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Sample records for safety research experiment facility reactor

  1. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume VII. Reactor cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The Reactor Cooling System (RCS) will provide the required cooling during test operations of the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The RCS transfers the reactor energy generated in the core to a closed-loop water storage system located completely inside the reactor containment building. After the reactor core has cooled to a safe level, the stored heat is rejected through intermediate heat exchangers to a common forced-draft evaporative cooling tower. The RCS is comprised of three independent cooling loops of which any two can remove sufficient heat from the core to prevent structural damage to the system components

  2. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume V. Reactor vessel and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel (PCRV) will serve as the primary pressure retaining structure for the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The reactor core, control rod drive room, primary heat exchangers, and gas circulators will be located in cavities within the PCRV. The orientation of these cavities, except for the control rod drive room, will be similar to the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs that are currently proposed or under design. Due to the nature of this type of structure, all biological and radiological shielding requirements are incorporated into the basic vessel design. At the midcore plane there are three radially oriented slots that will extend from the outside surface of the PCRV to the reactor core liner. These slots will accommodate each of the fuel motion monitoring systems which will be part of the observation apparatus used with the loop experiments

  3. Progress report concerning safety research for nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Examination and evaluation of safety research results for nuclear reactor facilities have been performed, as more than a year has elapsed since the plan had been initiated in April, 1976, by the special sub-committee for the safety of nuclear reactor facilities. The research is carried out by being divided roughly into 7 items, and seems to be steadily proceeding, though it does not yet reach the target. The above 7 items include researches for (1) criticality accident, (2) loss of coolant accident, (3) safety for light water reactor fuel, (4) construction safety for reactor facilities, (5) reduction of release of radioactive material, (6) safety evaluation based on the probability theory for reactor facilities, and (7) aseismatic measures for reactor facilities. With discussions on the progress and the results of the research this time, research on the behaviour on fuel in abnormal transients including in-core and out-core experiments has been added to the third item, deleting the power-cooling mismatch experiment in Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of JAERI. Also it has been decided to add two research to the seventh item, namely measured data collection, classification and analysis, and probability assessment of failures due to an earthquake. For these 7 items, the report describes the concrete contents of research to be performed in fiscal years of 1977 and 1978, by discussing on most rational and suitable contents conceivable at present. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor; Rao, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-05-15

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  5. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  6. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume IV. Reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The principal purpose of the SAREF Reactor Containment Building (RCB) is to prevent the uncontrolled release of radioactive materials to the atmosphere as a result of accidental occurrences inside the containment. The RCB houses numerous reactor systems and components including the Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel (PCRV). The design of the RCB is of reinforced concrete (steel-lined). The containment building is embedded nearly 100 feet in lava rock. It has therefore been necessary to independently formulate an appropriate and conservative design approach

  7. The experiences of research reactor accident to safety improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiranto, S.

    1999-01-01

    The safety of reactor operation is the main factor in order that the nuclear technology development program can be held according the expected target. Several experience with research reactor incidents must be learned and understood by the nuclear program personnel, especially for operators and supervisors of RSG-GA. Siwabessy. From the incident experience of research reactor in the world, which mentioned in the book 'Experience with research reactor incidents' by IAEA, 1995, was concluded that the main cause of research reactor accidents is understandless about the safety culture by the nuclear installation personnel. With learn, understand and compare between this experiences and the condition of RSG GA Siwabessy is expended the operators and supervisors more attention about the safety culture, so that RSG GA Siwabessy can be operated successfull, safely according the expected target

  8. In-pile experiments and test facilities proposed for fast reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmes, M.A.; Avery, R.; Goldman, A.J.; Fauske, H.K.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Rose, D.; Wright, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    The role of in-pile experiments in support of the resolution of fast breeder reactor safety and licensing issues has been re-examined, with emphasis on key safety issues. Experiment needs have been related to the specific characteristics of these safety issues and to realistic requirements for additional test facility capabilities which can be achieved and utilized within the next ten years. It is found that those safety issues related to the energetics of core disruptive accidents have the largest impact on new facility requirements. However, utilization of existing facilities with modifications can provide for a continuing increase in experiment capability and experiment results on a timely bases. Emphasis has been placed upon maximum utilization of existing facilities and minimum requirements for new facilities. This evaluation has concluded that a new Safety Test Facility, STF, along with major modifications to the EBR II facility, improvement in TREAT capabilities, the existing Sodium Loop Safety Facility and corresponding Support Facilities provide the essential elements of the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) required for resolution of key issues

  9. Proposal for a seismic facility for reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.A.; Dove, R.C.; Rhorer, R.L.

    1976-07-01

    Certain problem areas in the seismic analysis and design of nuclear reactors are enumerated and the way in which an experimental program might contribute to each area is examined. The use of seismic simulation testing receives particular attention, especially with regard to the verification of structural response analysis. The importance of scale modeling used in conjunction with seismic simulation is also stressed. The capabilities of existing seismic simulators are summarized, and a proposed facility is described which would considerably extend the ability to conduct, with confidence, confirmatory experiments on the behavior of reactor components when subjected to seismic excitation. Particular applications to gas-cooled and other reactor types are described

  10. Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Facility 10CFR830 Safety Basis Related to Facility Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomberlin, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a DOE Category A reactor, was designed to provide an irradiation test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. The ATR Safety Analysis Report, determined by DOE to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, provides versatility in types of experiments that may be conducted. This paper addresses two general types of experiments in the ATR facility and how safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore this type of experiment is addressed with more detail in the safety basis. This allows individual safety analyses for these experiments to be more routine and repetitive. The second type of experiment is less defined and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, individual safety analyses for the second type of experiment tend to be more unique from experiment to experiment. Experiments are also discussed relative to ''major modifications'' and DOE-STD-1027-92. Application of the USQ process to ATR experiments is also discussed

  11. Review of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1977-02-01

    A review is made of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research under way in both commercial power plants and test reactors. Such experiments are grouped in two; first, LWR fuel performance under normal and abnormal operating conditions, and second, irradiation effects on fracture toughness in LWR vessels. In the former are fuel densification, swelling, and the influence of power ramp and cycling on fuel rod, and also fuel rod behavior under accident conditions in in-reactor experiment. In the latter are the effects of neutron exposure level on the ferritic steel of pressure vessels, etc.. (auth.)

  12. Safety research experiment facilities, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liverman, J.L.

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement was prepared for the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) Project. The purpose of the proposed project is to modify some existing facilities and provide a new test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for conducting fast breeder reactor (FBR) safety experiments. The SAREF Project proposal has been developed after an extensive study which identified the FBR safety research needs requiring in-reactor experiments and which evaluated the capability of various existing and new facilities to meet these needs. The proposed facilities provide for the in-reactor testing of large bundles of prototypical FBR fuel elements under a wide variety of conditions, ranging from those abnormal operating conditions which might be expected to occur during the life of an FBR power plant to the extremely low probability, hypothetical accidents used in the evaluation of some design options and in the assessment of the long-term potential risk associated with wide-acale deployment of the FBR

  13. Design of Safety Parameter Monitoring Function in a Research Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jaekwan; Suh, Yongsuk

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the safety parameter monitoring system (SPDS) is to help operating personnel in the control room make quick assessments of the plant safety status. Thus, the basic function of the SPDS is a provision of a continuous indication of plant parameters or derived variables representative of the safety status of the plant. NUREG-0737 Supplement 1 provides details of the functional criteria for the SPDS, as one of the action plan requirements from TMI accident. The system provides various functions as follows: · Alerting based on safety function decision logics, · Success path analysis to achieve the integrity of the safety functions, · 3 layer display architecture - safety function, success path display for each safety function, system summary and equipment details for each safety function, · Integration with computer-based procedure. According to a Notice of the NSSC No. 2012-31, a research reactor facility generating more than 2 MW of power should also be furnished with the SPDS for emergency preparedness. Generally, a research reactor is a small size facility, and its number of instrumentations is fewer than that of NPPs. In particular, it is actually hard to have various and powerful functions from an economic perspective. Therefore, a safety parameter display system optimized for a research reactor facility must be proposed. This paper provides the requirement analysis results and proposes the design of safety parameter monitoring function for a research reactor. The safety parameter monitoring function supporting control room personnel during emergency conditions should be designed in a research reactor facility. The facility size and number of signals are smaller than that of the power plants. Also, it is actually hard to have various and powerful functions of nuclear power plants from an economic perspective. Thus, a safety parameter display system optimized to a research reactor must be proposed. First, we found important design items

  14. Design of Safety Parameter Monitoring Function in a Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaekwan; Suh, Yongsuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The primary purpose of the safety parameter monitoring system (SPDS) is to help operating personnel in the control room make quick assessments of the plant safety status. Thus, the basic function of the SPDS is a provision of a continuous indication of plant parameters or derived variables representative of the safety status of the plant. NUREG-0737 Supplement 1 provides details of the functional criteria for the SPDS, as one of the action plan requirements from TMI accident. The system provides various functions as follows: · Alerting based on safety function decision logics, · Success path analysis to achieve the integrity of the safety functions, · 3 layer display architecture - safety function, success path display for each safety function, system summary and equipment details for each safety function, · Integration with computer-based procedure. According to a Notice of the NSSC No. 2012-31, a research reactor facility generating more than 2 MW of power should also be furnished with the SPDS for emergency preparedness. Generally, a research reactor is a small size facility, and its number of instrumentations is fewer than that of NPPs. In particular, it is actually hard to have various and powerful functions from an economic perspective. Therefore, a safety parameter display system optimized for a research reactor facility must be proposed. This paper provides the requirement analysis results and proposes the design of safety parameter monitoring function for a research reactor. The safety parameter monitoring function supporting control room personnel during emergency conditions should be designed in a research reactor facility. The facility size and number of signals are smaller than that of the power plants. Also, it is actually hard to have various and powerful functions of nuclear power plants from an economic perspective. Thus, a safety parameter display system optimized to a research reactor must be proposed. First, we found important design items

  15. Safety Research Experiment Facilities, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This environmental statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) in support of the Energy Research and Development Administration's (ERDA) proposal for legislative authorization and appropriations for the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) Project. The purpose of the proposed project is to modify some existing facilities and provide a new test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for conducting fast breeder reactor (FBR) safety experiments. The SAREF Project proposal has been developed after an extensive study which identified the FBR safety research needs requiring in-reactor experiments and which evaluated the capability of various existing and new facilities to meet these needs. The proposed facilities provide for the in-reactor testing of large bundles of prototypical FBR fuel elements under a wide variety of conditions, ranging from those abnormal operating conditions which might be expected to occur during the life of an FBR power plant to the extremely low probability, hypothetical accidents used in the evalution of some design options and in the assessment of the long-term potential risk associated with wide-scale deployment of the FBR

  16. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume II. Building and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The conceptual design of Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) site system includes a review and evaluation of previous geotechnical reports for the area where SAREF will be constructed and the conceptual design of access and in-plant roads, parking, experiment-transport-vehicle maneuvering areas, security fencing, drainage, borrow area development and restoration, and landscaping

  17. Safety analysis for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of safety analysis for research reactors is to establish and confirm the design basis for items important to safety using appropriate analytical tools. The design, manufacture, construction and commissioning should be integrated with the safety analysis to ensure that the design intent has been incorporated into the as-built reactor. Safety analysis assesses the performance of the reactor against a broad range of operating conditions, postulated initiating events and other circumstances, in order to obtain a complete understanding of how the reactor is expected to perform in these situations. Safety analysis demonstrates that the reactor can be kept within the safety operating regimes established by the designer and approved by the regulatory body. This analysis can also be used as appropriate in the development of operating procedures, periodic testing and inspection programmes, proposals for modifications and experiments and emergency planning. The IAEA Safety Requirements publication on the Safety of Research Reactors states that the scope of safety analysis is required to include analysis of event sequences and evaluation of the consequences of the postulated initiating events and comparison of the results of the analysis with radiological acceptance criteria and design limits. This Safety Report elaborates on the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-4 on the Safety of Research Reactors, and the guidance given in IAEA Safety Series No. 35-G1, Safety Assessment of Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report, providing detailed discussion and examples of related topics. Guidance is given in this report for carrying out safety analyses of research reactors, based on current international good practices. The report covers all the various steps required for a safety analysis; that is, selection of initiating events and acceptance criteria, rules and conventions, types of safety analysis, selection of

  18. Study of In-Pile test facility for fast reactor safety research: performance requirements and design features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, N.; Kawatta, N.; Niwa, H.; Kondo, S.; Maeda, K

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a program and the main design features of a new in-pile safety facility SERAPH planned for future fast reactor safety research. The current status of R and D on technical developments in relation to the research objectives and performance requirements to the facility design is given.

  19. Physics design of fast reactor safety test facilities for in-pile experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Shaftman, D.H.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lam, S.K.; Pennington, E.M.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    A determined effort to identify and resolve current Fast Breeder Reactor safety testing needs has recently resulted in a number of conceptual designs for FBR safety test facilities which are very complex and diverse both in their features and in their purpose. The paper discusses the physics foundations common to most fast reactor safety test facilities and the constraints which they impose on the design. The logical evolution, features, and capabilities of several major conceptual designs are discussed on the basis of this common background

  20. Some considerations for assurance of reactor safety from experiences in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Sunao; Nishihara, Hideaki; Shibata, Toshikazu

    1981-01-01

    For the purpose of assuring reactor safety and strengthening research in the related fields, a multi-disciplinary group was formed among university researchers, including social scientists, with a special allocation of the Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. An excerpt from the first year's report (1979 -- 1980) is edited here, which contains an interpretation of Murphy's reliability engineering law, a scope of reactor diagnostic studies to be pursued at universities, and safety measures already implemented or suggested to be implemented in university research reactors. (author)

  1. Research for enhancing reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    Recent research for enhanced reactor safety covers extensive and numerous experiments and computed modelling activities designed to verify and to improve existing design requirements. The lectures presented at the meeting report GRS research results and the current status of reactor safety research in France. The GRS experts present results concerning expert systems and their perspectives in safety engineering, large-scale experiments and their significance in the development and verification of computer codes for thermohydraulic modelling of safety-related incidents, the advanced system code ATHLET for analysis of thermohydraulic processes of incidents, the analysis simulator which is a tool for fast evaluation of accident management measures, and investigations into event sequences and the required preventive emergency measures within the German Risk Study. (DG) [de

  2. Reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned reactor safety research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The reactor safety research program, sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, is described in terms of its program objectives, current status, and future plans. Elements of safety research work applicable to water reactors, fast reactors, and gas cooled reactors are presented together with brief descriptions of current and planned test facilities. (U.S.)

  3. Acoustic detection of boiling in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility in-reactor experiment P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, W.M.; Anderson, T.T.; Bobis, J.P.

