WorldWideScience

Sample records for safety test pressure

  1. Pressurizer Heater and Safety Valve Test for SPACE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Youn, Bum Soo; Jun, Hwang Yong; Kim, Se Yun; Ha, Sang Jun [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The Korea nuclear industry has been developing a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for safety analysis of PWR(pressurized water reactor). The new code is named SPACE(Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plant). In this paper, the pressurizer heater model and safety valve for SPACE code is tested. The SPACE code input for pressurizer is developed and simulations are performed. Calculations were performed with and without heater and safety valve model and results are compared to confirm effectiveness of heater and safety valve

  2. The Analysis of Loop Seal Purge Time for the KHNP Pressurizer Safety Valve Test Facility Using the GOTHIC Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ae; Kim, Chang Hyun; Kweon, Gab Joo; Park, Jong Woon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The pressurizer safety valves (PSV) in Pressurized Water Reactors are required to provide the overpressure protection for the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) during the overpressure transients. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) plans to build the PSV test facility for the purpose of providing the PSV pop-up characteristics and the loop seal dynamics for the new safety analysis. When the pressurizer safety valve is mounted in a loop seal configuration, the valve must initially pass the loop seal water prior to popping open on steam. The loop seal in the upstream of PSV prevents leakage of hydrogen gas or steam through the safety valve seat. This paper studies on the loop seal clearing dynamics using GOTHIC-7.2a code to verify the effects of loop seal purge time on the reactor coolant system overpressure.

  3. Pressure Safety Orientation Live #769

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-17

    Pressure Safety Orientation (course #769) introduces workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to the Laboratory Pressure Safety Program and to pressure-related hazards. This course also affords a hands-on exercise involving the assembly of a simple pressure system. This course is required for all LANL personnel who work on or near pressure systems and are exposed to pressure-related hazards. These personnel include pressure-system engineers, designers, fabricators, installers, operators, inspectors, maintainers, and others who work with pressurized fluids and may be exposed to pressure-related hazards.

  4. Pressure Safety Program Implementation at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lower, Mark [ORNL; Etheridge, Tom [ORNL; Oland, C. Barry [XCEL Engineering, Inc.

    2013-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC. In February 2006, DOE promulgated worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. These regulations, which are provided in 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, establish requirements for worker safety and health program that reduce or prevent occupational injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE contractors and their workers with safe and healthful workplaces at DOE sites. The regulations state that contractors must achieve compliance no later than May 25, 2007. According to 10 CFR 851, Subpart C, Specific Program Requirements, contractors must have a structured approach to their worker safety and health programs that at a minimum includes provisions for pressure safety. In implementing the structured approach for pressure safety, contractors must establish safety policies and procedures to ensure that pressure systems are designed, fabricated, tested, inspected, maintained, repaired, and operated by trained, qualified personnel in accordance with applicable sound engineering principles. In addition, contractors must ensure that all pressure vessels, boilers, air receivers, and supporting piping systems conform to (1) applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (2004) Sections I through XII, including applicable code cases; (2) applicable ASME B31 piping codes; and (3) the strictest applicable state and local codes. When national consensus codes are not applicable because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc., contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local codes. This report documents the work performed to address legacy pressure vessel deficiencies and comply

  5. Safety of hydrogen pressure gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voth, R. O.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the relative safety afforded an operator by various hydrogen-pressure gauge case designs. It is shown that assurance of personnel safety, should a failure occur, requires careful selection of available gauge designs, together with proper mounting. Specific gauge case features and mounting requirements are recommended.

  6. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  7. Application of RELAP5/MOD3.3 to Calculate Thermal Hydraulic Behavior of the Pressurizer Safety Valve Performance Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Ae; Oh, Seung Jong; Park, Jong Woon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The increase of the acceptance tolerance of Pressurizer Safety Valve (PSV) test is vital for the safe operation of nuclear power plants because the frequent tests may make the valves decrepit and become a cause of leak. Recently, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) is building a PSV performance test facility to provide the technical background data for the relaxation of the acceptance tolerance of PSV including the valve pop-up characteristics and the loop seal dynamics (if the plant has the loop seal in the upstream of PSV). The discharge piping and supports must be designed to withstand severe transient hydrodynamic loads when the safety valve actuates. The evaluation of hydrodynamic loads is a two-step process: first the thermal hydraulic behavior in the piping must be defined, and then the hydrodynamic loads are calculated from the thermal hydraulic parameters such as pressure and mass flow. The hydrodynamic loads are used as input to the structural analysis.

  8. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  9. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several blood pressure readings at home. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... medication options might work best for you. Low blood pressure Low blood pressure that either doesn't cause ...

  10. Pressure Safety: Advanced Live 11459

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-03-02

    Many Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) operations use pressure equipment and systems. Failure to follow proper procedures when designing or operating pressure systems can result in injuries to personnel and damage to equipment and/or the environment. This manual presents an overview of the requirements and recommendations that address the safe design and operation of pressure systems at LANL.

  11. Industrial safety of pressure vessels - structural integrity point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents different aspects of pressure vessel safety in the scope of industrial safety, focused to the chemical industry. Quality assurance, including application of PED97/23 has been analysed first, followed shortly by the risk assessment and in details by the structural integrity approach, which has been illustrated with three case studies. One important conclusion, following such an approach, is that so-called water proof testing can actually jeopardize integrity of a pressure vessel instead of proving it. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 174004 i br. TR 33044

  12. 30 CFR 7.104 - Internal static pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Internal static pressure test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Isolate and seal each segment of the intake system... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internal static pressure test. 7.104 Section 7.104 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION...

  13. Pressure Safety: Advanced Self-Study 30120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Pressure Safety Advance Self-Study (Course 30120) consists of an introduction, five modules, and a quiz. To receive credit in UTrain for completing this course, you must score 80% or better on the 15-question quiz (check UTrain). Directions for initiating the quiz are appended to the end of this training manual. This course contains several links to LANL websites. UTrain might not support active links, so please copy links into the address line in your browser.

  14. Safety of pulmonary function testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Cara; Ward, Simon; Walsted, Emil

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary function testing (PFT) is a key investigation in the evaluation of individuals with respiratory symptoms; however, the safety of routine and specialised PFT testing has not been reported in a large data set. Using patient safety incident (PSI) records, we aimed to assess risk...... was rated using the NHS National Patient Safety Agency and any hospital admission reported. RESULTS: There were 119 PSIs reported from 186 000 PFT; that is, 0.6 PSIs per 1000 tests. Cardiopulmonary PSIs were 3.3 times more likely to occur than non-cardiopulmonary (95% CI 2.17 to 5.12). Syncope was the most...... and specialised PFT is safe for patients, in the context of established screening preparticipation guidelines. In the event of a PSI, these are likely to be low risk of harm. Our findings highlight the most common PSIs encountered during PFT to facilitate risk reduction....

  15. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the maximum... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND...

  16. Systematic impact of institutional pressures on safety climate in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Dong, Shuang; Rose, Timothy; Li, Heng; Yin, Qin; Cao, Dongping

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores how three types of institutional pressure (i.e., coercive, mimetic and normative pressures) systematically impact on the safety climate of construction projects. These impacts are empirically tested by survey data collected from 186 questionnaires of construction companies operating in Shanghai, China. The results, obtained by partial least squares analysis, show that organizational management commitment to safety and employee involvement is positively related to all three institutional pressures, while the perception of responsibility for safety and health is significantly influenced by coercive and mimetic pressure. However, coercive and normative pressures have no significant effect on the applicability of safety rules and work practices, revealing the importance of external organizational pressures in improving project safety climate from a systematic view. The findings also provide insights into the use of institutional forces to facilitate the improvement of safety climate in the construction industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Triplets pass their pressure test

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    All the LHC inner triplets have now been repaired and are in position. The first ones have passed their pressure tests with flying colours. The repaired inner triplet at LHC Point 1, right side (1R). Ranko Ostojic (on the right), who headed the team responsible for repairing the triplets, shows the magnet to Robert Zimmer, President of the University of Chicago and of Fermi Research Alliance, who visited CERN on 20th August.Three cheers for the triplets! All the LHC inner triplets have now been repaired and are in position in the tunnel. Thanks to the mobilisation of a multidisciplinary team from CERN and Fermilab, assisted by the KEK Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), a solution has been found, tested, validated and applied. At the end of March this year, one of the inner triplets at Point 5 failed to withstand a pressure test. A fault was identified in the supports of two out of the three quadruple magne...

  18. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.307 Static...

  19. High pressure processing for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Windyga, B; Szczawiński, J; Szczawińska, M; Pietrzak, D; Prestamo, G

    2005-01-01

    Food preservation using high pressure is a promising technique in food industry as it offers numerous opportunities for developing new foods with extended shelf-life, high nutritional value and excellent organoleptic characteristics. High pressure is an alternative to thermal processing. The resistance of microorganisms to pressure varies considerably depending on the pressure range applied, temperature and treatment duration, and type of microorganism. Generally, Gram-positive bacteria are more resistant to pressure than Gram-negative bacteria, moulds and yeasts; the most resistant are bacterial spores. The nature of the food is also important, as it may contain substances which protect the microorganism from high pressure. This article presents results of our studies involving the effect of high pressure on survival of some pathogenic bacteria -- Listeria monocytogenes, Aeromonas hydrophila and Enterococcus hirae -- in artificially contaminated cooked ham, ripening hard cheese and fruit juices. The results indicate that in samples of investigated foods the number of these microorganisms decreased proportionally to the pressure used and the duration of treatment, and the effect of these two factors was statistically significant (level of probability, P monocytogenes and A. hydrophila. Mathematical methods were applied, for accurate prediction of the effects of high pressure on microorganisms. The usefulness of high pressure treatment for inactivation of microorganisms and shelf-life extention of meat products was also evaluated. The results obtained show that high pressure treatment extends the shelf-life of cooked pork ham and raw smoked pork loin up to 8 weeks, ensuring good micro-biological and sensory quality of the products.

  20. 49 CFR 230.35 - Pressure testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Pressure Testing of Boilers § 230.35 Pressure testing. The temperature of the steam locomotive boiler shall be raised to at least 70 deg. F any time hydrostatic pressure is applied to the boiler. ...

  1. Low-Cost, Lightweight Pressure Vessel Proof Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanez, Eric

    This experiment seeks to determine the burst strength of the low-cost, lightweight pressure vessel fabricated by the Suborbital Center of Excellence (SCE). Moreover, the test explores the effects of relatively large gage pressures on material strain for ‘pumpkin-shaped' pressure vessels. The SCE team used pressure transducers and analog gauges to measure the gage pressure while a video camera assembly recorded several gores in the shell for strain analysis. The team loaded the vessel in small intervals of pressure until the structure failed. Upon test completion, the pressure readings and video recordings were analyzed to determine the burst strength and material strain in the shell. The analysis yielded a burst pressure of 13.5 psi while the strain analysis reported in the shell. While the results of this proof test are encouraging, the structure's factor of safety must be increased for actual balloon flights. Furthermore, the pressure vessel prototype must be subjected to reliability tests to show the design can sustain gage pressures for the length of a balloon flight.

  2. Pressurized solid oxide fuel cell testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basel, R.A.; Pierre, J.F.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of the SOFC pressurized test program are to obtain cell voltage versus current (VI) performance data as a function of pressure; to evaluate the effects of operating parameters such as temperature, air stoichiometry, and fuel utilization on cell performance, and to demonstrate long term stability of the SOFC materials at elevated pressures.

  3. Testing of calibration and reconditioning of the pressurizer safety valves; Pruebas de tarado y reacondicionamiento de las valvulas de seguridad del presionador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, F.; Jardi, X.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents All activities that are required in the proposal of Tecnatom as: transport of valves to the laboratory in special containers and preparation of the expedition of the radioactive packages testing of leakage of valves with nitrogen, leak and calibration with initial steam and final tests, overhaul of the valve including the process Jack and Lap and mounting and dismounting of valves in the plant. (Author)

  4. Test Your Blood Pressure IQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living for Heart.org ... Changes That Matter • Find Tools & Resources HBP Resources Animation Library Track Your Blood Pressure: Print (PDF) | Online ...

  5. Fire safety arrangement of inhabited pressurized compartments of manned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolodian, Ivan; Melikhov, Anatoliy; Tanklevskiy, Leonid

    2017-06-01

    The article deals with innovative technical solutions that provide fire safety in inhabited pressurized compartments of manned spacecraft by means of a fireproof device of inhabited pressurized compartments via application of engineering means of fire prevention and fire spreading prevention by lowering fire load in an inhabited pressurized module up to the point when the maximum possible levels of fire factors in an inhabited pressurized compartment of a manned spacecraft are prevented. Represented technical solutions are used at the present time according to stated recommendations during provision of fire safety of equipment created by a number of Russian organizations for equipage of inhabited pressurized compartments of spacecraft of the Russian segment of International space station.

  6. 14 CFR 23.843 - Pressurization tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction..., windows, canopy, and valves, must be tested as a pressure vessel for the pressure differential specified... limitations of the airplane, up to the maximum altitude for which certification is requested. (4) Tests of...

  7. Model-based testing for software safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurbuz, Havva Gulay; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2017-01-01

    Testing safety-critical systems is crucial since a failure or malfunction may result in death or serious injuries to people, equipment, or environment. An important challenge in testing is the derivation of test cases that can identify the potential faults. Model-based testing adopts models of a

  8. Multifunctional Testing Rig for Machinery Safety Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vöth Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At the Centre of Drive and Lifting Technology ZAFT of Technische Hochschule Georg Agricola a new testing device will be available. The device is suitable for testing drivetrain components like safety clutches and hoist safety components like snag protection devices. In focus are continuous tests with regard to fatigue as well as transient tests with regard to switching characteristics. The article gives information on requirements on the testing rig out of the main purpose and out of the given environment. Furthermore concept, main data and engineering design of this equipment are demonstrated. Aspects and first results of the mechanical assembly are shown.

  9. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  10. The Development of the Code Safety Valve Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Ae; Park, Jong Woon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The Pressurizer Safety Valves (PSV) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) are required to provide the overpressure protection for the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) during the overpressure transients. According to the ASME OM code, all safety valves should be tested every 5 years with the acceptance tolerance of 1%. If one valve failed to meet this criterion, other two additional valves should be tested and if these valves don't meet the requirement, all valves should be tested. These frequent tests may make the valves decrepit and become a cause of leak. Therefore, increase of the acceptance tolerance is vital for the safe operation of the plant. In the United States, the acceptance tolerances are enlarged up to about 3% in most plants. This requires re-analysis of relevant accidents in FSAR. Also, the technical background data for the valve pop-up characteristics and the loop seal dynamics (if the plant has the loop seal in the upstream of PSV) are needed for the new safety analysis. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) plans to build the PSV test facility for the purpose of providing the background data. This paper describes the preliminary design of the facility and studies on the system dynamics using GOTHIC-7.2a code to verify the pressure vessel capacities and to find the best operating condition.

  11. Commonwealth Edison Company pressure locking test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunte, B.D.; Kelly, J.F.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure Locking is a phenomena which can cause the unseating thrust for a gate valve to increase dramatically from its typical static unseating thrust. This can result in the valve actuator having insufficient capability to open the valve. In addition, this can result in valve damage in cases where the actuator capability exceeds the valve structural limits. For these reasons, a proper understanding of the conditions which may cause pressure locking and thermal binding, as well as a methodology for predicting the unseating thrust for a pressure locked or thermally bound valve, are necessary. This report discusses the primary mechanisms which cause pressure locking. These include sudden depressurization of piping adjacent to the valve and pressurization of fluid trapped in the valve bonnet due to heat transfer. This report provides a methodology for calculating the unseating thrust for a valve which is pressure locked. This report provides test data which demonstrates the accuracy of the calculation methodology.

  12. Normal pressure tests on unstiffened flat plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Richard M; Sechler, Ernest J

    1944-01-01

    Flat sheet panels of aluminum alloy (all 17S-T except for two specimens of 24S-T) were tested under normal pressures with clamped edge supports in the structures laboratory of the Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The thicknesses used ranged from 0.010 to 0.080 inch; the panel sizes ranged from 10 by 10 inches to 10 by 40 inches; and the pressure range was from 0 to 60-pounds-per-square-inch gage. Deflection patterns were measured and maximum tensile strains in the center of the panel were determined by electric strain gages. The experimental data are presented by pressure-strain, pressure-maximum-deflection, and pressure-deflection curves. The results of these tests have been compared with the corresponding strains and deflections as calculated by the simple membrane theory and by large deflection theories.

  13. Standard test method for using atmospheric pressure rotating cage

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a generally accepted procedure to conduct the rotating cage (RC) experiment under atmospheric pressure. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Preservation of FFTF Data Related to Passive Safety Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.

    2010-10-01

    One of the goals of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR). A key area deserving special attention for preservation is the data relating to passive safety testing that was conducted in FFTF and EBR-II during the 1980’s. Accidents at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Station and Unit 2 at Three Mile Island changed the safety paradigm of the nuclear power industry. New emphasis was placed on assured safety based on intrinsic plant characteristics that protect not only the public, but the significant investment in the plant as well. Plants designated to perform in this manner are considered to be passively safe since no active sensor/alarm system or human intervention is required to bring the reactor to a safe shutdown condition. The liquid metal reactor (LMR) has several key characteristics needed for a passively safe reactor: reactor coolant with superior heat transfer capability and very high boiling point, low (atmospheric) system pressures, and reliable negative reactivity feedback. The credibility of the design for a passively safe LMR rests on two issues: the validity of analytic methods used to predict passive safety performance and the availability of relevant test data to calibrate design tools. Safety analysis methods used to analyze LMRs under the old safety paradigm were focused on calculating the source term for the Core Disruptive Accident. Passive safety design requires refined analysis methods for transient events because treatment of the detailed reactivity feedbacks is important in predicting the response of the reactor. Similarly, analytic tools should be calibrated against actual test experience in existing LMR facilities. The principal objectives of the combined FFTF natural circulation and Passive Safety Testing program were: 1) to verify natural circulation as a reliable means to safely remove decay heat, 2) to extend passive safety

  15. First experimental data of the cryogenic safety test facility PICARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, C.; Henriques, A.; Stamm, M.; Grohmann, S.

    2017-02-01

    The test facility PICARD, which stands for Pressure Increase in Cryostats and Analysis of Relief Devices, has been designed and constructed for cryogenic safety experiments. With a cryogenic liquid volume of 100 L, a nominal design pressure of 16 bar(g) and the capacity of measuring helium mass flow rates through safety relief devices up to 4 kg/s, the test facility allows the systematic investigation of hazardous incidents in cryostats under realistic conditions. In the course of experiments, the insulating vacuum is vented with atmospheric air or gaseous nitrogen at ambient temperature under variation of the venting diameter, the thermal insulation, the cryogenic fluid, the liquid level and the set pressure in order to analyze the impact on the heat flux and hence on the process dynamics. A special focus will be on the occurrence and implications of two-phase flow during expansion and on measuring the flow coefficients of safety devices at cryogenic temperatures. This paper describes the commissioning and the general performance of the test facility at liquid helium temperatures. Furthermore, the results of first venting experiments are presented.

  16. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  17. Time pressure test : fireworks compositions May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, R.; Arsenault, D.

    2008-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the feasibility of time-pressure tests on the pyrotechnic composition tables used to assign fireworks to dangerous goods divisions. The flash composition time was defined as the bursting charge or aural effect of the fireworks in relation to the amount of time taken for the pressure to rise. Seven fireworks samples were disassembled and tests were conducted in accordance with the UN manual for time-pressure tests in order to determine fireworks rise times and compare them to the results obtained from a sample of commercial sporting black powder. Results of the study indicated that the testing method is feasible. All 7 of the sample compositions were defined as flash compositions. The formulae of the fireworks were confirmed by chemical analysis. 1 tab.

  18. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive......, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established...

  19. Analysis of pressure transients in Safety Injection (SI) piping for the opening cause of SKN 3 Safety Relief Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk-Ho; Lim, Sang-Gyu; Kim, Han-Gon [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    During preoperation and tests for that, the damage of Safety Relief Valves (SRVs) located at the exit of Safety Injection Pumps (SIPs) has been observed and issued recently. To resolve this issue, the opening cause of SRVs was examined from system design, piping design and operating condition. SRV performs the function of thermal relief to protect the over-pressure depending on the temperature increase in the isolated piping. We recognized that the thermal expansion did not result in the opening of SRV because there was not the cause increasing the temperature in piping at that time. In addition, it was examined that there wasn't the external cause increasing the pressure in piping to the set pressure (144.0kg/m{sup 2}) of SRV. To confirm this, mini-flow tests for SIP performance were carried out again through enough air venting in the early of 2015. As shown in table 1, the results following SIPs startup were reasonable. Otherwise, maximum pressure was greater than 142.0 kg/m{sup 2} and the fluctuation of pressure was also greater than 10.0 kg/m{sup 2} in the results of 2014 having the possibility of air present in piping and the damage of SRV. So, the objective of this paper is to evaluate pressure transients depending upon air present in SI piping as the opening cause of SKN 3 SRVs. The damage of SRVs located at the exit of SIP has been observed during pre-operation and tests of SKN 3. According to the possibility of air present in SI piping, its effect for pressure transient was evaluated at the same condition using RELAP5 code. The evaluation results for various cases demonstrate that the compression and expansion of trapped air in piping following SIP startup happen and have an effect on the opening of SRV by inducing the fluctuation of pressure and over-pressure in excess of set pressure. Also, the sensitivity results for the amount of air show that the maximum pressure in SI piping is different depending upon the amount of air and the optimal amount of

  20. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Cautley, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Bohac, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Francisco, P. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Shen, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Gloss, S. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  1. Safety analysis of high pressure 3He-filled micro-channels for thermal neutron detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferko, Scott M.; Galambos, Paul C.; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2008-11-01

    This document is a safety analysis of a novel neutron detection technology developed by Sandia National Laboratories. This technology is comprised of devices with tiny channels containing high pressure {sup 3}He. These devices are further integrated into large scale neutron sensors. Modeling and preliminary device testing indicates that the time required to detect the presence of special nuclear materials may be reduced under optimal conditions by several orders of magnitude using this approach. Also, these devices make efficient use of our {sup 3}He supply by making individual devices more efficient and/or extending the our limited {sup 3}He supply. The safety of these high pressure devices has been a primary concern. We address these safety concerns for a flat panel configuration intended for thermal neutron detection. Ballistic impact tests using 3 g projectiles were performed on devices made from FR4, Silicon, and Parmax materials. In addition to impact testing, operational limits were determined by pressurizing the devices either to failure or until they unacceptably leaked. We found that (1) sympathetic or parasitic failure does not occur in pressurized FR4 devices (2) the Si devices exhibited benign brittle failure (sympathetic failure under pressure was not tested) and (3) the Parmax devices failed unacceptably. FR4 devices were filled to pressures up to 4000 + 100 psig, and the impacts were captured using a high speed camera. The brittle Si devices shattered, but were completely contained when wrapped in thin tape, while the ductile FR4 devices deformed only. Even at 4000 psi the energy density of the compressed gas appears to be insignificant compared to the impact caused by the incoming projectile. In conclusion, the current FR4 device design pressurized up to 4000 psi does not show evidence of sympathetic failure, and these devices are intrinsically safe.

  2. 78 FR 54510 - New Entrant Safety Assurance Program Operational Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration New Entrant Safety Assurance Program Operational Test... Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announces an operational test of procedural changes to the New Entrant Safety Assurance Program. The operational test began in July 2013 and will be in effect...

  3. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Cautley, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Bohac, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Francisco, P. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Shen, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Gloss, S. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  4. Avoiding bias in safety testing design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    All scientists are biased, no matter what their backgrounds or affiliations, so what is it about the scientific method that overcomes this and which makes science so successful? Key features are transparency and critical peer scrutiny. These general issues will be will be considered in terms of t...... of the scientific basis of risk assessment, including the design of safety testing procedures, particularly as applied to industrial chemicals....

  5. Safety analysis of high pressure gasous fuel container punctures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.R. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The following report is divided into two sections. The first section describes the results of ignitability tests of high pressure hydrogen and natural gas leaks. The volume of ignitable gases formed by leaking hydrogen or natural gas were measured. Leaking high pressure hydrogen produced a cone of ignitable gases with 28{degrees} included angle. Leaking high pressure methane produced a cone of ignitable gases with 20{degrees} included angle. Ignition of hydrogen produced larger overpressures than did natural gas. The largest overpressures produced by hydrogen were the same as overpressures produced by inflating a 11 inch child`s balloon until it burst.

  6. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  7. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998-2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  8. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998–2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-02-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  9. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998–2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  10. Industrial high pressure applications. Processes, equipment and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggers, Rudolf (ed.) [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik

    2012-07-01

    Industrial high pressure processes open the door to many reactions that are not possible under 'normal' conditions. These are to be found in such different areas as polymerization, catalytic reactions, separations, oil and gas recovery, food processing, biocatalysis and more. The most famous high pressure process is the so-called Haber-Bosch process used for fertilizers and which was awarded a Nobel prize. Following an introduction on historical development, the current state, and future trends, this timely and comprehensive publication goes on to describe different industrial processes, including methanol and other catalytic syntheses, polymerization and renewable energy processes, before covering safety and equipment issues. With its excellent choice of industrial contributions, this handbook offers high quality information not found elsewhere, making it invaluable reading for a broad and interdisciplinary audience.

  11. Work Pressure and Safety Behaviors among Health Workers in Ghana: The Moderating Role of Management Commitment to Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amponsah-Tawaih, Kwesi; Adu, Michael Appiah

    2016-12-01

    safety and healthy working environment has received numerous research attention over the years. Majority of these researches seem to have been conducted in the construction industry, with little attention in the health sector. Nonetheless, there are couple of studies conducted in Africa that suggest pressure in hospitals. Therefore the aim of the study was to examine how pressure influence safety behavior in the hospitals. With reference to the relevance of safety behavior in primary health care delivery, there was the need for the study. Data was obtained from 422 public hospital employees. Respondents were assured that all information would be kept confidential to increase the response rate and acquire more accurate information. Collection of questionnaires from participants took four weeks (20 working days), after which the data was analyzed. The result of the study showed that work pressure correlated negatively with safety behavior. General safety climate significantly correlated positively with safety behavior and negatively with work pressure, although the effect size for the latter was smaller. Hierarchical regression analysis showed management commitment to safety to moderate the relationship between work pressure and safety behavior. When employees perceive safety communication, safety systems and training to be positive, they seem to comply with safety rules and procedures than voluntarily participate in safety activities.

  12. Shutdown heat removal: safety water tests. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-07-08

    This specification establishes the requirements to design the SAFETY WATER TESTS to be constructed in the Hydraulic Test Facility (HTF) at the GE San Jose site. The test is an 1/8th scale model of a large loop type breeder reactor or a 1/14th scale model of a large pool type breeder reactor and uses water as the test fluid. It simulates a breeder reactor system with a 0.5 MW heated core with an upper and a lower plenum, a primary loop with 300 gpm flow rate and four auxiliary cooling systems (DRACS) that are to be immersed in the upper plenum and connected to the inlet plenum through a check valve.

  13. 9 CFR 113.40 - Dog safety tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dog safety tests. 113.40 Section 113... Procedures § 113.40 Dog safety tests. The safety tests provided in this section shall be conducted when... recommended for use in dogs. Serials which are not found to be satisfactory when tested pursuant to the...

  14. Future testing of active safety systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, F.M.; Pelders, H.A.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Active safety systems are increasingly becoming available in trucks and passenger vehicles. Developments in the field of active safety are shifting from increasing driver comfort towards increasing occupant safety. Furthermore, this shift is seen within active safety systems: safety functions are

  15. Testing of Confining Pressure Impacton Explosion Energy of Explosive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecki, Jan; Myszkowski, Jacek; Pytlik, Andrzej; Pytlik, Mateusz

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the results of testing the explosion effects of two explosive charges placed in an environment with specified values of confining pressure. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of variable environmental conditions on the suitability of particular explosives for their use in the prevention of natural hazards in hard coal mining. The research results will contribute to improving the efficiency of currently adopted technologies of natural hazard prevention and aid in raising the level of occupational safety. To carry out the subject matter measurements, a special test stand was constructed which allows the value of the initial pressure inside the chamber, which constitutes its integral part, to be altered before the detonation of the charge being tested. The obtained characteristics of the pressure changes during the explosion of the analysed charge helped to identify the work (energy) which was produced during the process. The test results are a valuable source of information, opening up new possibilities for the use of explosives, the development of innovative solutions for the construction of explosive charges and their initiation.

  16. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38 Section... Standard Procedures § 113.38 Guinea pig safety test. The guinea pig safety test provided in this section... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the animals...

  17. ORION - Crew Module Side Hatch: Proof Pressure Test Anomaly Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evernden, Brent A.; Guzman, Oscar J.

    2018-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle program was performing a proof pressure test on an engineering development unit (EDU) of the Orion Crew Module Side Hatch (CMSH) assembly. The purpose of the proof test was to demonstrate structural capability, with margin, at 1.5 times the maximum design pressure, before integrating the CMSH to the Orion Crew Module structural test article for subsequent pressure testing. The pressure test was performed at lower pressures of 3 psig, 10 psig and 15.75 psig with no apparent abnormal behavior or leaking. During pressurization to proof pressure of 23.32 psig, a loud 'pop' was heard at 21.3 psig. Upon review into the test cell, it was noted that the hatch had prematurely separated from the proof test fixture, thus immediately ending the test. The proof pressure test was expected be a simple verification but has since evolved into a significant joint failure investigation from both Lockheed Martin and NASA.

  18. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  19. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183.580 Section 183.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Tests § 183.580 Static...

  20. Pressure Venting Tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Max L.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests was devised to investigate the pressure venting behavior of one of the candidate ablators for the Orion capsule heat shield. Three different specimens of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) were instrumented with internal pressure taps and subjected to rapid pressure changes from near vacuum to one atmosphere and simulated Orion ascent pressure histories. The specimens vented rapidly to ambient pressure and sustained no detectable damage during testing. Peak pressure differences through the thickness of a 3-inch-thick specimen were less than 1 psi during a simulated ascent pressure history.

  1. Optimal design for projectile and blast protection during pressure testing

    OpenAIRE

    Storhaug, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    The thesis identifies the main hazards in hydrostatic pressure testing as pressure wave, water jet, burst of water hose, fragment and projectile discharge as well as ejection of plug or end section. A test, where a pressurized vessel ejected a projectile, was conducted as part of the thesis. The aim of this test was to find the relationship between potential energy inside pressure vessel and kinetic energy in a discharged projectile. The results showed that the Baker formula together with...

  2. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  3. Leadership and Work pressure as predictors of Health and Safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The investigation of health and safety (H&S) climate has received a lot of research attention in the field of occupational health and safety (OHS). The importance of two H&S dimensions that contribute to the H&S climate were studied. The effect of leadership, top management commitment to health and safety (H&S) and ...

  4. 14 CFR 25.843 - Tests for pressurized cabins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Pressurization § 25..., windows, and valves, must be tested as a pressure vessel for the pressure differential specified in § 25... limitations of the airplane, up to the maximum altitude for which certification is requested. (4) Tests of...

  5. Development and test of a model linking safety-specific transformational leadership and occupational safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barling, Julian; Loughlin, Catherine; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2002-06-01

    The authors developed, tested, and replicated a model in which safety-specific transformational leadership predicted occupational injuries in 2 separate studies. Data from 174 restaurant workers (M age = 26.75 years, range = 15-64) were analyzed using structural equation modeling (LISREL 8; K. G. Jöreskog & D. Sörbom, 1993) and provided strong support for a model whereby safety-specific transformational leadership predicted occupational injuries through the effects of perceived safety climate, safety consciousness, and safety-related events. Study 2 replicated and extended this model with data from 164 young workers from diverse jobs (M age = 19.54 years, range = 14-24). Safety-specific transformational leadership and role overload were related to occupational injuries through the effects of perceived safety climate, safety consciousness, and safety-related events.

  6. Analysis of pressure safety valves for fire protection on offshore oil and gas installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Michael; Eriksen, Jacob G.I.; Andreasen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of fire Pressure Safety Valves (PSV) has been investigated when offshore process equipment is exposed to a fire. Simulations of several typical offshore pressure vessels have been performed using the commercial software VessFire. The pressure vessels are exposed to a small jet f...

  7. Relevance of microbial finished product testing in food safety management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.; Jacxsens, L.; Membre, J.M.; Nauta, M.; Peterz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Management of microbiological food safety is largely based on good design of processes, products and procedures. Finished product testing may be considered as a control measure at the end of the production process. However, testing gives only very limited information on the safety status of a food.

  8. Relevance of microbial finished product testing in food safety management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwietering, Marcel H.; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Membré, Jeanne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Management of microbiological food safety is largely based on good design of processes, products and procedures. Finished product testing may be considered as a control measure at the end of the production process. However, testing gives only very limited information on the safety status of a food......-active way by implementing an effective food safety management system. For verification activities in a food safety management system, finished product testing may however be useful. For three cases studies; canned food, chocolate and cooked ham, the relevance of testing both of finished products....... If a hazardous organism is found it means something, but absence in a limited number of samples is no guarantee of safety of a whole production batch. Finished product testing is often too little and too late. Therefore most attention should be focussed on management and control of the hazards in a more pro...

  9. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAMJ. VOL 83. NOV 1993. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with once-daily slow-release verapamil. A. CANTOR, H. GILUTZ, T. MEYER. Abstract Blood pressure at rest is not predictive of round- the-clock values. Blood pressure should therefore be measured during effort to evaluate hypertension.

  10. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Moon Kee; Park, Choon Kyung; Yang, Sun Kyoo; Chun, Se Yung; Song, Chul Hwa; Jun, Hyung Kil; Jung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yun; Cho, Yung Roh; Min, Kyung Hoh; Jung, Jang Hwan; Jang, Suk Kyoo; Kim, Bok Deuk; Kim, Wooi Kyung; Huh, Jin; Kim, Sook Kwan; Moon, Sang Kee; Lee, Sang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. In this research, test facilities simulating the primary coolant system and safety system are being constructed for the design verification tests of the existing and advanced nuclear power plant. 97 figs, 14 tabs, 65 refs. (Author).

  11. Safety assessment for In-service Pressure Bending Pipe Containing Incomplete Penetration Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Tang, P.; Xia, J. F.; Ling, Z. W.; Cai, G. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Incomplete penetration defect is a common defect in the welded joint of pressure pipes. While the safety classification of pressure pipe containing incomplete penetration defects, according to periodical inspection regulations in present, is more conservative. For reducing the repair of incomplete penetration defect, a scientific and applicable safety assessment method for pressure pipe is needed. In this paper, the stress analysis model of the pipe system was established for the in-service pressure bending pipe containing incomplete penetration defects. The local finite element model was set up to analyze the stress distribution of defect location and the stress linearization. And then, the applicability of two assessment methods, simplified assessment and U factor assessment method, to the assessment of incomplete penetration defects located at pressure bending pipe were analyzed. The results can provide some technical supports for the safety assessment of complex pipelines in the future.

  12. Pre-service tightness tests of HTR-10 primary loop pressure boundary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Junjie; He Shuyan; Yu Suyuan. E-mail: suyuan@inet.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhang Zhengming

    2003-06-01

    The main design and operating parameters for the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) primary loop pressure boundary system are introduced in this paper. The component installations and the pneumatic and tightness test are also described, including the objectives and methods. The leakage rate test results are analyzed to show that the results meet the design requirements and have enough safety redundancy.

  13. A Test Suite for Safety-Critical Java using JML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders Peter; Søndergaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Development techniques are presented for a test suite for the draft specification of the Java profile for Safety-Critical Systems. Distinguishing features are: specification of conformance constraints in the Java Modeling Language, encoding of infrastructure concepts without implementation bias...

  14. Forklift Safety Fundamentals, #20299, Test 20300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grogin, Phillip W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-02-09

    A powered industrial truck (PIT) is defined as a mobile, powerdriven vehicle used to carry, push, pull, lift, or stack material (not including vehicles intended primarily for earth moving). There are many types of and names for PITs, including forklifts, trucks, fork trucks, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks, and tractors. Although not every PIT is a forklift, because PITs are commonly called “forklifts,” this course manual generally uses the term “forklift,” although at times the terms “truck” and “PIT” are also used. In some areas of this course, you will see green boxes that refer to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulation for PITs, which is 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.178, Powered Industrial Trucks. The letter in the parentheses refers to the specific section of the regulation.

  15. Safety of regadenoson stress testing in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moles, Victor M; Cascino, Thomas; Saleh, Ashraf; Mikhova, Krasimira; Lazarus, John J; Ghannam, Michael; Yun, Hong J; Konerman, Matthew; Weinberg, Richard L; Ficaro, Edward P; Corbett, James R; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Murthy, Venkatesh L

    2016-11-28

    We sought to determine the safety of regadenoson stress testing in patients with PH. PH is increasingly recognized at more advanced ages. As many as one-third of patients with PH have coronary artery disease. Because of their physical limitations, patients with PH are unable to adequately exercise. Regadenoson can potentially have an adverse impact due to their tenuous hemodynamics. Current guidelines suggest performing a coronary angiography in patients with PH who have angina or multiple coronary risk factors. We identified 67 consecutive patients with confirmed PH by catheterization (mean PA > 25 mmHg not due to left heart disease) who underwent MPI with regadenoson stress. Medical records were reviewed to determine hemodynamic and ECG response to regadenoson. No serious events occurred. Common side effects related to regadenoson were observed, dyspnea being the most common (70.6%). No syncope occurred. Heart rate increased from 74.6 ± 14 to 96.3 ± 18.3 bpm, systolic blood pressure increased from 129.8 ± 20.9 to 131.8 ± 31 mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure decreased from 77.1 ± 11.4 to 72.9 ± 15.3 mmHg. There was no ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or second- or third-degree atrioventricular block. Regadenoson stress MPI appears to be well tolerated and safe in patients with PH.

  16. Implications of Dynamic Pressure Transducer Mounting Variations on Measurements in Pyrotechnic Test Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibbern, Andreas; Crisafulli, Jeffrey; Hagopia, Michael; McDougle, Stephen H.; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate dynamic pressure measurements are often difficult to make within small pyrotechnic devices, and transducer mounting difficulties can cause data anomalies that lead to erroneous conclusions. Delayed initial pressure response followed by data ringing has been observed when using miniaturized pressure transducer mounting adapters required to interface transducers to small test chambers. This delayed pressure response and ringing, combined with a high data acquisition rate, has complicated data analysis. This paper compares the output signal characteristics from different pressure transducer mounting options, where the passage distance from the transducer face to the pyrotechnic chamber is varied in length and diameter. By analyzing the data and understating the associated system dynamics, a more realistic understanding of the actual dynamic pressure variations is achieved. Three pressure transducer mounting configurations (elongated, standard, and face/flush mount) were simultaneously tested using NASA standard initiators in closed volume pressure bombs. This paper also presents results of these pressure transducer mounting configurations as a result of a larger NASA Engineering and Safety Center pyrovalve test project. Results from these tests indicate the improved performance of using face/flush mounted pressure transducers in this application. This type of mounting improved initial pressure measurement response time by approximately 19 s over standard adapter mounting, eliminating most of the lag time; provided a near step-function type initial pressure increase; and greatly reduced data ringing in high data acquisition rate systems. The paper goes on to discuss other issues associated with the firing and instrumentation that are important for the tester to understand.

  17. Base pressure oscillations and safety of load launching into orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, P. V.; Zasukhin, O. N.; Upyrev, V. V.; Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.

    2017-06-01

    Physical details regarding base pressure low-frequency oscillations between rocket nozzles, their excitation and maintenance, are considered. Amplitude - frequency characteristics of these oscillations, as well as sequence of their type change, are studied. A single nozzle, a two-nozzle unit and a ring nozzle imitating multi-nozzle unit, are investigated in the present study.

  18. MODEL TESTING OF LOW PRESSURE HYDRAULIC TURBINE WITH HIGHER EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Nedbalsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A design of low pressure turbine has been developed and it is covered by an invention patent and a useful model patent. Testing of the hydraulic turbine model has been carried out when it was installed on a vertical shaft. The efficiency was equal to 76–78 % that exceeds efficiency of the known low pressure blade turbines. 

  19. Testing of Laterally Loaded Rigid Piles with Applied Overburden Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Foglia, Aligi

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale tests have been conducted to investigate the quasi-static behaviour of laterally loaded, non-slender piles installed in cohesionless soil. For that purpose, a new and innovative test setup has been developed. The tests have been conducted in a pressure tank such that it was possible...... to apply an overburden pressure to the soil. As a result of that, the traditional uncertainties related to low effective stresses for small-scale tests have been avoided. A normalisation criterion for laterally loaded piles has been proposed based on dimensional analysis. The test results using the novel...

  20. Pressure Testing of a Minimum Gauge PRSEUS Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew J.; Rouse, Marshall; Linton, Kim A.; Li, Victor P.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced aircraft configurations that have been developed to increase fuel efficiency require advanced, novel structural concepts capable of handling the unique load conditions that arise. One such concept is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) developed by the Boeing Company. The PRSEUS concept is being investigated by NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program for use in a hybrid-wing body (HWB) aircraft. This paper summarizes the analysis and test of a PRSEUS panel subjected to internal pressure, the first such pressure test for this structural concept. The pressure panel used minimum gauge skin, with stringer and frame configurations consistent with previous PRSEUS tests. Analysis indicated that for the minimum gauge skin panel, the stringer locations exhibit fairly linear response, but the skin bays between the stringers exhibit nonlinear response. Excellent agreement was seen between nonlinear analysis and test results in the critical portion at the center of the panel. The pristine panel was capable of withstanding the required 18.4 psi pressure load condition without exhibiting any damage. The impacted panel was capable of withstanding a pressure load in excess of 28 psi before initial failure occurred at the center stringer, and the panel was capable of sustaining increased pressure load after the initial failure. This successful PRSEUS panel pressure panel test was a critical step in the building block approach for enabling the use of this advanced structural concept on future aircraft, such as the HWB.

  1. Normal-Pressure Tests of Circular Plates with Clamped Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcpherson, Albert E; Ramberg, Walter; Levy, Samuel

    1942-01-01

    A fixture is described for making normal-pressure tests of flat plates 5 inches in diameter in which particular care was taken to obtain rigid clamping at the edges. Results are given for 19 plates, ranging in thickness form 0.015 to 0.072 inch. The center deflections and the extreme-fiber stresses at low pressures were found to agree with theoretical values; the center deflections at high pressures were 4 to 12 percent greater than the theoretical values. Empirical curves are derived of the pressure for the beginning of the permanent set as a function of the dimensions of the plate and the tensile properties of the material.

  2. Toward an understanding of the impact of production pressure on safety performance in construction operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sanguk; Saba, Farzaneh; Lee, Sanghyun; Mohamed, Yasser; Peña-Mora, Feniosky

    2014-07-01

    It is not unusual to observe that actual schedule and quality performances are different from planned performances (e.g., schedule delay and rework) during a construction project. Such differences often result in production pressure (e.g., being pressed to work faster). Previous studies demonstrated that such production pressure negatively affects safety performance. However, the process by which production pressure influences safety performance, and to what extent, has not been fully investigated. As a result, the impact of production pressure has not been incorporated much into safety management in practice. In an effort to address this issue, this paper examines how production pressure relates to safety performance over time by identifying their feedback processes. A conceptual causal loop diagram is created to identify the relationship between schedule and quality performances (e.g., schedule delays and rework) and the components related to a safety program (e.g., workers' perceptions of safety, safety training, safety supervision, and crew size). A case study is then experimentally undertaken to investigate this relationship with accident occurrence with the use of data collected from a construction site; the case study is used to build a System Dynamics (SD) model. The SD model, then, is validated through inequality statistics analysis. Sensitivity analysis and statistical screening techniques further permit an evaluation of the impact of the managerial components on accident occurrence. The results of the case study indicate that schedule delays and rework are the critical factors affecting accident occurrence for the monitored project. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Imaging indicator for ESD safety testing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whinnery, LeRoy L.,; Nissen, April; Keifer, Patrick N.; Tyson, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the development of a new detection method for electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing of explosives, using a single-lens reflex (SLR) digital camera and a 200-mm macro lens. This method has demonstrated several distinct advantages to other current ESD detection methods, including the creation of a permanent record, an enlarged image for real-time viewing as well as extended periods of review, and ability to combine with most other Go/No-Go sensors. This report includes details of the method, including camera settings and position, and results with wellcharacterized explosives PETN and RDX, and two ESD-sensitive aluminum powders.

  4. Design of a Hyperbaric Chamber for Pressure Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Sazali Shahmir Fikhri bin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A hyperbaric chamber is an application of a pressure vessel to test the integrity of components and equipments subjected to high pressure. The chamber comprises of several main parts such as a shell, heads, instrumentation attachments, threaded fasteners and support. This paper describes the design of hyperbaric chamber for pressure testing that compiles to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code. The design approach adopted is the “design by formula” method. A structural analysis of the hyperbaric chamber with a cylindrical shell and a vertical orientation, based on an operating pressure of 34.5 MPa, was done. The analysis of the stress distribution shows that the normalized principal stresses acting on the chamber are within the yield envelop based on the maximum distortional energy criteria.

  5. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  6. Implementation of 3D-Imaging technique for visual testing in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Tanco, André

    2014-01-01

    This master thesis has been performed by request of Dekra Industrial AB. Dekra Industrial AB is a Swedish subsidiary company of the German company Dekra and works for example with safety inspections within the nuclear power industry. The inspections performed by the company are often non-destructive testing (NDT) such as visual inspections of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The inspection methods used today are considered to be further developed and there is a strong demand of improving the...

  7. Influence of pressure change during hydraulic tests on fracture aperture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sung-Hoon; Koh, Yong-Kwon; Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Lee, Moo Yul; Choi, Jong Won

    2013-03-01

    In a series of field experiments, we evaluate the influence of a small water pressure change on fracture aperture during a hydraulic test. An experimental borehole is instrumented at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The target fracture for testing was found from the analyses of borehole logging and hydraulic tests. A double packer system was developed and installed in the test borehole to directly observe the aperture change due to water pressure change. Using this packer system, both aperture and flow rate are directly observed under various water pressures. Results indicate a slight change in fracture hydraulic head leads to an observable change in aperture. This suggests that aperture change should be considered when analyzing hydraulic test data from a sparsely fractured rock aquifer. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  8. Advances in the analysis of pressure interference tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez R, N. [Petroleos Mexicanos, PEMEX, Mexico City (Mexico); Samaniego V, F. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presented an extension for radial, linear, and spherical flow conditions of the El-Khatib method for analyzing pressure interference tests through utilization of the pressure derivative. Conventional analysis of interference tests considers only radial flow, but some reservoirs have physical field conditions in which linear or spherical flow conditions prevail. The INTERFERAN system, a friendly computer code for the automatic analysis of pressure interference tests, was also discussed and demonstrated by way of 2 field cases. INTERFERAN relies on the principle of superposition in time and space to interpret a test of several wells with variable histories of production or injection or both. The first field case addressed interference tests conducted in the naturally fractured geothermal field of Klamath Falls, and the second field case was conducted in a river-formed bed in which linear flow conditions are dominant. The analysis was deemed to be reliable. 13 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  9. Cerebral critical closing pressure in hydrocephalus patients undertaking infusion tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsos, Georgios V; Czosnyka, Marek; Smielewski, Peter; Garnett, Matthew R; Liu, Xiuyun; Kim, Dong-Joo; Donnelly, Joseph; Adams, Hadie; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2015-08-01

    Links between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compensation and cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been studied in many clinical scenarios. In hydrocephalus, disturbed CSF circulation seems to be a primary problem, having been linked to CBF disturbances, particularly in white matter close to surface of dilated ventricles. We studied possible correlations between cerebral haemodynamic indices using transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography and CSF compensatory dynamics assessed during infusion tests. We analysed clinical data from infusion tests performed in 34 patients suspected to suffer from normal pressure hydrocephalus, with signals including intracranial pressure (ICP), arterial blood pressure (ABP) and TCD blood flow velocity (FV). Cerebrospinal fluid compensatory parameters (including elasticity) were calculated according to a hydrodynamic model of the CSF circulation. Critical closing pressure (CrCP) was calculated with the cerebrovascular impedance methodology, while wall tension (WT) was estimated as CrCP-ICP. Closing margin (CM) was expressed as the difference between ABP and CrCP. Intracranial pressure increased during infusion from 6.7 ± 4.6 to 25.0 ± 10.5 mmHg (mean ± SD; P pressure increases and WT decreases during infusion tests. Closing margin at baseline pressure may act as an indicator of the cerebrospinal compensatory reserve.

