent with a growth rate of average productivity increases 2.4 percent. Whereas, the econometric estimation results indicate that the increase of efficiency will positively and significantly affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. On the other hand, the increase of import penetration will negatively affect the productivity of this industry.Keywords:Efficiency, Productivity, Import Penetration, DEA, Fixed Effect

  7. Efficiency and Import Penetration on the Productivity of Textile Industry and Textile Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Basuki Rakhmawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although textile industry and textile products belong to the strategic sub-sector of manufacturing industry in Indonesia, they are facing problems on the availability of energy, old production machines, and the flooding of imported products into the domestic market. This study is aimed to analyze the efficiency and productivity as performance indicators and how the efficiency and import penetration affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The methods of data analysis used in this research are divided in two phases. The first phase, the non-metric approach of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is applied to measure the efficiency and productivity. Secondly, the fixed effect model of econometric regression approach is used to find out the effects of efficiency and import penetration on the productivity of textile industry and textile products. The result shows that the average level of efficiency of textile industry and textile products during the period of 2004 – 2008 is about 40 percent with a growth rate of average productivity increases 2.4 percent. Whereas, the econometric estimation results indicate that the increase of efficiency will positively and significantly affect the productivity of textile industry and textile products. On the other hand, the increase of import penetration will negatively affect the productivity of this industry.

  8. African humid periods triggered the reactivation of a large river system in Western Sahara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skonieczny, C; Paillou, P; Bory, A; Bayon, G; Biscara, L; Crosta, X; Eynaud, F; Malaizé, B; Revel, M; Aleman, N; Barusseau, J-P; Vernet, R; Lopez, S; Grousset, F

    2015-11-10

    The Sahara experienced several humid episodes during the late Quaternary, associated with the development of vast fluvial networks and enhanced freshwater delivery to the surrounding ocean margins. In particular, marine sediment records off Western Sahara indicate deposition of river-borne material at those times, implying sustained fluvial discharges along the West African margin. Today, however, no major river exists in this area; therefore, the origin of these sediments remains unclear. Here, using orbital radar satellite imagery, we present geomorphological data that reveal the existence of a large buried paleodrainage network on the Mauritanian coast. On the basis of evidence from the literature, we propose that reactivation of this major paleoriver during past humid periods contributed to the delivery of sediments to the Tropical Atlantic margin. This finding provides new insights for the interpretation of terrigenous sediment records off Western Africa, with important implications for our understanding of the paleohydrological history of the Sahara.

  9. Monique VÉRITÉ, Henri Lhote – Une aventure scientifique au Sahara

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno LECOQUIERRE

    2015-01-01

    Auteur déjà en 1992 d’Odette du Puigaudeau : une bretonne au Sahara, Monique Vérité vient de livrer une nouvelle biographie passionnante, sur une personnalité saharienne haute en couleur, célèbre en France et au Sahara après-guerre et qui est aujourd’hui un peu oubliée : Henri Lhote (1903-1991). Henri Lhote peut être considéré comme l’un des plus grands explorateurs du Sahara au XXe siècle, aux côtés de Conrad Kilian et de Théodore Monod. Le parallèle avec ce dernier est assez fascinant car c...

  10. Textile Messages: Dispatches from the World of E-Textiles and Education. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies. Volume 62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechley, Leah, Ed.; Peppler, Kylie, Ed.; Eisenberg, Michael, Ed.; Yasmin, Kafai, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    "Textile Messages" focuses on the emerging field of electronic textiles, or e-textiles--computers that can be soft, colorful, approachable, and beautiful. E-textiles are articles of clothing, home furnishings, or architectures that include embedded computational and electronic elements. This book introduces a collection of tools that…

  11. Printing of organic light emitting diodes on textile

    OpenAIRE

    Verboven, Inge; Gilissen, Koen; Vandevenne, Glen; Troia, Mariagrazia; Leins, Martina; Walker, Matthias; Schulz, Andreas; Deferme, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Smart textiles with light-emitting properties open a whole new world of innovative textile applications such as indoor and outdoor design and safety clothing. To achieve light-emitting properties on textiles, organic light emitting diodes are printed or integrated onto textile substrates. The advantage of this approach is that typical textile properties like flexibility and drapabilty are maintained. The authors would like to thank the research and funding partners of the European CORNET p...

  12. A NEW SPECIES OF CYRTOSPIRIFER (BRACHIOPODA FROM THE MIDDLE DEVONIAN OF THE WESTERN SAHARA (NORTHWESTERN AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENA SCHEMM-GREGORY

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Cyrtospirifer is described from the Middle to Upper Givetian of the Western Sahara (Northwest Africa. Cyrtospirifer tindoufensis new species differs in its smaller number and coarser medial and flank plications and equibiconvex shell profile from the other Givetian species of Cyrtospirifer that all occur in Europe and to which the new species probably gives rise. The new implications of the proposed phylogeny of the earliest cyrtospiriferids and their origin from the Western Sahara are discussed. The palaeogeographic distribution of the cyrtospiriferids during the Givetian and Frasnian is shown and its migration ways are described considering the global transgression and regression cycles. 

  13. The blurred boundaries of political violence in the Sahel-Sahara

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The Sahel and the Sahara are faced with exceptional political instability involving a combination of rebellions, jihadist insurgencies, coups d’état, protest movements and illegal trafficking. Analysis of the outbreaks of violence reveals that the region is not just the victim of an escalation...... of wars and conflicts that marked the 20th century. The Sahel-Sahara has also become the setting of a globalised security environment, in which boundaries between what is local and global, domestic and international, military and civilian, politics and identity are blurred....

  14. Ethnopharmacological survey and phytochemical screening of some medicinal Asteraceae from Algerian Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. CHERITI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A first report of Asteraceae species census of the Algerian folk medicine, currently used in Sahara for the treatment of illenes is presented. 11 Asteraceae species namely: Anvillea radiata Coss, Artemisia herba-alba, Brocchia cinerea, Bubonium graveolens, Cotula anthemoides, Echinops spinosus, Launaea arborescens, Launaea nudicaulis, Launaea resedifolia, Scorzonera undulata and Warionia saharae were selected based on the survey through interviews with local inhabitant, herbalist in the Souk and old women according to our previous works. Ethnopharmacolgical potential and chemical constituents of this species are described.

  15. Ethnopharmacological survey and phytochemical screening of some medicinal Asteraceae from Algerian Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A CHERITI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A first report of Asteracea species census of the Algerian folk medicine, currently used in Sahara for the treatment of illenes is presented. 11 Asteraceae species namely: Anvillea radiata coss, Artemisia herba-alba, Brocchia cinerea, Bubonium graveolens, Cotula anthemoides, Echinops spinosus, Launaea arborescens, Launaea nudicaulis, Launaea resedifolia, Scorzonera undulata and Warionia saharae were selected based on the survey through interviews with local inhabitant, herbalist in the Souk and old women according to our previous works. Ethnopharmacolgical potential and chemical constituents of this species are described.

  16. Stretchable, Porous, and Conductive Energy Textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2010-02-10

    Recently there is strong interest in lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronics to meet the technological demands of modern society. Integrated energy storage devices of this type are a key area that is still significantly underdeveloped. Here, we describe wearable power devices using everyday textiles as the platform. With an extremely simple "dipping and drying" process using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ink, we produced highly conductive textiles with conductivity of 125 S cm-1 and sheet resistance less than 1 Ω/sq. Such conductive textiles show outstanding flexibility and stretchability and demonstrate strong adhesion between the SWNTs and the textiles of interest. Supercapacitors made from these conductive textiles show high areal capacitance, up to 0.48F/cm2, and high specific energy. We demonstrate the loading of pseudocapacitor materials into these conductive textiles that leads to a 24-fold increase of the areal capacitance of the device. These highly conductive textiles can provide new design opportunities for wearable electronics and energy storage applications. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  17. Stretchable, porous, and conductive energy textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liangbing; Pasta, Mauro; Mantia, Fabio La; Cui, Lifeng; Jeong, Sangmoo; Deshazer, Heather Dawn; Choi, Jang Wook; Han, Seung Min; Cui, Yi

    2010-02-10

    Recently there is strong interest in lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronics to meet the technological demands of modern society. Integrated energy storage devices of this type are a key area that is still significantly underdeveloped. Here, we describe wearable power devices using everyday textiles as the platform. With an extremely simple "dipping and drying" process using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ink, we produced highly conductive textiles with conductivity of 125 S cm(-1) and sheet resistance less than 1 Omega/sq. Such conductive textiles show outstanding flexibility and stretchability and demonstrate strong adhesion between the SWNTs and the textiles of interest. Supercapacitors made from these conductive textiles show high areal capacitance, up to 0.48F/cm(2), and high specific energy. We demonstrate the loading of pseudocapacitor materials into these conductive textiles that leads to a 24-fold increase of the areal capacitance of the device. These highly conductive textiles can provide new design opportunities for wearable electronics and energy storage applications.

  18. Mechanical Properties Of Traditional And Nanofibre Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursíny Petr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with a comparison of mechanical properties of a conventional yarn and a textile from nanofibres. The conventional yarn represents the textile objects with high degree of orientation of fibres and the textile from nanofibres represents the textile objects with low degree of orientation of fibres. The theoretical section is concerned with the issue of internal structure of plied yarn and resulting differences in the orientation and straightening of fibres and in utilisation of deformation properties of fibres in comparison to the referred nano textile. The experimental section describes the manner of realisation of both static and dynamic tests of conventional yarn and strips of nanofibres. The results show differences in the mechanical properties of conventional yarn and textile strip from nanofibres under static and dynamic loading conditions. The processing technology of conventional yarn has been verified in the long term. But textiles from nanofibres are a relatively new material and mechanical properties of the detected differences point out possible problems with their behaviour during standard technological processes.

  19. Textile effluent & waste water: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Mojsov, Kiro

    2013-01-01

    Textile processing is a growing industry that traditionally has used a lot of water, energy and harsh chemicals. Textile industries consume over 7 x 105tons of dyes annually and use up to 1 litre of water per kg of dye processed and arethird largest polluters in the world. As a characteristic of the textile processing industry, a wide range of structurally diverse dyes can be used in a single factory, and therefore effluents from the industry are extremely variable in composition. This needed...

  20. Rapid determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Utsey, Robin C.

    2013-03-12

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes in seawater samples for measurement. The new SRNL method employs a novel and effective pre-concentration step that utilizes a blend of calcium phosphate with iron hydroxide to collect both strontium and yttrium rapidly from the seawater matrix with enhanced chemical yields. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with rapid Sr Resin and DGA Resin cartridge separation options using vacuum box technology, allow seawater samples up to 10 liters to be analyzed. The total 89Sr + 90Sr activity may be determined by gas flow proportional counting and recounted after ingrowth of 90Y to differentiate 89Sr from 90Sr. Gas flow proportional counting provides a lower method detection limit than liquid scintillation or Cerenkov counting and allows simultaneous counting of samples. Simultaneous counting allows for longer count times and lower method detection limits without handling very large aliquots of seawater. Seawater samples up to 6 liters may be analyzed using Sr Resin for 89Sr and 90Sr with a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of 1-10 mBq/L, depending on count times. Seawater samples up to 10 liters may be analyzed for 90Sr using a DGA Resin method via collection and purification of 90Y only. If 89Sr and other fission products are present, then 91Y (beta energy 1.55 MeV, 58.5 day half-life) is also likely to be present. 91Y interferes with attempts to collect 90Y directly from the seawater sample without initial purification of Sr isotopes first and 90Y ingrowth. The DGA Resin option can be used to determine 90Sr, and if 91Y is also present, an ingrowth option with using DGA

  1. Environmental impact of seawater desalination plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutaz, I S

    1991-01-01

    Enormous amounts of seawater are desalted everyday worldwide. The total world production of fresh water from the sea is about 2621 mgd (9.92 million m(3) day(-1) 1985 figures). Desalting processes are normally associated with the rejection of high concentration waste brine from the plant itself or from the pretreatment units as well as during the cleaning period. In thermal processes, mainly multistage flash (MSF) thermal pollution occurs. These pollutants increase the seawater temperature, salinity, water current and turbidity. They also harm the marine environment, causing fish to migrate while enhancing the presence of algae, nematods and tiny molluscus. Sometimes micro-elements and toxic materials appear in the discharged brine.This paper will discuss the impact of the effluents from the desalination plants on the seawater environment with particular reference to the Saudi desalination plants, since they account for about 50% of the world desalination capacity.

  2. Extracting Minerals from Seawater: An Energy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Bardi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of recovering minerals from seawater has been proposed as a way of counteracting the gradual depletion of conventional mineral ores. Seawater contains large amounts of dissolved ions and the four most concentrated metal ones (Na, Mg, Ca, K are being commercially extracted today. However, all the other metal ions exist at much lower concentrations. This paper reports an estimate of the feasibility of the extraction of these metal ions on the basis of the energy needed. In most cases, the result is that extraction in amounts comparable to the present production from land mines would be impossible because of the very large amount of energy needed. This conclusion holds also for uranium as fuel for the present generation of nuclear fission plants. Nevertheless, in a few cases, mainly lithium, extraction from seawater could provide amounts of metals sufficient for closing the cycle of metal use in the economy, provided that an increased level of recycling can be attained.

  3. 76 FR 79166 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements ACTION: Determination to add a product... 21, 2011. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  4. 76 FR 78249 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: December 16, 2011. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  5. 75 FR 75664 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: December 6, 2010. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  6. 76 FR 16734 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... Publication. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined...

  7. 78 FR 16662 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability... Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a product in...: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined that certain...

  8. 78 FR 39713 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a..., 2013. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined...

  9. 77 FR 8221 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: February 14, 2012. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  10. 75 FR 65609 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... 26, 2010. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  11. 78 FR 7414 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: February 1, 2013. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  12. 75 FR 48931 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') August 9, 2010. AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination... Date: August 12, 2010. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA...

  13. 78 FR 17642 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... 22, 2013. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  14. 76 FR 52640 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to remove a.... SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined that an...

  15. 78 FR 18561 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability... Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a product in...: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined that certain...

  16. 76 FR 67424 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a...: November 1, 2011. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  17. 78 FR 16661 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... 18, 2013. SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has...

  18. Textile materials for lightweight constructions technologies, methods, materials, properties

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    In this book, experts on textile technologies convey both general and specific informa­tion on various aspects of textile engineering, ready-made technologies, and textile chemistry. They describe the entire process chain from fiber materials to various yarn constructions, 2D and 3D textile constructions, preforms, and interface layer design. In addition, the authors introduce testing methods, shaping and simulation techniques for the characterization of and structural mechanics calculations on anisotropic, pliable high-performance textiles, including specific examples from the fields of fiber plastic composites, textile concrete, and textile membranes. Readers will also be familiarized with the potential offered by increasingly popular textile structures, for instance in the fields of composite technology, construction technology, security technology, and membrane technology. Textile materials and semi-finished products have widely varied potential characteristics, and are commonly used as essential element...

  19. Dermatotoxicologic clinical solutions: textile dye dermatitis patch testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas; Edwards, Ashley; Maibach, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The authors provide a framework for working up and counseling a patient with suspected textile dermatitis, focusing on identifying which textile materials are most likely to be the cause of the eczematous lesions, the current clinical guidelines, the utility and appropriateness of patch testing, the limitations of these guidelines, and our pro tempore recommendations. While there are many challenges to correctly identify and counsel patients on how to avoid the offending textile products in a patient with suspected textile dye dermatitis, there is value in following the guidelines set forth to help identify the causative textile(s). Although patch tests can be useful, dermatologists should understand the limitations of standardized patch testing for patients with suspected textile dye-induced dermatitis. These guidelines are expected to increase the likelihood of identifying the causative textile(s), so that patch testing can be supplemented with swatch testing and chemical dye extraction to help discover the allergenic dye.

  20. Nettle as a distinct Bronze Age textile plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfjord, C; Mannering, U; Frei, K M; Gleba, M; Scharff, A B; Skals, I; Heinemeier, J; Nosch, M-L; Holst, B

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the production of plant fibre textiles in ancient Europe, especially woven textiles for clothing, was closely linked to the development of agriculture through the use of cultivated textile plants (flax, hemp). Here we present a new investigation of the 2800 year old Lusehøj Bronze Age Textile from Voldtofte, Denmark, which challenges this assumption. We show that the textile is made of imported nettle, most probably from the Kärnten-Steiermark region, an area which at the time had an otherwise established flax production. Our results thus suggest that the production of woven plant fibre textiles in Bronze Age Europe was based not only on cultivated textile plants but also on the targeted exploitation of wild plants. The Lusehøj find points to a hitherto unrecognized role of nettle as an important textile plant and suggests the need for a re-evaluation of textile production resource management in prehistoric Europe.

  1. Thin fiber and textile reinforced cementitious systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aldea, Corina-Maria

    2007-01-01

    This Special Publication (SP) contains ten papers which provide insight on the topics of state of the art of thin fiber and textile-reinforced cementitious systems both in academia and the industry...

  2. Nanomaterials for Functional Textiles and Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rivero, Pedro J; Urrutia, Aitor; Goicoechea, Javier; Arregui, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    ... macroscopic properties. This article reviews the most relevant approaches for incorporating such nanoparticles into synthetic fibers used traditionally in the textile industry allowing to give a solution to traditional...

  3. Wearable Electro-Textiles for Battlefield Awareness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winterhalter, C. A; Teverovsky, Justyna; Horowitz, Wendy; Sharma, Vikram; Lee, Kang

    2004-01-01

    This summary describes efforts to develop wearable electronic textiles and connectors to support body worn networking, communications, and battlefield awareness for future service members of the U.S. Army...

  4. ROMANIAN TEXTILE INDUSTRY AND ITS COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Ioana ŞERBĂNEL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization has set up a new era of international trade flows and implicitly international competition. This is best understood by analyzing the rise and fall within certain industries. The Global Value Chains (GVC framework has emerged from its theoretical origins to become a major paradigm used by several international organizations. A detailed scrutiny of GVC highlightsthe manner in which new patterns of production, international trade and employment shape prospects for development and competitiveness.The purpose of the article is to address the important role of the textile sector in national economy development. Firstly, the paper addresses the presentation of textile industry at global, European and national level. Then, it presents a competitiveness sectorial approach and the analysis of innovation in textile industry.Finally, it is presented the value chain for the textile industry in Romania.

  5. Textile composites based on natural fibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Li, Yan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available composites based on natural fibers are investigated, which includes the manufacuring techniques, fracture and mechanical properties and other behaviours. Consolidation and permeability of the textiles based on natural fibers are specially addressed...

  6. Allergic Contact Dermatitis Induced by Textile Necklace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uffe Nygaard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Allergic contact dermatitis to textile dyes is considered to be a rare phenomenon. A recent review reported a prevalence of contact allergy to disperse dyes between 0.4 and 6.7%. The relevance of positive patch testing was not reported in all studies. Textile dye allergy is easily overlooked and is furthermore challenging to investigate as textile dyes are not labelled on clothing. In this report, we present a case of allergic contact dermatitis to a textile necklace. The patch test showed strong reactions to the necklace and the azo dyes Disperse Orange 1 and Disperse Yellow 3. Despite the European legislation and the reduced use of disperse dyes in Third World countries, disperse azo dyes still induce new cases of allergic contact dermatitis.

  7. Possibilities and applications of smart textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotari Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of creating of new clothing products, the designers choose textiles which have: appearance, comfort, durability, shape retention, protection from bad weather, etc. These aspects not fully satisfy the new factors, such automatic regulation of body temperature; signs of heart attack; fever and others. Smart textiles possess such advanced properties. The functionality of smart textiles consists in informing, protecting and relaxing the wearer. In this research, we approached and revealed the application of e-textile materials and their importance in clothing. The research methodology consists in the efficacy of applying Cu wires to the fabric and the result obtained. The results obtained are positive and they are revealed in the research.

  8. Green piezoelectric for autonomous smart textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, E.; Borsa, C. J.; Briand, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the fabrication of Rochelle salt based piezoelectric textiles are shown. Structures composed of fibers and Rochelle salt are easily produced using green processes. Both manufacturing and the material itself are really efficient in terms of environmental impact, considering the fabrication processes and the material resources involved. Additionally Rochelle salt is biocompatible. In this green paradigm, active sensing or actuating textiles are developed. Thus processing method and piezoelectric properties have been studied: (1) pure crystals are used as acoustic actuator, (2) fabrication of the textile-based composite is detailed, (3) converse effective d33 is evaluated and compared to lead zirconate titanate ceramic. The utility of textile-based piezoelectric merits its use in a wide array of applications.

  9. Total design for textile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafirova Koleta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Product development is less than 20-30 years old and a relatively new area of research compared to the other classic academic disciplines. Integrated product development is a philosophy that systematically employs the teaming of functional disciplines to integrate and concurrently apple all the necessary processes to produce an effective and efficient product that satisfies customer needs. Product development might also be understood as a multidisciplinary field of research. The disciplines directly participating in product development include engineering design, innovation, manufacturing, marketing and management. A background contribution is also generated by disciplines such as psychology, social sciences and information technology. This article is an overview that introduces this philosophy to textile product development.

  10. Quality in primary health care services in sub-Sahara Africa: right or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Primary Health Care (PHC) system has been the foundation for the operation of the health system in most of Sub-Sahara Africa following the Alma Ata Declaration in 1978. Quality of care is an important determinant of health services utilization, and is a health outcome of public health importance. It is known that the ...

  11. Green Sahara impact on mid-latitudes during mid-Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Marco; Messori, Gabriele; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Zhang, Qiong

    2017-04-01

    In the mid-Holocene (6 kyr before present), North Africa was characterised by a vegetated Sahara and a stronger summer monsoon, resulting in a wetter climate. These conditions, induced by the different Earth's orbital parameters, and maintained by the precipitation-vegetation feedback, were associated with a substantial change of the regional atmospheric dynamics, with influences extending across the global Tropics and beyond. In this study, we explore the mid-latitude response to the vegetated Sahara in the mid-Holocene. We use the EC-Earth climate model to simulate the North African environment during mid-Holocene, i.e. extensive vegetation over the Sahara, and a consequent reduced dust emission. Vegetation and dust reduction are prescribed both in combination and in isolation, to determine the specific responses to the individual forcings. A significant response at mid-latitudes is simulated during boreal summer, when the precipitation-vegetation feedback is maximum in the Sahara. Results show increased precipitation over Mediterranean and Middle East, and warm anomalies across western Europe. This response is associated with the modification of the atmospheric circulation in the Euro-Atlantic sector. Specifically, the intensification of the subtropical jetstream favours precipitation across the Middle East, while a positive anomaly in the North Atlantic Oscillation leads the warming further west. These results suggest important implications for the understanding of future climate scenarios in the region, since a number of simulations project wetter conditions in North Africa.

  12. Hibiscus plant named `Sahara Sunset` U.S. Plant Patent 21,765

    Science.gov (United States)

    'Sahara Sunset' is a new and distinct cultivar of Hibiscus, botanically known as Hibiscus acetosella. The new Hibiscus was originated in Poplarville, Miss. and is a product of a mutation induction program. The parent of the present new cultivar is an unknown Hibiscus acetosella Wels. Ex Hiern seedli...

  13. Sud du Sahara | Page 59 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    flexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layout. Sud du Sahara. According to the International Land Coalition, between 2000 and 2010, foreign actors and country elites acquired an estimated 83 million hectares through large-scale land ...

  14. Alternate non-stop migration strategies of pied flycatchers to cross the Sahara desert

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, Janne; Both, Christiaan

    Each year more than two billion songbirds cross the Sahara, but how they perform this formidable task is largely unknown. Using geolocation tracks from 27 pied flycatchers, a nocturnally migrating passerine, we show that most birds made diurnal flights in both autumn and spring. These diurnal

  15. Le Sahara marocain : désenclavement et développement durable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EL MAHJOUB CHMOURK

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Moroccan Sahara: opening-up and sustainable development. The enclosing of the Moroccan Sahara results from the inversion and old situation. Indeed, during a very long time, the area was a way of passage, a platform in the south of Morocco. In testify the Tran-Saharan commercial routes, which were the main transportation routes back in time, like the goal of integration of the area in the country and compared to western Africa. It is with the economic crisis, and even a political crisis causing a fold on itself of this area until 1975.Since Sahara belongs to Morocco, it still profits a considerable public effort to carry out its opening-up and its economic insertion within the country. Massive investments carried out by the State give to the area the structuring which it missed. Which are the aspects of the Sahara development? Which role played the State in this development? The intervention of the State contributes to bring effective solutions to the problem of the opening-up of this surrounding space?

  16. Reconstruction of exposure histories of meteorites from Antarctica and the Sahara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupert, U.; Neumann, S.; Leya, I.; Michel, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Zentraleinrichtung fuer Strahlenschutz (ZfS); Kubik, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Bonani, G.; Hajdas, I.; Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, and {sup 26}Al were analyzed in H-, L-, and LL-chondrites from the Acfer region in the Algerian Sahara and from the Allan Hills/Antarctica. Exposure histories and terrestrial ages could be determined. (author) 3 figs., 2 refs.

  17. Equity in access to ARV drugs in Malawi | Ntata | SAHARA-J ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAHARA Journal Mission Statement The journal publishes contributions in English and French from all fields of social aspects of HIV/AIDS (care, support, ... culture, faith-based approaches, evidence-based intervention, health communication, structural and environmental intervention, financing, policy, media, etc).

  19. TEXTILE IMPACT PLATES FOR NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VISILEANU Emilia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents textile materials with destination impact plates, having different surface architectures and active treatments for functionalization, with influence upon the aging process of nano-Ag and nano-CeO2. The woven and knitted samples from 100% cotton, cotton/PES blend and 100% PES were treated by impregnation on the laboratory padding machine, drying and condensing on the machine for drying-condensing-heat setting, with the following recipes: 50g/l RUCOSTAR EEE6+20 ml 5% nano-Ag dispersion, or 10% nano-CeO2 in ethylene glycol, respectively water and 0,5ml acetic acid 60% for products from 100% cotton and PES/cotton and 50g/l NUVA N 2114 liquid with the same percent of nanoparticles but with 1 ml/l acetic acid 60%, in case of 100% PES samples. The samples were treated in 2 steps – hydrophobic/ oleo phobic in the first stage and hydrophobic/ oleo phobic/ functionalization with nano-Ag and nano-CeO2 in the second stage. The complex characterization of both type of materials : hydrophobic and oleo phobic properties, color change, whitening degree, DCS, FT-IR, SEM and microbiology, evidenced through the obtained results the justness of the selection for: the raw materials (100% cotton, cotton/PES, 100% PES, the weave (plain, twill, rib, pique, the fabric tightness and fabric cover etc. These data allowed the elaboration of textile material’s specifications for impact plates.