    1976-06-01

    Acoustic data were obtained from two high-temperature lithium niobate microphones on the loop background noise and transient pressure pulses during the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) P1 in-reactor experiment. This experiment simulated an LMFBR loss-of-piping-integrity (LOPI) transient on a nineteen element, end-of-life, enriched-UO 2 fuel assembly. The microphones were exposed to liquid sodium at a distance 4.85 meters above the reactor core at temperatures between 315 0 and 590 0 C. The distance and location of the microphones in the P1 Test Train provided an attenuative transmission path which was undesirable for optimum acoustic detection of sodium boiling and fuel failure. The data gathered on the loop background noise was observed to be dominated by pump and electrical noise at frequencies below 1.5 KHz and appeared to be dominated by flow induced local turbulence noise at higher frequencies. During the period of time that the sodium in the fuel assembly was at its saturation temperature 943 0 C (1730 0 F), as indicated by the wire wrap thermocouples, several discrete pulses were observed with peak-to-peak pressure between 3.3 kPa and 7.9 kPa and center frequencies between 360 and 550 Hz. The pulses occurred at two separate gradually increasing repetition rates. These observations appear to be consistent with the result of an impulsive forcing function interacting with a band passed Helmholtz resonator. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that sodium boiling occurred in the P1 fuel assembly, resulting in the formation of individual voids that collapsed upon reaching the subcooled sodium. These data provide pertinent information regarding the feasibility of sodium boiling detection and may provide additional insight into the dynamics of the void behavior

  4. Operational safety experience at 14 MW research reactor from Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.

    2007-01-01

    The main challenges identified in TRIGA Research Reactor operated in Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti, Romania, are in fact similar with challenges of many other research reactors in the world, those are: Ageing of work forces and knowledge management; Maintaining an enhanced technical and scientific competences; Ensuring adequate financial and human resources; Enhancing excellence in management; Ensuring confidence of stakeholders and public; Ageing of equipment and systems.To ensure safety availability of TRIGA Research Reactor in INR Pitesti, the financial resources were secured and a large refurbishment programme and modernization was undertaking by management of institute. This programme concern the modernization of reactor control and safety systems, primary cooling system instrumentation, radiation protection and releases monitoring with new spectrometric computerized abilities, ventilation filtering system and cooling towers. The expected life extension of the reactor will be about 15 years

  5. Review on conformance of JMTR reactor facility to safety design examination guides for water-cooled reactors for test and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Naka, Michihiro; Sakuta, Yoshiyuki; Hori, Naohiko; Matsui, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Masataka

    2009-03-01

    The safety design examination guides for water-cooled reactors for test and research are formulated as fundamental judgements on the basic design validity for licensing from a viewpoint of the safety. Taking the refurbishment opportunity of the JMTR, the conformance of the JMTR reactor facility to current safety design examination guides was reviewed with licensing documents, annexes and related documents. As a result, it was found that licensing documents fully satisfied the requirements of the current guides. Moreover, it was found that the JMTR reactor facility itself also satisfied the guides requirements as well as the safety performance, since the facility with safety function such as structure, systems, devices had been installed based on the licensing documents under the permission by the regulation authority. Important devices for safety have been produced under authorization of regulating authority. Therefore, it was confirmed that the licensing was conformed to guides, and that the JMTR has enough performance. (author)

  6. IAEA programme on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala, F.; Di Meglio, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the IAEA programme on research reactor safety and includes the safety related areas of conversions to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The program is based on the IAEA statutory responsibilities as they apply to the requirements of over 320 research reactors operating around the world. The programme covers four major areas: (a) the development of safety documents; (b) safety missions to research reactor facilities; (c) support of research programmes on research reactor safety; (d) support of Technical Cooperation projects on research reactor safety issues. The demand for these activities by the IAEA member states has increased substantially in recent years especially in developing countries with increasing emphasis being placed on LEU conversion matters. In response to this demand, the IAEA has undertaken an extensive programme for each of the four areas above. (author)

  7. Safety of Research Reactors. Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this Safety Requirements publication is to provide a basis for safety and a basis for safety assessment for all stages in the lifetime of a research reactor. Another objective is to establish requirements on aspects relating to regulatory control, the management of safety, site evaluation, design, operation and decommissioning. Technical and administrative requirements for the safety of research reactors are established in accordance with these objectives. This Safety Requirements publication is intended for use by organizations engaged in the site evaluation, design, manufacturing, construction, operation and decommissioning of research reactors as well as by regulatory bodies

  8. Experiments with preirradiated fuel rods in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiki, O.; Kobayashi, S.; Takariko, I.; Ishijima, K.

    1992-01-01

    In the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) owned and operated by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), extensive experimental studies on the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions have been continued since the start of the test program in 1975. Accumulated experimental data were used as the fundamental data base of the Japanese safety evaluation guideline for reactivity initiated events in light water cooled nuclear power plants established by the nuclear safety commission in 1984. All of the data used to establish the guideline were, however, limited to those derived from the tests with fresh fuel rods as test samples because of the lack of experimental facility to handle highly radioactive materials.The guideline, therefore, introduces the peak fuel enthalpy of 85 cal/g which was adopted from the SPERT-CDC data as a provisional failure threshold of preirradiated fuel rod and, says that this value should be revised based on the NSRR experiments in the future. According to the above requirement, new NSRR experimental program with the preirradiated fuel rods as test samples was started in 1989. Test fuel rods are prepared by refabrication of the long-sized fuel rods preirradiated in commercial PWRs and BWRs into short segments and by preirradiation of short-sized test fuel rods in the Japan Material Testing Reactor(JMTR). For the tests with preirradiated fuel rods as test samples, the special experimental capsules, the automatic instrumentation fitting device, the automatic capsule assembling device and the capsule loading device were newly developed. In addition, the existing hot cave was modified to mount the capsule assembling device and the other inspection tools and, a new small iron cell was established adjacent to the cave to store the instrumentation fitting device. (author)

  9. Experience and lessons learned in the assessment of safety justifications for experiments mounted in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Some experiments in research reactors are arguably a risky undertaking due to their uncertain outcome. The justifications for such experiments require careful assessment to validate their undertaking. The public, the operators and the installation itself must be safeguarded. Assessment of the potential risk is an acquired skill but in doing so the route can be eased by learning from the lessons experience can teach. This paper, essentially for the usage of safety managers, sets out some of the issues relating to the assessment process gained from our experience over a few tens of years in the assessment of experiments. Many of the conclusions reached may appear all too obvious viewed in retrospect, but they were not necessarily clear at the time. Those organizations setting up assessment teams may find some of the conclusions of value such that their proposed management system can embrace methodologies for assessment that can avoid or lessen the impact of some of the pitfalls we have tried to identify. Failure to recognise some of these points may run the risk of delayed clearances, dilated timescales and cost overruns. It is in the hope of reducing all these penalties that we offer our experiences

  10. Reactor safety research in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1980-02-01

    Objectives, means and results of Swedish light water reactor safety research during the 1970s are reviewed. The expenditure is about 40 Million Swkr per year excluding industry. Large efforts have been devoted to experimental studies of loss of coolant accidents. Large scale containment response tests for simulated pipe breaks were carried out at the Marviken facility. At Studsvik a method for testing fuel during fast power changes has been developed. Stress corrosion, crack growth and the effect of irradiation on the strength ductility of Zircaloy tube was studied. A method for determining the fracture toughness of pressure vessel steel was developed and it was shown that the fracture toughness was lower than earlier assumed. The release of fission products to reactor water was studied and so was the release, transport and removal of airborne radioactive matter for Swedish BWRs and PWRs. Test methods for iodine filter systems were developed. A system for continuous monitoring of radioactive noble gas stack release was developed for the Ringhals plant. Attention was drawn to the importance of the human factor for reactor safety. Probabilistic methods for risk analysis were applied to the Barsebaeck 2 and Forsmark 3 boiling water reactors. Procedures and working conditions for operator personnel were investigated. (GBn)

  11. Safety of research reactors (Design and Operation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirar, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to conduct a comprehensive up-to-date literature review on the current status of safety of research reactor both in design and operation providing the future trends in safety of research reactors. Data and technical information of variety selected historical research reactors were thoroughly reviewed and evaluated, furthermore illustrations of the material of fuel, control rods, shielding, moderators and coolants used were discussed. Insight study of some historical research reactors was carried with considering sample cases such as Chicago Pile-1, F-1 reactor, Chalk River Laboratories,. The National Research Experimental Reactor and others. The current status of research reactors and their geographical distribution, reactor category and utilization is also covered. Examples of some recent advanced reactors were studied like safety barriers of HANARO of Korea including safety doors of the hall and building entrance and finger print identification which prevent the reactor from sabotage. On the basis of the results of this research, it is apparent that a high quality of safety of nuclear reactors can be attained by achieving enough robust construction, designing components of high levels of efficiency, replacing the compounds of the reactor in order to avoid corrosion and degradation with age, coupled with experienced scientists and technical staffs to operate nuclear research facilities.(Author)

  12. Safety of research reactors - A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Due to historical reasons research reactors have received less regulatory attention in the world than nuclear power plants. This has given rise to several safety issues which, if not addressed immediately, may result in an undesirable situation. However, in Pakistan, research reactors and power reactors have received due attention from the regulatory authority. The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 has been under regulatory surveillance since 1965, the year of its commissioning. The second reactor has also undergone all the safety reviews and checks mandated by the licensing procedures. A brief description of the regulatory framework, the several safety reviews carried out have been briefly described in this paper. Significant activities of the regulatory authority have also been described in verifying the safety of research reactors in Pakistan along with the future activities. The views of the Pakistani regulatory authority on the specific issues identified by the IAEA have been presented along with specific recommendations to the IAEA. We are of the opinion that there are more Member States operating nuclear research reactors than nuclear power plants. Therefore, there should be more emphasis on the research reactor safety, which somehow has not been the case. In several recommendations made to the IAEA on the specific safety issues the emphasis has been, in general, to have a similar documentation and approach for maintaining and verifying operational safety at research reactors as is currently available for nuclear power reactors and may be planned for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (author)

  13. Meeting on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The meeting 'Reactor Safety Research' organized for the second time by the GRS by order of the BMFT gave a review of research activities on the safety of light water reactors in the Federal Repulbic of Germany, international co-operation in this field and latest results of this research institution. The central fields of interest were subjects of man/machine-interaction, operational reliability accident sequences, and risk. (orig.) [de

  14. The DRAGON aerosol research facility to study aerosol behaviour for reactor safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckow, Detlef; Guentay, Salih

    2008-01-01

    During a severe accident in a nuclear power plant fission products are expected to be released in form of aerosol particles and droplets. To study the behaviour of safety relevant reactor components under aerosol loads and prototypical severe accident conditions the multi-purpose aerosol generation facility DRAGON is used since 1994 for several projects. DRAGON can generate aerosol particles by the evaporation-condensation technique using a plasma torch system, fluidized bed and atomization of particles suspended in a liquid. Soluble, hygroscopic aerosol (i.e. CsOH) and insoluble aerosol particles (i.e. SnO 2 , TiO 2 ) or mixtures of them can be used. DRAGON uses state-of-the-art thermal-hydraulic, data acquisition and aerosol measurement techniques and is mainly composed of a mixing chamber, the plasma torch system, a steam generator, nitrogen gas and compressed air delivery systems, several aerosol delivery piping, gas heaters and several auxiliary systems to provide vacuum, coolant and off-gas treatment. The facility can be operated at system pressure of 5 bars, temperatures of 300 deg. C, flow rates of non-condensable gas of 900 kg/h and steam of 270 kg/h, respectively. A test section under investigation is attached to DRAGON. The paper summarizes and demonstrates with the help of two project examples the capabilities of DRAGON for reactor safety studies. (authors)

  15. Development and Operation of Experiment Course using Research Reactor and Associated Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, B. C.; Hwang, I. A.; Won, J. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Nam, J. S.; Seo, K. W.; Kim, H. N.

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of present research is to offer a specialized educational opportunity by developing specific curriculum for potential users, mainly university students majoring in related with nuclear engineering and radiation field, on site at KAERI, exploiting the diverse offering of HANARO and ancillary facilities. The specific items of this research accomplished are: First, Development of various curricula for specific research using HANARO and continuous operation of the developed curricula to provided university students with opportunities to use HANARO. Second, Continuous operation of research reactor related experimental training programs for university students in nuclear field to make contribution to cultivating specialists. Third, through the site experimental training for new coming nuclear engineering students, support future potential users to the nuclear research fields, as well as enlarge or broaden the base. Finally, it is hoped that these experiments broadens public awareness and acceptance of the present and potential future contribution of the reactor technology, there by bring positive impacts to policy making. As a whole, 108 students offered and 88 students from 6 universities have completed the course of the programs developed by this project. Also, 1 textbook and 1 teaching aid, a questionnaire have been developed to support the program.

  16. Study of fast reactor safety test facilities. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, G.I.; Boudreau, J.E.; McLaughlin, T.; Palmer, R.G.; Starkovich, V.; Stein, W.E.; Stevenson, M.G.; Yarnell, Y.L.

    1975-05-01

    Included are sections dealing with the following topics: (1) perspective and philosophy of fast reactor safety analysis; (2) status of accident analysis and experimental needs; (3) experiment and facility definitions; (4) existing in-pile facilities; (5) new facility options; and (6) data acquisition methods

  17. Technical safety requirements for the Annular Core Research Reactor Facility (ACRRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldt, K.R.; Morris, F.M.; Talley, D.G.; McCrory, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) document is prepared and issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements. The bases for the TSR are established in the ACRRF Safety Analysis Report issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The TSR identifies the operational conditions, boundaries, and administrative controls for the safe operation of the facility

  18. Probabilistic safety assessment for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    Increasing interest in using Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methods for research reactor safety is being observed in many countries throughout the world. This is mainly because of the great ability of this approach in achieving safe and reliable operation of research reactors. There is also a need to assist developing countries to apply Probabilistic Safety Assessment to existing nuclear facilities which are simpler and therefore less complicated to analyse than a large Nuclear Power Plant. It may be important, therefore, to develop PSA for research reactors. This might also help to better understand the safety characteristics of the reactor and to base any backfitting on a cost-benefit analysis which would ensure that only necessary changes are made. This document touches on all the key aspects of PSA but placed greater emphasis on so-called systems analysis aspects rather than the in-plant or ex-plant consequences

  19. Safety Research Experiment Facility project. Conceptual design report. Volume IX. Experiment handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Information on the SAREF Reactor experiment handling system is presented concerning functions and design requirements, design description, operation, casualty events and recovery procedures, and maintenance

  20. Safety status of Russian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    Gosatomnadzor of Russia is conducting the safety regulation and inspection activity related to nuclear and radiation safety at nuclear research facilities, including research reactors, critical assemblies and sub-critical assemblies. It implies implementing three major activities: 1) establishing the laws and safety standards in the field of research reactors nuclear and radiation safety; 2) research reactors licensing; and 3) inspections (or license conditions tracking and inspection). The database on nuclear research facilities has recently been updated based on the actual status of all facilities. It turned out that many facilities have been shutdown, whether temporary or permanently, waiting for the final decision on their decommissioning. Compared to previous years the situation has been inevitably changing. Now we have 99 nuclear research facilities in total under Gosatomnadzor of Russia supervision (compared to 113 in previous years). Their distribution by types and operating organizations is presented. The licensing and conduct of inspection processes are briefly outlined with emphasis being made on specific issues related to major incidents that happened in 2000, spent fuel management, occupational exposure, effluents and emissions, emergency preparedness and physical protection. Finally, a summary of problems at current Russian research facilities is outlined. (author)

  1. Development of Safety Review Guidance for Research and Training Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kju-Myeng; Shin, Dae-Soo; Ahn, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Hoon-Joo