  10. Orion ECLSS/Suit System Intermediate Pressure Integrated Suit Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barido, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    The Intermediate Pressure Integrated Suit Test (IPIST) phase of the integrated system testing of the Orion Vehicle Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) technology was conducted for the Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. This test was performed in the eleven-foot human-rated vacuum chamber at the NASA Johnson Space Center by the Crew and Thermal Systems Division. This testing is the second phase of suit loop testing to demonstrate the viability of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) being developed for Orion. The IPIST configuration consisted of development hardware that included the CAMRAS, air revitalization loop fan and suit loop regulator. Two test subjects were in pressure suits at varying suit pressures. Follow-on testing, to be conducted in 2014, will utilize the same hardware with human test subjects in pressure suits at vacuum. This paper will discuss the results and findings of IPIST and will also discuss future testing.

  11. A Test Suite for Safety-Critical Java using JML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Søndergaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Development techniques are presented for a test suite for the draft specification of the Java profile for Safety-Critical Systems. Distinguishing features are: specification of conformance constraints in the Java Modeling Language, encoding of infrastructure concepts without implementation bias......, and corresponding specifications of implicitly stated behavioral and real-time properties. The test programs are auto-generated from the specification, while concrete values for test parameters are selected manually. The suite is open source and publicly accessible....

  12. Safety Analysis of Shield Tunnel Segment Lining Based on Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ji Yong; Xiao Yong, Zhao; Lin, Cai Peng

    2017-11-01

    During the construction of the Nantanhai Shield Tunnel, some pressure sensors are installed to monitor the formation pressure of the segment lining. Based on the field test of Nantanhai Shield Tunnel, ANSYS software was used to calculate the mechanical model of plane strain according to structure and load pattern. Through the result, we find that the internal force of the lining of the tunnel meets requirements, and then we calculate the safety factor of the shield tunnel segment lining, And proposed the optimization of parameters.

  13. Safety Test Program Summary SNAP 19 Pioneer Heat Source Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1971-07-01

    Sixteen heat source assemblies have been tested in support of the SNAP 19 Pioneer Safety Test Program. Seven were subjected to simulated reentry heating in various plasma arc facilities followed by impact on earth or granite. Six assemblies were tested under abort accident conditions of overpressure, shrapnel impact, and solid and liquid propellant fires. Three capsules were hot impacted under Transit capsule impact conditions to verify comparability of test results between the two similar capsule designs, thus utilizing both Pioneer and Transit Safety Test results to support the Safety Analysis Report for Pioneer. The tests have shown the fuel is contained under all nominal accident environments with the exception of minor capsule cracks under severe impact and solid fire environments. No catastrophic capsule failures occurred in this test which would release large quantities of fuel. In no test was fuel visible to the eye following impact or fire. Breached capsules were defined as those which exhibit thoria contamination on its surface following a test, or one which exhibited visible cracks in the post test metallographic analyses.

  14. Autonomous Flight Safety System September 27, 2005, Aircraft Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the first aircraft test of the Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS). The test was conducted on September 27, 2005, near Kennedy Space Center (KSC) using a privately-owned single-engine plane and evaluated the performance of several basic flight safety rules using real-time data onboard a moving aerial vehicle. This test follows the first road test of AFSS conducted in February 2005 at KSC. AFSS is a joint KSC and Wallops Flight Facility (WEF) project that is in its third phase of development. AFSS is an independent subsystem intended for use with Expendable Launch Vehicles that uses tracking data from redundant onboard sensors to autonomously make flight termination decisions using software-based rules implemented on redundant flight processors. The goals of this project are to increase capabilities by allowing launches from locations that do not have or cannot afford extensive ground-based range safety assets, to decrease range costs, and to decrease reaction time for special situations. The mission rules are configured for each operation by the responsible Range Safety authorities and can be loosely categorized in four major categories: Parameter Threshold Violations, Physical Boundary Violations present position and instantaneous impact point (TIP), Gate Rules static and dynamic, and a Green-Time Rule. Examples of each of these rules were evaluated during this aircraft test.

  15. Safety test results of compact sodium-sulfer batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Kouji; Rachi, Hideki [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Oshima, Taku; Bito, Akihiro [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Sodium-sulfur batteries have been developed to provide load-leveling and stabilize the supply of electricity for electric utilities and large customers. However, concern for safety increases with the amount of sodium and sulfur required for commercial products. The latest (and largest) product is a 50 kW, 400 kWh battery module comprised of 384 cells, designated 'T5' cells. Safety is ensured by applying multiple levels of protection during design and manufacture, and confirmed by rigorous safety tests to verify performance during accident conditions that cause electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical hazards. These tests have proven that the T5 cell and 50 kW battery module are adequately safe during such events for use in commercial applications. (orig.)

  16. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  17. Automated vulnerability testing identifies patients with inadequate defibrillation safety margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika; Ruetz, Linda L; Anand, Kishlay; Monir, George; Abeyratne, Athula I; Bailey, J Russell; Shorofsky, Stephen R; Hsia, Henry H; Friedman, Paul A

    2012-12-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system efficacy is tested at implant by induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Defibrillation safety margin can be assessed without VF induction using upper limit of vulnerability methods, but these methods have required manual determination of T-wave timing. To test the feasibility of an inductionless system of implant testing, a multicenter prospective study of an automated vulnerability safety margin system was conducted, which measured T-wave timing using an intracardiac electrogram during a ventricular pacing train. The system delivered up to 4 T-wave shocks of 18 J. Lack of VF induction by all 4 shocks was considered evidence of defibrillation adequacy. Patients subsequently underwent conventional defibrillation testing to meet a standard implant criterion. The 95% lower CI for defibrillation success at 25 J for noninduced patients was found using Bayesian statistics. Sixty patients were enrolled at 6 centers. Vulnerability testing and defibrillation success results were obtained from 54 patients. Vulnerability testing induced VF in 10 (19%) patients, of whom 2 required system revision. All patients not induced by vulnerability testing were successfully defibrillated twice at ≤25 J. The Bayesian credible interval was 97% to 100% for the population success rate of defibrillation at 25 J for automated vulnerability safety margin noninduced patients. An automated system identified all patients who failed conventional safety margin testing, while inducing only 19% of patients. Although limited by sample size, this study suggests the feasibility of automated implant testing that substantially reduces the need for VF induction in patients receiving implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

  18. Work Pressure and Safety Behaviors among Health Workers in Ghana: The Moderating Role of Management Commitment to Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwesi Amponsah-Tawaih

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: When employees perceive safety communication, safety systems and training to be positive, they seem to comply with safety rules and procedures than voluntarily participate in safety activities.

  19. Safety and Function Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

    2013-01-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. Three turbines where selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of round two of the Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing project. Safety and Function testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, duration, noise, and power quality. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

  20. 30 CFR 18.68 - Tests for intrinsic safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... atmosphere. (4) A minimum of 1,000 make-break sparks will be produced in each test for direct current... components which affect intrinsic safety must meet the following requirements: (i) Current limiting... not more than two-thirds of their rated current and permissible peak inverse voltage. Zener diodes...

  1. Mine safety sensors: Test results in a simulated test stope

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dickens, J

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available in a simulated test stope John Dickens and Ruth Teleka CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation Johannesburg, South Africa Email: jdickens@csir.co.za Abstract—The South African mining industry is plagued by accidents, the most common of which are rock falls..., the locking mechanism and the wooden hanging-wall supports. The final structure included a simulated stope face in addition to the parts shown in the concept. The simulated stope face can be seen on the right of the stope in Fig. 2. 2 37 5 6 4 1 Fig. 1. A...

  2. Pressure-tension test for assessing fatigue in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Sayed M.; Boyd, Andrew J.; Komar, Andrew J. K.

    2017-04-01

    In a pressure-tension test, a cylindrical concrete specimen is inserted into a cylindrical steel jacket, with a rubber ``O'' ring seal at each end to prevent gas leakage. Gas pressure is then applied to the curved surface of the concrete cylinder, leaving the ends free. As the gas pressure is increased, the specimen eventually fractures across a single plane transverse to the axis of the cylinder. The gas pressure at fracture may then be considered as the tensile strength of the concrete. In this study, the pressure-tension test is used to study fatigue in concrete. A total of 22 standard concrete cylinders (100 mm × 200 mm) were tested. Both dry and wet specimens have been studied. Low-cycle loading, which involves the application of a few load cycles at high stress levels - such as a concrete structure under earthquake load - has been used in this study. It was found that the concrete specimens in a low-cycle loading fail after only a few cycles of loading and interestingly at a stress level lower than the maximum value applied in the cyclic loading. In addition, non-destructive testing (NDT) was performed to determine the progressive damage due to tensile load in concrete cylinders using Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV). It was found that UPV can be used to evaluate the damage in concrete even after the application of a very low-level of tensile stress - as low as 10% of its tensile strength.

  3. Time Pressure in Scenario-Based Online Construction Safety Quizzes and Its Effect on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Martin; Adair, Desmond

    2017-01-01

    Online quizzes have been shown to be effective learning and assessment approaches. However, if scenario-based online construction safety quizzes do not include time pressure similar to real-world situations, they reflect situations too ideally. The purpose of this paper is to compare engineering students' performance when carrying out an online…

  4. Food safety issues of high pressure processed fruit/vegetable juices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Houška, M.; Strohalm, J.; Totušek, J.; Tříska, Jan; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Gabrovská, D.; Otová, B.; Gresová, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2007), s. 157-162 ISSN 0895-7959 R&D Projects: GA MZe QF3287 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Vegetable juices * High pressure processing * Food safety * Anti-mutagenic activity Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 0.840, year: 2007

  5. 76 FR 1504 - Pipeline Safety: Establishing Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure or Maximum Operating Pressure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... and investigations have revealed examples where assessment methods, specific tools, and schedules were... learned from other parts of their system. In recent pipeline accident investigations, NTSB and PHMSA have... Pressure (MOP), and to utilize these risk analyses in the identification of appropriate assessment methods...

  6. An electronic pressure-meter nociception paw test for mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Cunha

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to describe and validate an electronic mechanical test for quantification of the intensity of inflammatory nociception in mice. The electronic pressure-meter test consists of inducing the animal hindpaw flexion reflex by poking the plantar region with a polypropylene pipette tip adapted to a hand-held force transducer. This method was compared to the classical von Frey filaments test in which pressure intensity is automatically recorded after the nociceptive hindpaw flexion reflex. The electronic pressure-meter and the von Frey filaments were used to detect time versus treatment interactions of carrageenin-induced hypernociception. In two separate experiments, the electronic pressure-meter was more sensitive than the von Frey filaments for the detection of the increase in nociception (hypernociception induced by small doses of carrageenin (30 µg. The electronic pressure-meter detected the antinociceptive effect of non-steroidal drugs in a dose-dependent manner. Indomethacin administered intraperitoneally (1.8-15 mg/kg or intraplantarly (30-300 µg/paw prevented the hypersensitive effect of carrageenin (100 µg/paw. The electronic pressure-meter also detected the hypernociceptive effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2; 10-100 ng in a dose-dependent manner. The hypernociceptive effect of PGE2 (100 ng was blocked by dipyrone (160 and 320 µg/paw but not by intraplantar administration of indomethacin (300 µg/paw. The present results validate the use of the electronic pressure-meter as more sensitive than the von Frey filaments in mice. Furthermore, it is an objective and quantitative nociceptive test for the evaluation of the peripheral antinociceptive effect of anti-inflammatory analgesic drugs, which inhibit prostaglandin synthesis (indomethacin or directly block the ongoing hypernociception (dipyrone.

  7. [Non-animal toxicology in the safety testing of chemicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Tuula; Tähti, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop predictive test methods better than animal experiments for assessing the safety of chemical substances to man. According to today's vision this is achieved by using human cell based tissue and organ models. In the new testing strategy the toxic effects are assessed by the changes in the critical parameters of the cellular biochemical routes (AOP, adverse toxic outcome pathway-principle) in the target tissues. In vitro-tests are rapid and effective, and with them automation can be applied. The change in the testing paradigm is supported by all stakeholders: scientists, regulators and people concerned on animal welfare.

  8. [The Scope, Quality and Safety Requirements of Drug Abuse Testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küme, Tuncay; Karakükcü, Çiğdem; Pınar, Aslı; Coşkunol, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to inform about the scopes and requirements of drug abuse testing. Drug abuse testing is one of the tools for determination of drug use. It must fulfill the quality and safety requirements in judgmental legal and administrative decisions. Drug abuse testing must fulfill some requirements like selection of the appropriate test matrix, appropriate screening test panel, sampling in detection window, patient consent, identification of the donor, appropriate collection site, sample collection with observation, identification and control of the sample, specimen custody chain in preanalytical phase; analysis in authorized laboratories, specimen validity tests, reliable testing METHODS, strict quality control, two-step analysis in analytical phase; storage of the split specimen, confirmation of the split specimen in the objection, result custody chain, appropriate cut-off concentration, the appropriate interpretation of the result in postanalytical phase. The workflow and analytical processes of drug abuse testing are explained in last regulation of the Department of Medical Laboratory Services, Ministry of Health in Turkey. The clinical physicians have to know and apply the quality and safety requirements in drug abuse testing according to last regulations in Turkey.

  9. Recommendations for safety testing with the in vivo comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Marie Z

    2012-08-30

    While the in vivo comet assay increases its role in regulatory safety testing, deliberations about the interpretation of comet data continue. Concerns can arise regarding comet assay publications with limited data from non-blind testing of positive control compounds and using protocols (e.g. dose concentrations, sample times, and tissues) known to give an expected effect. There may be a tendency towards bias when the validation or interpretation of comet assay data is based on results generated by widely accepted but non-validated assays. The greatest advantages of the comet assay are its sensitivity and its ability to detect genotoxicity in tissues and at sample times that could not previously be evaluated. Guidelines for its use and interpretation in safety testing should take these factors into account. Guidelines should be derived from objective review of data generated by blind testing of unknown compounds dosed at non-toxic concentrations and evaluated in a true safety-testing environment, where the experimental design and conclusions must be defensible. However, positive in vivo comet findings with such compounds are rarely submitted to regulatory agencies and this data is typically unavailable for publication due to its proprietary nature. To enhance the development of guidelines for safety testing with the comet assay, and with the permission of several sponsors, this paper presents and discusses relevant data from multiple GLP comet studies conducted blind, with unknown pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Based on these data and the lessons we have learned through the course of conducting these studies, I suggest significant adjustments to the current conventions, and I provide recommendations for interpreting in vivo comet assay results in situations where risk must be evaluated in the absence of carcinogenicity or clinical data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Technical safety appraisal of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-01

    This report presents the results of one of a series of Technical Safety Appraisals (TSAs) being conducted of Department of Energy (DOE) operations (nuclear and non-nuclear) by the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H), Office of Safety Appraisals. These TSAs are one of the initiatives announced by the Secretary of Energy on September 18, 1985, to enhance the DOE`s environment, safety, and health program. This TSA report focuses on the safety and health operations of the Nevada Operations Office (NV) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which was conducted concurrently, with and supporting a Tiger Team Assessment. The total effort of all the Tiger Team assessment, including environmental and manager evaluations, is reported in the Tiger Team Report, issued January 1990. The assessment of the NTS began November 5, 1989 with the briefing of the Tiger Team in Las Vegas at the Nevada Operations Office. The TSA team evaluation was conducted November 6--17, and November 26--December 1, 1989 at the NTS.

  11. Pressure-Sensitive Paints Advance Rotorcraft Design Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The rotors of certain helicopters can spin at speeds as high as 500 revolutions per minute. As the blades slice through the air, they flex, moving into the wind and back out, experiencing pressure changes on the order of thousands of times a second and even higher. All of this makes acquiring a true understanding of rotorcraft aerodynamics a difficult task. A traditional means of acquiring aerodynamic data is to conduct wind tunnel tests using a vehicle model outfitted with pressure taps and other sensors. These sensors add significant costs to wind tunnel testing while only providing measurements at discrete locations on the model's surface. In addition, standard sensor solutions do not work for pulling data from a rotor in motion. "Typical static pressure instrumentation can't handle that," explains Neal Watkins, electronics engineer in Langley Research Center s Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch. "There are dynamic pressure taps, but your costs go up by a factor of five to ten if you use those. In addition, recovery of the pressure tap readings is accomplished through slip rings, which allow only a limited amount of sensors and can require significant maintenance throughout a typical rotor test." One alternative to sensor-based wind tunnel testing is pressure sensitive paint (PSP). A coating of a specialized paint containing luminescent material is applied to the model. When exposed to an LED or laser light source, the material glows. The glowing material tends to be reactive to oxygen, explains Watkins, which causes the glow to diminish. The more oxygen that is present (or the more air present, since oxygen exists in a fixed proportion in air), the less the painted surface glows. Imaged with a camera, the areas experiencing greater air pressure show up darker than areas of less pressure. "The paint allows for a global pressure map as opposed to specific points," says Watkins. With PSP, each pixel recorded by the camera becomes an optical pressure

  12. 49 CFR 178.605 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... packaging design types intended to contain liquids and be performed periodically as specified in § 178.601(e... packagings and composite packagings other than plastic (e.g., glass, porcelain or stoneware), including their closures, must be subjected to the test pressure for 5 minutes. Plastic packagings and composite packagings...

  13. Testing Chemical Safety: What Is Needed to Ensure the Widespread Application of Non-animal Approaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Natalie; Sewell, Fiona; Chapman, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    Scientists face growing pressure to move away from using traditional animal toxicity tests to determine whether manufactured chemicals are safe. Numerous ethical, scientific, business, and legislative incentives will help to drive this shift. However, a number of hurdles must be overcome in the coming years before non-animal methods are adopted into widespread practice, particularly from regulatory, scientific, and global perspectives. Several initiatives are nevertheless underway that promise to increase the confidence in newer alternative methods, which will support the move towards a future in which less data from animal tests is required in the assessment of chemical safety.

  14. Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation for extubation failure after cardiac surgery: Pilot safety evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santo, Luca S; Bancone, Ciro; Santarpino, Giuseppe; Romano, Gianpaolo; Della Corte, Alessandro; Vicchio, Mariano; De Pietro, Antonio; Galdieri, Nicola; Cotrufo, Maurizio

    2009-02-01

    Extubation failure is a serious complication after cardiac surgery. The role of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure in patients undergoing cardiac surgery is unknown. This study aimed to assess the safety of implementing noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in this setting and its impact on lung function and operative outcomes. In a 6-month pilot prospective survey, the study population comprised 43 patients (32 were male with a mean age of 65.73 +/- 9 years; 3 heart transplantations, 18 coronary artery bypass grafts, 5 aortic dissections, and 17 valvular procedures; 34 active smokers, 25 with medically treated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 21 emergency/urgency procedures) who required noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure after initial weaning from a respirator. The cause of acute respiratory failure (classified as post-cardiopulmonary bypass lung injury in 48.8% [21 patients], cardiogenic edema in 30.2% [13 patients], and pneumonia in 21% [9 patients]), length of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation support, respiratory ratios (arterial oxygen tension/fraction of inspired oxygen assessed immediately before noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation, and every 6 hours after institution of pressure ventilation), and need for reintubation along with a set of predefined safety parameters were recorded. The mean length of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation support was 33.8 +/- 24.04 hours. Plotting respiratory ratios with length of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation supports a significant improvement was already evident within the first 6-hour frame (133.6 +/- 39.5 vs 205 +/- 65.7; P < .001) for all causes. Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation prevented intubation in 74.4% of the patients, with satisfactory recovery for post-cardiopulmonary bypass lung injury and cardiogenic dysfunction (90.5% and 69.2%, respectively) and poor results (55% reintubated) in those

  15. Standard Test Method for Water Penetration of Flat Plate Solar Collectors by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1986-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the resistance of flat plate solar collectors to water penetration when water is applied to their outer surfaces with a static air pressure at the outer surface higher than the pressure at the interior of the collector. 1.2 This test method is applicable to any flat plate solar collector. 1.3 The proper use of this test method requires a knowledge of the principles of pressure and deflection measurement. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific precautionary information is contained in Section 6.

  16. Using partial safety factors in wind turbine design and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the relationship between wind turbine design and testing in terms of the certification process. An overview of the current status of international certification is given along with a description of limit-state design basics. Wind turbine rotor blades are used to illustrate the principles discussed. These concepts are related to both International Electrotechnical Commission and Germanischer Lloyd design standards, and are covered using schematic representations of statistical load and material strength distributions. Wherever possible, interpretations of the partial safety factors are given with descriptions of their intended meaning. Under some circumstances, the authors` interpretations may be subjective. Next, the test-load factors are described in concept and then related to the design factors. Using technical arguments, it is shown that some of the design factors for both load and materials must be used in the test loading, but some should not be used. In addition, some test factors not used in the design may be necessary for an accurate test of the design. The results show that if the design assumptions do not clearly state the effects and uncertainties that are covered by the design`s partial safety factors, outside parties such as test labs or certification agencies could impose their own meaning on these factors.

  17. 46 CFR 61.30-20 - Automatic control and safety tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic control and safety tests. 61.30-20 Section 61... TESTS AND INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Fired Thermal Fluid Heaters § 61.30-20 Automatic control and safety tests. Operational tests and checks of all safety and limit controls, combustion controls...

  18. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Pressure Transducers in Liquid Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Amand, J F; Casas-Cubillos, J; Thermeau, J P

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnets of the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will operate in pressurised superfluid helium (1 bar, 1.9 K). About 500 pressure transducers will be placed in the liquid helium bath for monitoring the filling and the pressure transients after resistive transitions. Their precision must remain better than 100 mbar at pressures below 2 bar and better than 5% for higher pressures (up to 20 bar), with temperatures ranging from 1.8 K to 300 K. All the tested transducers are based on the same principle: the fluid or gas is separated from a sealed reference vacuum by an elastic membrane; its deformation indicates the pressure. The transducers will be exposed to high neutron fluence (2 kGy, 1014 n/cm2 per year) during the 20 years of machine operation. This irradiation may induce changes both on the membranes characteristics (leakage, modification of elasticity) and on gauges which measure their deformations. To investigate these effects and select the transducer to be used in the LHC, a...

  19. Cyber Security Test Strategy for Non-safety Display System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Han Seong [Joongbu University, Geumsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Eun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security has been a big issue since the instrumentation and control (I and C) system of nuclear power plant (NPP) is digitalized. A cyber-attack on NPP should be dealt with seriously because it might cause not only economic loss but also the radioactive material release. Researches on the consequences of cyber-attack onto NPP from a safety point of view have been conducted. A previous study shows the risk effect brought by initiation of event and deterioration of mitigation function by cyber terror. Although this study made conservative assumptions and simplifications, it gives an insight on the effect of cyber-attack. Another study shows that the error on a non-safety display system could cause wrong actions of operators. According to this previous study, the failure of the operator action caused by a cyber-attack on a display system might threaten the safety of the NPP by limiting appropriate mitigation actions. This study suggests a test strategy focusing on the cyber-attack on the information and display system, which might cause the failure of operator. The test strategy can be suggested to evaluate and complement security measures. Identifying whether a cyber-attack on the information and display system can affect the mitigation actions of operator, the strategy to obtain test scenarios is suggested. The failure of mitigation scenario is identified first. Then, for the test target in the scenario, software failure modes are applied to identify realistic failure scenarios. Testing should be performed for those scenarios to confirm the integrity of data and to assure effectiveness of security measures.

  20. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  1. High Pressure Hydrogen Pressure Relief Devices: Accelerated Life Testing and Application Best Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Robert M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rivkin, Carl H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-06

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs ) are used to protect high pressure systems from burst failure caused by overpressurization. Codes and standards require the use of PRDs for the safe design of many pressurized systems. These systems require high reliability due to the risks associated with a burst failure. Hydrogen service can increase the risk of PRD failure due to material property degradation caused by hydrogen attack. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has conducted an accelerated life test on a conventional spring loaded PRD. Based on previous failures in the field, the nozzles specific to these PRDs are of particular interest. A nozzle in a PRD is a small part that directs the flow of fluid toward the sealing surface to maintain the open state of the valve once the spring force is overcome. The nozzle in this specific PRD is subjected to the full tensile force of the fluid pressure. These nozzles are made from 440C material, which is a type of hardened steel that is commonly chosen for high pressure applications because of its high strength properties. In a hydrogen environment, however, 440C is considered a worst case material since hydrogen attack results in a loss of almost all ductility and thus 440C is prone to fatigue and material failure. Accordingly, 440C is not recommended for hydrogen service. Conducting an accelerated life test on a PRD with 440C material provides information on necessary and sufficient conditions required to produce crack initiation and failure. The accelerated life test also provides information on other PRD failure modes that are somewhat statistically random in nature.

  2. [Microcystin safety study during Cyanobacteria removal by pressure enhanced coagulation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin-Yue; Luan, Qing; Cong, Hai-Bing; Xu, Si-Tao; Liu, Yu-Jiao; Zhu, Xue-Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Pressure enhanced coagulation and sedimentation technique is an effective way for blue algae treatment. It is not clear whether Cyanobacteria balloon rupture will cause Cyanobacteria cells rupture, resulting in high intracellular concentrations of microcystin LR leak into the water, affecting drinking water safety. Therefore, in this study experimental comparative study of pressure and pre-oxidation of water containing Cyanobacteria was carried out to examine the microcystin LR concentration changes and Cyanobacteria removal efficiency. The results showed that microcystin concentration increase was not significant by the pre-treatment with Cyanobacteria water pressure, while the pre-oxidation process caused a significant increase in the concentration of microcystin. After 0.5-0.8 MPa pressure coagulation and sedimentation, removal of Cyanobacteria basically was over 90%, up to 93.5%, while the removal rate by pre-oxidation was low and unstable. Effluent turbidity is also significantly better in the pre-pressure method than the pre-oxidation. The results indicated that pressure enhanced coagulation is a safe and reliable method for Cyanobacteria removal.

  3. Supplementary safety system 1/4 scale testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, R.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1993-09-01

    During the course of updating the K-Reactor Safety Analysis Report Chapter 15 in 1990, it was identified that the current Supplementary Safety System (SSS) may not be adequate in protecting the reactor during the process water pump coastdown initiated by a loss of AC power when the safety rods are assumed to fail. A SSS modification project was initiated to add an additional ink injection pathway near the pump suction. In addition, the Department of Energy raised a question on the thermal buoyancy effects on moderator flow pattern and ink dispersion in the moderator space. The development and documentation of a two-dimensional code called MODFLOW was undertaken to describe the problem. This report discusses the results of the moderator flow and ink (Gadolinium Poison Solution - GPS) dispersion tests designed to provide qualified data for validation and benchmarking of the MODFLOW computer code with the secondary objectives being the development of concentration profiles and video footage of simulated GPS dispersion under steady-state and transient flow conditions.

  4. Comparison of three small-break loss-of-coolant accident tests with different break locations using the system-integrated modular advanced reactor-integral test loop facility to estimate the safety of the smart design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Bae

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Three small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA tests with safety injection pumps were carried out using the integral-effect test loop for SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor, i.e., the SMART-ITL facility. The types of break are a safety injection system line break, shutdown cooling system line break, and pressurizer safety valve line break. The thermal–hydraulic phenomena show a traditional behavior to decrease the temperature and pressure whereas the local phenomena are slightly different during the early stage of the transient after a break simulation. A safety injection using a high-pressure pump effectively cools down and recovers the inventory of a reactor coolant system. The global trends show reproducible results for an SBLOCA scenario with three different break locations. It was confirmed that the safety injection system is robustly safe enough to protect from a core uncovery.

  5. Comparison of three small-break loss-of-coolant accident tests with different break locations using the system-integrated modular advanced reactor-integral test loop facility to estimate the safety of the smart design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hwang; Ryu, Sung Uk; Yi, Sung Jae; Park, Hyun Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Eok [Dept. of Precision Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Three small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) tests with safety injection pumps were carried out using the integral-effect test loop for SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), i.e., the SMART-ITL facility. The types of break are a safety injection system line break, shutdown cooling system line break, and pressurizer safety valve line break. The thermal–hydraulic phenomena show a traditional behavior to decrease the temperature and pressure whereas the local phenomena are slightly different during the early stage of the transient after a break simulation. A safety injection using a high-pressure pump effectively cools down and recovers the inventory of a reactor coolant system. The global trends show reproducible results for an SBLOCA scenario with three different break locations. It was confirmed that the safety injection system is robustly safe enough to protect from a core uncovery.

  6. CLOSEOUT REPORT FOR HYBRID SULFUR PRESSURIZED BUTTON CELL TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeper, T.

    2010-09-15

    This document is the Close-Out Report for design and partial fabrication of the Pressurized Button Cell Test Facility at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This facility was planned to help develop the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) that is a key component of the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for generating hydrogen. The purpose of this report is to provide as much information as possible in case the decision is made to resume research. This report satisfies DOE Milestone M3GSR10VH030107.0. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by watersplitting. The HyS Cycle utilizes the high temperature (>800 C) thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both high thermodynamic efficiency and low hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. Sulfur dioxide from the decomposer is cycled back to electrolyzers. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. Anode and cathode are formed by spraying a catalyst, typically platinized carbon, on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). SRNL has been testing SDEs for several years including an atmospheric pressure Button Cell electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2} active area) and an elevated temperature/pressure Single Cell electrolyzer (54.8 cm{sup 2} active area). SRNL tested 37 MEAs in the Single Cell electrolyzer facility from June 2005 until June 2009, when funding was discontinued. An important result of the final months of testing was the development of a method that

  7. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each guinea...

  8. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Liquid Hydrogen Pressure Control Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. D.; Otto, J. M.; Cody, J. C.; Hastings, L. J.; Bryant, C. B.; Gautney, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy cryogenic propellant is an essential element in future space exploration programs. Therefore, NASA and its industrial partners are committed to an advanced development/technology program that will broaden the experience base for the entire cryogenic fluid management community. Furthermore, the high cost of microgravity experiments has motivated NASA to establish government/aerospace industry teams to aggressively explore combinations of ground testing and analytical modeling to the greatest extent possible, thereby benefitting both industry and government entities. One such team consisting of ManTech SRS, Inc., Edwards Air Force Base, and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was formed to pursue a technology project designed to demonstrate technology readiness for an SRS liquid hydrogen (LH2) in-space propellant management concept. The subject testing was cooperatively performed June 21-30, 2000, through a partially reimbursable Space Act Agreement between SRS, MSFC, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. The joint statement of work used to guide the technical activity is presented in appendix A. The key elements of the SRS concept consisted of an LH2 storage and supply system that used all of the vented H2 for solar engine thrusting, accommodated pressure control without a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), and minimized or eliminated the need for a capillary liquid acquisition device (LAD). The strategy was to balance the LH2 storage tank pressure control requirements with the engine thrusting requirements to selectively provide either liquid or vapor H2 at a controlled rate to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity environment of space operations. The overall test objective was to verify that the proposed concept could enable simultaneous control of LH2 tank pressure and feed system flow to the thruster without necessitating a TVS and a capillary LAD. The primary program objectives were designed to demonstrate technology readiness of the SRS concept

  9. Hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule of SA 533 cl. 1 reactor pressure vessel (1st test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Jung, Y. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Baik, S. J.; Oh, W. H.; Soong, W. S.; Hong, K. P

    2000-08-01

    The post-irradiated examinations such as impact test, tensile test, composition analysis and etc. were conducted to monitor and to evaluate the radiation-induced changes, so called radiation embrittlement, in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials. Those data should be applied to confirm safety as well as reliability of reactor pressure vessel. The scopes and contents of hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule are as follows; - Capsule transportation, cutting, dismantling and classification - Shim block and Dosimeter cutting and dismantling - Impact test - Tensile test - Composition analysis by EPMA - SEM observation on the fractured surface - Hardness test - Radwaste treatment.

  10. Inconsistent food safety pressures complicate environmental conservation for California produce growers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Controlling human pathogens on fresh vegetables, fruits and nuts is imperative for California growers. A range of rules and guidelines have been developed since 2006, when a widespread outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 was linked to bagged spinach grown in California. Growers face pressure from industry and government sources to adopt specific control measures on their farms, resulting in a complex, shifting set of demands, some of which conflict with environmental stewardship. We surveyed 588 California produce growers about on-farm practices related to food safety and conservation. Nearly all respondents considered both food safety and environmental protection to be important responsibilities for their farms. Responses indicate that clearing vegetation to create buffers around cropped fields, removing vegetation from ditches and ponds, and using poison bait and wildlife fences are commonly used practices intended to reduce wildlife movements onto farm fields. The survey also revealed that on-farm practices vary substantially even among farms with similar characteristics. This variability suggests inconsistencies in food safety requirements, auditors' interpretations or growers' perception of the demands of their buyers. Although site-specific considerations are important and practices should be tailored to local conditions, our findings suggest growers, natural resources and food safety would benefit from clearer, more consistent requirements.

  11. Quiz: Does Your Blood Pressure Pass the Test? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Quiz: Does Your Blood Pressure Pass the Test? Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Blood pressure changes throughout the day. It is highest while ...

  12. Design, Manufacture and Testing of Capacitive Pressure Sensors for Low-Pressure Measurement Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Mitrakos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the design, manufacture and testing of a capacitive pressure sensor with a high, tunable performance to low compressive loads (<10 kPa and a resolution of less than 0.5 kPa. Such a performance is required for the monitoring of treatment efficacy delivered by compression garments to treat or prevent medical conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, leg ulcers, varicose veins or hypertrophic scars. Current commercial sensors used in such medical applications have been found to be either impractical, costly or of insufficient resolution. A microstructured elastomer film of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS blend with a tunable Young’s modulus was used as the force-sensing dielectric medium. The resulting 18 mm × 18 mm parallel-plate capacitive pressure sensor was characterised in the range of 0.8 to 6.5 kPa. The microstructuring of the surface morphology of the elastomer film combined with the tuning of the Young’s modulus of the PDMS blend is demonstrated to enhance the sensor performance achieving a 0.25 kPa pressure resolution and a 10 pF capacitive change under 6.5 kPa compressive load. The resulting sensor holds good potential for the targeted medical application.

  13. On split Hopkinson pressure bar testing of rubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, John

    2011-06-01

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) studies of rubber materials are difficult due to their ability to undergo large deformations at low levels of stress. Analytical, numerical and experimental investigations are reported. The tests were performed using polymer bars. A key stage in this is the experimental determination of the propagation coefficient. An analytical investigation of the experimental arrangements used to ascertain the propagation coefficient is reported. A finite element (FE) simulation of longitudinal stress waves in solid, circular, polymer bars is presented also. The viscoelastic material definition employed in the FE simulations is obtained by curve fitting Prony series expansions to the experimentally derived elastic modulus. In order to assess the accuracy of the experimental arrangement, an FE model of the full viscoelastic SHPB set-up is then used to simulate tests on hyper-elastic materials with specified properties. Finally, experimental data for rubber materials at strain rates of the order of 1000 s-1 are presented.

  14. Radiation pressure calibration and test mass reflectivities for LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsakova, Natalia; Kaune, Brigitte; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments which were carried out during the main operations of LISA Pathfinder. These experiments were performed by modulating the power of the measurement and reference beams. In one series of experiments the beams were sequentially switched on and off. In the other series of experiments the powers of the beams were modulated within 0.1% and 1% of the constant power. These experiments use recordings of the total power measured on the photodiodes to infer the properties of the Optical Metrology System (OMS), such as reflectivities of the test masses and change of the photodiode efficiencies with time. In the first case the powers are back propagated from the different photodiodes to the same place on the optical bench to express the unknown quantities in the measurement with the complimentary photodiode measurements. They are combined in the way that the only unknown left is the test mass reflectivities. The second experiment compared two estimates of the force applied to the test masses due to the radiation pressure that appears because of the beam modulations. One estimate of the force is inferred from the measurements of the powers on the photodiodes and propagation of this measurement to the test masses. The other estimation of the force is done by calculating it from the change in the main scientific output of the instrument - differential displacement of the two test masses.

  15. Environmental testing of an experimental digital safety channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, K.; Tanaka, T.J.; Wilson, T.L. Jr.; Wood, R.T.

    1996-09-01

    This document presents the results of environmental stress tests performed on an experimental digital safety channel (EDSC) assembled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the NRC-sponsored Qualification of Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (W) System program. The objective of this study is to investigate failure modes and vulnerabilities of microprocessor-based technologies when subjected to environmental stressors. The study contributes to the technical basis for environmental qualification of safety-related digital I&C systems. The EDSC employs technologies and digital subsystems representative of those proposed for use in advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs) or for retrofits in existing plants. Subsystems include computers, electrical and optical serial communication links, fiber-optic network links, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters, and multiplexers. The EDSC was subjected to selected stressors that are a potential risk to digital equipment in a mild environment. The selected stressors were electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference (EMYRFI), temperature, humidity, and smoke exposure. The stressors were applied over ranges that were considerably higher than what the channel is likely to experience in a normal nuclear power plant environment. Ranges of stress were selected at a sufficiently high level to induce errors so that failure modes that are characteristic of the technologies employed could be identified.

  16. Testing a novel child farm safety intervention for Anabaptist audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgus, Shari; Rademaker, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Farming within the Anabaptist (within this article defined as various religious groups that do not believe in infant baptism; Amish, Hutterites, Mennonites, and Brethren are included within the definition and usually practice selective use of technology) population creates a unique situation with regards to teaching farm safety and health to children. Children working at an age younger than typical farm families, using older equipment and with increased exposure to livestock, affect injuries among Anabaptist children and youth. Addressing social differences and using low-tech methods for demonstrations help when planning resources and programs.An existing Farm Safety 4 Just Kids (FS4JK) magnetic farm scene, hazard hunt program was adapted for Anabaptist youth to include more images related to the Anabaptist lifestyle. The adapted educational display was piloted in 5 locations (Iowa, Pennsylvania, Ohio (2), and Ontario). Fifty-four boys and 54 girls participated in the pilot programs. Youth survey results indicated that animal-related issues were primary in Anabaptist youths' learning from the lessons. Behaviors most likely mentioned by youth as unsafe actions involved jumping off moving vehicles, mowing with bare feet, and approaching animals unsafely. Youth were most likely to change behavior when working with animals. Instructors indicated that the magnetic display medium was well received by the Anabaptist audience. Pilot testing led to adaptations to content and pictorial images.

  17. 78 FR 25488 - Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... COMMISSION Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear..., ``Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants.'' DG-1235 is proposed Revision 1 of RG... practices for qualifying safety-related actuators, and actuator components, in Nuclear Power Generating...

  18. 30 CFR 27.37 - Tests to determine adequacy of safety devices for bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests to determine adequacy of safety devices for bulbs. 27.37 Section 27.37 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 27.37 Tests to determine adequacy of safety devices for bulbs. The glass envelope of bulbs with the...

  19. Managing blood pressure control in Asian patients: safety and efficacy of losartan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Tommy Tsang; Cheung, Bernard Man Yung

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is common in Asian populations and is a major cause of cardiovascular diseases. The prevalence of hypertension is increasing in many Asian countries. The overall prevalence of hypertension in India and the People’s Republic of China has been estimated to be 20.6% in men and 22.6% in women. However, the rates of detection, treatment, and control of hypertension remain low in Asia. This reflects a low level of literacy and education, as well as a low level of access to medical care. To overcome these obstacles, strategies targeted at education, promotion, and optimization of medical care, are crucial to achieve target blood pressure control. Angiotensin receptor blockers are one of the first-line treatments for essential hypertension because they confer better cardiovascular outcomes. Losartan has been widely evaluated for the management of hypertension. Although some studies suggested that the blood pressure-lowering effect of losartan is perhaps lower than for other angiotensin receptor blockers, losartan has been demonstrated to be beneficial in terms of renal protection in patients with diabetes, heart failure resulting from either systolic or diastolic dysfunction, and diuretic-induced hyperuricemia. However, most of these data were obtained from Caucasian populations. The efficacy and safety of losartan in Asian populations may be different because of genetic and ethnic variations. Therefore, the efficacy and safety of losartan in Asian patients with hypertension warrant further study. PMID:24672231

  20. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Assessment: Education May Improve but not Guarantee the Safety of Palpation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Siamdoust, Seyed Alireza; Mohseni, Masood; Memarian, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure (ETCP) should be kept in the range of 20 - 30 cm H2O. Earlier studies suggested that ETCP assessment by palpation of pilot balloon results in overinflation or underinflation and subsequent complications such as tracheal wall damage and aspiration. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of an in vitro educational program on the ability of anesthesia personnel to inflate Endotracheal Tube Cuffs (ETT) within safe pressure limits. Patients and Methods: The survey included two series of blinded ETCP measurements in intubated patients before and two weeks after an in vitro educational intervention. The in vitro educational program included two separate trials. The anesthesia personnel were asked to inflate an ETT cuff inserted in a tracheal model using their usual inflation technique. In the same session, six ETTs at different pressure levels were examined by the participants and their estimation of ETCP was recorded. After the in vitro assessment, the participants were informed about the actual pressure of the in vitro ETCPs and were allowed to train their fingers by in vitro pilot balloon palpation with validated manometer measurements. Results: The mean ETCP after the in vitro survey was significantly lower than the mean ETCP before the intervention (45 ± 13 vs. 51 ± 15 cm H2O, P = 0.002). The rate of measurements within the safe pressure limits significantly improved after the in vitro education (24.2% vs. 39.7%, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Implementing educational programs with the introduction of estimation techniques besides the use of manometer as a standard intraoperative monitoring will improve the safety of the practice. PMID:26161313

  1. 30 CFR 35.21 - Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. 35... Temperature-pressure spray-ignition tests. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the... the pressure vessel and heated to a temperature of 150 °F. The temperature shall be maintained at not...

  2. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF...

  3. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure at rest is not predictive of roundthe- clock values. Blood pressure should therefore be measured during effort to evaluate hypertension and its response to treatment. The effect of sustained-release verapamil (240 mg taken once a day) on blood pressure at rest and during isometric effort was therefore ...

  4. Test description and preliminary pitot-pressure surveys for Langley Test Technique Demonstrator at Mach 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Ashby, George C., Jr.; Monta, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A propulsion/airframe integration experiment conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel using a 16.8-in.-long version of the Langley Test Technique Demonstrator configuration with simulated scramjet propulsion is described. Schlieren and vapor screen visualization of the nozzle flow field is presented and correlated with pitot-pressure flow-field surveys. The data were obtained at nominal free-stream conditions of Re = 2.8 x 10 exp 6 and a nominal engine total pressure of 100 psia. It is concluded that pitot-pressure surveys coupled to schlieren and vapor-screen photographs, and oil flows have revealed flow features including vortices, free shear layers, and shock waves occurring in the model flow field.

  5. [Blood pressure and sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome in workers. STOP-Bang test versus Epworth test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Herrero, M T; Capdevila-García, L; Bellido-Cambrón, M C; Ramírez-Iñiguez de la Torre, M V; Lladosa-Marco, S

    OSAHS is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Arterial hypertension is a key risk factor to consider due to its impact on health. Cross-sectional study carried out on Spanish public service workers. The nocturnal apnoea risk using the Epworth and STOP-Bang questionnaires and their influence on the mean values of blood pressure are assessed. The detection of OSAHS using the Epworth test and, particularly with the STOP-Bang shows a significant relationship with the mean values of blood pressure, with differences between both questionnaires. The Epworth and STOP-Bang questionnaires are useful for the initial detection of OSAHS and a higher prevalence of high blood pressure. Both can be used in screening procedures in occupational health. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Standard Test Method for Saltwater Pressure Immersion and Temperature Testing of Photovoltaic Modules for Marine Environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand repeated immersion or splash exposure by seawater as might be encountered when installed in a marine environment, such as a floating aid-to-navigation. A combined environmental cycling exposure with modules repeatedly submerged in simulated saltwater at varying temperatures and under repetitive pressurization provides an accelerated basis for evaluation of aging effects of a marine environment on module materials and construction. 1.2 This test method defines photovoltaic module test specimens and requirements for positioning modules for test, references suitable methods for determining changes in electrical performance and characteristics, and specifies parameters which must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable results is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be ...

  7. Research of explosives in an environment of high pressure and temperature using a new test stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Drzewiecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the test stand for determining the blast abilities of explosives in high pressure and temperature conditions as well as the initial results of the research are presented. Explosives are used in rock burst and methane prevention to destroy precisely defined fragments of the rock mass where energy and methane are accumulated. Using this preventive method for fracturing the structure of the rocks which accumulate the energy or coal of the methane seam very often does not bring the anticipated results. It is because of the short range of destructive action of the post-blast gases around the blast hole. Evaluation of the blast dynamics of explosives in a test chamber, i.e. in the pressure and temperature conditions comparable to those found “in situ”, will enable evaluation of their real usefulness in commonly used mining hazard preventive methods. At the same time, it will enable the development of new designs of the explosive charges used for precisely determined mining hazards. In order to test the explosives for their use in difficult environmental conditions and to determine the characteristics of their explosion, a test chamber has been built. It is equipped with a system of sensors and a high-frequency recording system of pressure and temperature during a controlled explosion of an explosive charge. The results of the research will enable the development of new technologies for rock burst and methane prevention which will significantly increase workplace health and safety level. This paper presented results constitute the initial phase of research started in the middle of 2014.

  8. Cryogenic Autogenous Pressurization Testing for Robotic Refueling Mission 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R.; DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Francis, J.; Mustafi, S.; Li, X.; Barfknecht, P.; DeLee, C. H.; McGuire, J.

    2015-01-01

    A wick-heater system has been selected for use to pressurize the Source Dewar of the Robotic Refueling Mission Phase 3 on-orbit cryogen transfer experiment payload for the International Space Station. Experimental results of autogenous pressurization of liquid argon and liquid nitrogen using a prototype wick-heater system are presented. The wick-heater generates gas to increase the pressure in the tank while maintaining a low bulk fluid temperature. Pressurization experiments were performed in 2013 to characterize the performance of the wick heater. This paper describes the experimental setup, pressurization results, and analytical model correlations.

  9. 77 FR 58607 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation Safety Approval Performance Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... evaluate the National Aerospace Training and Research (NASTAR) Center safety approval application. SUMMARY...: --Acceptance Test Plan, --Pressure profile demonstrations, and --Altimeter and pressure gauge test results. FOR...

  10. Adolescents, gangs, and perceptions of safety, parental engagement, and peer pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sarah E; Anderson, Debra G

    2012-10-01

    Adolescents are exposed to various forms of gang violence, and such exposure has led them to feel unsafe in their neighborhood and have differing interactions with their parents and peers. This qualitative study explored adolescents', parents', and community center employees' perceptions of adolescents' interaction with their neighborhood, family, and peers. Three themes emerged from the data: Most adolescents reported that the community center provided a safe environment for them; parental engagement influenced adolescents' experiences with gangs; and adolescents were subjected to peer pressure in order to belong. Exposure to gang violence can leave an impression on adolescents and affect their mental health, but neighborhood safety and relationships with parents and peers can influence adolescents' exposure to gang violence. Recommendations regarding the use of health care professionals at community centers are proposed. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Occupant safety design approaches using physical testing and numerical simulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linzmaier, L.C.; Carvalho, J.R.; Benar, M.; Vilela, D.; Altamore, P.