  20. Biofouling control of industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Albloushi, Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    The use of seawater in cooling towers for industrial applications has much merit in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries due to the scarcity and availability of fresh water. Seawater make-up in cooling towers is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in coastal areas. Such latent-heat removal with seawater in cooling towers is several folds more efficient than sensible heat extraction via heat exchangers. Operational challenges such as scaling, corrosion, and biofouling are a major challenge in conventional cooling towers, where the latter is also a major issue in seawater cooling towers. Biofouling can significantly hamper the efficiency of cooling towers. The most popular methods used in cooling treatment to control biofouling are disinfection by chlorination. However, the disadvantages of chlorination are formation of harmful disinfection byproducts in the presence of high organic loading and safety concerns in the storage of chlorine gas. In this study, the research focuses on biofouling control in seawater cooling towers by investigating two different approaches. The first strategy addresses the use of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone micro-bubbles and chlorine dioxide) in treatment of cooling towers. The second strategy investigates removing nutrients in seawater using granular activated carbon filter column and ultrafiltration to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Laboratory bench-scale tests in terms of temperature, cycle of concentration, dosage, etc. indicated that, at lower oxidant dosages (total residual oxidant (TRO) equivalent = 0.1 mg/l Cl2), chlorine dioxide had a better disinfection effect than chlorine and ozone. The performance of oxidizing biocides at pilot scale, operating at assorted conditions, showed that for the disinfectants tested, ozone could remove 95 % bioactivity of total number of bacteria and algae followed by chlorine dioxide at 85%, while conventional chlorine dosing only gave 60% reduction in bioactivities

  1. Lakeside Cemeteries in the Sahara: 5000 Years of Holocene Population and Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, Paul C.; Garcea, Elena A. A.; Jousse, Hélène; Stojanowski, Christopher M.; Saliège, Jean-François; Maga, Abdoulaye; Ide, Oumarou A.; Knudson, Kelly J.; Mercuri, Anna Maria; Stafford, Thomas W.; Kaye, Thomas G.; Giraudi, Carlo; N'siala, Isabella Massamba; Cocca, Enzo; Moots, Hannah M.; Dutheil, Didier B.; Stivers, Jeffrey P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Approximately two hundred human burials were discovered on the edge of a paleolake in Niger that provide a uniquely preserved record of human occupation in the Sahara during the Holocene (∼8000 B.C.E. to the present). Called Gobero, this suite of closely spaced sites chronicles the rapid pace of biosocial change in the southern Sahara in response to severe climatic fluctuation. Methodology/Principal Findings Two main occupational phases are identified that correspond with humid intervals in the early and mid-Holocene, based on 78 direct AMS radiocarbon dates on human remains, fauna and artifacts, as well as 9 OSL dates on paleodune sand. The older occupants have craniofacial dimensions that demonstrate similarities with mid-Holocene occupants of the southern Sahara and Late Pleistocene to early Holocene inhabitants of the Maghreb. Their hyperflexed burials compose the earliest cemetery in the Sahara dating to ∼7500 B.C.E. These early occupants abandon the area under arid conditions and, when humid conditions return ∼4600 B.C.E., are replaced by a more gracile people with elaborated grave goods including animal bone and ivory ornaments. Conclusions/Significance The principal significance of Gobero lies in its extraordinary human, faunal, and archaeological record, from which we conclude the following: The early Holocene occupants at Gobero (7700–6200 B.C.E.) were largely sedentary hunter-fisher-gatherers with lakeside funerary sites that include the earliest recorded cemetery in the Sahara.Principal components analysis of craniometric variables closely allies the early Holocene occupants at Gobero with a skeletally robust, trans-Saharan assemblage of Late Pleistocene to mid-Holocene human populations from the Maghreb and southern Sahara.Gobero was abandoned during a period of severe aridification possibly as long as one millennium (6200–5200 B.C.E).More gracile humans arrived in the mid-Holocene (5200–2500 B.C.E.) employing a diversified

  2. Lakeside cemeteries in the Sahara: 5000 years of holocene population and environmental change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Sereno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately two hundred human burials were discovered on the edge of a paleolake in Niger that provide a uniquely preserved record of human occupation in the Sahara during the Holocene ( approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Called Gobero, this suite of closely spaced sites chronicles the rapid pace of biosocial change in the southern Sahara in response to severe climatic fluctuation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two main occupational phases are identified that correspond with humid intervals in the early and mid-Holocene, based on 78 direct AMS radiocarbon dates on human remains, fauna and artifacts, as well as 9 OSL dates on paleodune sand. The older occupants have craniofacial dimensions that demonstrate similarities with mid-Holocene occupants of the southern Sahara and Late Pleistocene to early Holocene inhabitants of the Maghreb. Their hyperflexed burials compose the earliest cemetery in the Sahara dating to approximately 7500 B.C.E. These early occupants abandon the area under arid conditions and, when humid conditions return approximately 4600 B.C.E., are replaced by a more gracile people with elaborated grave goods including animal bone and ivory ornaments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The principal significance of Gobero lies in its extraordinary human, faunal, and archaeological record, from which we conclude the following: The early Holocene occupants at Gobero (7700-6200 B.C.E. were largely sedentary hunter-fisher-gatherers with lakeside funerary sites that include the earliest recorded cemetery in the Sahara.Principal components analysis of craniometric variables closely allies the early Holocene occupants at Gobero with a skeletally robust, trans-Saharan assemblage of Late Pleistocene to mid-Holocene human populations from the Maghreb and southern Sahara.Gobero was abandoned during a period of severe aridification possibly as long as one millennium (6200-5200 B.C.E.More gracile humans arrived in the mid

  3. Unravelling biodiversity, evolution and threats to conservation in the Sahara-Sahel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, José C; Godinho, Raquel; Martínez-Freiría, Fernando; Pleguezuelos, Juan M; Rebelo, Hugo; Santos, Xavier; Vale, Cândida G; Velo-Antón, Guillermo; Boratyński, Zbyszek; Carvalho, Sílvia B; Ferreira, Sónia; Gonçalves, Duarte V; Silva, Teresa L; Tarroso, Pedro; Campos, João C; Leite, João V; Nogueira, Joana; Alvares, Francisco; Sillero, Neftalí; Sow, Andack S; Fahd, Soumia; Crochet, Pierre-André; Carranza, Salvador

    2014-02-01

    Deserts and arid regions are generally perceived as bare and rather homogeneous areas of low diversity. The Sahara is the largest warm desert in the world and together with the arid Sahel displays high topographical and climatic heterogeneity, and has experienced recent and strong climatic oscillations that have greatly shifted biodiversity distribution and community composition. The large size, remoteness and long-term political instability of the Sahara-Sahel, have limited knowledge on its biodiversity. However, over the last decade, there have been an increasing number of published scientific studies based on modern geomatic and molecular tools, and broad sampling of taxa of these regions. This review tracks trends in knowledge about biodiversity patterns, processes and threats across the Sahara-Sahel, and anticipates needs for biodiversity research and conservation. Recent studies are changing completely the perception of regional biodiversity patterns. Instead of relatively low species diversity with distribution covering most of the region, studies now suggest a high rate of endemism and larger number of species, with much narrower and fragmented ranges, frequently limited to micro-hotspots of biodiversity. Molecular-based studies are also unravelling cryptic diversity associated with mountains, which together with recent distribution atlases, allows identifying integrative biogeographic patterns in biodiversity distribution. Mapping of multivariate environmental variation (at 1 km × 1 km resolution) of the region illustrates main biogeographical features of the Sahara-Sahel and supports recently hypothesised dispersal corridors and refugia. Micro-scale water-features present mostly in mountains have been associated with local biodiversity hotspots. However, the distribution of available data on vertebrates highlights current knowledge gaps that still apply to a large proportion of the Sahara-Sahel. Current research is providing insights into key

  4. Characterization of Textile-Insulated Capacitive Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charn Loong; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2017-01-01

    Capacitive biosensors are an emerging technology revolutionizing wearable sensing systems and personal healthcare devices. They are capable of continuously measuring bioelectrical signals from the human body while utilizing textiles as an insulator. Different textile types have their own unique properties that alter skin-electrode capacitance and the performance of capacitive biosensors. This paper aims to identify the best textile insulator to be used with capacitive biosensors by analysing the characteristics of 6 types of common textile materials (cotton, linen, rayon, nylon, polyester, and PVC-textile) while evaluating their impact on the performance of a capacitive biosensor. A textile-insulated capacitive (TEX-C) biosensor was developed and validated on 3 subjects. Experimental results revealed that higher skin-electrode capacitance of a TEX-C biosensor yields a lower noise floor and better signal quality. Natural fabric such as cotton and linen were the two best insulating materials to integrate with a capacitive biosensor. They yielded the lowest noise floor of 2 mV and achieved consistent electromyography (EMG) signals measurements throughout the performance test. PMID:28287493

  5. Characterization of Textile-Insulated Capacitive Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charn Loong; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2017-03-12

    Capacitive biosensors are an emerging technology revolutionizing wearable sensing systems and personal healthcare devices. They are capable of continuously measuring bioelectrical signals from the human body while utilizing textiles as an insulator. Different textile types have their own unique properties that alter skin-electrode capacitance and the performance of capacitive biosensors. This paper aims to identify the best textile insulator to be used with capacitive biosensors by analysing the characteristics of 6 types of common textile materials (cotton, linen, rayon, nylon, polyester, and PVC-textile) while evaluating their impact on the performance of a capacitive biosensor. A textile-insulated capacitive (TEX-C) biosensor was developed and validated on 3 subjects. Experimental results revealed that higher skin-electrode capacitance of a TEX-C biosensor yields a lower noise floor and better signal quality. Natural fabric such as cotton and linen were the two best insulating materials to integrate with a capacitive biosensor. They yielded the lowest noise floor of 2 mV and achieved consistent electromyography (EMG) signals measurements throughout the performance test.

  6. Greensilica® vectors for smart textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Joana C; Avelar, Inês; Martins, M Bárbara F; Gonçalves, M Clara

    2017-01-20

    The present work aims developing a versatile Greensilica® vector/carrier, able to bind to a wide range of textile matrices of carbohydrate polymers and susceptible of being loaded with chemicals/drugs/therapeutic molecules, to create a green tailor-made (multi)functional high-tech textile. A green, eco-friendly, ammonia-free, easily scalable, time-saving sol-gel process was established for the production of those silica-based colloidal particles (SiO2, amine-SiO2, diamine-SiO2, and epoxy-SiO2). Two different textile matrices (cotton, polyester) were functionalized, through the impregnation of Greensilica® particles. The impregnation was performed with and without cure. Diamine-SiO2 colloidal particles exhibited the higher bonding efficiency in cured textile matrices (both cotton and polyester), while with no cure the best adherence to cotton and polyester textile matrices was achieved with diamine-SiO2 and amine-SiO2, respectively. Use once and throw away and continued use applications were envisaged and screened through washing tests. The efficiency of the textiles impregnation was confirmed by SEM, and quantified by ICP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UROŠEVIĆ Snežana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is a very important industrial branch because it produces clothes for nearly seven billion people and textile materials for technical usage. It employs a huge number of competitive and qualified, mostly female work force. It is also technologically and technically challenging. Thus, it is vital to employ qualified and well trained employees with certain competences, knowledge and skills in order to respond to rapid technological and market changes. Here, we will consider the influence of the career development on doing business in the textile industry while acquiring the competitive advantage. Career development is a lifelong process and it is includes knowledge management. The term career has several meanings while nowadays it can mean advancement. The career usually reflects the professional development path of an individual during his or her working career. The career is that concept which connects and unifies most strongly and explicitly individual and organizational interests and needs. The theoretical part explains terms such as career development, importance and improvement of employees for an organization, the possibility for career development within the textile industry. The second part of the paper deals with research conducted among the employees of the textile sector in Leskovac, the town in Serbia with a long-lasting textile tradition.

  8. Research and development in the textile industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1987-06-01

    Included in the portfolio of IP's projects are the R and D activities for several advanced technologies targeted at the textile industry, one of the top ten energy intensive industries in the country. These R and D projects have primarily been aimed at improving the energy efficiency and productivity of textile production processes. Many projects in this area have been successfully completed, and some have resulted in the development and implementation of new technologies (e.g., foam processing) for various process steps. Other projects have produced technical results that have later been utilized by the industry in other capacities (e.g., hyperfiltration). Several projects at various stages of development are currently underway. This brochure describes the Office of Industrial Programs' R and D activities relevant to the textile industry. The brochure is comprised of the following: Industry Update, Energy Consumption in the Textile Industry, Energy Consumption in the Textile Industry, Potential Energy Savings in the Textile Industry, Office of Industrial Programs, R and D Efforts, and R and D Data Base.

  9. Wearable electronics formed on intermediate layer on textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-07-27

    One manner of producing more desirable clothing with electronic capabilities is to manufacture electronics, such as the charging wires or devices themselves, directly onto the textile materials. Textile materials generally do not support the manufacturing of electronic devices, in part because the surface of the textile is too rough for electronic devices or the processes used to manufacturing electronic devices. An intermediate layer (204) may be placed on the textile material (202) to reduce the roughness of the surface of the textile material and provide other beneficial characteristics for the placement of electronic devices (206) directly on the textile material.

  10. Resource Communication Technology and Marketing of Textile Products: A U.S. Textile Industry Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baah, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the qualitative positivistic case study was to explore whether resource communication technology has helped or would help the marketing of textile products in the U.S. textile industry. The contributions of human capital in the marketing department, the marketing-demand information system function, and the product supply chain…

  11. Biologically mediated dissolution of volcanic glass in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudigel, H; Yayanos, A; Chastain, R; Davies, G.T.; Verdurmen, E.A Th; Schiffmann, P; Bourcier, R; de Baar, H.J.W.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effects of biological mediation on the dissolution of basaltic glass in seawater. Experiments with typical seawater microbial populations were contrasted with a sterile control, and reactions were monitored chemically and isotopically. Biologically mediated experiments produce twice

  12. The Index of Refraction of Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    performed their uiesuremerts or presented their results in a manner which, at least superficially , was incompatible with those provided iy others. A...index of refraction of seawater as a function of temperatura and chlorinity was Undertaken by Utterback, Thompson, and Thomas (1934) wh: conducted

  13. Mesoscale spatial variability in seawater cavitation thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, N. P.; Elistratov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents the spatial variability of cavitation thresholds and some hydrological and hydrochemical parameters of seawater in the interfrontal zone of the Pacific Subarctic Front, in the Drake Passage, and in the equatorial part of the Pacific Ocean, measured in the near-surface layer to a depth of 70 m.

  14. Thermoresponsive magnetic nanoparticles for seawater desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qipeng; Chen, Ningping; Zhao, Dieling; Lu, Xianmao

    2013-11-13

    Thermoresponsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a class of smart materials that respond to a change in temperature may by used as a draw solute to extract water from brackish or seawater by forward osmosis (FO). A distinct advantage is the efficient regeneration of the draw solute and the recovery of water via heat-facilitated magnetic separation. However, the osmotic pressure attained by this type of draw solution is too low to counteract that of seawater. In this work, we have designed a FO draw solution based on multifunctional Fe3O4 nanoparticles grafted with copolymer poly(sodium styrene-4-sulfonate)-co-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PSSS-PNIPAM). The resulting regenerable draw solution shows high osmotic pressure for seawater desalination. This is enabled by three essential functional components integrated within the nanostructure: (i) a Fe3O4 core that allows magnetic separation of the nanoparticles from the solvent, (ii) a thermoresponsive polymer, PNIPAM, that enables reversible clustering of the particles for further improved magnetic capturing at a temperature above its low critical solution temperature (LCST), and (iii) a polyelectrolyte, PSSS, that provides an osmotic pressure that is well above that of seawater.

  15. Changes in Escherichia coli cells starved in seawater or grown in seawater-wastewater mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, P M; Gauthier, M J; Laumond, F M

    1987-07-01

    Some metabolic modifications of Escherichia coli cells during starvation in seawater were studied in laboratory microcosms. The apparent die-off of this bacterium under such conditions, as observed by comparing the enumeration of CFU in conventional freshwater media and direct epifluorescence counts, was partially prevented when cells were previously grown in salted organic medium or on seawater-wastewater agar. beta-Galactosidase activity of starved cells disappeared gradually with time, even though some other enzymatic activities, such as that of alkaline phosphatase, increased. Moreover, some modifications of sensitivity to antibiotics, heavy metals, and bacteriophages in seawater- and wastewater-grown cells suggested that the cells undergo structural changes under natural marine conditions. These results provide additional experimental data indicating the possible active adaptation of E. coli cells to seawater.

  16. Changes in Escherichia coli cells starved in seawater or grown in seawater-wastewater mixtures.

    OpenAIRE

    Munro, P M; Gauthier, M J; Laumond, F M

    1987-01-01

    Some metabolic modifications of Escherichia coli cells during starvation in seawater were studied in laboratory microcosms. The apparent die-off of this bacterium under such conditions, as observed by comparing the enumeration of CFU in conventional freshwater media and direct epifluorescence counts, was partially prevented when cells were previously grown in salted organic medium or on seawater-wastewater agar. beta-Galactosidase activity of starved cells disappeared gradually with time, eve...

  17. Secular decline of seawater calcium increases seawater buffering and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, M.; Sigman, D. M.; Higgins, J. A.; Haug, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model (Millero and Pierrot, 1998) to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] (Hain et al., 2015). We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increase in seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  18. Coping with arsenic-based pesticides on Dine (Navajo) textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jae R.

    Arsenic-based pesticide residues have been detected on Arizona State Museum's (ASM) Dine (Navajo) textile collection using a handheld portable X-ray (pXRF) spectrometer. The removal of this toxic pesticide from historic textiles in museums collections is necessary to reduce potential health risks to Native American communities, museum professionals, and visitors. The research objective was divided into three interconnected stages: (1) empirically calibrate the pXRF instrument for arsenic contaminated cotton and wool textiles; (2) engineer an aqueous washing treatment exploring the effects of time, temperature, agitation, and pH conditions to efficiently remove arsenic from wool textiles while minimizing damage to the structure and properties of the textile; (3) demonstrate the devised aqueous washing treatment method on three historic Navajo textiles known to have arsenic-based pesticide residues. The preliminary results removed 96% of arsenic from a high arsenic concentration (~1000 ppm) textile opposed to minimal change for low arsenic concentration textiles (<100 ppm).

  19. Submicrometre particle filtration with a dc activated plasma textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasipuram, S. C.; Wu, M.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Levine, J. F.; Jasper, W. J.; Saveliev, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma textiles are novel fabrics incorporating the advantages of cold plasma and low-cost non-woven or woven textile fabrics. In plasma textiles, electrodes are integrated into the fabric, and a corona discharge is activated within and on the surface of the fabric by applying high voltages above 10 kV between the electrodes. When the plasma textile is activated, submicrometre particles approaching the textile are charged by the deposition of ions and electrons produced by the corona, and then collected by the textile material. A stable plasma discharge was experimentally verified on the surface of the textile that was locally smooth but not rigid. A filtration efficiency close to 100% was observed in experiments conducted on salt particles with diameters ranging from 50 to 300 nm. Unlike conventional fibrous filters, the plasma textile provided uniform filtration in this range, without exhibiting a maximum particle penetration size.

  20. Seed viability and germination success of Acacia tortilis along land‐use and aridity gradients in the Eastern Sahara

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andersen, Gidske Leknæs; Krzywinski, Knut; Gjessing, Håkon K; Pierce, Richard Holton

    2016-01-01

    Our study focuses on the keystone species A cacia tortilis and is the first to investigate the effect of domestic ungulates and aridity on seed viability and germination over an extensive part of the Eastern Sahara...

  1. The Sahara as a Large-Scale Mars Analogue and the Activities of the Ibn Battuta Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ori, G. G.; Dell'Arciprete, I.; Taj Eddine, K.

    2014-07-01

    Sahara has experienced during its long geological history a large number of climatic changes from humid conditions similar to the climatic changes occurred on Mars. Consequently depositional systems show similar depositional patterns.

  2. Properties of Matter of Awa Textile from Linden Bark

    OpenAIRE

    宮本, 栞; 山下, そのみ

    2003-01-01

    The fabric structure, the mechanical properties and the sanitary properties of Awa textile from linden bark were compared with those of shirting and linen cloth. The form of fiber of weaving yarns of Awa textile from linden bark was observed by a scanning electron microscope. The change in whiteness of Awa textile with washing times through colorimetry. The results obtained were as followed. 1) Awa textile resembled linen cloth in the fiber surface and shirting in the fiber cross section. But...

  3. Methods for waste waters treatment in textile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Zezova, Silvana; Spasova, Sanja; Golomeova, Saska

    2014-01-01

    The processes of production of textiles or wet treatments and finishing processes of textile materials are huge consumers of water with high quality. As a result of these various processes, considerable amounts of polluted water are released. This paper puts emphasis on the problem of environmental protection against waste waters generated by textile industry. The methods of pretreatment or purification of waste waters in the textile industry can be: Primary (screening, sedimentation, homo...

  4. Electrical Textile Valves for Paper Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainla, Alar; Hamedi, Mahiar M; Güder, Firat; Whitesides, George M

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes electrically-activated fluidic valves that operate based on electrowetting through textiles. The valves are fabricated from electrically conductive, insulated, hydrophobic textiles, but the concept can be extended to other porous materials. When the valve is closed, the liquid cannot pass through the hydrophobic textile. Upon application of a potential (in the range of 100-1000 V) between the textile and the liquid, the valve opens and the liquid penetrates the textile. These valves actuate in less than 1 s, require low energy (≈27 µJ per actuation), and work with a variety of aqueous solutions, including those with low surface tension and those containing bioanalytes. They are bistable in function, and are, in a sense, the electrofluidic analog of thyristors. They can be integrated into paper microfluidic devices to make circuits that are capable of controlling liquid, including autonomous fluidic timers and fluidic logic. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Supercritical water oxidation treatment of textile sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shuzhong; Li, Yanhui; Lu, Jinling; Chen, Senlin; Luo, XingQi

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we studied the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of the textile sludge, the hydrothermal conversion of typical textile compounds and the corrosion properties of stainless steel 316. Moreover, the influence mechanisms of NaOH during these related processes were explored. The results show that decomposition efficiency for organic matter in liquid phase of the textile sludge was improved with the increment of reaction temperature or oxidation coefficient. However, the organic substance in solid phase can be oxidized completely in supercritical water. Serious coking occurred during the high pressure water at 250-450°C for the Reactive Orange 7, while at 300 and 350°C for the polyvinyl alcohol. The addition of NaOH not only accelerated the destruction of organic contaminants in the SCWO reactor, but effectively inhibited the dehydration conversion of textile compounds during the preheating process, which was favorable for the treatment system of textile sludge. The corrosion experiment results indicate that the stainless steel 316 could be competent for the body materials of the reactor and the heat exchangers. Furthermore, there was prominent enhancement of sodium hydroxide for the corrosion resistance of 316 in subcritical water. On the contrary the effect was almost none during SCWO.

  6. Development and characterization of textile batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, M.; Grethe, T.; Schwarz-Pfeiffer, A.; Ehrmann, A.

    2017-02-01

    During the past years, smart textiles have gained more and more attention. Products cover a broad range of possible applications, from fashion items such as LED garments to sensory shirts detecting vital signs to clothes with included electrical stimulation of muscles. For all electrical or electronic features included in garments, a power supply is needed - which is usually the bottleneck in the development of smart textiles, since common power supplies are not flexible and often not lightweight, prohibiting their unobtrusive integration in electronic textiles. In a recent project, textile-based batteries are developed. For this, metallized woven fabrics (e.g. copper, zinc, or silver) are used in combinations with carbon fabrics. The article gives an overview of our recent advances in optimizing power storage capacity and durability of the textile batteries by tailoring the gel-electrolyte. The gel-electrolyte is modified with respect to thickness and electrolyte concentration; additionally, the influence of additives on the long-time stability of the batteries is examined.

  7. Dermatophyte susceptibility varies towards antimicrobial textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Timo R; Mucha, Helmut; Hoefer, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Dermatophytoses are a widespread problem worldwide. Textiles in contact with infected skin can serve as a carrier for fungus propagation. Hitherto, it is unknown, whether antifungal textiles could contribute in controlling dermatophytes e.g. by disrupting the chain of infection. Testing of antimicrobial fabrics for their antifungal activities therefore is a fundamental prerequisite to assess the putative clinical relevance of textiles for dermatophyte prevention. Fabrics finished with either didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), poly-hexamethylenbiguanide, copper and two silver chloride concentrations were tested for their antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Candida albicans. To prove dermatophyte susceptibility towards the textiles, swatches were subjected to DIN EN 14199 (Trichophyton sp.) or DIN EN ISO 20743 (C. albicans) respectively. In addition, samples were embedded, and semi-thin sections were analysed microscopically. While all samples showed a clear inhibition of C. albicans, activity against Trichophyton sp. varied significantly: For example, DDAC completely inhibited T. rubrum growth, whereas T. mentagrophytes growth remained unaffected even in direct contact to the fibres. The results favour to add T. mentagrophytes as a test organism in textile dermatophyte efficacy tests. Microscopic analysis of swatches allowed detailed evaluation of additional parameters like mycelium thickness, density and hyphae penetration depth into the fabric. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. TEXTILE SURFACE MODIFICATION BY PYHSICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION – (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUCE Ismail

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile products are used in various branches of the industry from automotive to space products. Textiles produced for industrial use are generally referred to as technical textiles. Technical textiles are nowadays applied to several areas including transportation, medicine, agriculture, protection, sports, packaging, civil engineering and industry. There are rapid developments in the types of materials used in technical textiles. Therefore, modification and functionalization of textile surfaces is becoming more crucial. The improvements of the properties such as anti-bacterial properties, fire resistivity, UV radiation resistance, electrical conductivity, self cleaning, and super hydrophobic, is getting more concern with respect to developments in textile engineering. The properties of textile surfaces are closely related to the fiber structure, the differences in the polymer composition, the fiber mixture ratio, and the physical and chemical processes applied. Textile surface modifications can be examined in four groups under the name mechanical, chemical, burning and plasma. Surface modifications are made to improve the functionality of textile products. Textile surface modifications affect the properties of the products such as softness, adhesion and wettability. The purpose of this work is to reveal varieties of vapor deposition modifications to improve functionality. For this purpose, the pyhsical vapor deposition methods, their affects on textile products and their end-uses will be reviewed.

  9. Failure modes of conducting yarns in electronic-textile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M. de; Vries, H. de; Pacheco, K.; Heck, G. van

    2015-01-01

    Integration of electronic functionalities into textiles adds to the value of textiles. It allows measuring, detecting, actuating and treating or communicating with a body or object. These added values can render the smart textiles very useful, fun, supporting, protecting or even lifesaving. It is,

  10. Aerobic Bacterial degraders in effluent from Itoku textile industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The local textile industry in Itokun village is one major textile industry in Abeokuta Ogun state, known for “adire” production whose processes are not maintained at regulatory standards. This study involves isolating and identifying aerobic microorganisms in waste water effluents from this textile Industry and screening for ...

  11. Nettle as a distinct Bronze Age textile plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergfjord, C.; Mannering, Ulla; Frei, Karin Margarita

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the production of plant fibre textiles in ancient Europe, especially woven textiles for clothing, was closely linked to the development of agriculture through the use of cultivated textile plants (flax, hemp). Here we present a new investigation of the 2800 year old...

  12. Woven sculptural piece as added dimension to textile design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Woven sculptural piece as added dimension to textile design. ... Mgbakoigba: Journal of African Studies ... However, if adequate attention is given to it, it can be combined with other textile materials, independently to create desirable design, which can compete favorably in the international textile and arts market. Keywords: ...

  13. 19 CFR 11.12b - Labeling textile fiber products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling textile fiber products. 11.12b Section 11... THE TREASURY PACKING AND STAMPING; MARKING Marking § 11.12b Labeling textile fiber products. (a) Textile fiber products imported into the United States shall be labeled or marked in accordance with the...

  14. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.12 Trimmings of household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household...

  15. 19 CFR 10.771 - Textile or apparel goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile or apparel goods. 10.771 Section 10.771... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.771 Textile or apparel goods. (a) De minimis. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, a textile or apparel good that is not an originating good under the MFTA...

  16. 19 CFR 102.21 - Textile and apparel products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel products. 102.21 Section 102... THE TREASURY RULES OF ORIGIN Rules of Origin § 102.21 Textile and apparel products. (a) Applicability... control the determination of the country of origin of imported textile and apparel products for purposes...

  17. 19 CFR 10.811 - Textile or apparel goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile or apparel goods. 10.811 Section 10.811... Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.811 Textile or apparel goods. (a) De minimis—(1) General. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a textile or apparel good that is not an originating good under...

  18. Multilevel modelling of mechanical properties of textile composites: ITOOL Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broucke, Bjorn; Drechsler, Klaus; Hanisch, Vera; Hartung, Daniel; Ivanov, Dimitry S.; Koysin, V.; Lomov, Stepan V.; Middendorf, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the multi-level modelling of textile composites in the ITOOL project, focusing on the models of textile reinforcements, which serve as a basis for micromechanical models of textile composites on the unit cell level. The modelling is performed using finite element

  19. Were rivers flowing across the Sahara during the last interglacial? Implications for human migration through Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Tom J; Ramirez, Jorge A; Barton, Nick; Rogerson, Mike; Brücher, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Human migration north through Africa is contentious. This paper uses a novel palaeohydrological and hydraulic modelling approach to test the hypothesis that under wetter climates c.100,000 years ago major river systems ran north across the Sahara to the Mediterranean, creating viable migration routes. We confirm that three of these now buried palaeo river systems could have been active at the key time of human migration across the Sahara. Unexpectedly, it is the most western of these three rivers, the Irharhar river, that represents the most likely route for human migration. The Irharhar river flows directly south to north, uniquely linking the mountain areas experiencing monsoon climates at these times to temperate Mediterranean environments where food and resources would have been abundant. The findings have major implications for our understanding of how humans migrated north through Africa, for the first time providing a quantitative perspective on the probabilities that these routes were viable for human habitation at these times.