    2007-01-01

    The KINS already issued the safety review guidance for pressurized LWRs. But the safety review guidance for research and training reactors were not developed. So, the technical standard including safety review guidance for domestic research and training reactors has been applied mutates mutandis to those of nuclear power plants. It is often difficult for the staff to effectively perform the safety review of applications for the permit by the licensee, based on peculiar safety review guidance. The NRC and NSC provide the safety review guidance for test and research reactors and European countries refer to IAEA safety requirements and guides. The safety review guide (SRG) of research and training reactors was developed considering descriptions of the NUREG- 1537 Part 2, previous experiences of safety review and domestic regulations for related facilities. This study provided the safety review guidance for research and training reactors and surveyed the difference of major acceptance criteria or characteristics between the SRG of pressurized light water reactor and research and training reactors

  2. Research on the state-of-the-art of probabilistic safety assessment for non-reactor nuclear facilities (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamane, Yuichi; Tashiro, Sinsuke; Muramatsu, Ken

    2007-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) entrusted with a research on the state-of-the-art of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of non-reactor nuclear facilities (NRNF) such as fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities to the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). The objectives of this research is to obtain the basic useful information related for establishing the quantitative performance requirement and for risk-informed regulation through qualifying issues needed to be resolved for applying PSA to NRNF. A special committee of 'Research on the analysis methods for accident consequence in NFRF' was organized by the AESJ. The research activities of the committee were mainly focused on the analysis method for upper bounding consequences of accidents such as events of criticality, explosion, fire and solvent boiling postulated in NRNF resulting in release of radio active material to the environment. This report summarizes the results of research conducted by the committee in FY 2005. (author)

  3. RB research reactor Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This RB reactor safety report is a revised and improved version of the Safety report written in 1962. It contains descriptions of: reactor building, reactor hall, control room, laboratories, reactor components, reactor control system, heavy water loop, neutron source, safety system, dosimetry system, alarm system, neutron converter, experimental channels. Safety aspects of the reactor operation include analyses of accident causes, errors during operation, measures for preventing uncontrolled activity changes, analysis of the maximum possible accident in case of different core configurations with natural uranium, slightly and highly enriched fuel; influence of possible seismic events

  4. Safety upgrades to the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeAbreu, B.; Mark, J.M.; Mutterback, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The NRU (National Research Universal) Reactor is a 135 MW thermal research facility located at Chalk River Laboratories, and is owned and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. One of the largest and most versatile research reactors in the world, it serves as the R and D workhorse for Canada's CANDU business while at the same time filling the role as one of the world's major producers of medical radioisotopes. AECL plans to extend operation of the NRU reactor to approximately the year 2005 when a new replacement, the Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) will be available. To achieve this, AECL has undertaken a program of safety reassessment and upgrades to enhance the level of safety consistent with modem requirements. An engineering assessment/inspection of critical systems, equipment and components was completed and seven major safety upgrades are being designed and installed. These upgrades will significantly reduce the reactor's vulnerability to common mode failures and external hazards, with particular emphasis on seismic protection. The scheduled completion date for the project is 1999 December at a cost approximately twice the annual operating cost. All work on the NRU upgrade project is planned and integrated into the regular operating cycles of the reactor; no major outages are anticipated. This paper describes the safety upgrades and discusses the technical and managerial challenges involved in extending the operating life of the NRU reactor. (author)

  5. Power reactor core safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.; Kim, W.C.; Shon, D.S.; Kim, J.

    1981-01-01

    As a part of nuclear safety research program, a project was launched to develop a model to predict fuel failure, to produce the data required for the localizaton of fuel design and fabrication technology, to establish safety limits for regulation of nuclear power plants and to develop reactor operation method to minimize fuel failure through the study of fuel failure mechanisms. During 1980, the first year of this project, various fuel failure mechanisms were analyzed, an experimental method for out-of-pile tests to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of Zircaloy cladding underiodine environment was established, and characteristics of PWR and CANDU Zircaloy specimens were examined. Also developed during 1980 were the methods and correlations to evaluate fuel failures in the reactor core based on operating data from power reactors

  6. Research on the state-of-the-art of probabilistic safety assessment for non-reactor nuclear facilities (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamane, Yuichi; Tashiro, Sinsuke; Muramatsu, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) entrusted with research on the state-of-the-art of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for non-reactor nuclear facilities (NRNF) to the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). The objectives of this research is to obtain the basic useful information related for establishing the quantitative performance requirement and for risk-informed regulation through qualifying issues needed to be resolved for applying PSA to NRNF. A special committee of 'research on the analysis methods for accident consequence in NFRF' was organized in the AESJ. The research activities of the committee were mainly focused on the analysis method for upper bounding consequences of accidents such as events of criticality, explosion, fire and solvent boiling postulated in NRNF resulting in release of radio active material to the environment. (author)

  7. Refurbishment and safety upgradation of research reactor Cirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marik, S.K.; Rao, D.V.H.; Bhatnagar, A.; Pant, R.C.; Tikku, A.C.; Sankar, S.

    2006-01-01

    Cirus, a 40 MW t, vertical tank type research reactor, having wide range of research facilities, was commissioned in the year 1960. This research reactor, situated at Mumbai, India has been operated and utilized extensively for isotope production, material testing and neutron beam research for nearly four decades. With a view to assess the residual life of the reactor, detailed ageing studies were carried out during the early 1990s. Based on these studies, refurbishment of Cirus for its life extension was taken up. During refurbishment, additional safety features were incorporated in various systems to qualify them for the current safety standards. This paper gives the details of the operating experiences, utilization of the reactor along with methodologies followed for carrying out detailed ageing studies, refurbishment and safety upgradation for its life extension

  8. Physics and safety of advanced research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Hardt, P. von der

    1987-01-01

    Advanced research reactor concepts are presently being developed in order to meet the neutron-based research needs of the nineties. Among these research reactors, which are characterized by an average power density of 1-10 MW per liter, highest priority is now generally given to the 'beam tube reactors'. These provide very high values of the thermal neutron flux (10 14 -10 16 cm -2 s -1 ) in a large volume outside of the reactor core, which can be used for sample irradiations and, in particular, for neutron scattering experiments. The paper first discusses the 'inverse flux trap concept' and the main physical aspects of the design and optimization of beam tube reactors. After that two examples of advanced research reactor projects are described which may be considered as two opposite extremes with respect to the physical optimization principle just mentioned. The present situation concerning cross section libraries and neutronic computer codes is more or less satisfactory. The safety analyses of advanced research reactors can largely be updated from those of current new designs, partially taking advantage of the immense volume of work done for power reactors. The paper indicates a few areas where generic problems for advanced research reactor safety are to be solved. (orig.)

  9. Reactor safety research - results and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaschik, M.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed so far is an essential contribution to the determination of the safety margins of nuclear facilities and their systems and to the further development of safety engineering. The further development of safety engineering involves a shift of emphasis in reactor safety research towards event sequences beyond the design basis. The aim of this shift in emphasis is the further development of the preventive level. This is based on the fact that the conservative design of the operating and safety systems involves and essential safety potential. The R and D work is intended to help develop accident management measures and to take the plant back into the safe state even after severe accidents. In this context, it is necessary to make full use of the safety margins of the plant and to include the operating systems for coping with accidents. As a result of the aims, the research work approaches operating and plant-specific processes. (orig./DG) [de

  10. RB research reactor safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This new version of the safety report is a revision of the safety report written in 1962 when the RB reactor started operation after reconstruction. The new safety report was needed because reactor systems and components have been improved and the administrative procedures were changed. the most important improvements and changes were concerned with the use of highly enriched fuel (80% enriched), construction of reactor converter outside the reactor vessel, improved control system by two measuring start-up channels, construction of system for heavy water leak detection, new inter phone connection between control room and other reactor rooms. This report includes description of reactor building with installations, rector vessel, reactor core, heavy water system, control system, safety system, dosimetry and alarm systems, experimental channels, neutron converter, reactor operation. Safety aspects contain analyses of accident reasons, method for preventing reactivity insertions, analyses of maximum hypothetical accidents for cores with natural uranium, 2% enriched and 80% enriched fuel elements. Influence of seismic events on the reactor safety and well as coupling between reactor and the converter are parts of this document

  11. Experimental facilities for gas-cooled reactor safety studies. Task group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) completed a study on Nuclear Safety Research in OECD Countries: Support Facilities for Existing and Advanced Reactors (SFEAR) which focused on facilities suitable for current and advanced water reactor systems. In a subsequent collective opinion on the subject, the CSNI recommended to conduct a similar exercise for Generation IV reactor designs, aiming to develop a strategy for ' better preparing the CSNI to play a role in the planned extension of safety research beyond the needs set by current operating reactors'. In that context, the CSNI established the Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) in 2008 with the objective of providing an overview of facilities suitable for performing safety research relevant to gas-cooled reactors and sodium fast reactors. This report addresses gas-cooled reactors; a similar report covering sodium fast reactors is under preparation. The findings of the TAREF are expected to trigger internationally funded CSNI projects on relevant safety issues at the key facilities identified. Such CSNI-sponsored projects constitute a means for efficiently obtaining the necessary data through internationally co-ordinated research. This report provides an overview of experimental facilities that can be used to carry out nuclear safety research for gas-cooled reactors and identifies priorities for organizing international co-operative programmes at selected facilities. The information has been collected and analysed by a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) as part of an ongoing initiative of the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) which aims to define and to implement a strategy for the efficient utilisation of facilities and resources for Generation IV reactor systems. (author)

  12. MAPLE research reactor safety uncertainty assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sills, H.E.; Duffey, R.B.; Andres, T.H.

    1999-01-01

    The MAPLE (multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experiment) reactor is a low pressure, low temperature, open-tank-in pool type research reactor that operates at a power level of 5 to 35 MW. MAPLE is designed for ease of operation, maintenance, and to meet today's most demanding requirements for safety and licensing. The emphasis is on the use of passive safety systems and environmentally qualified components. Key safety features include two independent and diverse shutdown systems, two parallel and independent cooling loops, fail safe operation, and a building design that incorporates the concepts of primary containment supported by secondary confinement

  13. Experience in the implementation of quality assurance program and safety culture assessment of research reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Suryopratomo, K.

    2001-01-01

    The implementation of quality assurance program and safety culture for research reactor operation are of importance to assure its safety status. It comprises an assessment of the quality of both technical and organizational aspects involved in safety. The method for the assessment is based on judging the quality of fulfillment of a number of essential issues for safety i.e. through audit, interview and/or discussions with personnel and management in plant. However, special consideration should be given to the data processing regarding the fuzzy nature of the data i.e. in answering the questionnaire. To accommodate this situation, the SCAP, a computer program based on fuzzy logic for assessing plant safety status, has been developed. As a case study, the experience in the assessment of Kartini research reactor safety status shows that it is strongly related to the implementation of quality assurance program in reactor operation and awareness of reactor operation staffs to safety culture practice. It is also shown that the application of the fuzzy rule in assessing reactor safety status gives a more realistic result than the traditional approach. (author)

  14. IAEA safety standards for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.

    2007-01-01

    The general structure of the IAEA Safety Standards and the process for their development and revision are briefly presented and discussed together with the progress achieved in the development of Safety Standards for research reactor. These documents provide the safety requirements and the key technical recommendations to achieve enhanced safety. They are intended for use by all organizations involved in safety of research reactors and developed in a way that allows them to be incorporated into national laws and regulations. The author reviews the safety standards for research reactors and details their specificities. There are 4 published safety standards: 1) Safety assessment of research reactors and preparation of the safety analysis report (35-G1), 2) Safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors (35-G2), 3) Commissioning of research reactors (NS-G-4.1), and 4) Maintenance, periodic testing and inspection of research reactors (NS-G-4.2). There 5 draft safety standards: 1) Operational limits and conditions and operating procedures for research reactors (DS261), 2) The operating organization and the recruitment, training and qualification of personnel for research reactors (DS325), 3) Radiation protection and radioactive waste management in the design and operation of research reactors (DS340), 4) Core management and fuel handling at research reactors (DS350), and 5) Grading the application of safety requirements for research reactors (DS351). There are 2 planned safety standards, one concerning the ageing management for research reactor and the second deals with the control and instrumentation of research reactors

  15. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions

  16. Safety research for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, W.T.

    1982-10-01

    Continuing research to develop and verify computer models of CANDU-PHW reactor process and safety systems is described. It is focussed on loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) because they are the precursors of more serious accidents. Research topics include: (i) fluid-dynamic and heat-transfer processes in the heat transport system during the blowdown and refilling phases of LOCAs; (ii) thermal and mechanical behaviour of fuel elements; (iii) thermal and mechanical behaviour of the fuel and the fuel-channel assembly in situations where the heavy-water moderator is the sink for decay heat produced in the fuel; (iv) chemical behaviour of fission gases that might be released into the reactor coolant and transported to the containment system; and (v) combustion of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures that would be produced if fuel temperatures were sufficiently high to initiate the zirconium-water reaction. The current status of the research on each of these topics is highlighted with particular emphasis on the conclusions reached to date and their impact on the continuing program

  17. Evaluation of neutronic characteristics of in-pile test reactor for fast reactor safety research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uto, N.; Ohno, S.; Kawata, N. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1996-09-01

    An extensive research program has been carried out at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation for the safety of future liquid-metal fast breeder reactors to be commercialized. A major part of this program is investigation and planning of advanced safety experiments conducted with a new in-pile safety test facility, which is larger and more advanced than any of the currently existing test reactors. Such a transient safety test reactor generally has unique neutronic characteristics that require various studies from the reactor physics point of view. In this paper, the outcome of the neutronics study is highlighted with presenting a reference core design concept and its performance in regard to the safety test objectives. (author)

  18. Critical experiments facility and criticality safety programs at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Takeshita, Isao; Suzaki, Takenori; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Nomura, Yasushi

    1985-10-01

    The nuclear criticality safety is becoming a key point in Japan in the safety considerations for nuclear installations outside reactors such as spent fuel reprocessing facilities, plutonium fuel fabrication facilities, large scale hot alboratories, and so on. Especially a large scale spent fuel reprocessing facility is being designed and would be constructed in near future, therefore extensive experimental studies are needed for compilation of our own technical standards and also for verification of safety in a potential criticality accident to obtain public acceptance. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is proceeding a construction program of a new criticality safety experimental facility where criticality data can be obtained for such solution fuels as mainly handled in a reprocessing facility and also chemical process experiments can be performed to investigate abnormal phenomena, e.g. plutonium behavior in solvent extraction process by using pulsed colums. In FY 1985 detail design of the facility will be completed and licensing review by the government would start in FY 1986. Experiments would start in FY 1990. Research subjects and main specifications of the facility are described. (author)

  19. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  20. The IAEA programme on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.

    2007-01-01

    According to the research reactor database of IAEA (RRDB), 250 reactors are operating worldwide, 248 have been shut down and 170 have been decommissioned. Among the 248 reactors that do not run, some will resume their activities, others will be dismantled and the rest do not face a clear future. The analysis of reported incidents shows that the ageing process is a major cause of failures, more than two thirds of operating reactors are over 30 years old. It also appears that the lack of adequate regulations or safety standards for research reactors is an important issue concerning reactor safety particularly when reactors are facing re-starting or upgrading or modifications. The IAEA has launched a 4-axis program: 1) to set basic safety regulations and standards for research reactors, 2) to provide IAEA members with an efficient help for the application of these safety regulations to their reactors, 3) to foster international exchange of information on research reactor safety, and 4) to provide IAEA members with a help concerning safety issues linked to malicious acts or sabotage on research reactors

  1. Light water reactor safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Aksan, S.N.; Behringer, K.; Prodan, M.; Stierli, F.; Ullrich, G.