    2001-01-01

    The vehicle design environment from a crashworthiness and safety perspective has become increasingly complex in recent years. New legal requirements imposed by the European Union (EU) and the United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) have created a design space of great

  12. Semi-natural test methods to evaluate fire safety of wall claddings: Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolka Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of test methods worldwide to evaluate fire safety of facades. An overview of available test methods implemented in fire safety codes was presented at the 1st Conference of Fire Safety of Facades in 2013. [1] Since then, a number of changes and developments occurred. The purpose of this paper is to present the updated global overview of facade fire spread test methods made for building regulations.

  13. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: test reproducibility and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisant

    1998-08-01

    The use of data from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has the potential to shift how we think about assessing the cardiovascular risk factor of blood pressure. Group mean 24 h, 12 h, 8 h, and hourly blood pressures for two recordings are highly reproducible. A single 24 h ambulatory blood pressure data set correlates better to echocardiographic left ventricular wall thickness than does the average blood pressure of multiple office measurements and than does a single-office visit measurement. Both blunted and excessive nocturnal declines in blood pressure have been associated with more target-organ damage than that with a normal nocturnal decline in blood pressure. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has proven to be an indispensable tool in development of drugs. Unfortunately, movement, environmental noise, and excessive vibration interfere with measurement of ambulatory blood pressure. The devices are less accurate for patients with dysrhythmias. False data resulting in incorrect medical decisions might be the most important problem with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Reproducibility of individual ambulatory blood pressure data sets is poor. For an individual patient, it might be difficult to detect white-coat hypertension, determine dipping status, and assess a drug's effect. The use of a single ambulatory monitoring record can be inadequate for diagnosing a patient as hypertensive or normotensive. Portable noninvasive ABPM devices would provide more interpretable information if they included an activity detector, a body-position detector, and facilities for performing continuous electrocardiography and measurements of blood pressure. Devices should perform accurately when someone is engaged in vigorous activity. Perhaps detection of sleep and emotional arousal would complete the requirements for an ideal monitor.

  14. Integrated Safety Program for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Mehlman, William F.; Kompanietz, G.

    1994-07-01

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) is sponsored by the Ballistic Missile Defense Office (BMDO) to demonstrate and evaluate the Russian-built TOPAZ II nuclear reactor as a power source for an electric propulsion system in space. From its inception, safety has been a central feature of the NEPSTP program. This paper addresses the work done to define the safety organizational relationships, responsibilities, management, engineering requirements, and documentation to assure an integrated safety program that coordinates the various safety activities in Mission Safety, Range Safety and Nuclear Safety. Because the United States has not launched a nuclear reactor since 1965, much of the focus of the safety program has been directed toward the unique safety considerations of using a nuclear reactor in space. Our preliminary findings indicate that the safe use of the TOPAZ II for the NEPSTP space mission is feasible.

  15. Pressure measurements and comfort of foam safety cushions for confined seating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colin; Emck, Adrian J; Hunston, Michael J; Jarvis, Philip C

    2009-06-01

    Glider flights may require the pilot to sit for many hours in a cramped cockpit that allows little movement. Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the performance of different seat cushions in a glider simulator. Subjects were male glider pilots with a maximum height of 1.85 m (6.07 ft) who participated in simulated glider flights lasting 1.5 h. A pressure-mapping device was used to determine cushion performance. By analyzing 15 subjects we calculated the pressure threshold for comfort, above which fidgeting provided objective evidence of discomfort. To determine cushion performance relative to that threshold, 20 other pilots then sat on 5 different viscoelastic foam cushions in the simulator. The time-averaged peak pressure below which no discomfort-induced fidgeting occurred was 8.8 kPa (1.28 psi). The highest peak pressure at which discomfort could be relieved by fidgeting was 11.0 kPa (1.6 psi). Of the five cushions tested, pressure remained below the discomfort threshold for almost all subjects for only one type of cushion. The best-performing cushion had a layered structure made up of approximately 25 mm of Confor C47 foam with an overlay of approximately 13 mm of Confor C45. The other types of energy-absorbing cushions tested, either with or without a softer top layer, are unlikely to provide comfortable seating solutions for most pilots. We conclude that satisfactory cushions are available for this application and that they can be objectively evaluated using this technique.

  16. 30 CFR 250.425 - What are the requirements for pressure testing liners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations... drilling or other down-hole operations until you obtain a satisfactory pressure test. If the pressure...) You must test each drilling liner (and liner-lap) to a pressure at least equal to the anticipated...

  17. DHS small-scale safety and thermal testing of improvised explosives-comparison of testing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, J. G.; Sandstrom, M. M.; Brown, G. W.; Warner, K. F.; Phillips, J. J.; Shelley, T. J.; Reyes, J. A.; Hsu, P. C.

    2014-05-01

    One of the first steps in establishing safe handling procedures for explosives is small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing. To better understand the response of improvised materials or homemade explosives (HMEs) to SSST testing, 16 HME materials were compared to three standard military explosives in a proficiency-type round robin study among five laboratories-two DoD and three DOE-sponsored by DHS. The testing matrix has been designed to address problems encountered with improvised materials-powder mixtures, liquid suspensions, partially wetted solids, immiscible liquids, and reactive materials. More than 30 issues have been identified that indicate standard test methods may require modification when applied to HMEs to derive accurate sensitivity assessments needed for developing safe handling and storage practices. This paper presents a generalized comparison of the results among the testing participants, comparison of friction results from BAM (German Bundesanstalt für Materi-alprüfung) and ABL (Allegany Ballistics Laboratory) designed testing equipment, and an overview of the statistical results from the RDX (1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine) standard tested throughout the proficiency test.

  18. Development and test of rural pedestrian safety countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Prior to any promulgation by NHTSA of four model traffic regulations for rural pedestrian safety it was the objective of this study to assess, where feasible, the potential effectiveness of these regulations to prevent pedestrian accidents. The model...

  19. Influence of different safety shoes on gait and plantar pressure: a standardized examination of workers in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsmann, Elke; Noll, Ulrike; Ellegast, Rolf; Hermanns, Ingo; Kraus, Thomas

    2016-09-30

    Working conditions, such as walking and standing on hard surfaces, can increase the development of musculoskeletal complaints. At the interface between flooring and musculoskeletal system, safety shoes may play an important role in the well-being of employees. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different safety shoes on gait and plantar pressure distributions on industrial flooring. Twenty automotive workers were individually fitted out with three different pairs of safety shoes ( "normal" shoes, cushioned shoes, and midfoot bearing shoes). They walked at a given speed of 1.5 m/s. The CUELA measuring system and shoe insoles were used for gait analysis and plantar pressure measurements, respectively. Statistical analysis was conducted by ANOVA analysis for repeated measures. Walking with cushioned safety shoes or a midfoot bearing safety shoe led to a significant decrease of the average trunk inclination (pindustrial accident, but in addition, safety shoes could be a long-term preventive instrument for maintaining health of the employees' musculoskeletal system, as they are able to affect gait parameters. Further research needs to focus on safety shoes in working situations.

  20. 30 CFR 250.423 - What are the requirements for pressure testing casing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations... drilling or other down-hole operations until you obtain a satisfactory pressure test. If the pressure...

  1. Improvement of auditing technology of safety analysis through thermal-hydraulic separate effect tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, Hee Cheon; Moon, Young Min; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Sang Ik; Kim, Eung Soo; Yeom, Keum Soo [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    The objective of the present research is to perform the separate effect tests and to assess the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code for the analysis of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the reactor coolant system and the improvement of the auditing technology of safety analysis. Three Separate Effect Tests (SETs) are the reflux condensation in the U-tube, the direct contact condensation in the hot-leg and the mixture level buildup in the pressurizer. The experimental data and the empirical correlations are obtained through SETs. On the ases of the three SET works, models in RELAP5 are modified and improved, which are compared with the data. The Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) are assessed using the modified RELAP5. In the reflux condensation test, the data of heat transfer coefficients and flooding are obtained and the condensation models are modified using the non-iterative model, as results, modified code better predicts the data. In the direct contact condensation test, the data of heat transfer coefficients are obtained for the cocurrent and countercurrent flow between the mixture gas and the water in condition of horizontal stratified flow. Several condensation and friction models are modified, which well predict the present data. In the mixture level test, the data for the mixture level and the onset of water draining into the surge line are obtained. The standard RELAP5 over-predicts the mixture level and the void fraction in the pressurizer. Simple modification of model related to the pool void fraction is suggested. The KSNP is assessed using the standard and the modified RELAP5 resulting from the experimental and code works for the SETs. In case of the pressurizer manway opening with available secondary side of the steam generators, the modified code predicts that the collapsed level in the pressurizer is little accumulated. The presence and location of the opening and the secondary condition of the steam generators have an effect on the coolant inventory. The

  2. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D

  3. High-pressure thermal sterilization: food safety and food quality of baby food puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenich, Robert; Kleinstueck, Elke; Crews, Colin; Anderson, Warwick; Pye, Celine; Riddellova, Katerina; Hradecky, Jaromir; Moravcova, Eliska; Reineke, Kai; Knorr, Dietrich

    2014-02-01

    The benefits that high-pressure thermal sterilization offers as an emerging technology could be used to produce a better overall food quality. Due to shorter dwell times and lower thermal load applied to the product in comparison to the thermal retorting, lower numbers and quantities of unwanted food processing contaminants (FPCs), for example, furan, acrylamide, HMF, and MCPD-esters could be formed. Two spore strains were used to test the technique; Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, over the temperature range 90 to 121 °C at 600 MPa. The treatments were carried out in baby food puree and ACES-buffer. The treatments at 90 and 105 °C showed that G. stearothermophilus is more pressure-sensitive than B. amyloliquefaciens. The formation of FPCs was monitored during the sterilization process and compared to the amounts found in retorted samples of the same food. The amounts of furan could be reduced between 81% to 96% in comparison to retorting for the tested temperature pressure combination even at sterilization conditions of F₀-value in 7 min. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site. Nuclear chimney analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1985-12-01

    Investigations of barometric pressure testing of NTS nuclear chimneys were reviewed. This review includes the models used in the interpretation, methods of analysis, and results. Analytic and semi-analytic models were presented and applied to both historical data and new data taken for this current project. An interpretation technique based on non-linear least squares methods was used to analyze this data in terms of historic and more recent chimney models. Finally, a detailed discussion of radioactive gas transport due to surface barometric pressure fluctuations was presented. This mechanism of transport, referred to as ''barometric pumping,'' is presented in terms of conditions likely to be encountered at the NTS. The report concludes with a discussion of the current understanding of gas flow properties in the alluvial and volcanic areas of the NTS, and suggestions for future efforts directed toward increasing this understanding are presented.

  5. 78 FR 67206 - Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear...-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants.'' This RG is being revised to provide applicants and licensees with the most current information on testing safety-related actuators in nuclear power plants. This RG...

  6. 75 FR 34064 - Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards, Test Procedures for Roof Trusses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... reduce the overload test period from 12 hours to 6 hours, and allow the test specimens to be of average... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 3280 RIN 2502-A172 Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards... Construction and Safety Standards by adopting proposals made by the Manufactured Home Consensus Committee (MHCC...

  7. Efficacy and safety of budesonide administered by pressurized metered-dose inhaler in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Eli O; Pearlman, David S; Eckerwall, Gӧran; Uryniak, Tom; DePietro, Michael; Lampl, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    Budesonide is approved for delivery using a nebulized solution and dry-powder inhaler, but its use through a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) in pediatric patients with asthma has not been determined. To examine the efficacy and safety of 160 μg twice daily of budesonide through a pMDI vs placebo in children 6 to younger than 12 years with asthma and a demonstrated need for inhaled corticosteroids. A 6-week, international, multicenter, double-blinded, parallel-group, phase 2 study randomized 304 pediatric patients (mean age, 9 years; 21.7% inhalations) twice daily of budesonide through a pMDI or placebo after a 7- to 21-day run-in period. The primary efficacy end point was change from baseline in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF); safety end points included adverse events, vital signs, and discontinuations. Budesonide treatment significantly improved morning PEF vs placebo; mean treatment effect (budesonide vs placebo) was 13.6 L/min (P vs placebo for forced expiratory volume in 1 second, evening PEF, forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% of pulmonary volume, reliever medication use, nighttime awakenings, awakenings with reliever use, and percentage of patients with at least 15- and at least 30-L/min increase in morning PEF from baseline. The numbers of patients experiencing adverse events and discontinuations were smaller in the budesonide than in the placebo group. No serious adverse events were reported. Budesonide at 160 μg twice daily through a pMDI was generally well tolerated and significantly improved lung function, symptoms, rescue medication use, and nighttime awakenings vs placebo in children 6 to younger than 12 years with asthma and a demonstrated need for inhaled corticosteroids. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Safety and Effectiveness of a Novel Facemask for Positive Pressure Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tod A; Szabo, Tamas A; Bridges, Kathryn H; Sabbagh, Michel J; Hand, William R; Wolf, Bethany J; Warters, Robert D

    2017-11-10

    Manual positive pressure ventilation is an essential skill in a variety of clinical situations. The C&E technique is commonly used with standard facemasks to provide effective ventilation. The Tao mask is a novel design that allows a more ergonomic grip. A seal between the mask and face is made with downward pressure of the palm, centered on the mask, and jaw lift is achieved with 4 fingers centered under the mandible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Tao mask compared to a standard mask before and after the administration of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) using 2 previously established ventilation scales. One hundred fifty-two patients >18 years of age who were scheduled for general anesthesia were recruited. All care team members were shown a brief instructional video on the use of the Tao mask. After induction of general anesthesia with a standardized protocol, each patient was ventilated with both the standard (Vital Signs #082510) and Tao masks and effectiveness was measured using the Han and Warters scales. This process was repeated after NMB. The sequence of masks was determined with a random-number generator. Tao mask ventilation scores were significantly better than standard mask scores on both the Han scale and the Warters scale before the administration of NMB (P effectiveness compared to a standard mask. The study design favored the standard mask because all participating practitioners had multiple years of experience with the standard mask and no prior experience with the Tao mask. Since the incidence of inadequate mask ventilation goes up significantly with inexperienced operators, the improved effectiveness of the Tao mask could be even more profound with novice operators.

  9. Wind pressure testing of tornado safe room components made from wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Falk; Deepak Shrestha

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of a wood tornado safe room to resist wind pressures produced by a tornado, two safe room com-ponents were tested for wind pressure strength. A tornado safe room ceiling panel and door were static-pressure-tested according to ASTM E 330 using a vacuum test system. Re-sults indicate that the panels had load capacities from 2.4 to 3.5 times that...

  10. Study of fast reactor safety test facilities. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.; Boudreau, J.E.; McLaughlin, T.; Palmer, R.G.; Starkovich, V.; Stein, W.E.; Stevenson, M.G.; Yarnell, Y.L.

    1975-05-01

    Included are sections dealing with the following topics: (1) perspective and philosophy of fast reactor safety analysis; (2) status of accident analysis and experimental needs; (3) experiment and facility definitions; (4) existing in-pile facilities; (5) new facility options; and (6) data acquisition methods. (DG)

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Renal Sympathetic Denervation on Dogs with Pressure Overload-Induced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pingan; Leng, Shuilong; Luo, Yishan; Li, Shaonan; Huang, Zicheng; Liu, Zhenxi; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Jie; Lei, Xiaoming

    2017-02-01

    In dogs with heart failure (HF) induced by overload pressure, the role of renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) on heart failure and in the renal artery is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy and safety of RSD in dogs with pressure overload-induced heart failure. Twenty mongrel dogs were divided into a sham-operated group, an HF group and an HF + RSD group. In the sham-operated group, the abdominal aorta was located but was not constricted, in the HF group, the abdominal aorta was constricted without RSD, and the HF+RSD group underwent RSD with constriction of the abdominal aorta after 10 weeks. Blood sampling assays, echocardiography, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurement and histopathological examination were performed. Renal sympathetic denervation caused a significant reduction in the levels of noradrenaline (166.62±6.84 vs. 183.48±13.66 pg/ml, P<0.05), plasma renin activity (1.93±0.12 vs. 2.10±0.13 ng/mlh, P<0.05) and B-type natriuretic peptide (71.14±3.86 vs. 83.15±5.73 pg/ml, P<0.05) at eight weeks after RSD in the HF+RSD group. Compared with the HF group at eight weeks, the left ventricular internal dimension at end-diastole and end-systole were lower and the left ventricular ejection fraction was higher (all P<0.05) at eight weeks after RSD in the HF+RSD group. Intravenous ultrasound images showed no changes in the renal artery lumen, and intimal hyperplasia and vascular lumen stenosis were not observed after RSD. Renal sympathetic denervation could improve cardiac function in dogs with HF induced by pressure overload; RSD had no adverse influence on the renal artery. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Licensing assessment of the CANDU pressurized heavy water reactor. Volume I. Preliminary safety information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The PHWR design contains certain features that will require significant modifications to comply with USNRC siting and safety requirements. The most significant of these features are the reactor vessel; control systems; quality assurance program requirements; seismic design of structures, systems and components; and providing an inservice inspection program capability. None of these areas appear insolvable with current state-of-the-art engineering or with upgrading of the quality assurance program for components constructed outside of the USA. In order to be licensed in the U. S., the entire reactor assembly would have to be redesigned to comply with ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1 and Division 2. A summary matrix at the end of this volume identifies compliance of the systems and structures of the PHWR plant with the USNRC General Design Criteria. The matrix further identifies the estimated incremental cost to a 600 MWe PHWR that would be required to license the plant in the U. S. Further, the matrix identifies whether or not the incremental licensing cost is size dependent and the relative percentage of the base direct cost of a Canadian sited plant.

  13. 30 CFR 18.98 - Enclosures, joints, and fastenings; pressure testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enclosures, joints, and fastenings; pressure... Field Approval of Electrically Operated Mining Equipment § 18.98 Enclosures, joints, and fastenings; pressure testing. (a) Cast or welded enclosures shall be designed to withstand a minimum internal pressure...

  14. Comparing two levels of closed system suction pressure in ICU patients: Evaluating the relative safety of higher values of suction pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannik, Ahmad R.; Haghighat, Somayeh; Saghaei, Mahmoud; Eghbali, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal suctioning (ETS) is one of the most common supportive measures in intensive care units (ICU). ETS may be associated with complications including hypoxia and tachycardia. Closed system suctioning (CSS) decreases the rate of cardiorespiratory complication mainly due to continuation of ventilatory support and oxygenation during procedure. CSS has questionable efficacy, therefore higher values of negative pressure has been recommended to enhance the efficacy of CSS. This study was designed to evaluate the effects on gas exchange of 200 mmHg suctioning pressure compared with 100 mmHg in CSS. Materials and Methods: Fifty mechanically ventilated (MV) ICU patients were selected for the study. Two consecutive ten seconds CSS using suction pressures of 100 and 200 mmHg, in random order applied in each subject with the two hours wash out period. Effects of two levels of suction pressure on gas exchange were measured by recording the SPo2 values at 4 times. Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance didn't show any significant difference between two levels of pressure (P = 0.315), but within each groups (100 and 200 mmHg) SPO2 changes was significant (P = 0.000). There was a mild but significant and transient increase in heart rate following both suction pressures, but no significant difference between two groups. Conclusion: The results show that CSS with suction pressure 200 mmHg has no detrimental effect on cardiorespiratory function of MV ICU patients. Since the safety of 200 mmHg suctioning pressure was approved, using 200 mmHg suction pressures is recommended for ETS of MV patients. PMID:23983740

  15. Environmental testing of a prototypic digital safety channel, phase I: System design and test methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, K.; Turner, G.W.; Mullens, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    A microprocessor-based reactor trip channel has been assembled for environmental testing under an Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Qualification Program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The goal of this program is to establish the technical basis for the qualification of advanced I&C systems. The trip channel implemented for this study employs technologies and digital subsystems representative of those proposed for use in some advanced light-water reactors (ALNWS) such as the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBNW) and AP600. It is expected that these tests will reveal any potential system vulnerabilities for technologies representative of those proposed for use in ALNWS. The experimental channel will be purposely stressed considerably beyond what it is likely to experience in a normal nuclear power plant environment, so that the tests can uncover the worst-case failure modes (i.e., failures that are likely to prevent an entire trip system from performing its safety function when required to do so). Based on information obtained from this study, it may be possible to recommend tests that are likely to indicate the presence of such failure mechanisms. Such recommendations would be helpful in augmenting current qualification guidelines.

  16. Tensile and burst tests in support of the cadmium safety rod failure evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-02-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. This report discusses confirmatory separate effects tests conducted to support the evaluation of failures observed in the safety rod thermal tests. As part of the failure evaluation, the potential for liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of the safety rod cladding by cadmium (Cd) -- aluminum (Al) solutions was examined. Based on the test conditions, literature data, and U-Bend tests, its was concluded that the SS304 safety rod cladding would not be subject to LME by liquid Cd-Al solutions under conditions relevant to the safety rod thermal tests or gamma heating accident. To confirm this conclusion, tensile tests on SS304 specimens were performed in both air and liquid Cd-Al solutions with the range of strain rates, temperatures, and loading conditions spanning the range relevant to the safety rod thermal tests and gamma heating accident.

  17. Reducing uncertainty in geostatistical description with well testing pressure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, A.C.; He, Nanqun [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States); Oliver, D.S. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Geostatistics has proven to be an effective tool for generating realizations of reservoir properties conditioned to static data, e.g., core and log data and geologic knowledge. Due to the lack of closely spaced data in the lateral directions, there will be significant variability in reservoir descriptions generated by geostatistical simulation, i.e., significant uncertainty in the reservoir descriptions. In past work, we have presented procedures based on inverse problem theory for generating reservoir descriptions (rock property fields) conditioned to pressure data and geostatistical information represented as prior means for log-permeability and porosity and variograms. Although we have shown that the incorporation of pressure data reduces the uncertainty below the level contained in the geostatistical model based only on static information (the prior model), our previous results assumed did not explicitly account for uncertainties in the prior means and the parameters defining the variogram model. In this work, we investigate how pressure data can help detect errors in the prior means. If errors in the prior means are large and are not taken into account, realizations conditioned to pressure data represent incorrect samples of the a posteriori probability density function for the rock property fields, whereas, if the uncertainty in the prior mean is incorporated properly into the model, one obtains realistic realizations of the rock property fields.

  18. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    35 mmHg sysrolic and 97 ± 21 mmHg diastolic. Twenty-nine patients were unresponsive to various drug combinations as judged by diastolic blood pressures which remained above 100 mmHg at rest, while 16 had not received any prior medical therapy. Four patients had coronary artery disease, treated with nitrates and.

  19. Making work safer: testing a model of social exchange and safety management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJoy, David M; Della, Lindsay J; Vandenberg, Robert J; Wilson, Mark G

    2010-04-01

    This study tests a conceptual model that focuses on social exchange in the context of safety management. The model hypothesizes that supportive safety policies and programs should impact both safety climate and organizational commitment. Further, perceived organizational support is predicted to partially mediate both of these relationships. Study outcomes included traditional outcomes for both organizational commitment (e.g., withdrawal behaviors) as well as safety climate (e.g., self-reported work accidents). Questionnaire responses were obtained from 1,723 employees of a large national retailer. Using structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques, all of the model's hypothesized relationships were statistically significant and in the expected directions. The results are discussed in terms of social exchange in organizations and research on safety climate. Maximizing safety is a social-technical enterprise. Expectations related to social exchange and reciprocity figure prominently in creating a positive climate for safety within the organization. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535ÀC. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535ÀC and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice wont be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  1. Optimal Design of Safety Instrumented Systems for Pressure Control of Methanol Separation Columns in the Bisphenol a Manufacturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Bok Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A bisphenol A production plant possesses considerable potential risks in the top of the methanol separation column, as pressurized acetone, methanol, and water are processed at an elevated temperature, especially in the event of an abnormal pressure increase due to a sudden power outage. This study assesses the potential risks in the methanol separation column through hazard and operability assessments and evaluates the damages in the case of fire and explosion accident scenarios. The study chooses three leakage scenarios: a 5-mm puncture on the methanol separation column, a 50-mm diameter fracture of a discharge pipe and a catastrophic rupture, and, simulated using Phast (Ver. 6.531, the concentration distribution of scattered methanol, thermal radiation distribution of fires, and overpressure distribution of vapor cloud explosions. Implementation of a safety-instrumented system equipped with two-out-of-three voting as a safety measure can detect overpressure at the top of the column and shut down the main control valve and the emergency shutoff valve simultaneously. By applying a safety integrity level of three, the maximal release volume of the safety relief valve can be reduced and, therefore, the design capacity of the flare stack can also be reduced. Such integration will lead to improved safety at a reduced cost.

  2. Suggestion on the safety classification of spent fuel dry storage in China’s pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Qu, Yunhuan; Meng, De; Zhang, Qiaoer; Lu, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    China’s spent fuel storage in the pressurized water reactors(PWR) is stored with wet storage way. With the rapid development of nuclear power industry, China’s NPPs(NPPs) will not be able to meet the problem of the production of spent fuel. Currently the world’s major nuclear power countries use dry storage as a way of spent fuel storage, so in recent years, China study on additional spent fuel dry storage system mainly. Part of the PWR NPP is ready to apply for additional spent fuel dry storage system. It also need to safety classificate to spent fuel dry storage facilities in PWR, but there is no standard for safety classification of spent fuel dry storage facilities in China. Because the storage facilities of the spent fuel dry storage are not part of the NPP, the classification standard of China’s NPPs is not applicable. This paper proposes the safety classification suggestion of the spent fuel dry storage for China’s PWR NPP, through to the study on China’s safety classification principles of PWR NPP in “Classification for the items of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants (GB/T 17569-2013)”, and safety classification about spent fuel dry storage system in NUREG/CR - 6407 in the United States.

  3. Advantages of the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system for the rat colon rupture pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chengdong; Guo, Xuan; Li, Zhen; Qian, Shuwen; Zheng, Feng; Qin, Haiqing

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on colorectal anastomotic leakage to reduce the incidence of anastomotic leakage. However, how to precisely determine if the bowel can withstand the pressure of a colorectal anastomosis experiment, which is called anastomotic bursting pressure, has not been determined. A task force developed the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system to provide precise measurement of the maximum pressure that an anastomotic colon can withstand, and to compare it with the commonly used method such as the mercury and air bag pressure manometer in a rat colon rupture pressure test. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the manual ball manometry (H) group, the tracing machine manometry pressure gauge head (MP) group, and the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system (ME) group. The rats in each group were subjected to a cut colon rupture pressure test after injecting anesthesia in the tail vein. Colonic end-to-end anastomosis was performed, and the rats were rested for 1 week before anastomotic bursting pressure was determined by one of the three methods. No differences were observed between the normal colon rupture pressure and colonic anastomotic bursting pressure, which were determined using the three manometry methods. However, several advantages, such as reduction in errors, were identified in the ME group. Different types of manometry methods can be applied to the normal rat colon, but the colonic anastomotic bursting pressure test using the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system is superior to traditional methods. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macario Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure. Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs=0.60 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0088, apnea-hypopnea index (rs=0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p=0.039, lowest oxygen saturation (rs=-0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p=0.048, and oxygen desaturation index (rs=0.62 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0057. Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  5. Test-retest reliability of the VA National Center for Patient Safety culture questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiner, Brian; Ronconi, Julia M; McKnight, Scott; Young-Xu, Yinong; Mills, Peter D; Watts, Bradley V

    2016-12-01

    Patient safety culture may have a significant influence on safety processes and outcomes. Therefore, it is important to have valid tools to measure patient safety culture in order to identify potential levers for cultural change that could improve patient safety. The 65-item Department of Veterans Affairs Patient Safety Culture Survey (VA PSCS) consists of 14 dimensions and is administered biannually to VA employees. Test-retest reliability of the VA PSCS has not been established. We conducted repeated administrations of the VA PSCS among 28 VA employees. We measured intraclass correlation coefficients for each item and dimension. Test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.7 or greater for 13 out of 14 dimensions of the VA PSCS. Employees had difficulty reliably reporting how others feel about patient safety. In general, the VA PSCS survey showed adequate test-retest reliability. Items asking what others think or feel showed lower reliability. Further work is needed to better understand the relationship between safety culture, safety processes and safety outcomes. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Testing for altruism and social pressure in charitable giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVigna, Stefano; List, John A; Malmendier, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Every year, 90% of Americans give money to charities. Is such generosity necessarily welfare enhancing for the giver? We present a theoretical framework that distinguishes two types of motivation: individuals like to give, for example, due to altruism or warm glow, and individuals would rather not give but dislike saying no, for example, due to social pressure. We design a door-to-door fund-raiser in which some households are informed about the exact time of solicitation with a flyer on their doorknobs. Thus, they can seek or avoid the fund-raiser. We find that the flyer reduces the share of households opening the door by 9% to 25% and, if the flyer allows checking a Do Not Disturb box, reduces giving by 28% to 42%. The latter decrease is concentrated among donations smaller than $10. These findings suggest that social pressure is an important determinant of door-to-door giving. Combining data from this and a complementary field experiment, we structurally estimate the model. The estimated social pressure cost of saying no to a solicitor is $3.80 for an in-state charity and $1.40 for an out-of-state charity. Our welfare calculations suggest that our door-to-door fund-raising campaigns on average lower the utility of the potential donors.

  7. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  8. The Self-Calibration Test of flowmeter installed in STELLA(Sodium Integral Effect Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Minhwan; Jeong, Ji-Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study is to describe the procedure of the self-calibration test for the flowmeters and to analyze the result of the test. In this work, the test procedure of the self-calibration of two flowmeters (FT-101, FT-102) installed in STELLA facility was described and the test result was analyzed. In regard to the long-term SFR development plan, a large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test project is being progressed by KAERI. This project is called STELLA (Sodium Integral Effect Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment), and it is proceeding by adopting the QA (Quality Assurance) program. Due to the specificity of an experiment using sodium(Na) categorized as Class 3(pyrophoric material and water-prohibiting substance) by the Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act, it is necessary to apply QA in consideration of the sodium experiment environment in certain parts. The one of them is about calibration of measuring instrument such as a flowmeter, thermocouple and pressure gauge. It is described in the QAP (Quality Assurance Procedures) of KAERI that calibration work should be conducted in accordance with self-calibration procedures in a special case where conventional calibration is not practicable. The calibration of two flowmeters (FT-101, FT-102) installed in STELLA facility is the typical example. As a result of test, it was confirmed that the flowmeters meet the pass criterion. Therefore, it was concluded that the flowmeters maintain instrument capacity a year ago.

  9. A Review of External Pressure Testing Techniques for Shells including a Novel Volume-Control Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackay, J.R.; Van Keulen, F.

    2009-01-01

    A review of conventional testing methods for applying external hydrostatic pressure to buckling-critical shells is presented. A new “volume-control” pressure testing method, aimed at preventing catastrophic specimen failures and improving control of specimen deformation near the critical load, is

  10. Incident at university research facility - pressure testing of gas hydrate cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2014-01-01

    A master student designed a cell for observing the development of gas hydrates as conditions in the cell were changed. The supervisor asked for a pressure test of the cell before the experiments started. The student chose-to perform the pressure test using compressed air and this resulted in one...

  11. Verification of Overall Safety Factors In Deterministic Design Of Model Tested Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper deals with concepts of safety implementation in design. An overall safety factor concept is evaluated on the basis of a reliability analysis of a model tested rubble mound breakwater with monolithic super structure. Also discussed are design load identification and failure mode limit st...

  12. When patient safety and skills development go hand in hand through targeted prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in patients with spinal-cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard, Randi; Bonne, Stine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Content: Background Pressure ulcers (PU) and wounds are a commonly seen complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), which can lead to prolonged hospital admission and other serious complications including infection, pain, and spasticity. However, with a targeted effort, many PU/wounds can...... be prevented and patient safety increased. It has, however, proved difficult to achieve continuous and systematic PU/wound care. The Spinal Cord Injury Centre of Western Denmark has developed the PU/wound patrol, a new initiative that has also been tested and evaluated among the Centre’s nursing staff. Aims...... - to increase patient safety through conscious, targeted monitoring and treatment by nurses of all types of PU/wounds observed in patients at the Centre - to ensure a high degree of professionalism in rehabilitative nursing care given to patients with PU/wounds, by developing nursing skills Method The PU/wound...

  13. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  14. Animal models for microbicide safety and efficacy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Ronald S

    2013-07-01

    Early studies have cast doubt on the utility of animal models for predicting success or failure of HIV-prevention strategies, but results of multiple human phase 3 microbicide trials, and interrogations into the discrepancies between human and animal model trials, indicate that animal models were, and are, predictive of safety and efficacy of microbicide candidates. Recent studies have shown that topically applied vaginal gels, and oral prophylaxis using single or combination antiretrovirals are indeed effective in preventing sexual HIV transmission in humans, and all of these successes were predicted in animal models. Further, prior discrepancies between animal and human results are finally being deciphered as inadequacies in study design in the model, or quite often, noncompliance in human trials, the latter being increasingly recognized as a major problem in human microbicide trials. Successful microbicide studies in humans have validated results in animal models, and several ongoing studies are further investigating questions of tissue distribution, duration of efficacy, and continued safety with repeated application of these, and other promising microbicide candidates in both murine and nonhuman primate models. Now that we finally have positive correlations with prevention strategies and protection from HIV transmission, we can retrospectively validate animal models for their ability to predict these results, and more importantly, prospectively use these models to select and advance even safer, more effective, and importantly, more durable microbicide candidates into human trials.

  15. Analysis, design and testing of high pressure waterjet nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    1996-01-01

    The Hydroblast Research Cell at MSFC is both a research and a processing facility. The cell is used to investigate fundamental phenomena associated with waterjets as well as to clean hardware for various NASA and contractor projects. In the area of research, investigations are made regarding the use of high pressure waterjets to strip paint, grease, adhesive and thermal spray coatings from various substrates. Current industrial methods of cleaning often use ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as chlorinated solvents, and high pressure waterjet cleaning has proven to be a viable alternative. Standard methods of waterjet cleaning use hand held or robotically controlled nozzles. The nozzles used can be single-stream or multijet nozzles, and the multijet nozzles may be mounted in a rotating head or arranged in a fan-type shape. We consider in this paper the use of a rotating, multijet, high pressure water nozzle which is robotically controlled. This method enables rapid cleaning of a large area, but problems such as incomplete coverage (e.g. the formation of 'islands' of material not cleaned) and damage to the substrate from the waterjet have been observed. In addition, current stripping operations require the nozzle to be placed at a standoff distance of approximately 2 inches in order to achieve adequate performance. This close proximity of the nozzle to the target to be cleaned poses risks to the nozzle and the target in the event of robot error or the striking of unanticipated extrusions on the target surface as the nozzle sweeps past. Two key motivations of this research are to eliminate the formation of 'coating islands' and to increase the allowable standoff distance of the nozzle.

  16. Clinical Efficacy and Safety of a New Method for Pressure Off-load for Patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome: Ankle-foot Pneumoorthosis with TM Orlett

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Yurevna Strakhova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AimThe purpose of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy, safety and consumer properties of ankle-foot pneumoorthosis with a HAS-337 TM Orlett compared with non-removable total contact cast (TCC immobilization.Materials and methodsOur study included 40 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1 and type 2 (DM2 with neuropathic diabetic foot syndrome and chronic uninfected wounds of the plantar surface of the forefoot, with wound duration of at least 3 weeks, wound areas not less than 1 cm2 and wound depths not more than stage II based on Wagner’s classification. We excluded patients with infected wounds, osteomyelitis, Charcot osteoarthropathy or peripheral vascular disease. Our test group included 20 patients who received pressure off-load using ankle-foot pneumoorthosis with a HAS-337 TM Orlett. For a control group (n = 20, pressure off-load was achieved using TCC immobilization. Both groups were comparable with regard to age, gender, duration and degree of diabetes compensation and by original wound defect sizes (p >0.05. The study duration was 6 months. Plantar pressure was measured inside the orthosis or TCC and was compared with test shoe measurements. Our major criteria for pressure relief were reduced pressures in the wound area and the whole foot and the rate of wound healing.ResultsAt the end of the 6-month period, complete healing of all ulcers was achieved. The average healing time was 46.1±19.0 days for the test group and was 48.3±20.5 days for the control group (p >0.05. Two patients who wore pneumoorthosis with HAS-337 were discontinued upon patient request.With pneumoorthosis, the maximum peak pressure on the foot and wound defect areas was reduced by 26% and 57%, respectively. The pressure/time integral decreased on average by 41% (p >0.05. Furthermore, in the midfoot area with pneumoorthosis, the maximum pressure increased by 48% and the pressure/time integral increased by 47%.ConclusionsUsing pneumoorthosis with

  17. Pressure-Decay Measurements Improve Bubble-Point Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkey, J. S.; Orton, G. F.

    1983-01-01

    Technique reduces by factor of about 100 minimum detectable flaw size in bubble-point test. By measuring rate of slow leakage, flaws as small as about 10-4 in. 2 (0.06mm2) are detected. Since technique does not require observation of screen, tests run on screens already installed inside tanks and pipes.

  18. Safety impact of an integrated crash warning system based on field test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    This paper provides the results of an analysis : conducted to assess the safety impact of an integrated : vehicle-based crash warning system based on : naturalistic driving data collected from a field : operational test. The system incorporates four ...

  19. Safety of railroad passenger vehicle dynamics : OMNISIM simulation and test correlations for passenger rail cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the work is to validate the safety assessment methodology previously developed for passenger rail vehicle dynamics, which requires the application of simulation tools as well as testing of vehicles under different track scenarios. This...

  20. Extended occupant safety through virtual testing: objectives of the European project VITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Happee, R.; Baldauf, H.; Puppini, R.; Oakley, C.

    2001-01-01

    Increasingly stringent international passenger safety norms and the need to reduce vehicle body weight for environmental and protection requirements demand efficient and innovative design methods. Computer simulation, or virtual testing, allows an integrated evaluation of these aspects in the early

  1. Evolution of strategies to improve preclinical cardiac safety testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintant, Gary; Sager, Philip T; Stockbridge, Norman

    2016-07-01

    The early and efficient assessment of cardiac safety liabilities is essential to confidently advance novel drug candidates. This article discusses evolving mechanistically based preclinical strategies for detecting drug-induced electrophysiological and structural cardiotoxicity using in vitro human ion channel assays, human-based in silico reconstructions and human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. These strategies represent a paradigm shift from current approaches, which rely on simplistic in vitro assays that measure blockade of the Kv11.1 current (also known as the hERG current or IKr) and on the use of non-human cells or tissues. These new strategies have the potential to improve sensitivity and specificity in the early detection of genuine cardiotoxicity risks, thereby reducing the likelihood of mistakenly discarding viable drug candidates and speeding the progression of worthy drugs into clinical trials.

  2. Test of 6-in. -thick pressure vessels. Series 3: intermediate test vessel V-7. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Holz, P.P.; Smith, J.E.; Bryan, R.H.

    1976-08-01

    The test of intermediate test vessel V-7 was a crack-initiation fracture test of a 152-mm-thick (6-in.), 990-mm-OD (39-in.) vessel of ASTM A533, grade B, class 1 steel plate with a sharp outside surface flaw 457 mm (18 in.) long and about 135 mm (5.3 in.) deep. The vessel was heated to 91/sup 0/C (196/sup 0/F) and pressurized hydraulically until leakage through the flaw terminated the test at a peak pressure of 147 MPa (21,350 psi). Fracture toughness data obtained by testing precracked Charpy-V and compact-tension specimens machined from a prolongation of the cylindrical test shell were used in pretest analyses of the flawed vessel. The vessel, as expected, did not burst. Upon depressurization, the ruptured ligament closed so as to maintain static pressure without leakage at about 129 MPa (18,700 psi).

  3. Testing of Axially Loaded Bucket Foundation with Applied Overburden Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkunaite, Evelina; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    This report analyses laboratory testing data performed with a bucket foundation model subjected to axial loading. The examinations were conducted at the Geotechnical laboratory of Aalborg University. The report aims at showing and discussing the results of the static and cyclic axial loading tests...... on the bucket foundation model. Finally, a cyclic loading interaction diagram is given that can be applied for a full-scale bucket foundation design....

  4. 9 CFR 113.45 - Sheep safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Test procedure... equivalent of two doses of bacterial vaccine or 10 doses of viral vaccine. (2) Administer vaccine in the...

  5. 9 CFR 113.44 - Swine safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Test procedure... equivalent of two doses of bacterial vaccine or 10 doses of viral vaccine. (2) Administer vaccine in the...

  6. New methods for the safety testing of transgenic food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Ib; Poulsen, Morten; Kledal, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    on the OECD 90 day rodent study supplemented with sensitive and specific markers for potential toxicity of the products encode by the inserted genes in the tested food item, the use of a semisynthetic diet with interchangeable constituents and the extensive use of initial chemical and in-vitro testing...... for guiding the precise design of the animal study. The genetically modified food plants to be used for this test development will be 3 transgenic rice varieties (2 types of lectins and the Bt toxin). Objectives The overall objective of this project is to develop and validate the scientific methodology which...... in a scientifically valid and economically feasible manner. The specific objectives are to: improve the sensitivity and specificity of standard OECD guideline toxicity tests towards detection of specific chemical entities in the GM food matrix by the measurement of additional biological endpoints based on prior...

  7. Effects of time pressure and noise on non-destructive testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkvist, J.; Svenson, Ola [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology; Edland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Manual ultrasonic testing (UT) is the most frequently used non-destructive testing (NDT) method for in-service inspection of components important to safety and/or plant availability. Earlier, great variations have been found in operator performance, often attributed to operator fatigue. However, no conclusive findings have been reported. According to the Yerkes-Dodson law there is an optimal arousal level where performance is highest, for simple tasks this optimum is higher than for more complex tasks. In the present study twenty operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of six test pieces with manufactured flaws. The operators performed the inspections under stress (high arousal - time pressure and noise) and non-stress conditions; one condition the first day and the other the second and last day. It was hypothesised that the stress condition led to a level of arousal so high that it would affect the results negatively. The results confirmed that the operators were affected by the stress condition. However, contrary to the hypotheses it was found that the manipulation increased operator performance. Operators with the stress condition the first day performed better than the other operators did (under both the stress and the non-stress condition). This was interpreted as the 'stress first' (group 1) operators had established efficient performance patterns the first day - affecting also the second day. Operators beginning with stress condition also tended to be more motivated. It was concluded that operator performance is affected by arousal. The operators with non-stress first (group 2) worked hard with the complex task but their arousal level was assumed to be above the optimal, resulting in a low hit rate.

  8. Developing and Testing the Health Care Safety Hotline: A Prototype Consumer Reporting System for Patient Safety Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eric C; Ridgely, M Susan; Quigley, Denise D; Hunter, Lauren E; Leuschner, Kristin J; Weingart, Saul N; Weissman, Joel S; Zimmer, Karen P; Giannini, Robert C

    2017-06-01

    This article describes the design, development, and testing of the Health Care Safety Hotline, a prototype consumer reporting system for patient safety events. The prototype was designed and developed with ongoing review by a technical expert panel and feedback obtained during a public comment period. Two health care delivery organizations in one metropolitan area collaborated with the researchers to demonstrate and evaluate the system. The prototype was deployed and elicited information from patients, family members, and caregivers through a website or an 800 phone number. The reports were considered useful and had little overlap with information received by the health care organizations through their usual risk management, customer service, and patient safety monitoring systems. However, the frequency of reporting was lower than anticipated, suggesting that further refinements, including efforts to raise awareness by actively soliciting reports from subjects, might be necessary to substantially increase the volume of useful reports. It is possible that a single technology platform could be built to meet a variety of different patient safety objectives, but it may not be possible to achieve several objectives simultaneously through a single consumer reporting system while also establishing trust with patients, caregivers, and providers.

  9. Performance Evaluation Tests of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinoza-Loza, F

    2002-03-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen. This flexibility results in multiple advantages with respect to compressed hydrogen tanks or low-pressure liquid hydrogen tanks. Our work is directed at verifying that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. A series of tests have been conducted, and the results indicate that no significant vessel damage has resulted from cryogenic operation. Future activities include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for certification of insulated pressure vessels.

  10. An Ultra-low Frequency Modal Testing Suspension System for High Precision Air Pressure Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoling YUAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a resolution for air pressure control challenges in ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension systems, an incremental PID control algorithm with dead band is applied to achieve high-precision pressure control. We also develop a set of independent hardware and software systems for high-precision pressure control solutions. Taking control system versatility, scalability, reliability, and other aspects into considerations, a two-level communication employing Ethernet and CAN bus, is adopted to complete such tasks as data exchange between the IPC, the main board and the control board ,and the pressure control. Furthermore, we build a single set of ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension system and complete pressure control experiments, which achieve the desired results and thus confirm that the high-precision pressure control subsystem is reasonable and reliable.

  11. Improvement of auditing technology of safety analysis through thermal-hydraulic separate effect tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, Hee Cheon; Park, Hyun Sik; Kim, Hyougn Tae; Moon, Young Min; Choi, Sung Won; Heo, Sun [Korea Advanced Institute Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-15

    The loss-of-RHR accident during midloop operation has been important as results of the probabilistic safety analysis. The condensation models In RELAP5/MOD3 are not proper to analyze the midloop operation. To audit and improve the model in RELAP5/MOD3.2, several items of separate effect tests have been performed. The 29 sets of reflux condensation data is obtained and the correlation is developed with these heat transfer coefficient's data. In the experiment of the direct contact condensation in hot leg, the apparatus setting is finished and a few experimental data is obtained. Non-iterative model is used to predict the model in RELAP5/MOD3.2 with the results of reflux condensation and evaluates better than the present model. The results of the direct contact condensation in a hot leg represent to be similar with the present model. The study of the CCF and liquid entrainment in a surge line and pressurizer is selected as the third separate experiment and is on performance.

  12. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Electrosurgical Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli Golpaygani, A; Movahedi, M M; Reza, M

    2016-09-01

    Modern medicine employs a wide variety of instruments with different physiological effects and measurements. Periodic verifications are routinely used in legal metrology for industrial measuring instruments. The correct operation of electrosurgical generators is essential to ensure patient's safety and management of the risks associated with the use of high and low frequency electrical currents on human body. The metrological reliability of 20 electrosurgical equipment in six hospitals (3 private and 3 public) was evaluated in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards. The achieved results show that HF leakage current of ground-referenced generators are more than isolated generators and the power analysis of only eight units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output power measurements was low. Results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially in high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses for operating staff in the field of meterology in medicine to be acquianted with critical parameters to get accuracy results with operation room equipment.

  13. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Electrosurgical Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavakoli Golpaygani A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Modern medicine employs a wide variety of instruments with different physiological effects and measurements. Periodic verifications are routinely used in legal metrology for industrial measuring instruments. The correct operation of electrosurgical generators is essential to ensure patient’s safety and management of the risks associated with the use of high and low frequency electrical currents on human body. Material and Methods: The metrological reliability of 20 electrosurgical equipment in six hospitals (3 private and 3 public was evaluated in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards. Results: The achieved results show that HF leakage current of ground-referenced generators are more than isolated generators and the power analysis of only eight units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output power measurements was low. Conclusion: Results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially in high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses for operating staff in the field of meterology in medicine to be acquianted with critical parameters to get accuracy results with operation room equipment.

  14. Predictive value of lumbar infusion test in normal pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of all cases in the study, 18 (90%) had positive test results and were operated on; 16 (80%) of patients reported subjective improvement, and postoperative assessments verified the improvements in 15 patients (75%). Improvements were highly significant in walking and memory. Most of the patients improved by surgery ...

  15. Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module (PCM) Flight Inertial Load Static Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Giovanni; Mancini, Simone; Palmieri, Paolo; Rutigliano, Luigi

    2012-07-01

    Cygnus PCM Flight Inertial Load Static Test campaign has been performed by Thales Alenia Space - Italy (TAS-I) to achieve the Static Qualification of its Primary Structure. A “Proto-flight Approach” has been followed (as per [1] and [2]), thus the first flight unit, the PCM0, has been tested up to qualification level (qualification/acceptance factor equivalent to 1.2 [1]). The PCM0 has been constrained to a dummy Service Module (the second member of Cygnus Spacecraft), representative in terms of interfaces provisions, and flight load conditions have been reproduced with proper forces that have been applied by means of hydraulic jacks at internal PCM secondary structure interfaces. Test load cases have been defined in order to simulate load paths and relevant stress fields associated to the worst flight load conditions by using the FE model analyses. Tests have been monitored by means of gauges and displacement transducers and results have been utilized to correlate the PCM FEM following [3] requirements.