  20. Resource Geopolitics: Cold War Technologies, Global Fertilizers, and the Fate of Western Sahara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camprubí, Lino

    2015-07-01

    When, after years of geological and geophysical exploration, a phosphate mine was discovered at Bu-Craa in 1964, Western Sahara received renewed geopolitical attention. Several countries competing for the control of the world fertilizer market, including Morocco, Spain, France, and the United States, developed diverging strategies to gain control of the mineral. After intense negotiations revolving around the materiality of mining technologies and involving reserve estimations, sabotage, and flexing of diplomatic muscles, Morocco took over the Spanish colony in 1975. While this secured Morocco's place in the world market, it condemned the local population to exile and domination. This article explores three technological stages of the exploitation of phosphate in Western Sahara that underpin the geopolitical history. This perspective yields new visions of cold war technology and postcolonial markets.

  1. Fibrous and textile materials for composite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fangueiro, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the fibers and textiles used in composite materials. It presents both existing technologies currently used in commercial applications and the latest advanced research and developments. It also discusses the different fiber forms and architectures, such as short fibers, unidirectional tows, directionally oriented structures or advanced 2D- and 3D-textile structures that are used in composite materials. In addition, it examines various synthetic, natural and metallic fibers that are used to reinforce polymeric, cementitious and metallic matrices, as well as fiber properties, special functionalities, manufacturing processes, and composite processing and properties. Two entire chapters are dedicated to advanced nanofiber and nanotube reinforced composite materials. The book goes on to highlight different surface treatments and finishes that are applied to improve fiber/matrix interfaces and other essential composite properties. Although a great deal of information about fibers and textile str...

  2. Wearable Textile Electrodes for ECG Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiogram (ECG is one of the most important parameters for monitoring of the physiological state of a person. Currently available systems for ECG monitoring are both stationary and wearable, but the comfort of the monitored person is not at a satisfactory level because these systems are not part of standard clothing. This article is therefore devoted to the development and measurement of wearable textile electrodes for ECG measurement device with high comfort for the user. The electrode material is made of electrically conductive textile. This creates a textile composite that guarantees high comfort for the user while ensuring good quality of ECG measurements. The composite is implemented by a carrier (a T-shirt with flame retardant and sensing electrodes embroidered with yarn based on a mixture of polyester coated with silver nanoparticles and cotton. The electrodes not only provide great comfort but are also antibacterial and antiallergic due to silver nanoparticles.

  3. How Associative Material Characteristics Create Textile Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasling, Karen Marie; Bang, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    and meanings. As educators of future designers we are concerned with teaching students, how to develop and use materials for ‘future design’ in a way that embrace multiple properties, including aesthetic, technical, functional and sustainable concerns. In this study we are specifically concerned......Product design, and especially relevant for this study textiles design, is concerned with designing not only the product itself, but just as much the material, which forms the product. It is further highly relevant that designers relate their materials and product to an existing context...... materials and to reflect on, how personal associations can be embodied in [textile] materials. The discussion and results of the study stressed the coherence and differences of textile techniques used to express the given keywords and how the assignment has influenced the students’ material practice. How...

  4. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeki Matsunaga

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence o...

  5. Oil droplets as light absorbents in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otremba, Zbigniew

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents spectra of light absorption coefficient of oil-in-water emulsion, derived using the Mie theory. In order to achieve that concentration of oil, degree of oil dispersion in seawater as well as spectra of light absorption coefficient and refractive index of chosen oils must be known. A significant role of the size distribution of oil droplets has been revealed: light absorption coefficient of emulsion increases with the rate of dispersion.

  6. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-12-30

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  7. Implementing Apache Spark jobs execution and Apache Spark cluster creation for Openstack Sahara

    OpenAIRE

    ALEKSIYANTS A.; Borisenko, O.; TURDAKOV D.; Sher, A; Kuznetsov, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the problem of creating virtual clusters in clouds for big data analysis with Apache Hadoop and Apache Spark is discussed. Existing methods for Apache Spark clusters creation are described in this work. Also the implemented solution for building Apache Spark clusters and Apache Spark jobs execution in Openstack environment is described. The implemented solution is a modification for OpenStack Sahara project and it was featured in Openstack Liberty release.

  8. Sud du Sahara | Page 68 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    flexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layout. Sud du Sahara. La persistance de la pauvreté en Afrique subsaharienne, dans le contexte de progression rapide de la mondialisation et de la libéralisation des échanges commerciaux des deux dernières décennies, a suscité énormément de débats en ...

  9. Sud du Sahara | Page 78 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    flexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layout. Sud du Sahara. La persistance de la pauvreté en Afrique subsaharienne, dans le contexte de progression rapide de la mondialisation et de la libéralisation des échanges commerciaux des deux dernières décennies, a suscité énormément de débats en ...

  10. Sud du Sahara | Page 62 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    flexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layoutflexible layout. Sud du Sahara. La persistance de la pauvreté en Afrique subsaharienne, dans le contexte de progression rapide de la mondialisation et de la libéralisation des échanges commerciaux des deux dernières décennies, a suscité énormément de débats en ...

  11. Microbial Diversity of the Hypersaline Sidi Ameur and Himalatt Salt Lakes of the Algerian Sahara

    OpenAIRE

    Boutaiba, Saad; Hacene, Hocine; Bidle, Kelly A.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial populations within hypersaline lakes often exhibit high activities of photosynthesis, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and other processes and, thus, can have profound impacts on biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and other important elements within arid lands. To further understand these types of ecosystems, the physicochemical and biological properties of Sidi Ameur and Himalatt Salt Lakes in the Algerian Sahara were examined and compared. Both lakes were relativel...

  12. Tropical cyclone activity enhanced by Sahara greening and reduced dust emissions during the African Humid Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Emanuel, Kerry A.; Chiacchio, Marc; Diro, Gulilat T.; Zhang, Qiong; Sushama, Laxmi; Stager, J. Curt; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.

    2017-06-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) can have devastating socioeconomic impacts. Understanding the nature and causes of their variability is of paramount importance for society. However, historical records of TCs are too short to fully characterize such changes and paleo-sediment archives of Holocene TC activity are temporally and geographically sparse. Thus, it is of interest to apply physical modeling to understanding TC variability under different climate conditions. Here we investigate global TC activity during a warm climate state (mid-Holocene, 6,000 yBP) characterized by increased boreal summer insolation, a vegetated Sahara, and reduced dust emissions. We analyze a set of sensitivity experiments in which not only solar insolation changes are varied but also vegetation and dust concentrations. Our results show that the greening of the Sahara and reduced dust loadings lead to more favorable conditions for tropical cyclone development compared with the orbital forcing alone. In particular, the strengthening of the West African Monsoon induced by the Sahara greening triggers a change in atmospheric circulation that affects the entire tropics. Furthermore, whereas previous studies suggest lower TC activity despite stronger summer insolation and warmer sea surface temperature in the Northern Hemisphere, accounting for the Sahara greening and reduced dust concentrations leads instead to an increase of TC activity in both hemispheres, particularly over the Caribbean basin and East Coast of North America. Our study highlights the importance of regional changes in land cover and dust concentrations in affecting the potential intensity and genesis of past TCs and suggests that both factors may have appreciable influence on TC activity in a future warmer climate.

  13. Tropical cyclone activity enhanced by Sahara greening and reduced dust emissions during the African Humid Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S R; Emanuel, Kerry A; Chiacchio, Marc; Diro, Gulilat T; Zhang, Qiong; Sushama, Laxmi; Stager, J Curt; Donnelly, Jeffrey P

    2017-06-13

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) can have devastating socioeconomic impacts. Understanding the nature and causes of their variability is of paramount importance for society. However, historical records of TCs are too short to fully characterize such changes and paleo-sediment archives of Holocene TC activity are temporally and geographically sparse. Thus, it is of interest to apply physical modeling to understanding TC variability under different climate conditions. Here we investigate global TC activity during a warm climate state (mid-Holocene, 6,000 yBP) characterized by increased boreal summer insolation, a vegetated Sahara, and reduced dust emissions. We analyze a set of sensitivity experiments in which not only solar insolation changes are varied but also vegetation and dust concentrations. Our results show that the greening of the Sahara and reduced dust loadings lead to more favorable conditions for tropical cyclone development compared with the orbital forcing alone. In particular, the strengthening of the West African Monsoon induced by the Sahara greening triggers a change in atmospheric circulation that affects the entire tropics. Furthermore, whereas previous studies suggest lower TC activity despite stronger summer insolation and warmer sea surface temperature in the Northern Hemisphere, accounting for the Sahara greening and reduced dust concentrations leads instead to an increase of TC activity in both hemispheres, particularly over the Caribbean basin and East Coast of North America. Our study highlights the importance of regional changes in land cover and dust concentrations in affecting the potential intensity and genesis of past TCs and suggests that both factors may have appreciable influence on TC activity in a future warmer climate.

  14. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-09-29

    The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

  15. Projected world market for seawater desalination equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    A forecast is presented of the market for seawater desalination plants. The conclusions presented herein are based on a number of sources of information, of which the most important are: responses to questionnaires mailed to 300 cognizant water agencies in 61 countries; the published market growth trend over the period 1971 to 1983; and an analysis of the geography, rainfall, population, industrial growth, and energy availability in the respective countries. Analysis suggests the possibility that financing, although currently a major stumbling block to the purchase of desalting plants, may be effected by an exchange program in which the purchaser of plants will offer some exportable product(s) in exchange. The forecast suggests the likelihood that the seawater desalination market is becoming saturated. A plateau is expected to develop in new plant sales of additional capacity in the immediate future, followed by a downturn by the end of the century. This report, however, emphasizes the importance of the replacement market, which will involve substantial sales to replace worn-out and obsolescent equipment. The combined new-plus-replacement annual sales can be expected to reach 1.25 million m/sup 3//d (330 Mgd) by the year 2000. Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) is expected to represent 270,000 m/sup 3//d (70 Mgd) by the end of the century because of technological improvements in membrane systems and components.

  16. Drinking water in Cuba and seawater desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneses-Ruiz, E. [CUBAENERGIA, Playa, Havana (Cuba)]. E-mail: emeneses@cien.energia.inf.cu; Turtos-Carbonell, L.M.; Oviedo-Rivero, I. [CUBAENERGIA, Playa, Havana (Cuba)

    2004-07-01

    The lack of drinking water has become a problem at world level because, in many places, supplies are very limited and, in other places, their reserves have been drained. At the present time there are estimated to be around two thousand million people that don't have drinking water for several reasons, such as drought, contamination and the presence of saline waters not suitable for human consumption. Because of the human need for water, they have always taken residence in areas where the supply was guaranteed, sometimes impeding the exploitation of other areas that can be economically very interesting. However, this resource is usually very close and in abundance in the form of seawater but its salinity makes it unusable for many basic requirements. Humanity has been forced, therefore, to take into consideration the possibilities of the economic treatment of seawater. Cuba has regions where the supplies of drinking water are scarce and others where the lack of this resource limits economic exploitation. The present work is approached with regard to the situation of hydro resources in Cuba, it includes: a description of the main hydrographic basins of the country; the contamination levels of the waters and the measures for mitigation; analysis of the supplies and demand for drinking water and its quality; regulatory aspects. The state of seawater desalination in Cuba is also included and the possibility of its realisation using nuclear energy and the advantages that this would bring is evaluated. (author)

  17. Lithium in Brachiopods - proxy for seawater evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspers, Natalie; Magna, Tomas; Tomasovych, Adam; Henkel, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Marine biogenic carbonates have the potential to serve as a proxy for evolution of seawater chemistry. In order to compile a record of the past and recent δ7Li in the oceans, foraminifera shells, scleractinian corals and belemnites have been used. However, only a foraminifera-based record appears to more accurately reflect the Li isotope composition of ocean water. At present, this record is available for the Cenozoic with implications for major events during this period of time, including K/T event [1]. A record for the entire Phanerozoic has not yet been obtained. In order to extend this record to the more distant past, Li elemental/isotope systematics of brachiopods were investigated because these marine animals were already present in Early Cambrian oceans and because they are less sensitive to diagenesis-induced modifications due to their shell mineralogy (low-Mg calcite). The preliminary data indicates a species-, temperature- and salinity-independent behavior of Li isotopes in brachiopod shells. Also, no vital effects have been observed for different shell parts. The consistent offset of -4‰ relative to modern seawater is in accordance with experimental data [2]. Further data are now being collected for Cenozoic specimens to more rigorously test brachiopods as possible archives of past seawater in comparison to the existing foraminiferal records. [1] Misra & Froelich (2012) Science 335, 818-823 [2] Marriott et al. (2004) Chem Geol 212, 5-15

  18. Smart Textiles in Humanistic Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe; Fisker, Anna Marie; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalised patients’ healing process, supported by stimulating architecture. In this regard, we address focus on the potential influence of the design principle, discussing how healing architecture may contribute in making the future hospital institutions more responsive to human needs. The main...... of some of the stakeholders involved in the design process? Relating to the Danish scene of hospital design, we introduce the research project “Smart Textiles in Future Hospitals”, stating the overall hypothesis that textiles in hospital interiors possess an unexploited architectural potential in relation...

  19. A New ‘T’ for Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earley, Rebecca; Vuletich, Clara; Hadridge, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The paper is based on a training programme given to researchers in the Textiles Environment Design (TED) project at the University of the Arts London (UAL). The programme took place over three years (September 2010 to October 2013) whilst the researchers were engaged as consultants and researchers...... sustainable design strategies for textiles and fashion was the framework for the Sustainable Design Inspiration (SDI) work at H&M – a broad and holistic approach to redesigning products including materials, process, systems, services, consumer behaviour and activism....

  20. TEXTILE PATTERNS BASED ON ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ORNAMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElSayed ElNashar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A developed digital collection of textile patterns is presented Iin the report. As objects in this collection designed modern textile prints developed on the basis of elements of ancient Egyptian costume are included. Software tools are developed to obtain colors, shapes and descriptions of the used ancient Egyptian elements. The resulting elements are in vector format, and can be used in CAD systems and spreadsheets. Descriptions of these motifs can be used for comparison with such elements from other national costumes.

  1. Antioxidant cosmeto-textiles: skin assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina; Martí, Meritxell; Martínez, Vanessa; Rubio, Laia; Parra, José L; Coderch, Luisa

    2013-05-01

    Resveratrol, a natural product, has been reported to have antioxidant activities such as the scavenging of free radicals. This compound could be used in the dermocosmetic field to protect the skin from oxidative stress. In this work, the percutaneous profile of resveratrol in ethanol solutions through pig skin was determinated by an in vitro methodology. The percutaneous absorption of resveratrol was measured and compared with trolox, an analogous of Vitamin E. Both antioxidants were found in all skin sections (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis). Besides, the free radical scavenging activity of resveratrol and trolox has been evaluated using DPPH method. The effective dose (ED₅₀) of compounds and DPPH radical inhibition in each skin layer were evaluated. Under the conditions used for these experiments, it can be deduced that resveratrol is more efficient than trolox as an antioxidant, also in the inner skin layers. The cosmeto-textiles with an active substance incorporated into their structure are increasingly used in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. The action of several cosmeto-textiles on the skin was assessed by in vitro and in vivo methodologies. Samples of these cosmeto-textiles were prepared with resveratrol incorporated into cotton and polyamide fabrics. An in vitro percutaneous absorption was used to demonstrate the delivery of the resveratrol from the textile to the different skin layers (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis). Additionally, these cosmeto-textiles containing the antioxidant were applied onto the forearms of volunteers to evaluate the textiles' efficacy in skin penetration. The antioxidant's antiradical capacity was evaluated using the DPPH method. Results showed that resveratrol could be detected in the dermis, epidermis, and stratum corneum (SC) by an in vitro percutaneous absorption method and was also detected in the outermost layers of the SC by an in vivo method (stripping). A smaller amount of resveratrol was

  2. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobials for textile applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Lena; Height, Murray; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Many antimicrobial technologies are available for textiles. They may be used in many different textile applications to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Due to the biological activity of the antimicrobial compounds, the assessment of the safety of these substances is an ongoing subject of research and regulatory scrutiny. This review aims to give an overview on the main compounds used today for antimicrobial textile functionalization. Based on an evaluation of scientific publications, market data as well as regulatory documents, the potential effects of antimicrobials on the environment and on human health were considered and also life cycle perspectives were taken into account. The characteristics of each compound were summarized according to technical, environmental and human health criteria. Triclosan, silane quaternary ammonium compounds, zinc pyrithione and silver-based compounds are the main antimicrobials used in textiles. The synthetic organic compounds dominate the antimicrobials market on a weight basis. On the technical side the application rates of the antimicrobials used to functionalize a textile product are an important parameter with treatments requiring lower dosage rates offering clear benefits in terms of less active substance required to achieve the functionality. The durability of the antimicrobial treatment has a strong influence on the potential for release and subsequent environmental effects. In terms of environmental criteria, all compounds were rated similarly in effective removal in wastewater treatment processes. The extent of published information about environmental behavior for each compound varies, limiting the possibility for an in-depth comparison of all textile-relevant parameters across the antimicrobials. Nevertheless the comparative evaluation showed that each antimicrobial technology has specific risks and benefits that should be taken into account in evaluating the suitability of different antimicrobial products. The

  3. Design Management in the Textile Industry - A Network Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul Rind; Bang, Anne Louise

    In this paper we explore textile design activities and textile design management from an industrial network perspective. The textile industry is probably one of the most globalized manufacturing industries in the world and thus one of the most dispersed industries on the globe. Most studies...... on design management are framed inside the organisational context of the firm. In this study the role and practice of textile design is addressed in perspective of the global textile production network. The empirical data stems from six case studies exploring how different types of enterprises are organised...

  4. Functional textiles driven by transforming NiTi wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heller Luděk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over last ten years, we have carried out extensive research on the use of thin NiTi wires for advanced functional textiles. In this work we discuss general challenges and opportunities in the design, production and processing of NiTi textiles stemming from the fact that NiTi is martensitically transforming metal. As a case example, application of weft knitting technology to NiTi wires is discussed in detail covering technological aspects related to textile processing, shape setting as well as multiaxial thermomechanical properties of final products. Finally, two weft knitted NiTi textile proof-of-concepts with a promising application potential are presented. First, a textile based actuator with large strokes and low forces characteristics is introduced. Second, 3D textiles with temperature-adaptive cross-section height for applications in technical or protective textiles are described.

  5. Role of alginate in antibacterial finishing of textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; He, Jinmei; Huang, Yudong

    2017-01-01

    Antibacterial finishing of textiles has been introduced as a necessary process for various purposes especially creating a fabric with antimicrobial activities. Currently, the textile industry continues to look for textiles antimicrobial finishing process based on sustainable biopolymers from the viewpoints of environmental friendliness, industrialization, and economic concerns. This paper reviews the role of alginate, a sustainable biopolymer, in the development of antimicrobial textiles, including both basic physicochemical properties of alginate such as preparation, chemical structure, molecular weight, solubility, viscosity, and sol-gel transformation property. Then different processing routes (e.g. nanocomposite coating, ionic cross-linking coating, and Layer-by-Layer coating) for the antibacterial finishing of textiles by using alginate are revised in some detail. The achievements in this area have increased our knowledge of alginate application in the field of textile industry and promoted the development of green textile finishing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textiles finished with siloxane sulfopropylbetaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Xiong, Meiling; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a novel environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textile finished with reactive siloxane sulfopropylbetaine(SSPB). The results show that SSPB can be covalently bound onto the cotton textile surface, imparting perdurable antibacterial activity. The textiles finished with SSPB have been investigated systematically from the mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydrophilic properties and antibacterial properties. It is found that the hydrophilicity and breaking strength are improved greatly after the cotton textiles are finished with SSPB. Additionally, the cotton textiles finished with SSPB exhibit good antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus, ATCC 6538), gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E.coli, 8099) and fungi Candida albicans (C.albicans, ATCC 10231). Moreover, SSPB is nonleachable from the textiles, and it does not induce skin stimulation and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is ideal candidate for environmentally friendly antibacterial textile applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. The future of textile production in high wage countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M.; Gloy, Y.-S.; Gries, T.

    2017-10-01

    It is undisputed that smart production in the context of industry 4.0 offers significant potential for industrial production in Germany. Exploiting this potential provides an opportunity to meet the growing competitive pressure for textile production in high-wage Germany. The complete cross-linking of textile mills towards Textile Production 4.0 means substantial savings. However, currently there are still some challenges that have to be overcome on the long way to Textile Production 4.0. This paper initially reflects the particular challenges of textile production in high-wage Germany. Later, the vision of the future of smart textile production will be outlined. In addition, first pilot solutions and current research approaches which pave the way for Textile Production 4.0 are described.

  8. Environmental Assessment of Textile Material Recovery Techniques : Examining Textile Flows in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Youhanan, Lena

    2013-01-01

    The production of textiles, focusing on cotton and polyester, carries with it major environmental concerns such as significant water and chemical use as well as the use of non-renewable resources. Measures need to be taken to decrease those environmental burdens. The present study investigates four different recovery techniques in terms of specific environmental factors. The investigated recovery methods are the Re:newcell method, polyester recycling, textile to insulation material and biogas...

  9. Health Risk Assessment for Organotins in Textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen PJCM; Veen MP van; Speijers GJA; CSR; LBM

    2000-01-01

    In January 1998 RIVM was asked to carry out a preliminary risk assessment on organic tin compounds (organotins) in textiles. Measurements carried out by the Dutch Health Protection Inspectorate had shown these potentially toxic compounds to be present in several consumer products, including items of

  10. Three-Dimensional Printed Thermal Regulation Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tingting; Yang, Zhi; Chen, Chaoji; Li, Yiju; Fu, Kun; Dai, Jiaqi; Hitz, Emily M; Xie, Hua; Liu, Boyang; Song, Jianwei; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-11-01

    Space cooling is a predominant part of energy consumption in people's daily life. Although cooling the whole building is an effective way to provide personal comfort in hot weather, it is energy-consuming and high-cost. Personal cooling technology, being able to provide personal thermal comfort by directing local heat to the thermally regulated environment, has been regarded as one of the most promising technologies for cooling energy and cost savings. Here, we demonstrate a personal thermal regulated textile using thermally conductive and highly aligned boron nitride (BN)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite (denoted as a-BN/PVA) fibers to improve the thermal transport properties of textiles for personal cooling. The a-BN/PVA composite fibers are fabricated through a fast and scalable three-dimensional (3D) printing method. Uniform dispersion and high alignment of BN nanosheets (BNNSs) can be achieved during the processing of fiber fabrication, leading to a combination of high mechanical strength (355 MPa) and favorable heat dispersion. Due to the improved thermal transport property imparted by the thermally conductive and highly aligned BNNSs, better cooling effect (55% improvement over the commercial cotton fiber) can be realized in the a-BN/PVA textile. The wearable a-BN/PVA textiles containing the 3D-printed a-BN/PVA fibers offer a promising selection for meeting the personal cooling requirement, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption and cost for cooling the whole building.

  11. Textile wastewater biocoagulation by Caesalpinia spinosa extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Revelo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2014/12/06 - Accepted: 2015/03/24The textile industry in Ecuador is still a matter of concern because of the inappropriate disposal of their effluents into the local water supply. The present research was carried out in Pelileo (Tungurahua-Ecuador where textile wastewaters are discharged into waterways. An environmentally friendly solution to treat highly contaminated organic textile wastewaters is herein evaluated: a remediation process of biocoagulation was performed using extracts from the Caesalpinia spinosa plant also known as guarango or tara. It was determined that using C. spinosa extracts to treat wastewater has the same statistical effect as when applying a chemical coagulant (polyaluminum chloride 15%. Activated zeolite adsorbed color residuals from treated water to obtain turbidity removal more than 90%. A mathematical model showed that turbidity removal between 50-90% can be obtained by applying 25-45 g/L of guarango extracts and zeolite per 700 mL of textile wastewater. The natural coagulation using C. spinosa extracts produced 85% less sludge than polyaluminum chloride, and removed high organic matter content in the wastewater (1050 mg/L by 52%.

  12. COLOR POLLUTION CONTROL IN TEXTILE DYEING INDUSTRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    E-mail: ssreedharreddy@yahoo.com. COLOR POLLUTION CONTROL IN TEXTILE DYEING INDUSTRY EFFLUENTS. USING TANNERY SLUDGE DERIVED ACTIVATED CARBON. Sajjala Sreedhar Reddy1∗, Bijjam Kotaiah2 and Nanaga Siva Prasad Reddy3. 1Adama University, Faculty of Technology, Post Box No. 1888 ...

  13. Robust fabric substrates for photonic textile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Pieterson, L.; Bouten, P.C.P.; Kriege, J.C.; Bhattacharya, R.

    2010-01-01

    A fabric substrate is described for electronic textile with robust interwoven connections between the conductive yarns in it. The fabric's robustness, as a function of the electrical reliability of its conductive yarn connections, is shown to hold over large deformations.This fabric is then used to

  14. Strain mapping analysis of textile composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, Dimitry; Ivanov, S.; Lomov, Stepan; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the work is meso-scale analysis (scale level of the fabric unit cell) of textile composite deformation and failure. The surface strain measurement is used for: (1) experimental investigation, which includes study of strain distribution at various stages of deformation, plasticity

  15. Masters and Apprentices of Textile Craft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelie Holmberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how the craftsmen at the workroom at Handarbetets vänner, Stockholm, learned their craft skills during the years 1948‒2012. What this knowledge consisted of and how the apprentices’ knowledge grows into skillfulness. Interviews with 15 weavers and embroiderers who have worked during the time period form the empirical material. The period of time was chosen according to the informants´ times of employment.The strategies for learning are affected by dialogue between the craftsmen, both a verbal and a silent dialogue. The dialogue is an important part of the learning even though the making is central. The workroom forms its own way of making textile art, a way of doing that is learned from master to apprentice. In this situated knowledge, the different masters have their own ways of for instance mixing color and material, all corresponding with core values. The learning is also affected by the artistic leader and the artist.The learning within the workroom occurs in the making of objects, but never at the cost of the quality of the objects. The core values of the establishments, and the fact that there is a strive to be profitable, makes the circumstances. The collaboration with the artist in creating unique textile art is the primary goal; the learning is something that is taken for granted in order to withhold the competence in the establishment.Keywords: textile craft, master and apprentice, craftsmen, textile art, workroom

  16. Contactless EMG sensors embroidered into textile

    OpenAIRE

    Linz, Torsten; Gourmelon, L.; Langereis, G.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain maximum unobtrusiveness with sensors for monitoring health parameters on the human body, two technical solutions are combined. First we propose contactless sensors for capacitive electromyography measurements. Secondly, the sensors are integrated into textile, so complete fusion with a wearable garment is enabled. We are presenting the first successful measurements with such sensors.

  17. Textile finishing chemicals: an industrial guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flick, Ernest W

    1990-01-01

    ..., hand modifiers, antistatic agents, biocides, fixatives, scouring agents, leveling agents, dispersants, defoamers, anticracking agents, binders, lubricating agents, stiffeners, and sequestering agents. The chemicals may constitute a substantial portion of the finished textile. In many cases 10% or more of the fabric's final weight may derive fro...

  18. State Skill Standards: Fashion, Textiles and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rene Crepaldi; Gaudy, Glenna; Green-Jobe, Victoria; Hatch, Susan; Moen, Julianne; Sheldon, Shannon; Smith, Loree; Chessell, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The mission of Fashion, Textiles and Design Education is to prepare students for family and community life and careers in the fashion industry by creating opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors needed to: (1) Examine skills needed to effectively manage clothing decisions; (2) Evaluate the use, care and production…

  19. Microbial degradation of textile industrial effluents | Palamthodi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the in situ degradation of textile industrial effluent was carried out. The degradation of two different dyes, blue and green colour has ... The degradation of dye was confirmed via the decolourisation assay and by the measurement of COD and BOD values. A trickling bed reactor was designed and the treatment of ...