    1980-07-01

    The research and development activities for the safety of Light Water Power Reactors carried out 1979 at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research are described. Considerations concerning the necessity, objectives and size of the Safety Research Project are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of the activities in the five tasks of the program, covering fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing, thermal-hydraulics, reactor noise analysis and pressure vessel steel surveillance. (Auth.)

  2. Experimental facilities for Generation IV reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krecanova, E.; Di Gabriele, F.; Berka, J.; Zychova, M.; Macak, J.; Vojacek, A.

    2013-06-01

    Centrum Vyzkumu Rez (CVR) is research and development Company situated in Czech Republic and member of the UJV group. One of its major fields is material research for Generation IV reactor concepts, especially supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), very high temperature/gas-cooled fast reactor (VHTR/GFR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). The CVR is equipped by and is building unique experimental facilities which simulate the environment in the active zones of these reactor concepts and enable to pre-qualify and to select proper constructional materials for the most stressed components of the facility (cladding, vessel, piping). New infrastructure is founded within the Sustainable Energy project focused on implementation the Generation IV and fusion experimental facilities. The research of SCWR concept is divided to research and development of the constructional materials ensured by SuperCritical Water Loop (SCWL) and fuel components research on Fuel Qualification Test loop (SCWL-FQT). SCWL provides environment of the primary circuits of European SCWR, pressure 25 MPa, temperature 600 deg. C and its major purpose is to simulate behavior of the primary medium and candidate constructional materials. On-line monitoring system is included to collect the operational data relevant to experiment and its evaluation (pH, conductivity, chemical species concentration). SCWL-FQT is facility focused on the behavior of cladding material and fuel at the conditions of so-called preheater, the first pass of the medium through the fuel (in case of European SCWR concept). The conditions are 450 deg. C and 25 MPa. SCWL-FQT is unique facility enabling research of the shortened fuel rods. VHTR/GFR research covers material testing and also cleaning methods of the medium in primary circuit. The High Temperature Helium Loop (HTHL) enables exposure of materials and simulates the VHTR/GFR core environment to analyze the behavior of medium, especially in presence of organic compounds and

  3. Research reactor safety - an overview of crucial aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverie, M.

    1998-01-01

    Chronology of the commissioning orders of the French research reactors illustrates the importance of the time factor. When looking at older reactors, one must, on one hand, demonstrate, not only the absence of risks tied to the reactor's ageing, but, on the other hand, adapt the reactor's original technical designs to today's safety practices and standards. The evolution of reactor safety requirements over the last twenty years sometimes makes this adaptation difficult. The design of the next research reactors, after a one to two decades pause in construction, will require to set up new safety assessment bases that will have to take into account the nuclear power plant safety evolution. As a general statement, research reactor safety approaches will require the incorporation of specific design rules for research reactors: experience feedback for one of a kind design, frequent modifications required by research programmes, special operational requirements with operators/researchers interfaces. (author)

  4. Research reactor safety - an overview of crucial aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverie, M. [Atomic Energy Commission, Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1998-07-01

    Chronology of the commissioning orders of the French research reactors illustrates the importance of the time factor. When looking at older reactors, one must, on one hand, demonstrate, not only the absence of risks tied to the reactor's ageing, but, on the other hand, adapt the reactor's original technical designs to today's safety practices and standards. The evolution of reactor safety requirements over the last twenty years sometimes makes this adaptation difficult. The design of the next research reactors, after a one to two decades pause in construction, will require to set up new safety assessment bases that will have to take into account the nuclear power plant safety evolution. As a general statement, research reactor safety approaches will require the incorporation of specific design rules for research reactors: experience feedback for one of a kind design, frequent modifications required by research programmes, special operational requirements with operators/researchers interfaces. (author)

  5. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.L.; Lerouge, B.

    1980-11-01

    This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. Some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion

  6. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; Holland, D.F.; Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g. for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions. 18 refs

  7. Nuclear reactor safety research in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeile, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed information about the performance of nuclear reactor systems, and especially about the nuclear fuel, is vital in determining the consequences of a reactor accident. Fission products released from the fuel during accidents are the ultimate safety concern to the general public living in the vicinity of a nuclear reactor plant. Safety research conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has provided the NRC with detailed data relating to most of the postulated nuclear reactor accidents. Engineers and scientists at the INEL are now in the process of gathering data related to the most severe nuclear reactor accident - the core melt accident. This paper describes the focus of the nuclear reactor safety research at the INEL. The key results expected from the severe core damage safety research program are discussed

  8. LMFBR safety experiment facility planning and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, M.G.; Scott, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    In the past two years considerable effort has been placed on the planning and design of new facilities for the resolution of LMFBR safety issues. The paper reviews the key issues, the experiments needed to resolve them, and the design aspects of proposed new facilities. In addition, it presents a decision theory approach to selecting an optimal combination of modified and new facilities

  9. Commissioning of research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on meeting the requirements for the commissioning of research reactors on the basis of international best practices. Specifically, it provides recommendations on fulfilling the requirements established in paras 6.44 and 7.42-7.50 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety of Research Reactors, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-4, IAEA, Vienna (2005) and guidance and specific and consequential recommendations relating to the recommendations presented in paras 615-621 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors, Safety Series No. 35-G2, IAEA, Vienna (1994) and paras 228-229 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety Assessment of Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report, Safety Series No. 35-G1, IAEA, Vienna (1994). This Safety Guide is intended for use by all organizations involved in commissioning for a research reactor, including the operating organization, the regulatory body and other organizations involved in the research reactor project

  10. Safety of Research Reactors. Specific Safety Requirements (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements for all main areas of safety for research reactors, with particular emphasis on requirements for design and operation. It explains the safety objectives and concepts that form the basis for safety and safety assessment for all stages in the lifetime of a research reactor. Technical and administrative requirements for the safety of new research reactors are established in accordance with these objectives and concepts, and they are to be applied to the extent practicable for existing research reactors. The safety requirements established in this publication for the management of safety and regulatory supervision apply to site evaluation, design, manufacturing, construction, commissioning, operation (including utilization and modification), and planning for decommissioning of research reactors (including critical assemblies and subcritical assemblies). The publication is intended for use by regulatory bodies and other organizations with responsibilities in these areas and in safety analysis, verification and review, and the provision of technical support.

  11. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department. Annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E. [eds.

    2000-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1999. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR 3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Management Plant, and the educational reactor DR 1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au)

  12. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjær, A.; Jensen, Per Hedemann

    2000-01-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1999. The department´s research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: "Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety" and"Radioecology and Tracer Studies". The nuclear...... facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR 3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Management Plant, and the educational reactor DR 1. Lists of staff and publications are includedtogether with a summary of the staff´s participation in national and international committees....

  13. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Aarkrog, A.; Brodersen, K. [and others

    1998-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1997. The department`s research and development activities were organized in four research programmes: Reactor Safety, Radiation protection, Radioecology, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the educational reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff`s participation in national and international committees. (au) 11 tabs., 39 ills.; 74 refs.

  14. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E

    1999-04-01

    The report present a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1998. The department`s research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: `Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety` and `Radioecology and Tracer Studies`. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment plant, and the educational reactor DR1. Lsits of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff`s participation in national and international committees. (au)

  15. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E.

    2000-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1999. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR 3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Management Plant, and the educational reactor DR 1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au)

  16. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities department annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Floto, H.; Heydorn, K.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    1997-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1996. The Department's research and development activities are organized in three research programmes: Radiation Protection, Reactor Safety, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the Research Reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the Educational Reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au) 2 tabs., 28 ills

  17. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Aarkrog, A.; Brodersen, K.

    1998-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1997. The department's research and development activities were organized in four research programmes: Reactor Safety, Radiation protection, Radioecology, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the educational reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au)

  18. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E.

    1999-04-01

    The report present a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1998. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment plant, and the educational reactor DR1. Lsits of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au)

  19. IAEA activities on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.

    1995-01-01

    Since its inception in 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included activities in its programme to address aspects of research reactors such as safety, utilization and fuel cycle considerations. These activities were based on statutory functions and responsibilities, and on the current situation of research reactors in operation around the world; they responded to IAEA Member States' general or specific demands. At present, the IAEA activities on research reactors cover the above aspects and respond to specific and current issues, amongst which safety-related are of major concern to Member States. The present IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP) is a response to the current situation of about 300 research reactors in operation in 59 countries around the world. (orig.)

  20. Performance improvement of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor for reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) is a TRIGA type reactor which has been in operation at Sandia Laboratories since 1967. The reactor is utilized in a wide variety of experimental programs which include radiation effects, neutron radiography, activation analysis, and fast reactor safety. During the past several years, the ACPR has become an important experimental facility for the United States Fast Reactor Safety Research Program and questions of interest to the safety of the LMFBR are being addressed. In order to enhance the capabilities of the ACPR for reactor safety experiments, a project to improve the performance of the reactor was initiated. It is anticipated that the pulse fluence can be increased by a factor of 2.0 to 2.5 utilizing a two-region core concept with high heat capacity fuel elements around the central irradiation cavity. In addition, the steady-state power of the reactor will be increased by about a factor of two. The new features of the improvements are described

  1. Technical report: technical development on the silicide plate-type fuel experiment at nuclear safety research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Hiroki

    1991-08-01

    According to a reduction of fuel enrichment from 45 w/o 235 U to 20 w/o, an aluminide plate-type fuel used currently in the domestic research and material testing reactors will be replaced by a silicide plate-type one. One of the major concern arisen from this alternation is to understand the fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, this is strongly necessary from the safety and licensing point of view. The in-core RIA experiments are, therefore, carried out at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The silicide plate-type fuel consisted of the ternary alloy of U-Al-Si as a meat with uranium density up to 4.8 g/cm 3 having thickness by 0.51 mm and the binary alloy of Al-3%Mg as a cladding by thickness of 0.38 mm. Comparison of the physical properties of this metallic plate fuel with the UO 2 -zircaloy fuel rod used conventionally in commercial light water reactors shows that the heat conductivity of the former is of the order of about 13 times greater than the latter, however the melting temperature is only one-half (1570degC). Prior to in-core RIA experiments, there were some difficulties lay in our technical path. This report summarized the technical achievements obtained through our four years work. (J.P.N.)

  2. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

  3. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment

  4. IRSN research programs concerning reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardelay, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is made up of 3 parts. The first part briefly presents the missions of IRSN (French research institute on nuclear safety), the second part reviews the research works currently led by IRSN in the following fields : -) the assessment of safety computer codes, -) thermohydraulics, -) reactor ageing, -) reactivity accidents, -) loss of coolant, -) reactor pool dewatering, -) core meltdown, -) vapor explosion, and -) fission product release. In the third part, IRSN is shown to give a major importance to experimental programs led on research or test reactors for collecting valid data because of the complexity of the physical processes that are involved. IRSN plans to develop a research program concerning the safety of high or very high temperature reactors. (A.C.)

  5. Review of experiments for research reactors - approved 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This standard establishes guidelines for the review and approval of experiments performed at research reactor facilities. This standard identifies the major areas that shall be reviewed for each experiment to ensure that it (a) falls within the limits delineated in the technical specifications, (b) does not present an unreviewed safety question as defined in 10 CFR Section 50.59 π2-, (c) does not constitute a threat to the health and safety of any individual or group of individuals, and (d) does not constitute a hazard to the reactor facility or other equipment. In addition, this standard recommends a system for classifying experiments to establish levels of review and approval commensurate with the level of risk inherent in the experiment

  6. Research reactor utilization, safety, decommissioning, fuel and waste management. Posters of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    For more than 50 years research reactors have played an important role in the development of nuclear science and technology. They have made significant contributions to a large number of disciplines as well as to the educational and research programmes of about 70 countries world wide. About 675 research reactors have been built to date, of which some 278 are now operating in 59 countries (86 of them in 38 developing Member States). Altogether over 13,000 reactor-years of cumulative operational experience has been gained during this remarkable period. The objective of this conference was to foster the exchange of information on current research reactor concerns related to safety, operation, utilization, decommissioning and to provide a forum for reactor operators, designers, managers, users and regulators to share experience, exchange opinions and to discuss options and priorities. The topical areas covered were: a) Utilization, including new trends and directions for utilization of research reactors. Effective management of research reactors and associated facilities. Engineering considerations and experience related to refurbishment and modifications. Strategic planning and marketing. Classical applications (nuclear activation analysis, isotope production, neutron beam applications, industrial irradiations, medical applications). Training for operators. Educational programmes using a reactor. Current developments in design and fabrication of experimental facilities. Irradiation facilities. Projects for regional uses of facilities. Core management and calculation tools. Future trends for reactors. Use of simulators for training and educational programmes. b) Safety, including experience with the preparation and review of safety analysis reports. Human factors in safety analysis. Management of extended shutdown periods. Modifications: safety analysis, regulatory aspects, commissioning programmes. Engineering safety features. Safety culture. Safety peer reviews and

  7. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.L.; Lerouge, B.

    1983-01-01

    From the very beginning of the CEA up to now, a great deal of work has been devoted to the development and utilization of research reactors in France for the needs of fundamental and applied research, production of radioisotopes, and training. In recent years, new reactors were commissioned while others were decommissioned. Moreover some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors (Osiris and Isis). This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion. Safety of research reactors has been studied in detail and many improvements have been brought due to: implementation of a specific experimental program, and adaptation of safety principles and rules elaborated for power reactors. Research reactors in operation in France have been built within a 22 year period. Meanwhile, safety rules have been improved. Old reactors do not comply with all the new rules but modifications are continuously made: after analysis of incidents, when replacement of equipment has to be carried out, when an important modification (fuel conversion for example) is decided upon

  8. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J L; Lerouge, B [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France)

    1983-08-01

    From the very beginning of the CEA up to now, a great deal of work has been devoted to the development and utilization of research reactors in France for the needs of fundamental and applied research, production of radioisotopes, and training. In recent years, new reactors were commissioned while others were decommissioned. Moreover some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors (Osiris and Isis). This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion. Safety of research reactors has been studied in detail and many improvements have been brought due to: implementation of a specific experimental program, and adaptation of safety principles and rules elaborated for power reactors. Research reactors in operation in France have been built within a 22 year period. Meanwhile, safety rules have been improved. Old reactors do not comply with all the new rules but modifications are continuously made: after analysis of incidents, when replacement of equipment has to be carried out, when an important modification (fuel conversion for example) is decided upon.