  16. Examination of cadmium safety rod thermal test specimens and failure mechanism evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.K.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental cadmium safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. Companion reports describe the experiments and a structural evaluation (finite element analysis) of the safety rod. This report deals primarily with the examination of the test specimens, evaluation of possible failure mechanisms, and confirmatory separate effects experiments. It is concluded that the failures observed in the cadmium safety rod thermal tests which occurred at low temperature (T < 600{degrees}C) with slow thermal ramp rates (slow cladding strain rates) resulted from localized dissolution of the stainless steel cladding by the cadmium/aluminum solution and subsequent ductility exhaustion and rupture. The slow thermal ramp rate is believed to be the root cause for the failures; specifically, the slow ramp rate led to localized cladding shear deformation which ruptured the protective oxide film on the cladding inner surface and allowed dissolution to initiate. The test results and proposed failure mechanism support the conclusion that the rods would not fail below 500{degrees}C even at slow ramp rates. The safety rod thermal test specimen failures which occurred at high temperature (T > 800{degrees}C) with fast thermal ramp rates are concluded to be mechanical in nature without significant environmental degradation. Based on these tests, tasks were initiated to design and manufacture B{sub 4}C safety rods to replace the cadmium safety rods. The B{sub 4}C safety rods have been manufactured at this time and it is currently planned to charge them to the reactor in the near future. 60 refs.

  17. Safety Issues at the DOE Test and Research Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety issues at the Department of Energy (DOE) test and research reactors. Part A identifies six safety issues of the reactors. These issues include the safety design philosophy, the conduct of safety reviews, the performance of probabilistic risk assessments, the reliance on reactor operators, the fragmented…

  18. Application of automatic inspection system to nondestructive test of heat transfer tubes of primary pressurized water cooler in the high temperature engineering test reactor. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Takeshi; Furusawa, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Miyamoto, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Power Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Heat transfer tubes of a primary pressurized water cooled (PPWC) in the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) form the reactor pressure boundary of the primary coolant, therefore are important from the viewpoint of safety. To establish inspection techniques for the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC, an automatic inspection system was developed. The system employs a bobbin coil probe, a rotating probe for eddy current testing (ECT) and a rotating probe for ultrasonic testing (UT). Nondestructive test of a half of the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC was carried out by the automatic inspection system during reactor shutdown period of the HTTR (about 55% in the maximum reactor power in this paper). The nondestructive test results showed that the maximum signal-to-noise ratio was 1.8 in ECT. Pattern and phase of Lissajous wave, which were obtained for the heat transfer tube of the PPWC, were different from those obtained for the artificially defected tube. In UT echo amplitude of the PPWC tubes inspected was lower than 20% of distance-amplitude calibration curve. Thus, it was confirmed that there was no defect in depth, which was more than the detecting standard of the probes, on the outer surface of the heat transfer tubes of the PPWC inspected. (author)

  19. A Study on Performance and Safety Tests of Defibrillator Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavakoli Golpaygani A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, more than 10,000 different types of medical devices can be found in hospitals. This way, medical electrical equipment is being employed in a wide variety of fields in medical sciences with different physiological effects and measurements. Hospitals and medical centers must ensure that their critical medical devices are safe, accurate, reliable and operational at the required level of performance. Defibrillators are critical resuscitation devices. The use of reliable defibirillators has led to more effective treatments and improved patient safety through better control and management of complications during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR. Materials and Methods: The metrological reliability of twenty frequent use, manual defibrillators in use ten hospitals (4 private and 6 public in one of the provinces of Iran according to international and national standards was evaluated. Results: Quantitative analysis of control and instrument accuracy showed the amount of the obtained results in many units are critical which had less value over the standard limitations especially in devices with poor battery. For the accuracy of delivered energy analysis, only twelve units delivered acceptable output values and the precision in the output energy measurements especialy in weak battry condition, after activation of discharge alarm, were low. Conclusion: Obtained results indicate a need for new and severe regulations on periodic performance verifications and medical equipment quality control program especially for high risk instruments. It is also necessary to provide training courses on the fundumentals of operation and performane parameters for medical staff in the field of meterology in medicine and how one can get good accuracy results especially in high risk medical devices.

  20. 9 CFR 113.39 - Cat safety tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....39 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... individual serum samples tested for antibody to the virus. (ii) The cats shall be considered susceptible if swabs are negative for virus isolation and the serums are free of virus antibody at the 1:2 final...

  1. Application of the Life Safety Code to a Historic Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askins, Bruce; Lemke, Paul R.; Lewis, William L.; Covell, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    NASA has conducted a study to assess alternatives to refurbishing existing launch vehicle modal test facilities as opposed to developing new test facilities to meet the demands of a very fiscally constrained test and evaluation environment. The results of this study showed that Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Test Stand (TS) 4550 could be made compliant, within reasonable cost and schedule impacts, if safety processes and operational limitations were put in place to meet the safety codes and concerns of the Fire Marshall. Trades were performed with key selection criteria to ensure that appropriate levels of occupant safety are incorporated into test facility design modifications. In preparation for the ground vibration tests that were to be performed on the Ares I launch vehicle, the Ares Flight and Integrated Test Office (FITO) organization evaluated the available test facility options, which included the existing mothballed structural dynamic TS4550 used by Apollo and Shuttle, alternative ground vibration test facilities at other locations, and construction of a new dynamic test stand. After an exhaustive assessment of the alternatives, the results favored modifying the TS4550 because it was the lowest cost option and presented the least schedule risk to the NASA Constellation Program for Ares Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test (IVGVT). As the renovation design plans and drawings were being developed for TS4550, a safety concern was discovered the original design for the construction of the test stand, originally built for the Apollo Program and renovated for the Shuttle Program, was completed before NASA s adoption of the currently imposed safety and building codes per National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code [NFPA 101] and International Building Codes. The initial FITO assessment of the design changes, required to make TS4550 compliant with current safety and building standards, identified a significant cost increase and schedule impact

  2. Design and Testing of the Safety Agenda Mobile App for Managing Health Care Managers' Patient Safety Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, José Joaquín; Carrillo, Irene; Fernandez, Cesar; Vicente, Maria Asuncion; Guilabert, Mercedes

    2016-12-08

    Adverse events are a reality in clinical practice. Reducing the prevalence of preventable adverse events by stemming their causes requires health managers' engagement. The objective of our study was to develop an app for mobile phones and tablets that would provide managers with an overview of their responsibilities in matters of patient safety and would help them manage interventions that are expected to be carried out throughout the year. The Safety Agenda Mobile App (SAMA) was designed based on standardized regulations and reviews of studies about health managers' roles in patient safety. A total of 7 managers used a beta version of SAMA for 2 months and then they assessed and proposed improvements in its design. Their experience permitted redesigning SAMA, improving functions and navigation. A total of 74 Spanish health managers tried out the revised version of SAMA. After 4 months, their assessment was requested in a voluntary and anonymous manner. SAMA is an iOS app that includes 37 predefined tasks that are the responsibility of health managers. Health managers can adapt these tasks to their schedule, add new ones, and share them with their team. SAMA menus are structured in 4 main areas: information, registry, task list, and settings. Of the 74 users who tested SAMA, 64 (86%) users provided a positive assessment of SAMA characteristics and utility. Over an 11-month period, 238 users downloaded SAMA. This mobile app has obtained the AppSaludable (HealthyApp) Quality Seal. SAMA includes a set of activities that are expected to be carried out by health managers in matters of patient safety and contributes toward improving the awareness of their responsibilities in matters of safety.

  3. Standard guide for corrosion tests in high temperature or high pressure environment, or both

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures, specimens, and equipment for conducting laboratory corrosion tests on metallic materials under conditions of high pressure (HP) or the combination of high temperature and high pressure (HTHP). See for definitions of high pressure and temperature. 1.2 Tests conducted under HP or HTHP by their nature have special requirements. This guide establishes the basic considerations that are necessary when these conditions must be incorporated into laboratory corrosion tests. 1.3 The procedures and methods in this guide are applicable for conducting mass loss corrosion, localized corrosion, and electrochemical tests as well as for use in environmentally induced cracking tests that need to be conducted under HP or HTHP conditions. 1.4 The primary purpose for this guide is to promote consistency of corrosion test results. Furthermore, this guide will aid in the comparison of corrosion data between laboratories or testing organizations that utilize different equipment. 1.5 The values s...

  4. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety.

  5. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. Methods The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Results Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. Discussion This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety. PMID:26406893

  6. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingzhi; Du, Juntao; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton’s second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable. PMID:28095441

  7. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhi Yang

    Full Text Available A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton's second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable.

  8. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingzhi; Du, Juntao; Li, Zhiwei; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton's second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable.

  9. Study of Cost Effective Large Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors that Employ Passive Safety Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, J. W.; Corletti, M. M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2003-11-12

    A report of DOE sponsored portions of AP1000 Design Certification effort. On December 16, 1999, The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Design Certification of the AP600 standard nuclear reactor design. This culminated an 8-year review of the AP600 design, safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment. The AP600 is a 600 MWe reactor that utilizes passive safety features that, once actuated, depend only on natural forces such as gravity and natural circulation to perform all required safety functions. These passive safety systems result in increased plant safety and have also significantly simplified plant systems and equipment, resulting in simplified plant operation and maintenance. The AP600 meets NRC deterministic safety criteria and probabilistic risk criteria with large margins. A summary comparison of key passive safety system design features is provided in Table 1. These key features are discussed due to their importance in affecting the key thermal-hydraulic phenomenon exhibited by the passive safety systems in critical areas. The scope of some of the design changes to the AP600 is described. These changes are the ones that are important in evaluating the passive plant design features embodied in the certified AP600 standard plant design. These design changes are incorporated into the AP1000 standard plant design that Westinghouse is certifying under 10 CFR Part 52. In conclusion, this report describes the results of the representative design certification activities that were partially supported by the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. These activities are unique to AP1000, but are representative of research activities that must be driven to conclusion to realize successful licensing of the next generation of nuclear power plants in the United States.

  10. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  11. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  12. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  13. INVESTIGATION OF SAFETY OF BOTTLED DRINKING WATER WITH USE OF ALIVE TEST - OBJECT – PLANARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYUDMILA G. ELISEEVA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The samples of drinking water in bottles were compared by organoleptic, chemical composition and safety. To determine safety the method of biotesting with Planaria (Dugesia tigrina was used. The degree of planarian regeneration in different water samples was measured. The data obtained showed that this test object may be successfully used for assessment of safety of bottled drinking water with sufficient correlation with organoleptic properties and toxic elements content. The properties of water were shown to depend on the source and producer.

  14. Safety testing and operational procedures for self-developed radiofrequency coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jens; Henning, Anke; Giapitzakis, Ioannis A; Scheffler, Klaus; Shajan, G; Pohmann, Rolf; Avdievich, Nikolai I

    2016-09-01

    The development of novel radiofrequency (RF) coils for human ultrahigh-field (≥7 T), non-proton and body applications is an active field of research in many MR groups. Any RF coil must meet the strict requirements for safe application on humans with respect to mechanical and electrical safety, as well as the specific absorption rate (SAR) limits. For this purpose, regulations such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard for medical electrical equipment, vendor-suggested test specifications for third party coils and custom-developed test procedures exist. However, for higher frequencies and shorter wavelengths in ultrahigh-field MR, the RF fields may become extremely inhomogeneous in biological tissue and the risk of localized areas with elevated power deposition increases, which is usually not considered by existing safety testing and operational procedures. In addition, important aspects, such as risk analysis and comprehensive electrical performance and safety tests, are often neglected. In this article, we describe the guidelines used in our institution for electrical and mechanical safety tests, SAR simulation and verification, risk analysis and operational procedures, including coil documentation, user training and regular quality assurance testing, which help to recognize and eliminate safety issues during coil design and operation. Although the procedure is generally applicable to all field strengths, specific requirements with regard to SAR-related safety and electrical performance at ultrahigh-field are considered. The protocol describes an internal procedure and does not reflect consensus among a large number of research groups, but rather aims to stimulate further discussion related to minimum coil safety standards. Furthermore, it may help other research groups to establish their own procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Performance and Certification Testing of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Garcia-Villazana, O; Espinosa-Loza, F

    2001-06-03

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH2) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures. Future activities also include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for obtaining certification for insulated pressure vessels.

  16. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

  17. Safety and Feasibility of High-pressure Transvenous Limb Perfusion With 0.9% Saline in Human Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zheng; Kocis, Keith; Valley, Robert; Howard, James F; Chopra, Manisha; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili; Muenzer, Joseph; Powers, William

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated safety and feasibility of the transvenous limb perfusion gene delivery method in muscular dystrophy. A dose escalation study of single limb perfusion with 0.9% saline starting with 5% of limb volume was carried out in adults with muscular dystrophies under intravenous analgesia/anesthesia. Cardiac, vascular, renal, muscle, and nerve functions were monitored. A tourniquet was placed above the knee with inflated pressure of 310 mm Hg. Infusion was carried out with a clinically approved infuser via an intravenous catheter inserted in the saphenous vein with a goal infusion rate of 80 ml/minute. Infusion volume was escalated stepwise to 20% limb volume in seven subjects. No subject complained of any post procedure pain other than due to needle punctures. Safety warning boundaries were exceeded only for transient depression of limb tissue oximetry and transient elevation of muscle compartment pressures; these were not associated with nerve, muscle, or vascular damage. Muscle magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) demonstrated fluid accumulation in muscles of the perfused lower extremity. High-pressure retrograde transvenous limb perfusion with saline up to 20% of limb volume at above infusion parameters is safe and feasible in adult human muscular dystrophy. This study will serve as a basis for future gene transfer clinical trials. PMID:21772257

  18. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  19. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  20. Energetic Materials Center Report--Small-Scale Safety and Thermal Testing Evaluation of Butyl Nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2013-04-26

    Butyl Nitrate (BN) was examined by Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) Testing techniques to determine its sensitivity to impact, friction, spark and thermal exposure simulating handling and storage conditions. Under the conditions tested, the BN exhibits thermal sensitivity above 150 °C, and does not exhibit sensitive to impact, friction or spark.

  1. Road safety effect of obligatory eye test for 45 year olds and older.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    Some years ago, the introduction of an obligatory eye test for drivers 45 years old and older was (once more) brought to discussion. We expect that the introduction of such a measure will only have a very slight positive effect on road safety. This measure, in which only visual acuity is tested,

  2. 78 FR 47805 - Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... COMMISSION Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants..., ``Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' This... quality in the software used in safety systems of nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please refer to Docket...

  3. Analysis using formal method and testing technique for the processor module for safety-critical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J. Y.; Choi, B. J.; Song, H. J.; Hwang, D. Y.; Song, G. H.; Lee, H. [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    This research is on help develop nuclear power plant control system, through the requirement specification and verification method development. As the result of applying the test method, a test standard was obtain through test documentation writing support and a test document reflecting the standard test activities based on the test standard. The specification and verification of the pCOS system and the unified testing documentation and execution helps the entire project to progress and enable us to achieve necessary documents and technology to develop a safety critical system.

  4. Test and Evaluation Report of the Physio Control Blood Pressure Monitor Model LIFESTAT (Trademark) 100

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    oscillometric technique. Arterial pulsations acting against the inflated cuff are used to determine blood pressure and pulse rate. These pulsations are...USAARL Report No. 92-44 AD-A248 352 IIII~~~l1I7 1 111 li-l Test and Evaluation Report of the Physlo Control Blood Pres-sure Monitor Model LIFESTAT5...1. TITLE (Include Securrry Ciaspfication) Test and Evaluation Report of the Phy.’io Control Blood Pressure Monitor Model LIFESTATO 100 12 PERSONAL

  5. Stability analysis and testing of a train of centrifugal compressors for high pressure gas injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmott, E.A. [Dresser-Rand Co., Olean, NY (United States)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the rotor dynamic stability analysis and the PTC-10 Class 1 test of a three body centrifugal compressor train for high pressure natural gas injection services. This train had a full load full pressure string test on hydrocarbon gases to a final discharge pressure of 500 BAR (7250 PSIA). Each compressor is of the back to back configuration, and is equipped with tilting pad seals, damper bearings, and a honeycomb labyrinth at the division wall with shunt holes. The driver is a gas turbine.

  6. Experiment data report for Semiscale Mod-1 Test S-29-3; integral test from reduced initial pressure. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crapo, H.S.; Collins, B.L.; Sackett, K.E.

    1976-09-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-29-3 of the Semiscale Mod-1 special heat transfer test series. This test is among several Semiscale Mod-1 experiments conducted to investigate the thermal and hydraulic phenomena accompanying a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor system. Test S-29-3 was conducted from an initial cold leg fluid temperature of 544/sup 0/F and an initial pressure of 1,760 psia. A simulated double-ended offset shear cold leg break was used to investigate the system response to a depressurization transient starting from a lower initial pressure than that usually associated with pressurized water reactor operation. System flow was set to achieve a full core fluid temperature differential of 66/sup 0/F at full core power of 1.6 MW. The flow resistance of the intact loop was based on core area scaling. An electrically heated core with a peaked radial power profile was used in the pressure vessel to simulate the effects of a nuclear core. During system depressurization, core power was reduced from the initial level of 1.6 MW to simulate the surface heat flux response of nuclear fuel rods until such time that departure from nucleate boiling might occur. Blowdown to the pressure suppression system was accompanied by simulated emergency core cooling injection into both the intact and broken loops. Coolant injection was continued until testtermination at 200 seconds after initiation of blowdown. The purpose of the report is to make available the uninterpreted data from Test S-29-3 for future data analysis and test results reporting activites. The data, presented in the form of graphs in engineering units, have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to assure that they are reasonable and consistent.

  7. Preventing in-facility pressure ulcers as a patient safety strategy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nancy; Schoelles, Karen M

    2013-03-05

    Complications from hospital-acquired pressure ulcers cause 60,000 deaths and significant morbidity annually in the United States. The objective of this systematic review is to review evidence regarding multicomponent strategies for preventing pressure ulcers and to examine the importance of contextual aspects of programs that aim to reduce facility-acquired pressure ulcers. CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PreMEDLINE were searched for articles published from 2000 to 2012. Studies (any design) that implemented multicomponent initiatives to prevent pressure ulcers in adults in U.S. acute and long-term care settings and that reported pressure ulcer rates at least 6 months after implementation were selected. Two reviewers extracted study data and rated quality of evidence. Findings from 26 implementation studies (moderate strength of evidence) suggested that the integration of several core components improved processes of care and reduced pressure ulcer rates. Key components included the simplification and standardization of pressure ulcer-specific interventions and documentation, involvement of multidisciplinary teams and leadership, use of designated skin champions, ongoing staff education, and sustained audit and feedback.

  8. An overview of changes in pressure values of the middle ear using impedance audiometry among diver candidates in a hyperbaric chamber before and after a pressure test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoraga, J. S.; Bramantyo, B.; Bardosono, S.; Simanungkalit, S. H.; Basiruddin, J.

    2017-08-01

    Impedance audiometry is not yet routinely used in pressure tests, especially in Indonesia. Direct exposure to pressure in a hyperbaric chamber is sometimes without any assessment of the middle ear or the Eustachian tube function (ETF) of ventilation. Impedance audiometry examinations are important to assess ETF ventilation. This study determined the middle ear pressure value changes associated with the ETF (ventilation) of prospective divers. This study included 29 prospective divers aged 20-40 years without conductive hearing loss. All subjects underwent a modified diving impedance audiometry examination both before and after the pressure test in a double-lock hyperbaric chamber. Using the Toynbee maneuver, the values obtained for changes of pressure in the middle ear were significant before and after the pressure test in the right and left ears: p audiometry examination is necessary for the selection of candidate divers undergoing pressure tests within a hyperbaric chamber.

  9. 800 C Silicon Carbide (SiC) Pressure Sensors for Engine Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    MEMS-based 4H-SiC piezoresistive pressure sensors have been demonstrated at 800 C, leading to the discovery of strain sensitivity recovery with increasing temperatures above 400 C, eventually achieving up to, or near, 100 recovery of the room temperature values at 800 C. This result will allow the insertion of highly sensitive pressure sensors closer to jet, rocket, and hypersonic engine combustion chambers to improve the quantification accuracy of combustor dynamics, performance, and increase safety margin. Also, by operating at higher temperature and locating closer to the combustion chamber, reduction of the length (weight) of pressure tubes that are currently used will be achieved. This will result in reduced costlb to access space.

  10. Assuring safety without animal testing concept (ASAT). Integration of human disease data with in vitro data to improve toxicology testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stierum, Rob; Aarts, Jac; Boorsma, Andre; Bosgra, Sieto; Caiment, Florian; Ezendam, Janine; Greupink, Rick; Hendriksen, Peter; Soeteman-Hernandez, Lya G.; Jennen, Danyel; Kleinjans, Jos; Kroese, Dinant; Kuper, Frieke; van Loveren, Henk; Monshouwer, Mario; Russel, Frans; van Someren, Eugene; Tsamou, Maria; Groothuis, Geny

    2014-01-01

    According to the Assuring Safety Without Animal Testing (ASAT) principle, risk assessment may ultimately become possible without the use of animals (Fentem et al., (2004). Altern. Lab. Anim. 32, 617-623). The ASAT concept takes human disease mechanisms as starting point and tries to define if

  11. Iterative Cellular Screening System for Nanoparticle Safety Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Sambale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have the potential to exhibit risks to human beings and to the environment; due to the wide applications of nanoproducts, extensive risk management must not be neglected. Therefore, we have constructed a cell-based, iterative screening system to examine a variety of nanoproducts concerning their toxicity during development. The sensitivity and application of various cell-based methods were discussed and proven by applying the screening to two different nanoparticles: zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. They were used as benchmarks to set up our methods and to examine their effects on mammalian cell lines. Different biological processes such as cell viability, gene expression of interleukin-8 and heat shock protein 70, as well as morphology changes were investigated. Within our screening system, both nanoparticle suspensions and coatings can be tested. Electric cell impedance measurements revealed to be a good method for online monitoring of cellular behavior. The implementation of three-dimensional cell culture is essential to better mimic in vivo conditions. In conclusion, our screening system is highly efficient, cost minimizing, and reduces the need for animal studies.

  12. 77 FR 72905 - Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate; Contractor MIS Reporting; and Obtaining DAMIS Sign-In...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate; Contractor MIS Reporting; and Obtaining DAMIS Sign-In Information AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  13. Pressure loss tests for DR-BEP of fullsize 17 x 17 PWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Chun, Se Young; Chang, Seok Kyu; Won, Soon Youn; Cho, Young Rho; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyoung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the conditions, procedure and results in the pressure loss tests carried out for a double grid type debris resistance bottom end piece (DR-BEP) designed by KAERI. In this test, the pressure loss coefficients of the full size 17 x 17 PWR simulated fuel assembly with DR-BET and with standard-BEP were measured respectively, and the pressure loss coefficients of DR-BEP were compared with the coefficients of STD-BET. The test conditions fall within the ranges of loop pressure from 5.2 to 45 bar, loop temperature from 27 to 221 deg C and Reynolds number in fuel bundle from 2.17 x 10{sup 4} to 3.85 x 10{sup 5}. (Author) 5 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Testing of a 4 K to 2 K heat exchanger with an intermediate pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Most large sub-atmospheric helium refrigeration systems incorporate a heat exchanger at the load, or in the distribution system, to counter-flow the sub-atmospheric return with the super-critical or liquid supply. A significant process improvement is theoretically obtainable by handling the exergy loss across the Joule-Thompson throttling valve supplying the flow to the load in a simple but different manner. As briefly outlined in previous publications, the exergy loss can be minimized by allowing the supply flow pressure to decrease to a sub-atmospheric pressure concurrent with heat exchange flow from the load. One practical implementation is to sub-divide the supply flow pressure drop between two heat exchanger sections, incorporating an intermediate pressure drop. Such a test is being performed at Jefferson Lab's Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). This paper will briefly discuss the theory, practical implementation and test results and analysis obtained to date.

  15. Prestressed Concrete-Lined Pressure Tunnels : Towards Improved Safety and Economical Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simanjuntak, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure tunnels for hydropower plants are relatively expensive constructions, particularly when steel linings are used. Concrete linings can be economically attractive; however, their applicability is limited by the low tensile strength of concrete. Techniques to improve the bearing capacity of

  16. Safety life cycle analysis applied to the engineering of pressure relief valves in process plants

    OpenAIRE

    Basco Montia, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Chemical plants and other industrial installations process and store hazardous materials, which represent a certain risk to people, equipment and the environment. Overpressure is one of the most common upsets in process plants and relief devices (pressure relief valves, rupture discs, overpressure-vacuum valves) are required on process equipment to prevent internal pressures from rising to levels, which could cause catastrophic equipment failure. They are the ultimate line of protection again...

  17. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. `grounded` and `with goose neck`). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.). 3 refs.

  18. Suitport Feasibility: Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a space suit prototype on the second generation MMSEV cabin, and testing is planned using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. Pressurized testing will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, a suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents

  19. Performance and Safety Tests on Samsung 18650 Li-ion Cells: Two Cell Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Jeevarajan, Judith; Rehm, Raymond; Bragg, Bobby; Zhang, Wenlin

    2002-01-01

    In order to meet the applications for space shuttle in future, two types of Samsung cells, with capacity 1800 mAh and 2000 mAh, have been investigated. The studies focused on: (1) Performance tests: completed 250 cycles at various combinations of charge/discharge C rates and discharge capacity measurements at various temperatures; and (2) Safety tests: overcharge and overdischarge, heat abuse, short circuit, internal and external short, and vibration, vacuum, and drop tests

  20. Interpretation and evaluation of monitoring results for main pipelines hydraulic pressure testing under non-isothermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Ju. A.; Ivanov, R. N.; Grinevich, V. A.; Pakhotin, A. N.

    2017-08-01

    The paper examines hydraulic pressure testing of main oil pipelines. The research objective is to identify and describe the characteristic features of pressure changes in pressure testing of the main pipeline, caused by temperature changes. The notions on the interpretation and evaluation of the results for pipeline pressure testing under non-isothermal conditions are given, the number of pressure sampling points and temperature information being limited; and considering the elevation difference along the length of the test section (where applicable). A formula for calculating the fresh water volumetric expansion coefficient correlation with temperature and pressure is proposed. A method for interpreting the hydraulic pressure testing results is developed, considering the parameters spread effect on the coefficients of the volumetric expansion and the modulus of elasticity for the test fluid, as well as the coefficients of linear expansion and Young's modulus for pipe steel. The application of the method allows to monitor the hydraulic pressure testing for main oil pipelines.

  1. CFD analysis with fluid-structure interaction of opening high-pressure safety valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, A.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van Heumen, M.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    A multi-mesh numerical valve model has been developed to analyze the opening characteristic of highpressure safety valves. Newton’s law and the CFD result for the flow force are used to model the movement of the valve. In incompressible transient flow simulations a large force rise and collapse is

  2. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Konzek, G.J.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1978-05-01

    Detailed appendices are presented under the following headings: reference PWR facility description, reference PWR site description, estimates of residual radioactivity, alternative methods for financing decommissioning, radiation dose methodology, generic decommissioning activities, intermediate dismantlement activities, safe storage and deferred dismantlement activities, compilation of unit cost factors, and safety assessment details.

  3. Low-pressure membrane integrity tests for drinking water treatment: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Wyart, Y; Perot, J; Nauleau, F; Moulin, P

    2010-01-01

    Low-pressure membrane systems, including microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes, are being increasingly used in drinking water treatments due to their high level of pathogen removal. However, the pathogen will pass through the membrane and contaminate the product if the membrane integrity is compromised. Therefore, an effective on-line integrity monitoring method for MF and UF membrane systems is essential to guarantee the regulatory requirements for pathogen removal. A lot of works on low-pressure membrane integrity tests have been conducted by many researchers. This paper provides a literature review about different low-pressure membrane integrity monitoring methods for the drinking water treatment, including direct methods (pressure-based tests, acoustic sensor test, liquid porosimetry, etc.) and indirect methods (particle counting, particle monitoring, turbidity monitoring, surrogate challenge tests). Additionally, some information about the operation of membrane integrity tests is presented here. It can be realized from this review that it remains urgent to develop an alternative on-line detection technique for a quick, accurate, simple, continuous and relatively inexpensive evaluation of low-pressure membrane integrity. To better satisfy regulatory requirements for drinking water treatments, the characteristic of this ideal membrane integrity test is proposed at the end of this paper.

  4. Association between pressure pain sensitivity and autonomic function as assessed by a tilt table test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Søren; Bergmann, Natasha; Karpatschof, Benny

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that pressure sensitivity of the sternum (PPS) is associated with autonomic nervous system (ANS) function as assessed by tilt table test (TTT). in patients with stable ischemic heart disease. OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate an association between PPS and systolic...... blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) responses to TTT; and (2) to test the hypothesis that a reduction of resting PPS raises the PPS, SBP and HR responses to TTT response and lowers risk factors for ANS dysfunction (ANSD). METHODS: Cross-sectional study: In 361 patients with stable ischemic heart...

  5. Structural and preliminary thermal performance testing of a pressure activated contact heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. Y.; Christian, E. L.; Wohlwend, J. W.; Parish, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    A contact heat exchanger concept is being developed for use onboard Space Station as an interface device between external thermal bus and pressurized modules. The concept relies on mechanical contact activated by the fluid pressure inside thin-walled tubes. Structural testings were carried out to confirm the technology feasibility of using such thin-walled tubes. The test results also verified the linear elastic stress analysis which was used to predict the tube mechanical behaviors. A preliminary thermal testing was also performed with liquid Freon-11 flowing inside tubes and heat being supplied by electrical heating from the bottom of the contact heat exchanger baseplate. The test results showed excellent agreement of test data with analytical prediction for all thermal resistances except for the two-phase flow characteristics. Testing with two-phase flow inside tubes will, however, be performed on the NASA-JSC test bed.

  6. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  7. Design and Test of a Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Thruster with Cold Helium Pressurization Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    A liquid oxygen / liquid methane 2,000 lbf thruster was designed and tested in conjuction with a nozzle heat exchanger for cold helium pressurization. Cold helium pressurization systems offer significant spacecraft vehicle dry mass savings since the pressurant tank size can be reduced as the pressurant density is increased. A heat exchanger can be incorporated into the main engine design to provide expansion of the pressurant supply to the propellant tanks. In order to study the systems integration of a cold-helium pressurization system, a 2,000 lbf thruster with a nozzle heat exchanger was designed for integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle at NASA Johnson Space Center. The testing goals were to demonstrate helium loading and initial conditioning to low temperatures, high-pressure/low temperature storage, expansion through the main engine heat exchanger, and propellant tank injection/pressurization. The helium pressurant tank was an existing 19 inch diameter composite-overwrap tank, and the targert conditions were 4500 psi and -250 F, providing a 2:1 density advantage compared to room tempatrue storage. The thruster design uses like-on-like doublets in the injector pattern largely based on Project Morpheus main engine hertiage data, and the combustion chamber was designed for an ablative chamber. The heat exchanger was installed at the ablative nozzle exit plane. Stand-alone engine testing was conducted at NASA Stennis Space Center, including copper heat-sink chambers and highly-instrumented spoolpieces in order to study engine performance, stability, and wall heat flux. A one-dimensional thermal model of the integrated system was completed. System integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle is complete, and systems demonstrations will follow.

  8. Safety aspects of atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet operation on skin: In vivo study on mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Spela; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Filipic, Gregor; Sersa, Gregor; Cvelbar, Uros

    2017-01-01

    Biomedical applications of plasma require its efficacy for specific purposes and equally importantly its safety. Herein the safety aspects of cold plasma created with simple atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced with helium gas and electrode discharge are evaluated in skin damage on mouse, at different duration of exposure and gas flow rates. The extent of skin damage and treatments are systematically evaluated using stereomicroscope, labelling with fluorescent dyes, histology, infrared imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. The analyses reveal early and late skin damages as a consequence of plasma treatment, and are attributed to direct and indirect effects of plasma. The results indicate that direct skin damage progresses with longer treatment time and increasing gas flow rates which reflect changes in plasma properties. With increasing flow rates, the temperature on treated skin grows and the RONS formation rises. The direct effects were plasma treatment dependent, whereas the disclosed late-secondary effects were more independent on discharge parameters and related to diffusion of RONS species. Thermal effects and skin heating are related to plasma-coupling properties and are separated from the effects of other RONS. It is demonstrated that cumulative topical treatment with helium plasma jet could lead to skin damage. How these damages can be mitigated is discussed in order to provide guidance, when using atmospheric pressure plasma jets for skin treatments.

  9. SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR TANK 241-AZ-101 MIXER PUMP PROCESS TEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAMMOND DM; HARRIS JP; MOUETTE P

    1997-06-09

    This document contains the completed safety analysis which establishes the safety envelope for performing the mixer pump process test in Tank 241-AZ-101. This process test is described in TF-210-OTP-001. All equipment necessary for the mixer pump test has been installed by Project W-151. The purpose of this document is to describe and analyze the mixer pump test for Aging Waste Facility (AWF) Tank 241-AZ-101 and to address the 'yes/maybe' responses marked for evaluation questions identified in Unreviewed Safety Question Evaluation (USQE) TF-94-0266. The scope of this document is limited to the performance of the mixer pump test for Tank 241-AZ-101. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination (USQD) TF-96-0018 verified that the installation of two mixer pumps into Tank 241-AZ-101 was within the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Authorization Basis. USQDs TF-96-0461, TF-96-0448, and TF-96-0805 verified that the installation of the in-tank video camera, thermocouples, and Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer (URSILLA), respectively, were within the current TWRS Authorization Basis. USQD TF-96-1041 verified that the checkout testing of the installed equipment was within the current TWRS Authorization Basis. Installation of the pumps and equipment has been completed. An evaluation of safety considerations associated with operation of the mixer pumps for the mixer pump test is provided in this document. This document augments the existing AWF authorization basis as defined in the Interim Safety Basis (Stahl 1997), and as such, will use the existing Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) of Heubach 1996 to adequately control the mixer pump test. The hazard and accident analysis is limited to the scope and impact of the mixer pump test, and therefore does not address hazards already addressed by the current AWF authorization basis. This document does not evaluate removal of the mixer pumps. Safety considerations for removal of the pumps will be

  10. Test of a novel miniature blood pressure sensor in the coronary arteries of a swine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Sun, Kai; Zou, Xiaotian; Barringhaus, Kurt; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-06-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) has proven to be very useful in diagnosis of narrowed coronary arteries. It is a technique that is used in coronary catheterization to measure blood pressure difference across a coronary artery stenosis in maximal flow. In-vivo blood pressure measurement is critical in FFR diagnosis. This paper presents a novel miniature all-optical fiber blood pressure sensor. It is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometry principle. The FP cavity was fabricated by directly wet etching the fiber tip. Then, a diaphragm with well-controlled thickness was bonded to the end face of the fiber using the thermal bonding technique. Finally, the sensor was packaged with a bio-compatible and flexible coil for animal tests. A 25-50 kg Yorkshire swine model was introduced as the animal test target. The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was exposed, and beyond the takeoff of the largest diagonal branch, a 3.0 mm vascular occluder was secured. Firstly, standard invasive manometry was used to obtain the blood pressure as baseline. Next, a guiding catheter was introduced into the ostium of the left main coronary artery, and the miniature blood pressure sensor was advanced into the LAD at a point beyond the vascular occlude. The blood pressure beyond the vascular occlude was recorded. The sensor successfully recorded the blood pressure at both near-end and far-end of the vascular occluder.

  11. Design, Analysis and Testing of a PRSEUS Pressure Cube to Investigate Assembly Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovanof, Nicolette; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Baraja, Jaime; Gould, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Due to its potential to significantly increase fuel efficiency, the current focus of NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Program is the hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft. Due to the complex load condition that exists in HWB structure, as compared to traditional aircraft configurations, light-weight, cost-effective and manufacturable structural concepts are required to enable the HWB. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept is one such structural concept. A building block approach for technology development of the PRSEUS concept is being conducted. As part of this approach, a PRSEUS pressure cube was developed as a risk reduction test article to examine a new integral cap joint concept. This paper describes the design, analysis and testing of the PRSEUS pressure cube test article. The pressure cube was required to withstand a 2P, 18.4 psi, overpressure load requirement. The pristine pressure cube was tested to 2.2P with no catastrophic failure. After the addition of barely visible impact damage, the cube was pressure loaded to 48 psi where catastrophic failure occurred, meeting the scale-up requirement. Comparison of pretest and posttest analyses with the cube test response agree well, and indicate that current analysis methods can be used to accurately analyze PRSEUS structure for initial failure response.

  12. Liquid Oxygen Liquid Acquisition Device Bubble Point Tests with High Pressure LOX at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurns, John M.; Hartwig, Jason W.

    2011-01-01

    When transferring propellant in space, it is most efficient to transfer single phase liquid from a propellant tank to an engine. In earth s gravity field or under acceleration, propellant transfer is fairly simple. However, in low gravity, withdrawing single-phase fluid becomes a challenge. A variety of propellant management devices (PMD) are used to ensure single-phase flow. One type of PMD, a liquid acquisition device (LAD) takes advantage of capillary flow and surface tension to acquire liquid. The present work reports on testing with liquid oxygen (LOX) at elevated pressures (and thus temperatures) (maximum pressure 1724 kPa and maximum temperature 122K) as part of NASA s continuing cryogenic LAD development program. These tests evaluate LAD performance for LOX stored in higher pressure vessels that may be used in propellant systems using pressure fed engines. Test data shows a significant drop in LAD bubble point values at higher liquid temperatures, consistent with lower liquid surface tension at those temperatures. Test data also indicates that there are no first order effects of helium solubility in LOX on LAD bubble point prediction. Test results here extend the range of data for LOX fluid conditions, and provide insight into factors affecting predicting LAD bubble point pressures.

  13. Well test analysis results interpretation: Combined type curve and pressure derivative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, P.; Matteotti, G. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Geologia, Paleontologia e Geofisica Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Idraulica)

    In reviewing theoretical concepts forming the basis for the interpretation of well test analyses, this paper focusses on the 'theoretical model' for the determination of the parameters and variables. It then applies this theory to the combined type curve and pressure derivative interpretation approaches. Finally, the paper illustrates an approach combining the combined type curve and pressure derivative methods for homogeneous and isotropic conditions in a thermal aquifer and in the presence of the skin effect and wellbore storage.

  14. Influence of headspace pressure on methane production in Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests

    OpenAIRE

    Valero Morales, David; Montes Casaus, Jesús A.; Rico Gutiérrez, José Luis; Rico de la Hera, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT:The biochemical methane potential test is the most commonly applied method to determine methane production from organic wastes. One of the parameters measured is the volume of biogas produced which can be determined manometrically by keeping the volume constant and measuring increases in pressure. In the present study, the effect of pressure accumulation in the headspace of the reactors has been studied. Triplicate batch trials employing cocoa shell, waste coffee grounds and dairy ma...

  15. Results From a Pressure Sensitive Paint Test Conducted at the National Transonic Facility on Test 197: The Common Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Lipford, William E.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.; Goad, Linda R.

    2011-01-01

    This report will serve to present results of a test of the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique on the Common Research Model (CRM). This test was conducted at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center. PSP data was collected on several surfaces with the tunnel operating in both cryogenic mode and standard air mode. This report will also outline lessons learned from the test as well as possible approaches to challenges faced in the test that can be applied to later entries.

  16. Wind Tunnel Tests for Wind Pressure Distribution on Gable Roof Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path. PMID:24082851

  17. Wind tunnel tests for wind pressure distribution on gable roof buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiao-kun; Li, Yuan-qi

    2013-01-01

    Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path.

  18. Inexpensive Method of Testing Ambient and Thermally Elevated Resistive and Piezoresistive Thin-Film Pressure Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christopher; Rae, Philip; Heatwole, Eric; Tasker, Douglas; Los Alamos National Labortatory Team

    2017-06-01

    Manganin is an alloy that changes resistance when subjected to high-pressure, but is insensitive to temperature changes. Resistance curves as a function of pressure for these gauges have been established. Another commonly used piezoresistive pressure sensor are thin-film carbon gauges, which are more pressure sensitive than manganin gauges. Carbon gauge response in high temperature is not well quantified. The current research is focused on verifying these established resistance curves as well as verifying this specific experimental configuration. In this research the carbon gauges' resistance change is measured for thermally elevated gauges. In this setup a 20 mm caliber gun drove planar copper projectiles at the gauge, which was embedded in a copper anvil. The Hugoniot relationship allows for a comparison between observed and theoretical pressure over a pressure range 5 to 20 GPa for manganin gauges and 1 to 5 GPa for carbon gauges. The comparison between the data obtained in this research and that of others shows that the pressure-resistance curve of manganin does to not vary between lots of manganin. Additionally, the data shows that this setup is a relatively inexpensive quick means of testing gauge response to high-pressure shocks and is suitable for elevated temperature.

  19. Structural safety of coolant channel components under excessively high pressure tube diametral expansion rate at garter spring location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravind, M. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sinha, S.K., E-mail: sunilks@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Structural safety of coolant channel assembly in the event of high diametral expansion of pressure tube in a 220 MWe pressurised heavy water reactor was investigated using axisymmetric and 3-D finite element models. The axisymmetric analyses were performed and stresses were evaluated for pressure tube, girdle wire and calandria tube at different point of time for diametral expansion rates of 0.2%, 0.25% and 0.3% per year of the pressure tube inside diameter. The results of this study indicated that for the case of 0.3% per year of diametral expansion rate (worst case scenario), occurrence of complete circumferential interference of garter spring with calandria tube at the location of maximum expansion would take place much earlier at around 14 years or 4.2% of the total expansion of pressure tube as opposed to its anticipated design life (30 years). This fact was further corroborated by 3-D finite element analysis performed for the actual assembly configuration under actual loadings. The latter analysis revealed that net section yielding of calandria tube occurs in just 1 year after the occurrence of total circumferential interference between calandria tube and garter spring spacer. It has also been observed that the maximum stress intensity in girdle wire does not increase beyond the ultimate tensile strength even when maximum stress intensity in calandria tube reaches its yield strength. These analyses also revealed that the structural as well as functional integrity of pressure tube and the garter spring is not affected as result of this interference.

  20. Organizational culture, team climate, and quality management in an important patient safety issue: nosocomial pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marije; Halfens, Ruud J G; van der Weijden, Trudy; Wensing, Michel; Akkermans, Reinier; Grol, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly, policy reform in health care is discussed in terms of changing organizational culture, creating practice teams, and organizational quality management. Yet, the evidence for these suggested determinants of high-quality care is inconsistent. To determine if the type of organizational culture (Competing Values Framework), team climate (Team Climate Inventory), and preventive pressure ulcer quality management at ward level were related to the prevalence of pressure ulcers. Also, we wanted to determine if the type of organizational culture, team climate, or the institutional quality management related to preventive quality management at the ward level. In this cross-sectional observational study multivariate (logistic) regression analyses were performed, adjusting for potential confounders and institution-level clustering. Data from 1274 patients and 460 health care professionals in 37 general hospital wards and 67 nursing home wards in the Netherlands were analyzed. The main outcome measures were nosocomial pressure ulcers in patients at risk for pressure ulcers (Braden score ≤ 18) and preventive quality management at ward level. No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate, or preventive quality management at the ward level and the prevalence of nosocomial pressure ulcers. Institutional quality management was positively correlated with preventive quality management at ward level (adj. β 0.32; p organizational culture, team climate, or preventive quality management at the ward level. These results would therefore not subscribe the widely suggested importance of these factors in improving health care. However, different designs and research methods (that go beyond the cross-sectional design) may be more informative in studying relations between such complex factors and outcomes in a more meaningful way. Copyright ©2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Test re-test reliability of centre of pressure measures during standing balance in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Carpenter, Mark G; Garland, S Jayne; Hunt, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of changes in standing balance following an intervention requires accurate measurement of balance parameters. The reliability of centre of pressure measures of balance during single-leg standing has not been reported in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the test re-test reliability of force platform centre of pressure measures during single-leg standing in older adults with knee osteoarthritis. Twenty-five adults with radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis performed single-leg standing balance trials on a laboratory-grade force platform on two occasions, no more than 14 days apart. Participants were asked to stand on their more symptomatic limb for three, ten second trials. Centre of pressure measures collected included: standard deviation in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions, mean path length, velocity, and area. The mean of the three trials was calculated. Intraclass correlation coefficients, standard error of measurement, Bland and Altman plots and the minimum detectable change were calculated. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.54 to 0.87, suggesting mixed reliability of measures. Reliability was lowest for the centre of pressure area (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.54), and highest for centre of pressure velocity and path length (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.87 for both). Standard error of measurement values were low for standard deviation in the mediolateral direction and high for centre of pressure area. These results suggest that centre of pressure values, in particular path length and velocity, are appropriate for assessment of standing balance in people with medial knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety and Function Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roadman, J.; Murphy, M.; van Dam, J.

    2013-10-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. Several turbines were selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a part of the Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include duration, power performance, acoustic noise, and power quality. Viryd Technologies, Inc. of Austin, Texas, was the recipient of the DOE grant and provided the turbine for testing.

  3. Development of crash imminent test scenarios for Integrated Vehicle-Based Safety Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    This report identifies crash imminent test scenarios based on common pre-crash scenarios for integrated vehicle-based safety systems that alert the driver of a light vehicle or a heavy truck to an impending rear-end, lane change, or run-off-road cras...

  4. The Range Safety Debris Catalog Analysis in Preparation for the Pad Abort One Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, Prasad; Pratt, William

    2010-01-01

    With each flight test a Range Safety Data Package is assembled to understand the potential consequences of various failure scenarios. Debris catalog analysis considers an overpressure failure of the Abort Motor and the resulting debris field created 1. Characterize debris fragments generated by failure: weight, shape, and area 2. Compute fragment ballistic coefficients 3. Compute fragment ejection velocities.

  5. 30 CFR 250.1630 - Safety-system testing and records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 250.1630 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL.... Testing must be in accordance with API RP 14C, Appendix D (incorporated by reference as specified in § 250.198). For safety system devices other than those listed in API RP 14C, Appendix D, you must utilize...

  6. Performance and Safety Tests on Samsung 18650 Li-ion Cells with Two Capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Jeevarajan, Judith; Rehm, Raymond; Bragg, Bobby; Zhang, Wenlin

    2001-01-01

    In order to meet the applications for Space Shuttle in the future, Samsung 18650 cylindrical Li-ion cells with two different capacities have been evaluated. The capacities are 1800 mAh, and 2000 mAh. The studies focused on the performance and safety tests of the cells.

  7. Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bal-Price, Anna; Coecke, Sandra; Costa, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Bal-Price AK, Coecke S, Costa L, Crofton KM, Fritsche E, Goldberg A, Grandjean P, Lein PJ, Li A, Lucchini R, Mundy WR, Padilla S, Persico A, Seiler AEM, Kreysa J. Conference Report: Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation. Altex 2012: 29: 202-15....

  8. Assuring safety without animal testing: the case for the human testis in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapin, R.E.; Boekelheide, K.; Cortvrindt, R.; Duursen, van M.; Gant, T.; Jegou, B.; Marczylo, E.; Pelt, van A.M.; Post, J.N.; Roelofs, M.J.; Schlatt, S.; Teerds, K.J.; Toppari, J.; Piersma, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    From 15 to 17 June 2011, a dedicated workshop was held on the subject of in vitro models for mammalian spermatogenesis and their applications in toxicological hazard and risk assessment. The workshop was sponsored by the Dutch ASAT initiative (Assuring Safety without Animal Testing), which aims at

  9. Expressing best practices in (risk) analysis and testing of safety-critical systems using patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzner, Wolfgang; Sieverding, Sven; Kacimi, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The continuing pervasion of our society with safety-critical cyber-physical systems not only demands for adequate (risk) analysis, testing and verification techniques, it also generates growing experience on their use, which can be considered as important as the tools themselves for their efficie...