  20. Biotechnology In The Mauritian Textile Industry | Kistamah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Mauritius Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1 (1998) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Biotechnology In The Mauritian Textile Industry. N Kistamah, S Rosunee ...

  1. Friction in textile thermoplastic composites forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko; ten Thije, R.H.W.; Sachs, Ulrich; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Binetruy, C.; Boussu, F.

    2010-01-01

    A previously developed mesoscopic friction model for glass/PP textile composite laminates during forming is evaluated for glass and carbon/PPS laminates, at higher temperatures and lower viscosities than before. Experiments were performed for tool/ply and ply/ply configurations in a new friction

  2. Recycling of textiles: the South African scene *

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seugnet

    image of plastics, 1992). Larney et al (1996) recommended that a study should be undertaken to assess the situation regarding the recycling of textiles in South Africa, a study that they undertook shortly afterwards. This study is reported in this article. OBJECTIVES. The specific objectives of the study were to investigate.

  3. NASA CPAS Drogue Textile Riser Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Elsa J.; Petersen, Michael L.; Anderson, Brian; Johnson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Steel cable was chosen for the lower end of the drogue and main parachute risers on NASA's Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) to protect the risers from extreme temperatures and abrasion should they contact the crew module during deployment, as was done for Apollo. Due to the weight and deployment complexity inherent in steel, there was significant interest in the possibility of substituting textile for steel for the drogue and main parachute risers. However, textile risers could be damaged when subjected to high temperature and abrasion. Investigations were consequently performed by a subset of the authors to determine whether sacrificial, non-load-bearing textile riser covers could be developed to mitigate the thermal and abrasion concerns. Multiple material combinations were tested, resulting in a cover design capable of protecting the riser against severe riser/crew module contact interactions. A feasibility study was then conducted to evaluate the performance of the textile drogue riser cover in relevant abrasive environments. This paper describes the testing performed and documents the results of this feasibility study.

  4. Stability of a gold nanoparticle-DNA system in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Il; Lee, Min Hyung; Lee, Jung Heon

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the stability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in seawater. The large amount of Na+, Mg2+, K+, and Ca2+ in seawater makes AuNPs unstable resulting in immediate aggregation. We found that AuNPs become much more stable when they were treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW = 20, 000) before exposure to seawater. The AuNPs maintained stability up to 10 days when they were treated with 16.6% PEG 20000. The AuNP-DNA complex formed in the presence of 3.3% PEG 20000 maintained stability when exposed to seawater. We also demonstrated that the AuNP-DNA complexes can be redispersed after centrifugation and show sequence-specific aggregation in seawater. The results show that the both AuNPs and an AuNP-DNA system can be used in seawater and have the potential to be used to study marine systems.

  5. Enhancement of Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Dietz, Travis [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Tsinas, Zois [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Tomaszewski, Claire [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Pazos, Ileana M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Nigliazzo, Olga [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Li, Weixing [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Adel-Hadadi, Mohamad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Barkatt, Aaron [Univ. of Palermo (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Even at a concentration of 3 μg/L, the world’s oceans contain a thousand times more uranium than currently know terrestrial sources. In order to take advantage of this stockpile, methods and materials must be developed to extract it efficiently, a difficult task considering the very low concentration of the element and the competition for extraction by other atoms in seawater such as sodium, calcium, and vanadium. The majority of current research on methods to extract uranium from seawater are vertical explorations of the grafting of amidoxime ligand, which was originally discovered and promoted by Japanese studies in the late 1980s. Our study expands on this research horizontally by exploring the effectiveness of novel uranium extraction ligands grafted to the surface of polymer substrates using radiation. Through this expansion, a greater understanding of uranium binding chemistry and radiation grafting effects on polymers has been obtained. While amidoxime-functionalized fabrics have been shown to have the greatest extraction efficiency so far, they suffer from an extensive chemical processing step which involves treatment with powerful basic solutions. Not only does this add to the chemical waste produced in the extraction process and add to the method’s complexity, but it also significantly impacts the regenerability of the amidoxime fabric. The approach of this project has been to utilize alternative, commercially available monomers capable of extracting uranium and containing a carbon-carbon double bond to allow it to be grafted using radiation, specifically phosphate, oxalate, and azo monomers. The use of commercially available monomers and radiation grafting with electron beam or gamma irradiation will allow for an easily scalable fabrication process once the technology has been optimized. The need to develop a cheap and reliable method for extracting uranium from seawater is extremely valuable to energy independence and will extend the quantity of

  6. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Matsunaga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  7. Physicochemical properties of protein-modified silver nanoparticles in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hangyue

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the physicochemical properties of silver nanoparticles stabilized with casein protein in seawater. UV?vis spectrometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to measure the stability of silver nanoparticles in seawater samples. The obtained results show an increased aggregation tendency of silver nanoparticles in seawater, which could be attributed its relatively high cation concentration that could neutralize the negatively charges adsorbed on the surface of silver nanoparticles and reduce the electrostatic repulsion forces between nanoparticles. Similarly, due to the surface charge screening process, the zeta potential of silver nanoparticles in seawater decreased. This observation further supported the aggregation behavior of silver nanoparticles. This study also investigated the dissolution of silver nanoparticles in seawater. Result shows that the silver nanoparticle dissolution in DI water is lower than in seawater, which is attributed to the high Cl? concentration present in seawater. As Cl? can react with silver and form soluble AgCl complex, dissolution of silver nanoparticles was enhanced. Finally, this study demonstrated that silver nanoparticles are destabilized in seawater condition. These results may be helpful in understanding the environmental risk of discharged silver nanoparticles in seawater conditions.

  8. Corrosion and Protection of Metal in the Seawater Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiangyu; Gao, Lili; Cui, Zhendong; Yin, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    Seawater desalination develops rapid for it can solve water scarcity efficiently. However, corrosion problem in the seawater desalination system is more serious than that in normal water. So, it is important to pay attention to the corrosion and protection of metal in seawater desalination. The corrosion characteristics and corrosion types of metal in the seawater desalination system are introduced in this paper; In addition, corrosion protect methods and main influencing factors are stated, the latest new technologies about anti-corrosion with quantum energy assisted and magnetic inhibitor are presented.

  9. Buffer Capacity, Ecosystem Feedbacks, and Seawater Chemistry under Global Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Toonen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA results in reduced seawater pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag, but also reduced seawater buffer capacity. As buffer capacity decreases, diel variation in seawater chemistry increases. However, a variety of ecosystem feedbacks can modulate changes in both average seawater chemistry and diel seawater chemistry variation. Here we model these effects for a coastal, reef flat ecosystem. We show that an increase in offshore pCO2 and temperature (to 900 µatm and + 3 °C can increase diel pH variation by as much as a factor of 2.5 and can increase diel pCO2 variation by a factor of 4.6, depending on ecosystem feedbacks and seawater residence time. Importantly, these effects are different between day and night. With increasing seawater residence time and increasing feedback intensity, daytime seawater chemistry becomes more similar to present-day conditions while nighttime seawater chemistry becomes less similar to present-day conditions. Recent studies suggest that carbonate chemistry variation itself, independent of the average chemistry conditions, can have important effects on marine organisms and ecosystem processes. Better constraining ecosystem feedbacks under global change will improve projections of coastal water chemistry, but this study shows the importance of considering changes in both average carbonate chemistry and diel chemistry variation for organisms and ecosystems.

  10. Ion exchange properties of Japanese natural zeolites in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajima, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    Ion exchange properties of five different Japanese natural zeolites in seawater were examined. Sodium ions could be reduced by all zeolites, although anions, Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-), in seawater showed barely changes. Natural zeolite desalination treatment mainly depends on the ion exchange between Na(+), K(+) and Mg(2+) in seawater and Ca(2+) in natural zeolite. This study found that mordenite is superior to clinoptilolite for use in Na(+) reduction. Mordenite with high cation exchange capacity containing Ca(2+) resulted in the highest Na(+) reduction from seawater.

  11. Seawater drinking restores water balance in dehydrated harp seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Ole-Jakob; Nordøy, Erling S

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to answer the question of whether dehydrated harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) are able to obtain a net gain of water from the intake of seawater. Following 24 h of fasting, three subadult female harp seals were dehydrated by intravenous administration of the osmotic diuretic, mannitol. After another 24 h of fasting, the seals were given 1,000 ml seawater via a stomach tube. Urine and blood were collected for measurement of osmolality and osmolytes, while total body water (TBW) was determined by injections of tritiated water. In all seals, the maximum urinary concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) were higher than in seawater, reaching 540 and 620 mM, respectively, compared to 444 and 535 mM in seawater. In another experiment, the seals were given ad lib access to seawater for 48 h after mannitol-induced hyper-osmotic dehydration. In animals without access to seawater, the mean blood osmolality increased from 331 to 363 mOsm kg(-1) during dehydration. In contrast, the blood osmolality, hematocrit and TBW returned to normal when the seals were permitted ad lib access to seawater after dehydration. In conclusion, this study shows that harp seals have the capacity to gain net water from mariposa (voluntarily drinking seawater) and are able to restore water balance after profound dehydration by drinking seawater.

  12. Hydrothermal transport of heavy metals by seawater: The role of seawater/basalt ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, W.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    Seawater reacted with basaltic glass at 260??C and 500 bars under water-dominated conditions (50 : 1 water/rock ratio) efficiently leached and maintained heavy metals in solution. Cu, Zn, and Ba are transferred in significant proportions to the aqueous phase, while Fe and Mn attain concentrations of 45 and 20 ppm respectively as the basalt is completely made over to magnesian smectite. High metal solubility is a function of acidity maintained by large excess of dissolved Mg and equilibria with the alteration phase. Metal concentrations and relative proportions are consistent within limits required for metal-rich fluid which produced East Pacific Rise metalliferous sediments. Experiments mixing metal-bearing altered seawater and normal seawater were carried out as a qualitative indicator of sea-floor precipitation processes. Bulk composition of the precipitates are strongly influenced by mixing ratio. Precipitates range from silica-magnesium rich under low dilution by seawater to essentially pure ferric hydroxide under conditions of high dilution. ?? 1977.

  13. Microbial control of seawater by microfiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmer Soler T

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent scientific literature presents seawater as a potential aid to solve a variety of health diseases in animals and human beings because by means of its mineral and trace elements content. In Colombia, Nicaragua and Spain it is collected in a natural way from de shore and drunk; however, this can represent a health risk because of the problems related to chemical and microbiological contamination. Microbial control of seawater allows the improvement of its microbiological quality. Objective: to compare the efficiency of three microbial control methods: microfiltration, solar exposition and quarantine. Methodology: 30 samples were collected in 20-liter high density polyethylene containers in three different places in the Colombian Atlantic coast. Results: 15 samples out of 30 showed the presence of bacteria such as E. coli and halophiles bacteria like Vibrio and Aeromonas. Microfiltration through ceramic filters of 0.5 µm produces disinfection in 100% of the samples but the quarantine for five months and solar disinfection are effective in 66 and 21% respectively. The latter requires certain weather conditions to achieve disinfection and it only allows managing small quantities of water. Dicussion: Considering chemical contamination in some places which cannot be controlled through disinfection methods, the collection of water offshore in clean places is suggested and then microfiltration treatment should be performed.

  14. Controls of Trace Metals in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruland, K. W.; Lohan, M. C.

    2003-12-01

    Since the early 1970s, marine chemists have gained a first-order understanding of the concentrations, distributions, and chemical behaviors of trace metals in seawater. Important factors initiating this quantum leap in knowledge were major advances in modern analytical chemistry and instrumentation, along with the development and adoption of clean techniques. An instrumental development in the mid-1970s that spurred the early research on trace metals was the availability of the sensitive graphite furnace as the sample introduction system to an atomic absorption spectrometer. More recently, the appearance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometers has provided an even more sensitive and powerful instrumental capability to the arsenal of marine chemists. In addition to these instruments back in shore-based laboratories, there has been the development of sensitive shipboard methods such as stripping voltammetry and flow injection analysis (FIA) systems with either chemiluminescence or catalytically enhanced spectrophotometric detection. Along with the development of these highly sensitive analytical techniques came a recognition and appreciation of the importance of handling contamination issues by using clean techniques during all phases of sampling and analysis. This is necessary due to low concentrations of trace metals in seawater relative to the ubiquitousness of metals on a ship or in a laboratory (e.g., dust, steel hydrowire, rust, paint with copper and zinc antifouling agents, brass fittings, galvanized material, sacrificial zinc anodes, etc.). As a result, seawater concentrations of most trace metals have now been accurately determined in at least some parts of the oceans, and their oceanic distributions have been found to be consistent with oceanographic processes.The concentrations and distributions of trace metals in seawater are controlled by a combination of processes. These processes include external sources of trace metals delivered by

  15. Assimilation of MODIS AOD measurements during the Sahara dust episode in April 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Hirtl, Marcus; Flandorfer, Claudia; Pagowski, Mariusz

    2017-04-01

    In April 2016, an air pollution event with highly elevated surface concentrations of particulate matter (PM) has been observed in Europe. At the Sonnblick observatory (an atmospheric monitoring platform at 3100 m in the Alps in Austria), PM10 surface concentrations were considerably elevated (>100 μg/m3) on April 5, 2016. This event was caused by a Sahara dust storm. In this study we use the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry) model to predict the transport of Sahara dust from northern Africa towards Europe. Simulations were performed from April 1, 2016 to April 8, 2016 using the GOCART (Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport) aerosol scheme. The GOCART model simulates tropospheric aerosols such as dust and sea salt (both with different size bins), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), and sulfate, enabling the computation of PM2.5 and PM10. Gridpoint statistical interpolation (GSI) is then used to assimilate data of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) total aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval products at a wavelength of 550 nm from the Terra and Aqua satellites. Data assimilation is performed at 12 UTC with an assimilation window of ±3 hours. PM10 analyses are evaluated against PM10 surface measurements provided by EEA (European Environment Agency) and the Austrian Environmental Agency. First results indicate that WRF-Chem underestimates surface concentration of PM10 during the Sahara dust event in April 2016 over Europe but the assimilation of MODIS AOD substantially improves PM10 analyses.

  16. Characterization of textile electrodes and conductors using standardized measurement setups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, L; Neuhaus, C; Medrano, G; Jungbecker, N; Walter, M; Gries, T; Leonhardt, S

    2010-02-01

    Textile electrodes and conductors are being developed and used in different monitoring scenarios, such as ECG or bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements. Compared to standard materials, conductive textile materials offer improved wearing comfort and enable long-term measurements. Unfortunately, the development and investigation of such materials often suffers from the non-reproducibility of the test scenarios. For example, the materials are generally tested on human skin which is difficult since the properties of human skin differ for each person and can change within hours. This study presents two test setups which offer reproducible measurement procedures for the systematic analysis of textile electrodes and conductors. The electrode test setup was designed with a special skin dummy which allows investigation of not only the electrical properties of textile electrodes but also the contact behavior between electrode and skin. Using both test setups, eight textile electrodes and five textile conductors were analyzed and compared.

  17. Stretchable biofuel cell with enzyme-modified conductive textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yudai; Takai, Yuki; Kato, Yuto; Kai, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Takeo; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko

    2015-12-15

    A sheet-type, stretchable biofuel cell was developed by laminating three components: a bioanode textile for fructose oxidation, a hydrogel sheet containing fructose as fuel, and a gas-diffusion biocathode textile for oxygen reduction. The anode and cathode textiles were prepared by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT)-decorated stretchable textiles with fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) and bilirubin oxidase (BOD), respectively. Enzymatic reaction currents of anode and cathode textiles were stable for 30 cycles of 50% stretching, with initial loss of 20-30% in the first few cycles due to the partial breaking of the CNT network at the junction of textile fibers. The assembled laminate biofuel cell showed power of ~0.2 mW/cm(2) with 1.2 kΩ load, which was stable even at stretched, twisted, and wrapped forms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Health and safety aspects of textile workers from Solapur (India textile industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul B Hiremath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Textile sector in India plays an important role in the country's economy, providing employment to a significant population in rural and urban areas. Objectives: This paper focuses on health and safety aspects of textile workers in Solapur City (one of the key textile cluster in the state of Maharashtra, India. Methodology: A sample of 180 workers from the identified textile industries of Solapur city were assessed for their general physique, muscle tone, lung condition, and eyesight using different techniques. The study aimed at developing a framework for understanding risks to textile workers resulting from lack of health and safety standards in companies. Results: Findings showed that most of the workers have been affected by respiratory problems, increase in muscle tone, eye problems and musculoskeletal problem. It has been also observed that job security or regular work impacts positively to the worker’s long term body health. However, there is an immediate need to adopt and implement measures in accordance with Indian Factories Act (OHSAS 18001/ILO-OSH 2001 which includes directions and procedures in respect of industrial installations, work environment and occupational health and safety guidelines.

  19. Inputs, productivity, and agricultural growth in Africa South of the Sahara:

    OpenAIRE

    Nin-Pratt, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The evidence of improved performance of agriculture in Africa south of the Sahara (SSA) in recent years has indeed been quite striking when compared with the past. For the first time, the sector has maintained a real growth rate of 3.4 percent per year, well above the population growth rate of 2.5 percent. Despite this improved performance, agricultural productivity growth in SSA continues to lag behind every other region of the world, growing at rates that are roughly half of the average rat...

  20. Textile-based sampling for potentiometric determination of ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Arnebrant, Thomas; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Bobacka, Johan

    2015-06-02

    Potentiometric sensing utilizing textile-based micro-volume sampling was applied and evaluated for the determination of clinically (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)) and environmentally (Cd(2+), Pb(2+) and pH) relevant analytes. In this technological design, calibration solutions and samples were absorbed into textiles while the potentiometric cells (ion-selective electrodes and reference electrode) were pressed against the textile. Once the liquid, by wicking action, reached the place where the potentiometric cell was pressed onto the textile, hence closing the electric circuit, the potentiometric response was obtained. Cotton, polyamide, polyester and their blends with elastane were applied for micro-volume sampling. The textiles were found to influence the determination of pH in environmental samples with pH close to neutral and Pb(2+) at low analyte concentrations. On the other hand, textile-based micro-volume sampling was successfully applied in measurements of Na(+) using solid-contact sodium-selective electrodes utilizing all the investigated textiles for sampling. It was found that in order to extend the application of textile-based sampling toward environmental analysis of ions it will be necessary to tailor the physio-chemical properties of the textile materials. In general, textile-based sampling opens new possibilities for direct chemical analysis of small-volume samples and provide a simple and low-cost method to screen various textiles for their effects on samples to identify which textiles are the most suitable for on-body sensing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacterial Growth on Chitosan-Coated Polypropylene Textile

    OpenAIRE

    D. Erben; V. Hola; J. Jaros; J. Rahel

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling is a problem common in all systems where microorganisms and aqueous environment meet. Prevention of biofouling is therefore important in many industrial processes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to evaluate the ability of material coating to inhibit biofilm formation. Chitosan-coated polypropylene nonwoven textile was prepared using dielectric barrier discharge plasma activation. Resistance of the textile to biofouling was then tested. First, the textile was submerge...

  2. Does wintering north or south of the Sahara correlate with timing and breeding performance in black-tailed godwits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentie, Rosemarie; Marquez-Ferrando, Rocío; Figuerola, Jordi; Gangoso, Laura; Hooijmeijer, Jos C E W; Loonstra, A H Jelle; Robin, Frédéric; Sarasa, Mathieu; Senner, Nathan; Valkema, Haije; Verhoeven, Mo A; Piersma, Theunis

    2017-04-01

    Migrating long distances requires time and energy, and may interact with an individual's performance during breeding. These seasonal interactions in migratory animals are best described in populations with disjunct nonbreeding distributions. The black-tailed godwit (Limosa limosa limosa), which breeds in agricultural grasslands in Western Europe, has such a disjunct nonbreeding distribution: The majority spend the nonbreeding season in West Africa, while a growing number winters north of the Sahara on the Iberian Peninsula. To test whether crossing the Sahara has an effect on breeding season phenology and reproductive parameters, we examined differences in the timing of arrival, breeding habitat quality, lay date, egg volume, and daily nest survival among godwits (154 females and 157 males), individually marked in a breeding area in the Netherlands for which wintering destination was known on the basis of resightings. We also examined whether individual repeatability in arrival date differed between birds wintering north or south of the Sahara. Contrary to expectation, godwits wintering south of the Sahara arrived two days earlier and initiated their clutch six days earlier than godwits wintering north of the Sahara. Arrival date was equally repeatable for both groups, and egg volume larger in birds wintering north of the Sahara. Despite these differences, we found no association between wintering location and the quality of breeding habitat or nest survival. This suggests that the crossing of an important ecological barrier and doubling of the migration distance, twice a year, do not have clear negative reproductive consequences for some long-distance migrants.

  3. Nanolevel Functionalization of Natural Fiber Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihodceva, S.; Kukle, S.; Barloti, J.

    2011-06-01

    One of the main tasks of presented research are to impact the additional value on natural fabrics by adding them new properties with a metal nano-level coating, evaluate coating technologies. Having the ability to control the surface of a natural fiber offers great rewards that go far beyond pure economics as natural fibers are renewable and biodegradable. The paper describes the process of vacuum evaporation and magnetron sputtering of copper coatings on cotton textile materials, analysis of the metal coated textile surface by laser laboratory complex and SEM. The investigation results evince that laser laboratory complex measurements of reflected and through covered material transmitted light can be applied to trace the unevenness of deposited metal film on the covered fabric surface and its changes from exploitation impacts without samples destruction.

  4. Optical textile tests MRI patients from afar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Paula

    2008-11-01

    Researchers in Europe have developed a wearable textile fitted with optical sensors that could be used to remotely monitor a patient's breathing patterns while they undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The new textile will allow medical staff to keep an eye on children and other vulnerable patients who often have to be calmed with sedatives or anaesthetic drugs to keep them still during a scan. The technique will be particularly useful if proposed European Union (EU) legislation that is designed to protect medical staff from being exposed to the high magnetic fields of MRI systems comes into force in 2012. The new rules would prevent nurses from being in the room where the scan is taking place.

  5. Smart Textiles in Humanistic Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe Emil; Fisker, Anna Marie; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2013-01-01

    With the construction of new hospitals, the design principle healing architecture is introduced, representing the humanistic vision of improving hospitalised patients’ healing process, supported by stimulating architecture. In this regard, we address focus on the potential influence of the design....... Associated with the methodology of evidence-based design (EBD), we in this regard question, if these challenges derive from conflicting paradigms of some of the stakeholders involved in the design process? Relating to the Danish scene of hospital design, we introduce the research project “Smart Textiles...... in Future Hospitals”, stating the overall hypothesis that textiles in hospital interiors possess an unexploited architectural potential in relation to the humanistic visions of healing architecture. Concerned with the operational challenge of unfolding the visionary design principle, we suggest to re...

  6. Applications of cyclodextrins in medical textiles - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Cezar-Doru; Parteni, Oana; Ochiuz, Lacramioara

    2016-02-28

    This paper presents data on the general properties and complexing ability of cyclodextrins and assessment methods (phase solubility, DSC tests and X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectra, analytical method). It focuses on the formation of drug deposits on the surface of a textile underlayer, using a cyclodextrin compound favoring the inclusion of a drug/active principle and its release onto the dermis of patients suffering from skin disorders, or for protection against insects. Moreover, it presents the kinetics, duration, diffusion flow and release media of the cyclodextrin drug for in vitro studies, as well as the release modeling of the active principle. The information focuses on therapies: antibacterial, anti-allergic, antifungal, chronic venous insufficiency, psoriasis and protection against insects. The pharmacodynamic agents/active ingredients used on cotton, woolen and synthetic textile fabrics are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of test methods for textile composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, John E.; Ifju, Peter G.; Fedro, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program was initiated in 1990 with the purpose of developing less costly composite aircraft structures. A number of innovative materials and processes were evaluated as a part of this effort. Chief among them are composite materials reinforced with textile preforms. These new forms of composite materials bring with them potential testing problems. Methods currently in practice were developed over the years for composite materials made from prepreg tape or simple 2-D woven fabrics. A wide variety of 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit preforms were suggested for application in the ACT program. The applicability of existing test methods to the wide range of emerging materials bears investigation. The overriding concern is that the values measured are accurate representations of the true material response. The ultimate objective of this work is to establish a set of test methods to evaluate the textile composites developed for the ACT Program.

  8. Coagulation and ultrafiltration in seawater reverse osmosis pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabatabai, S.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is a globally expanding coastal industry with an installed capacity of over 80 million m3/day. Algal blooms pose a challenge to the operation of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes and pre-treatment systems due to high concentrations of algal cells and algal organic

  9. Effect of sulphide on corrosion of copper in seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishna Pillai, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The corrosion of ETP copper in natural seawater and putrid seawater has been studied. The corrosion rates and the sulphide content were monitored at regular intervals. In the absence of oxygen in the putrid media, the presence of sulphide favoured a reduction in the corrosion rate.

  10. Henry's law constants for dimethylsulfide in freshwater and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, J. W. H.; Wakeham, S. G.; Howes, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    Distilled water and several waters of varying salinity were subjected, over a 0-32 C temperature range, to measurements for Henry's law constants for dimethylsulfide. Values for distilled water and seawater of the solubility parameters A and C are obtained which support the concept that the concentration of dimethylsulfide in the atmosphere is far from equilibrium with seawater.

  11. Biodegradation of phenanthrene in artificial seawater by using free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and related aromatic compounds. This paper reports the domestication of strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B in artificial seawater (AS) and the immobilization of the strain onto rice straw. Results showed that adding 85% artificial seawater had very low impact on the growth and phenanthrene degradation ability of strain GY2B ...

  12. Simulation of seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers: Some typical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers is generally three dimensional (3-D) in nature. In the literature, there is a general lack of reported results on 3-D simulations. This paper presents some typical example simulations of 3-D seawater intrusion process for a specified hypothetical study area. The simulation results presented ...

  13. Corrosion of mild steel, copper and brass in crude oil / seawater mixture

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi, S.; Sawant, S.S.; Wagh, A.B.

    Mild steel, copper and brass coupons were introduced in natural seawater containing varying amount of crude oil. Mild steel showed higher rate of corrosion in seawater containing oil and lower corrosion rate in natural as well as artificial seawater...

  14. GIITEX: investigación en la industria textil

    OpenAIRE

    Bonet Aracil, María Angeles; BOU-BELDA Eva; Montava Seguí, Ignacio José; Díaz-García, Pablo; Monllorpérez, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    [ES] El GIITEX es un grupo de investigación de la Universidad Politécnica de Valencia. Centra su labor investigación en todas aquellas investigaciones que están relacionadas con el sector textil. El la actualidad el GIITEX trabaja en las líneas de investigación siguientes: adaptación de nuevas tecnologías a procesos productivos textiles; biomateriales y procesos biotecnológicos de aplicación textil; análisis de la capacidad de cosido de un hilo; funcionalización de textiles mediante la adició...

  15. Energy-harvesting & self-actuated textiles for the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    for smart textiles by questioning how they can be implemented within a domestic context to encourage more resilient environments. More specifically investigating the potential of energyharvesting & self-actuated textiles, the project hopes to highlight new ways for thinking the home as a more permeable...... the context of rising sustainable design agendas, the role and influence of new materials and technologies on the conceptualization and making of responsive textiles. Exploring the intersection between textiles, architecture and smart technologies, this on-going research aims to map out new design territories...

  16. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Towards Organ Weaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, pore size and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important role in the effective use of textile technologies in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the current advances in the manufacturing of biofunctional fibers. Different textile methods such as knitting, weaving, and braiding are discussed and their current applications in tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26924450

  17. Comparison of Quantitative Antifungal Testing Methods for Textile Fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Yasuo; Seino, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A

    2017-01-01

     Quantitative antifungal testing methods for textile fabrics under growth-supportive conditions were studied. Fungal growth activities on unfinished textile fabrics and textile fabrics modified with Ag nanoparticles were investigated using the colony counting method and the luminescence method. Morphological changes of the fungi during incubation were investigated by microscopic observation. Comparison of the results indicated that the fungal growth activity values obtained with the colony counting method depended on the morphological state of the fungi on textile fabrics, whereas those obtained with the luminescence method did not. Our findings indicated that unique characteristics of each testing method must be taken into account for the proper evaluation of antifungal activity.