  9. The operating organization and the recruitment, training and qualification of personnel for research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations on meeting the requirements on the operating organization and on personnel for research reactors. It covers the typical operating organization for research reactor facilities; the recruitment process and qualification in terms of education, training and experience; programmes for initial and continuing training; the authorization process for those individuals having an immediate bearing on safety; and the processes for their requalification and reauthorization

  10. Experts' discussion on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The experts' discussion on reactor safety research deals with risk analysis, political realization, man and technics, as well as with the international state of affairs. Inspite of a controversy on individual issues and on the proportion of governmental and industrial involvment in reactor safety research, the continuation and intensification of corresponding research work is said to be necessary. Several participants demanded to consider possible 'conventional accidents' as well as a stronger financial commitment by the industry in this sector. The ratio 'man and technics' being an interface decisive for the proper functioning or failure of complex technical systems requires even more research work to be done. (GL) [de

  11. Reactor safety research. The CEC contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krischer, W.

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of the EC Commission in the reactor safety research dates back almost to the implementation of the EURATOM Treaty and has thus lasted for thirty years. The need for close collaboration and for general consensus on some crucial problems of concern to the public, has made the role of international organizations and, as far as Europe is concerned, the role of the European Community particularly important. The areas in which the CEC has been active during the last five years are widespread. This is partly due to the fact that, after TMI and Chernobyl, the effort and the interest of the different countries in reactor safety was considerable. Reactor Safety Research represents the proceedings of a seminar held by the Commission at the end of its research programme 1984-88 on reactor safety. As such it gives a comprehensive overview of the recent activities and main results achieved in the CEC Joint Research Centre and in national laboratories throughout Europe on the basis of shared cost actions. In a concluding chapter the book reports on the opinions, expressed during a panel by a group of major exponents, on the needs for future research. The main topics addressed are, with particular reference to Light Water Reactors (LWRS): reliability and risk evaluation, inspection of steel components, primary circuit components end-of-life prediction, and abnormal behaviour of reactor cooling systems. As far as LMFBRs are concerned, the topics covered are: severe accident modelling, material properties and structural behaviour studies. There are 67 pages, all of which are indexed separately. Reactor Safety Research will be of particular interest to reliability and safety engineers, nuclear engineers and technicians, and mechanical and structural engineers. (author)

  12. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume III. Utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The SAREF Electric Power System supplies and distributes power from the EBR-II switchgear for operation of all normal facilities on the site, from an on-site Experiment Diesel Generator for operation of all experiment related loads, and from an emergency engine generator and/or an uninterruptible power supply for operation of all essential and critical loads during a failure of both of the other two systems

  13. Improving nuclear safety at international research reactors: The Integrated Research Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (IRRSEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David; Newton, Douglas; Connery, Joyce

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear energy continues to play a major role in the world's energy economy. Research and test reactors are an important component of a nation's nuclear power infrastructure as they provide training, experiments and operating experience vital to developing and sustaining the industry. Indeed, nations with aspirations for nuclear power development usually begin their programs with a research reactor program. Research reactors also are vital to international science and technology development. It is important to keep them safe from both accident and sabotage, not only because of our obligation to prevent human and environmental consequence but also to prevent corresponding damage to science and industry. For example, an incident at a research reactor could cause a political and public backlash that would do irreparable harm to national nuclear programs. Following the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, considerable efforts and resources were committed to improving the safety posture of the world's nuclear power plants. Unsafe operation of research reactors will have an amplifying effect throughout a country or region's entire nuclear programs due to political, economic and nuclear infrastructure consequences. (author)

  14. The emphasis is on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    For the second time the Association for Reactor Safety mbH (GRS), Koeln, organised on behalf of the BMFT the conference 'Reactor safety research'. About 400 visitors took part. The public who were interested were given a review of the activities which are being undertaken by the BMFT in the programme 'Research and safety of light-water reactors'. The series of conference papers initiated by the BMFT is to be developed into a permanent information source which will be of interest to those working on nuclear questions such as official quarters, industry and high schools, and experts who have to give judgements. The most important statements by various research groups in industry, high schools and also associations of experts, are summarised. (orig.) [de

  15. Proceedings of the seminar on nuclear safety research and the workshop on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The seminar on the nuclear safety research was held on November 20, 2000 according to the start of new five year safety research plan (FY2001-2005: established by Nuclear Safety Commission) with 79 participants. In the seminar, Commissioner Dr. Kanagawa gave the outline of the next five year safety research plan. Following this presentation, progresses and future scopes of safety researches in the fields of reactor facility, fuel cycle facility, radioactive waste and environmental impact on radiation at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were reported. After the seminar, the workshop on reactor safety research was held on November 21-22, 2000 with 141 participants. In the workshop, four sessions titled safety of efficient and economic utilization of nuclear fuel, safety related to long-term utilization of power reactors, research on common safety-related issues and toward further improvement of nuclear safety were organized and, outcomes and future perspectives in these wide research R and D in the related area at other organizations including NUPEC, JAPEIC and Kansai Electric Power Co. was presented in each session. This report compiles outlines of the presentations and used materials in the seminar and the workshop to form the proceedings for the both meetings. (author)

  16. Experience in utilizing research reactors in Yugoslavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Raisic, N. [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Copic, M.; Gabrovsek, Z. [Jozef Stefan Institute Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1972-07-01

    The nuclear institutes in Yugoslavia possess three research reactors. Since 1958, two heavy-water reactors have been in operation at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, a zero-power reactor RB and a 6. 5-MW reactor RA. At the Jozef Stefan Institute, a 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor has been operating since 1966. All reactors are equipped with the necessary experimental facilities. The main activities based on these reactors are: (1) fundamental research in solid-state and nuclear physics; (2) R and D activities related to nuclear power program; and (3) radioisotope production. In fundamental physics, inelastic neutron scattering and diffraction phenomena are studied by means of the neutron beam tubes and applied to investigations of the structures of solids and liquids. Valuable results are also obtained in n - γ reaction studies. Experiments connected with the fuel -element development program, owing to the characteristics of the existing reactors, are limited to determination of the fuel element parameters, to studies on the purity of uranium, and to a small number of capsule irradiations. All three reactors are also used for the verification of different methods applied in the analysis of power reactors, particularly concerning neutron flux distributions, the optimization of reactor core configurations and the shielding effects. An appreciable irradiation space in the reactors is reserved for isotope production. Fruitful international co-operation has been established in all these activities, on the basis of either bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The paper gives a critical analysis of the utilization of research reactors in a developing country such as Yugoslavia. The investments in and the operational costs of research reactors are compared with the benefits obtained in different areas of reactor application. The impact on the general scientific, technological and educational level in the country is also considered. In particular, an attempt is made ro

  17. Experience in utilizing research reactors in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Raisic, N.; Copic, M.; Gabrovsek, Z.

    1972-01-01

    The nuclear institutes in Yugoslavia possess three research reactors. Since 1958, two heavy-water reactors have been in operation at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, a zero-power reactor RB and a 6. 5-MW reactor RA. At the Jozef Stefan Institute, a 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor has been operating since 1966. All reactors are equipped with the necessary experimental facilities. The main activities based on these reactors are: (1) fundamental research in solid-state and nuclear physics; (2) R and D activities related to nuclear power program; and (3) radioisotope production. In fundamental physics, inelastic neutron scattering and diffraction phenomena are studied by means of the neutron beam tubes and applied to investigations of the structures of solids and liquids. Valuable results are also obtained in n - γ reaction studies. Experiments connected with the fuel -element development program, owing to the characteristics of the existing reactors, are limited to determination of the fuel element parameters, to studies on the purity of uranium, and to a small number of capsule irradiations. All three reactors are also used for the verification of different methods applied in the analysis of power reactors, particularly concerning neutron flux distributions, the optimization of reactor core configurations and the shielding effects. An appreciable irradiation space in the reactors is reserved for isotope production. Fruitful international co-operation has been established in all these activities, on the basis of either bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The paper gives a critical analysis of the utilization of research reactors in a developing country such as Yugoslavia. The investments in and the operational costs of research reactors are compared with the benefits obtained in different areas of reactor application. The impact on the general scientific, technological and educational level in the country is also considered. In particular, an attempt is made ro

  18. Introduction to Safety Analysis Approach for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Suki

    2016-01-01

    The research reactors have a wide variety in terms of thermal powers, coolants, moderators, reflectors, fuels, reactor tanks and pools, flow direction in the core, and the operating pressure and temperature of the cooling system. Around 110 research reactors have a thermal power greater than 1 MW. This paper introduces a general approach to safety analysis for research reactors and deals with the experience of safety analysis on a 10 MW research reactor with an open-pool and open-tank reactor and a downward flow in the reactor core during normal operation. The general approach to safety analysis for research reactors is described and the design features of a typical open-pool and open-tank type reactor are discussed. The representative events expected in research reactors are investigated. The reactor responses and the thermal hydraulic behavior to the events are presented and discussed. From the minimum CHFR and the maximum fuel temperature calculated, it is ensured that the fuel is not damaged in the step insertion of reactivity by 1.8 mk and the failure of all primary pumps for the reactor with a 10 MW thermal power and downward core flow

  19. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  20. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions

  1. Reactor safety research in times of change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1970ies reactor safety research sponsored by the German Ministry of Economics an Technology and its predecessors and pursued independently from interests of industry or industrial associations as well as from current licensing issues significantly contributed to the extension of knowledge regarding risks and possible threats associated with the operation of nuclear power plants. The results of these research activities triggered several measures taken by industry and utilities to further enhance the internationally recognized high safety standards of nuclear power plants in Germany. Furthermore, by including especially universities in the distinguished research activities a large number of young scientists were given the opportunity to qualify in the field of nuclear reactor technology and safety thus contributing to the preservation of competence during the demographic change. The nuclear phase out in Germany affects also issues of reactor safety research in Germany. While Germany will progressively decrease and terminate the use of nuclear energy for public power supply other countries in Europe and in other parts of the world are continuing, expanding and even starting the use of nuclear power. As generally recognized, nuclear safety is an international issue and in the wake of the Fukushima disaster there are several initiatives to launch a system of internationally binding safety rules and guide lines. The German Competence Alliance therefore has elaborated a framework of areas were future reactor safety research will still be needed to support German efforts based on own and independent expertise to continuously develop and establish highest safety standards for the use of nuclear power supply domestic and abroad.

  2. Safety evaluation of the Dalat research reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, V.H.; Lam, P.V.; An, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    After an introduction presenting the essential characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor, the document presents i) The safety assurance condition of the reactor, ii) Its safety behaviour after 5 years of operation, iii) Safety research being realized on the reactor. Following is questionnaire of safety evaluation and a list of attachments, which concern the reactor

  3. Safety of research reactors. Topical issues paper no. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.; Ferraz-Bastos, J.L.; Kim, S.C.; Voth, M.; Boeck, H.; Dimeglio, F.; Litai, D.

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) missions. The prime objective of these missions has been to conduct a comprehensive operational safety review of the research reactor facility and to verify compliance with the IAEA Safety Standards. The methods used during an INSARR mission have been collected and analysed. Some of the important issues identified are the following: general ageing of the facility; uncertain status of many research reactors (in extended shutdown); indefinite deferral of return to operation or decommissioning; inadequate regulatory supervision; insufficient systematic (periodic) reassessment of safety; lack of quality assurance (QA) programmes; lack of an international safety convention or arrangement; lack of financial support for safety measures (e.g. safety reassessment, safety upgrading, decommissioning) and utilization; lack of clear utilization programmes; inadequate emergency preparedness; inadequate safety documentation (e.g. safety analysis report, operating rules and procedures, emergency plan); inadequate funding of shutdown reactors; weak safety culture; loss of expertise and corporate memory; loss of information concerning radioactive materials contained in retired experimental devices stored in the facility indefinitely; obsolescence of equipment and lack of spare parts; inadequate training and qualifications of regulators and operators; safety implications of new fuel types. These issues have been addressed by the IAEA Secretariat and the chairman of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG). INSAG has identified three major safety issues that are: the increasing age of research reactors, the number of research reactors that are not operating anymore but have not been decommissioned, and the number of research reactors in countries that do not have appropriate regulatory authorities. This issue paper discusses the concerns generated by an analysis of the results of INSARR missions and those expressed by INSAG. The

  4. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume VIII. Instrumentation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Included are sections dealing with the following: nuclear instrumentation system, reactor control system, plant protection system, plant annunciator system, data acquisition system, and reactor cooling system instrumentation and control

  5. Reactor safety research in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, J.; Zammite, R.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals withs PWR research only and covers programs performed in CEA or in cooperation between CEA and EDF or Framatome. Emphasis is being given to core cooling faults and associated procedures, primary circuit two-phase thermohydraulics, core damage, safeguarding of confinement, evaluation of accidental releases, and management of accident consequences. Most of the design and construction adequacy problems have already been solved in a generic manner, nevertheless new designs are now being studied and may require complementary research. (DG)

  6. Safety infrastructure for countries establishing their first research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.; Shokr, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Establishment of a research reactor is a major project requiring careful planning, preparation, implementation, and investment in time and human resources. The implementation of such a project requires establishment of sustainable infrastructures, including legal and regulatory, safety, technical, and economic. An analysis of the needs for a new research reactor facility should be performed including the development of a utilization plan and evaluation of site availability and suitability. All these elements should be covered by a feasibility study of the project. This paper discusses the elements of such a study with the main focus on the specific activities and steps for developing the necessary safety infrastructure. Progressive involvement of the main organizations in the project, and application of the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors and IAEA Safety Standards in different phases of the project are presented and discussed. (author)

  7. Thermal hydraulic reactor safety analyses and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, H.; Eerikaeinen, L.; Kervinen, T.; Kilpi, K.; Mattila, L.; Miettinen, J.; Yrjoelae, V.

    1989-04-01

    The report introduces the results of the thermal hydraulic reactor safety research performed in the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) during the years 1972-1987. Also practical applications i.e. analyses for the safety authorities and power companies are presented. The emphasis is on description of the state-of-the-art know how. The report describes VTT's most important computer codes, both those of foreign origin and those developed at VTT, and their assessment work, VTT's own experimental research, as well as international experimental projects and other forms of cooperation VTT has participated in. Appendix 8 contains a comprehensive list of the most important publications and technical reports produced. They present the content and results of the research in detail.(orig.)

  8. Research reactor facilities, recent developments at Imperial College, London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, S.J.; Goddard, A.J.H.; O Connell, J.

    1998-01-01

    The 100 kW CONSORT pool-type reactor is now the only Research Reactor in the UK. Because of its strategic importance, Imperial College is continuing and accelerating a programme of refurbishment of the control system, and planning for a further fuel charge. These plans are described and the progress to date discussed. To this end, a description of the enhanced Safety Case being written is provided here and refueling plans discussed. The current range of facilities available is described, and future plans highlighted. (author)

  9. Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This Safety Guide is a revision of Safety Series No. 35-G2 on safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors. It provides recommendations on meeting the requirements for the categorization, safety assessment and approval of research reactor experiments and modification projects. Specific safety considerations in different phases of utilization and modification projects are covered, including the pre-implementation, implementation and post-implementation phases. Guidance is also provided on the operational safety of experiments, including in the handling, dismantling, post-irradiation examination and disposal of experimental devices. Examples of the application of the safety categorization process for experiments and modification projects and of the content of the safety analysis report for an experiment are also provided. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Management system for the utilization and modification of a research reactor; 3. Categorization, safety assessment and approval of an experiment or modification; 4. Safety considerations for the design of an experiment or modification; 5. Pre-implementation phase of a modification or utilization project; 6. Implementation phase of a modification or utilization project; 7. Post-implementation phase of a utilization or modification project; 8. Operational safety of experiments at a research reactor; 9. Safety considerations in the handling, dismantling, post-irradiation examination and disposal of experimental devices; 10. Safety aspects of out-of-reactor-core installations; Annex I: Example of a checklist for the categorization of an experiment or modification at a research reactor; Annex II: Example of the content of the safety analysis report for an experiment at a research reactor; Annex III: Examples of reasons for a modification at a research reactor.