  10. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all.

  11. Preliminary design of safety and interlock system for indian test facility of diagnostic neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Himanshu, E-mail: htyagi@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Soni, Jignesh [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Yadav, Ratnakar; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Gahlaut, Agrajit [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Bansal, Gourab; Pandya, Kaushal; Chakraborty, Arun [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Indian Test Facility being built to characterize DNB for ITER delivery. • Interlock system required to safeguard the investment incurred in building the facility and protecting ITER deliverable components. • Interlock levels upto 3IL-3 identified. • Safety instrumented system for occupational safety being designed. Safety I&C functions of SIL-2 identified. • The systems are based on ITER PIS and PSS design guidelines. - Abstract: Indian Test Facility (INTF) is being built in Institute For Plasma Research to characterize Diagnostic Neutral Beam in co-operation with ITER Organization. INTF is a complex system which consists of several plant systems like beam source, gas feed, vacuum, cryogenics, high voltage power supplies, high power RF generators, mechanical systems and diagnostics systems. Out of these, several INTF components are ITER deliverable, that is, beam source, beam line components and power supplies. To ensure successful operation of INTF involving integrated operation of all the constituent plant systems a matured Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) is required. The INTF DACS is based on CODAC platform following on PCDH (Plant Control Design Handbook) guidelines. The experimental phases involve application of HV power supplies (100 KV) and High RF power (∼800 KW) which will produce energetic beam of maximum power 6MW within the facility for longer durations. Hence the entire facility will be exposed tohigh heat fluxes and RF radiations. To ensure investment protection and to provide occupational safety for working personnel a matured Safety and Interlock system is required for INTF. The Safety and Interlock systems are high-reliability I&C systems devoted completely to the specific functions. These systems will be separate from the conventional DACS of INTF which will handle the conventional control and acquisition functions. Both, the Safety and Interlock systems are based on IEC 61511 and IEC 61508 standards as

  12. 78 FR 47011 - Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants..., ``Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' This... (ANSI/IEEE) Standard (Std.) 1008-1987, ``IEEE Standard for Software Unit Testing'' with the...

  13. 77 FR 50722 - Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants... regulatory guide (DG), DG-1208, ``Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software used in Safety Systems... revision endorses, with clarifications, the enhanced consensus practices for testing of computer software...

  14. Safety Performance Evaluations for the Vehicle Based Movable Barriers Using Full Scale Crash Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Minsoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to develop a prototype of large-size movable barriers to protect roadside workers from incoming vehicles to the road work area with the following functions: maximization of work space in the right and left directions, convenient mobility, and minimization of impact without modification of the inside of movable barriers into traffic lanes and perform safety performance assessment on passengers through full scale crash tests. The large movable barrier was divided into folder type and telescope type and the development stage was now at the prototype phase. A full scale crash test was conducted prior to certification test at a level of 90%. The full scale crash test result showed that both types of folder type movable barrier and telescope type movable barrier satisfied the standard of the passenger safety performance evaluation at a level of 90%.

  15. A simulator for oscillometric blood-pressure signals to test automated noninvasive sphygmomanometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, W.; Mieke, S.; Seemann, R.; Ittermann, B.

    2011-02-01

    A device was developed allowing to generate simulated human blood pressure signals for the purpose of testing the performance of automated noninvasive sphygmomanometers. The apparatus reproducibly generates blood-pressure oscillations synthesized from prerecorded measurements on human subjects. These real-life data allow for a much better evaluation of the accuracy of blood-pressure measurements than the existing simulators using artificial and thus less realistic waveforms. To assess the performance of a given sphygmomanometer under both stable and varying conditions, generated signals can be repeated in their original shape or distorted by well-defined artifacts. In comparison to clinical tests, the procedural influences on the performance testing of sphygmomanometers are largely reduced when the simulator is used.

  16. Evolution of the Mascotte test bench to high pressure operation and related combustor technology issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vingert, L.; Habiballah, M.; Hervat, P. [ONERA, 92 - Chatillon (France); Dugue, F. [CSTM, (France); Vuilermoz, P. [Centre National d' Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the evolutions of the Mascotte test facility, developed by the Onera to study elementary processes involved in the combustion of cryogenic propellants. Three successive versions of this test facility were built up: a V01 version with only low chamber pressures (< 10 bars) and hydrogen at ambient temperature, a V02 version with a heat exchanger for the cooling of hydrogen down to 100 deg. K which permitted to increase the maximum flow rate of gaseous hydrogen at low pressure with subsonic flow at the injector exit, and a V03 version with supercritical pressures in the combustor and with an increase of the maximum oxygen flow rate. The low and high combustion chambers of the Mascotte test facility are described in a second part: combustors, optimization of metallic modules, heat flux measurements, design of the visualization module, design of the nozzle. (J.S.)

  17. Suitport Feasibility - Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a spacesuit while the spacesuit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a spacesuit prototype using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. This test will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents design of a human rated second generation suitport, modifications to

  18. G-Tunnel pressurized slot-testing preparations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Dodds, D.J. [North Pacific Research, Portland, OR (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National laboratories elected to conduct a development program on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of the potentials of pressurized slot strength testing. This report describes the preparations leading to the measurements and evaluations.

  19. Two-phase flow experiments on Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a model of the hot leg of a pressurized water reactor (2015 test series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk; Pietruske, Heiko; Szalinski, Lutz

    2016-12-15

    Counter-Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) is of importance for PWR safety analyses in several accident scenarios connected with loss of coolant. Basing on the experiences obtained during a first series of hot leg tests now new experiments on counter-current flow limitation were conducted in the TOPFLOW pressure vessel. The test series comprises air-water tests at 1 and 2 bar as well as steam-water tests at 10, 25 and 50 bar. During the experiments the flow structure was observed along the hot leg model using a high-speed camera and web-cams. In addition pressure was measured at several positions along the horizontal part and the water levels in the reactor-simulator and steam-generator-simulator tanks were determined. This report documents the experimental setup including the description of operational and special measuring techniques, the experimental procedure and the data obtained. From these data flooding curves were obtained basing on the Wallis parameter. The results show a slight shift of the curves in dependency of the pressure. In addition a slight decrease of the slope was found with increasing pressure. Additional investigations concern the effects of hysteresis and the frequencies of liquid slugs. The latter ones show a dependency on pressure and the mass flow rate of the injected water. The data are available for CFD-model development and validation.

  20. The dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test (DARHT) facility personnel safety system (PSS) control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The mission of the Dual Axis Radiograph Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility is to conduct experiments on dynamic events of extremely dense materials. The PSS control system is designed specifically to prevent personnel from becoming exposed to radiation and explosive hazards during machine operations and/or the firing site operation. This paper will outline the Radiation Safety System (RSS) and the High Explosive Safety System (HESS) which are computer-controlled sets of positive interlocks, warning devices, and other exclusion mechanisms that together form the PSS.

  1. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  2. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  3. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  4. SAFETY

    CERN Document Server

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  5. Effectiveness and safety of nicardipine and labetalol infusion for blood pressure management in patients with intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Gutierrez, Santiago; Thomas, Jiz; Reccius, Andres; Agarwal, Sachin; Lantigua, Hector; Li, Min; Carpenter, Amanda M; Mayer, Stephan A; Schmidt, J Michael; Lee, Kiwon; Claassen, Jan; Badjatia, Neeraj; Lesch, Christine

    2013-02-01

    Nicardipine and labetalol are two commonly used antihypertensives for treating elevated blood pressures in the setting of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). There are no studies comparing these two agents as continuous infusions. A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients admitted between November 2009 and January 2011 with ICH and SAH to compare effectiveness and safety between both agents. Percent time spent at goal was set as the primary outcome. The secondary outcomes included blood pressure variability, time to goal, incidence of bradycardia, tachycardia, and hypotension. A total of 81 patients were available for analysis, 10 initiated on labetalol (LAB), 57 on nicardipine (NIC), and 14 required the combination of these agents (COMB) to reach goal. We found no difference between NIC, LAB, and the COMB groups in the median percent time at goal [88 % (61-98); 93 % (51-99); 66 % (25-95), (p = NS)]. Median percentage of blood pressure variability, hypotension, and bradycardia were also comparable between groups, however, more tachycardia was observed in the COMB group versus both LAB and NIC groups (45 vs. 0 vs. 3 %; p < 0.001). Mean time to goal SBP in 24 patients who had BP readings available at 1st h of initiation was 32 ± 34 min in the NIC group and 53 ± 42 min in the LAB group (p = 0.03). Both agents appear equally effective and safe for blood pressure control in SAH and ICH during the initial admission hours. A prospective study is needed to validate these findings.

  6. Licensing assessment of the Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. Preliminary safety information document. Volume II. [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    ERDA has requested United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) to evaluate the design of the Canadian natural uranium fueled, heavy water moderated (CANDU) nuclear reactor power plant to assess its conformance with the licensing criteria and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for light water reactors. This assessment was used to identify cost significant items of nonconformance and to provide a basis for developing a detailed cost estimate for a 1140 MWe, 3-loop Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) located at the Middletown, USA Site.

  7. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for 2024-T3 aluminium alloy sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, J. C.; Harris, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselages. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof cycle was longer than that without the proof cycle because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  8. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  9. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  10. 30 CFR 250.427 - What are the requirements for pressure integrity tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Casing and Cementing Requirements § 250.427 What are the requirements for pressure integrity tests... must suspend drilling operations and remedy the situation. ...

  11. Static in situ test of the axial power shaping rod and shim safety control rod mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soberano, F T; Gannon, J A; Parlee, K A

    1982-08-01

    There are eight Axial Power Shaping Rods (APSRs) and 61 Shim Safety Control Rods (SSCRs) within the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor core. This report describes the test results for all eight APSRs and three SSCRs. The tests were performed in situ from the Control Rod Drive (CRD) system logic cabinets and the transformer cabinets located in the cable spreading room. The tests were intended to determine the condition of the Absolute Position Indicators (APIs), the stator thermocouples, and the stators, and to assess each components' survival of the TMI-2 accident.

  12. High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance: Wind Pressure Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRenzis, A.; Kochkin, V.

    2013-01-01

    This technical report is focused primarily on laboratory testing that evaluates wind pressure performance characteristics for wall systems constructed with exterior insulating sheathing. This research and test activity will help to facilitate the ongoing use of non-structural sheathing options and provide a more in-depth understanding of how wall system layers perform in response to high wind perturbations normal to the surface.

  13. High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance. Wind Pressure Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRenzis, A. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This technical report is focused primarily on laboratory testing that evaluates wind pressure performance characteristics for wall systems constructed with exterior insulating sheathing. This research and test activity will help to facilitate the ongoing use of non-structural sheathing options and provide a more in-depth understanding of how wall system layers perform in response to high wind perturbations normal to the surface.

  14. Pilot study to test the safety of an exercise machine on healthy adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Taeko; Ishida, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Mitsuko; Yamagata, Zentaro

    2010-06-01

    To assess the safety and effectiveness of a chair-type training machine developed for the elderly and to conduct a training program in healthy women using this machine. Twenty-four healthy women (mean age: 27.0 +/- 5.4 years; range: 21-38 years) were randomly assigned to the exercise program (intervention) group (n = 12) or the control group (n = 12). Training program using the chair-type training machine for the elderly in 60-min sessions twice a week for 12 weeks. Safety standards for machinery (ISO 12100) and physiological phenomena (blood pressure, heart rate, and subjective symptoms and objective symptoms) were assessed. The primary endpoints were isometric muscle strength (knee joint extension strength (KJES)), ankle dorsal flexion strength (ADFS), and ankle plantar flexion strength (APFS); these were assessed using standardized protocols at the beginning and the end of intervention. There were two dropouts in the intervention group. The safety of the machine was judged as acceptable based on the standard. No training-related medical problems occurred. It was observed that 12 weeks after the end of the training program, the isometric muscle strengths of all the left muscles and the right APFS were reinforced in the intervention group (P < 0.05). The right KJES and right ADFS of the intervention group did not show significant change when compared to the control. The chair-type training machine and the training program with this machine are safe and effective for increasing muscle strength.

  15. A Study for Experiment to Measure Mechanical Properties of Pressurizer Nozzle and Safety-Ends in Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Weon [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sung Ho [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Recently the primary water stress corrosion cracking(PWSCC) has occurred in the dissimilar metal weld region between pressurizer nozzle and safe-end in nuclear power plants(NPPs). As material of the pressurizer nozzle, SA508 Gr. 3 low alloy steel was used. F316L stainless steel and Alloy 82/182 were used as safe-end and weld metal, respectively. Although mechanical properties are needed for evaluation of the structural integrity against flaw in the material, material specification and standard don't supply those properties. Therefore, the present study conducted tensile and fracture toughness tests on SA508 Gr.3 and F316L stainless steel at ambient temperature and operating temperature of NPPs and reported the tested results.

  16. Strain test and stress intensity assessment of a CPR1000 Nuclear Power Plant pressurizer during pre-delivery hydrostatic test

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lei; Xu, Decheng; Yu, Min; Xue, Fei; Jiang, Jiawang; Zhang,Guodong; Zhao, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    Strain gages are applied to get the strain and stress of a CPR1000 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) pressurizer during the pre-delivery hydrostatic test. The measured strain curves are discussed to find the deformation features of the cylinder. The stresses of cylindrical base metal, longitudinal welds and girth welds are calculated and compared with the theoretical values. The stresses in girth welds and upper head nozzle welds show non-uniformity at these areas. The possible reasons are discussed ...

  17. Assuring consumer safety without animal testing: a feasibility case study for skin sensitisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Gavin; Aleksic, Maja; Aptula, Aynur; Carmichael, Paul; Fentem, Julia; Gilmour, Nicola; Mackay, Cameron; Pease, Camilla; Pendlington, Ruth; Reynolds, Fiona; Scott, Daniel; Warner, Guy; Westmoreland, Carl

    2008-11-01

    Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD; chemical-induced skin sensitisation) represents a key consumer safety endpoint for the cosmetics industry. At present, animal tests (predominantly the mouse Local Lymph Node Assay) are used to generate skin sensitisation hazard data for use in consumer safety risk assessments. An animal testing ban on chemicals to be used in cosmetics will come into effect in the European Union (EU) from March 2009. This animal testing ban is also linked to an EU marketing ban on products containing any ingredients that have been subsequently tested in animals, from March 2009 or March 2013, depending on the toxicological endpoint of concern. Consequently, the testing of cosmetic ingredients in animals for their potential to induce skin sensitisation will be subject to an EU marketing ban, from March 2013 onwards. Our conceptual framework and strategy to deliver a non-animal approach to consumer safety risk assessment can be summarised as an evaluation of new technologies (e.g. 'omics', informatics), leading to the development of new non-animal (in silico and in vitro) predictive models for the generation and interpretation of new forms of hazard characterisation data, followed by the development of new risk assessment approaches to integrate these new forms of data and information in the context of human exposure. Following the principles of the conceptual framework, we have been investigating existing and developing new technologies, models and approaches, in order to explore the feasibility of delivering consumer safety risk assessment decisions in the absence of new animal data. We present here our progress in implementing this conceptual framework, with the skin sensitisation endpoint used as a case study. 2008 FRAME.

  18. Characterizing hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs using transient pressure tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    2015-06-01

    This work presents an unconventional gas reservoir simulator and its application to quantify hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs using transient pressure data. The numerical model incorporates most known physical processes for gas production from unconventional reservoirs, including two-phase flow of liquid and gas, Klinkenberg effect, non-Darcy flow, and nonlinear adsorption. In addition, the model is able to handle various types and scales of fractures or heterogeneity using continuum, discrete or hybrid modeling approaches under different well production conditions of varying rate or pressure. Our modeling studies indicate that the most sensitive parameter of hydraulic fractures to early transient gas flow through extremely low permeability rock is actually the fracture-matrix contacting area, generated by fracturing stimulation. Based on this observation, it is possible to use transient pressure testing data to estimate the area of fractures generated from fracturing operations. We will conduct a series of modeling studies and present a methodology using typical transient pressure responses, simulated by the numerical model, to estimate fracture areas created or to quantity hydraulic fractures with traditional well testing technology. The type curves of pressure transients from this study can be used to quantify hydraulic fractures in field application.

  19. Testing methods of pressure distribution of bra cups on breasts soft tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, B.; Nemcokova, R.; Svoboda, M.

    2017-10-01

    Objective of this study is to evaluate testing methods of pressure distribution of bra cups on breasts soft tissue, the system which do not affect the space between the wearer's body surface and bra cups and thus do not influence the geometry of the measured body surface and thus investigate the functional performance of brassieres. Two measuring systems were used for the pressure comfort evaluating: 1) The pressure distribution of a wearing bra during 20 minutes on women's breasts has been directly measured using pressure sensor, a dielectricum which is elastic polyurethane foam bra cups. Twelve points were measured in bra cups. 2) Simultaneously the change of temperature in the same points bra was tested with the help of noncontact system the thermal imager. The results indicate that both of those systems can identify different pressure distribution at different points. The same size of bra designing features bra cups made from the same material and which is define by the help of same standardised body dimensions (bust and underbust) can cause different value of a compression on different shape of a woman´s breast soft tissue.

  20. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Southwest Windpower H40 Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dam, J.; Link, H.; Meadors, M.; Bianchi, J.

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this test was to evaluate the safety and function characteristics of the Whisper H40 wind turbine. The general requirements of wind turbine safety and function tests are defined in the IEC standard WT01. The testing was conducted in accordance with the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) Quality Assurance System, including the NWTC Certification Team Certification Quality Manual and the NWTC Certification Team General Quality Manual for the Testing of Wind Turbines, as well as subordinate documents. This safety and function test was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Field Verification Program for small wind turbines.

  1. Threat, Pressure, and Communication About Concussion Safety: Implications for Parent Concussion Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Babkes Stellino, Megan; Chrisman, Sara P D; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-08-01

    Parental communication about the importance of reporting concussion symptoms can influence a child's attitudes about such reporting, and is likely related to perceived threat of concussion. However, parental investment in child sport achievement might impede this communication. To examine the relationship between perceived threat of concussion and parent-child communication regarding concussion symptom reporting, and the potential interaction with parental pressure regarding child sport achievement. A total of 236 parents of youth soccer players completed an anonymous online survey. There were greater odds of encouraging concussion reporting among parents who perceived that their child had a greater likelihood of sustaining a concussion ( OR = 1.03, 95% CI [1.01, 1.04]) and lower odds among parents who exhibited greater parental sport pressure ( OR = 0.88, 95% CI [0.78, 0.99]). Parents whose child had a prior concussion were much more likely to communicate with their child about concussion reporting ( OR = 7.86, 95% CI [3.00, 20.55]). Initiatives are needed to support healthy sport parenting, particularly focusing on parental encouragement of concussion reporting. Possible directions for concussion education for parents based on the results of this study include providing parents with concrete guidance about the important role they can play in encouraging their child to report symptoms of a concussion, communicating the athletic consequences of continued sport involvement while experiencing symptoms of a concussion, and using narrative messaging with exemplars to personalize the information for parents of youth who have not previously sustained a concussion.

  2. Safety and Environment- Masterplan 2020 of DLR's Rocket Test Center Lampoldhausen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberzettl, Andreas; Dommers, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The German Aerospace Center DLR is the German research institute with approximately 7000 employees in 16 domestic locations. Among the research priorities of the German Aerospace Center DLR includes aerospace, energy and transport. DLR is institutionally supported by federal and state governments.Next funding sources arise in the context of third-party funds business (contract research and public contracts and subsidiaries). Main activities of the test center Lampoldshausen are testing of ARIANE's main and upper stage engines in the frame of ESA contracts.In the last years the test center of the DLR in Lampoldshausen has grown strongly, so that the number of employees is actually of about 230. The testing department is mainly responsible for rocket combustion testing according to customer requirements.Two kinds of test facilities are operated, sea level test benches and the altitude simulation test facilities.In addition to the DLR's growth also the activities of the industrial partner ASTRIUM has been elevated so that actually nearly 600 employees are present on site Lampoldshausen.The management of the site in relation to safety and security requires special measures with special respect to the presence of more people inside the testing area in order to guarantee trouble-free and safe experimental operation onsite the DLR's test plants. In order to meet with the future needs of continuing growth, the security and safety requirements have to be adopted.This report gives comprehensive outlook information about future possible scenarios of our coming tasks.Main driving force for future requests is the evolution of the rocket ARIANE. The testing of the new upper stage test facility for ARIANE 5 midlife evolution has been started. A new test position P5.2 is foreseen to perform the qualification of the new upper stage with the VINCI engine. This project will be very complex, in parallel running operation processes will require special procedures related to the overall

  3. Composite sequential Monte Carlo test for post-market vaccine safety surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ivair R

    2016-04-30

    Group sequential hypothesis testing is now widely used to analyze prospective data. If Monte Carlo simulation is used to construct the signaling threshold, the challenge is how to manage the type I error probability for each one of the multiple tests without losing control on the overall significance level. This paper introduces a valid method for a true management of the alpha spending at each one of a sequence of Monte Carlo tests. The method also enables the use of a sequential simulation strategy for each Monte Carlo test, which is useful for saving computational execution time. Thus, the proposed procedure allows for sequential Monte Carlo test in sequential analysis, and this is the reason that it is called 'composite sequential' test. An upper bound for the potential power losses from the proposed method is deduced. The composite sequential design is illustrated through an application for post-market vaccine safety surveillance data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Risk Factors for Inadequate Defibrillation Safety Margins Vary With the Underlying Cardiac Disease: Implications for Selective Testing Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnes, J.L.; Westra, S.W.; Bouwels, L.H.; Boer, M.J. de; Brouwer, M.A.; Smeets, J.L.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In view of the shift from routine toward no or selective defibrillation testing, optimization of the current risk stratification for inadequate defibrillation safety margins (DSMs) could improve individualized testing decisions. Given the pathophysiological differences in myocardial

  5. Biosafety Test for Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria: Proposed Environmental and Human Safety Index (EHSI) Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vílchez, Juan I.; Navas, Alfonso; González-López, Jesús; Arcos, Susana C.; Manzanera, Maximino

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) colonize plants and enhance their growth by different mechanisms. Some of these microorganisms may represent a potential threat to human, animal or plant health; however, their use might be approved in parts of Europe if they have been recommended as plant growth enhancers. The current regulatory framework has resulted in a fragmented, contradictory system, and there is an urgent need to establish harmonized protocols for the predictability, efficiency, consistency and especially the safety of PGPB for human and animal health and for the environment. In response to current efforts to update biosafety policies and provide alternative methods to replace the use of vertebrate animals, we propose a panel of tests and an evaluation system to reliably determine the biosafety of bacterial strains used as PGPB. Based on the results of different tests, we propose a scoring system to evaluate the safety of candidates for PGPB within the limitations of the assays used. PMID:26779168

  6. Analysis and Testing of a Metallic Repair Applicable to Pressurized Composite Aircraft Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Development of repair technology is vital to the long-term application of new structural concepts on aircraft structure. The design, analysis, and testing of a repair concept applicable to a stiffened composite panel based on the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure was recently completed. The damage scenario considered was a mid-bay to mid-bay saw-cut with a severed stiffener, flange, and skin. A bolted metallic repair was selected so that it could be easily applied in the operational environment. The present work describes results obtained from tension and pressure panel tests conducted to validate both the repair concept and finite element analysis techniques used in the design effort. Simulation and experimental strain and displacement results show good correlation, indicating that the finite element modeling techniques applied in the effort are an appropriate compromise between required fidelity and computational effort. Static tests under tension and pressure loadings proved that the proposed repair concept is capable of sustaining load levels that are higher than those resulting from the current working stress allowables. Furthermore, the pressure repair panel was subjected to 55,000 pressure load cycles to verify that the design can withstand a life cycle representative for a transport category aircraft. These findings enable upward revision of the stress allowables that had been kept at an overly-conservative level due to concerns associated with repairability of the panels. This conclusion enables more weight efficient structural designs utilizing the composite concept under investigation.

  7. Dynamic testing of concrete under high confined pressure. Influence of saturation ratio and aggregate size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete structures can be exposed to intense pressure loadings such as projectile-impact or detonation near a concrete structural element. To investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete under high confining pressure, dynamic quasi-oedometric compression tests have been performed with a large diameter (80 mm Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. The concrete sample is placed within a steel confining ring and compressed along its axial direction. Hydrostatic pressures as high as 800 MPa and axial strain of about − 10% are reached during the tests. In the present work, experiments have been conducted on two types of concrete: MB50 microconcrete with a maximum grain size of 2 mm and R30A7 ordinary concrete of maximum grain size about 8 mm. Both concretes are tested in dry or saturated conditions. According to these dynamic experiments it is noted that grain size has a small influence whereas water content has a strong effect on the confined behaviour of concrete.

  8. Systolic Blood Pressure Response During Exercise Stress Testing: The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Wesley T; Qureshi, Waqas T; Blaha, Michael J; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-05-07

    The prognostic significance of modest elevations in exercise systolic blood pressure response has not been extensively examined. We examined the association between systolic blood pressure response and all-cause death and incident myocardial infarction (MI) in 44 089 (mean age 53±13 years, 45% female, 26% black) patients who underwent exercise treadmill stress testing from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project (1991-2010). Exercise systolic blood pressure response was examined as a categorical variable (>20 mm Hg: referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg, and ≤0 mm Hg) and per 1 SD decrease. Cox regression was used to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CI for the association between systolic blood pressure response and all-cause death and incident MI. Over a median follow-up of 10 years, a total of 4782 (11%) deaths occurred and over 5.2 years, a total of 1188 (2.7%) MIs occurred. In a Cox regression analysis adjusted for demographics, physical fitness, and cardiovascular risk factors, an increased risk of death was observed with decreasing systolic blood pressure response (>20 mm Hg: HR=1.0, referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg: HR=1.13, 95% CI=1.05, 1.22; ≤0 mm Hg: HR=1.21, 95% CI=1.09, 1.34). A trend for increased MI risk was observed (>20 mm Hg: HR=1.0, referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg: HR=1.09, 95% CI=0.93, 1.27; ≤0 mm Hg: HR=1.19, 95% CI=0.95, 1.50). Decreases in systolic blood pressure response per 1 SD were associated with an increased risk for all-cause death (HR=1.08, 95% CI=1.05, 1.11) and incident MI (HR=1.09, 95% CI=1.03, 1.16). Our results suggest that modest increases in exercise systolic blood pressure response are associated with adverse outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. Safety Testing of AGR-2 UCO Compacts 6-4-2 and 2-3-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Morris, Robert N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burns, Zachary M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Fred C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) and elevated-temperature safety testing are being performed on tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated-particle fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program second irradiation experiment (AGR-2). Details on this irradiation experiment have been previously reported [Collin 2014]. The AGR-2 PIE effort builds upon the understanding acquired throughout the AGR-1 PIE campaign [Demkowicz et al. 2015] and is establishing a database for the different AGR-2 fuel designs.

  10. Blood Pressure Lowering and Safety Improvements With Liver Angiotensinogen Inhibition in Models of Hypertension and Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullick, Adam E; Yeh, Steve T; Graham, Mark J; Engelhardt, Jeffery A; Prakash, Thazha P; Crooke, Rosanne M

    2017-09-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension is an important contributor to cardiovascular disease. Despite the armamentarium of antihypertensive treatments, there remains a need for novel agents effective in individuals who cannot reach acceptable blood pressure levels. Inhibitors targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are widely used but may not optimally inhibit RAAS and demonstrate an acceptable safety profile. Experiments were conducted to characterize a series of AGT (angiotensinogen) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and compare their efficacy and tolerability to traditional RAAS blockade. AGT ASOs which target multiple systemic sites of AGT versus an N-acetylgalactosamine-conjugated AGT ASO that targets the liver were compared with captopril and losartan. Spontaneously hypertensive rats fed an 8% NaCl diet, a model of malignant hypertension resistant to standard RAAS inhibitors, demonstrated robust and durable blood pressure reductions with AGT ASO treatments, which was not observed with standard RAAS blockade. Studies in rat models of acute kidney injury produced by salt deprivation revealed kidney injury with ASO treatment that reduced kidney-expressed AGT, but not in animals treated with the N-acetylgalactosamine AGT ASO despite comparable plasma AGT reductions. Administration of either captopril or losartan also produced acute kidney injury during salt deprivation. Thus, intrarenal RAAS derived from kidney AGT, and inhibited by the standard of care, contributes to the maintenance of renal function during severe RAAS challenge. Such improvements in efficacy and tolerability by a liver-selective AGT inhibitor could be desirable in individuals not at their blood pressure goal with existing RAAS blockade. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. [Modification of the test pressure-flow for evaluation of detrusor contractility in absence of urination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arustamov, D L; Akilov, F A; Rakhimov, N M; Khodzhimetov, T A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was design and validation of the test for examination of detrusor contractility in the absence of urination. The method consists in registration of detrusor pressure in maximal speed of urinary flow in the course of artificial urination using Foley's catheter. Urethral resistance was modeled by raising drainage up to 40 cm above the level of the symphysis which was adjusted and found optimal in 48 of 179 examinees. The method allowed to select patients with infravesical obstruction (IVO) and normal detrusor contractility (n = 36) as well as patients with hypocontractility without IVO (n = 12). The test "pressure-flow" in artificial urination evaluates detrusor contractility in patients unable to urinate. The test distinquishes patients with normal detrusor contractility and those with different degree of its impairment. This is important in assessment and prognosis of deficient urination.

  12. Association between the elbow flexion test and extraneural pressure inside the cubital tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Nakamichi, Noriaki; Morita, Kozo; Okada, Eijiro; Hasegawa, Takayuki

    2011-02-01

    The elbow flexion test is a standard, provocative diagnostic test for cubital tunnel syndrome (CubTS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the elbow flexion test and the degree of extraneural pressure in the cubital tunnel of CubTS patients. Extraneural pressure on the ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel was evaluated using 0.7-mm thickness catheter during surgery of 25 CubTS cases and compared with the results of preoperative elbow flexion testing. Statistic analysis was performed using Student's t-test with a confidence level of 95% (p cubital tunnel induced by maximum elbow flexion (p = .45). Our results suggested that the mechanism of provocation of symptoms of CubTS by the elbow flexion could not be explained simply by dynamic pressure in the cubital tunnel, and other pathophysiological factors could also be contributing. Diagnostic III. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. D-Zero Central Calorimeter Pressure Vessel and Vacuum Vessel Safety Notes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucinski, R.; Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1990-10-25

    The relief valve and relief piping capacity was calculated to be 908 sefm air. This exceeds all relieving conditions. The vessel also has a rupture disc with a 2640 scfm air stamped capacity. In order to significantly decrease the amount of time required to fill the cryostats, it is desired to raise the setpoint of the 'operating' relief valve on the argon storage dewar to 20 psig from its existing 16 psig setting. This additional pressure increases the flow to the cryostats and will overwhelm the relief capacity if the temperature of the modules within these vessels is warm enough. Using some conservative assumptions and simple calculations within this note, the maximum average temperature that the modules within each cryostat can be at prior to filling from the storage dewar with liquid argon is at least 290 K. The average temperature of the module mass for any of the three cryostats can be as high as 290 K prior to filling that particular cryostat. This should not be confused with the average temperature of a single type or location which is useful in protecting the modules-not necessarily the vessel itself. A few modules of each type and at different elevations should be used in an average which would account for the different weights of each module. Note that at 290 K, the actual flow of argon through the relief valve and the rupture disk was under the maximum theoretical flows for each relief device. This means that the bulk temperature could actually have been raised to flow argon through the reliefs at their maximum capacity. Therefore, the temperature of 290 K is a conservative value for the calculated flow rate of 12.3 gpm. Safeguards in addition to and used in conjunction with operating procedures shall be implemented in such a way so that the above temperature limitation is not exceeded and such that it is exclusive of the programmable logic controller (PLC). One suggestion is using a toggle switch for each cryostat mounted in the PLC I/O box

  14. 33 CFR 159.95 - Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety. 159.95 Section 159.95... SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.95 Safety. (a) Each device must— (1) Be free of... explosion or over pressurization as a result of an accumulation of gases; and (3) Meet all other safety...

  15. Safety and efficacy of travoprost solution for the treatment of elevated intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Luciano; Riva, Ivano; Katsanos, Andreas; Floriani, Irene; Centofanti, Marco; Konstas, Anastasios G P

    2015-01-01

    Travoprost is a prostaglandin analogue widely used for reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients affected with glaucoma and ocular hypertension. It exerts its ocular hypotensive effect through the prostaglandin FP receptors, located in the ciliary muscle and the trabecular meshwork. Several studies have shown that topical administration of travoprost induces a mean IOP reduction ranging from 25% to 32%, and sustained throughout the 24-hour cycle. When compared with timolol, travoprost is more effective at reducing IOP, while generally no difference has been found in the head-to-head comparison with other prostaglandin analogues. The fixed combination of travoprost and timolol has demonstrated a hypotensive efficacy comparable to the concomitant administration of the two drugs. Recently, a new preservative-free formulation of travoprost 0.004% has been marketed for reducing tolerability-related problems in subjects affected with ocular surface disease. Low rates of topical and systemic adverse reactions, strong ocular hypotensive efficacy, and once-a-day dosing make travoprost a first-line treatment for patients affected with elevated IOP.

  16. Reliability of a test measuring transversus abdominis muscle recruitment with a pressure biofeedback unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Garnier, Katharina; Köveker, Kirstin; Rackwitz, Berid; Kober, Ulrike; Wilke, Sabine; Ewert, Thomas; Stucki, Gerold

    2009-03-01

    There are indications that segmental stabilising exercises (SSEs) are effective in the treatment of low back pain. The evaluation of successful training in SSE performance in patients requires a reliable outcome measure. The PRONE test gives an indication of the activity of the transversus abdominis muscle. Performed in prone lying using a pressure biofeedback unit, it has been used as an aid to training and to assess the subject's ability to perform SSEs correctly. To evaluate inter-observer and test-retest reliability of the PRONE test. Repeated measures by three observers on 2 days. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Germany. Forty nurses (39 females and one male), aged between 24 and 62 years, with at least one episode of low back pain. During the test, movement of the abdominal wall was monitored by measuring a change in pressure during muscle contraction termed 'abdominal hollowing'. Defined observation and palpation criteria were verified by the observers to ensure correct execution of the test. Participants were tested on two separate days. On the first day, Observer A performed two similar test sets, each with four exercises. On the second test day, Observers B and C conducted one test set each. This study found an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 0.67] for inter-observer reliability, and an ICC of 0.81 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.90) for test-retest reliability. Kappa values and the limits of agreement were also calculated with similar results. For this subject group, the PRONE test had relatively low inter-observer reliability but, as may be expected, higher test-retest reliability. It is suggested that by providing visual feedback, the PRONE test may enhance patients' insight into their deep abdominal muscle recruitment and thereby increase their motivation to exercise.

  17. Digital System Reliability Test for the Evaluation of safety Critical Software of Digital Reactor Protection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Kook Shin

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A new Digital Reactor Protection System (DRPS based on VME bus Single Board Computer has been developed by KOPEC to prevent software Common Mode Failure(CMF inside digital system. The new DRPS has been proved to be an effective digital safety system to prevent CMF by Defense-in-Depth and Diversity (DID&D analysis. However, for practical use in Nuclear Power Plants, the performance test and the reliability test are essential for the digital system qualification. In this study, a single channel of DRPS prototype has been manufactured for the evaluation of DRPS capabilities. The integrated functional tests are performed and the system reliability is analyzed and tested. The results of reliability test show that the application software of DRPS has a very high reliability compared with the analog reactor protection systems.

  18. The need to optimize inservice testing and inspection to enhance safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    Welcome to the Fourth U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (USNRC/ASME) Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing in Nuclear Power Plants. This symposium provides a forum to exchange information on technical and regulatory issues associated with the testing of valves and pumps used in nuclear power plants. Progress made since the last symposium will be discussed along with various methods for in service testing of valves and pumps. Active participation by industry representatives, regulators and consultants will entail discussion of a broad array of ideas and points of view regarding how to improve the in service testing of valves and pumps at nuclear power plants. One of the challenges faced is the need to optimize the in service testing and inspection to enhance safety, operability and reliability. The author addresses this challenge from an ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards point of view.

  19. Venus Pressure Chamber: A Small Testing Facility Available to the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Natasha M.; Wegel, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    Venus is an inhospitable planet where the surface mean. temperature is approximately 740K and the global mean pressure is approximately 95 bars. The atmosphere is comprised mostly of CO2 (approximately 96.5%) and N2 (approximately3.5%) with trace amounts of CO and other reactive gases. Although Venus is very similar in size and mass with the Earth and is Earth's nearest planetary neighbor, it has not received many visitors from Earth, especially those that can land on the surface. The challenge most often cited for this scarcity of surface probes is the workability/survivability of instruments and equipment in Venus' harsh environment. In order to overcome this obstacle, a small pressure chamber has been acquired for use by the scientific community. It is housed at Goddard Space. Flight Center in Maryland and is available to the community for testing of small flight components, instruments and short-term experiments that require high temperatures and pressures.

  20. Computer Administered Safety Planning for Individuals at Risk for Suicide: Development and Usability Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Edwin D; Brown, Gregory K; Stanley, Barbara; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Camargo, Carlos A; Miller, Ivan W

    2017-05-15

    Safety planning is a brief intervention that has become an accepted practice in many clinical settings to help prevent suicide. Even though it is quick compared to other approaches, it frequently requires 20 min or more to complete, which can impede adoption. A self-administered, Web-based safety planning application could potentially reduce clinician time, help promote standardization and quality, and provide enhanced ability to share the created plan. The aim of this study was to design, build, and test the usability of a Web-based, self-administered safety planning application. We employed a user-centered software design strategy led by a multidisciplinary team. The application was tested for usability with a target sample of suicidal patients. Detailed observations, structured usability ratings, and Think Aloud procedures were used. Suicidal ideation intensity and perceived ability to cope were assessed pre-post engagement with the Web application. A total of 30 participants were enrolled. Usability ratings were generally strong, and all patients successfully built a safety plan. However, the completeness of the safety plan varied. The mean number of steps completed was 5.5 (SD 0.9) out of 6, with 90% (27/30) of participants completing at least 5 steps and 67% (20/30) completing all 6 steps. Some safety planning steps were viewed as inapplicable to some individuals. Some confusion in instructions led to modifications to improve understandability of each step. Ratings of suicide intensity after completion of the application were significantly lower than preratings, pre: mean 5.11 (SD 2.9) versus post: mean 4.46 (SD 3.0), t27=2.49, P=.02. Ratings of ability to cope with suicidal thoughts after completion of the application were higher than preratings, with the difference approaching statistical significance, pre: mean 5.93 (SD 2.9), post: mean 6.64 (SD 2.4), t27=-2.03, P=.05. We have taken the first step toward identifying the components needed to maximize

  1. Food Safety Practices Assessment Tool: An Innovative Way to Test Food Safety Skills among Individuals with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Elena T.; Scarpati, Stanley E.; Pivarnik, Lori F.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an innovative assessment tool designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a food safety skills curriculum for learners receiving special education services. As schools respond to the increased demand for training students with special needs about food safety, the need for effective curricula and tools is also increasing. A…

  2. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Proficiency Testing on Small-Scale Safety and Thermal Testing of Improvised Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John; Sandstrom, Mary; Brown, Geoffrey; Warner, Kirstin; Phillips, Jason; Shelley, Timothy; Reyes, Jose; Hsu, Peter

    2013-06-01

    One of the first steps in establishing safe handling procedures for explosives is small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing. To better understand the response of improvised materials or HMEs to SSST testing, 18 HME materials were compared to 3 standard military explosives in a proficiency-type round robin study among five laboratories--2 DoD and 3 DOE--sponsored by DHS. The testing matrix has been designed to address problems encountered with improvised materials--powder mixtures, liquid suspensions, partially wetted solids, immiscible liquids, and reactive materials. Over 30 issues have been identified that indicate standard test methods may require modification when applied to HMEs to derive accurate sensitivity assessments needed for development safe handling and storage practices. This presentation will discuss experimental difficulties encountered when testing these problematic samples, show inter-laboratory testing results, show some statistical interpretation of the results, and highlight some of the testing issues. Some of the work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-617519 (721812).

  3. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the second volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of failure modes and effects analysis; accident analysis; operational safety requirements; quality assurance program; ES&H management program; environmental, safety, and health systems critical to safety; summary of waste-management program; environmental monitoring program; facility expansion, decontamination, and decommissioning; summary of emergency response plan; summary plan for employee training; summary plan for operating procedures; glossary; and appendices A and B.

  4. Efficacy and safety of valsartan plus hydroclorothiazide for high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvolo, Antonio; Mercurio, Valentina; Fazio, Valeria; Carlomagno, Guido; Russo, Teresa; Affuso, Flora; Fazio, Serafino

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of the combination valsartan plus hydrochlorothiazide (160 mg and 25 mg daily, respectively) in young-middle aged males with high-normal blood pressure (BP) or first-degree arterial hypertension with evidence of target organ damage. METHODS: Twenty males with high-normal BP or first-degree hypertension associated with left ventricular concentric remodeling and/or increased aortic stiffness were enrolled. BP at rest and during exercise, and echocardiographic parameters of the left ventricle (LV), were evaluated at baseline and after 3 mo of treatment. The effects of treatment on aortic stiffness, metabolic parameters, renal and erectile function were also assessed. RESULTS: BP was significantly reduced by treatment both at rest (P < 0.001) and during exercise (P < 0.001), and 85% of patients achieved BP normalization (< 130/85 mmHg). Doppler echocardiography showed a significant reduction of LV mass (P < 0.005). LV hypertrophy was identified in 70% of subjects at baseline and in 5% after 3 mo of treatment. The ratio of early (E) to late (A) trans-mitral diastolic flow velocity increased, (P < 0.05), the relative wall thickness decreased (P < 0.05) and the left ventricular relaxation time shortened (P < 0.005). The left atrial diameter (P < 0.05) and the aortic diameter (P < 0.05) and stiffness (P < 0.005) also decreased. CONCLUSION: The full-dose combination of valsartan plus hydrochlorothiazide produced optimal BP control with regression of target organ damage, already after 3 mo, without relevant side effects. PMID:21160714

  5. Safety and efficacy of travoprost solution for the treatment of elevated intraocular pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaranta L

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Luciano Quaranta,1,* Ivano Riva,1,* Andreas Katsanos,2 Irene Floriani,3 Marco Centofanti,4,† Anastasios G P Konstas51Centre for the Study of Glaucoma, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy; 2Ophthalmology Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 3Laboratory of Clinical Research, IRCCS, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy; 4DSCMT, University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; 5Glaucoma Unit, 1st University Department of Ophthalmology, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece*These authors contributed equally to this work; †Dr Centofanti passed away on 1 March 2015Abstract: Travoprost is a prostaglandin analogue widely used for reducing intraocular pressure (IOP in patients affected with glaucoma and ocular hypertension. It exerts its ocular hypotensive effect through the prostaglandin FP receptors, located in the ciliary muscle and the trabecular meshwork. Several studies have shown that topical administration of travoprost induces a mean IOP reduction ranging from 25% to 32%, and sustained throughout the 24-hour cycle. When compared with timolol, travoprost is more effective at reducing IOP, while generally no difference has been found in the head-to-head comparison with other prostaglandin analogues. The fixed combination of travoprost and timolol has demonstrated a hypotensive efficacy comparable to the concomitant administration of the two drugs. Recently, a new preservative-free formulation of travoprost 0.004% has been marketed for reducing tolerability-related problems in subjects affected with ocular surface disease. Low rates of topical and systemic adverse reactions, strong ocular hypotensive efficacy, and once-a-day dosing make travoprost a first-line treatment for patients affected with elevated IOP.Keywords: prostaglandin analogue, glaucoma, ocular hypertension

  6. Intracompartmental pressure testing: results of an international survey of current clinical practice, highlighting the need for standardised protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hislop, Matthew; Tierney, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Despite more recent non-invasive modalities generating some credence in the literature, intracompartmental pressure testing is still considered the 'gold standard' for investigating chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS). Intracompartmental pressure testing, when used correctly, has been shown to be accurate and reliable. However, it is a user-dependent investigation, and the manner in which the investigation is conducted plays a large role in the outcome of the test. Despite this, a standard, reproducible protocol for intracompartmental pressure testing has not been described. This results in confusion regarding interpretation of results and reduces the tests' reliability. A summary of the current understanding of CECS is presented, along with the results of a survey of specialists in Australia and New Zealand who perform intracompartmental pressure testing, which confirms that a uniform approach is currently not used in clinical practice. This highlights the need for a consensus and standardised approach to intracompartmental pressure testing.

  7. Diagnostic Value of Electrocardiogram in Predicting Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Ali; Ebdali, Reyhaneh Takalloo; Sajjadi, Seyed Sajed; Golnezhad, Reza

    2016-08-01

    It is believed that an exaggerated blood pressure response (EBPR) to exercise stress test is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events. It is also assumed that QT dispersion (QT-d), which was originally proposed to measure the spatial dispersion of ventricular recovery times, may have a relationship to cardiovascular events. The objective of this study was to examine the difference of changes in QT-d, Maxi-QT, Mini-QT, and QT-c (corrected QT interval) of the electrocardiogram in two groups of patients with exaggerated blood pressure responses (EBPR group) and normal responses (control group) to exercise testing. Also, the diagnostic value of each of these criteria in the prediction of EBPR was studied. This cross-sectional study was conducted from May 2015 to February 2016 on patients suspected of coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing exercise testing who had been referred to Ghaem and Imam Reza hospitals in Mashhad (Iran). All patients underwent a treadmill exercise test with the 12-lead ECG, which was optically scanned and digitized for analysis of QT-d, QT max, and QT min. Patients were divided into two groups of normal and EBPR to exercise testing. QT changes of ECG were compared between the two groups, and the diagnostic accuracy of QT variables for prediction of EBPR to exercise testing was studied. A multiple linear regression analysis (MLR), Pearson Chi-qquare, independent samples t-test, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used as statistical methods in IBM SPSS version 19. Sixty patients (55% male) with a mean age of 50.48 ± 10.89 years were studied in two groups of normal (n=30) and exaggerated blood pressure response (n=30) to exercise testing. Maximum QT and QT dispersion were statistically different in individuals' exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise stress test (p exercise testing. Also, a significant difference in maxi-QT and QT-d was observed between two groups of patients with normal and EBPR during

  8. Study of the post-derailment safety measures on low-speed derailment tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lirong; Wang, Kaiyun; Lin, Jianhui; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Zaigang; Song, Xinwu; Du, Gaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Prevention of train from derailment is the most important issue for the railway system. Keeping derailed vehicle close to the track centreline is beneficial to minimise the severe consequences associated with derailments. In this paper, the post-derailment safety measures are studied based on low-speed derailment tests. Post-derailment devices can prevent deviation of the train from the rail by catching the rail, and they are mounted under the axle box. Considering the different structures of vehicles, both trailer and motor vehicles are equipped with the safety device and then separately used in low-speed derailment tests. In derailment tests, two kinds of track, namely the CRTS-I slab ballastless track and the CRTS-II bi-block sleeper ballastless track, are adopted to investigate the effect of the track types on the derailment. In addition, the derailment speed and the weight of the derailed vehicle are also taken into account in derailment tests. The test results indicate that the post-derailment movement of the vehicle includes running and bounce. Reducing the derailment speed and increasing the weight of the head of the train are helpful to reduce the possibility for derailments. For the CRTS-I slab ballastless track, the safety device can prevent trailer vehicles from deviating from the track centreline. The gearbox plays an important role in controlling the lateral displacement of motor vehicle after a derailment while the safety device contributes less to keep derailed motor vehicles on the track centreline. The lateral distance between the safety device and rails should be larger than 181.5 mm for protecting the fasteners system. And for the CRTS-II bi-block sleeper ballastless track, it helps to decrease the post-derailment distance due to the longitudinal impacts with sleepers. It can also restrict the lateral movement of derailed vehicle due to the high shoulders. The results suggest that, CRTS-II bi-block sleeper ballastless track should be widely used

  9. Seismic Earth Pressures of Retaining Wall from Large Shaking Table Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwei Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To ascertain seismic response of retaining wall in the Wenchuan earthquake, large shaking table tests are performed and an acceleration record is acted in 3 directions. In the tests, acceleration time history recorded at Wolong station in the Wenchuan earthquake is used to excite the model wall. Results from the tests show that the location of dynamic resultant earth pressure is 0.35–0.49 H from toe of the wall for road shoulder retaining wall on rock foundation, 0.33–0.42 H for embankment retaining wall on rock foundation, and 0.46–0.77 H for road shoulder retaining wall on soil foundation. Besides, dynamic earth pressure increases with the increase of ground shaking from 0.1 g to 0.9 g and the relationship is nonlinear. The distribution is closed to for PGA less than 0.4 g but larger for PGA larger than and equal to 0.4 g, especially on the soil foundation. After the comparison of measured earth pressures and theoretical results by pseudodynamic method and pseudostatic method, results of the former are consistent with those of the shaking table test, but results of the latter method are smaller than measured.