  18. Roadmap to sustainable textiles and clothing regulatory aspects and sustainability standards of textiles and the clothing supply chain

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the elements involved in achieving sustainability in textiles and clothing sector. The chapters covered in three volumes of this series title cover all the distinctive areas earmarked for achieving sustainable development in textiles and clothing industry. This third volume highlights the areas pertaining to the regulatory aspects and sustainability standards applicable to textiles and clothing supply chain. There are various standards earmarked for measuring the environmental impacts and sustainability of textile products. There are also plenty of certification schemes available along with the index systems applicable to textile sector. Brands and manufactures are also venturing into new developments to achieve sustainable development in textile sector. This third volume addresses all these important aspects.

  19. Seawater Chemistry Across Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, S.; Turchyn, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Continental weathering is recognized as one of the primary mechanisms moderating the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. Past carbon cycle perturbations, often associated with mass extinction events, recovered on a timescale of hundreds of thousands of years, broadly consistent with enhanced chemical weathering being the key moderating process. Since chemical weathering of continental rocks controls the delivery of cations to the oceans, records of seawater cation chemistry provide a powerful archive of this interplay and feedback between climate and weathering.The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary at 65.6 Ma is the last major mass extinction event. The two accepted drivers of K-Pg events were the geologically coeval eruption of Deccan Trap continental flood basalts and the meteorite impact at Chicxulub. The Chicxulub impact happened during a second pulse of Deccan traps volcanism. Thus, teasing apart the timing and dominant driver of the mass extinction and the recovery remains enigmatic. A key feature of the K-Pg event is the transient acidification of the global surface ocean that drove the collapse of the oceanic ecosystem. This surface ocean acidification was caused by `geologically instantaneous' influx of large quantities of acidic gases (viz. CO2, SO2) to the ocean-atmosphere system. We will present high-resolution records of Li, B, Mg, and Ca isotope (δ7Li, δ11B, δ26Mg, and δ44Ca, respectively) measured in single species foraminifera across the K-Pg boundary to assess the perturbation and the subsequent continental weathering feedback. The unique aspect of the proposed research is in the first direct reconstruction of seawater isotopic composition of elements intimately linked to the continental weathering cycle (Li, Mg, and Ca), and the carbon budget of the ocean-atmosphere system (Boron) across an event of rapid climate transition and recovery. Moreover, this will allow to fingerprint the timing of the acidic gas input to the atmosphere and to

  20. Textile UWB Antenna Bending and Wet Performances

    OpenAIRE

    Mai A.R.Osman; Rahim, M. K. A.; N. A. Samsuri; M. K. Elbasheer; M. E. Ali

    2012-01-01

    The vision and ideas of wearable computing systems describe future electronic systems as an integral part of our everyday clothing that provides the wearer with such intelligent personal assistants. Recently, there has been growing interest in the antenna community to merge between wearable systems technology, ultrawideband (UWB) technology and textile technology. This work aimed to make closer steps towards real wearability by investigating the possibilities of designing wearable UWB antenna...

  1. Kaleidoscope – Printed Textiles by Neil Bottle

    OpenAIRE

    Bottle, Neil

    2013-01-01

    One man show at Rochester Art Gallery. In the Kaleidoscope series, Neil Bottle explores the relationship between digital textile printing and craft printing techniques and how these seemingly opposing practices can coexist. A combination of the latest cutting-edge digital print techniques such as dye sublimation combined with craft traditions such as screen printing, discharge printing, pleating and shibori have been developed in the work. The Kaleidoscope series of wallhangings is pr...

  2. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  3. Mechanics Methodology for Textile Preform Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poe, Clarence C., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    NASA and its contractors have completed a program to develop a basic mechanics underpinning for textile composites. Three major deliverables were produced by the program: 1. A set of test methods for measuring material properties and design allowables; 2. Mechanics models to predict the effects of the fiber preform architecture and constituent properties on engineering moduli, strength, damage resistance, and fatigue life; and 3. An electronic data base of coupon type test data. This report describes these three deliverables.

  4. Interactive educational software of textile desing

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Abad, Francisco; Rojas Sola, José Ignacio; Hernández Abad, Vicente; Ochoa Vives, Manuel; Font Andreu, Jorge; Hernández Díaz, David; Villar Ribera, Ricardo Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel educational software package which develops an Interactive Didactic Application (IDA) created in the Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), and which contains the essentials of Textile Design. It is an open application which uses a database in ASCII format. The principal elements of this database are lists of whole numbers structured according to indexed colors in standard RGB format. This generates a rational system of indexes of numerical lists, which a...

  5. FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE EVOLUTIONS OF TEXTILE SECTOR ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta BARBUTA MISU

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete liberalization of international trade led to important changes in financial performancesof the national enterprises. This paper has in view to present the consequences of these changes fromthe macroeconomic level to microeconomic level. Thus, indicators of the financial performance forthree enterprises at the textile sector from Galati are studied selectively. The scope of this study isboth to realize a financial performance hierarchy and to present of their evolution directions in thefuture.

  6. Influence of textile properties on thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marolleau, A.; Salaun, F.; Dupont, D.; Gidik, H.; Ducept, S.

    2017-10-01

    This study reports on the impact of textile properties on thermal comfort. The fabric weight, thickness, porosity, moisture regain, air permeability and density have been considered and correlated to the thermal and water vapour resistance, permeability index, thermal conductivity and effusivity, and moisture management capacity. Results suggest that moisture transfer is affected by thickness, density and moisture regain whereas thermal transfer by air permeability and density.

  7. Textile sustainability: reuse of clean waste from the textile and apparel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broega, A. C.; Jordão, C.; Martins, S. B.

    2017-10-01

    Today societies are already experiencing changes in their production systems and even consumption in order to guarantee the survival and well-being of future generations. This fact emerges from the need to adopt a more sustainable posture in both people’s daily lives and productive systems. Within this context, textile sustainability emerges as the object of study of this work whose aim is to analyse which sustainability dimensions are being prioritized by the clean waste management systems of the textile and garment industries. This article aims to analyse solutions that are being proposed by sustainable creative business models in the reuse of discarded fabrics by the textile industry. Search also through a qualitative research by a case study (the Reuse Fabric Bank) understand the benefits generated by the re-use in environmental, economic, social and ways to add value.

  8. Characteristics of phosphate adsorption onto granulated coal ash in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaoka, S.; Yamamoto, T. [Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    The deterioration of sediments is a serious environmental problem. Controlling nutrient release fluxes from sediments is important to alleviating eutrophication and to reducing terrigenous nutrient loads. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phosphate removal performance of granulated coal ash (GCA) from seawater, which is produced from coal thermal electric power generation. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the removal kinetics of phosphate from seawater under both oxic and anoxic conditions. Phosphate was removed well from seawater under both oxic and anoxic conditions. The adsorption isotherm for phosphate revealed that GCA could remove phosphate effectively from seawater above a concentration of 1.7 {mu} mol L{sup -1}. GCA can reduce the concentration of phosphate in seawater effectively under anoxic conditions where iron type adsorbents cannot be applied. Therefore, GCA could potentially be used to adsorb phosphate in the organically-enriched sediment, which generally occurs under highly reductive conditions.

  9. Characteristics of phosphate adsorption onto granulated coal ash in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tamiji

    2010-08-01

    The deterioration of sediments is a serious environmental problem. Controlling nutrient release fluxes from sediments is important to alleviating eutrophication and to reducing terrigenous nutrient loads. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phosphate removal performance of granulated coal ash (GCA) from seawater, which is produced from coal thermal electric power generation. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the removal kinetics of phosphate from seawater under both oxic and anoxic conditions. Phosphate was removed well from seawater under both oxic and anoxic conditions. The adsorption isotherm for phosphate revealed that GCA could remove phosphate effectively from seawater above a concentration of 1.7micromolL(-1). GCA can reduce the concentration of phosphate in seawater effectively under anoxic conditions where iron type adsorbents cannot be applied. Therefore, GCA could potentially be used to adsorb phosphate in the organically-enriched sediment, which generally occurs under highly reductive conditions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Degradation of textile dyes by cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Maria Dellamatrice

    Full Text Available Abstract Dyes are recalcitrant compounds that resist conventional biological treatments. The degradation of three textile dyes (Indigo, RBBR and Sulphur Black, and the dye-containing liquid effluent and solid waste from the Municipal Treatment Station, Americana, São Paulo, Brazil, by the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae UTCC64, Phormidium autumnale UTEX1580 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was evaluated. The dye degradation efficiency of the cyanobacteria was compared with anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic systems in terms of discolouration and toxicity evaluations. The discoloration was evaluated by absorption spectroscopy. Toxicity was measured using the organisms Hydra attenuata, the alga Selenastrum capricornutum and lettuce seeds. The three cyanobacteria showed the potential to remediate textile effluent by removing the colour and reducing the toxicity. However, the growth of cyanobacteria on sludge was slow and discoloration was not efficient. The cyanobacteria P. autumnale UTEX1580 was the only strain that completely degraded the indigo dye. An evaluation of the mutagenicity potential was performed by use of the micronucleus assay using Allium sp. No mutagenicity was observed after the treatment. Two metabolites were produced during the degradation, anthranilic acid and isatin, but toxicity did not increase after the treatment. The cyanobacteria showed the ability to degrade the dyes present in a textile effluent; therefore, they can be used in a tertiary treatment of effluents with recalcitrant compounds.

  11. Degradation of textile dyes by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellamatrice, Priscila Maria; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo de; Fiore, Marli Fátima; Monteiro, Regina Teresa Rosim

    Dyes are recalcitrant compounds that resist conventional biological treatments. The degradation of three textile dyes (Indigo, RBBR and Sulphur Black), and the dye-containing liquid effluent and solid waste from the Municipal Treatment Station, Americana, São Paulo, Brazil, by the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae UTCC64, Phormidium autumnale UTEX1580 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was evaluated. The dye degradation efficiency of the cyanobacteria was compared with anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic systems in terms of discolouration and toxicity evaluations. The discoloration was evaluated by absorption spectroscopy. Toxicity was measured using the organisms Hydra attenuata, the alga Selenastrum capricornutum and lettuce seeds. The three cyanobacteria showed the potential to remediate textile effluent by removing the colour and reducing the toxicity. However, the growth of cyanobacteria on sludge was slow and discoloration was not efficient. The cyanobacteria P. autumnale UTEX1580 was the only strain that completely degraded the indigo dye. An evaluation of the mutagenicity potential was performed by use of the micronucleus assay using Allium sp. No mutagenicity was observed after the treatment. Two metabolites were produced during the degradation, anthranilic acid and isatin, but toxicity did not increase after the treatment. The cyanobacteria showed the ability to degrade the dyes present in a textile effluent; therefore, they can be used in a tertiary treatment of effluents with recalcitrant compounds. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Toward a systematic classification of textile damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, T G; Samlal-Soedhoe, R S; van der Weerd, J

    2018-01-01

    The accuracy of textile damage analyses was evaluated by laboratory tests carried out by trained experts. The analyzed damages were prepared by various methods, including stabbing, cutting, shooting, heating/burning, etc. A number of damages were aged by household washing and tumble-drying procedures, addition of blood, or burying. The samples were analyzed by routine laboratory evaluation. The results indicate that the properties of a damage provide a good indication of the way a textile had been damaged. Nevertheless, scoring of the answers is not straightforward. Results indicated that examiners evaluated damages on different levels of specificity and thereby showed the latent need for a more systematic approach to damage classification. The second part of the current contribution therefore presents the classification scheme we developed. This classification scheme aims to guide examiners during examination and accommodates the vast majority of textile damages observed in forensic casework. Each of the proposed classes is defined, relevant literature in each of the classes is reviewed, and the characteristics that can be expected after different damaging actions are explained. Finally, we share some ideas for further investigations. Copyright © 2018 Central Police University.

  13. Smart Textiles for Strengthening of Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Marcin; Krzywoń, Rafał; Dawczyński, Szymon; Szojda, Leszek; Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Araujo, Pedro; Velez, Fernando Jose; Castro-Gomes, Joao

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents results of mechanical tests on a prototype of an innovative structural strengthening in form of self-monitoring fabric. Smart textile employs carbon fibers conductivity for measuring strains while monitoring changes of electric resistance under increasing load. A general solution was tested in a series of calibrating tests on strengthening of small size concrete slabs. Promising results of simple specimen, has encouraged the research team to perform the next tests using mastered carbon fibre reinforced fabric. Main tests were performed on natural scale RC beam. Smart textile proved its efficiency in both: strengthening and monitoring of strains during load increase. New strengthening proposal was given 10% increase of loading capacity and the readings of strain changes were similar to those obtained in classical methods. In order to calibrate the prototype and to define range limits of solution usability, textile sensor was tested in areas of large deformations (timber beam) and aswell as very small strains (bridge bearing block). In both cases, the prototype demonstrated excellent performance in the range of importance for structural engineering. This paper also presents an example of use of the smart strengthening in situ, in a real life conditions.

  14. Proteolytic enzymes in seawater: contribution of prokaryotes and protists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Y.; Suzuki, S.

    2016-02-01

    Proteolytic enzyme is one of the major catalysts of microbial processing of organic matter in biogeochemical cycle. Here we summarize some of our studies about proteases in seawater, including 1) distribution of protease activities in coastal and oceanic seawater, 2) responses of microbial community and protease activities in seawater to organic matter amending, and 3) possible contribution of heterotrophic protists besides prokaryotes to proteases in seawater, to clarify cleared facts and remaining questions. Activities of aminopeptidases, trypsin-type and chymotrypsin-type proteases were detected from both coastal and oceanic seawater by using MCA-substrate assay. Significant activities were detected from not only particulate (cell-associated) fraction but also dissolved fraction of seawater, especially for trypsin-type and chymotrypsin-type proteases. Hydrolytic enzymes in seawater have been commonly thought to be mainly derived from heterotrophic prokaryotes; however, it was difficult to determine actual source organisms of dissolved enzymes in natural seawater. Our experiment with addition of dissolved protein to subtropical oligotrophic Pacific water showed drastically enhancement of the protease activities especially aminopeptidases in seawater, and the prokaryotic community structure simultaneously changed to be dominant of Bacteroidetes, indicating that heterotrophic bacteria were actually one of the sources of proteases in seawater. Another microcosm experiment with free-living marine heterotrophic ciliate Paranophrys marina together with an associated bacterium showed that extracellular trypsin-type activity was mainly attributed to the ciliate. The protist seemed to work in organic matter digestion in addition to be a grazer. From the results, we propose a system of organic matter digestion by prokaryotes and protists in aquatic environments, although their actual contribution in natural environments should be estimated in future studies.

  15. Offshore treating facilities for seawater injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubine, J.K.; Randolph, S.G.

    1973-08-01

    This is a review of commonly used treating facilities for injection of seawater. The principal problems are corrosion from dissolved oxygen and possible reservoir plugging by suspended solids. Oxygen is removed chemically or by physical desorption, or by a combination of both. Chemical methods use sodium sulfite or sulfur dioxide, etc., to react with oxygen; these methods are good for small systems or low oxygen concentrations, up to about 10,000 bwpd or to above this amount when in conjunction with physical desorption. Methods of physical desorption include vacuum towers, vacuum plus hydrocarbon gases, or hydrocarbon gases without vacuum. Another method is to simultaneously lift water and remove oxygen. Selection of an optimum method depends on availability and value of a suitable stripping gas. Various methods of solids removal by filtration are discussed briefly.

  16. Mortality of fecal bacteria in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lara, J.; Menon, P.; Servais, P.; Billen, G. (Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-03-01

    The authors propose a method for determining the mortality rate for allochthonous bacteria released in aquatic environments without interference due to the loss of culturability in specific culture media. This method consists of following the disappearance of radioactivity from the trichloracetic acid-insoluble fraction in water samples to which ({sup 3}H)thymidine-prelabeled allochthonous bacteria have been added. In coastal seawater, they found that the actual rate of disappearance of fecal bacteria was 1 order of magnitude lower than the rate of loss of culturability on specific media. Minor adaptation of the procedure may facilitate assessment of the effect of protozoan grazing and bacteriophage lysis on the overall bacterial mortality rate.

  17. Energy Implications of Seawater Desalination (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, H.; Heberger, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater has traditionally come from rivers, lakes, streams, and groundwater aquifers. As demand increases and climate change alters the location and timing of water supply, these traditional sources are becoming unavailable, more difficult, or increasingly expensive to develop. As a result, many communities are switching to alternative sources of water. Interest in pursuing seawater desalination is high in many coastal communities. In California, for example, 17 plants are proposed for development along the California coast and two in Mexico. Water managers are pursing desalination because is a local supply that can help diversify the water supply portfolio. Additionally, it is a reliable supply, which can be especially valuable during a drought. But removing the salt from seawater is an energy-intensive process that consumes more energy per gallon than most other water supply and treatment options. These energy requirements are key factors that will impact the extent and success of desalination in California. Energy requirements for seawater desalination average about 4.0 kWh per cubic meter (m3) of water produced. By comparison, the least energy-intensive options of local sources of groundwater and surface water require 0 - 0.90 kWh per m3; wastewater reuse, depending on treatment levels, may require from 0.26 - 2.2 kWh per m3. Beyond the electricity required for the desalination facility itself, producing any new source of water, including through desalination, increases the amount of energy required to deliver and use the water produced as well as collect, treat, and dispose of the wastewater generated. Energy is the largest single variable cost for a desalination plant, varying from one-third to more than one-half the cost of produced water. Building a desalination plant may reduce a water utility's exposure to water reliability risks at the added expense of an increase in exposure to energy price risk. In dependent on hydropower, electricity prices tend to

  18. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mercurio

    Full Text Available Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR. The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities. Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1 so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated

  19. Propiedades generales de los suavizantes textiles catiónicos: especificaciones de producto y sus efectos en los textiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Carrión Fité, Francisco Javier

    1988-01-01

    Tras la introducción de los suavizantes como productos auxiliares textiles, se recalca la importancia comercial de los suavizantes textiles catiónicos, incidiendo tanto en los aspectos relacionados con la formulacion del producto como en su efecto sobre los textiles, comentando el cambio de propiedades táctiles, mecánicas, funcionales y de aspecto de los mismos. Se resumen aspectos generales físico-químicos relativos a su adsorción por parte de los textiles, citando por ultimo algunos metodos...

  20. Biogeochemical inferences of mobility of early Holocene fisher-foragers from the Southern Sahara Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Knudson, Kelly J

    2011-09-01

    North Africa is increasingly seen as an important context for understanding modern human evolution and reconstructing biocultural adaptations. The Sahara, in particular, witnessed a fluorescence of hunter-gatherer settlement at the onset of the Holocene after an extended occupational hiatus. Subsequent subsistence changes through the Holocene are contrary to those documented in other areas where mobile foraging gave way to settled agricultural village life. In North Africa, extractive fishing and hunting was supplanted by cattle and caprine pastoralism under deteriorating climatic conditions. Therefore, the initial stage of food production in North Africa witnessed a likely increase in mobility. However, there are few studies of paleomobility in Early Holocene hunter-gatherer Saharan populations and the degree of mobility is generally assumed. Here, we present radiogenic strontium isotope ratios from Early Holocene fisher-forager peoples from the site of Gobero, central Niger, southern Sahara Desert. Data indicate a relatively homogeneous radiogenic strontium isotope signature for this hunter-gather population with limited variability exhibited throughout the life course or among different individuals. Although the overall signature was local, some variation in the radiogenic strontium isotope data likely reflects transhumance into the nearby Aïr Massif. Data from Gobero were significantly less variable than in other worldwide hunter-gatherer populations, including those thought to be fairly sedentary. Strontium data from Gobero were also significantly different from contemporaneous sites in southwestern Libya. These patterns are discussed with respect to archaeological models of community organization and technological evolution. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Were rivers flowing across the Sahara during the last interglacial? Implications for human migration through Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J Coulthard

    Full Text Available Human migration north through Africa is contentious. This paper uses a novel palaeohydrological and hydraulic modelling approach to test the hypothesis that under wetter climates c.100,000 years ago major river systems ran north across the Sahara to the Mediterranean, creating viable migration routes. We confirm that three of these now buried palaeo river systems could have been active at the key time of human migration across the Sahara. Unexpectedly, it is the most western of these three rivers, the Irharhar river, that represents the most likely route for human migration. The Irharhar river flows directly south to north, uniquely linking the mountain areas experiencing monsoon climates at these times to temperate Mediterranean environments where food and resources would have been abundant. The findings have major implications for our understanding of how humans migrated north through Africa, for the first time providing a quantitative perspective on the probabilities that these routes were viable for human habitation at these times.

  2. DETERMINANTS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH IN SUB-SAHARA AFRICA: 1961-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajide Abraham Ajao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined changes in agricultural productivity in Sub-Sahara Africa countries in the context of diverse institutional arrangements using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA. From a time series which consists of information on agricultural production and means of production were obtained from FAO AGROSTAT and rainfall data from Steve O’Connell data base. The information was for a 43-year period (1961-2003; DEA method was used to measure Malmquist index of total factor productivity. A decomposition of TFP measures revealed that the observed increase in the TFP in the sub–Sahara Africa agriculture is due to technological change rather than efficiency change which is the main constrained of achieving higher level of TFP during the reference period. The study further examined the effect of land quality, malaria, education and selected governance indicators such as, control of corruption and government effectiveness on productivity growth. All the variables included in the model are significant with the exception of government effectiveness

  3. Geochemical variations in aeolian mineral particles from the Sahara-Sahel Dust Corridor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Castillo, Sonia; Alastuey, Andrés; Cuevas, Emilio; Herrmann, Ludger; Mounkaila, Mohammed; Elvira, Josep; Gibbons, Wes

    2006-10-01

    The Sahara-Sahel Dust Corridor runs from Chad to Mauritania and expels huge amounts of mineral aerosols into the Atlantic Ocean. Data on samples collected from Algeria, Chad, Niger, and Western Sahara illustrate how corridor dust mineralogy and chemistry relate to geological source and weathering/transport history. Dusts sourced directly from igneous and metamorphic massifs are geochemically immature, retaining soluble cations (e.g., K, Na, Rb, Sr) and accessory minerals containing HFSE (e.g., Zr, Hf, U, Th) and REE. In contrast, silicate dust chemistry in desert basins (e.g., Bodélé Depression) is influenced by a longer history of transport, physical winnowing (e.g., loss of Zr, Hf, Th), chemical leaching (e.g., loss of Na, K, Rb), and mixing with intrabasinal materials such as diatoms and evaporitic salts. Mineral aerosols blown along the corridor by the winter Harmattan winds mix these basinal and basement materials. Dusts blown into the corridor from sub-Saharan Africa during the summer monsoon source from deeply chemically weathered terrains and are therefore likely to be more kaolinitic and stripped of mobile elements (e.g., Na, K, Mg, Ca, LILE), but retain immobile and resistant elements (e.g., Zr, Hf, REE). Finally, dusts blown southwestwards into the corridor from along the Atlantic Coastal Basin will be enriched in carbonate from Mesozoic-Cenozoic marine limestones, depleted in Th, Nb, and Ta, and locally contaminated by uranium-bearing phosphate deposits.

  4. Biotreatment of effluent from 'Adire' textile factories in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okareh, Oladapo T; Ademodi, Tuntunlade F; Igbinosa, Etinosa O

    2017-11-10

    In this present study, bacteria were isolated from wastewater and polluted soil collected from two cottage textile factories in Ibadan. These bacteria isolates were used for the biotreatment of textile mill effluent. The physicochemical parameters of the textile mill effluent before treatment were carried out and percentage decolourisation of the effluent was analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis technique). The degradation products of the textile mill effluent characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The pH values of the effluent were within the permissible limit of Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA) and National Environmental Standards and Regulations Enforcement Agency (NESREA), while temperature and electric conductivity of the effluents were below the permissible limit of FEPA and NESREA. The BOD, COD, TSS, TDS and chloride of the textile mill effluent from the two cottage textile factories were above the permissible limits of FEPA and NESREA. Twelve bacteria isolates were screened, effective in decolourising commercial dyes and used to decolourise the textile mill effluent. The bacteria isolates were characterised and identified as Bacillus sp., Micrococcus sp., Erwinia sp., Acinetobacter sp. and Nocardia sp. The decolourisation of textile effluent was observed through the changes of spectra of UV-visible spectrophotometer. The following bacteria revealed different percentage proportion of decolouration profile:- Bacillus sp., had the highest percentage decolourisation of 57.7%, whereas Micrococcus sp. and Acinetobacter sp. had percentage decolourisation of 32.8 and 26.3%, respectively. The degradation profile of textile effluent was revealed through FTIR spectral analysis. The changes in the position of major peaks revealed from the textile effluent through FTIR spectral analysis, appearances of new peaks and the disappearances of existing peaks signify the degradation of the wastewater. Thus, some native

  5. Uranium from Seawater Program Review; Fuel Resources Uranium from Seawater Program DOE Office of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-07-01

    For nuclear energy to remain sustainable in the United States, economically viable sources of uranium beyond terrestrial ores must be developed. The goal of this program is to develop advanced adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater at twice the capacity of the best adsorbent developed by researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1.5 mg U/g adsorbent. A multidisciplinary team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Austin was assembled to address this challenging problem. Polymeric adsorbents, based on the radiation grafting of acrylonitrile and methacrylic acid onto high surface-area polyethylene fibers followed by conversion of the nitriles to amidoximes, have been developed. These poly(acrylamidoxime-co-methacrylic acid) fibers showed uranium adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. The essence of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area trunk material that considerably increases the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. This technology received an R&D100 Award in 2012. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials. Simultaneously, de novo structure-based computational design methods are being used to design more selective and stable ligands and the most promising candidates are being synthesized, tested and evaluated for incorporation onto a support matrix. Fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic studies are being carried out to improve the adsorption efficiency, the selectivity of uranium over other metals, and the stability of the adsorbents. Understanding

  6. CFD and CHD in random packing columns with seawater desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Mei-Shan [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). College of Civil Engineering; Wang, Shi-He; Wang, Xiao-Ming [State Power Environmental Protection Research Institute, Nanjing (China); Guo, Ming-Chun [Shanghai Huolin engineering Plastics Co., Ltd., Shanghai (China)

    2013-07-01

    By the volume average method, gas-liquid two-phase flow CFD and CHT model is established to describe the random packing column in seawater desulfurization. By numerical calculation, the flow velocity, porosity distribution, pressure distribution and temperature distribution of seawater are obtained. Pressure loss and the outlet temperature of seawater are compared with experimental data, the prediction results and experimental results are well consistent, is exactly the same trend. Analyzing the results of calculation, a significant ''wall flow'' phenomena was found, and the reason of its formation is that the porosity of filler near the wall is significantly higher than in the middle region. Analyzing the distribution of seawater temperature, it is found that the distribution of seawater temperature is more uniform on the top of column, the seawater temperature near the wall fluctuated and were gradually more uniform towards the center of the column. Along the direction of the column from top to bottom, the seawater temperature gradually decreased, and the degree of fluctuations gradually reduced and basically does not change at half of the column, which indicated that the heat exchange between the gas and liquid has been basically completed.

  7. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Helen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments.

  8. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments. PMID:22616934

  9. Synthesis and characterization of textile azo dyes derivatives of methoxyphenols

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Queiroz, Maria João R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Azo dyes are used extensively in the textile and dyestuff industries and effluents from these industrial processes are usually resistant to biological treatment. Textile azo dyes with bioaccessible groups such as guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and 2,6--dimethoxyphenol, for lignin-degrading fungus were synthesized using aminobenzoic and aminosulfonic acids as diazocomponents.

  10. Biodegradation of textile Azo Dyes by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Santos, Isabel M.; Queiroz, Maria João R.P.; Lima, Nelson

    1998-01-01

    Azo dyes are used extensively in the textile and dyestuff industries and effluents from these industrial processes are usually resistant to biological treatment. Textile azo dyes with bioaccessible groups such as guaiacol and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, for lignin-degrading fungus as P. chrysosporium were synthesised.