  10. Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-15

    This Safety Guide is a revision of Safety Series No. 35-G2 on safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors. It provides recommendations on meeting the requirements for the categorization, safety assessment and approval of research reactor experiments and modification projects. Specific safety considerations in different phases of utilization and modification projects are covered, including the pre-implementation, implementation and post-implementation phases. Guidance is also provided on the operational safety of experiments, including in the handling, dismantling, post-irradiation examination and disposal of experimental devices. Examples of the application of the safety categorization process for experiments and modification projects and of the content of the safety analysis report for an experiment are also provided. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Management system for the utilization and modification of a research reactor; 3. Categorization, safety assessment and approval of an experiment or modification; 4. Safety considerations for the design of an experiment or modification; 5. Pre-implementation phase of a modification or utilization project; 6. Implementation phase of a modification or utilization project; 7. Post-implementation phase of a utilization or modification project; 8. Operational safety of experiments at a research reactor; 9. Safety considerations in the handling, dismantling, post-irradiation examination and disposal of experimental devices; 10. Safety aspects of out-of-reactor-core installations; Annex I: Example of a checklist for the categorization of an experiment or modification at a research reactor; Annex II: Example of the content of the safety analysis report for an experiment at a research reactor; Annex III: Examples of reasons for a modification at a research reactor.

  11. Safety assesment necessary in selecting the technologies for partial decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Application to research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niculae, O.; Stan, C.; Vladescu, G.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of this work is identification and evaluation of safety indicators - quantities used in monitoring the safety assurance during decommissioning processes in nuclear facilities identification of safety indicators is made on basis of qualitative and quantitative analysis, effected for both normal decommissioning, as well as in case of foreseen event occurrence. The safety indicators form an integrated system which can be represented by a pyramidal structural with the following levels (in increasing complexity order): specific indicators, strategic indicators, overall indicators, safety closure. This work suggests that evaluation of safety assurance level during the conduct of a decommissioning process to be based on the overall analysis of the set of indicators emphasizing not only the evaluation of individual safety indicators but also the interdependencies between them. The evaluation method is based on the 'step-by-step' principle. The evaluation was carried-out either directly or by means of dedicated evaluation forms which cover both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the analysis. At the some time identified are the adequate protection measures for the personnel implied in decommissioning, as well as for population and environment. The paper present also technologies adequate in the decommissioning. (authors)

  12. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG ampersand G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options

  13. Reactor safety research and safety technology. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theenhaus, R.; Wolters, J.

    1987-01-01

    The state of HTR safety research work reached permits a comprehensive and reliable answer to be given to questions which have been raised by the reactor accident at Chernobyl, regarding HTR safety. Together with the probability safety analyses, the way to a safety concept suitable for an HTR is cleared; instructions are given for design optimisation with regard to safety technique and economy. The consequences of a graphite fire, the neutron physics design and the consequenes of the lack of a safety containment are briefly described. (DG) [de

  14. French safety authority projects in the field of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint Raymond, P.; Duthe, M.; Abou Yehia, H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper gives an outline of some actions initiated by the French safety authority in the field of research and test reactors. An important action concerns the definition of the authorisation criteria for the implementation of experiments in these reactors. In particular, it is necessary to define clearly in which conditions an experiment may be authorised internally by the operating organisation or needs a formal approval by the safety authority. The practice related to the systematic safety reassessment of old facilities and the regulatory provisions associated with the decommissioning are presented after a discussion on the ageing issues. (author)

  15. Hydrogen problems in reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, H.

    1984-01-01

    The BMFT and BMI have initiated a workshop 'Hydrogen Problems in Reactor Safety Research' that took place October 3./4., 1983. The objective of this workshop was to present the state of the art in the main areas - Hydrogen-Production - Hydrogen-Distribution - Hydrogen-Ignition - Hydrogen-Burning and Containment Behaviour - Mitigation Measures. The lectures on the different areas are compiled. The most important results of the final discussion are summarized as well. (orig.) [de

  16. Ventilation safety of facilities comprising nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guirlet, J.

    1982-01-01

    The reliability of the ventilation is one of the most important aspects in the prevention of the nuisances that a nuclear installation can provide, since the ventilation is located at the last barrier. A certain number of essential points have been recalled here. But it is necessary to bear in mind other requirements such as the limitation in the number of crossovers, the answers to be found should the system fail, the need to show that ventilation systems do not in themselves bring other nuisances such as noise, irradiation or contamination hazards, likelyhood of recycling the contamination, vibrations, fire. Finally, it is absolutely essential, right from the project stage, that the design ensures that very good accessibility, very easy dismantling and handling, as well as all the facilities needed to make sure of the initial and periodic tests, are guaranteed [fr

  17. Safety considerations for research reactors in extended shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    According to the IAEA Research Reactor Database, in the last 20 years, 367 research reactors have been shut down. Of these, 109 have undergone decommissioning and the rest are in extended shutdown with no clear definition about their future. Still other research reactors are infrequently operated with no meaningful utilization programme. These two situations present concerns related to safety such as loss of corporate memory, personnel qualification, maintenance of components and systems and preparation and maintenance of documentation. There are many reasons to shut down a reactor; these may include: - the need to carry out modifications in the reactor systems; - the need for refurbishment to extend the lifetime of the reactor; - the need to repair reactor structures, systems, or components; - the need to remedy technical problems; - regulatory or public concerns; - local conflicts or wars; - political convenience; - the lack of resources. While any one of these reasons may lead to shutdown of a reactor, each will present unique problems to the reactor management. The large variations from one research reactor to the next also will contribute to the uniqueness of the problems. Any option that the reactor management adopts will affect the future of the facility. Options may include dealing with the cause of the shutdown and returning to normal operation, extending the shutdown period waiting a future decision, or decommissioning. Such options are carefully and properly analysed to ensure that the solution selected is the best in terms of reactor type and size, period of shutdown and legal, economic and social considerations. This publication provides information in support of the IAEA safety standards for research reactors

  18. CSNI collective statement on support facilities for existing and advanced reactors. The function of OECD/Nea joint projects Nea committee on the safety of nuclear installations (CSNI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) has recently completed a study on the availability and utilisation of facilities supporting safety studies for current and advanced nuclear power reactors. The study showed that significant steps had been undertaken in the past several years in support of safety test facilities, mainly by conducting multinational joint projects centered on the capability of unique test facilities worldwide. Given the positive experience of the safety research projects, it has been recommended that efforts be made to prioritize technical issues associated with advanced (Generation IV) reactor designs and to develop options on how to efficiently obtain the necessary data through internationally co-ordinated research, preparing a gradual extension of safety research beyond the needs set by currently operating reactors. This statement constitutes a reference for future CSNI activities and for safety authorities, R and D centres and industry for internationally co-ordinated research initiatives in the nuclear safety research area. (author)

  19. Radiation protection planning for decommissioning of research reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Roger; Harman, Neil; Craig, David; Fecitt, Lorna; Lobach, Yuri; Gorlinskij, Juri; Kolyadin, Vyacheslav; Pavlenko, Vytali

    2008-01-01

    The MR reactor at the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (RRCKI), Moscow was a 50 MW multipurpose material testing and research reactor equipped with nine experimental loop facilities to test prototype fuel for various nuclear power reactors being developed. The reactor was shut down in 1993 and de-fuelled. The experimental loops are located in basement rooms around the reactor. The nature of the research into the characteristics of fuel design and coolant chemistry resulted in fission products and activation products in the test loop equipment. Decommissioning of the loops therefore presents a number of challenges. In addition the city of Moscow has expanded such that the RRC KI is now surrounded by housing which had to be taken into account in the radiological protection planning. This paper describes the techniques proposed to undertake the dismantling operations in order to minimise the radiation exposure to workers and members of the public. Estimates have been made of the worker doses which could be incurred during the dismantling process and the environmental impacts which could occur. These are demonstrated to be as low as reasonably achievable. The work was funded by the UK Department of Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (DBERR) (formerly the Department of Trade and Industry) under the Nuclear Safety Programme (NSP) set up to address nuclear safety issues in the Former Soviet Union. (author)

  20. Current safety issues related to research reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.

    2000-01-01

    The Agency has included activities on research reactor safety in its Programme and Budget (P and B) since its inception in 1957. Since then, these activities have traditionally been oriented to fulfil the Agency's functions and obligations. At the end of the decade of the eighties, the Agency's Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP) consisted of a limited number of tasks related to the preparation of safety related publications and the conduct of safety missions to research reactor facilities. It was at the beginning of the nineties when the RRSP was upgraded and expanded as a subprogramme of the Agency's P and B. This subprogramme continued including activities related to the above subjects and started addressing an increasing number of issues related to the current situation of research reactors (in operation and shut down) around the world such as reactor ageing, modifications and decommissioning. The present paper discusses some of the above issues as recognised by various external review or advisory groups (e.g., Peer Review Groups under the Agency's Performance Programme Appraisal System (PPAS) or the standing International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG)) and the impact of their recommendations on the preparation and implementation of the part of the Agency's P and B relating to the above subject. (author)

  1. UCN-VCN facility and experiments in Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Okumura, Kiyoshi; Utsuro, Masahiko

    1993-01-01

    An ultracold and very cold neutron facility was installed in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). The facility consists of a very cold neutron (VCN) guide tube, a VCN bender, a supermirror neutron turbine and experimental equipments with ultracold neutrons (UCN). The properties of each equipments are presented. UCN is generated by a supermirror neutron turbine combined with the cold neutron source operated with liquid deuterium, and the UCN output spectrum was measured by the time-of-flight method. A gravity analyzer for high resolution spectroscopy and a neutron bottle for decay experiments are now developing as the UCN research in KUR. (author)

  2. Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) Utilization Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xoubi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) is a 5 MW light water open pool multipurpose reactor that serves as the focal point for Jordan National Nuclear Centre, and is designed to be utilized in three main areas: Education and training, nuclear research, and radioisotopes production and other commercial and industrial services. The reactor core is composed of 18 fuel assemblies, MTR plate type 19.75% enriched uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) in aluminium matrix, and is reflected on all sides by beryllium and graphite. The reactor power is upgradable to 10 MW with a maximum thermal flux of 1.45×10 14 cm -2 s -1 , and is controlled by a Hafnium control absorber rod and B 4 C shutdown rod. The reactor is designed to include laboratories and classrooms that will support the establishment of a nuclear reactor school for educating and training students in disciplines like nuclear engineering, reactor physics, radiochemistry, nuclear technology, radiation protection, and other related scientific fields where classroom instruction and laboratory experiments will be related in a very practical and realistic manner to the actual operation of the reactor. JRTR is designed to support advanced nuclear research as well as commercial and industrial services, which can be preformed utilizing any of its 35 experimental facilities. (author)

  3. Research reactors: design, safety requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Abobaker Mohammed Rahmtalla

    2014-09-01

    There are two types of reactors: research reactors or power reactors. The difference between the research reactor and energy reactor is that the research reactor has working temperature and fuel less than the power reactor. The research reactors cooling uses light or heavy water and also research reactors need reflector of graphite or beryllium to reduce the loss of neutrons from the reactor core. Research reactors are used for research training as well as testing of materials and the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and for industrial application. The difference is also that the research reactor smaller in terms of capacity than that of power plant. Research reactors produce radioactive isotopes are not used for energy production, the power plant generates electrical energy. In the world there are more than 284 reactor research in 56 countries, operates as source of neutron for scientific research. Among the incidents related to nuclear reactors leak radiation partial reactor which took place in three mile island nuclear near pennsylvania in 1979, due to result of the loss of control of the fission reaction, which led to the explosion emitting hug amounts of radiation. However, there was control of radiation inside the building, and so no occurred then, another accident that lead to radiation leakage similar in nuclear power plant Chernobyl in Russia in 1986, has led to deaths of 4000 people and exposing hundreds of thousands to radiation, and can continue to be effect of harmful radiation to affect future generations. (author)

  4. Brookhaven Reactor Experiment Control Facility, a distributed function computer network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmler, D.G.; Greenlaw, N.; Kelley, M.A.; Potter, D.W.; Rankowitz, S.; Stubblefield, F.W.

    1975-11-01

    A computer network for real-time data acquisition, monitoring and control of a series of experiments at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor has been developed and has been set into routine operation. This reactor experiment control facility presently services nine neutron spectrometers and one x-ray diffractometer. Several additional experiment connections are in progress. The architecture of the facility is based on a distributed function network concept. A statement of implementation and results is presented

  5. Nuclear safety requirements for operation licensing of Egyptian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    From the view of responsibility for health and nuclear safety, this work creates a framework for the application of nuclear regulatory rules to ensure safe operation for the sake of obtaining or maintaining operation licensing for nuclear research reactors. It has been performed according to the recommendations of the IAEA for research reactor safety regulations which clearly states that the scope of the application should include all research reactors being designed, constructed, commissioned, operated, modified or decommissioned. From that concept, the present work establishes a model structure and a computer logic program for a regulatory licensing system (RLS code). It applies both the regulatory inspection and enforcement regulatory rules on the different licensing process stages. The present established RLS code is then applied to the Egyptian Research Reactors, namely; the first ET-RR-1, which was constructed and still operating since 1961, and the second MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2) which is now in the preliminary operation stage. The results showed that for the ET-RR-1 reactor, all operational activities, including maintenance, in-service inspection, renewal, modification and experiments should meet the appropriate regulatory compliance action program. Also, the results showed that for the new MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2), all commissioning and operational stages should also meet the regulatory inspection and enforcement action program of the operational licensing safety requirements. (author)

  6. Guidelines for the Review of Research Reactor Safety: Revised Edition. Reference Document for IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) is an IAEA safety review service available to Member States with the objective of supporting them in ensuring and enhancing the safety of their research reactors. This service consists of performing a comprehensive peer review and an assessment of the safety of the respective research reactor. The reviews are based on IAEA safety standards and on the provisions of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. The INSARR can benefit both the operating organizations and the regulatory bodies of the requesting Member States, and can include new research reactors under design or operating research reactors, including those which are under a Project and Supply Agreement with the IAEA. The first IAEA safety evaluation of a research reactor operated by a Member State was completed in October 1959 and involved the Swiss 20 MW DIORIT research reactor. Since then, and in accordance with its programme on research reactor safety, the IAEA has conducted safety review missions in its Member States to enhance the safety of their research reactor facilities through the application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors and the relevant IAEA safety standards. About 320 missions in 51 Member States were undertaken between 1972 and 2012. The INSARR missions and other limited scope safety review missions are conducted following the guidelines presented in this publication, which is a revision of Guidelines for the Review of Research Reactor Safety (IAEA Services Series No. 1), published in December 1997. This publication details those IAEA safety standards and guidance publications relevant to the safety of research reactors that have been revised or published since 1997. The purpose of this publication is to give guidance on the preparation, implementation, reporting and follow-up of safety review missions. It is also intended to be of assistance to operators and regulators in conducting

  7. Self Assessment for the Safety of Research Reactor in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melani, Ai; Chang, Soon Heung

    2008-01-01

    At the present Indonesia has no nuclear power plant in operation yet, although it is expected that the first nuclear power plant will be operated and commercially available in around the year of 2016 to 2017 in Muria Peninsula. National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) has three research reactor; which are: Reactor Triga Mark II at Bandung, Reactor Kartini at Yogyakarta and Reactor Serbaguna (Multi Purpose Reactor) at Serpong. The Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors establishes 'best practice' guidelines for the licensing, construction and operation of research reactors. In this paper the author use the requirement in code of conduct to review the safety of research reactor in Indonesia