  10. Development of an Arm Phantom for Testing Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Jackson, LaTecia D.

    Approximately one in every three adults age 20 older are diagnosed with high blood pressure or hypertension. It is estimated that hypertension affects 78 million people in the United States, is equally prevalent in both men and woman (Crabtree, Stuart-Shor, & McAllister, 2013). In the United States, around 78% of people suffering from hypertension are aware of their condition, with only 68% using hypertensive medications to control their blood pressure (Writing Group et al., 2010). Clinically, blood pressure measurements may lack accuracy, which can be attributed to various factors, including device limitations, cuff mis-sizing and misplacement, white-coat effect, masked hypertension, and lifestyle factors. The development of an arm phantom to simulate physiologic properties of a human arm and arterial BP waveforms may allow us to better assess the accuracy of non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitors. The objective of this study are to: (1) Develop an arm phantom to replicate physiological properties of the human arm, and (2) Incorporate the arm phantom into a mock circulatory flow loop to simulate different physiological blood pressure readings on the bench. A tissue mimicking material, styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene (SEBS), a co-block polymer was used to develop the arm phantom for in-vitro testing. To determine the optimal mechanical properties for the arm phantom, individual arm components were isolated and tested. A protocol was developed to evaluate various components for optimal arm phantom development. Mechanical testing was conducted on 10%, 15%, and 20% SEBS gel samples for modulus of elasticity measurements in order to simulate physiological properties of the human arm. As a result of the SEBS polymer being a new material for this application, this investigation will contribute to resolving the limitations that occurred during experimentation. In this study, we demonstrated that although SEBS polymer may be an ideal material to use for simulating

  11. Upper airway collapsibility evaluated by a negative expiratory pressure test in severe obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Romano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the usefulness of measuring upper airway collapsibility with a negative expiratory pressure application as a screening test for severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. INTRODUCTION: OSA is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and it may have serious consequences. Its recognition may have important implications during the perioperative period. Increased upper airway collapsibility is one of the main determinants of OSA, and its evaluation could be useful for identifying this condition. METHODS: Severe OSA and normal subjects (24 in each group were matched by body mass index and referred to our sleep laboratory. The subjects were enrolled in an overnight sleep study, and a diurnal negative expiratory pressure test was performed. Flow drop (DV and expiratory volume were measured in the first 0.2 s (V02 of the negative expiratory pressure test. RESULTS: DV (% and V02 (% values were statistically different between normal and OSA subjects. OSA patients showed a greater decrease in flow than normal subjects. In addition, severely OSA patients exhaled during the first 0.2 s of the negative expiratory pressure application was an average of only 11.2% of the inspired volume compared to 34.2% for the normal subjects. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristics showed that V02 (% and DV (% could accurately identify severe OSA in subjects with sensitivities of 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively, and specificities of 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: V02 (% and DV (% are highly accurate parameters for detecting severe OSA. The pharyngeal collapsibility measurement, which uses negative expiratory pressure during wakefulness, is predictive of collapsibility during sleep.

  12. Initial development and testing of a novel foam-based pressure sensor for wearable sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyth Barry

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper provides an overview of initial research conducted in the development of pressure-sensitive foam and its application in wearable sensing. The foam sensor is composed of polypyrrole-coated polyurethane foam, which exhibits a piezo-resistive reaction when exposed to electrical current. The use of this polymer-coated foam is attractive for wearable sensing due to the sensor's retention of desirable mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by textile structures. Methods The development of the foam sensor is described, as well as the development of a prototype sensing garment with sensors in several areas on the torso to measure breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Sensor properties were characterized, and data from pilot tests was examined visually. Results The foam exhibits a positive linear conductance response to increased pressure. Torso tests show that it responds in a predictable and measurable manner to breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Conclusion The polypyrrole foam shows considerable promise as a sensor for medical, wearable, and ubiquitous computing applications. Further investigation of the foam's consistency of response, durability over time, and specificity of response is necessary.

  13. Using plastic instability to validate and test the strength law of a material under pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolis Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In dynamical experiments (pressures higher than 10 GPa, strain rate around 104–106 s−1, metals are classically described using an equation of state and a strength law which is usually set using data from compression or traction tests at low pressure (few MPa and low strain rates (less than 103 s−1. In consequence, it needs to be extrapolated during dynamical experiments. Classical shock experiments do not allow a fine validation of the stress law due to the interaction with the equation of state. To achieve this aim, we propose to use a dedicated experiment. We started from the works of Barnes et al. (1974 and 1980 where plastic instabilities initiated by a sinusoidal perturbation at the surface of the metal develop with the pressure. We adapted this principle to a new shape of initial perturbation and realized several experiments. We will present the setup and its use on a simple material: gold. We will detail how the interpretation of the experiments, coupled with previous characterization experiments helps us to test the strength lax of this material at high pressure and high strain rate.

  14. PIE on Safety-Tested Loose Particles from Irradiated Compact 4-4-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Morris, Robert Noel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Fred C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed in support of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel development and qualification for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). This work is sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) through the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Office under the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program. The AGR-1 experiment was the first in a series of TRISO fuel irradiation tests initiated in 2006. The AGR-1 TRISO particles and fuel compacts were fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2006 using laboratory-scale equipment and irradiated for 3 years in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate and evaluate fuel performance under HTGR irradiation conditions. Post-irradiation examination was performed at INL and ORNL to study how the fuel behaved during irradiation, and to test fuel performance during exposure to elevated temperatures at or above temperatures that could occur during a depressurized conduction cooldown event. This report summarizes safety testing and post-safety testing PIE conducted at ORNL on loose particles extracted from irradiated AGR-1 Compact 4-4-2.

  15. Environmental assessment of general-purpose heat source safety verification testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared to identify and evaluate potential environmental, safety, and health impacts associated with the Proposed Action to test General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) assemblies at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) 10,000-Foot Sled Track Facility, Albuquerque, New Mexico. RTGs are used to provide a reliable source of electrical power on board some spacecraft when solar power is inadequate during long duration space missions. These units are designed to convert heat from the natural decay of radioisotope fuel into electrical power. Impact test data are required to support DOE`s mission to provide radioisotope power systems to NASA and other user agencies. The proposed tests will expand the available safety database regarding RTG performance under postulated accident conditions. Direct observations and measurements of GPHS/RTG performance upon impact with hard, unyielding surfaces are required to verify model predictions and to ensure the continual evolution of the RTG designs that perform safely under varied accident environments. The Proposed Action is to conduct impact testing of RTG sections containing GPHS modules with simulated fuel. End-On and Side-On impact test series are planned.

  16. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Chrisensen, Cad L.

    2016-11-01

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test had two

  17. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Hot-Fire Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Hot-fire test demonstrations were successfully conducted using a cold helium pressurization system fully integrated into a liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion system (Figure 1). Cold helium pressurant storage at near liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures (-275 F and colder) and used as a heated tank pressurant provides a substantial density advantage compared to ambient temperature storage. The increased storage density reduces helium pressurant tank size and mass, creating payload increases of 35% for small lunar-lander sized applications. This degree of mass reduction also enables pressure-fed propulsion systems for human-rated Mars ascent vehicle designs. Hot-fire test results from the highly-instrumented test bed will be used to demonstrate system performance and validate integrated models of the helium and propulsion systems. A pressurization performance metric will also be developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes.

  18. Validation of a wind tunnel testing facility for blade surface pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P.; Antoniou, I.; Soerensen, N.N.; Madsen, H.A.

    1998-04-01

    This report concerns development and validation of a 2d testing facility for airfoil pressure measurements. The VELUX open jet wind tunnel was used with a test stand inserted. Reynolds numbers until 1.3 million were achieved with an airfoil chord of 0.45 m. The aerodynamic load coefficients were found from pressure distribution measurements and the total drag coefficient was calculated from wake rake measurements. Stationary inflow as well as dynamic inflow through pitching motion was possible. Wind tunnel corrections were applied for streamline curvature and down-wash. Even though the wind tunnel is not ideal for 2d testing, the overall quality of the flow was acceptable with a uniform flow field at the test stand position and a turbulence intensity of 1 % at the inlet of the test section. Reference values for free stream static and total pressure were found upstream of the test stand. The NACA 63-215 airfoil was tested and the results were compared with measurements from FFA and NACA. The measurements agreed well except for lift coefficient values at high angles of attack and the drag coefficient values at low angles of attack, that were slightly high. Comparisons of the measured results with numerical predictions from the XFOIL code and the EllipSys2D code showed good agreement. Measurements with the airfoil in pitching motion were carried out to study the dynamic aerodynamic coefficients. Steady inflow measurements at high angles of attack were used to investigate the double stall phenomenon. (au) EFP-94; EFP-95; EFP-97. 8 tabs., 82 ills., 16 refs.

  19. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  20. A Step Towards Electric Propulsion Testing Standards: Pressure Measurements and Effective Pumping Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Swiatek, Michael W.; Yim, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The electric propulsion community has been implored to establish and implement a set of universally applicable test standards during the research, development, and qualification of electric propulsion systems. Existing practices are fallible and result in testing variations which leads to suspicious results, large margins in application, or aversion to mission infusion. Performance measurements and life testing under appropriate conditions can be costly and lengthy. Measurement practices must be consistent, accurate, and repeatable. Additionally, the measurements must be universally transportable across facilities throughout the development, qualification, spacecraft integration and on-orbit performance. A preliminary step to progress towards universally applicable testing standards is outlined for facility pressure measurements and effective pumping speed calculations. The standard has been applied to multiple facilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Test results and analyses of universality of measurements are presented herein.

  1. US Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The assessment, which was conducted from July 20 through August 4, 1992, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and progress of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices; the DOE Nevada Field Office (NV); and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. This report presents a summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management.

  2. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) plutonium recycle test reactor graphite cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, T.

    1997-09-29

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) provides the evaluation necessary to demonstrate that the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) Graphite Cask meets the requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for transfer of Type B, fissile, non-highway route controlled quantities of radioactive material within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The scope of this SEP includes risk, shieldling, criticality, and.tiedown analyses to demonstrate that onsite transportation safety requirements are satisfied. This SEP also establishes operational and maintenance guidelines to ensure that transport of the PRTR Graphite Cask is performed safely in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14. This SEP is valid until October 1, 1999. After this date, an update or upgrade to this document is required.

  3. 40 CFR 53.56 - Test for effect of variations in ambient pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... specification given. The candidate sampler must meet all specifications for the associated PM2.5 or PM10−2.5... analog recording device, the accuracy of the entire instrument-recorder system shall be calibrated or... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 or PM10â2.5 § 53.56 Test for effect of variations in ambient pressure. (a...

  4. The influence of the equivalent hydraulic diameter on the pressure drop prediction of annular test section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kayiem, A. H. H.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The flow behaviour and the pressure drop throughout an annular flow test section was investigated in order to evaluate and justify the reliability of experimental flow loop for wax deposition studies. The specific objective of the present paper is to assess and highlight the influence of the equivalent diameter method on the analysis of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the flow and the pressure drop throughout the annular test section. The test section has annular shape of 3 m length with three flow passages, namely; outer thermal control jacket, oil annular flow and inner pipe flow of a coolant. The oil annular flow has internal and external diameters of 0.0422 m and 0.0801 m, respectively. Oil was re-circulated in the annular passage while a cold water-glycol mixture was re-circulated in the inner pipe counter currently to the oil flow. The experiments were carried out at oil Reynolds number range of 2000 to 17000, covering laminar, transition and turbulent flow regimes. Four different methods of equivalent diameter of the annulus have been considered in this hydraulic analysis. The correction factor model for frictional pressure drop was also considered in the investigations. All methods addressed the high deviation of the prediction from the experimental data, which justified the need of a suitable pressure prediction correlation for the annular test section. The conventional hydraulic diameter method is a convenient substitute for characterizing physical dimension of a non-circular duct, and it leads to fairly good correlation between turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer characteristic of annular ducts.

  5. Supporting documents for LLL area 27 (410 area) safety analysis reports, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odell, B. N. [comp.

    1977-02-01

    The following appendices are common to the LLL Safety Analysis Reports Nevada Test Site and are included here as supporting documents to those reports: Environmental Monitoring Report for the Nevada Test Site and Other Test Areas Used for Underground Nuclear Detonations, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, Rept. EMSL-LV-539-4 (1976); Selected Census Information Around the Nevada Test Site, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, Rept. NERC-LV-539-8 (1973); W. J. Hannon and H. L. McKague, An Examination of the Geology and Seismology Associated with Area 410 at the Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, Rept. UCRL-51830 (1975); K. R. Peterson, Diffusion Climatology for Hypothetical Accidents in Area 410 of the Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, Rept. UCRL-52074 (1976); J. R. McDonald, J. E. Minor, and K. C. Mehta, Development of a Design Basis Tornado and Structural Design Criteria for the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, Rept. UCRL-13668 (1975); A. E. Stevenson, Impact Tests of Wind-Borne Wooden Missiles, Sandia Laboratories, Tonopah, Rept. SAND 76-0407 (1976); and Hydrology of the 410 Area (Area 27) at the Nevada Test Site.

  6. BAYESIAN CALIBRATION OF SAFETY CODES USING DATA FROM SEPARATE-AND INTEGRAL EFFECTS TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurko, Joseph P.; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Youngblood, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale system codes for simulation of safety performance of nuclear plants may contain parameters whose values are not known very accurately. In order to be able to use the results of these simulation codes with confidence, it is important to learn how the uncertainty on the values of these parameters affects the output of the codes. New information from tests or operating experience is incorporated into safety codes by a process known as calibration, which reduces uncertainty in the output of the safety code, and thereby improves its support for decision-making. Modern analysis capabilities afford very significant improvements on classical ways of doing calibration, and the work reported here implements some of those improvements. The key innovation has come from development of safety code surrogate model (code emulator) construction and prediction algorithms. A surrogate is needed for calibration of plant-scale simulation codes because the multivariate nature of the problem (i.e., the need to adjust multiple uncertain parameters at once to fit multiple pieces of new information) calls for multiple evaluations of performance, which, for a computation-intensive model, makes calibration very computation-intensive. Use of a fast surrogate makes the calibration processes used here with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling feasible. Moreover, most traditional surrogates do not provide uncertainty information along with their predictions, but the Gaussian Process (GP) based code surrogates used here do. This improves the soundness of the code calibration process. Results are demonstrated on a simplified scenario with data from Separate and Integral Effect Tests.

  7. PIE on Safety-Tested AGR-1 Compact 5-1-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Morris, Robert Noel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Fred C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed in support of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel development and qualification for High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). AGR-1 was the first in a series of TRISO fuel irradiation experiments initiated in 2006 under the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program; this work continues to be funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) initiative. AGR-1 fuel compacts were fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2006 and irradiated for three years in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to demonstrate and evaluate fuel performance under HTGR irradiation conditions. PIE is being performed at INL and ORNL to study how the fuel behaved during irradiation, and to examine fuel performance during exposure to elevated temperatures at or above temperatures that could occur during a depressurized conduction cooldown event. This report summarizes safety testing of irradiated AGR-1 Compact 5-1-1 in the ORNL Core Conduction Cooldown Test Facility (CCCTF) and post-safety testing PIE.

  8. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  9. Safety assessment characteristics of pedestrian legform impactors in vehicle-front impact tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of safety assessment results of front-area vehicle impact tests carried out using the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) legform impactor and a flexible legform impactor (FLEX legform impactor). Different types of vehicles (sedan, sport utility vehicle, high-roof K-car, and light cargo van) were examined. The impact locations in the study were the center of the bumper and an extremely stiff structure of the bumper (i.e., in front of the side member) of each tested vehicle. The measured injury criteria were normalized by injury assessment reference values of each legform impactor. The test results for center and side-member impacts indicated that there were no significant differences in ligament injury assessments derived from the normalized knee ligament injury measures between the TRL legform impactor and the FLEX legform impactor. Evaluations made using the TRL legform impactor and the FLEX legform impactor are thus similar in the vehicle safety investigation for knee ligament injury. Vehicle-center impact test results revealed that the tibia fracture assessments derived from the normalized tibia fracture measures did not significantly differ between the TRL legform impactor and the FLEX legform impactor. However, for an impact against an extremely stiff structure, there was a difference in the tibia fracture assessment between the FLEX legform impactor and the TRL legform impactor owing to their different sensor types. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Testing Chemical Safety: What Is Needed to Ensure the Widespread Application of Non-animal Approaches?

    OpenAIRE

    Natalie Burden; Fiona Sewell; Kathryn Chapman

    2015-01-01

    Scientists face growing pressure to move away from using traditional animal toxicity tests to determine whether manufactured chemicals are safe. Numerous ethical, scientific, business, and legislative incentives will help to drive this shift. However, a number of hurdles must be overcome in the coming years before non-animal methods are adopted into widespread practice, particularly from regulatory, scientific, and global perspectives. Several initiatives are nevertheless underway that promis...

  11. Implementation of Alternative Test Strategies for the Safety Assessment of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology introduces a new field that requires novel approaches and methods for hazard and risk assessment. For an appropriate scientific platform for safety assessment, nanoscale properties and functions of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), including how the physicochemical properties of the materials related to mechanisms of injury at the nano-bio interface, must be considered. Moreover, this rapidly advancing new field requires novel test strategies that allow multiple toxicants to be screened in robust, mechanism-based assays in which the bulk of the investigation can be carried out at the cellular and biomolecular level whilst maintaining limited animal use and is based on the contribution of toxicological pathways to the pathophysiology of disease. First, a predictive toxicological approach for the safety assessment of ENMs will be discussed against the background of a ‘21st-century vision’ for using alternative test strategies (ATSs) to perform toxicological assessment of large numbers of untested chemicals, thereby reducing a backlog that could otherwise become a problem for nanotechnology. An ATS is defined here as an alternative/reduction alternative to traditional animal testing. Secondly, the approach of selecting pathways of toxicity to screen for the pulmonary hazard potential of carbon nanotubes and metal oxides will be discussed, as well as how to use these pathways to perform high-content or high-throughput testing and how the data can be used for hazard ranking, risk assessment, regulatory decision-making and ‘safer-by-design’ strategies. Finally, the utility and disadvantages of this predictive toxicological approach to ENM safety assessment, and how it can assist the 21st- century vision, will be addressed PMID:23879741

  12. Implementation of alternative test strategies for the safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, A E

    2013-12-01

    Nanotechnology introduces a new field that requires novel approaches and methods for hazard and risk assessment. For an appropriate scientific platform for safety assessment, nanoscale properties and functions of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), including how the physicochemical properties of the materials relate to mechanisms of injury at the nano-bio interface, must be considered. Moreover, this rapidly advancing new field requires novel test strategies that allow multiple toxicants to be screened in robust, mechanism-based assays in which the bulk of the investigation can be carried out at the cellular and biomolecular level whilst maintaining limited animal use and is based on the contribution of toxicological pathways to the pathophysiology of disease. First, a predictive toxicological approach for the safety assessment of ENMs will be discussed against the background of a '21st-century vision' for using alternative test strategies (ATSs) to perform toxicological assessment of large numbers of untested chemicals, thereby reducing a backlog that could otherwise become a problem for nanotechnology. An ATS is defined here as an alternative to animal experiments or refinement/reduction alternative to traditional animal testing. Secondly, the approach of selecting pathways of toxicity to screen for the pulmonary hazard potential of carbon nanotubes and metal oxides will be discussed, as well as how to use these pathways to perform high-content or high-throughput testing and how the data can be used for hazard ranking, risk assessment, regulatory decision-making and 'safer-by-design' strategies. Finally, the utility and disadvantages of this predictive toxicological approach to ENM safety assessment, and how it can assist the 21st-century vision, will be addressed. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  13. Fluctuating Pressure Analysis of a 2-D SSME Nozzle Air Flow Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darren; Hidalgo, Homero

    1996-01-01

    To better understand the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) startup/shutdown tansients, an airflow test of a two dimensional nozzle was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center's trisonic wind tunnel. Photographic and other instrumentation show during an SSME start large nozzle shell distortions occur as the Mach disk is passing through the nozzle. During earlier develop of the SSME, this startup transient resulted in low cycle fatigue failure of one of the LH2 feedlines. The two dimensional SSME nozzle test was designed to measure the static and fluctuating pressure environment and color Schlieren video during the startup and shutdown phases of the run profile.

  14. Hydrostatic pressure testing of graphite/epoxy cylinder C6-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, H.W.; Starbuck, J.M.

    1992-07-01

    This report details the design, fabrication, and testing of IM6 graphite cylinder C6-1, which achieved a record pressure in hydrotest without failure. Included are the details of the cylinder construction, the design calculations for stress and buckling, and the cylinder failure predictions. Also provided are the design details of the metal end closures including the design calculations for the linear tapered end plugs. Finally, the test data and observations from the hydrotest are summarized. This work is performed under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. The project is funded by the Director as a three-year project.

  15. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  16. Analyzing the Use of Gaseous Helium as a Pressurant with Cryogenic Propellants with Thermodynamic Venting System Modelling and Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Vermilion, D. J.; Tucker, S. P.

    2008-03-01

    Cryogens are viable candidate propellants for NASA's Lunar and Mars exploration programs. To provide adequate mass flow to the system's engines and/or prevent feed system cavitation, gaseous helium (GHe) is frequently considered as a pressurant. A Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) is designed to maintain tank pressure during low gravity operations without propellant resettling. Tests were conducted in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the effects of GHe pressurant on pressure control performance of a TVS with liquid hydrogen (LH2) and nitrogen (LN2) test liquids. The TVS used comprises a recirculation pump, a Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. A small amount of liquid extracted from the tank recirculation line was passed through the J-T valve and then through the heat exchanger, extracting thermal energy from the bulk liquid and ullage and thereby enabling pressure control. The LH2/GHe tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and LN2/GHe tests were conducted at fill levels of 50% and 25%. Moreover, each test was conducted with a specified tank ullage pressure control band. A one-dimensional TVS performance program was used to analyze and correlate the test data. Predictions were compared with test data of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature.

  17. Development and Testing of a Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist for EFNEP and FSNE Adult Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Traliece; Serrano, Elena L.; Cox, Ruby H.; Lambur, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop and assess reliability and validity of the Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist to measure nutrition, food safety, and physical activity practices among adult Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and Food Stamp Nutrition Education program (FSNE) participants. Methods: Test-retest…

  18. 77 FR 50720 - Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants... Nuclear Power Plants.'' The DG-1207 is proposed Revision 1 of RG 1.170, dated September 1997. This... for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants'' is temporarily...

  19. Influence of headspace pressure on methane production in Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, David; Montes, Jesús A; Rico, José Luis; Rico, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The biochemical methane potential test is the most commonly applied method to determine methane production from organic wastes. One of the parameters measured is the volume of biogas produced which can be determined manometrically by keeping the volume constant and measuring increases in pressure. In the present study, the effect of pressure accumulation in the headspace of the reactors has been studied. Triplicate batch trials employing cocoa shell, waste coffee grounds and dairy manure as substrates have been performed under two headspace pressure conditions. The results obtained in the study showed that headspace overpressures higher than 600mbar affected methane production for waste coffee grounds. On the contrary, headspace overpressures within a range of 600-1000mbar did not affect methane production for cocoa shell and dairy manure. With the analyses performed in the present work it has not been possible to determine the reasons for the lower methane yield value obtained for the waste coffee grounds under high headspace pressures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A pressurized He II cryogenic system for the superconducting magnet test facility at KEK

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, N; Iida, M; Tanaka, K; Tsuchiya, K; Ajima, Y; Higashi, N; Nakamoto, T; Nakamoto, K; Ohuchi, N; Ogitsu, T; Shintomi, T; Sugawara, S; Takahashi, N; Terashima, A; Wachi, Y; Yamamoto, A

    2002-01-01

    A cryogenic system for the test facility of high gradient superconducting quadrupole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has been constructed at KEK. It consists of a vertical double-bath cryostat in He II at an atmospheric pressure, a vacuum pumping system and a pair of refrigerator/liquefiers to maximize the cooling capacity to test 6.3 m long magnets. The system has been successfully operated in the first cold test at the 6.3 m prototype magnet since March 2001 with a refrigeration power of 55.5 W at 1.9 K. The design and test results are described in this paper. (6 refs).

  1. Orthostatic blood pressure test for risk stratification in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Münch

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD in young adults, mainly ascribed to ventricular tachycardia (VT. Assuming that VT is the major cause of (pre- syncope in HCM patients, its occurrence is essential for SCD risk stratification and primarily preventive ICD-implantation. However, evidence of VT during syncope is often missing. As the differentiation of potential lethal causes for syncope such as VT from more harmless reasons is crucial, HCM patients were screened for orthostatic dysregulation by using a simple orthostatic blood pressure test.Over 15 months (IQR [9;20] 100 HCM patients (55.8±16.2 yrs, 61% male were evaluated for (pre-syncope and VT (24h-ECGs, device-memories within the last five years. Eighty patients underwent an orthostatic blood pressure test. Logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis.In older patients (>40 yrs a positive orthostatic test result increased the chance of (pre- syncope by a factor of 63 (95%-CI [8.8; 447.9], p<0.001; 93% sensitivity, 95%-CI [76; 99]; 74% specificity, 95%-CI [58; 86]. No correlation with VT was shown. A prolonged QTc interval also increased the chance of (pre- syncope by a factor of 6.6 (95%-CI [2.0; 21.7]; p=0.002.The orthostatic blood pressure test is highly valuable for evaluation of syncope and presyncope especially in older HCM patients, suggesting that orthostatic syncope might be more relevant than previously assumed. Considering the high complication rates due to ICD therapies, this test may provide useful information for the evaluation of syncope in individual risk stratification and may help to prevent unnecessary device implantations, especially in older HCM patients.

  2. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryskamp, J.M. [ed.; Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG&G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options.

  3. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryskamp, J.M. (ed.); Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options.

  4. A multi-stakeholder perspective on the use of alternative test strategies for nanomaterial safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Andre E; Nasser, Elina; Godwin, Hilary; Avery, David; Bahadori, Tina; Bergeson, Lynn; Beryt, Elizabeth; Bonner, James C; Boverhof, Darrell; Carter, Janet; Castranova, Vince; Deshazo, J R; Hussain, Saber M; Kane, Agnes B; Klaessig, Frederick; Kuempel, Eileen; Lafranconi, Mark; Landsiedel, Robert; Malloy, Timothy; Miller, Mary Beth; Morris, Jeffery; Moss, Kenneth; Oberdorster, Gunter; Pinkerton, Kent; Pleus, Richard C; Shatkin, Jo Anne; Thomas, Russell; Tolaymat, Thabet; Wang, Amy; Wong, Jeffrey

    2013-08-27

    There has been a conceptual shift in toxicological studies from describing what happens to explaining how the adverse outcome occurs, thereby enabling a deeper and improved understanding of how biomolecular and mechanistic profiling can inform hazard identification and improve risk assessment. Compared to traditional toxicology methods, which have a heavy reliance on animals, new approaches to generate toxicological data are becoming available for the safety assessment of chemicals, including high-throughput and high-content screening (HTS, HCS). With the emergence of nanotechnology, the exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in research, development, and commercialization requires a robust scientific approach to screen ENM safety in humans and the environment rapidly and efficiently. Spurred by the developments in chemical testing, a promising new toxicological paradigm for ENMs is to use alternative test strategies (ATS), which reduce reliance on animal testing through the use of in vitro and in silico methods such as HTS, HCS, and computational modeling. Furthermore, this allows for the comparative analysis of large numbers of ENMs simultaneously and for hazard assessment at various stages of the product development process and overall life cycle. Using carbon nanotubes as a case study, a workshop bringing together national and international leaders from government, industry, and academia was convened at the University of California, Los Angeles, to discuss the utility of ATS for decision-making analyses of ENMs. After lively discussions, a short list of generally shared viewpoints on this topic was generated, including a general view that ATS approaches for ENMs can significantly benefit chemical safety analysis.

  5. InstantLabs Listeria species food safety kit. Performance tested methods 041304.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neil; Bambusch, Lauren; Le, Thu; Morey, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The InstantLabs Listeria Species Food SafetyKitwas validated against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) reference method 11290-1 for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. The matrixes (stainless steel, sealed concrete, cheddar cheese, raw shrimp, and hot dogs) were inoculated with approximately 1 CFU/test portion of various Listeria species to generate fractional positives (5-15) in 20 inoculated samples. Enrichments were also fractionally inoculated with L. monocytogenes for side-by-side testing of the InstantLabs Listeria monocytogenes Food Safety Kit. Stainless steel and sealed concrete samples were validated using 4 x 4" and 1 x 1" test areas, respectively, and enriched in Buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth (BLEB) at 35 +/- 1 degrees C for 22-28 h. All food samples were tested at 25 g or 25 mL and enriched in BLEB at 35 +/- 1 degrees C for 24-28 h. All samples were confirmed using the ISO reference method, regardless of initial screen result. The InstantLabs test method performed as well as or better than the reference method for the detection of Listeria species on stainless steel, sealed concrete, cheddar cheese, raw shrimp, and hot dogs. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 80 Listeria species and 30 non-Listeria species examined. The method was shown to be robust when variations were introduced to the enrichment time, the volume for DNA extraction, and the heat block time (data not shown).

  6. InstantLabs Listeria monocytogenes food safety kit. Performance tested method 051304.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neil; Bambusch, Lauren; Le, Thu; Morey, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The InstantLabs Listeria monocytogenes Food Safety Kit was validated against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) reference method 11290-1 for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. The matrixes (stainless steel, sealed concrete, ice cream, whole milk, cheddar cheese, raw shrimp, hot dogs, deli turkey, and lettuce) were inoculated with approximately 1 CFU/test portion of L. monocytogenes to generate fractional positives (5-15) in 20 inoculated samples. Enrichments were also fractionally inoculated with L. grayii for side-by-side testing of the Listeria Species Food Safety Kit. Stainless steel and sealed concrete samples were validated using 4 x 4" and 1 x 1 " test areas, respectively, and enriched in Buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth (BLEB) at 35 +/- 1degreesC for 22-28 h. All food samples were tested at 25 g and enriched in BLEB at 35 +/- 1 degreesC for 24-28 h. All samples were confirmed using the ISO reference method, regardless of initial screen result. The InstantLabs test method performed as well as or better than the reference method for the detection of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel and sealed concrete and in ice cream, whole milk, cheddar cheese, raw shrimp, hot dogs, deli turkey, and lettuce. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 50 L. monocytogenes serovars and 30 non-L. monocytogenes species examined. The method was shown to be robust when the enrichment times, volumes for DNA extraction, and heat block times were varied.

  7. Efficacy and safety of various active irrigation devices when used with either positive or negative pressure: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malentacca, Augusto; Uccioli, Umberto; Zangari, Dario; Lajolo, Carlo; Fabiani, Cristiano

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of different devices available for canal cleansing. The following systems were tested: passive ultrasonic irrigation, EndoVac (Discus Dental, Culver City, CA), and the irrigation ultrasonic needle (ProUltra PiezoFlow Irrigation Ultrasonic Needle; Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) used in both the injection mode (IUNI) and the aspiration mode (IUNA). In the control group, traditional irrigation with a syringe and side-vented needle was used. A resin model was used with 4 lateral canals (respectively at 2, 5, 8, and 11 mm from the apical foramen) filled with bovine pulp stained with fuchsin. The model also included a 2-mm chamber in communication with the apex, again filled with bovine pulp, which enabled the measurement of the extrusion of NaOCl beyond the apex. With regard to efficacy, the most effective systems were found to be those using the ultrasonic needle, either in aspiration or injection modes; EndoVac was the least effective. Conversely, IUNI was found to bring the highest risk with regard to the extrusion of sodium hypochlorite beyond the apex. EndoVac was the safest but only by a slight margin compared with IUNA and passive ultrasonic irrigation. Based on this study, the system that best reconciles efficacy and safety appears to be IUNA. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fatigue testing structural steel as a factor of safety of technical facilities maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ulewicz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Guarantee of quality and safety exploitation of machines and equipment is a significant factor in the design and manufacture of these components. This paper presents an analysis of fatigue test results of samples in the bending load on the rotation in the range from 104 to 107 ,the number of cycles of applied load, with a frequency of 40 Hz. Whöler curve shows the results of the fatigue properties of steel S355J2 which is used in the construction of vehicles. There was also carried out a fractographic analysis.

  9. Fluor-Hanford 3013 Digital Radiography Dead Zone Mitigation Project Pressure Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, K.

    2003-11-21

    The use of digital radiographic (DR) measurement of lid deflection as an indication of pressurization of the 3013 inner can was first reported by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The conclusions of this report were that for cans with relatively large initial concavity, lid deflection could be used to meet the 3013 standard (DOE-STD-3013-2000) requirement for a nondestructive indication of a pressurization of 100 psig. During acceptance testing of the system in the Spring of 2003, it was confirmed that for some cans the DR measured lid deflection could become insensitive to the change in lid deflection when compared to actual mechanical measurements. The basic explanation of this phenomenon is that characteristics of the lid geometry such as tilt and wobble can obfuscate the bottom of the lid where the deflection is measured. The purpose of this report is to document the results of the pressure testing and the efficacy of the alternate imaging and analysis methods developed to mitigate the dead zone problem. Prior to review of the results, a review of the current method and an introduction to the newly developed methods and techniques is provided.

  10. Safety of nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma for tooth bleaching evaluated in terms of microhardness and mineral content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S. H.; Hong, J. W.; Lee, H. J.; Jeon, Y. C.; Kim, G. C.

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of bleaching with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma and 15% hydrogen peroxide (HP) or 15% carbamide peroxide (CP). Sixty human enamel and dentin slabs were randomly assigned to six groups as follows: Group 1 was a control group and did not receive any treatment; Group 2 was exposed only to plasma, as a negative control; Group 3 was treated with 15% HP; Group 4 was treated with 15% HP plus plasma; Group 5 was treated with 15% CP alone; and Group 6 was treated with 15% CP plus plasma during 30 min bleaching treatments. A microhardness measurement was conducted according to a microhardness tester. The amount of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), chloride (Cl), sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), and zinc (Zn) in the enamel and dentin was quantified with an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The data were analyzed by using the Student’s t test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), complemented by Tukey’s test. The statistical analysis did not show any significant differences in microhardness values and six mineral contents in all groups (p  >  0.05). Therefore, we believe that the application of nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a safe energy source for tooth bleaching.

  11. Safety and Efficacy Assessment of Two New Leprosy Skin Test Antigens: Randomized Double Blind Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoire, Becky L.; Groathouse, Nathan A.; TerLouw, Stephen; Neupane, Kapil Dev; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Khadge, Saraswoti; Kunwar, Chatra B.; Macdonald, Murdo; Hawksworth, Rachel; Thapa, Min B.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Tibbals, Melinda; Smith, Carol; Dube, Tina; She, Dewei; Wolff, Mark; Zhou, Eric; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Mason, Robin; Sizemore, Christine; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Background New tools are required for the diagnosis of pre-symptomatic leprosy towards further reduction of disease burden and its associated reactions. To address this need, two new skin test antigens were developed to assess safety and efficacy in human trials. Methods A Phase I safety trial was first conducted in a non-endemic region for leprosy (U.S.A.). Healthy non-exposed subjects (n = 10) received three titrated doses (2.5 µg, 1.0 µg and 0.1 µg) of MLSA-LAM (n = 5) or MLCwA (n = 5) and control antigens [Rees MLSA (1.0 µg) and saline]. A randomized double blind Phase II safety and efficacy trial followed in an endemic region for leprosy (Nepal), but involved only the 1.0 µg (high dose) and 0.1 µg (low dose) of each antigen; Tuberculin PPD served as a control antigen. This Phase II safety and efficacy trial consisted of three Stages: Stage A and B studies were an expansion of Phase I involving 10 and 90 subjects respectively, and Stage C was then conducted in two parts (high dose and low dose), each enrolling 80 participants: 20 borderline lepromatous/lepromatous (BL/LL) leprosy patients, 20 borderline tuberculoid/tuberculoid (BT/TT) leprosy patients, 20 household contacts of leprosy patients (HC), and 20 tuberculosis (TB) patients. The primary outcome measure for the skin test was delayed type hypersensitivity induration. Findings In the small Phase I safety trial, reactions were primarily against the 2.5 µg dose of both antigens and Rees control antigen, which were then excluded from subsequent studies. In the Phase II, Stage A/B ramped-up safety study, 26% of subjects (13 of 50) showed induration against the high dose of each antigen, and 4% (2 of 50) reacted to the low dose of MLSA-LAM. Phase II, Stage C safety and initial efficacy trial showed that both antigens at the low dose exhibited low sensitivity at 20% and 25% in BT/TT leprosy patients, but high specificity at 100% and 95% compared to TB patients. The high dose of both antigens

  12. Safety and efficacy assessment of two new leprosy skin test antigens: randomized double blind clinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky L Rivoire

    Full Text Available New tools are required for the diagnosis of pre-symptomatic leprosy towards further reduction of disease burden and its associated reactions. To address this need, two new skin test antigens were developed to assess safety and efficacy in human trials.A Phase I safety trial was first conducted in a non-endemic region for leprosy (U.S.A.. Healthy non-exposed subjects (n = 10 received three titrated doses (2.5 µg, 1.0 µg and 0.1 µg of MLSA-LAM (n = 5 or MLCwA (n = 5 and control antigens [Rees MLSA (1.0 µg and saline]. A randomized double blind Phase II safety and efficacy trial followed in an endemic region for leprosy (Nepal, but involved only the 1.0 µg (high dose and 0.1 µg (low dose of each antigen; Tuberculin PPD served as a control antigen. This Phase II safety and efficacy trial consisted of three Stages: Stage A and B studies were an expansion of Phase I involving 10 and 90 subjects respectively, and Stage C was then conducted in two parts (high dose and low dose, each enrolling 80 participants: 20 borderline lepromatous/lepromatous (BL/LL leprosy patients, 20 borderline tuberculoid/tuberculoid (BT/TT leprosy patients, 20 household contacts of leprosy patients (HC, and 20 tuberculosis (TB patients. The primary outcome measure for the skin test was delayed type hypersensitivity induration.In the small Phase I safety trial, reactions were primarily against the 2.5 µg dose of both antigens and Rees control antigen, which were then excluded from subsequent studies. In the Phase II, Stage A/B ramped-up safety study, 26% of subjects (13 of 50 showed induration against the high dose of each antigen, and 4% (2 of 50 reacted to the low dose of MLSA-LAM. Phase II, Stage C safety and initial efficacy trial showed that both antigens at the low dose exhibited low sensitivity at 20% and 25% in BT/TT leprosy patients, but high specificity at 100% and 95% compared to TB patients. The high dose of both antigens showed lower specificity (70% and 60

  13. Safety and efficacy assessment of two new leprosy skin test antigens: randomized double blind clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoire, Becky L; Groathouse, Nathan A; TerLouw, Stephen; Neupane, Kapil Dev; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Khadge, Saraswoti; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Kunwar, Chatra B; Macdonald, Murdo; Hawksworth, Rachel; Thapa, Min B; Hagge, Deanna A; Tibbals, Melinda; Smith, Carol; Dube, Tina; She, Dewei; Wolff, Mark; Zhou, Eric; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Mason, Robin; Sizemore, Christine; Brennan, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    New tools are required for the diagnosis of pre-symptomatic leprosy towards further reduction of disease burden and its associated reactions. To address this need, two new skin test antigens were developed to assess safety and efficacy in human trials. A Phase I safety trial was first conducted in a non-endemic region for leprosy (U.S.A.). Healthy non-exposed subjects (n = 10) received three titrated doses (2.5 µg, 1.0 µg and 0.1 µg) of MLSA-LAM (n = 5) or MLCwA (n = 5) and control antigens [Rees MLSA (1.0 µg) and saline]. A randomized double blind Phase II safety and efficacy trial followed in an endemic region for leprosy (Nepal), but involved only the 1.0 µg (high dose) and 0.1 µg (low dose) of each antigen; Tuberculin PPD served as a control antigen. This Phase II safety and efficacy trial consisted of three Stages: Stage A and B studies were an expansion of Phase I involving 10 and 90 subjects respectively, and Stage C was then conducted in two parts (high dose and low dose), each enrolling 80 participants: 20 borderline lepromatous/lepromatous (BL/LL) leprosy patients, 20 borderline tuberculoid/tuberculoid (BT/TT) leprosy patients, 20 household contacts of leprosy patients (HC), and 20 tuberculosis (TB) patients. The primary outcome measure for the skin test was delayed type hypersensitivity induration. In the small Phase I safety trial, reactions were primarily against the 2.5 µg dose of both antigens and Rees control antigen, which were then excluded from subsequent studies. In the Phase II, Stage A/B ramped-up safety study, 26% of subjects (13 of 50) showed induration against the high dose of each antigen, and 4% (2 of 50) reacted to the low dose of MLSA-LAM. Phase II, Stage C safety and initial efficacy trial showed that both antigens at the low dose exhibited low sensitivity at 20% and 25% in BT/TT leprosy patients, but high specificity at 100% and 95% compared to TB patients. The high dose of both antigens showed lower specificity (70% and 60

  14. SFR Site Investigation. Evaluation of selected interference tests and pressure responses during drilling at SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walger, Ellen; Ludvigson, Jan-Erik; Gentzschein, Bengt (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2010-10-15

    In this activity, evaluation of selected hydraulic interference tests and drilling activities within the SFR area performed during 2008-2010 has been made. During the selected interference tests, pumping (or injection) was carried out in boreholes KFR105, HFR101 (both pumping and injection) and HFR102 during the time period from May, 2008 to March, 2010. Groundwater head measurements were performed in all existing SFR-boreholes at the time of testing during the entire test periods as well as during different drilling periods of boreholes HFR102, KFR27, KFR102A, KFR105, HFR106 and KFR106. The activity involves identification and evaluation of potential pressure responses in all instrumented SFR-boreholes from three interference tests and drilling of six boreholes. A fourth interference test (in HFR102), for which no responses were detected by the preliminary analysis, was also included for more detailed evaluation. For the four interference test, quantitative evaluation of hydraulic parameters and response indices of the responding observation sections was made when possible. Finally, a resulting response matrix was prepared for the interference tests. The drilling responses were classified by diagnostic analysis and response index 1, which is based on the response time lag. The hydraulic diffusivity T/S of the responding observation sections was estimated from the response time lags during drilling. For the drilling responses, a response matrix based on the diagnostic analysis and probable depth of response was prepared as well as a resulting response matrix based on response index 1. The pressure responses in the observation boreholes during the interference tests in KFR105 and HFR101 were generally rather slow and weak and in many cases significantly delayed, both at start and stop of pumping/injection respectively. According to the response analysis, the most distinct and fastest responses were found in borehole sections KFR104:1-2 during the interference

  15. Experimental testing of cooling by low pressure adsorption in a zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redman, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    A small scale facility was designed, constructed, and utilized to test the use of zeolite adsorption of water vapor to augment chill storage in ice for conventional space cooling. The facility uses solar-derived energy, for the heat source and evaporatively chilled water for the heat sump. The product cooling uses sublimation of ice instead of melting. The ZCAT facility utilizes a heat pumping technique in which a water vapor adsorbent functions as the compressor and condenser. The design was based on use of 13X zeolite as the adsorber because of its high adsorbence at low pressures. However, it has been determined that other materials such as silica gel should give superior performance. While zeolite 13X holds more water in the pressure and temperature ranges of interest, silica gel cycles more water and has less residue water. Both points are very important in the design of an efficient and cost effective system.