  11. Biomarkers For Rheumatoid Arthritis In Textile Workers And The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown origin. There was an evidence of increased rate of RA in textile workers, and was higher among women. Fifty two textile workers (have worked for more than two years) and sixty two control subjects of both sexes were ...

  12. Interwoven Story: A Narrative Study of Textiles as Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Dion, Catherine-Laura

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from both narrative research and Joe Kincheloe's work of research bricolage this study inquired into how textiles have served as educator throughout my life. Weaving, as the earliest and most integral of textile fabrications, is particularly featured in this narrative inquiry. A loom, in its most basic form, consists of three components; a…

  13. Ecological modernisation and institutional transformations in the Danish textile industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Bent; Hansen, Ole Erik; Holm, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The interplay of environmental regulation programs and environmental transformations in the Danish textile industry is analysed. The result of the interplay is summarised as an ecological modernisation process, which has established distributed environmental competences at enterprises...... and institutional actors in the textile industry, and has established new environmental perceptions and agendas in the industry....

  14. Application of the mixture design to decolourise effluent textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Important pollutants in textile effluents are mainly recalcitrant organics, colours, toxicants and inhibitory compounds, surfactants, chlorinated compounds (AOX), pH and salts. An aerobic system using a continuous stirred bed reactor (SBR) was continuously operated at constant temperature and fed with textile wastewater ...

  15. Environmental assessment of end-of-life textiles in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koligkioni, Athina; Parajuly, Keshav; Sørensen, Birgitte Lilholt

    2017-01-01

    The European Union is on its way to a circular economy through eco-design, waste prevention, reuse and recycling of products and materials. This study analyzes the environmental effects of end-of-life textile management in Denmark. First, a Mass Flow Analysis was performed for textile flows from...

  16. DETERMINATION OF TRACE HEAVY METALS IN SOME TEXTILE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    People want to be able to buy clothing, bedding and household textiles that have been tested and are not dyed in any way with harmful substances [6-8]. Textile products contain some organic and inorganic substance including trace metal ions. Especially, reactive and pigment dyes contain trace heavy metals at high level.

  17. Advanced microgel-functionalized polyester textiles adaptive to ambient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glampedaki, P.

    2011-01-01

    A new approach toward textile-based multi-functional and stimuli-responsive materials is proposed. Polyelectrolyte microgel technology is combined with conventional functionalization methods of photo- and thermo-crosslinking to activate the surface of polyester textiles, making them interactive with

  18. Lithium-Ion Textile Batteries with Large Areal Mass Loading

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2011-10-06

    We integrate Li-ion battery electrode materials into a 3D porous textile conductor by using a simple process. When compared to flat metal current collectors, our 3D porous textile conductor not only greatly facilitates the ability for a high active material mass loading on the battery electrode but also leads to better device performance.

  19. 16 CFR 423.6 - Textile wearing apparel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Textile wearing apparel. 423.6 Section 423.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES CARE LABELING OF TEXTILE WEARING APPAREL... the outside of the package or on a hang tag fastened to the product. (b) Care labels must state what...

  20. Stories in the Cloth: Art Therapy and Narrative Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, Lisa Raye

    2016-01-01

    In this article I weave together the relevance of narrative textile work in therapeutic and human rights contexts; showcase Common Threads, an international nonprofit that uses story cloths with survivors of gender-based violence; outline a master's level art therapy course in story cloths; and relate how textiles helped build a sibling…

  1. Assessing the Suitability of Woven Fabric and Composite Textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This art studio experimental study explored the suitability of woven cotton fabric as alternative material for creating pictorial designs for murals based on the batik, tie-and-dye, screen printing, appliqué and embroidery techniques in textiles. While painted and sculpted murals abound in Ghana, the study found textile murals a ...

  2. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  3. Toxicity assessment of treated effluents from a textile industry in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Veejay

    Key words: Textile effluent, toxicity, surface waters, growth inhibition, Celosia argentea. INTRODUCTION. Industrial effluents are undesirable by-products of economic development and technological advancement. When improperly disposed off, they imperil human health and the environment. Effluents from textile industries ...

  4. Evaluation of Microbial Systems for Biotreatment of Textile Waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of some microbial species for the decolourization and degradation of textile dye has been investigated. Six microbial strains were isolated from soil contaminated with textile waste effluents using the spread plate technique and the isolates were identified as bacterial isolates (Pseudomonas fluorescence, ...

  5. Textile and fashion production skills for sustainable development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria is a country with abundant wealth in human, cultural and natural resources. It is one country noted for its people's penchant for textiles, fashion and style. On the basis of Nigeria's rich, vibrant and viable traditional textile and fashion industry vis-à-vis the need to keep Niger Delta youths out of violence, this paper this ...

  6. Prevalence of noise induced hearing loss in textile industries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross sectional study measured the prevalence of Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in textile industries in Dar Es Salaam city and Morogoro municipality. Data were collected from 125 employees randomly selected from each of the textile factory mill in each region through structured questionnaires and audiogram ...

  7. Experimental Studies on Durability of Concrete Using Textile Effluent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt was made to use the waste water from textile industry for construction purpose, so that the shortage in water can be greatly reduced and the waste water can be suitably disposed for safe guarding the environment. The basic properties of the treated and untreated water from the textile industry were tested and the ...

  8. Industrial Design Management: The Focal Development for Textile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian textiles are on the downward trend for the past ten years. This had been blamed on the importation of second hand clothing and the inability of the textile industry to adjust to the technological growth. This has affected designs, productions, fastness of fabrics and the market forces. This paper suggest possible ...

  9. Development of smart conductive 2D-3D textile grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, P. (Pramod); Bottenberg, E. (Eliza); Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Gooijer, H. (Henk)

    2013-01-01

    The conductive textile grid is a large-scale (226 x 115 cm) multi-layer demonstrator exhibiting different conductive textile materials with certain outputs (such as LEDs, thermo-chromic ink and shape memory alloy) can be connected onto a base conductive fabric. Various conductive materials such as

  10. Antimicrobial Approaches for Textiles: From Research to Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Santos Morais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The large surface area and ability to retain moisture of textile structures enable microorganisms’ growth, which causes a range of undesirable effects, not only on the textile itself, but also on the user. Due to the public health awareness of the pathogenic effects on personal hygiene and associated health risks, over the last few years, intensive research has been promoted in order to minimize microbes’ growth on textiles. Therefore, to impart an antimicrobial ability to textiles, different approaches have been studied, being mainly divided into the inclusion of antimicrobial agents in the textile polymeric fibers or their grafting onto the polymer surface. Regarding the antimicrobial agents, different types have been used, such as quaternary ammonium compounds, triclosan, metal salts, polybiguanides or even natural polymers. Any antimicrobial treatment performed on a textile, besides being efficient against microorganisms, must be non-toxic to the consumer and to the environment. This review mainly intends to provide an overview of antimicrobial agents and treatments that can be performed to produce antimicrobial textiles, using chemical or physical approaches, which are under development or already commercially available in the form of isolated agents or textile fibers or fabrics.

  11. Adapting the Jukun Traditional Symbols for Textile Design and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adapting the Jukun Traditional Symbols for Textile Design and Production. ... Mgbakoigba: Journal of African Studies ... This research work on adaptation of the Jukun cultural symbols for textile design gives a brief introduction of the Jukun people, which are called the “karorofawas” with their rich cultural symbols.

  12. Sustainability Knowledge and Behaviors of Apparel and Textile Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller Connell, Kim Y.; Kozar, Joy M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze changes in undergraduate student knowledge of issues of sustainability relevant to the apparel and textiles industry. Assessment occurred prior to and upon completion of a course that addressed topics specific to the global production and distribution of apparel and textile goods. The study also…

  13. Identification and Characterization of Textile Fibers by Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Fiona M.; Smith, Michael J.; Silva, Magda B.

    2011-01-01

    Textile fibers are ubiquitous in the sense that they are present in the fabric of clothing, furniture, and floor and wall coverings. A remarkable variety of textile fibers with different chemical compositions are produced for many different commercial applications. As fibers are readily transferred, they are frequently recovered from crime scenes…

  14. Bioremediation of textile effluent polluted soil using kenaf ( Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the performance and heavy metals uptake of kenaf at different levels of compost application in textile effluent polluted soil. Polluted soil was collected from the vicinity of a textile company in Nigeria. Twelve-litre plastic pots were filled with 10 kg soil. Soil amendments applied were: 0 (control), 60 Kg N ...

  15. Long-distance autumn migration across the Sahara by painted lady butterflies: exploiting resource pulses in the tropical savannah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Constantí; Soto, David X; Talavera, Gerard; Vila, Roger; Hobson, Keith A

    2016-10-01

    The painted lady, Vanessa cardui, is a migratory butterfly that performs an annual multi-generational migration between Europe and North Africa. Its seasonal appearance south of the Sahara in autumn is well known and has led to the suggestion that it results from extremely long migratory flights by European butterflies to seasonally exploit the Sahel and the tropical savannah. However, this possibility has remained unproven. Here, we analyse the isotopic composition of butterflies from seven European and seven African countries to provide new support for this hypothesis. Each individual was assigned a geographical natal origin, based on its wing stable hydrogen isotope (δ 2 H w ) value and a predicted δ 2 H w basemap for Europe and northern Africa. Natal assignments of autumn migrants collected south of the Sahara confirmed long-distance movements (of 4000 km or more) starting in Europe. Samples from Maghreb revealed a mixed origin of migrants, with most individuals with a European origin, but others having originated in the Sahel. Therefore, autumn movements are not only directed to northwestern Africa, but also include southward and northward flights across the Sahara. Through this remarkable behaviour, the productive but highly seasonal region south of the Sahara is incorporated into the migratory circuit of V. cardui. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Adverse drug reaction reports for cardiometabolic drugs from sub Sahara Africa: A study in VigiBase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhe, Derbew F.; Juhlin, Kristina; Star, Kristina; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Michael, Kidane; Taxis, Katja; Mol, Peter G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many pharmacovigilance centers have been established in Sub Sahara Africa (SSA) in recent years. Their focus has been on ADRs to drugs for communicable diseases. Little is known about ADRs caused by drugs for cardiometabolic diseases, although its burden is increasing rapidly in SSA.

  17. Declines in a ground-dwelling arthropod community during an invasion by Sahara mustard (Brassica tournefortii) in aeolian sand habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather L. Hulton VanTassel; Anne M. Hansen; Cameron W. Barrows; Quresh Latif; Margaret W. Simon; Kurt E. Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Sahara Mustard (Brassica tournefortii; hereafter mustard), an exotic plant species, has invaded habitats throughout the arid southwestern United States. Mustard has reached high densities across aeolian sand habitats of southwestern deserts, including five distinct sand habitats in the eastern Coachella Valley, California. We examined trends in ground-dwelling...

  18. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY OF RESP I RATORY CONDITION IN NON TEXTILE AND TEXTILE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among cotton - ginning workers. Byssinosis is a respiratory disease caused by inhalation of cotton dust for prolonged period of time. This is most frequently occurs in the cotton mill workers. The Aim of the study is 1. Determining the proportion of workers experiencing difficulty in breathing, chest tightness, chest pain, coughing, wheezing and phlegm. 2. To evaluate the pulmonary function test variation in textile workers with non - textile workers. The present study was conducted on three groups (I, II, III of male subjects of age ranging 30 to 40 yrs, 41 to 50 yrs & 51 to 60 yrs. And each of the group is divided again into textile workers & non - textile workers. A structured questionnaire enquiring about the respiratory health was administered to the employees. And our result shows the Byssinotic symptoms were too high in cotton mill workers than control group. The pulmonary function test shows a significant reduction in lung capacity, and the mean values of FVC, FEV1, FEV1%, FEF 50%, were on negative side among cotton mill workers compared to control group and which is statistically significant.

  19. Nanoporous Carbon Nitride: A High Efficient Filter for Seawater Desalination

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-01-01

    The low efficiency of commercially-used reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has been the main obstacle in seawater desalination application. Here, we report the auspicious performance, through molecular dynamics simulations, of a seawater desalination filter based on the recently-synthesized graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) [Nat. Commun., 2015, 6, 6486]. Taking advantage of the inherent nanopores and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N filter, highly efficient seawater desalination can be achieved by modulating the nanopores under tensile strain. The water permeability can be improved by two orders of magnitude compared to RO membranes, which offers a promising approach to the global water shortage solution.

  20. Groundwater resources exploration in the Zug area (Tiris, Western Sahara); Prospeccion de recursos hidricos subterraneos en el area de Zug (Tiris, Sahara Occidental)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, B.; Villarroya, F.; Rebollo, L. F.; Olaiz, A.; Lopez, J.

    2015-07-01

    The area of Zug is located in the southwestern corner of the Tiris dorsal, in the Western Sahara. The area is characterized by outcrops of materials, mainly gneisses of archaic age and fractured granitic rocks, which in the southern sector are covered by aeolian sand sheets. A hydrogeological survey of the territory has been carried out, and boreholes and dug wells have been located and analyzed and this information integrated with the sparse outcrops. Based on this study, two hydrogeological domains have been established: Zug and Azzefal. From the analysis of satellite images, field work, geophysical profiles, a well inventory and chemical analysis, three priority areas for the location of future water supply wells have been identified: 1) alluvial fans, preferably located on the slopes of the dikes that cross the Tiris dorsal; 2) sabkhas (salt flats) as places of con- centration of ephemeral runoff and subsurface infiltration of accumulated water; 3) highly fractured granitic areas. Some of these three cases coincide with existing wells in this area. Electrical tomography shows how, in specific locations, low resistivity values reach 50 metres, opening up the possibility of finding sufficient water to meet the aforementioned needs. The water quality is not suitable for human supply directly from the well without chemical treatment. The area is still full of opportunities for future research, but only when a more stable political situation exists. (Author)

  1. Scalable and Environmentally Benign Process for Smart Textile Nanofinishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jicheng; Hontañón, Esther; Blanes, Maria; Meyer, Jörg; Guo, Xiaoai; Santos, Laura; Paltrinieri, Laura; Ramlawi, Nabil; Smet, Louis C P M de; Nirschl, Hermann; Kruis, Frank Einar; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas; Biskos, George

    2016-06-15

    A major challenge in nanotechnology is that of determining how to introduce green and sustainable principles when assembling individual nanoscale elements to create working devices. For instance, textile nanofinishing is restricted by the many constraints of traditional pad-dry-cure processes, such as the use of costly chemical precursors to produce nanoparticles (NPs), the high liquid and energy consumption, the production of harmful liquid wastes, and multistep batch operations. By integrating low-cost, scalable, and environmentally benign aerosol processes of the type proposed here into textile nanofinishing, these constraints can be circumvented while leading to a new class of fabrics. The proposed one-step textile nanofinishing process relies on the diffusional deposition of aerosol NPs onto textile fibers. As proof of this concept, we deposit Ag NPs onto a range of textiles and assess their antimicrobial properties for two strains of bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae). The measurements show that the logarithmic reduction in bacterial count can get as high as ca. 5.5 (corresponding to a reduction efficiency of 99.96%) when the Ag loading is 1 order of magnitude less (10 ppm; i.e., 10 mg Ag NPs per kg of textile) than that of textiles treated by traditional wet-routes. The antimicrobial activity does not increase in proportion to the Ag content above 10 ppm as a consequence of a "saturation" effect. Such low NP loadings on antimicrobial textiles minimizes the risk to human health (during textile use) and to the ecosystem (after textile disposal), as well as it reduces potential changes in color and texture of the resulting textile products. After three washes, the release of Ag is in the order of 1 wt %, which is comparable to textiles nanofinished with wet routes using binders. Interestingly, the washed textiles exhibit almost no reduction in antimicrobial activity, much as those of as-deposited samples. Considering that a realm

  2. Integrated measure and control system for textile machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuantao; Zhao, Jinzhi; Zhao, Zexiang

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, textile mechanical drive control is researched. Textile machinery integrated measure and control system is established. The system is composed of micro-computer, PLC, transducer, implement device, all kinds of detective components and industrial Ethernet etc. Technology of industrial field bus control and Internet technique are applied. The system is on a background of textile production technique, such as spring, woven, chemical fiber, non-woven, dyeing and finishing. A network based open integrated control system is developed. Various characteristics of production technique flow and textile machinery movement discipline are presented. Configuration software is introduced according to user's control tasks. Final remote automatic controls are finished. This may make development cost reduced, and development periods shortened. Some problems in textile machinery development process are solved, which may make transparency factory and remote development realized.

  3. Towards conductive textiles: coating polymeric fibres with graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Ana I S; Rodrigues, Daniela P; De Sanctis, Adolfo; Alonso, Elias Torres; Pereira, Maria S; Amaral, Vitor S; Melo, Luis V; Russo, Saverio; de Schrijver, Isabel; Alves, Helena; Craciun, Monica F

    2017-06-26

    Conducting fibres are essential to the development of e-textiles. We demonstrate a method to make common insulating textile fibres conductive, by coating them with graphene. The resulting fibres display sheet resistance values as low as 600 Ωsq-1, demonstrating that the high conductivity of graphene is not lost when transferred to textile fibres. An extensive microscopic study of the surface of graphene-coated fibres is presented. We show that this method can be employed to textile fibres of different materials, sizes and shapes, and to different types of graphene. These graphene-based conductive fibres can be used as a platform to build integrated electronic devices directly in textiles.

  4. The Role of Textiles in Dermatitis: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobolaji-Lawal, Motunrayo; Nedorost, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Dermatitis has important implications for individuals who are affected. It can significantly impair function and quality of life. Dermatitis is multi-factorial and often includes elements of atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and irritant contact dermatitis in a co-existent manner. Textiles are in contact with the human skin for extended periods of time and as a result, they are an important part of the cutaneous environment. Thus, it is not surprising that textiles play a major role in both the etiology and the treatment of various types of dermatitis. This review discusses the role of textiles in dermatitis with an emphasis on interesting and recent advances, trends, perspectives, gaps, and conflicts in the field. In addition, we mention other disease processes to be aware of as they can often mimic textile pattern dermatitis. Lastly, we provide a diagnostic approach for patients presenting with textile pattern dermatitis.

  5. Exploring dynamic lighting, colour and form with smart textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, I.; Silva, C.; Worbin, L.; Souto, A. P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses an ongoing research, aiming at the development of smart textiles that transform the incident light that passes through them – light transmittance – to design dynamic light without acting upon the light source. A colour and shape change prototype was developed with the objective of studying textile changes in time; to explore temperature as a dynamic variable through electrical activation of the smart materials and conductive threads integrated in the textile substrate; and to analyse the relation between textile chromic and morphologic behaviour in interaction with light. Based on the experiments conducted, results have highlighted some considerations of the dynamic parameters involved in the behaviour of thermo-responsive textiles and demonstrated design possibilities to create interactive lighting scenarios.

  6. Regional hydrogen roadmap. Project development framework for the Sahara Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhamou, Khalid [Sahara Wind Inc., Rabat (Morocco); Arbaoui, Abdelaziz [Ecole National Superieure des Arts et Metiers ENSAM Meknes (Morocco); Loudiyi, Khalid [Al Akhawayn Univ. (Morocco); Ould Mustapha, Sidi Mohamed [Nouakchott Univ. (Mauritania). Faculte des Sciences et Techniques

    2010-07-01

    The trade winds that blow along the Atlantic coast from Morocco to Senegal represent one of the the largest and most productive wind potentials available on earth. Because of the erratic nature of winds however, wind electricity cannot be integrated locally on any significant scale, unless mechanisms are developed for storing these intermittent renewable energies. Developing distributed wind energy solutions feeding into smaller electricity markets are essential for solving energy access issues and enabling the development of a local, viable renewable energy industry. These may be critical to address the region's economic challenges currently under pressure from Sub-Saharan migrant populations. Windelectrolysis for the production of hydrogen can be used in grid stabilization, as power storage, fuel or chemical feedstock in specific industries. The objective of the NATO SfP 'Sahara Trade Winds to Hydrogen' project is to support the region's universities through an applied research framework in partnership with industries where electrolysis applications are relevant. By powering two university campuses in Morocco and Mauritania with small grid connected wind turbines and 30 kW electrolyzers generating hydrogen for power back-up as part of ''green campus concepts'' we demonstrated that wind-electrolysis for the production of hydrogen could absorb larger quantities of cheap generated wind electricity in order to maximize renewable energy uptakes within the regions weaker grid infrastructures. Creating synergies with local industries to tap into a widely available renewable energy source opens new possibilities for end users such as utilities or mining industries when processing raw minerals, whose exports generates key incomes in regions most exposed to desertification and climate change issue. Initiated by Sahara Wind Inc. a company from the private sector, along with the Al Akhawayn University, the Ecole Nationale Superieure

  7. Dune ages in the sand deserts of the southern Sahara and Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Charlie; Armitage, Simon

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we aim to document the history of aeolian processes within the southern Sahara as part of the INQUA Dune Atlas. We review available luminescence ages for sand dunes across the southern Sahara and attempt to correlate periods of sand accumulation and to develop an improved understanding of the dune chronology on a regional basis. This was achieved by analysing dune age by country, as well as by latitude and longitude. The results show a very patchy spatial distribution of dune ages with large gaps that encompass some of the largest sand seas. Despite these gaps, some related patterns in dune morphology and stratigraphy appear to be consistent between northern Nigeria and southern Mali where older linear dunes are distinct from younger Late Holocene transverse and barchanoid dunes. Elsewhere in Mauretania linear dunes with different orientations appear to have accumulated at different times, most likely in response to changes in atmospheric circulation. Regional climatic changes are identified where dunes are transgressed by lake deposits within endorehic basins. We identify four locations where dune accumulation is terminated by lacustrine transgressions, two of which, in Lake Chad and the Bodélé Depression, occur shortly after the last glacial maximum (LGM). The third example at Gobiero in Niger occurred later, in the early Holocene, around 8.4 ka and a fourth marks a later transgression of Palaeolake MegaChad after 4.7 ka. Larger-scale latitudinal and longitudinal distributions in dune ages across the southern Sahara do not show any consistent patterns, though this may due to the small sample size relative to the study area. In addition, local variations in external controls such as wind regime, rainfall, vegetation and sand supply need to be considered, sometimes on a site by site basis. Limiting the analysis to dune ages determined using the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) protocol indicates a lack of dune preservation during the LGM and

  8. Textile dye degradation using nano zero valent iron: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Chandra Devi; Kanmani, S

    2016-07-15

    Water soluble unfixed dyes and inorganic salts are the major pollutants in textile dyeing industry wastewater. Existing treatment methods fail to degrade textile dyes and have limitations too. The inadequate treatment of textile dyeing wastewater is a major concern when effluent is directly discharged into the nearby environment. Long term disposal threatens the environment, which needs reclamation. This article reviews the current knowledge of nano zero valent iron (nZVI) technique in the degradation of textile dyes. The application of nZVI on textile dye degradation is receiving great attention in the recent years because nZVI particles are highly reactive towards the pollutant, less toxic, and economical. The nZVI particles aggregate quickly with respect to time and the addition of supports such as resin, nickel, zinc, bentonite, biopolymer, kaolin, rectorite, nickel-montmorillonite, bamboo, cellulose, biochar, graphene, and clinoptilolite enhanced the stability of iron nanoparticles. Inclusion of supports may in turn introduce additional toxic pollutants, hence green supports are recommended. The majority of investigations concluded dye color removal as textile dye compound removal, which is not factual. Very few studies monitored the removal of total organic carbon and observed the products formed. The results revealed that partial mineralization of the textile dye compound was achieved. Instead of stand alone technique, nZVI can be integrated with other suitable technique to achieve complete degradation of textile dye and also to treat multiple pollutants in the real textile dyeing wastewater. It is highly recommended to perform more bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to apply this technique to the textile effluent contaminated sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. PRODUCTION WITH 3D PRINTERS IN TEXTILES [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KESKIN Reyhan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 3D printers are gaining more attention, finding different applications and 3D printing is being regarded as a ‘revolution’ of the 2010s for production. 3D printing is a production method that produces 3-dimensional objects by combining very thin layers over and over to form the object using 3D scanners or via softwares either private or open source. 3D printed materials find application in a large range of fields including aerospace, automotive, medicine and material science. There are several 3D printing methods such as fused deposition modeling (FDM, stereolithographic apparatus (SLA, selective laser sintering (SLS, inkjet 3D printing and laminated object manufacturing (LOM. 3D printing process involves three steps: production of the 3D model file, conversion of the 3D model file into G-code and printing the object. 3D printing finds a large variety of applications in many fields; however, textile applications of 3D printing remain rare. There are several textile-like 3D printed products mostly for use in fashion design, for research purposes, for technical textile applications and for substituting traditional textiles suchas weft-knitted structures and lace patterns. 3D printed textile-like structures are not strong enough for textile applications as they tend to break easily and although they have the drape of a textile material, they still lack the flexibility of textiles. 3D printing technology has to gain improvement to produce materials that will be an equivalent for textile materials, and has to be a faster method to compete with traditional textile production methods.

  10. Shock Metamorphism of L6 Chondrites Sahara 98222 and Yamato 74445: the P-T Conditions and the Shock age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, S.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Miyahara, M.; Terada, K.; Kimura, M.

    2007-12-01

    Impact phenomena are the fundamental processes of accretion of the terrestrial planets. Therefore, investigations of meteorites that experienced shock events are useful for understanding mechanisms of planetary impact events and formation of terrestrial planets. Heavily shocked meteorites contain abundant shock melt veins, where some high-pressure minerals have been discovered. In this study, we investigated mineralogy of shock melt veins of two L6 chondrites (Sahara 98222 and Yamato 74445) and estimated the P-T conditions during their impact events.We found that the shock melt veins of these meteorites contain several high-pressure minerals such as wadsleyite, jadeite and tuite for Sahara 98222 and ringwoodite (+ wadsleyite), akimotoite and lingunite for Yamato 74445. Tuite is a high-pressure polymorph of whitlockite and lingunite is a high-pressure polymorph of albite with hollandite structure. Based on mineralogy in the shock veins; we estimated the pressure and temperature conditions during their impact events: 13-15 GPa, > 2000°C for Sahara 98222 and 15- 24 GPa, > 2200°C for Yamato 74445, respectively.We also conducted a U-Pb dating of phosphates in and around the shock melt veins of Sahara 98222 using a Sensitive High Resolution Ion Micro Probe (SHRIMP-II) at Hiroshima University to reveal when this shock event occurred. We obtained following radioactive ages: Pb-Pb isochron age: 4466 ± 31 Ma; U-Pb isochron age: 4498 ± 150 Ma; Total U-Pb isochron age: 4467 ± 22 Ma. These ages seem to be slightly younger than the previously reported ages of chondrites, which are usually older than 4500 Ma. This could suggest that Sahara 98222 have recorded a shock event in the very early stage of the solar system where the planetary formation was going on.

  11. MILITARY TEXTILE MATERIALS FOR EXTREME WEATHER CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TSOUTSEOS Athanasios

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the leaps in technology in warfare and modern weaponry, the human soldier remains the most important aspect of a competitive army. Military textile materials are an essential, yet often neglected, factor that protect the soldier and enable his or her actions in varying fields around the globe. The participation of most countries in larger military or peacekeeping organisations like the NATO and the UN involves the extension of the geographical areas of activity in environments varying greatly from the soldiers’ country of origin. Protection from the varying weather conditions and comfort are important factors for the optimal operational ability of a person in humanitarian actions or at combat field. Research in performance textiles has given rise to various forms of multilayered clothing and functional membranes with several commercial tradenames. These performance textiles aim at specialized sports and recreational activities as mountain climbing, hiking and cycling, among others. Additional advancements involve even more specialized function like the incorporation of microelectronics monitoring of vital signals of the human body or for the control of equipment. The incorporation of such technological advancements is a current challenge for the national and international military forces that inherit a set of strict procedures. These procedures involve standardization, detailed technical descriptions, cost and of course customs particular to each force. On the other hand, the advancements cannot be neglected and the numbers of soldiers involved are significant to enable the need for change. Current paper is concentrated on the clothing and fabric developments relating to the protection of the soldiers from extreme weather conditions.

  12. Surface-Roughness-Based Virtual Textiles: Evaluation Using a Multi-Contactor Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Matthew; Summers, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Virtual textiles, generated in response to exploratory movements, are presented to the fingertip via a 24-contactor vibrotactile array. Software models are based on surface-roughness profiles from real textiles. Results suggest that distinguishable "textile-like" surfaces are produced, but these lack the necessary accuracy for reliable matching to real textiles.