  8. The reactor and cold neutron research facility at NIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prask, H J; Rowe, J M [Reactor Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The NIST Reactor (NBSR) is a 20 MW research reactor located at the Gaithersburg, MD site, and has been in operation since 1969. It services 26 thermal neutron facilities which are used for materials science, chemical analysis, nondestructive evaluation, neutron standards work, and irradiations. In 1987 the Department of Commerce and NIST began development of the CNRF - a $30M National Facility for cold neutron research -which will provide fifteen new experimental stations with capabilities currently unavailable in this country. As of May 1992, four of the planned seven guides and a cold port were installed, eight cold neutron experimental stations were operational, and the Call for Proposals for the second cycle of formally-reviewed guest-researcher experiments had been sent out. Some details of the performance of instrumentation are described, along with the proposed design of the new hydrogen cold source which will replace the present D{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O ice cold source. (author)

  9. The reactor and cold neutron research facility at NIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prask, H.J.; Rowe, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The NIST Reactor (NBSR) is a 20 MW research reactor located at the Gaithersburg, MD site, and has been in operation since 1969. It services 26 thermal neutron facilities which are used for materials science, chemical analysis, nondestructive evaluation, neutron standards work, and irradiations. In 1987 the Department of Commerce and NIST began development of the CNRF - a $30M National Facility for cold neutron research -which will provide fifteen new experimental stations with capabilities currently unavailable in this country. As of May 1992, four of the planned seven guides and a cold port were installed, eight cold neutron experimental stations were operational, and the Call for Proposals for the second cycle of formally-reviewed guest-researcher experiments had been sent out. Some details of the performance of instrumentation are described, along with the proposed design of the new hydrogen cold source which will replace the present D 2 O/H 2 O ice cold source. (author)

  10. Researches at hadron experiment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Shinya

    2006-01-01

    Some of the nuclear, hadron and elementary particle experiments proposed to hadron experiment facility to use the extracted slow proton beam at J-PARC are overviewed. Characteristic feature of the facility is the secondary beam obtained from the intense proton beam. Nuclear hadron physics experiments and kaon rare decay experiments are presented here as the typical ones. Hypernuclear spectroscopy with S=-2 state is expected to be started as soon as the beam becomes available. The kaon bound systems not only with three nucleons like K-pnn but also more numerous like Li and Be are to be studied systematically. Bound states of two kaons using (K - , K + ) reaction will be challenged. Pentaquark will be searched for and its properties will be studied if it really exists. Nuclear structure studies from the view point of large Bjorken x are planned to be studied by irradiating hydrogen, deuteron or heavier targets with primary proton beam and analyzing generated muon pairs. Properties of vector mesons in nuclear matter are to be studied with the primary beam. Neutral kaon rare decay will be investigated to study CP nonconservation. Large progress of elementary particle physics is anticipated by using the intense proton beam at J-PARC. (S. Funahashi)

  11. Procedures for conducting probabilistic safety assessment for non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A well performed and adequately documented safety assessment of a nuclear facility will serve as a basis to determine whether the facility complies with the safety objectives, principles and criteria as stipulated by the national regulatory body of the country where the facility is in operation. International experience shows that the practices and methodologies used to perform safety assessments and periodic safety re-assessment for non-reactor nuclear facilities differ significantly from county to country. Most developing countries do not have methods and guidance for safety assessment that are prescribed by the regulatory body. Typically the safety evaluation for the facility is based on a case by case assessment. Whilst conservative deterministic analyses are predominantly used as a licensing basis in many countries, recently probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) techniques have been applied as a useful complementary tool to support safety decision making. The main benefit of PSA is to provide insights into the safety aspects of facility design and operation. PSA points up the potential environmental impacts of postulated accidents, including the dominant risk contributors, and enables safety analysts to compare options for reducing risk. In order to advise on how to apply PSA methodology for the safety assessment of non-reactor nuclear facilities, the IAEA organized several consultants meetings, which led to the preparation of this TECDOC. This document is intended as guidance for the conduct of PSA in non-nuclear facilities. The main emphasis here is on the general procedural steps of a PSA that is specific for a non-reactor nuclear facility, rather than the details of the specific methods. The report is directed at technical staff managing or performing such probabilistic assessments and to promote a standardized framework, terminology and form of documentation for these PSAs. It is understood that the level of detail implied in the tasks presented in this

  12. Neutron beam facilities at the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.

    2003-01-01

    The exciting development for Australia is the construction of a modern state-of-the-art 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor which is currently under construction to replace the aging reactor (HIFAR) at ANSTO in 2006. To cater for advanced scientific applications, the replacement reactor will provide not only thermal neutron beams but also a modern cold-neutron source moderated by liquid deuterium at approximately -250 deg C, complete with provision for installation of a hot-neutron source at a later stage. The latest 'supermirror' guides will be used to transport the neutrons to the Reactor Hall and its adjoining Neutron Guide Hall where a suite of neutron beam instruments will be installed. These new facilities will expand and enhance ANSTO's capabilities and performance in neutron beam science compared with what is possible with the existing HIFAR facilities, and will make ANSTO/Australia competitive with the best neutron facilities in the world. Eight 'leading-edge' neutron beam instruments are planned for the Replacement Research Reactor when it goes critical in 2006, followed by more instruments by 2010 and beyond. Up to 18 neutron beam instruments can be accommodated at the Replacement Research Reactor, however, it has the capacity for further expansion, including potential for a second Neutron Guide Hall. The first batch of eight instruments has been carefully selected in conjunction with a user group representing various scientific interests in Australia. A team of scientists, engineers, drafting officers and technicians has been assembled to carry out the Neutron Beam Instrument Project to successful completion. Today, most of the planned instruments have conceptual designs and are now being engineered in detail prior to construction and procurement. A suite of ancillary equipment will also be provided to enable scientific experiments at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields. This paper describes the Neutron Beam Instrument Project and gives

  13. Safety report content and development for test loop facility on MARIA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konechko, A.; Shumskij, A.M.; Mikul'ahin, V.E.

    1982-01-01

    A 600 kW test loop facility for investigatin.o safety problems is realized on MARIA reactor in Poland together with USSR organizations. Safety reports have been developed in two steps at the designstage. The 1st report being essentially a preliminary safety analysis was developed within the scope of the feasibility study. At the engineering design stage the preliminary test loop facility safety report had been prepared considering measures excluding the possibility of the MARIA reactor damage. The test loop facility safety report is fulfilled for normal, transient and emergency operation regimes. Separate safety basing for each group of experiments will be prepared. The report presents the test loop facility safety criteria coordinated by the nuclear safety comission. They contains the preliminary reports on the test loop facility safety. At the final stage of construction and at thecommitioning stage the start-up safety report will be developed which after required correction and adding up the putting into operation data will turn into operation safety report [ru

  14. Guidelines for Self-assessment of Research Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    Self-assessment is an organization’s internal process to review its current status, processes and performance against predefined criteria and thereby to provide key elements for the organization’s continual development and improvement. Self-assessment helps the organization to think through what it is expected to do, how it is performing in relation to these expectations, and what it needs to do to improve performance, fulfil the expectations and achieve better compliance with the predefined criteria. This publication provides guidelines for a research reactor operating organization to perform a self-assessment of the safety management and the safety of the facility and to identify gaps between the current situation and the IAEA safety requirements for research reactors. These guidelines also provide a methodology for Member States, regulatory bodies and operating organizations to perform a self-assessment of their application of the provisions of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. This publication also addresses planning, implementation and follow-up of actions to enhance safety and strengthen application of the Code. The guidelines are applicable to all types of research reactor and critical and subcritical assemblies, at all stages in their lifetimes, and to States, regulatory bodies and operating organizations throughout all phases of research reactor programmes. Research reactor operating organizations can use these guidelines at any time to support self-assessments conducted in accordance with the organization’s integrated management system. These guidelines also serve as a tool for an organization to prepare to receive an IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) mission. An important result of this is the opportunity for an operating organization to identify focus areas and make safety improvements in advance of an INSARR mission, thereby increasing the effectiveness of the mission and efficiency of the

  15. Surveys of research projects concerning nuclear facility safety, financed by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Protection and Reactor Safety, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    Each progress report is a collection of individual reports, categorized by subject matter. They are a documentation of the contractor's progress, rendered by themselves on standardized forms, published, for the sake of general information on progress made in investigations concerning reactor safety, by the project attendance department of the GRS. The individual reports have serial numbers. Each report includes particulars of the objective, work carried out, results obtained and plans for project continuation. (orig.) [de

  16. Surveys of research projects concerning nuclear facility safety, financed by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Protection and Reactor Safety, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    Each progress report is a collection of individual reports, categorized by subject matter. They are a documentation of the contractor's progress, rendered by themselves on standardized forms, published, for the sake of general information on progress made in investigations concerning reactor safety, by the project attendance department of the GRS. The individual reports have serial numbers. Each report includes particulars of the objective, work carried out, results obtained and plans for project continuation. (orig.) [de

  17. Surveys of research projects concerning nuclear facility safety financed by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Protection and Reactor Safety, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Each progress report is a collection of individual reports, categorized by subject matter. They are a documentation of the contractor's progress, rendered by themselves on standardized forms, published, for the sake of general information on progress made in investigations concerning reactor safety, by the project attendance department of the GRS. The individual reports have serial numbers. Each report includes particulars of the objective, work carried out, results obtained and plans for project continuation. (orig.) [de

  18. The organization of research reactor safety in the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, W.

    1983-01-01

    The present state of organization and development of research reactor safety in the UKAEA are outlined by addressing the fundamental safety principles which have been adopted in keeping with national health and safety requirement. The organisation, assessment and monitoring of research reactor safety on complex multi-discipline and multi-activity nuclear research and development site are discussed. Methods of safety assessment, such as probabilistic risk assessment and risk acceptance criteria, which have been developed and applied in practice are explained, and some indication of the directions in which some of the current developments in the safety of UKAEA research reactors is also included. (A.J.)

  19. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hanson, A. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, L-Y [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cuadra, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  20. Lessons from feedback of safety operating experience for reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, J.; Rapavy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of events in WWER operations as a part of safety experience feedback provide a valuable source of lessons for reactor physics. Examples of events from Bohunice operation will be shown such as events with inadequate approach to criticality, positive reactivity insertions, expulsion of a control rod from shut-down reactor, problems with reactor protection system and control rods. (Authors)

  1. Reactor safety research and development in Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitheanandan, T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories provides three different services to stakeholders and customers. The first service provided by the laboratory is the implementation of Research and Development (R&D) programs to provide the underlying technological basis of safe nuclear power reactor designs. A significant portion of the Canadian R&D capability in reactor safety resides at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories, and this capability was instrumental in providing the science and technology required to aid in the safety design of CANDU power reactors. The second role of the laboratory has been in supporting nuclear facility licensees to ensure the continued safe operation of nuclear facilities, and to develop safety cases to justify continued operation. The licensing of plant life extension is a key industry objective, requiring extensive research on degradation mechanisms, such that safety cases are based on the original safety design data and valid and realistic assumptions regarding the effect of ageing and management of plant life. Recently, Chalk River Laboratories has been engaged in a third role in research to provide the technical basis and improved understanding for decision making by regulatory bodies. The state-of-the-art test facilities in Chalk River Laboratories have been contributing to the R&D needs of all three roles, not only in Canada but also in the international community, thorough Canada's participation in cooperative programs lead by International Atomic Energy Agency and the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency. (author)

  2. Experience and prospects for developing research reactors of different types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuatbekov, R.P.; Tretyakov, I.T.; Romanov, N.V.; Lukasevich, I.B.

    2015-01-01

    NIKIET has a 60-year experience in the development of research reactors. Altogether, there have been more than 25 NIKIET-designed plants of different types built in Russia and 20 more in other countries, including pool-type water-cooled and water moderated research reactors, tank-type and pressure-tube research reactors, pressurized high-flux, heavy-water, pulsed and other research reactors. Most of the research reactors were designed as multipurpose plants for operation at research centers in a broad range of applications. Besides, unique research reactors were developed for specific application fields. Apart from the experience in the development of research reactor designs and the participation in the reactor construction, a unique amount of knowledge has been gained on the operation of research reactors. This makes it possible to use highly reliable technical solutions in the designs of new research reactors to ensure increased safety, greater economic efficiency and maintainability of the reactor systems. A multipurpose pool-type research reactor of a new generation is planned to be built at the Center for Nuclear Energy Science & Technology (CNEST) in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to be used to support a spectrum of research activities, training of skilled personnel for Vietnam nuclear industry and efficient production of isotopes. It is exactly the applications a research reactor is designed for that defines the reactor type, design and capacity, and the selection of fuel and components subject to all requirements of industry regulations. The design of the new research reactor has a great potential in terms of upgrading and installation of extra experimental devices. (author)

  3. Research reactor management. Safety improvement activities in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jong-Sup; Jung, Hoan-Sung; Hong, Sung Taek; Ahn, Guk-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Safety activities in HANARO have been continuously conducted to enhance its safe operation. Great effort has been placed on a normalization and improvement of the safety attitude of the regular staff and other employees working at the reactor and other experimental facilities. This paper introduces the activities on safety improvement that were performed over the last few years. (author)

  4. Safety problems encountered in construction and operation of the sodium test facilities of the Institute of Reactor Development (IRD) at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleisiek, K.

    1971-01-01

    In this report the safety aspects of the design and construction of a sodium boiling loop and a sodium tank test facility are discussed. Subsequently two experiments concerning the safety of the facilities are described: the testing of a drip basin to collect the sodium and to limit the rate of burning in the case of a leak, and the investigation of the chemical reaction of sodium with the insulating materials. Finally some general emergency procedures in the case of sodium incidents are discussed. A 16 mm-film demonstrating sodium fires and fire fighting methods will be shown. (author)

  5. Safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors. Requirements situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R. Allan; Holmstrom, Heikki; Reocreux, Michel; Schulz, Helmut; Liesch, Klaus; Santarossa, Giampiero; Hayamizu, Yoshitaka; Asmolov, Vladimir; Bolshov, Leonid; Strizhov, Valerii; Bougaenko, Sergei; Nikitin, Yuri N.; Proklov, Vladimir; Potapov, Alexandre; Kinnersly, Stephen R.; Voronin, Leonid M.; Honekamp, John R.; Frescura, Gianni M.; Maki, Nobuo; Reig, Javier; ); Bekjord, Eric S.; Rosinger, Herbert E.