  16. Thermal-Hydraulic Integral Effect Test with ATLAS for an Intermediate Break Loss of Coolant Accident at a Pressurizer Surge Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Seok Cho; Park, Hyun Sik; Choi, Nam Hyun; Park, Yu Sun; Kim, Jong Rok; Bae, Byoung Uhn; Kim, Yeon Sik; Kim, Kyung Doo; Choi, Ki Yong; Song, Chul Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The main objectives of this test were not only to provide physical insight into the system response of the APR1400 during the pressurizer surge line break accident but also to produce an integral effect test data to validate the SPACE code. In order to simulate a double-ended guillotine break of a pressurizer surge line in the APR1400, the IB-SUR-01R test was performed with ATLAS. The major thermal-hydraulic phenomena such as the system pressures, the collapsed water levels, and the break flow rate were presented and discussed. Despite the core was uncovered, no excursion in the cladding temperature was observed. The pressurizer surge line break can be classified as a hot leg break from a break location point of view. Compared with a cold leg break, coolability in the core may be better in case of a hot leg break due to the enhanced flow in the core region. This integral effect test data will be used to evaluate the prediction capability of existing safety analysis codes of the MARS and the RELAP5 as well as the SPACE code. Furthermore, this data can be utilized to identify any code deficiency for an IBLOCA simulation, especially for DVI-adapted plants. Redefinition of break size for design basis accident (DBA) based on risk information is being extensively investigated due to the potential for safety benefits and unnecessary burden reduction from current LBLOCA (large break loss of coolant accident)-based ECC (Emergency Core Cooling) Acceptance Criteria. As a transition break size (TBS), the rupture of medium-size pipe is considered to be more important than ever in risk-informed regulation (RIR)-relevant safety analysis. As plants age, are up-rated, and continue to seek improved operating efficiencies, the small break and intermediate break LOCA (IBLOCA) can become a concern. In particular, IBLOCA with DVI (Direct Vessel Injection) features will be addressed to support redefinition of a design-basis LOCA. With an aim of expanding code validation to address small

  17. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara; Desoye, Gernot; Hansson, Stefan; Kenna, Gerry; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Markert, Udo R; Powles-Glover, Nicola; Schneider, Henning; Leach, Lopa

    2016-09-01

    The human placenta is a critical life-support system that nourishes and protects a rapidly growing fetus; a unique organ, species specific in structure and function. We consider the pressing challenge of providing additional advice on the safety of prescription medicines and environmental exposures in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, "PlaNet", will bridge academia, industry and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intraocular pressure dynamics with prostaglandin analogs: a clinical application of water-drinking test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özyol P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pelin Özyol,1 Erhan Özyol,1 Ercan Baldemir2 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Biostatistics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Mugla, Turkey Aim: To evaluate the clinical applicability of the water-drinking test in treatment-naive primary open-angle glaucoma patients. Methods: Twenty newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in this prospective study. The water-drinking test was performed at baseline and 6 weeks and 3 months after prostaglandin analog treatment. Peak and fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP measurements obtained with the water-drinking test during follow-up were analyzed. Analysis of variance for repeated measures and paired and unpaired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean baseline IOP values in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma were 25.1±4.6 mmHg before prostaglandin analog treatment, 19.8±3.7 mmHg at week 6, and 17.9±2.2 mmHg at month 3 after treatment. The difference in mean baseline IOP of the water-drinking tests was statistically significant (P<0.001. At 6 weeks of prostaglandin analog treatment, two patients had high peak and fluctuation of IOP measurements despite a reduction in baseline IOP. After modifying treatment, patients had lower peak and fluctuation of IOP values at month 3 of the study. Conclusion: Peak and fluctuation of IOP in response to the water-drinking test were lower with prostaglandin analogs compared with before medication. The water-drinking test can represent an additional benefit in the management of glaucoma patients, especially by detecting higher peak and fluctuation of IOP values despite a reduced mean IOP. Therefore, it could be helpful as a supplementary method in monitoring IOP in the clinical practice. Keywords: glaucoma, intraocular pressure, water-drinking test, prostaglandin analog, intra­ocular pressure fluctuation

  19. Operational lessons learned in conducting a multi-country collaboration for vaccine safety signal verification and hypothesis testing: The global vaccine safety multi country collaboration initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard-Maure, Christine; Elango, Varalakshmi; Black, Steven; Perez-Vilar, Silvia; Castro, Jose Luis; Bravo-Alcántara, Pamela; Molina-León, Helvert Felipe; Weibel, Daniel; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Zuber, Patrick L F

    2018-01-08

    Timely and effective evaluation of vaccine safety signals for newly developed vaccines introduced in low and middle- income countries (LMICs) is essential. The study tested the development of a global network of hospital-based sentinel sites for vaccine safety signal verification and hypothesis testing. Twenty-six sentinel sites in sixteen countries across all WHO regions participated, and 65% of the sites were from LMIC. We describe the process for the establishment and operationalization of such a network and the lessons learned in conducting a multi-country collaborative initiative. 24 out of the 26 sites successfully contributed data for the global analysis using standardised tools and procedures. Our study successfully confirmed the well-known risk estimates for the outcomes of interest. The main challenges faced by investigators were lack of adequate information in the medical records for case ascertainment and classification, and access to immunization data. The results suggest that sentinel hospitals intending to participate in vaccine safety studies strengthen their systems for discharge diagnosis coding, medical records and linkage to vaccination data. Our study confirms that a multi-country hospital-based network initiative for vaccine safety monitoring is feasible and demonstrates the validity and utility of large collaborative international studies to monitor the safety of new vaccines introduced in LMICs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Nondestructive Methods and Special Test Instrumentation Supporting NASA Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Greene, Nathanael; Cameron, Ken; Madaras, Eric; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh; Murthy, Pappu; Revilock, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aging composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), being used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are currently under evaluation to better quantify their reliability and clarify their likelihood of failure due to stress rupture and age-dependent issues. As a result, some test and analysis programs have been successfully accomplished and other related programs are still in progress at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and other NASA centers, with assistance from the commercial sector. To support this effort, a group of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) experts was assembled to provide NDE competence for pretest evaluation of test articles and for application of NDE technology to real-time testing. Techniques were required to provide assurance that the test article had adequate structural integrity and manufacturing consistency to be considered acceptable for testing and these techniques were successfully applied. Destructive testing is also being accomplished to better understand the physical and chemical property changes associated with progression toward "stress rupture" (SR) failure, and it is being associated with NDE response, so it can potentially be used to help with life prediction. Destructive work also includes the evaluation of residual stresses during dissection of the overwrap, laboratory evaluation of specimens extracted from the overwrap to evaluate physical property changes, and quantitative microscopy to inform the theoretical micromechanics.

  1. Review of the Safety Concern Related to CANDU Moderator Temperature Distribution and Status of KAERI Moderator Circulation Test (MCT) Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Bo W.; Kim, Hyoung T. [Severe Accident and PHWR Safety Research Division, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tongbeum [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Im, Sunghyuk [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    threshold temperature and no further deformation is expected. Consequently, a sufficient condition to ensure fuel channel integrity following a large LOCA, is the avoidance of sustained calandria tubes dryout. If the moderator available subcooling at the onset of a large LOCA is greater than the subcooling requirements, a sustained calandria tube dryout is avoided. The temperature oscillations observed in reactor and in test measurements such as MTF need to be characterized and quantified to show that it does not jeopardize the currently available safety margins. Because of the importance of an accurate prediction of moderator temperature distributions and the related moderator subcooling, a 1/4 scaled-down moderator tank of a CANDU-6 reactor, called Moderator Circulation Test (MCT), was erected at KAERI and the current status of MCT experiment progress is described and further experiments are expected to be carried out to generate the experimental data necessary to validate the computer codes that will be used to analyze the accident analysis of operating CANDU-6 plants.

  2. 23. MPA-Seminar: Safety and reliability of plant technology with special emphasis on behaviour of pressurized components and systems at increased loading. Vol. 2. Papers 27-50; 23. MPA-Seminar: Sicherheit und Verfuegbarkeit in der Anlagentechnik mit dem Schwerpunkt Verhalten von druckfuehrenden Komponenten und Systemen bei erhoehten Belastungen. Bd. 2. Vortraege 27-50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This book is dedicated to the components of nuclear and conventional power plants with special emphasis on the behaviour of pressurized components and systems. The following topics are discussed: 1. structure and safety analysis, 2. aging phenomena, 3. nondestructive testing, and 4. optimization of in-service inspection.

  3. Continuous 24-hour Intraocular Pressure Monitoring With a Contact Lens Sensor: Safety, Tolerability, and Reproducibility in Glaucoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Kaweh; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Tafreshi, Ali; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety, tolerability, and reproducibility of intraocular pressure (IOP) patterns during repeated continuous 24-hour IOP monitoring with a telemetric contact-lens sensor (CLS). Design Prospective clinical trial. Participants Forty patients with suspect (n=21) or established glaucoma (n=19). Methods Patients participated in two 24-hour IOP monitoring sessions (S1 and S2) at a 1-week interval using the SENSIMED Triggerfish CLS (Sensimed AG, Switzerland). Patients pursued daily activities and sleep behavior was not controlled. The recordings were analyzed for differences between daytime and nighttime data and for reproducibility of signal patterns between the 2 sessions. Pearson correlations were obtained by pairing intervals across sessions. Main Outcome Measures Adverse events (AE), tolerability using the visual analogue score (VAS), and reproducibility of IOP patterns. Results Mean age was 55.5 ± 15.7 years and 60.0% were male. Main AEs were blurred vision (82.5%), conjunctival hyperemia (80.0%), and superficial punctate keratitis (15.0%). Patients reported a mean VAS of 27.2 ± 18.5 (S1) and 23.8 ± 18.7 (S2) (P = 0.216). Positive linear slopes of the sensor signal from the wake to the sleep period were detected for the ‘no glaucoma medication’ group (slope: 0.14 ± 0.15, p < 0.01, S1; slope: 0.12 ± 0.17, p = 0.03, S2) and for the ‘glaucoma medication’ group (slope: 0.03 ± 0.24, p = 0.52, S1; slope: 0.11 ± 0.16, p = 0.02, S2). Overall correlation between the two sessions was 0.59 (0.51 ‘no glaucoma medication’; 0.63 ‘glaucoma medication’) (P = 0.117). Conclusions Repeated use of the CLS demonstrated good safety and tolerability. The recorded IOP patterns showed fair reproducibility, suggesting that data from 24-h continuous IOP monitoring may be useful in the management of glaucoma patients. PMID:22892888

  4. Testing of a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Multi-Bay Pressure Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn; Rouse, Marshall; Przekop, Adam; Lovejoy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to develop technologies to reduce aviation's impact on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe to enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company have worked together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composite structures. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together. The PRSEUS concept is designed to maintain residual load carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. A series of building block tests were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. The final step in the building block series is an 80%-scale pressure box representing a portion of the center section of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. The testing of this article under maneuver load and internal pressure load conditions is the subject of this paper. The experimental evaluation of this article, along with the other building block tests and the accompanying analyses, has demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the HWB vehicle. Additionally, much of the development effort is also applicable to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, advanced aircraft configurations, and other structures where weight and through-the-thickness strength are design considerations.

  5. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions and Intracranial Pressure During CSF Infusion Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael A; Malm, Jan; Eklund, Anders; Horton, Nicholas J; Voss, Susan E

    A noninvasive method to monitor changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) is required for astronauts on long-duration spaceflight who are at risk of developing the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure syndrome that has some, but not all of the features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We assessed the validity of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to detect changes in ICP. Subjects were eight patients undergoing medically necessary diagnostic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infusion testing for hydrocephalus. DPOAE measurements were obtained with an FDA-approved system at baseline and six controlled ICP levels in ∼3 mmHg increments in random order, with a range from 10.8 ± 2.9 mmHg (SD) at baseline to 32.3 ± 4.1 mmHg (SD) at level 6. For f2 frequencies between 800 and 1700 Hz, when ICP was ≥ 12 mmHg above baseline ICP, DPOAE angles increased significantly and DPOAE magnitudes decreased significantly, but less robustly. Significant changes in DPOAE angle and magnitude are seen when ICP is ≥ 12 mmHg above a subject's supine baseline ICP during CSF infusion testing. These results suggest that the changes in DPOAE angle and magnitude seen with change in ICP are physiologically based, and suggest that it should be possible to detect pathological ICP elevation using DPOAE measurements. To use DPOAE for noninvasive estimation of ICP during spaceflight will require baseline measurements in the head-up, supine, and head-down positions to obtain baseline DPOAE values at different ICP ranges. Williams MA, Malm J, Eklund A, Horton NJ, Voss SE. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions and intracranial pressure during CSF infusion testing. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(10):844-851.

  6. Instrumented gait analysis for an objective pre-/postassessment of tap test in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Valentina; Lanotte, Michele; Carlone, Marina; Campagnoli, Marcello; Azzolin, Irene; Scarafia, Roberto; Massazza, Giuseppe; Knaflitz, Marco

    2015-07-01

    To present an objective method to evaluate gait improvements after a tap test in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH). Retrospective analysis of gait data. Public tertiary care center, day hospital. The gait analysis was performed before and 2 to 4 hours after the tap test. Participants included patients with INPH (n=60) and age- and sex-matched controls (n=50; used to obtain reference intervals). From an initial referred sample of 79 patients (N=79), we excluded those unable to walk without walking aids (n=9) and those with incomplete (pre-/posttap test) gait data (n=10). Thirteen out of 60 patients were shunted and then reappraised after 6 months. Not applicable. Mahalanobis distance from controls, before and after the tap test. Eleven gait parameters were combined in a single quantitative score. Walking velocity was also evaluated because it is frequently used in tap test assessment. Patients were classified into 2 groups: tap test responders (n=22, 9 of them were shunted) and not suitable for shunt (n=38, 4 of them were shunted). In the tap test responders group, 9 out of 9 patients improved after shunt. In the not suitable for shunt group, 3 out of 4 patients did not improve. Gait velocity increased after the tap test in 53% of responders and in 37% of patients not suitable for shunt. The new method is applicable to clinical practice and allows for selecting tap test responders in an objective way, quantifying the improvements. Our results suggest that gait velocity alone is not sufficient to reliably assess tap test effects. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. NASA Prototype All Composite Tank Cryogenic Pressure Tests to Failure with Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Pena, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This Paper will describe the results of pressurization to failure of 100 gallon composite tanks using liquid nitrogen. Advanced methods of health monitoring will be compared as will the experimental data to a finite element model. The testing is wholly under NASA including unique PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) based active vibration technology. Other technologies include fiber optics strain based systems including NASA AFRC technology, Acoustic Emission, Acellent smart sensor, this work is expected to lead to a practical in-Sutu system for composite tanks.

  8. Evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness for Yong Gwang unit 5 reactor pressure vessel materials (Baseline Tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Se Hwan; Kim, Joo Hag; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kwon, Sun Chil; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness (K{sub d}) of intermediate shell and its weld in SA 508 CI. 3 Yong Gwang 5 reactor pressure vessel was determined and evaluated. Precracked thirty six Charpy specimens were tested by using an instrumented impact tester. The purpose of present work is to evaluate and confirm the un-irradiated dynamic fracture toughness and to provide pre-irradiation baseline data for future evaluation on dynamic fracture toughness change during operation. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  9. Turbulence model comparisons for a low pressure 1.5 stage test turbine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dunn, Dwain I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Dunn_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 29874 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Dunn_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Copyright 2009 by the American... Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. All rights reserved 1 ISABE-2009-1258 TURBULENCE MODEL COMPARISONS FOR A LOW PRESSURE 1.5 STAGE TEST TURBINE Dwain Dunn and Glen Snedden CSIR. P.O. Box 395. Pretoria 0001 South Africa T.W. von...

  10. Safety and feasibility of regadenoson use for suboptimal heart rate response during symptom-limited standard Bruce exercise stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Sara L; Lanka, Viswanatha; Hainer, Jon; Blankstein, Ron; Skali, Hicham; Forman, Daniel E; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Dorbala, Sharmila

    2012-10-01

    Regadenoson during exercise stress test (ETT) can provide maximal hyperemia for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), along with exercise information. Our aim was to study the feasibility and safety of regadenoson injection at peak ETT for submaximal heart rate (HR) response. Consecutive patients who underwent SPECT MPI with standard Bruce ETT or supine-regadenoson (Supine-Reg) were analyzed. ETT patients were grouped as ETT-Max [maximal HR > 0.85 * (220 - age), N = 1,522], ETT-Submax (submaximal HR no regadenoson, N = 504), ETT-Reg (submaximal HR and regadenoson, N = 211). The HR during ETT was submaximal in 715 (32%) patients. Of these, 211 patients (30%) underwent ETT-Reg (mean exercise duration: 5.5 ± 2.5 minutes). ETT-Reg patients had a higher frequency of hypertension, diabetes, smoking and beta-blocker use, similar rest systolic blood pressure (SBP), but lower rest and peak HR and peak SBP compared to ETT-Max patients. There were no serious complications with regadenoson. Side effects (49% vs 6%, P < .0001) were fewer and aminophylline use was lower with ETT-Reg compared to Supine-Reg (0.5% vs 8.1%, P = .001). Submaximal HR response to ETT is common. ETT-Reg is safe, feasible, and well-tolerated. ETT-Reg facilitates a diagnostic MPI with reporting of functional capacity, exercise ECG/hemodynamic changes and MPI at maximal hyperemia.

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  12. Filter Efficiency and Pressure Testing of Returned ISS Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.; Berger, Gordon M.; Vijayakumar, R.; Perry, Jay L.

    2017-01-01

    The air quality control equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and future deep space exploration vehicles provide the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation. The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Seg-ment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. In our previous work, we presented results of efficiency and pressure drop measurements for a sample set of two returned BFEs with a service life of 2.5 years. In this follow-on work, we present similar efficiency, pressure drop, and leak tests results for a larger sample set of six returned BFEs. The results of this work can aid the ISS Program in managing BFE logistics inventory through the stations planned lifetime as well as provide insight for managing filter element logistics for future exploration missions. These results also can provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.

  13. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jy-An; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap of a vessel and a piston that is moveable within the vessel. Pressurized fluid is provided to compression and tension chambers defined between the piston and the vessel. When the pressure in the compression chamber is greater than the pressure in the tension chamber, the specimen is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. While the specimen is subjected to either force, it is also surrounded by the pressurized fluid in the tension chamber. In some examples, the specimen is surrounded by hydrogen.

  14. Hypothesis Testing of Inclusion of the Tolerance Interval for the Assessment of Food Safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hungyen Chen

    Full Text Available In the testing of food quality and safety, we contrast the contents of the newly proposed food (genetically modified food against those of conventional foods. Because the contents vary largely between crop varieties and production environments, we propose a two-sample test of substantial equivalence that examines the inclusion of the tolerance intervals of the two populations, the population of the contents of the proposed food, which we call the target population, and the population of the contents of the conventional food, which we call the reference population. Rejection of the test hypothesis guarantees that the contents of the proposed foods essentially do not include outliers in the population of the contents of the conventional food. The existing tolerance interval (TI0 is constructed to have at least a pre-specified level of the coverage probability. Here, we newly introduce the complementary tolerance interval (TI1 that is guaranteed to have at most a pre-specified level of the coverage probability. By applying TI0 and TI1 to the samples from the target population and the reference population respectively, we construct a test statistic for testing inclusion of the two tolerance intervals. To examine the performance of the testing procedure, we conducted a simulation that reflects the effects of gene and environment, and residual from a crop experiment. As a case study, we applied the hypothesis testing to test if the distribution of the protein content of rice in Kyushu area is included in the distribution of the protein content in the other areas in Japan.

  15. Annotated bibliography of safety-related occurrences in pressurized-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1976-07-01

    The bibliography presented contains 100-word abstracts of reports to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plants in 1975. The report includes 1097 abstracts, arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor, that describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies experienced at the facilities. Key-word and permuted-title indexes are provided to facilitate location of the subjects of interest, and tables summarizing the information contained in the bibliography are presented. The information listed in the tables includes instrument failures, equipment failures, system failures, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). A few of the unique events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail.

  16. Annotated bibliography of safety-related occurrences in pressurized-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1977-08-01

    The bibliography contains 100-word abstracts of reports to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plants in 1976. Included are 1264 abstracts that describe incidents, failures, and design construction deficiencies experienced at the facilities. They are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Key-word and permuted-title indexes are provided to facilitate location of the subjects of interest, and tables summarizing the information contained in the bibliography are presented. The information listed in the tables includes instrument failures, equipment failures, system failures, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). A few of the unique events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail.

  17. Fast Responding Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Large-Scale Wind Tunnel Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work focuses on implementing fast-response pressure-sensitive paint for measurements of unsteady pressure in rotorcraft applications. Significant...

  18. High strain rate tensile testing of sheet materials using three Hopkinson pressure bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to circumvent the inherent problems associated with Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar (SHTB systems, a new experimental technique is proposed for the high strain rate tensile testing of sheet specimens in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB systems. Existing solutions employ a multiple gage section hat-shaped specimen to transform the incoming pulse from compression into tension at the specimen level. However, multiple gage section specimens are not suitable for studying the post-necking behavior of materials as the required symmetry of the mechanical system is no longer guaranteed in the post-necking range. Here, we present a new load-inversion device that is used in conjunction with three Hopkinson pressure bars for the tensile loading of single gage section sheet specimen. The device is designed to transform the compression load applied at its boundaries into a tensile loading of the specimen. Two output bars are used to measure the total force applied on the specimen boundaries, while Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to determine the strain histories on the specimen surface based on photographs acquired at a frequency of about 100 kHz. In addition to uniaxial tensile experiments on TRIP780 steel sheet specimens at strain rates ranging from 200/s to 1000/s, results are presented on the dynamic fracture testing of notched tensile specimens.

  19. Lewis Research Center's coal-fired, pressurized, fluidized-bed reactor test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobak, J. A.; Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A 200-kilowatt-thermal, pressurized, fluidized-bed (PFB) reactor, research test facility was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a NASA-funded project to assess and evaluate the effect of PFB hot-gas effluent on aircraft turbine engine materials that might have applications in stationary-power-plant turbogenerators. Some of the techniques and components developed for this PFB system are described. One of the more important items was the development of a two-in-one, gas-solids separator that removed 95+ percent of the solids in 1600 F to 1900 F gases. Another was a coal and sorbent feed and mixing system for injecting the fuel into the pressurized combustor. Also important were the controls and data-acquisition systems that enabled one person to operate the entire facility. The solid, liquid, and gas sub-systems all had problems that were solved over the 2-year operating time of the facility, which culminated in a 400-hour, hot-gas, turbine test.

  20. Development and testing of a nutrition, food safety, and physical activity checklist for EFNEP and FSNE adult programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Traliece; Serrano, Elena L; Cox, Ruby H; Lambur, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To develop and assess reliability and validity of the Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist to measure nutrition, food safety, and physical activity practices among adult Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and Food Stamp Nutrition Education program (FSNE) participants. Test-retest reliability (Cronbach alpha), internal consistency (Pearson Correlation), criterion-related validity (Spearman Correlation Coefficients), and sensitivity-to-change, were calculated for dietary quality, food safety, and physical activity, based on data collected from 73 EFNEP and FSNE participants. Nutrition and physical activity domains achieved reliability coefficients of 0.70. The instrument scored Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.20 for nutrition, 0.34 for food safety, and 0.28 for physical activity. The instrument consistently measured dietary and physical activity practices, but not food safety. All domains obtained low correlation coefficients, although consistent with other studies' validity results. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Investigation of the IEC Safety Standard for Small Wind Turbine Design Through Modeling and Testing: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonkman, J.; van Dam, J.; Forsyth, T.; Davis, D.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1999, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Maintenance Team 2 (MT2) has been working on a revision of the IEC 61400-2 standard on the safety, quality, integrity, and design requirements of small wind turbines (SWTs). During this effort, a study was conducted to evaluate the quality of the structural design criteria specified by the original 2 standard. Test measurements and aeroelastic predictions of loads were gathered for a collection of SWTs and evaluated against the simplified load models and load cases specified in the standard. The collection of turbines included variations in rotor size, blade number, rotor location (upwind/downwind), hub type (rigid/teetered), yaw mechanism (free/active), and others. In general, the comparison of load measurements and model predictions exemplified the inaccuracy of the design load levels in the original -2 standard and suggested methods of improvement. Revisions being made to the standard include enhanced load models, new load cases, and improved safety factors. This work should culminate in a revised IEC 61400-2 standard that has a higher degree of applicability and dependability than the original.

  2. 10 CFR 32.101 - Schedule B-prototype tests for luminous safety devices for use in aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... inch of mercury. Lowered pressure shall be maintained for 1 minute or until air bubbles cease to be... pressure. Any evidence of bubbles emanating from within the device, or water entering the device, shall be.... Loss of tritium or promethium-147 from each tested device shall be measured by wiping with filter paper...

  3. A systematic review of the effect of pre-test rest duration on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadler, Sean; Chuter, Vivienne; Hawke, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of toe and ankle blood pressure is commonly used to evaluate peripheral vascular status, yet the pre-test rest period is inconsistent in published studies and among practitioners, and could affect results...

  4. Testing the effects of safety climate and disruptive children behavior on school bus drivers performance: A multilevel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Dov; Lee, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The study was designed to test a multilevel path model whose variables exert opposing effects on school bus drivers' performance. Whereas departmental safety climate was expected to improve driving safety, the opposite was true for in-vehicle disruptive children behavior. The driving safety path in this model consists of increasing risk-taking practices starting with safety shortcuts leading to rule violations and to near-miss events. The study used a sample of 474 school bus drivers in rural areas, driving children to school and school-related activities. Newly developed scales for measuring predictor, mediator and outcome variables were validated with video data taken from inner and outer cameras, which were installed in 29 buses. Results partially supported the model by indicating that group-level safety climate and individual-level children distraction exerted opposite effects on the driving safety path. Furthermore, as hypothesized, children disruption moderated the strength of the safety rule violation-near miss relationship, resulting in greater strength under high disruptiveness. At the same time, the hypothesized interaction between the two predictor variables was not supported. Theoretical and practical implications for studying safety climate in general and distracted driving in particular for professional drivers are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of safety training involving non-destructive testing among students at specialized vocational high schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim Young Khi [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Dept. of Education amd Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    By examining the safety issues involved in on-site training sessions conducted at specialized vocational high schools, and by analyzing the effects of non-destructive testing (NDT) safety training, this study aims to contribute to ensuring the general safety of high school students. Students who expressed an interest in participation were surveyed regarding current NDT training practices, as well as NDT safety training. A total of 361 students from 4 schools participated in this study; 37.7% (136 students) were from the Seoul metropolitan area and 62.3% (225 students) were from other areas. Of the respondents, 2.2% (8 students) reported having engaged in NDT. As a result of safety training, statistically significant improvements were observed in most areas, except for individuals with previous NDT experience. The areas of improvement included safety awareness, acquisition of knowledge, subjective knowledge levels, objective knowledge levels, and adjustments to existing personal attitudes. Even at absolutely necessary observation-only training sessions, it is crucial that sufficient safety training and additional safety measures be adequately provided.

  6. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the third volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of appendices C through U of the report

  7. Operation Cornerstone onsite radiological safety report for announced nuclear tests, October 1988--September 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    Cornerstone was the name assigned to the series of underground nuclear experiments conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. This report includes those experiments publicly announced. Remote radiation measurements were taken during and after each nuclear experiment by a telemetry system. Radiation Protection Technicians (RPT) with portable radiation detection instruments surveyed reentry routes into ground zeros (GZ) before other planned entries were made. Continuous surveillance was provided while personnel were in radiation areas and appropriate precautions were taken to protect persons from unnecessary exposure to radiation and toxic gases. Protective clothing and equipment were issued as needed. Complete radiological safety and industrial hygiene coverage were provided during drilling and mineback operations. Telemetered and portable radiation detector measurements are listed. Detection instrumentation used is described and specific operational procedures are defined.

  8. A new method for testing and evaluating grassy airfields and its effects upon flying safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław PYTKA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a review of methods and technologies developed during a research project entitled “Methods of testing and evaluation of grassy airfields”, conducted at the Lublin University of Technology between 2011 and 2014. Based on the terramechanical studies of wheel-soil interactions, the authors have developed a method for the determination of wheel-grass friction and rolling resistance coefficients, which are of critical importance for the ground performance of an airplane. Moreover, a mobile application has been created for use by pilots, controllers or airfield administration crew. The application connects online with a weather service to gather atmospheric data as inputs for a mathematical model that produces a real-time cone index (CI value for a given airfield. The paper also discusses the applicability of the method within the air transportation system, as well as possible effects of the described technology upon the safety of flight operations on grassy airfields.

  9. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the first volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of an introduction, summary/conclusion, site description and assessment, description of facility, and description of operation.

  10. Improvement of auditing technology of safety analysis through thermal-hydraulic separate effect tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, Hee Cheon; Park, Hyun Sik; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Moon, Young Min; Choi, Sung Won; Hwang, Do Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    The direct-contact condensation hear transfer coefficients are experimentally obtained in the following conditions : pure steam/steam in the presence of noncondensible gas, horizontal/slightly inclined pipe, cocurrent/countercurrent stratified flow with water. The empirical correlation for liquid Nusselt number is developed in conditions of the slightly inclined pipe and the cocurrent stratified flow. The several models - the wall friction coefficient, the interfacial friction coefficient, the correlation of direct-contact condensation with noncondensible gases, and the correlation of wall film condensation - in the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code are modified, As results, RELAP5/MOD3.2 is improved. The present experimental data is used for evaluating the improved code. The standard RELAP5/MOD3.2 code is modified using the non-iterative modeling, which is a mechanistic model and does not require any interfacial information such as the interfacial temperature, The modified RELAP5/MOD3.2 code os used to simulate the horizontally stratified in-tube condensation experiment which represents the direct-contact condensation phenomena in a hot leg of a nuclear reactor. The modeling capabilities of the modified code as well as the standard code are assessed using several hot-leg condensation experiments. The modified code gives better prediction over local experimental data of liquid void fraction and interfacial heat transfer coefficient than the standard code. For the separate effect test of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the pressurizer, the scaling analysis is performed to obtain a similarity of the phenomena between the Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant(KSNPP) and the present experimental facility. The diameters and lengths of the hot-leg, the surge line and the pressurizer are scaled down with the similitude of CCFL and velocity. The ratio of gas flow rate is 1/25. The experimental facility is composed of the air-water supply tank, the horizontal pipe, the surge line and the

  11. Safety review and stress test of the uranium enrichment facility Gronau; Compact. Sicherheitsueberpruefung und Stresstest der Urananreicherungsanlage Gronau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiboemer, Burkhard [URENCO Deutschland GmbH, Gronau (Germany). Ueberwachung

    2013-07-01

    As a consequence of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan in 2011 and the subsequent catastrophic destruction of the nuclear power plant in Fukushima URENCO has agreed to perform the safety check of the uranium enrichment facility Gronau (UAG) two years earlier than planned. The review was started in May 2011. The contribution deals with the requirements for the safety analysis and the questionnaire for the stress test, the methodology for realization of the safety check and the results of the investigations performed by URENCO and experts of ESK.

  12. Field test to study the pressure equilization on air permeable facade elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, C.A. van; Kalkman, I.M.; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2014-01-01

    The net wind load on the outer layer of a façade consisting of multiple layers is determined by the external pressure and the cavity pressure. For an air-permeable outer layer, the cavity pressure is dependent on the extent to which the external pressure equalizes over the openings. Minimizing the

  13. A systematic review of the effect of pre-test rest duration on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Sadler, Sean; Chuter, Vivienne; Hawke, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurement of toe and ankle blood pressure is commonly used to evaluate peripheral vascular status, yet the pre-test rest period is inconsistent in published studies and among practitioners, and could affect results. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate all research that has investigated the effect of different periods of pre-test rest on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure. Methods The following databases were searched up to April 2012: Medline (from 1946), EMBASE (...

  14. CSER 96-014: criticality safety of project W-151, 241-AZ-101 retrieval system process test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vail, T.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-06

    This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report (CSER) documents a review of the criticality safety implications of a process test to be performed in tank 241-AZ-101 (101-AZ). The process test will determine the effectiveness of the retrieval system for mobilization of solids and the practicality of the system for future use in the underground storage tanks at Hanford. The scope of the CSER extends only to the testing and operation of the mixer pumps and does not include the transfer of waste from the tank. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality is extremely unlikely, if not impossible, in this tank.

  15. Assuring safety without animal testing: the case for the human testis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Robert E; Boekelheide, Kim; Cortvrindt, Rita; van Duursen, Majorie B M; Gant, Tim; Jegou, Bernard; Marczylo, Emma; van Pelt, Ans M M; Post, Janine N; Roelofs, Maarke J E; Schlatt, Stefan; Teerds, Katja J; Toppari, Jorma; Piersma, Aldert H

    2013-08-01

    From 15 to 17 June 2011, a dedicated workshop was held on the subject of in vitro models for mammalian spermatogenesis and their applications in toxicological hazard and risk assessment. The workshop was sponsored by the Dutch ASAT initiative (Assuring Safety without Animal Testing), which aims at promoting innovative approaches toward toxicological hazard and risk assessment on the basis of human and in vitro data, and replacement of animal studies. Participants addressed the state of the art regarding human and animal evidence for compound mediated testicular toxicity, reviewed existing alternative assay models, and brainstormed about future approaches, specifically considering tissue engineering. The workshop recognized the specific complexity of testicular function exemplified by dedicated cell types with distinct functionalities, as well as different cell compartments in terms of microenvironment and extracellular matrix components. This complexity hampers quick results in the realm of alternative models. Nevertheless, progress has been achieved in recent years, and innovative approaches in tissue engineering may open new avenues for mimicking testicular function in vitro. Although feasible, significant investment is deemed essential to be able to bring new ideas into practice in the laboratory. For the advancement of in vitro testicular toxicity testing, one of the most sensitive end points in regulatory reproductive toxicity testing, such an investment is highly desirable. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Technical communication: design and in vitro testing of a pressure-sensing syringe for endotracheal tube cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Alexander H; Slocum, Alexander H; Spiegel, Joan E

    2012-05-01

    Endotracheal intubation is a frequently performed procedure in the prehospital setting, intensive care unit, and for patients undergoing surgery. The endotracheal tube cuff must be inflated to a pressure that prevents air leaks without compromising tracheal mucosal blood flow. For simultaneous endotracheal tube cuff inflation and measurement, we designed and tested a novel pressure-sensing syringe in vitro. The prototype was developed using a standard 10-mL polycarbonate syringe body that houses a plunger and a silicone rubber bellows, the pressure-sensing element. Bellow feasibility was determined and modeled using finite element analysis. Repeatability testing at each pressure measurement for each bellows (pressure versus deflection) was within an average standard deviation of 0.3 cm to 1.61 cm (1%-5% error). Using an aneroid manometer for comparison, there was excellent linear correlation with a Spearman rank of 0.99 (P < 0.001), up to 30 cm H(2)O.

  17. Combined Effects of High Pressure Processing and Addition of Soy Sauce and Olive Oil on Safety and Quality Characteristics of Chicken Breast Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew A. Kruk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the combined effect of high pressure (HP with the addition of soy sauce and/or olive oil on the quality and safety of chicken breast meats. Samples were cut into 100 g pieces and 10% (w/w of soy sauce (SS, 10% (w/w of olive oil (OO, and a mixture of both 5% of soy sauce and 5% olive oil (w/w (SO were pressurized into meat with high pressure at 300 or 600 MPa. Cooking loss was lower in OO samples than SS samples. With increased pressure to 600 MPa, the oleic acid content of OO samples increased. The total unsaturated fatty acids were the highest in SO and OO 600 MPa samples. Lipid oxidation was retarded by addition of olive oil combined with HP. The addition of olive oil and soy sauce followed by HP decreased the amount of volatile basic nitrogen during storage and reduced the population of pathogens. Sensory evaluation indicated that the addition of olive oil enhanced the overall acceptance and willingness to buy. In conclusion, the combination of HP with the addition of soy sauce and/or olive oil is an effective technology that can improve chemical, health, sensory qualities and safety of chicken breast.

  18. Combined effects of high pressure processing and addition of soy sauce and olive oil on safety and quality characteristics of chicken breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Zbigniew A; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Yun Ji; Rutley, David L; Jung, Samooel; Lee, Soo Kee; Jo, Cheorun

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the combined effect of high pressure (HP) with the addition of soy sauce and/or olive oil on the quality and safety of chicken breast meats. Samples were cut into 100 g pieces and 10% (w/w) of soy sauce (SS), 10% (w/w) of olive oil (OO), and a mixture of both 5% of soy sauce and 5% olive oil (w/w) (SO) were pressurized into meat with high pressure at 300 or 600 MPa. Cooking loss was lower in OO samples than SS samples. With increased pressure to 600 MPa, the oleic acid content of OO samples increased. The total unsaturated fatty acids were the highest in SO and OO 600 MPa samples. Lipid oxidation was retarded by addition of olive oil combined with HP. The addition of olive oil and soy sauce followed by HP decreased the amount of volatile basic nitrogen during storage and reduced the population of pathogens. Sensory evaluation indicated that the addition of olive oil enhanced the overall acceptance and willingness to buy. In conclusion, the combination of HP with the addition of soy sauce and/or olive oil is an effective technology that can improve chemical, health, sensory qualities and safety of chicken breast.

  19. An Overview of Trials´Accreditation and Recognition of Brazilian Tests Used for the Safety Evaluation of Cosmetic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana dos Santos Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For some time, Brazil has been appointed as one of the greatest consumers of cosmetic products in the world. Although cosmetics may seem harmless, destined exclusively to enhance personal appearance or to clean and protect the skin, hair and nails, new studies and events are highlighting the need to evaluate the safety of such products. The present work interrelated the lifecycle of a cosmetic product with the safety trials and tests applicable to some cycle phases. From this information, a survey was made of accredited Conformity Assessment Bodies (CAB and test facilities recognized by the General Coordination for Accreditation (CGCRE which are competent respectively to carry out safety trials and tests of cosmetics. Twenty five competent laboratories were identified to carry out chemical and/or biological trials of cosmetics, according to the legislation ABNT ISO IEC 17025:2005, and 10 test facilities recognized by the Compliance Monitoring Program that can carry out tests of the development of a product for register purposes, aiming at human health and safety. It is interesting to notice that Brazil has accredited laboratories to carry out trials that are critical for the health of the population, such as the levels of heavy metals and the presence of pathogens. On the other hand, CGCRE does not have a program to recognize safety clinical trials. The importance of this kind of study is understood, considering the world history of adverse reactions and the great consumption of cosmetics in the country.

  20. Choking under the pressure of a positive stereotype: gender identification and self-consciousness moderate men's math test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagler, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly underperformed when exposed to gender-relevant test instructions. No significant effects were found under a gender-irrelevant condition. These findings are discussed in the contexts of research on stereotype threat, stereotype lift, and choking under pressure.

  1. Safety testing of acellular pertussis vaccines: Use of animals and 3Rs alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonakker, Marieke; Arciniega, Juan; Hendriksen, Coenraad

    2017-11-02

    The current test of acellular Bordetella pertussis (aP) vaccines for residual pertussis toxin (PTx) is the Histamine Sensitization test (HIST), based on the empirical finding that PTx sensitizes mice to histamine. Although HIST has ensured the safety of aP vaccines for years, it is criticized for the limited understanding of how it works, its technical difficulty, and for animal welfare reasons. To estimate the number of mice used worldwide for HIST, we surveyed major aP manufacturers and organizations performing, requiring, or recommending the test. The survey revealed marked regional differences in regulatory guidelines, including the number of animals used for a single test. Based on information provided by the parties surveyed, we estimated the worldwide number of mice used for testing to be 65,000 per year: ∼48,000 by manufacturers and ∼17,000 by national control laboratories, although the latter number is more affected by uncertainty, due to confidentiality policies. These animals covered the release of approximately 850 final lots and 250 in-process lots of aP vaccines yearly. Although there are several approaches for HIST refinement and reduction, we discuss why the efforts needed for validation and implementation of these interim alternatives may not be worthwhile, when there are several in vitro alternatives in various stages of development, some already fairly advanced. Upon implementation, one or more of these replacement alternatives can substantially reduce the number of animals currently used for the HIST, although careful evaluation of each alternative's mechanism and its suitable validation will be necessary in the path to implementation.

  2. Radionuclides release from re-irradiated fuel under high temperature and pressure conditions. Gamma-ray measurements of VEGA-5 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Kiuchi, Toshio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to clarify mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents and to improve source term predictability. The fifth VEGA-5 test was conducted in January 2002 to confirm the reproducibility of decrease in cesium release under elevated pressure that was observed in the VEGA-2 test and to investigate the release behavior of short-life radionuclides. The PWR fuel of 47 GWd/tU after about 8.2 years of cooling was re-irradiated at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) for 8 hours before the heat-up test. After that, the two pellets of 10.9 g without cladding were heated up to about 2,900 K at 1.0 MPa under the inert He condition. The experiment reconfirmed the decrease in cesium release rate under the elevated pressure. The release data on short-life radionuclides such as Ru-103, Ba-140 and Xe-133 that have never been observed in the previous VEGA tests without re-irradiation was obtained using the {gamma} ray measurement. (author)

  3. Safeguard: Progress and Test Results for a Reliable Independent On-Board Safety Net for UAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven D.; Dill, Evan T.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Gilabert, Russell V.

    2017-01-01

    As demands increase to use unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for a broad spectrum of commercial applications, regulatory authorities are examining how to safely integrate them without compromising safety or disrupting traditional airspace operations. For small UAS, several operational rules have been established; e.g., do not operate beyond visual line-of-sight, do not fly within five miles of a commercial airport, do not fly above 400 feet above ground level. Enforcing these rules is challenging for UAS, as evidenced by the number of incident reports received by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This paper reviews the development of an onboard system - Safeguard - designed to monitor and enforce conformance to a set of operational rules defined prior to flight (e.g., geospatial stay-out or stay-in regions, speed limits, and altitude constraints). Unlike typical geofencing or geo-limitation functions, Safeguard operates independently of the off-the-shelf UAS autopilot and is designed in a way that can be realized by a small set of verifiable functions to simplify compliance with existing standards for safety-critical systems (e.g. for spacecraft and manned commercial transportation aircraft systems). A framework is described that decouples the system from any other devices on the UAS as well as introduces complementary positioning source(s) for applications that require integrity and availability beyond what can be provided by the Global Positioning System (GPS). This paper summarizes the progress and test results for Safeguard research and development since presentation of the design concept at the 35th Digital Avionics Systems Conference (DASC '16). Significant accomplishments include completion of software verification and validation in accordance with NASA standards for spacecraft systems (to Class B), development of improved hardware prototypes, development of a simulation platform that allows for hardware-in-the-loop testing and fast-time Monte Carlo

  4. Cardiac interference reduction in diaphragmatic MMG signals during a Maintained Inspiratory Pressure Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlabous, L; Torres, A; Fiz, J A; Jané, R

    2013-01-01

    A recursive least square (RLS) adaptive filtering algorithm for reduction of cardiac interference in diaphragmatic mecanomyographic (MMGdi) signals is addressed in this paper. MMGdi signals were acquired with a capacitive accelerometer placed between 7th and 8th intercostal spaces, on the right anterior axillary line, during a maintained inspiratory pressure test. Subjects were asked to maintain a constant inspiratory pressure with a mouthpiece connected to a closed tube (without breathing). This maneuver was repeated at five different contraction efforts: apnea (no effort), 20 cmH2O, 40 cmH2O, 60 cmH2O and maximum voluntary contraction. An adaptive noise canceller (ANC) using the RLS algorithm was applied on the MMGdi signals. To evaluate the behavior of the ANC, the MMGdi signals were analyzed in two segments: with and without cardiac interference (WCI and NCI, respectively). In both segments it was analyzed the power spectral density (PSD), and the ARV and RMS amplitude parameters for each contraction effort. With the proposed ANC algorithm the amplitude parameters of the WCI segments were reduced to a level similar to the one of the NCI segments. The obtained results showed that ANC using the RLS algorithm allows to significantly reduce the cardiac interference in MMGdi signals.

  5. International Space Station (ISS) Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs): Filter Efficiency and Pressure Testing of Returned Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2017-01-01

    The air revitalization system aboard the International Space Station (ISS) provides the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation due to the microgravity environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Adsorption (HEPA) media filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Segment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. These filters see a replacement interval, as part of maintenance, of 2-5 years dependent on location in the ISS. In this work, we present particulate removal efficiency, pressure drop, and leak test results for a sample set of 8 BFEs returned from the ISS after filter replacement. The results can potentially be utilized by the ISS Program to ascertain whether the present replacement interval can be maintained or extended to balance the on-ground filter inventory with extension of the lifetime of ISS beyond 2024. These results can also provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.

  6. Ablative material testing for low-pressure, low-cost rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, G. Paul; Smith, Timothy D.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of ablative materials suitable for the production of light weight, low cost rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles are presented. Ten individual specimens of four different compositions of silica cloth-reinforced phenolic resin materials were evaluated for comparative erosion in a subscale rocket engine combustion chamber. Gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen were used as propellants, operating at a nominal chamber pressure of 1138 kPa (165 psi) and a nominal mixture ratio (O/F) of 3.3. These conditions were used to thermally simulate operation with RP-1 and liquid oxygen, and achieved a specimen throat gas temperature of approximately 2456 K (4420 R). Two high-density composition materials exhibited high erosion resistance, while two low-density compositions exhibited approximately 6-75 times lower average erosion resistance. The results compare favorably with previous testing by NASA and provide adequate data for selection of ablatives for low pressure, low cost rocket engines.

  7. Background Pressure Profiles for Sonic Boom Vehicle Testing in the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Shaw, Stephen; Adamson, Eric; Simerly, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify test facilities that offer sonic boom measurement capabilities, an exploratory test program was initiated using wind tunnels at NASA research centers. The subject of this report is the sonic boom pressure rail data collected in the Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The purpose is to summarize the lessons learned based on the test activity, specifically relating to collecting sonic boom data which has a large amount of spatial pressure variation. The wind tunnel background pressure profiles are presented as well as data which demonstrated how both wind tunnel Mach number and model support-strut position affected the wind tunnel background pressure profile. Techniques were developed to mitigate these effects and are presented.

  8. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Non-Slender Piles in a Pressure Tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    The monopile foundation concept is often employed as the foundation for offshore wind turbines. Typically, piles with diameters of 4-6 m and embedded lengths of 15-30 m are em¬ployed. Hence, the length to diameter ratio is around 5. The design method recommended by the American Petroleum Institute...... and Det Norske Veritas is, however, based on slender piles with length to diameter ratios larger than 10. Hence, the design method needs to be validated for non-slender piles. The aim of the present work is to investigate the pile behaviour for non-slender piles by means of small-scale testing. When...... were conducted on six piles with diameters between 40 and 100 mm and length to diameter ratios of 3-6 m. The effect of applying an overburden pressure is eval¬uated for the load-displacement relationships and the variation of pile deflection with depth....

  9. High Powered Tests of Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavities for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. Alumina of purities ranging from 96 to 99.8% was tested in a high pressure RF test cell at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of breakdown studies with pure nitrogen gas, and oxygen-doped nitrogen gas indicate the peak surface electric field on the alumina ranges between 10 and 15 MV/m. How these results affect the design of a prototype cooling channel cavity will be discussed.

  10. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Greene, N.; Palko, Joseph L.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Sutter, James; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to a previously reported experimental investigation and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel s residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  11. High-pressure processing of a raw milk cheese improved its food safety maintaining the sensory quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Francisco José; Delgado, Jonathan; González-Crespo, José; Cava, Ramón; Ramírez, Rosario

    2013-12-01

    The effect of high-pressure treatment (400 or 600 MPa for 7 min) on microbiology, proteolysis, texture and sensory parameters was investigated in a mature raw goat milk cheese. At day 60 of analysis, Mesophilic aerobic, Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria and Listeria spp. were inactivated after high-pressure treatment at 400 or 600 MPa. At day 90, mesophilic aerobic, lactic acid bacteria and Micrococacceae counts were significantly lower in high-pressure-treated cheeses than in control ones. In general, nitrogen fractions were significantly modified after high-pressure treatment on day 60 at 600 MPa compared with control cheeses, but this effect was not found in cheeses after 30 days of storage (day 90). On the other hand, high-pressure treatment caused a significant increase of some texture parameters. However, sensory analysis showed that neither trained panellists nor consumers found significant differences between control and high-pressure-treated cheeses.

  12. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in small abdominal aortic aneurysm: profile, safety, and mortality estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jonathan; Powell, Alyssa; Smith, Kimberly; Fonda, Holly; Dalman, Ronald L

    2011-06-01

    Few data are available regarding exercise testing in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate safety and to characterize the hemodynamic and cardiopulmonary (CPX) response to exercise in a large group of patients with AAA. Three hundred and six patients with AAA ≥3.0 to ≤5.0 cm (mean 72 ± 8 years) underwent CPX as part of a randomized trial of exercise training. CPX and hemodynamic responses, ischemic events, rhythm disturbances, and risk estimates based on treadmill scores were quantified and compared to an age-matched group of 2155 veterans referred for exercise testing for clinical reasons. Peak VO(2) was similar between patients with AAA and the referral group (20.0 ± 6 ml/kg/min; 77 percent of age-predicted and 20.3 ± 7 ml/kg/min; 80 percent of age-predicted, respectively). The incidence of exercise-induced hypotension and hypertension was higher in AAA patients versus the referral group (2.9 and 3.6 percent vs mortality, respectively, were similar between groups. Patients with AAA have a slightly higher incidence of hyper- and hypotensive responses to exercise than age-matched referrals, but no serious events related to CPX occurred. AAA patients can undergo maximal CPX safely and have risk scores based on treadmill test results that are similar to age-matched referral subjects. These findings extend recent studies using sub-maximal evaluations to stratify risk in patients considered for surgery, and support the routine use of exercise testing for risk evaluation and the functional assessment of patients with AAA.

  13. Safety of type and screen method compared to conventional antiglobulin crossmatch procedures for compatibility testing in Indian setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past 30 years, pretransfusion tests have undergone considerable modification. In 1984, AABB recommended that the full cross match could be replaced by an abbreviated cross match in patients with negative antibody screen. However, before implementation of such a policy, issue regarding safety of T & S needs to be evaluated. Objectives: The aim of pretransfusion testing (PTT is to ensure that enough red blood cells (RBCs in the selected red cell components will survive when transfused. Results and Conclusion: We have, therefore in this study; evaluated safety of T & S procedure for PTT in comparison with conventional test tube cross match. The T & S procedure gave a safety of 91.6%. Also, the usefulness of the T & S was shown through the detection of unexpected antibodies in 0.75% (15 out of 2026 of cases.