  13. A structural lattice model for electronic textile: an experimental and computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, C.W.; Van Os, K.; Luitjens, S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic textiles combine textiles with the functionality of electronic applications.To understand the mechanical issues of reliability, mechanical failure and compatibility of these electronic textiles, research has to be performed that focusses on the interplay of the textile with the electronic

  14. 76 FR 68690 - Rules and Regulations Under the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... applicable to written advertising, including Internet advertising; clarify or revise the list of exclusions... Textile Fiber Products Identification Act (``Textile Act''), 15 U.S.C. 70-70k, requires marketers to... Textile Act also contains advertising and record-keeping provisions. Section 7(c) of the Textile Act...

  15. 16 CFR 303.42 - Arrangement of information in advertising textile fiber products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... textile fiber products. 303.42 Section 303.42 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.42 Arrangement of information in advertising textile fiber products. (a) Where a textile...

  16. 78 FR 52907 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the Dominican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability...'') AGENCY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ACTION: Determination to add a... Implementation of Textile Agreements (``CITA'') has determined that certain polyester/nylon cut corduroy fabric...

  17. 16 CFR 303.30 - Textile fiber products in form for consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Textile fiber products in form for consumer... CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.30 Textile fiber products in form for consumer. A textile fiber product shall be considered to be in the form intended for...

  18. A New ‘T’ for Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earley, Rebecca; Vuletich, Clara; Hadridge, Phil

    2016-01-01

    for Hennes and Mauritz (H&M) and the Sustainable Fashion Academy (SFA) in Stockholm, Sweden. The project was developed as part of the Mistra Future Fashion research consortium, which aims to bring scientists and designers together to find sustainable and profitable industry solutions. The TED’s TEN...... sustainable design strategies for textiles and fashion was the framework for the Sustainable Design Inspiration (SDI) work at H&M – a broad and holistic approach to redesigning products including materials, process, systems, services, consumer behaviour and activism....

  19. From magnetic textiles to micromagnetic simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrmann née Tillmanns, Andrea; Weber, Marcus O.; Kammermeier, Tom; Błachowicz, Tomasz; Pawela, Łukasz; Ehrmann née Tillmanns, Andrea; Weber, Marcus O.; Kammermeier, Tom; Błachowicz, Tomasz; Pawela, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    Pewne układy magnetyczne, jak warstwy Fe/MnFe2, wykazują nieoczekiwane anizotropie. Podjęto próby odtworzenia tychże zjawisk w układach makroskopowych na bazie materiałów tekstylnych Plakat naukowy Some magnetic systems (e.g. 4-fold Fe/MnF2 thin film samples) show unexpected anisotropies – common simulations not valid, new phenomenological approaches lack support by physics-based simulations. Tailoring magnetic anisotropies by textile processing (weaving, braiding, warp knitting) of mag...

  20. Flexural Behavior of Textile-Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the flexural behaviour of textile-reinforced concrete (TRC. Two samples of TRC made of high strength reinforcing fabrics made of glass and carbon rovings were produced. Three-point bending test was carried out to examine the flexural performance of the developed samples. The maximum flexural strength and reinforcement efficiency were calculated. Experimental results showed that that all types of applied fabric reinforcement contributed to increases strength as compared to nonreinforced concrete. Furthermore, the deformation behavior of reinforced concrete was analyzed. The advantage is in higher residual load-bearing capacity, which allows maintaining the integrity of the structure.

  1. Strontium (Sr) separation from seawater using titanate adsorbents: Effects of seawater matrix ions on Sr sorption behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungho; Hong, Hye-jin; Ryu, Taegong; Park, In-Su

    2017-04-01

    Strontium (Sr) which has many industrial applications such as ferrite magnet, ceramic, and fire works exists in seawater with the concentration of approximately 7 mg/L. In previous report estimating economic potential on recovery of various elements from seawater in terms of their commercial values and concentrations in seawater, Sr locates upper than approximate break-even line, which implies Sr recovery from seawater can be potentially profitable. Recently, Sr separation from seawater has received great attention in the environmental aspect after Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident which released much amount of radioactive Sr and Cs. Accordingly, the efficient separation of radioactive elements released to seawater has become critical as an important technological need as well as their removal from radioactive wastes. So far, it has been introduced to separate Sr from aqueous media by various methods including solvent extraction, adsorption by solid materials, and ion exchange. Among them, the adsorption technique using solid adsorbents is of great interest for selectively separating Sr from seawater with respect to low concentration level of Sr. In this study, we synthesized titanate nanotube (TiNT) by simple hydrothermal reaction, characterized its physicochemical properties, and systematically evaluated Sr sorption behavior under various reaction conditions corresponding to seawater environment. The synthesized TiNT exhibited the fibril-type nanotube structure with high specific surface area of 260 m2/g. The adsorption of Sr on TiNT rapidly occurred following pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and was in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model, indicating maximum adsorption capacity of 97 mg/g. Based on Sr uptake and Na release with stoichiometric balance, sorption mechanism of Sr on TiNT was found to be ion-exchange between Na in TiNT lattice and Sr in solution phase, which was also confirmed by XRD and Raman analysis. Among competitive ions, Ca

  2. A closed recirculated sea-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    Study of a virus disease in the chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) necessitated the use of a marine environment to study the long range effects of the disease and to complete the life cycle of its etiologic agent. A closed recirculated sea-water system was designed for use under experimental laboratory conditions so that controlled studies of the disease could be made. As others may wish to do marine environment studies in the laboratory, the design and operation of our system are presented. Other systems currently in use have been described by Chin (1959), DeWitt and Salo (1960), McCrimmon and Berst (1966), and the authors of collected papers edited by Clark and Clark (1964). Preparatory to the design and construction of the system in use in this laboratory, visits were made to marine systems in use at the University of Washington's College of Fisheries, Seattle, -washington, and Friday Harbor Laboratory, San Juan Island, Washington; the Washington State Department of Fisheries' Point whitney Shellfish Laboratory, Brinnon, Washington; Humboldt State College, Arcata, California; and the Steinhart Aquarium of the California Academy of Science, San Francisco, California.

  3. Tyrihans SRSWI (subsea raw seawater injection)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Time, Nils Petter

    2010-07-01

    By the summer of 2010, Statoil will have installed and commissioned a 2 x 2.5 MW electrical subsea pump system for injection of seawater on the Tyrihans field. Powered from the Kristin platform, the system will pump untreated water directly from the sea into one well at a rate of 14000 m3/day to achieve an Increased Oil Recovery of 10%. The pump system was designed and delivered by Aker Solutions and interfaces the Tyrihans subsea production system delivered by FMC, a power umbilical from Nexans as well as the Kristin topside facilities. In addition to qualification testing, the SRSWI system underwent extensive system testing, including performance- and long term testing, and function testing of the control system from FMC and Kongsberg Maritime. The subsea modules of the SRSWI system and the power umbilical were installed by Acergy's vessel Scandi Acergy, while the topside transformers and variable speed drives were installed on Kristin by Aker Reinertsen, the topside modifications and hook-up contractor. The many interfaces in this project required close and constructive cooperation between the parties in all phases of the development. This paper summarises the experiences from the project. (Author)

  4. Brevibacterium marinum sp. nov., isolated from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Dong

    2008-02-01

    A novel yellow-pigmented actinobacterium was isolated from seawater collected from Hwasun Beach in Jeju, Republic of Korea. A comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the organism, designated HFW-26(T), was closely related to members of the genus Brevibacterium. As found for other species of the genus Brevibacterium, strain HFW-26(T) possessed meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic cell-wall diamino acid, contained MK-8(H(2)) as the major menaquinone, contained polar lipids that included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and an unknown phospholipid, and had anteiso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(17 : 0) as the predominant fatty acids. The G+C content of the DNA was 71.4 mol%. The phylogenetically closest relative was Brevibacterium picturae DSM 16132(T) (99.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). However, DNA-DNA hybridization of strain HFW-26(T) showed 35.1-43.7 % relatedness with respect to B. picturae DSM 16132(T). The novel isolate could be clearly distinguished from B. picturae DSM 16132(T) on the basis of some cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics. A battery of phenotypic and genetic data obtained in this study suggest that strain HFW-26(T) represents a novel species of the genus Brevibacterium, for which the name Brevibacterium marinum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HFW-26(T) (=JBRI 2001(T)=KCTC 19221(T)=DSM 18964(T)).

  5. A quality control procedure for seawater temperature data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ghosh, A; Pankajakshan, T.

    A three level quality check has been developed for seawater temperature data. The standards used in the procedure for the quality check are the characteristic property of vertical temperature distribution, watermass property and a standard...

  6. Seawater State Variables in Hatchery and Raceway Tanks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ambient seawater temperature and salinity was recorded on an intermittent basis for comparison with adjusted temperatures used in the aquaculture of bivalves

  7. Ionic potential as a controller of seawater composition

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    Attempts have been made to study whether linear relations exist between ionic potentials (IP) and factors determining their fate in seawater. Various elements have been studied according to the geochemical classification. Lithophilic 1 (L1) elements...

  8. The future of seawater desalination: energy, technology, and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elimelech, Menachem; Phillip, William A

    2011-08-05

    In recent years, numerous large-scale seawater desalination plants have been built in water-stressed countries to augment available water resources, and construction of new desalination plants is expected to increase in the near future. Despite major advancements in desalination technologies, seawater desalination is still more energy intensive compared to conventional technologies for the treatment of fresh water. There are also concerns about the potential environmental impacts of large-scale seawater desalination plants. Here, we review the possible reductions in energy demand by state-of-the-art seawater desalination technologies, the potential role of advanced materials and innovative technologies in improving performance, and the sustainability of desalination as a technological solution to global water shortages.

  9. Corrosion performance of zinc coated steel in seawater environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuan; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Haichao; Sun, Huyuan; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    Considering the continuous exploitation of marine resources, it is very important to study the anticorrosion performance and durability of zinc coated streel (ZCS) because its increasing use as reinforcements in seawater. Tafel polarization curves and linear polarization curves combined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to evaluate the corrosion performance of ZCS at Qingdao test station during long-term immersion in seawater. The results indicated that the corrosion rate of the ZCS increased obviously with immersion time in seawater. The corrosion products that formed on the zinc coated steel were loose and porous, and were mainly composed of Zn5(OH)8Cl2, Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2, and ZnO. Pitting corrosion occurred on the steel surface in neutral seawater, and the rate of ZCS corrosion decreased with increasing pH.

  10. Dynamics of seawater bacterial communities in a shellfish hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, S M; Chapman, C C; Bermudes, M; Tamplin, M L

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial disease is a significant issue for larviculture of several species of shellfish, including oysters. One source of bacteria is the seawater used throughout the hatchery. In this study carried out at a commercial oyster hatchery in Tasmania, Australia, the diversity of the bacterial community and its relationship with larval production outcomes were studied over a 2-year period using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and tag-encoded pyrosequencing. The bacterial communities were very diverse, dominated by the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Cyanobacteria. The communities were highly variable on scales of days, weeks and seasons. The difference between the intake seawater and treated clean seawater used in the hatchery was smaller than the observed temporal differences in the seawater throughout the year. No clear correlation was observed between production outcomes and the overall bacterial community structure. However, one group of Cyanobacterial sequences was more abundant when mass mortality events occurred than when healthy spat were produced although they were always present.

  11. Local Human Development in contexts of permanent crisis: Women’s experiences in the Western Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María López Belloso

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Sahrawi women are active agents in the social dynamics of the refugee camps, in which they have developeda number of coping strategies to overcome the hardships of a deteriorating humanitarian situation. Since the outbreak of the con#ict and the forced settlement in Tindouf, Algeria, women have been responsible for the entire management of refugee camps, assuming leadership roles in many sectors of society.This paper highlights the Sahrawi women’s contribution to the process of local human development in a context of protracted refuge such as the one in the Western Sahara. In addition to the enlargement of the refugee population’s capacities in relation to material and physical assets, social and organizational abilities, and motivational strengths, one of the major achievements of Sahrawi women has been their own individual and collective process of empowerment within the camp life.

  12. Comparison of efficacy of unheated and heat-treated Sahara honey on wound healing in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baghdad Khiati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the efficacy of unheated and heat-treated Sahara honey on wound healing in rabbits on the basis of macroscopic observation changes. Methods: Eight female rabbits were used. Using aseptic surgical technique, a 3 cm incision was made on the back of each rabbit and two rabbits with injuries in each group were treated daily with a topical application of unheated and heated honey, sulfadiazine and sterile saline, respectively. Results: The unheated honey demonstrated the highest activity on the wound compared to reference ointment silver sulfadiazine, heat-treated honey and sterile saline respectively. Further the present investigation proves that unheated honey is possessing superior wound healing activity than that of heat-treated honey. Conclusions: The result of this study confirms that unheated honey had the best wound healing effect even better than heat-treated honey.

  13. δ13C values of grass species collected in the northern Sahara desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus; Troughton, John H; Card, Kay A

    1976-06-01

    δ13C values were measured for 45 Poaceae species collected in the northern Sahara desert, at the foot of the Saharan Atlas. The results indicate a clear relationship between carbon isotope discrimination and phytogeographical distribution of the grasses. Mediterranean species predominantly had δ13C values indicating the C3 pathway of photosynthesis. By contrast, nearly all species belonging to the Saharo-Arabian and /or Sudanian group showed a C4 like carbon isotope composition. Leaf material of two species, Lygeum spartum and Stipa tenacissima, had δ13C values in the region of-20‰, i.e. intermediate between the mean δ13C values of C3 and C4 plants. However, additional speciments of both these grasses obtained from a different source (herbarium of the Hebrew University, Jerusalem) yielded a C3 like carbon isotope composition.

  14. Greening of the Sahara suppressed ENSO activity during the mid-Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Zhang, Qiong; Muschitiello, Francesco; Lu, Zhengyao; Chafik, Léon; Niedermeyer, Eva M.; Stager, J. Curt; Cobb, Kim M.; Liu, Zhengyu

    2017-07-01

    The evolution of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) during the Holocene remains uncertain. In particular, a host of new paleoclimate records suggest that ENSO internal variability or other external forcings may have dwarfed the fairly modest ENSO response to precessional insolation changes simulated in climate models. Here, using fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model simulations, we show that accounting for a vegetated and less dusty Sahara during the mid-Holocene relative to preindustrial climate can reduce ENSO variability by 25%, more than twice the decrease obtained using orbital forcing alone. We identify changes in tropical Atlantic mean state and variability caused by the momentous strengthening of the West Africa Monsoon (WAM) as critical factors in amplifying ENSO's response to insolation forcing through changes in the Walker circulation. Our results thus suggest that potential changes in the WAM due to anthropogenic warming may influence ENSO variability in the future as well.

  15. Dust and Biological Aerosols from the Sahara and Asia Influence Precipitation in the Western US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creamean, Jessie; Suski, Kaitlyn; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Cazorla, Alberto; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; White, Allen B.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-03-29

    Winter storms in California’s Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation (1), while few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global source of ice nuclei (IN). Here, we show that dust and biological aerosols transported from as far as the Sahara were present in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated IN concentrations and ice-induced precipitation. This study presents the first direct cloud and precipitation measurements showing that Saharan and Asian dust and biological aerosols likely serve as IN and play an important role in orographic precipitation processes over the western United States.

  16. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM phase images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  17. A Strategy for Material-specific e-Textile Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gowrishankar, Ramyah; Bredies, Katharina; Ylirisku, Salu

    2017-01-01

    The interaction design of e-Textile products are often characterized by conventions adopted from electronic devices rather than developing interactions that can be specific to e-Textiles. We argue that textile materials feature a vast potential for the design of novel digital interactions....... Especially the shape-reformation capabilities of textiles may inform the design of expressive and aesthetically rewarding applications. In this chapter, we propose ways in which the textileness of e-Textiles can be better harnessed. We outline an e-Textile Interaction Design strategy that is based...... on defining the material-specificity of e-Textiles as its ability to deform in ways that match the expectations we have of textile materials. It embraces an open-ended exploration of textile-related interactions (for e.g. stretching, folding, turning-inside-out etc.) and their potential for electronic...

  18. Understanding Marine Biocorrosion: Experiments with Artificial and Natural Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    from inverse polarization resistance ( Rp−1 (ohms − 1 )) of carbon steel exposed to Key West seawater side for 395 days under different seawater...but were inconsistent from batch to batch at the same site and between sites. Similarly, using polarization resistance measurements, Ray et al...Microbiologically infl uenced corrosion as a model system for the study of metal microbe interactions: A unifying electron transfer hypothesis

  19. International overview of seawater desalination plant by reverse osmosis technology

    OpenAIRE

    Kangwen, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Master's thesis in Environmental technology In a world faced with increased urbanization, population growth, climate change and degradation of water supplies, the importance of a reliable source of technology to provide fresh water emphasizes the importance of seawater desalination. Over the years a variety of seawater desalination methods have been developed throughout the world. The most common technologies available for desalination around the world are membrane reverse osmosis (RO),...

  20. Simultaneous Extraction of Lithium and Hydrogen from Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    being produced today. They basically differ in the type of electrolyte that is used. The first type of electrolysers is characterised by the use of a...the charge carriers. The reactions that take place in the electrolysis cells. In the second type of electrolysers the electrolyte is an ion...exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysers . Figure 1 shows a configuration of the seawater electrolysis. Seawater and fresh water are introduced to the

  1. Influence of seawater intrusion on microbial communities in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Tatsuya; Kim, Jungman; Kim, Yumi; Nguyen, Son G; Guevarra, Robin B; Kim, Gee Pyo; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Groundwater is the sole source of potable water on Jeju Island in the Republic of (South) Korea. Groundwater is also used for irrigation and industrial purposes, and it is severely impacted by seawater intrusion in coastal areas. Consequently, monitoring the intrusion of seawater into groundwater on Jeju is very important for health and environmental reasons. A number of studies have used hydrological models to predict the deterioration of groundwater quality caused by seawater intrusion. However, there is conflicting evidence of intrusion due to complicated environmental influences on groundwater quality. Here we investigated the use of next generation sequencing (NGS)-based microbial community analysis as a way to monitor groundwater quality and detect seawater intrusion. Pristine groundwater, groundwater from three coastal areas, and seawater were compared. Analysis of the distribution of bacterial species clearly indicated that the high and low salinity groundwater differed significantly with respect to microbial composition. While members of the family Parvularculaceae were only identified in high salinity water samples, a greater percentage of the phylum Actinobacteria was predominantly observed in pristine groundwater. In addition, we identified 48 shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with seawater, among which the high salinity groundwater sample shared a greater number of bacterial species with seawater (6.7%). In contrast, other groundwater samples shared less than 0.5%. Our results suggest that NGS-based microbial community analysis of groundwater may be a useful tool for monitoring groundwater quality and detect seawater intrusion. This technology may also provide additional insights in understanding hydrological dynamics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. International overview of seawater desalination plant by reverse osmosis technology

    OpenAIRE

    Kangwen, Shu

    2012-01-01

    In a world faced with increased urbanization, population growth, climate change and degradation of water supplies, the importance of a reliable source of technology to provide fresh water emphasizes the importance of seawater desalination. Over the years a variety of seawater desalination methods have been developed throughout the world. The most common technologies available for desalination around the world are membrane reverse osmosis (RO), thermal distillation (TD) and electrodialysis ...

  3. Calcium extraction from brine water and seawater using oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, Nadia Chrisayu; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum

    2017-01-01

    Calcium can be extracted not only from rocks but also from natural liquor such as seawater and brine water. In order to extract the calcium from seawater and brine water, oxalic acid was used in this research. Effect of variations of the volume of the oxalic acid at a constant concentration in seawater and brine water to produce calcium was investigated. The concentration of oxalic acid was 100 g/l and the variations of its volume were 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml, and 50 ml. The used seawater and brine water were firstly evaporated from 100 ml into 50 ml and then the oxalic acid was added into them with mixing to produce the calcium precipitates. The precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The SEM analysis showed that the precipitates from brine water were consisted of only calcium compound while from seawater sodium one was also found along with calcium compound. The XRD analysis showed that the calcium was present in the form of calcium oxalate for both seawater and brine water. The ICP-OES analysis of the filtrate from seawater precipitation showed that the its calcium content was decreased from 826.20 ppm to 0.04 ppm while from brine water, it decreased from 170.06 ppm to 1.96 ppm. These results showed that both seawater and brine water have the potential to be a raw material for calcium production.

  4. Tuberculosis in African refugees from the Eastern Sub-Sahara region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, Lior; Riesenberg, Klaris; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Schlaeffer, Francisc; Smolyakov, Rorzalia

    2012-02-01

    The southern region of Israel has recently experienced an influx of African refugees from the Eastern Sub-Sahara desert area. These influxes have led to a significant increase in incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in that region. To review the data of African refugees diagnosed with TB between January 2008 and August 2010 at a tertiary care regional hospital. Twenty-five TB cases were diagnosed, 22 of which presented with pulmonary TB, 3 with extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB), and 7 with combined pulmonary and EPTB. Only one case had concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and multidrug-resistant TB. Fifteen patients underwent extensive radiological investigations including chest, abdominal and spine computed tomography, 1 was reviewed by magnetic resonance imaging, and 9 underwent tissue biopsy. Eighteen patients were admitted as suspected TB and 4 as suspected pneumonia or pulmonary infiltrates that could have been defined as suspected TB. All 24 HIV-negative cases were sensitive to first-line drugs for TB, except for one case that was resistant to streptomycin and one to rifampicin. All patients responded well to first-line therapy. The average duration of hospitalization was 8.7 days (range 1-36). Following diagnosis 23 patients were transferred to a quarantine facility. We identified overutilization of medical resources and invasive procedures. For African refugees from the eastern Sub-Sahara who were HIV-negative and suspected of having TB, a sputum acid-fast smear and culture should have been the primary investigative tools before initiating treatment with four drugs (first-line), and further investigations should have been postponed and reserved for non-responders or for patients for whom the culture was negative. Physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for EPTB in this population.

  5. Inside the "African cattle complex": animal burials in the holocene central Sahara.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino di Lernia

    Full Text Available Cattle pastoralism is an important trait of African cultures. Ethnographic studies describe the central role played by domestic cattle within many societies, highlighting its social and ideological value well beyond its mere function as 'walking larder'. Historical depth of this African legacy has been repeatedly assessed in an archaeological perspective, mostly emphasizing a continental vision. Nevertheless, in-depth site-specific studies, with a few exceptions, are lacking. Despite the long tradition of a multi-disciplinary approach to the analysis of pastoral systems in Africa, rarely do early and middle Holocene archaeological contexts feature in the same area the combination of settlement, ceremonial and rock art features so as to be multi-dimensionally explored: the Messak plateau in the Libyan central Sahara represents an outstanding exception. Known for its rich Pleistocene occupation and abundant Holocene rock art, the region, through our research, has also shown to preserve the material evidence of a complex ritual dated to the Middle Pastoral (6080-5120 BP or 5200-3800 BC. This was centred on the frequent deposition in stone monuments of disarticulated animal remains, mostly cattle. Animal burials are known also from other African contexts, but regional extent of the phenomenon, state of preservation of monuments, and associated rock art make the Messak case unique. GIS analysis, excavation data, radiocarbon dating, zooarchaeological and isotopic (Sr, C, O analyses of animal remains, and botanical information are used to explore this highly formalized ritual and the lifeways of a pastoral community in the Holocene Sahara.

  6. Research of Model Scale Seawater Intrusion using Geoelectric Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyadi Supriyadi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A depth experience and knowledge are needed in analyzing the prediction of seawater intrusion. We report here a physical modelling for monitoring the model scale of seawater intrusion. The model used in this research is glass basin consists of two parts; soil and seawater. The intrusion of seawater into soil in the glass basin is modelled. The results of 2-D inversion by using software Res2DInv32 showed that the monitoring of seawater intrusion, in soil model scale, can be detected by using Schlumberger configuration resistivity method. The watering process of freshwater into soil caused the electric resistivity value decreased. This phenomenon can be seen from the transition of the resistivity pseudo section before and after the watering process using different cummulative volume of freshwater in different soil. After being intruded by the seawater, the measured soil resistivity is 2.22 Ωm – 5.69 Ωm which means that the soil had been intruded.

  7. Nanopatterned textile-based wearable triboelectric nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Wanchul; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Lee, Keun Young; Shin, Kyung-Sik; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lin, Jianjian; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a fully flexible, foldable nanopatterned wearable triboelectric nanogenerator (WTNG) with high power-generating performance and mechanical robustness. Both a silver (Ag)-coated textile and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanopatterns based on ZnO nanorod arrays on a Ag-coated textile template were used as active triboelectric materials. A high output voltage and current of about 120 V and 65 μA, respectively, were observed from a nanopatterned PDMS-based WTNG, while an output voltage and current of 30 V and 20 μA were obtained by the non-nanopatterned flat PDMS-based WTNG under the same compressive force of 10 kgf. Furthermore, very high voltage and current outputs with an average value of 170 V and 120 μA, respectively, were obtained from a four-layer-stacked WTNG under the same compressive force. Notably it was found there are no significant differences in the output voltages measured from the multilayer-stacked WTNG over 12 000 cycles, confirming the excellent mechanical durability of WTNGs. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the self-powered operation of light-emitting diodes, a liquid crystal display, and a keyless vehicle entry system only with the output power of our WTNG without any help of external power sources.

  8. NONWOVEN TEXTILES WITH MEDICAL DESTINATION ROMANIAN PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BULACU Romulus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The widest range of medical disposable from nonwoven textiles are: absorbent and hygiene products : (diapers, feminine care, incontinence from the layered structures absorbent or impervious; use products such as hospital operating theaters sterile clothing (caps, gowns, masks, shoe coverings, materials for field operators, lab coats, packaging materials for hot or cold treatments, sterile materials (wipes, bandages, sterile bandages, etc.. Currently these materials, in their majority, are imported. This paper presents research done for getting, with the country equipment, disposable medical products from 40 g/m2 nonwoven textile materials. The technology adopted for the purpose, in SC "Minet" S.A. Ramnicu Valcea, Romania consisted of the following steps:Carding - folding, the aggregate Spinnbau-Hergeth type, Germany, with major changes carding technology adjustment and folding, to obtain a fibrous layer with a mass per unit surface of about 40-50 g / m2 and a width of 2,1 m;Pre-heat consolidation by pre-heating required only to ensure product stability required minimal interphase transport to final consolidation. Final thermal consolidation of the fibrous layer by thermal calendering at a temperature of 110°C and calenders cylinder speed of 2 m / min. The processing of the fiber by carding - folding and preliminary thermally consolidation and final by calendering.

  9. Plasma Sterilization: New Epoch in Medical Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, P.; Arun, N.; Vigneswaran, C.

    2015-04-01

    Clothing is perceived to be second skin to the human body since it is in close contact with the human skin most of the times. In hospitals, use of textile materials in different forms and sterilization of these materials is an essential requirement for preventing spread of germs. The need for appropriate disinfection and sterilization techniques is of paramount importance. There has been a continuous demand for novel sterilization techniques appropriate for use on various textile materials as the existing sterilization techniques suffer from various technical and economical drawbacks. Plasma sterilization is the alternative method, which is friendlier and more effective on the wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Basically, the main inactivation factors for cells exposed to plasma are heat, UV radiation and various reactive species. Plasma exposure can kill micro-organisms on a surface in addition to removing adsorbed monolayer of surface contaminants. Advantages of plasma surface treatment are removal of contaminants from the surface, change in the surface energy and sterilization of the surface. Plasma sterilization aims to kill and/or remove all micro-organisms which may cause infection of humans or animals, or which can cause spoilage of foods or other goods. This review paper emphasizes necessity for sterilization, essentials of sterilization, mechanism of plasma sterilization and the parameters influencing it.