  14. Patient-led training on patient safety: a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V; Winterbottom, A; Symons, J; Thompson, Z; Quinton, N; Corrado, O J; Melville, C; Watt, I; Torgerson, D; Wright, J

    2013-09-01

    Training in patient safety is an important element of medical education. Most educational interventions on patient safety training adopt a 'health-professional lens' with limited consideration on the impact of safety lapses on the patient and their families and little or no involvement of patients in the design or delivery of the training. This paper describes a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a patient-led educational intervention to facilitate safety training amongst newly qualified doctors. Patients and/or carers who had experienced harm during their care shared narratives of their stories with trainees; this was followed by a focused discussion on patient safety issues exploring the causes and consequences of safety incidents and lessons to be learned from these. The intervention, which will be further tested in an NIHR-funded randomised controlled trial (RCT), was successfully implemented into an existing training programme and found acceptance amongst the patients and trainees. The pilot study proved to be a useful step in refining the intervention for the RCT including identifying appropriate outcome measures and highlighting organisational issues.

  15. Verification of FPGA-Signal using the test board which is applied to Safety-related controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Youn-Hu; Yoo, Kwanwoo; Lee, Myeongkyun; Yun, Donghwa [SOOSAN ENS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This article aims to provide the verification method for BGA-type FPGA of Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) developed as Safety Class. The logic of FPGA in the control device with Safety Class is the circuit to control overall logic of PLC. Saftety-related PLC must meet the international standard specifications. With this reason, we use V and V according to an international standard in order to secure high reliability and safety. By using this, we are supposed to proceed to a variety of verification courses for extra reliability and safety analysis. In order to have efficient verification of test results, we propose the test using the newly changed BGA socket which can resolve the problems of the conventional socket on this paper. The Verification of processes is divided into verification of Hardware and firmware. That processes are carried out in the unit testing and integration testing. The proposed test method is simple, the effect of cost reductions by batch process. In addition, it is advantageous to measure the signal from the Hi-speed-IC due to its short length of the pins and it was plated with the copper around it. Further, it also to prevent abrasion on the IC ball because it has no direct contact with the PCB. Therefore, it can be actually applied is to the BGA package test and we can easily verify logic as well as easily checking the operation of the designed data.

  16. Open-Loop Pitch Table Optimization for the Maximum Dynamic Pressure Orion Abort Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwater, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has scheduled the retirement of the space shuttle orbiter fleet at the end of 2010. The Constellation program was created to develop the next generation of human spaceflight vehicles and launch vehicles, known as Orion and Ares respectively. The Orion vehicle is a return to the capsule configuration that was used in the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs. This configuration allows for the inclusion of an abort system that safely removes the capsule from the booster in the event of a failure on launch. The Flight Test Office at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been tasked with the flight testing of the abort system to ensure proper functionality and safety. The abort system will be tested in various scenarios to approximate the conditions encountered during an actual Orion launch. Every abort will have a closed-loop controller with an open-loop backup that will direct the vehicle during the abort. In order to provide the best fit for the desired total angle of attack profile with the open-loop pitch table, the table is tuned using simulated abort trajectories. A pitch table optimization program was created to tune the trajectories in an automated fashion. The program development was divided into three phases. Phase 1 used only the simulated nominal run to tune the open-loop pitch table. Phase 2 used the simulated nominal and three simulated off nominal runs to tune the open-loop pitch table. Phase 3 used the simulated nominal and sixteen simulated off nominal runs to tune the open-loop pitch table. The optimization program allowed for a quicker and more accurate fit to the desired profile as well as allowing for expanded resolution of the pitch table.

  17. Fabrication and mechanical testing of glass chips for high-pressure synthetic or analytical chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbroek, R.E.; Hermes, D.C.; Kakuta, M.; Benito-Lopez, F.; Verboom, Willem; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; van den Berg, Albert; Reinhoudt, David

    The pressure strength of microfluidics glass chips for high-pressure chemistry has been examined. Internal pressures up to 320 bar have been measured, although variations are substantial. Long annealing steps at high temperatures did not show any improvement, but smoothening the powder blasted

  18. Queckenstedts's test : electromanometric examination of CSF pressure on jugular compression and its clinical value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakke, Johannes Peter Willem Frederik

    1969-01-01

    Isovolumetric CSF pressure recording provides a very accurate analogue of hydrodynamic events occurring in the subarachnoid space. This study was undertaken to determine normal parameters of CSF pressure rise and fall on jugular compression for e1ectro manometric CSF pressure measurement and to

  19. Tissue donation and virus safety: more nucleic acid amplification testing is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruss, A; Caspari, G; Krüger, D H; Blümel, J; Nübling, C M; Gürtler, L; Gerlich, W H

    2010-10-01

    In tissue and organ transplantation, it is of great importance to avoid the transmission of blood-borne viruses to the recipient. While serologic testing for anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and -2, anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBc), and Treponema pallidum infection is mandatory, there is until now in most countries no explicit demand for nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) to detect HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and HCV infection. After a review of reports in the literature on viral transmission events, tissue-specific issues, and manufacturing and inactivation procedures, we evaluated the significance of HIV, HCV, and HBV detection using NAT  in  donors of various types of tissues and compared our results with the experiences of blood banking organizations. There is a significant risk of HIV, HCV, and HBV transmission by musculoskeletal tissues because of their high blood content and the high donor-recipient ratio. If no effective virus inactivation procedure for musculoskeletal tissue is applied, donors should be screened using NAT  for  HIV, HCV, and HBV. Serologically screened cardiovascular tissue carries a very low risk of HIV, HCV, or HBV transmission. Nevertheless, because effective virus inactivation is impossible (retention of tissue morphology) and the donor-recipient ratio may be as high as 1:10, we concluded that NAT  should be performed for HIV, HCV, and HBV as an additional safety measure. Although cornea allografts carry the lowest risk of transmitting HIV, HCV, and HBV  owing to corneal physiology, morphology, and the epidemiology of corneal diseases, NAT  for  HCV should still be performed. If the NAT  screening of a donor for HIV, HCV, and HBV is negative, quarantine storage of the donor tissue seems dispensable. In view of numerous synergistic effects with transfusion medicine, it would be advantageous for tissue banks to cooperate with blood

  20. Safety of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products - Part 1: General requirements and tests

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    This International Standard deals with safety aspects of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products such as electrical, thermal and mechanical safety. This standard covers the following types of dry-type transformers, power supplies, including switch mode power supplies, and reactors, the windings of which may be encapsulated or non-encapsulated. It has the status of a group safety publication in accordance with IEC Guide 104.

  1. Rupture Properties of Blood Vessel Walls Measured by Pressure-Imposed Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Toshiro; Sugita, Syukei; Matsumoto, Takeo; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Akimoto, Hiroji; Tabayashi, Koichi; Sato, Masaaki

    It is expected to be clinically useful to know the mechanical properties of human aortic aneurysms in assessing the potential for aneurysm rupture. For this purpose, a newly designed experimental setup was fabricated to measure the rupture properties of blood vessel walls. A square specimen of porcine thoracic aortas is inflated by air pressure at a rate of 10mmHg/s (≈1.3MPa/s) until rupture occurs. Mean breaking stress was 1.8±0.4 MPa (mean±SD) for the specimens proximal to the heart and 2.3±0.8MPa for the distal specimens, which are not significantly different to those values obtained longitudinally from conventional tensile tests. Moreover, the local breaking stretch ratio in the longitudinal direction was significantly higher at the ruptured site (2.7±0.5) than at the unruptured site (2.2±0.4). This testing system for studying the rupture properties of aortic walls is expected to be applicable to aortic aneurysms. Experimental verification of the present technique for the homogeneous, isotropic material is also presented.

  2. Ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-(tandem) mass spectrometry in human sports drug testing: possibilities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Pop, Valentin; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2013-05-31

    Doping control analytical laboratories for human sports predominantly employ nowadays chromatographic-mass spectrometric test methods for routine, high throughput screening and confirmation assays concerning low and high molecular mass analytes. Liquid chromatography-(tandem) mass spectrometry [(LC-MS(/MS)] and particularly ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-MS/MS instruments have become devices of choice due to their indispensable capabilities that compensate for limitations inherent to other commonly used strategies such as immunological and gas chromatography-(tandem) mass spectrometry [(GC-MS(/MS)]-based detection methods. UHPLC-MS/MS-based assays at low mass spectrometric resolution have been established allowing for fast and sensitive targeted analyses focusing on pre-selected target analytes with diagnostic precursor-product ion pairs. Combining UHPLC to high resolution/high accuracy MS(/MS) further expanded the targeted approach (i.e., plotting extracted ion chromatograms of protonated or deprotonated molecules as well as product ions measured with accurate masses) toward non-targeted analyses enabling also retrospective data mining. In this review, recent applications of UHPLC-MS/MS in sports drug testing procedures published between 2008 and 2012 are presented and advantages as well as limitations in a short- and long-term perspective are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of Rock Dynamic Test with Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of rock dynamic properties by split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB was experimentally and numerically evaluated with ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The effects of different diameters, different loading rates, and different propagation distances on wave dispersion of input bars in SHPB with rectangle and half-sine wave loadings were analyzed. The results show that the dispersion effect on the diameter of input bar, loading rate, and propagation distance under half-sine waveform loading is ignorable compared with the rectangle wave loading. Moreover, the degrees of stress uniformity under rectangle and half-sine input wave loadings are compared in SHPB tests, and the time required for stress uniformity is calculated under different above-mentioned loadings. It is confirmed that the stress uniformity can be realized more easily using the half-sine pulse loading compared to the rectangle pulse loading, and this has significant advantages in the dynamic test of rock-like materials. Finally, the Holmquist-Johnson-Concrete constitutive model is introduced to simulate the failure mechanism and failure and fragmentation characteristics of rock under different strain rates. And the numerical results agree with that obtained from the experiment, which confirms the effectiveness of the model and the method.

  4. Effects of operator time pressure and noise on manual ultrasonic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkvist, J. [Stockholm Univ., Dept. of Psychology, Stockholm (Sweden); Edland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Svenson, O. [Stockholm Univ., Dept. of Psychology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-08-01

    In earlier studies of manual ultrasonic testing, great variations have been found in operator performance, often attributed to operator fatigue. However, no conclusive findings have been reported. In the present study, twenty operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of six test-pieces with manufactured flaws. The operators performed the inspections under stress (high arousal - time pressure and noise) and no-stress conditions; one condition the first day and the other the second and last day. According to the Yerkes-Dodson Law there is an optimal arousal level where performance is highest. It was hypothesised that the stress condition led to a level of arousal so high that it would affect the results negatively. However, contrary to the hypotheses it was found that the manipulation increased operator performance. Operators with the stress condition day 1 performed better than the other operators (under the no-stress condition). This was interpreted as the 'stress first' (group 1) operators had established efficient performance patterns the first day - affecting also the second day. Operators beginning with stress condition also tended to be more motivated. It was concluded that operator performance is affected by arousal. (author)

  5. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

  6. Screening test for rapid food safety evaluation by menadione-catalysed chemiluminescent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashoji, Shiro; Yoshikawa, Naoko; Kirihara, Masayuki; Tsuneyoshi, Toshihiro

    2013-06-15

    The chemiluminescent assay of menadione-catalysed H2O2 production by living mammalian cells was proposed to be useful for rapid food safety evaluation. The tested foods were extracted with water, ethanol and dimethylsulfoxide, and each extract was incubated with NIH3T3, Neuro-2a and HepG2 cells for 4h. Menadione-catalysed H2O2 production by living mammalian cells exposed to each extract was determined by the chemiluminescent assay requiring only 10 min, and the viability of the cells was estimated as percentage based on H2O2 production by intact cells. In this study the cytotoxicity of food was rated in order of inhibitory effect on H2O2 production by intact cells. The well known natural toxins such as Fusarium mycotoxin, tomato toxin tomatine, potato toxin solanine and marine toxins terodotoxin and brevetoxin could be detected by the above chemiluminescent assay. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Testing the risk compensation hypothesis for safety helmets in alpine skiing and snowboarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michael D; Buller, David B; Andersen, Peter A; Walkosz, Barbara J; Voeks, Jennifer H; Dignan, Mark B; Cutter, Gary R

    2007-06-01

    The prevalence of helmet use by alpine skiers and snowboarders was estimated and self-reports on risk taking were assessed to test for potential risk compensation when using helmets in these sports. Skiers and snowboarders were observed and interviewed at 34 resorts in the western United States and Canada. Respondents were 1779 adult skiers and snowboarders in the 2003 ski season. Observations of helmet use and questions about perceived speed and degree of challenge when not wearing a helmet (helmet wearers) or in previous ski seasons (non-helmet wearers). Helmet wearers reported that they skied/snowboarded at slower speeds (OR = 0.64, p<0.05) and challenged themselves less (OR = 0.76, p<0.05) than non-helmet wearers. Adoption of safety helmets in 2003 (23%) continued to increase over 2002 (OR = 0.46, p<0.05) and 2001 (OR = 0.84, p<0.05). No evidence of risk compensation among helmet wearers was found. Decisions to wear helmets may be part of a risk reduction orientation. Helmet use continues to trend upwards but adoption may be slowing.

  8. Safety and Suitability for Service Assessment Testing for Surface and Underwater Launched Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Quadripartite Advisory Publication ( QAP )-268. 8.5.4 Firing Circuits. Conduct a full hazard assessment using Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), Failure...4439 8 Software Safety AOP-52 ITOP 01-1-057 QAP -268 Joint Software Systems Safety Engineering Handbook Def Stan 00-56, AOP-52 VG

  9. The feasibility of replacing animal testing for assessing consumer safety: a suggested future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentem, Julia; Chamberlain, Mark; Sangster, Bart

    2004-12-01

    At present, we are unable to use much of the data derived from alternative (non-animal) tests for human health risk assessment. This brief Comment outlines why it is plausible that new paradigms could be developed to enable risk assessment to support consumer safety decisions, without the need to generate data in animal tests. The availability of technologies that did not exist 10 years ago makes this new approach possible. The approach is based on the concept that data and information derived from applying existing and new technologies to non-animal models can be interpreted in terms of harm and disease in man. A prerequisite is that similar data and information generated in a clinical setting are available to permit this "translation". The incorporation of this additional translation step should make it possible to use data and information generated in non-animal models as inputs to risk assessment. The new technologies include genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabonomics. Their application to in vitro and human "models" enables large amounts of data to be generated very quickly. The processing, interpretation and translation of these data need to be supported by powerful informatics capabilities and statistical tools. The use of integrated "systems biology" approaches will further support the interpretation by providing better understanding of the underlying biological complexity and mechanisms of toxicity. Clinical medicine is using the opportunities offered by the new "omics" technologies to advance the understanding of disease. The application of these technologies in clinical medicine will generate massive amounts of data that will need processing and interpretation to allow clinicians to better diagnose disease and understand the patients' responses to therapeutic interventions. Support from clinical epidemiology will be essential. If these data and information can be made generally accessible in an ethical and legal way, they should also permit

  10. A tiered approach to the use of alternatives to animal testing for the safety assessment of cosmetics: skin irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Martin; Jones, Penny; Goebel, Carsten; Dufour, Eric; Rowland, Joanna; Araki, Daisuke; Costabel-Farkas, Margit; Hewitt, Nicola J; Hibatallah, Jalila; Kirst, Annette; McNamee, Pauline; Schellauf, Florian; Scheel, Julia

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of the skin irritancy and corrosivity potential of an ingredient is a necessity in the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients. To date, there are two formally validated alternatives to the rabbit Draize test for skin corrosivity in place, namely the rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance (TER) assay and the Human Skin Model Test using EpiSkin, EpiDerm and SkinEthic reconstructed human epidermal equivalents. For skin irritation, EpiSkin, EpiDerm and SkinEthic are validated as stand-alone test replacements for the rabbit Draize test. Data from these tests are rarely considered in isolation and are evaluated in combination with other factors to establish the overall irritating or corrosive potential of an ingredient. In light of the deadlines established in the Cosmetics Directive for cessation of animal testing for cosmetic ingredients, a COLIPA scientific meeting was held in Brussels on 30th January, 2008 to review the use of alternative approaches and to set up a decision tree approach for their integration into tiered testing strategies for hazard and safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients and their use in products. In conclusion, the safety assessments for skin irritation/corrosion of new chemicals for use in cosmetics can be confidently accomplished using exclusively alternative methods.

  11. Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-01-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. The results of the testing provide the manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine mounted on an 18-m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  12. Assessing health-related fitness tests in the school setting: reliability, feasibility and safety; the ALPHA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España-Romero, V; Artero, E G; Jimenez-Pavón, D; Cuenca-Garcia, M; Ortega, F B; Castro-Piñero, J; Sjöstrom, M; Castillo-Garzon, M J; Ruiz, J R

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability, feasibility and safety of a health-related fitness test battery administered by Physical Education (PE) teachers in the school setting. Six PE teachers, from three primary schools and three secondary schools, assessed twice (7 days apart) the 20 m shuttle run, handgrip and standing long jump tests, as well as weight, stature, triceps and subscapular thickness and waist circumference in 58 children (age: 6-11 yr) and 80 adolescents (age: 12-18 yr). Feasibility and safety were assessed by researches by means of direct observation. Significant inter-trial differences were found for the standing long jump test (3.8+/-12.7 cm, Pfitness tests administered by PE teachers are reliable, feasible and safe to be performed in the school setting. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  13. Pressure data for four analytically defined arrow wings in supersonic flow. [Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    In order to provide experimental data for comparison with newly developed finite difference methods for computing supersonic flows over aircraft configurations, wind tunnel tests were conducted on four arrow wing models. The models were machined under numeric control to precisely duplicate analytically defined shapes. They were heavily instrumented with pressure orifices at several cross sections ahead of and in the region where there is a gap between the body and the wing trailing edge. The test Mach numbers were 2.36, 2.96, and 4.63. Tabulated pressure data for the complete test series are presented along with selected oil flow photographs. Comparisons of some preliminary numerical results at zero angle of attack show good to excellent agreement with the experimental pressure distributions.

  14. Test of 6-in. -thick pressure vessels. Series 4: intermediate test vessels V-5 and V-9 with inside nozzle corner cracks. [BWR and PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Holz, P.P.; Smith, J.E.

    1977-08-01

    Failure testing is described for two 99-cm-diam (39-in.), 15.2-cm-thick (6-in.) steel pressure vessels, each containing one flawed nozzle. Vessel V-5 was tested at 88/sup 0/C (190/sup 0/F) and failed by leaking without fracturing after extensive stable crack growth. Vessel V-9 was tested at 25/sup 0/C (75/sup 0/F) and failed by fracturing. Material properties measured before the tests were used for pretest and posttest fracture analyses. Test results supported by analysis indicate that inside nozzle corner cracks are not subject to plane strain under pressure loading. The preparation of inside nozzle corner cracks is described in detail. Extensive experimental data are tabulated and plotted.

  15. Testing efficacy of teaching food safety and identifying variables that affect learning in a low-literacy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie Tolar; Romero, Angélica Lissette Hernández; Linares, Ana Lucía Molina; Challinor, Julia M; Day, Sara W; Caniza, Miguela

    2015-03-01

    Nurses at a meeting of the Asociación de Hemato Oncología Pediátrica de Centroamérica y El Caribe recognized food safety as one of the main issues affecting patient care. The objective was to increase awareness of food safety issues among caregivers for pediatric cancer patients in Guatemala and El Salvador. A low-literacy booklet about food safety, "Alimentación del niño con cáncer (Feeding the child with cancer)," was developed for caregivers. Tests were developed to assess information acquisition and retention. An educator's guide was developed for consistency of education along with a demographics questionnaire. The efficacy of the booklet was tested with 162 caregivers of patients with newly diagnosed leukemia. Information retention was tested 1 and 3 months after the initial education. The booklet was found to be efficient for food safety education. There was no significant difference between post-educational knowledge in either country at 1 month or in Guatemala at 3 months. Pre-educational knowledge was not associated with any demographic variable except for self-reported ability to read in El Salvador. There was no significant association between learning ability and demographic variables in either country. Caregivers from El Salvador had a better ability to learn than caregivers from Guatemala. Education using the booklet greatly improved food safety knowledge, which remained high 1 and 3 months later. Education with the booklet was efficacious for teaching a low-literacy population about food safety. However, it is unknown which part of the education contributed to the significant improvement in knowledge.

  16. The effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the microbiological quality and safety of carrot juice during refrigerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Margaret F; McKay, Alan M; Connolly, Malachy; Linton, Mark

    2012-05-01

    The microbial quality of untreated and pressure-treated carrot juice was compared during storage at 4, 8 and 12 °C. High pressure treatment at 500 MPa and 600 MPa (1 min/20 °C) reduced the total counts by approximately 4 log CFU ml⁻¹ and there was very little growth of the survivors during storage at 4 °C for up to 22 days. Total counts increased during storage of pressure-treated juice at 8 °C and 12 °C but took significantly longer to reach maximum levels compared to the untreated juice. The microflora in the untreated juice consisted predominantly of Gram-negative bacteria, identified as mostly Pantoea spp., Erwinia spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Initially the pressure-treated juice contained low numbers of spore-forming bacteria (Bacillus spp. and Paenibacillus spp.) and Gram-positive cocci; the spore-formers continued to dominate during storage. When irradiation-sterilised juice was inoculated with a cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes, numbers decreased during storage at 4 °C and 8 °C by 1.50 and 0.56 log CFU ml⁻¹ respectively. When the inoculated carrot juice was pressure treated (500 MPa/1 min/20 °C) no L. monocytogenes were found immediately after pressure treatment or during storage at 4, 8 and 12 °C (>6 log inactivation). In contrast, pressure treatment in TSBYE only resulted in 1.65 log inactivation and survivors grew rapidly. This suggests that the antilisterial effect of carrot juice is enhanced by HPP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Derivation of a measure of systolic blood pressure mutability: a novel information theory-based metric from ambulatory blood pressure tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Danitza J; Vogel, Eugenio E; Saravia, Gonzalo; Stockins, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We provide ambulatory blood pressure (BP) exams with tools based on information theory to quantify fluctuations thus increasing the capture of dynamic test components. Data from 515 ambulatory 24-hour BP exams were considered. Average age was 54 years, 54% were women, and 53% were under BP treatment. The average systolic pressure (SP) was 127 ± 8 mm Hg. A data compressor (wlzip) designed to recognize meaningful information is invoked to measure mutability which is a form of dynamical variability. For patients with the same average SP, different mutability values are obtained which reflects the differences in dynamical variability. In unadjusted linear regression models, mutability had low association with the mean systolic BP (R(2) = 0.056; P information toward diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Blunted heart rate recovery is associated with exaggerated blood pressure response during exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Umuttan; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Gok, Hasan

    2013-11-01

    Increased sympathetic activity and endothelial dysfunction are the proposed mechanisms underlying exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise (EBPR). However, data regarding heart rate behavior in patients with EBPR are lacking. We hypothesized that heart rate recovery (HRR) could be impaired in patients with EBPR. A total of 75 normotensive subjects who were referred for exercise treadmill test examination and experienced EBPR were included to this cross-sectional case-control study. The control group consisted of 75 age- and gender-matched normotensive subjects without EBPR. EBPR was defined as a peak exercise systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥210 mmHg in men and ≥190 mmHg in women. HRR was defined as the difference in HR from peak exercise to 1 min in recovery; abnormal HRR was defined as ≤12 beats/min. These parameters were compared with respect to occurrence of EBPR. Mean values of systolic and diastolic BP at baseline, peak exercise, and the first minute of the recovery were significantly higher in the subjects with EBPR. Mean HRR values were significantly lower (P < 0.001) in subjects with EBPR when compared with those without. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between the decrease in systolic BP during the recovery and degree of HRR in individuals without EBPR (r = 0.42, P < 0.001). Such a correlation was not observed in subjects with EBPR (r = 0.11, P = 0.34). The percentage of abnormal HRR indicating impaired parasympathetic reactivation was higher in subjects with EBPR (29 % vs 13 %, P = 0.02). In logistic regression analyses, HRR and resting systolic BP were the only determinants associated with the occurrence of EBPR (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Decreased HRR was observed in normotensive individuals with EBPR. In subjects with normal BP response to exercise, a linear correlation existed between the degree of HRR and decrease in systolic BP during the recovery period. However, such a correlation

  19. Testing a Model of Resistance to Peer Pressure among Mexican-Origin Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaca, Mayra Y.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the factors associated with resistance to peer pressure toward antisocial behaviors among a sample of Mexican-origin adolescents (n=564) living in a large Southwestern city in the U.S. A model examining the influence of generational status, emotional autonomy from parents, and self-esteem on resistance to peer pressure was…

  20. Joint Ordnance Test Procedure (JOTP)-001 Allied Ammunition Safety and Suitability for Service Assessment Testing Publication - Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    Environmental Test Specification. c. FR: Part of Programme d’Essais en Environnement . A.4 NATO: Environmental Test Programme. a. US...Environmental Test Project/Program. b. UK: Environmental Test Programme c. FR: Programme d’Essais en Environnement A.5 NATO...UK: Environmental Test Report. c. FR: Rapport d’Essai en Environnement . A.7 NATO: Compliance Statement. a. US: Compliance

  1. A systematic review of the effect of pre-test rest duration on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Sean; Chuter, Vivienne; Hawke, Fiona

    2014-04-05

    Measurement of toe and ankle blood pressure is commonly used to evaluate peripheral vascular status, yet the pre-test rest period is inconsistent in published studies and among practitioners, and could affect results. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate all research that has investigated the effect of different periods of pre-test rest on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure. The following databases were searched up to April 2012: Medline (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1947), CINAHL (from 1937), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (from 1800). No language or publication restrictions were applied. Eighty-eight content experts and researchers in the field were contacted by email to assist in the identification of published, unpublished, and ongoing studies. Studies evaluating the effect of two or more pre-test rest durations on toe or ankle systolic blood pressure were eligible for inclusion. No restrictions were placed on participant characteristics or the method of blood pressure measurement. Outcomes included toe or ankle systolic blood pressure and adverse effects. Abstracts identified from the search terms were independently assessed by two reviewers for potential inclusion. 1658 abstracts were identified by electronic searching. Of the 88 content experts and researchers in the field contacted by email a total of 33 replied and identified five potentially relevant studies. No studies were eligible for inclusion. There is no evidence of the effect of different periods of pre-test rest duration on toe and ankle systolic blood pressure measurements. Rigorous trials evaluating the effect of different durations of pre-test rest are required to direct clinical practice and research.

  2. Report to the Attorney General on Body Armor Safety Initiative Testing and Activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    On November 17, 2003, Attorney General John Ashcroft announced the U.S. Department of Justice's Body Armor Safety Initiative in response to concerns from the law enforcement community regarding the effectiveness of body armor in use...

  3. Buttock and back pressure distribution tests on seats of mobile agricultural machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostens, I; Papajoannou, G; Spaepen, A; Ramon, H

    2001-08-01

    Multidisciplinary effort is usually required in the evaluation of comfort problems in the working environment of mobile agricultural machinery workers. Comfort can be partly assessed from the study of the pressure distribution of the human-seat interface. Four combine foam seats and a new air-based seat were compared with regards to static buttocks and back support pressures. Within and between subject variability and the issue of measurement repeatability were addressed. Significant differences were found in the maximum pressure profiles of the four seating systems with seats 2 and 3 performing better than seat I (seat 4 showed no significant difference when compared to the other seats). There is an almost linear relationship between mean pressure and body mass index. In all cases the air seating system performed better with regards to the static pressure gradients.

  4. Safety evaluation report related to operation of Fast Flux Test Facility. Supplement No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    This supplement provides (1) the staff's evaluation of additional information received since issuance of the Safety Evaluation Report regarding previously identified uncompleted review items, (2) a discussion of comments made by the ACRS in its report of November 8, 1978, and (3) the staff's evaluation of additional or revised information related to new or old issues that have arisen since the issuance of the Safety Evaluation Report.

  5. Central blood pressure in children and adolescents: non-invasive development and testing of novel transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T Y; Qasem, A; Ayer, J G; Butlin, M; O'Meagher, S; Melki, C; Marks, G B; Avolio, A; Celermajer, D S; Skilton, M R

    2017-12-01

    Central blood pressure can be estimated from peripheral pulses in adults using generalised transfer functions (TF). We sought to create and test age-specific non-invasively developed TFs in children, with comparison to a pre-existing adult TF. We studied healthy children from two sites at two time points, 8 and 14 years of age, split by site into development and validation groups. Radial and carotid pressure waveforms were obtained by applanation tonometry. Central systolic pressure was derived from carotid waveforms calibrated to brachial mean and diastolic pressures. Age-specific TFs created in the development groups (n=50) were tested in the validation groups aged 8 (n=137) and 14 years (n=85). At 8 years of age, the age-specific TF estimated 82, 99 and 100% of central systolic pressure values within 5, 10 and 15 mm Hg of their measured values, respectively. This TF overestimated central systolic pressure by 2.2 (s.d. 3.7) mm Hg, compared to being underestimated by 5.6 (s.d. 3.9) mm Hg with the adult TF. At 14 years of age, the age-specific TF estimated 60, 87 and 95% of values within 5, 10 and 15 mm Hg of their measured values, respectively. This TF underestimated central systolic pressure by 0.5 (s.d. 6.7) mm Hg, while the adult TF underestimated it by 6.8 (s.d. 6.0) mm Hg. In conclusion, age-specific TFs more accurately predict central systolic pressure measured at the carotid artery in children than an existing adult TF.

  6. A Proposal for a Methodology to Develop a Cyber-Attack Penetration Test Scenario Including NPPs Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Hyo [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Han Seong [Joongbu Univ., Geumsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Won [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Gook [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Penetration test is a method to evaluate the cyber security of NPPs; so, this approach was performed in some studies. Because they focused on vulnerability finding or test bed construction, scenario based approach was not performed. However, to test the cyber security of NPPs, a proper test scenario should be needed. Ahn et al. developed cyber-attack scenarios but those scenarios couldn't be applied in penetration test because they developed the scenarios based on past incidents of NPPs induced by cyber-attack. That is, those scenarios only covered scenarios which were happened before; so, they couldn't cover other various scenarios and couldn't reflect them into a penetration test. In this study, a method to develop a cyber-attack penetration test scenario of NPPs especially focused on safety point of view is suggested. To evaluate the cyber security of NPPs, penetration test can be a possible way. In this study, a method to develop a penetration test scenario was explained. Especially, the goal of hacker was focused on nuclear fuel integrity deterioration. So, in the methodology, Level 1 PSA results were utilized to reflect plant safety into the security. From the PSA results, basic event was post processed and possible cyber-attacks were reviewed with vulnerabilities of digital control system.

  7. Discussion map and cooking classes: testing the effectiveness of teaching food safety to immigrants and refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Abby; Yu, Nan; Buro, Brandy; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a food safety map as an educational method with English language learners. English language learner community members (n = 73) were assigned randomly to participate in 1 of 3 experimental conditions: food safety map, cooking class, and control. Participants in the food safety map and cooking class conditions completed a pre-education demographic and cooking history questionnaire, a post-education knowledge and intention questionnaire, and a 2-week post-cooking and food safety habits assessment. Participants in the control group received no educational training but completed the pre- and 2-week post-education assessments. The cooking class and the map class were both effective in increasing food safety knowledge. Specifically, by comparing with the control group, they significantly increased participants' knowledge of safely cooking large meat (χ² [df = 2, n = 66] = 40.87; P class types generated similar positive educational effects on boosting food safety behavioral intention (measured right after the class). The data collected 2 weeks after the classes suggested that individuals who took the classes followed the suggested food behaviors more closely than those in the control group (P class, the map produces similar learning and behavioral outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing a primary care patient measure of safety (PC PMOS): a modified Delphi process and face validity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernan, Andrea L; Giles, Sally J; O'Hara, Jane K; Fuller, Jeffrey; Johnson, Julie K; Dunbar, James A

    2016-04-01

    Patients are a valuable source of information about ways to prevent harm in primary care and are in a unique position to provide feedback about the factors that contribute to safety incidents. Unlike in the hospital setting, there are currently no tools that allow the systematic capture of this information from patients. The aim of this study was to develop a quantitative primary care patient measure of safety (PC PMOS). A two-stage approach was undertaken to develop questionnaire domains and items. Stage 1 involved a modified Delphi process. An expert panel reached consensus on domains and items based on three sources of information (validated hospital PMOS, previous research conducted by our study team and literature on threats to patient safety). Stage 2 involved testing the face validity of the questionnaire developed during stage 1 with patients and primary care staff using the 'think aloud' method. Following this process, the questionnaire was revised accordingly. The PC PMOS was received positively by both patients and staff during face validity testing. Barriers to completion included the length, relevance and clarity of questions. The final PC PMOS consisted of 50 items across 15 domains. The contributory factors to safety incidents centred on communication, access to care, patient-related factors, organisation and care planning, task performance and information flow. This is the first tool specifically designed for primary care settings, which allows patients to provide feedback about factors contributing to potential safety incidents. The PC PMOS provides a way for primary care organisations to learn about safety from the patient perspective and make service improvements with the aim of reducing harm in this setting. Future research will explore the reliability and construct validity of the PC PMOS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Safety of the two-step tuberculin skin test in Indian health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Devasahayam J; Shankar, Deepa; Datey, Ashima; Zwerling, Alice; Pai, Madhukar

    2014-12-01

    Health care workers (HCW) in low and middle income countries are at high risk of nosocomial tuberculosis infection. Periodic screening of health workers for both TB disease and infection can play a critical role in TB infection control. Occupational health programs that implement serial tuberculin skin testing (TST) are advised to use a two-step baseline TST. This helps to ensure that boosting of waned immune response is not mistaken as new TB infection (i.e. conversion). However, there are no data on safety of the two-step TST in the Indian context where HCWs are repeatedly exposed. Nursing students were recruited from 2007 to 2009 at the Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, India. Consenting nursing students were screened with a baseline two-step TST at the time of recruitment. From 2007 to 2008 adverse events were recorded when reported during the TST reading (Cohort A). Nurses recruited in the final study year (2009) answered an investigator administered questionnaire assessing all likely side-effects Cohort B). This information was extracted from the case report forms and analysed. Between 2007 and 09, 800 trainees consented to participate in the annual TB screening study and 779 did not have a past history of TB or recall a positive TST and were selected to administer TST. Of these, 755 returned for reading the result and had complete data and were included for the final analysis - 623 subjects in (cohort A) and 132 in (cohort B). These were included for the final analysis. In cohort A only 1.3% reported adverse events. In cohort B, as per the investigator administered questionnaire; 25% reported minor side effects. Itching and local pain were the most common side effects encountered. There were no major adverse events reported. In particular, the adverse events were similar in the second step of the test and not more severe. Screening of HCWs with two-step TST for LTBI is simple and safe, and hence suitable for wide scale implementation in high

  10. Baseline Blood Pressure Effect on the Benefit and Safety of Intra-Arterial Treatment in MR CLEAN (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Maxim J H L; Ergezen, Saliha; Lingsma, Hester F; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Fransen, Puck S S; Beumer, Debbie; van den Berg, Lucie A; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert; Emmer, Bart J; van der Worp, H Bart; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Roos, Yvo B W E M; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van Zwam, Wim H; Majoie, Charles B L M; van der Lugt, Aad; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2017-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is associated with poor outcome and the occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in acute ischemic stroke. Whether BP influences the benefit or safety of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) is not known. We aimed to assess the relation of BP with functional outcome, occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and effect of IAT. This is a post hoc analysis of the MR CLEAN (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands). BP was measured at baseline, before IAT or stroke unit admission. We estimated the association of baseline BP with the score on the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days and safety parameters with ordinal and logistic regression analysis. Effect of BP on the effect of IAT was tested with multiplicative interaction terms. Systolic BP (SBP) had the best correlation with functional outcome. This correlation was U-shaped; both low and high baseline SBP were associated with poor functional outcome. Higher SBP was associated with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.25 for every 10 mm Hg higher SBP [95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.44]). Between SBP and IAT, there was no interaction for functional outcome, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, or other safety parameters; the absolute benefit of IAT was evident for the whole SBP range. The same was found for diastolic BP. BP does not affect the benefit or safety of IAT in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by proximal intracranial vessel occlusion. Our data provide no arguments to withhold or delay IAT based on BP. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN10888758. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Vibration of safety injection pump motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattrelos, D.

    1996-12-01

    This paper covers a fault encountered in the safety injection pump motors of the French 900 MWe unit nuclear power stations. This fault was not revealed either during the low pressure safety injection and containment spray system pump qualification tests under accident conditions or during the special tests on a test bench carried out to attempt to replicate the fault and to identify ways of remedying it. This constitutes a potential common mode of failure of the safety injection system and the containment spray system pumps. The vibration phenomena illustrate the importance of carrying out tests in the plants under conditions as close as possible to those of actual accident situations.

  12. High Strain Rate Testing of Rocks using a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiessler, Ruprecht; Kenkmann, Thomas; Poelchau, Michael; Nau, Siegfried; Hess, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic mechanical testing of rocks is important to define the onset of rate dependency of brittle failure. The strain rate dependency occurs through the propagation velocity limit (Rayleigh wave speed) of cracks and their reduced ability to coalesce, which, in turn, significantly increases the strength of the rock. We use a newly developed pressurized air driven Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar (SHPB), that is specifically designed for the investigation of high strain rate testing of rocks, consisting of several 10 to 50 cm long strikers and bar components of 50 mm in diameter and 2.5 meters in length each. The whole set up, composed of striker, incident- and transmission bar is available in aluminum, titanium and maraging steel to minimize the acoustic impedance contrast, determined by the change of density and speed of sound, to the specific rock of investigation. Dynamic mechanical parameters are obtained in compression as well as in spallation configuration, covering a wide spectrum from intermediate to high strain rates (100-103 s-1). In SHPB experiments [1] one-dimensional longitudinal compressive pulses of diverse shapes and lengths - formed with pulse shapers - are used to generate a variety of loading histories under 1D states of stress in cylindrical rock samples, in order to measure the respective stress-strain response at specific strain rates. Subsequent microstructural analysis of the deformed samples is aimed at quantification fracture orientation, fracture pattern, fracture density, and fracture surface properties as a function of the loading rate. Linking mechanical and microstructural data to natural dynamic deformation processes has relevance for the understanding of earthquakes, landslides, impacts, and has several rock engineering applications. For instance, experiments on dynamic fragmentation help to unravel super-shear rupture events that pervasively pulverize rocks up to several hundred meters from the fault core [2, 3, 4]. The dynamic, strain

  13. Suitport Feasibility - Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests with the Marman Clamp and Pneumatic Flipper Suitport Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Rodriggs, Liana; Allton, Charles; Jennings, Mallory; Aitchision, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. Two second generation suitports were designed and tested. The previously reported second generation Marman Clamp suitport and a newer concept, the Pneumatic Flipper Suitport. These second generation suitports demonstrated human donning and doffing of the Z1 spacesuit with an 8.3 psi pressure differential across the spacesuit. Testing was performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. The test included human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test brought these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents the results of the testing, including unexpected difficulties with doffing, and engineering solutions implemented to ease the difficulties. A review of suitport functions, including a discussion of the need to doff a pressurized suit in earth gravity, is included. Recommendations for future design and testing are documented.

  14. Suitport Feasibility - Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests with the Marmon Clamp and Pneumatic Flipper Suitport Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Rodriggs, Liana; Alton, Charles; Jennings, Mallory; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. Two second generation suitports were designed and tested. The previously reported second generation Marman Clamp suitport and a newer concept, the Pneumatic Flipper Suitport. These second generation suitports demonstrated human donning and doffing of the Z1 spacesuit with an 8.3 psi pressure differential across the spacesuit. Testing was performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. The test included human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test brought these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents the results of the testing, including unexpected difficulties with doffing, and engineering solutions implemented to ease the difficulties. A review of suitport functions, including a discussion of the need to doff a pressurized suit in earth gravity, is included. Recommendations for future design and testing are documented.

  15. A study for the domestic application plan of the Generic Safety Issue(GSI) for the Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Un Chul; Jang, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Kyung; Lee, Doo Yong; Park, Chang Hwan [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    In this study, a base work to construct the database of the domestic and foreign GSls were done through performing the deviation of GSls for the PHWR by investigating the development trend of international joint studies and the GSls of 4 countries as the PHWR state and examined the IAEA acceptance of GSls classification for the GSls of Canada, Korea Republic of, Argentina and India. We evaluated the possibility of application of the safety Issue for PHWR by investigating causes, contents and follow-up measures of each items. To evaluate the domestic application validity of the safety issue, We made the investigation matrix for the safety issue of each countries and also are reflecting new results in investigation matrix by examining IAEA PHWR GSI development trend. We intended to derive the GSls which are most appropriate in our PHWR by examining every issues. the derived GSls are divided into the design parts and the operation parts. And they have to be solved as soon as possible.

  16. Current food safety management systems in fish-exporting companies require further improvements to adequately cope with contextual pressure: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onjong, Hillary Adawo; Wangoh, John; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau

    2014-10-01

    Fish-processing plants still face food safety (FS) challenges worldwide despite the existence of several quality assurance standards and food safety management systems/s (FSMSs). This study assessed performance of FSMS in fish exporting sector considering pressure from the context in which they operate. A FSMS diagnostic tool with checklist was used to assess the context, FSMS, and FS output in 9 Kenyan fish exporting companies. Majority (67%) companies operated at moderate- to high-risk context but with an average performance in control and assurance activities. This situation could be insufficient to deal with ambiguity, uncertainty, and vulnerability issues in the context characteristics. Contextual risk posed by product characteristics (nature of raw materials) and chain environment characteristics was high. Risk posed by the chain environment characteristics, low power in supplier relationships, and low degree of authority in customer relationships was high. Lack of authority in relationship with suppliers would lead to high raw material risk situation. Even though cooling facilities, a key control activity, was at an advanced level, there was inadequate packaging intervention equipment which coupled with inadequate physical intervention equipment could lead to further weakened FSMS performance. For the fish companies to improve their FSMS to higher level and enhance predictability, they should base their FSMS on scientific information sources, historical results, and own experimental trials in their preventive, intervention, and monitoring systems. Specific suggestions are derived for improvements toward higher FSMS activity levels or lower risk levels in context characteristics. Weak areas in performance of control and assurance activities in export fish-processing sector already implementing current quality assurance guidelines and standards were studied taking into consideration contextual pressure wherein the companies operate. Important mitigation

  17. Risky substance use and peer pressure in Swiss young men: Test of moderation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Joseph; Baggio, Stéphanie; Grazioli, Véronique S; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Daeppen, Jean-Bernard; Gmel, Gerhard

    2016-11-01

    Peer pressure (PP) toward misconduct is a well-known risk factor for substance use. However, the way it interacts with social factors and the associations of the aspects of PP other than PP toward misconduct have been understudied. This study examined the associations of three aspects of PP with risky substance use and tested whether the associations of PP toward misconduct were moderated by social factors. A representative sample of 5,680 young Swiss males completed a questionnaire assessing risky alcohol, cigarette, and cannabis use, PP toward misconduct, toward peer involvement, and toward peer conformity, as well as social support (SS) and neighbourhood cohesion. Multinomial logistic regression models were used. PP toward misconduct was positively associated with all substance use outcomes. The PP toward misconduct-risky alcohol use association was stronger in individuals reporting high than in those reporting low levels of PP toward peer involvement, SS, and neighbourhood cohesion. The PP toward misconduct-risky cannabis use association was stronger in individuals reporting high than in those reporting low levels of SS and neighbourhood cohesion. The PP toward misconduct-smoking association was stronger in individuals reporting high than in those reporting low levels of PP toward peer involvement. The risk for substance use associated with PP toward misconduct varies as a function of social factors. Being well connected with others (high level of PP toward peer involvement and SS), and living in a cohesive neighbourhood may amplify the risk for risky substance use associated with PP toward misconduct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Relation of Risk of Atrial Fibrillation With Systolic Blood Pressure Response During Exercise Stress Testing (from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Wesley T; Qureshi, Waqas T; Blaha, Michael J; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Brawner, Clinton A; Nasir, Khurram; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-12-15

    Decreases in systolic blood pressure during exercise may predispose to arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) because of underlying abnormal autonomic tone. We examined the association between systolic blood pressure response and incident AF in 57,442 (mean age 54 ± 13 years, 47% women, and 29% black) patients free of baseline AF who underwent exercise treadmill stress testing from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing project. Exercise systolic blood pressure response was examined as a categorical variable across clinically relevant categories (>20 mm Hg: referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg, and ≤0 mm Hg) and per 1-SD decrease. Cox regression, adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, medications, history of coronary heart disease, history of heart failure, and metabolic equivalent of task achieved, was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between systolic blood pressure response and incident AF. Over a median follow-up of 5.0 years, a total of 3,381 cases (5.9%) of AF were identified. An increased risk of AF was observed with decreasing systolic blood pressure response (>20 mm Hg: HR 1.0, referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg: HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.99, 1.20; ≤0 mm Hg: HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.40). Similar results were obtained per 1-SD decrease in systolic blood pressure response (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.12). The results were consistent when stratified by age, sex, race, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. In conclusion, our results suggest that a decreased systolic blood pressure response during exercise may identify subjects who are at risk for developing AF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment guided by rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Tanzanian children: safety and alternative bacterial diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sykes Alma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WHO guidelines for the treatment of young children with suspected malaria have recently changed from presumptive treatment to anti-malarial treatment guided by a blood slide or malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT. However, there is limited evidence of the safety of this policy in routine outpatient settings in Africa. Methods Children 3-59 months of age with a non-severe febrile illness and no obvious cause were enrolled over a period of one year in a malaria endemic area of Tanzania. Treatment was determined by the results of a clinical examination and RDT result, and blood culture and serum lactate were also collected. RDT-negative children were followed up over 14 days. Results Over the course of one year, 965 children were enrolled; 158 (16.4% were RDT-positive and treated with artemether-lumefantrine and 807 (83.4% were RDT-negative and treated with non-anti-malarial medicines. Compared with RDT-positives, RDT-negative children were on average younger with a lower axillary temperature and more likely to have a history of cough or difficulty in breathing. Six (0.6% children became RDT-positive after enrolment, all of whom were PCR-negative for Plasmodium falciparum DNA at enrolment. In addition, 12 (1.2% children were admitted to hospital, one with possible malaria, none of whom died. A bacterial pathogen was identified in 9/965 (0.9% children, eight of whom were RDT-negative and one was RDT-positive, but slide-negative. Excluding three children with Salmonella typhi, all of the children with bacteraemia were ≤12 months of age. Compared to double-read research slide results RDTs had a sensitivity of 97.8% (95%CI 96.9-98.7 and specificity of 96.3% (95%CI 96.3-98.4. Conclusions Use of RDTs to direct the use of anti-malarial drugs in young children did not result in any missed diagnoses of malaria although new infections soon after a consultation with a negative RDT result may undermine confidence in results. Invasive

  20. An experimental study on CHF in pool boiling system with SA508 test heater under atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Juno, E-mail: nezads@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Soon Heung, E-mail: shchang@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pool boiling CHF experiment was performed with several fluids under atmospheric pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The test specimen (50 mm Multiplication-Sign 10 mm Multiplication-Sign 0.7 mm) is made of SA508 Grade 3 Class 1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA508 showed much higher CHF value than SS304. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion of SA508 is the reason of the CHF enhancement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All additives showed little CHF enhancement effects. - Abstract: In this study, pool boiling CHF experiments under atmospheric pressure with SA508 test heater was performed. SA508 is the material of the reactor pressure vessel in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, the CHF behavior of SA508 material is important for the reactor pressure vessel integrity at accident, but there are few studies about that. SA508 material showed very different CHF behavior from other cases (stainless steel). It showed very higher CHF value and the test heater surface was changed significantly. This test heater surface change is due to corrosion of SA508, and the rate of corrosion increases with boiling time. The corrosion product is analyzed as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), and magnetite has been used as one of nanofluid for CHF enhancement. The size of magnetite produced on the test heater surface is 20-140 nm, that is, it is nanoscale. Therefore, the CHF enhancement mechanism of SA508 material is similar to the case using other test heater (like stainless steel) with magnetite nanofluid. Additives like TSP, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CNT nanoparticles are also tested, but they did not show the CHF enhancement effect. In case of TSP, it showed CHF decrease effect due to preventing effect on SA508 corrosion.