  10. Tubular Steel Arch Stabilized by Textile Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Svoboda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tubular steel arch supporting textile membrane roofing is investigated experimentally and numerically. The stabilization effects of the textile membrane on in-plane and out-of-plane behavior of the arch is of primary interest. First a model of a large membrane structure tested in laboratory is described. Prestressed membranes of PVC coated polyester fabric Ferrari® Précontraint 702S were used as a currently standard and excellent material. The test arrangement, loading and resulting load/deflection values are presented. The supporting structure consisted of two steel arch tubes, outer at edge of the membrane and inner supporting interior of the membrane roofing. The stability and strength behavior of the inner tube under both symmetrical and asymmetrical loading was monitored and is shown in some details. Second the SOFiSTiK software was employed to analyze the structural behavior in 3D, using geometrically nonlinear analysis with imperfections (GNIA. The numerical analysis, FE mesh sensitivity, the membrane prestressing and common boundary conditions are validated by test results. Finally a parametrical study concerning stability of mid arch with various geometries in a membrane structure with several supporting arches is presented, with recommendations for a practical design.

  11. Nanomaterials for Functional Textiles and Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Pedro J.; Urrutia, Aitor; Goicoechea, Javier; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles are very interesting because of their surface properties, different from bulk materials. Such properties make possible to endow ordinary products with new functionalities. Their relatively low cost with respect to other nano-additives make them a promising choice for industrial mass-production systems. Nanoparticles of different kind of materials such as silver, titania, and zinc oxide have been used in the functionalization of fibers and fabrics achieving significantly improved products with new macroscopic properties. This article reviews the most relevant approaches for incorporating such nanoparticles into synthetic fibers used traditionally in the textile industry allowing to give a solution to traditional problems for textiles such as the microorganism growth onto fibers, flammability, robustness against ultraviolet radiation, and many others. In addition, the incorporation of such nanoparticles into special ultrathin fibers is also analyzed. In this field, electrospinning is a very promising technique that allows the fabrication of ultrathin fiber mats with an extraordinary control of their structure and properties, being an ideal alternative for applications such as wound healing or even functional membranes.

  12. Health and safety concerns of textiles with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L.; Ramos, D.

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing concern related to the effects of nanomaterials in health and safety.Nanotechnologies are already present in many consumer products, including textiles. “Nanotextiles” can be considered as traditional textiles with the incorporation of nanoparticles. They present often functionalities such as antibacterial, ultraviolet radiation protection, water and dirt repellency, self-cleaning or flame retardancy. Nanoparticles can be released from the textile materials due to different effects (abrasion and other mechanical stresses, sweat, irradiation, washing, temperature changes, etc.). It is then expectable that “nanotextiles” may release individual nanoparticles, agglomerates of nanoparticles or small particles of textile with or without nanoparticles, depending on the type of integration of the nanoparticles in textiles. The most important exposure route of the human body to nanoparticles in case of textiles is skin contact. Several standards are being developed under the auspices of the European Committee for Standardization. In this paper, it is presented the development and application of a test method to evaluate the skin exposure to nanoparticles, to evaluate the transfer of the nanoparticles from the textile to the skin by the effect of abrasion and sweat.

  13. Long term respiratory health effects in textile workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Peggy S.; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Over 60 million people worldwide work in the textile or clothing industry. Recent studies have recognized the contribution of workplace exposures to chronic lung diseases, in particular chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Early studies in textile workers have focused on the relationship between hemp or cotton dust exposure and the development of a syndrome termed Byssinosis. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effect of long term exposure to organic dust in textile workers on chronic respiratory disease in the broader context of disease classifications such as reversible or irreversible obstructive lung disease (i.e. asthma or COPD), and restrictive lung disease. Recent findings Cessation of exposure to cotton dusts leads to improvement in lung function. Recent animal models have suggested a shift in the lung macrophage:dendritic cell population as a potential mechanistic explanation for persistent inflammation in the lung due to repeated cotton-dust related endotoxin exposure. Other types of textile dust, such as silk, may contribute to COPD in textile workers. Summary Textile dust related obstructive lung disease has characteristics of both asthma and COPD. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of chronic lung disease due to organic dust exposure in textile workers. PMID:23361196

  14. A wearable tracking device inkjet-printed on textile

    KAUST Repository

    Krykpayev, Bauyrzhan

    2017-05-20

    Despite the abundance of localization applications, the tracking devices have never been truly realized in E-textiles. Standard printed circuit board (PCB)-based devices are obtrusive and rigid and hence not suitable for textile based implementations. An attractive option would be direct printing of circuit layout on the textile itself, negating the use of rigid PCB materials. However, high surface roughness and porosity of textiles prevents efficient and reliable printing of electronics on textile. In this work, by printing an interface layer on the textile first, a complete localization circuit integrated with an antenna has been inkjet-printed on the textile for the first time. Printed conductive traces were optimized in terms of conductivity and resolution by controlling the number of over-printed layers. The tracking device determines the wearer\\'s position using WiFi and this information can be displayed on any internet-enabled device, such as smart phone. The device is compact (55mm×45mm) and lightweight (22g with 500mAh battery) for people to comfortably wear it and can be easily concealed in case discretion is required. The device operates at 2.4GHz communicated up to a distance of 55m, with localization accuracy of up to 8m.

  15. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) contamination from textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supreeyasunthorn, Phenpimuk; Boontanon, Suwanna K; Boontanon, Narin

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in textiles and to determine PFOS and PFOA contamination in textile washing water. Quantification analysis was performed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of 32 textile samples by methanol extraction revealed that the average concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were 0.18 µg m(-2) (0.02 to 0.61 µg m(-2)) and 2.74 µg m(-2) (0.31 to 14.14 µg m(-2)), respectively. Although the average concentration of PFOS found in textile samples was below European Union (EU) Commission regulations (textile samples had PFOA concentrations exceeding 1 µg m(-2). Thus, based on these results, the concentration of PFOA in products should also be regulated. Experiments on PFOS and PFOA leaching into washing water were conducted. The maximum concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were measured after the first washing; the concentrations gradually decreased with each subsequent washing. PFOS and PFOA migrated from textiles and were released into the environment, with disappearance percentages of 29.8% for PFOS and 99% for PFOA. The data presented in this study showed that textiles could be a significant direct and indirect source of PFOS and PFOA exposure for both humans and the environment.

  16. Electric energy consumption in the cotton textile processing stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palamutcu, S. [Textile Engineering Department, Pamukkale University, Engineering Faculty, 20070 Kinikli, Denizli (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    Electric energy is one of the primary energy sources consumpted in cotton textile processing. Current energy cost rate is reported about 8-10% in the total production cost of an ordinary textile product manufactured in Turkey. Significantly important share of this energy cost is electric energy. The aim of this paper was to investigate unit electric energy consumption of cotton textile processing stages using real-time measurements method. Actual and estimated Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) values for electric energy was calculated in the cotton textile processing stages of spinning, warping-sizing, weaving, wet processing and clothing manufacturing. Actual electric energy consumption data are gathered from monthly records of the involved plant managements. Estimated electric energy consumption data is gathered through on-site measurement. Actual and estimated electric energy consumption data and monthly production quantities of the corresponding months are used to facilitate specific electric energy consumption of the plants. It is found that actual electric energy consumption amount per unit textile product is higher than the estimated electric energy consumption amount per unit textile product of each involved textile processing stages. (author)

  17. THE DYNAMICS OF THE TEXTILE MARKET. ANALYTICAL REFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliona CERNOVA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the transition to a market economy, the state of many countries’ economies and the international textile industry face considerable challenges. There are many uncertainties surrounding the global textile market, exacerbated by gloomy predictions that for a decade should have been eliminated, resulting in “free” trade flows. There is no doubt that manufacturers which have created niche markets will be better positioned to compete in the global marketplace and achieve higher margins for products while yielding greater profitability. This paper is an introduction of a reasearch that examines how some textile market niches have evolved. The goal of this paper is research and the role that textile niche markets will play by 2025. Specific objectives are: to give a broad overview of various trade theories, including classical, neo-classical, post-neo-classical, and modern, in order to determine what are the possibilities for development and protection. In particular, emphasis will be focused the special problems, due to the vector exchanges and commercial conjuncture, to illustrate how traditional marketing methods differ from market to market and to examine what role will play niche markets in the textiles industry and textile apparel industry in 2050. The results of this research study will help formulate a business strategy that can be used in market capitalization and will provide a framework for research for textile researchers at a global level.

  18. Dermal exposure potential from textiles that contain silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Thomas, Treye A; LeBouf, Ryan F; Wade, Eleanor E; Abbas Virji, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Factors that influence exposure to silver particles from the use of textiles are not well understood. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of product treatment and physiological factors on silver release from two textiles. Methods: Atomic and absorbance spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were applied to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the textiles and evaluate silver release in artificial sweat and saliva under varying physiological conditions. One textile had silver incorporated into fiber threads (masterbatch process) and the other had silver nanoparticles coated on fiber surfaces (finishing process). Results: Several complementary and confirmatory analytical techniques (spectroscopy, microscopy, etc.) were required to properly assess silver release. Silver released into artificial sweat or saliva was primarily in ionic form. In a simulated “use” and laundering experiment, the total cumulative amount of silver ion released was greater for the finishing process textile (0.51±0.04%) than the masterbatch process textile (0.21±0.01%); P<0.01. Conclusions: We found that the process (masterbatch vs finishing) used to treat textile fibers was a more influential exposure factor than physiological properties of artificial sweat or saliva. PMID:25000110

  19. Blue and grey water footprint of textile industry in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Laili; Ding, Xuemei; Wu, Xiongying

    2013-01-01

    Water footprint (WF) is a newly developed idea that indicates impacts of freshwater appropriation and wastewater discharge. The textile industry is one of the oldest, longest and most complicated industrial chains in the world's manufacturing industries. However, the textile industry is also water intensive. In this paper, we applied a bottom-up approach to estimate the direct blue water footprint (WFdir,blue) and direct grey water footprint (WFdir,grey) of China's textile industry at sector level based on WF methodology. The results showed that WFdir,blue of China's textile industry had an increasing trend from 2001 to 2010. The annual WFdir,blue surpassed 0.92 Gm(3)/yr (giga cubic meter a year) since 2004 and rose to peak value of 1.09 Gm(3)/yr in 2007. The original and residuary WFdir,grey (both were calculated based on the concentration of chemical oxygen demand (CODCr)) of China's textile industry had a similar variation trend with that of WFdir,blue. Among the three sub-sectors of China's textile industry, the manufacture of textiles sector's annual WFdir,blue and WFdir,grey were much larger than those of the manufacture of textile wearing apparel, footware and caps sector and the manufacture of chemical fibers sector. The intensities of WFdir,blue and WF(res)dir,grey of China's textile industry were year by year decreasing through the efforts of issuing restriction policies on freshwater use and wastewater generation and discharge, and popularization of water saving and wastewater treatment technologies.

  20. Finite element based micro-mechanics modeling of textile composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Textile composites have the advantage over laminated composites of a significantly greater damage tolerance and resistance to delamination. Currently, a disadvantage of textile composites is the inability to examine the details of the internal response of these materials under load. Traditional approaches to the study fo textile based composite materials neglect many of the geometric details that affect the performance of the material. The present three dimensional analysis, based on the representative volume element (RVE) of a plain weave, allows prediction of the internal details of displacement, strain, stress, and failure quantities. Through this analysis, the effect of geometric and material parameters on the aforementioned quantities are studied.

  1. The Potential of Improving Medical Textile for Cutaneous Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, C. D.; Cerempei, A.; Salariu, M.; Parteni, O.; Ulea, E.; Campagne, Chr

    2017-10-01

    The paper dwells on the prospect of medical textiles designed to release a drug/active principle to the dermis of patients suffering from cutaneous disease (allergic dermatitis, psoriasis, bacterial/infectious conditions and inflammatory conditions). The paper is an overview of general and experimental data from textile applications. An adequate medical textile may have a cellulosic structure, mainly knitted cotton fabric. In special cases, one may use woven fabric for multilayer drug-releasing systems. As far as controlled release systems are concerned, we carried out a critical comparison between the systems described in literature and our experimental findings as concerns cyclodextrin, hydrogel, film charged with active principles and multilayer system.

  2. Stimuli-responsive Hydrogels for Textile Functionalisation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štular Danaja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews hydrogels used for the functionalisation of textile materials. Hydrogels are reviewed according to their reason for incorporation, aspects of crosslinking, stimuli-responsive characteristics and particle size. A more in-depth focus on the effect of hydrogel particle size is provided, where macrogels, microgels and nanogels for textile functionalisation are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of each size group are presented. Furthermore, the correlation between synthesis conditions and the sizes of hydrogel particles is discussed, in addition to the applications of macro-, micro- and nanogels to textile materials and their intended uses.

  3. MUSEOS TEXTILES EN CANADÁ, GUATEMALA Y MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco López Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Los productos textiles no suelen ser protagónicos en las prácticas museográficas tradicionales; se les considera objetos decorativos, piezas de arte popular o elementos etnográficos, pero generalmente apoyan discursos de otras tipologías museales, más convencionales y establecidas. Por ello, este texto compara los fondos y los sistemas expositivos de tres instituciones dedicadas exclusivamente al objeto textil: el Textile Museum of Canada (fundado en Toronto en 1975; el Museo Ixchel del Traje Indígena (inaugurado en Guatemala en 1977; y el Museo Textil de Oaxaca (abierto al público en 2008. Se propone que los museos textiles son entidades híbridas y sugerentes, con frágiles acervos que requieren soluciones museográficas provenientes de la antropología, la historia del arte occidental “culta” y las artes populares. Si bien el discurso curatorial de los museos textiles ha sido relativamente periférico, también es polivalente: (reafirma identidades nacionales, pero construye nuevas visiones —más incluyentes— de diversidad cultural. Textile artifacts are not central devices in generalized curatorial practices: even if these objects might be considered simultaneously as decorative items, popular art pieces or ethnographical resources, they are certainly not independent from more traditionalist and established kinds of exhibits. For those reasons, this article will compare the collections and displays of three important institutions exclusively related to textile artifacts: the Textile Museum of Canada (inaugurated in Toronto in 1975; the Museum Ixchel of the Indigenous Garment (opened to the public in 1977 in Guatemala; and the Museum Textil of Oaxaca, Mexico (founded in 2008. Some institutional, architectonical and technical aspects of these three museums will be compared. The article will suggest some patrimonial possibilities latent in textile museums, according to their precise typological traits, with the main idea that

  4. Study of energy optimization in textile sector; Estudo de otimizacao energetica setorial textil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, N.W.B.; Camargos, J.O. [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Morais, F.M. de; Mattos Silva, E. de [Centro de Apoio a Pequena e Media Empresa, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1990-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study carried by CEMIG (electric power public utility of Minas Gerais state) and CEAG (support center for the medium and small company of Minas Gerais State) on the energy optimization in the textile sector. The main results were the following: characterization of the sector`s productive process; consumption distribution of electric power and alternative sources of energy; specific consumptions; recommendations for energy conservation and technologic situation of the sector. 11 refs., 4 tabs

  5. A study of the relict fish fauna of northern Chad, with the first records of a polypterid and a poeciliid in the Sahara desert

    OpenAIRE

    Trape, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Seventeen species and sub-species of fishes belonging to four families (Cyprinidae, Clariidae, Aplocheilidae, Cichlidae) were known to occur in perennial bodies of water in the Sahara desert. The study of fishes collected in Lake Boukou near Ounianga Serir (Borkou, northern Chad) shows, for the first time, the occurrence in the Sahara desert of relict populations of Polypterus senegalus (Polypteridae) and Poropanchax normani (Poeciliidae). The Cichlidae Tilapia zilli was also collected in thi...

  6. Monitoring project impact on biomass increase in the context of the Great Green Wall for the Sahara and Sahel Initiative in Senegal

    OpenAIRE

    SCHUCKNECHT ANNE; MERONI MICHELE; REMBOLD Felix

    2016-01-01

    Land degradation and desertification represent a major threat to the population and ecosystems of (semi)-arid regions like the Sahel and the Sahara. In 2007, the African Union launched a pan-African programme, the Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel Initiative (GGWSSI) to reverse land degradation and desertification in the region, improve food security and support local people to adapt to climate change. Within the GGWSSI different kinds of projects have been implemented. In order t...

  7. Influence of glacial meltwater on global seawater δ234U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Carli A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Das, Sarah B.; Sheik, Cody; Stevenson, Emily I.

    2018-03-01

    We present the first published uranium-series measurements from modern Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) runoff and proximal seawater, and investigate the influence of glacial melt on global seawater δ234U over glacial-interglacial (g-ig) timescales. Climate reconstructions based on closed-system uranium-thorium (U/Th) dating of fossil corals assume U chemistry of seawater has remained stable over time despite notable fluctuations in major elemental compositions, concentrations, and isotopic compositions of global seawater on g-ig timescales. Deglacial processes increase weathering, significantly increasing U-series concentrations and changing the δ234U of glacial meltwater. Analyses of glacial discharge from GrIS outlet glaciers indicate that meltwater runoff has elevated U concentrations and differing 222Rn concentrations and δ234U compositions, likely due to variations in subglacial residence time. Locations with high δ234U have the potential to increase proximal seawater δ234U. To better understand the impact of bulk glacial melt on global seawater δ234U over time, we use a simple box model to scale these processes to periods of extreme deglaciation. We account for U fluxes from the GrIS, Antarctica, and large Northern Hemisphere Continental Ice Sheets, and assess sensitivity by varying melt volumes, duration and U flux input rates based on modern subglacial water U concentrations and compositions. All scenarios support the hypothesis that global seawater δ234U has varied by more than 1‰ through time as a function of predictable perturbations in continental U fluxes during g-ig periods.

  8. Impurities Removal in Seawater to Optimize the Magnesium Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, N. C.; Firdiyono, F.; Sulistiyono, E.

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium extraction from seawater is promising way because magnesium is the second abundant element in seawater and Indonesia has the second longest coastline in the world. To optimize the magnesium extraction, the impurities in seawater need to be eliminated. Evaporation and dissolving process were used in this research to remove the impurities especially calcium in seawater. Seawater which has been evaporated from 100 ml to 50 ml was dissolved with variations solution such as oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate. The solution concentration is 100 g/l and it variations are 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml and 50 ml. This step will produce precipitate and filtrate then it will be analysed to find out the result of this process. The precipitate was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) but the filtrate was analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). XRD analysis shows that calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate were formed and ICP analysis shows that the remaining calcium in seawater using oxalic acid is about 0.01% and sodium 0.14% but when using ammonium bicarbonate the remaining calcium is 2.5% and sodium still more than 90%. The results show that both oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate can remove the impurities but when using oxalic acid, not only the impurities but also magnesium was precipitated. The conclusion of this research is the best solution to remove the impurities in seawater without precipitate the magnesium is using ammonium bicarbonate.

  9. La industria textil uruguaya (1900-1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Bertino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La industria textil uruguaya se inició a comienzos del siglo XX con la instalación de algunas fábricas de tejidos de lana y de una gran hilandería de lana peinada. Desde la crisis de 1929, sustentada en la protección cambiaría, se expandió en forma acelerada durante el periodo conocido como de industrialización por sustitución de importaciones. Alcanzó su apogeo entre fines de la segunda guerra mundial y comienzos de la década de los cincuenta, al instalar hilanderías de algodón y de fibras sintéticas y cuando las exportaciones industriales laneras adquirieron una importante dimensión. El progresivo agotamiento de la sustitución de importaciones, los frenos opuestos a las exportaciones, junto al estancamiento económico del país y el desmontaje de la protección estatal, la sumieron en una profunda crisis y en la pérdida creciente de significación en la industria y en la economía uruguaya.The Uruguayan textile industry started in the early xxth century based on the production of woven fabric and wool spinning mill (tops. From the years of the 1929's crisis onwards, it went through a great expansion due to a protectionist policy based on favourable exchange rates. Those were the times of the Import Substitutive Industrialization (ISI in the country. After the Second World War and, particularly, during the fifties it reached its height with the production of cotton fabrics and synthetic fibers. Meanwhile, wool exports would grow strongly. However, in the late fifties, the ISI strategy was in trouble and the obstacles for export's growth and the economic stagnation together with the removal of the protectionist's policies, put an end to the textile industry development. As a consequence, it experienced a deep crisis and lost importance both for the industry and for the economy as a whole.

  10. Boron Removal in Seawater Reverse Osmosis System

    KAUST Repository

    Rahmawati, Karina

    2011-07-01

    Reverse osmosis successfully proves to remove more than 99% of solute in seawater, providing fresh water supply with satisfied quality. Due to some operational constraints, however, some trace contaminants removal, such as boron, cannot be achieved in one pass system. The stringent criterion for boron from World Health Organization (WHO) and Saudi Arabia local standard (0.5 mg/l) is hardly fulfilled by single pass sea water reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants. Some design processes have been proposed to deal with boron removal, but they are not economically efficient due to high energy and chemical consumption. The objective of this study was to study boron removal by different reverse osmosis membranes in two pH conditions, with and without antiscalant addition. Thus, it was expected to observe the possibility of operating single pass system and necessity to operate two pass system using low energy membrane. Five membrane samples were obtained from two different manufacturers. Three types of feed water pH were used, pH 8, pH 10, and pH 10 with antiscalant addition. Experiment was conducted in parallel to compare membrane performance from two manufacturers. Filtration was run with fully recycle mode for three days. Sample of permeate and feed were taken every 12 hours, and analyzed for their boron and TDS concentration. Membrane samples were also tested for their surface charge. The results showed that boron rejection increases as the feed pH increases. This was caused by dissociation of boric acid to negatively charged borate ion and more negatively charged membrane surface at elevated pH which enhance boron rejection. This study found that single pass reverse osmosis system, with and without elevating the pH, may not be possible to be applied because of two reasons. First, permeate quality in term of boron, does not fulfill WHO and local Saudi Arabia regulations. Second, severe scaling occurs due to operation in alkaline condition, since Ca and Mg concentration are

  11. Une vie consacrée à la science du Sahara et de son passé

    OpenAIRE

    Sèbe, Berny

    2014-01-01

    Né en 1916, Henri-Jean Hugot est le dernier représentant de l’élite des savants pluri-disciplinaires du Sahara encore parmi nous. A l’instar des Théodore Monod ou des Henri Lhote, qui nous ont quittés dans les deux dernières décennies, il s’est intéressé au cours de sa longue carrière scientifique à de nombreux aspects du passé des grands espaces sahariens, offrant des perspectives pionnières qui ont permis de notables avancées dans la compréhension des populations préhistoriques du Sahara. ...

  12. Geochemical and mineralogical evidence for Sahara and Sahel dust additions to Quaternary soils on Lanzarote, eastern Canary Islands, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Skipp, G.; Prospero, J.M.; Patterson, D.; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the most important source of dust in the world today, and dust storms are frequent on the nearby Canary Islands. Previous workers have inferred that the Sahara is the most important source of dust to Canary Islands soils, with little contribution from the Sahel region. Soils overlying a late Quaternary basalt flow on Lanzarote, Canary Islands, contain, in addition to volcanic minerals, quartz and mica, exotic to the island's bedrock. Kaolinite in the soils also likely has an exotic origin. Trace-element geochemistry shows that the soils are derived from varying proportions of locally derived basalt and African dust. Major-element geochemistry, clay mineralogy and interpretation of satellite imagery suggest that dust additions to the Canary Islands come not only from the Sahara Desert, but also from the Sahel region. ?? Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. The friction property of super-hydrophobic cotton textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Changhong; Li, Jun

    2010-04-01

    Two kinds of super-hydrophobic cotton textiles were prepared via dip-coating cotton textiles with nano-silica suspensions, and the cotton textiles exhibits high contact angle more than 160° and low sliding angle lower than 4°. A friction method was used to evaluate the durability of the as-prepared super-hydrophobic cotton textiles, the results shows that one of the as-prepared super-hydrophobic cottons exhibits better stability property against friction, and its contact angle remained higher than 150° and sliding angle remained lower than 15° after 1000 times friction. SEM analysis shows the reduction of hydrophobic property was resulted from the damage of surface structure during friction cycle.

  14. Energy and environmental nanotechnology in conductive paper and textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2012-01-01

    Paper and textiles have been used ubiquitously in our everyday lives, such as books and newspapers for propagating information, clothing and packaging. In this perspective, we will summarize our recent efforts in exploring these old materials for emerging energy and environmental applications. The motivations and challenges of using paper and textiles for device applications will be discussed. Various types of energy and environmental devices have been demonstrated including supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, microbial fuel cells and water filters. Due to their unique morphologies, paper and textile-based devices not only can be fabricated with simple processing, but also show outstanding device performance. Being renewable and earth-abundant materials, paper and textiles could play significant roles in addressing future energy and environmental challenges. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Indoor Decontamination Textiles by Photocatalytic Oxidation: A Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Memon, Hafeezullah; Yasin, Sohail; Ali Khoso, Nazakat; Hussain, Munir

    2015-01-01

    ...; this is achieved by imparting functionality to the textile materials. The indoor environment possesses a variety of pollutants which do not come from the outer environment, but they come from the inner environment itself...

  16. E-textiles in Clinical Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Fleury

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Electronic textiles have potential for many practical uses in clinical rehabilitation. This scoping review appraises recent and emerging developments of textile-based sensors with applications to rehabilitation. Contributions published from 2009 to 2013 are appraised with a specific focus on the measured physiological or biomechanical phenomenon, current measurement practices, textile innovations, and their merits and limitations. While fabric-based signal quality and sensor integration have advanced considerably, overall system integration (including circuitry and power has not been fully realized. Validation against clinical gold standards is inconsistent at best, and feasibility with clinical populations remains to be demonstrated. The overwhelming focus of research and development has been on remote sensing but the opportunity for textile-mediated feedback to the wearer remains unexplored. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  17. Fundamental Aspects on Conductive Textiles Implemented in Intelligent System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.; Ene, D.; Amariei, N.; Popa, A.

    2017-06-01

    Conductive fibers, which are electrically conductive elements having the structure of a fiber, have a fairly long history and have been used for applications in electronic textiles as well as for aesthetics, anti-static and shielding purposes. Electrically conducting textile fibers, such as gold-coated threads, were produced in antiquity for aesthetic purposes, before the discovery of electricity, using various manufacturing methods. The textile intelligent systems, which comprise conducting textile structures (electroconducting wires or structures), present a dynamic behavior which favors the self regulation of the thermal insulation and vapor permeability with the purpose to maintain the thermo-physiological balance; the clothing assembly aims at monitoring the biologic potential, used only in critical situation (ex. accidents, falling down in a precipice etc.).

  18. Auxiliaries for the textile industry and environmental protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda VISAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry is an industrial field that affects the environment, from the plant growth until the production process. The obtaining of environmental licence for Romanian companies that produce textile products is related to elaboration and implementation of a modern system for an environmental management, that consist in utilization of ecological technologies for finishing, in diminution the water and energy consumption, cleaning of waste waters, reutilization of cleaned waters, sustainable management of wastes. In this study, the surfactant categories used in the textile industry that fulfil the conditions of environment protection, are presented. Some exemplifications were made involving the existing surfactants in Romanian textile industry, obtained from both domestic and external production. Also, some recommendation are suggested regarding the utilization of surfactants manufactured from either vegetal oils or chemical/petrochemical wastes, with similar properties as those from import having decreased prices an that affect as small as possible the environment.

  19. Development of a luminous textile for reflective pulse oximetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehel, Marek; Wolf, Martin; Boesel, Luciano F.; Rossi, René M.; Bona, Gian-Luca; Scherer, Lukas J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a textile-based sensing principle for long term photopletysmography (PPG) monitoring is presented. Optical fibers were embroidered into textiles such that out-coupling and in-coupling of light was possible. The “light-in light-out” properties of the textile enabled the spectroscopic characterization of human tissue. For the optimization of the textile sensor, three different carrier fabrics and different fiber modifications were compared. The sample with best light coupling efficiency was successfully used to measure heart rate and SpO2 values of a subject. The latter was determined by using a modified Beer-Lambert law and measuring the light attenuation at two different wavelengths (632 nm and 894 nm). Moreover, the system was adapted to work in reflection mode which makes the sensor more versatile. The measurements were additionally compared with commercially available system and showed good correlation. PMID:25136484

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF KLEBSIELLA FROM TEXTILE FINISHING PLANT EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella strains are found in abnormally high numbers in a stream receiving wastewater from a textile finishing plant. Representative strains are randomly selected to determine biochemical, serotype, and virulence patterns. All strains conform to the commonly accepted biochemic...