    1998-01-01

    In June 1995, an OECD Support Group was set up to perform a broad study of the safety research needs of Russian-designed reactors. The emphasis of the study is on the VVER-type reactors in part because of the larger base of knowledge within the NEA Member countries related to LWRs. For the RBMKs, the study does not make the judgement that such reactors can be brought to acceptable levels of safety but focuses on near term efforts that can contribute to reducing the risk to the public. The need for the safety research must be evaluated in context of the lifetime of the reactors. The principal outcome of the work of the Support Group is the identification of a number of research topics which the members believe should receive priority attention over the next several years if risk levels are to be reduced and public safety enhanced. These appear in the Conclusions and Recommendations section of the report, and are the following: - The most important near-term need for VVER and RBMK safety research is to establish a sound technical basis for the emergency operating procedures used by the plant staff to prevent or halt the progression of accidents (i.e., Accident Management) and for plant safety improvements. - Co-operation of Western and Eastern experts should help to avoid East-West know-how gaps in the future, as safety technology continues to improve. - Safety research in Eastern countries will make an important contribution to public safety as it has in OECD countries. - RBMK safety research, including verification of codes, starts from a smaller base of experience than VVER, and is at an earlier stage of development. Technical Conclusions: - Research to improve human performance and operational safety of VVER and RBMK plants is extremely important. - VVER thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics research should focus on full validation of codes to VVER-specific features, and on extension of experimental data base. - Methods of assessing VVER pressure boundary

  6. Safety in decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Guide covers the technical and administrative considerations relevant to the nuclear aspects of safety in the decommissioning of reactors, as they apply to the reactor and the reactor site. While the treatment, transport and disposal of radioactive wastes arising from decommissioning are important considerations, these aspects are not specifically covered in this Guide. Likewise, other possible issues in decommissioning (e.g. land use and other environmental issues, industrial safety, financial assurance) which are not directly related to radiological safety are also not considered. Generally, decommissioning will be undertaken after planned final shutdown of the reactor. In some cases a reactor may have to be decommissioned following an unplanned or unexpected event of a series or damaging nature occurring during operation. In these cases special procedures for decommissioning may need to be developed, peculiar to the particular circumstances. This Guide could be used as a basis for the development of these procedures although specific consideration of the circumstances which create the need for them is beyond its scope

  7. Nuclear Security Management for Research Reactors and Related Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    This publication provides a single source guidance to assist those responsible for the implementation of nuclear security measures at research reactors and associated facilities in developing and maintaining an effective and comprehensive programme covering all aspects of nuclear security on the site. It is based on national experience and practices as well as on publications in the field of nuclear management and security. The scope includes security operations, security processes, and security forces and their relationship with the State’s nuclear security regime. The guidance is provided for consideration by States, competent authorities and operators

  8. Ageing Management for Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    This Safety Guide was developed under the IAEA programme for safety standards for research reactors, which covers all the important areas of research reactor safety. It supplements and elaborates upon the safety requirements for ageing management of research reactors that are established in paras 6.68-6.70 and 7.109 of the IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Safety of Research Reactors. The safety of a research reactor requires that provisions be made in its design to facilitate ageing management. Throughout the lifetime of a research reactor, including its decommissioning, ageing management of its structures, systems and components (SSCs) important to safety is required, to ensure continued adequacy of the safety level, reliable operation of the reactor, and compliance with the operational limits and conditions. Managing the safety aspects of research reactor ageing requires implementation of an effective programme for the monitoring, prediction, and timely detection and mitigation of degradation of SSCs important to safety, and for maintaining their integrity and functional capability throughout their service lives. Ageing management is defined as engineering, operation, and maintenance strategy and actions to control within acceptable limits the ageing degradation of SSCs. Ageing management includes activities such as repair, refurbishment and replacement of SSCs, which are similar to other activities carried out at a research reactor in maintenance and testing or when a modification project takes place. However, it is important to recognize that effective management of ageing requires the use of a methodology that will detect and evaluate ageing degradation as a consequence of the service conditions, and involves the application of countermeasures for prevention and mitigation of ageing degradation. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on managing ageing of SSCs important to safety at research reactors on the basis of international

  9. Ageing Management for Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Safety Guide was developed under the IAEA programme for safety standards for research reactors, which covers all the important areas of research reactor safety. It supplements and elaborates upon the safety requirements for ageing management of research reactors that are established in paras 6.68-6.70 and 7.109 of the IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Safety of Research Reactors. The safety of a research reactor requires that provisions be made in its design to facilitate ageing management. Throughout the lifetime of a research reactor, including its decommissioning, ageing management of its structures, systems and components (SSCs) important to safety is required, to ensure continued adequacy of the safety level, reliable operation of the reactor, and compliance with the operational limits and conditions. Managing the safety aspects of research reactor ageing requires implementation of an effective programme for the monitoring, prediction, and timely detection and mitigation of degradation of SSCs important to safety, and for maintaining their integrity and functional capability throughout their service lives. Ageing management is defined as engineering, operation, and maintenance strategy and actions to control within acceptable limits the ageing degradation of SSCs. Ageing management includes activities such as repair, refurbishment and replacement of SSCs, which are similar to other activities carried out at a research reactor in maintenance and testing or when a modification project takes place. However, it is important to recognize that effective management of ageing requires the use of a methodology that will detect and evaluate ageing degradation as a consequence of the service conditions, and involves the application of countermeasures for prevention and mitigation of ageing degradation. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on managing ageing of SSCs important to safety at research reactors on the basis of international

  10. The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project: A world-class research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.; Meek, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a new research facility being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility is based on a 330 MW, heavy-water cooled and reflected reactor as the neutron source, with a thermal neutron flux of about 7.5x10 19 m -2 ·sec -1 . Within the reflector region will be one hot source which will serve 2 hot neutron beam tubes, two cryogenic cold sources serving fourteen cold neutron beam tubes, two very cold beam tubes, and seven thermal neutron beam tubes. In addition there will be ten positions for materials irradiation experiments, five of them instrumented. The paper touches on the project status, safety concerns, cost estimates and scheduling, a description of the site, the reactor, and the arrangements of the facilities

  11. New safety experiments in decommissioned superheated steam reactor at Karlstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerting, K.

    1986-01-01

    This article gives a concise summary of the Status Report of the Superheated Steam Reactor Safety Program (PHDR) Project, held at KfK on Dec. 5, 1985. The results discussed dealt with fire experiments, shock tests simulating airplane crashes, temperature shocks in the reactor pressure vessel, studies of crack detection in pressure vessels and blasting experiments associated with nuclear plant decommissioning

  12. The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility: Status-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Sharpe, J.P.; Schuetz, S.T.; Petti, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) Facility, a US DOE National User Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), comprises capabilities and infrastructure to support both tritium and non-tritium research activities important to the development of safe and environmentally friendly fusion energy. Research thrusts include (1) interactions of tritium and deuterium with plasma-facing-component (PFC) materials, (2) fusion safety issues [PFC material chemical reactivity and dust/debris generation, activation product mobilization, tritium behavior in fusion systems], and (3) molten salts and fusion liquids for tritium breeder and coolant applications. This paper updates the status of STAR and the capabilities for ongoing research activities, with an emphasis on the development, testing and integration of the infrastructure to support tritium research activities. Key elements of this infrastructure include a tritium storage and assay system, a tritium cleanup system to process glovebox and experiment tritiated effluent gases, and facility tritium monitoring systems

  13. Psychometric model for safety culture assessment in nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, C.S. do; Andrade, D.A.; Mesquita, R.N. de

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A psychometric model to evaluate ‘safety climate’ at nuclear research facilities. • The model presented evidences of good psychometric qualities. • The model was applied to nuclear research facilities in Brazil. • Some ‘safety culture’ weaknesses were detected in the assessed organization. • A potential tool to develop safety management programs in nuclear facilities. - Abstract: A safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants depends not only on technical performance, but also on the people and on the organization. Organizational factors have been recognized as the main causal mechanisms of accidents by research organizations through USA, Europe and Japan. Deficiencies related with these factors reveal weaknesses in the organization’s safety culture. A significant number of instruments to assess the safety culture based on psychometric models that evaluate safety climate through questionnaires, and which are based on reliability and validity evidences, have been published in health and ‘safety at work’ areas. However, there are few safety culture assessment instruments with these characteristics (reliability and validity) available on nuclear literature. Therefore, this work proposes an instrument to evaluate, with valid and reliable measures, the safety climate of nuclear research facilities. The instrument was developed based on methodological principles applied to research modeling and its psychometric properties were evaluated by a reliability analysis and validation of content, face and construct. The instrument was applied to an important nuclear research organization in Brazil. This organization comprises 4 research reactors and many nuclear laboratories. The survey results made possible a demographic characterization and the identification of some possible safety culture weaknesses and pointing out potential areas to be improved in the assessed organization. Good evidence of reliability with Cronbach's alpha

  14. Psychometric model for safety culture assessment in nuclear research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, C.S. do, E-mail: claudio.souza@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2468, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, D.A., E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mesquita, R.N. de, E-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A psychometric model to evaluate ‘safety climate’ at nuclear research facilities. • The model presented evidences of good psychometric qualities. • The model was applied to nuclear research facilities in Brazil. • Some ‘safety culture’ weaknesses were detected in the assessed organization. • A potential tool to develop safety management programs in nuclear facilities. - Abstract: A safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants depends not only on technical performance, but also on the people and on the organization. Organizational factors have been recognized as the main causal mechanisms of accidents by research organizations through USA, Europe and Japan. Deficiencies related with these factors reveal weaknesses in the organization’s safety culture. A significant number of instruments to assess the safety culture based on psychometric models that evaluate safety climate through questionnaires, and which are based on reliability and validity evidences, have been published in health and ‘safety at work’ areas. However, there are few safety culture assessment instruments with these characteristics (reliability and validity) available on nuclear literature. Therefore, this work proposes an instrument to evaluate, with valid and reliable measures, the safety climate of nuclear research facilities. The instrument was developed based on methodological principles applied to research modeling and its psychometric properties were evaluated by a reliability analysis and validation of content, face and construct. The instrument was applied to an important nuclear research organization in Brazil. This organization comprises 4 research reactors and many nuclear laboratories. The survey results made possible a demographic characterization and the identification of some possible safety culture weaknesses and pointing out potential areas to be improved in the assessed organization. Good evidence of reliability with Cronbach's alpha

  15. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces.

  16. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces

  17. Regulatory aspects and experience with Russian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, S.I.

    2003-01-01

    Regulatory activity of Gosatomnadzor of Russia in the field of research reactors (RR) safety implies implementing three major aspects: 1) establishing the nuclear and radiation safety standards; 2) licensing; and 3) inspection and enforcement. Relatively recently a full set of safety standards and regulations for RR has been established thus allowing Gosatomnadzor of Russia to effectively implement its designated functions in the field of RR safety. A minimum set of these documents is shown as follows: Level I: Fundamentals: Law 'On the use of nuclear energy'; Law 'On Public radiation protection' Level II: Safety Standard: 'General Provisions for Safety of Research Facilities' Level III: Safety Rules: Nuclear Safety; - Radiation Safety; Waste Management; Safe Decommissioning of RR; Safety Analysis Report; QAP Level IV: Safety Regulations: Licensing (incl. Peer Review and Safety Assessment) - Inspection Gosatomnadzor of Russia has created and regularly updates the database on nuclear research reactors based on the actual status of all facilities. According to the database many facilities have been shutdown during recent years whether temporary or permanently waiting for the final decision on their decommissioning. For example, in 2003 Gosatomnadzor of Russia has 85 nuclear research reactors under its supervision (compared to 113 in 1998). This fact can be explained by three main reasons: 1) experimental program finished and no other programmes in place; 2) lack of resources (financial and human); 3) safety problems (physical obsolescence and ageing of equipment). One of the main difficulties in regulating RR safety is a variety of operating organizations - 21, with different financial and human resource capabilities. Ministries responsible for supporting their operation are of a little help. It becomes obvious that a unified governmental program for RR utilization is urgently needed to decide what number of RR and for what needed purposes is required to support the

  18. Monitoring and reviewing research reactor safety in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, R.C.; Greenslade, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    Th research reactors operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) comprise the 10 MW reactor HIFAR and the 100 kW reactor Moata. Although there are no power reactors in Australia the problems and issues of public concern which arise in the operation of research reactors are similar to those of power reactors although on a smaller scale. The need for independent safety surveillance has been recognized by the Australian Government and the ANSTO Act, 1987, required the Board of ANSTO to establish a Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) with responsibility to the Minister for monitoring and reviewing the safety of nuclear plant operated by ANSTO. The Executive Director of ANSTO operates HIFAR subject to compliance with requirements and arrangements contained in a formal Authorization from the Board of ANSTO. A Ministerial Direction to the Board of ANSTO requires the NSB to report to him, on a quarterly basis, matters relating to its functions of monitoring and reviewing the safety of ANSTO's nuclear plant. Experience has shown that the Authorization provides a suitable framework for the operational requirements and arrangements to be organised in a disciplined and effective manner, and also provides a basis for audits by the NSB by which compliance with the Board's safety requirements are monitored. Examples of the way in which the NSB undertakes its monitoring and reviewing role are given. Moata, which has a much lower operating power level and fission product inventory than HIFAR, has not been subject to a formal Authorization to date but one is under preparation

  19. Guidelines for the review research reactor safety. Reference document for IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1992, the IAEA published new safety standards for research reactors as part of the set of publications considered by its Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP). This set also includes publications giving guidance for all safety aspects related to the lifetime of a research reactor. In addition, the IAEA has also revised the Safety Standards for radiation protection. Consequently, it was considered advisable to revise the Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) procedures to incorporate the new requirements and guidance as well as to extend the scope of the safety reviews to currently operating research reactors. The present report is the result of this revision. The purpose of this report is to give guidance on the preparation, execution, reporting and follow-up of safety review mission to research reactors as conducted by the IAEA under its INSARR missions safety service. However, it will also be of assistance to operators and regulators in conducting: (a) ad hoc safety assessments of research reactors to address individual issues such as ageing or safety culture; and (b) other types of safety reviews such as internal and peer reviews and regulatory inspections

  20. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  1. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  2. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  3. Water cooled reactor technology: Safety research abstracts no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD publish these Nuclear Safety Research Abstracts within the framework of their efforts to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants and to promote the exchange of research information. The abstracts are of nuclear safety related research projects for: pressurized light water cooled and moderated reactors (PWRs); boiling light water cooled and moderated reactors (BWRs); light water cooled and graphite moderated reactors (LWGRs); pressurized heavy water cooled and moderated reactors (PHWRs); gas cooled graphite moderated reactors (GCRs). Abstracts of nuclear safety research projects for fast breeder reactors are published independently by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD and are not included in this joint publication. The intention of the collaborating international organizations is to publish such a document biannually. Work has been undertaken to develop a common computerized system with on-line access to the stored information

  4. A plan for safety and integrity of research reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moatty, Mona S. Abdel; Khattab, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A plan for in-service inspection of research reactor components is put. ► Section XI of the ASME Code requirements is applied. ► Components subjected to inspection and their classes are defined. ► Flaw evaluation and its acceptance–rejection criteria are reviewed. ► A plan of repair or replacement is prepared. -- Abstract: Safety and integrity of a research reactor that has been operated over 40 years requires frequent and thorough inspection of all the safety-related components of the facility. The need of increasing the safety is the need of improving the reliability of its systems. Diligent and extensive planning of in-service inspection (ISI) of all reactor components has been imposed for satisfying the most stringent safety requirements. The Safeguards Officer's responsibilities of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code ASME Code have been applied. These represent the most extensive and time-consuming part of ISI program, and identify the components subjected to inspection and testing, methods of component classification, inspection and testing techniques, acceptance/rejection criteria, and the responsibilities. The paper focuses on ISI planning requirements for welded systems such as vessels, piping, valve bodies, pump casings, and control rod-housing parts. The weld in integral attachments for piping, pumps, and valves are considered too. These are taken in consideration of safety class (1, 2, 3, etc.), reactor age, and weld type. The parts involve in the frequency of inspection, the examination requirements for each inspection, the examination method are included. Moreover the flaw evaluation, the plan of repair or replacement, and the qualification of nondestructive examination personnel are considered

  5. Safety research for evolutionary light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The development of nuclear energy has been characterized by a continuous evolution of the technological and philosophical underpinnings of reactor safety to enable operation of the plant without causing harm to either the plant operators or the public. Currently, the safety of a nuclear plant is assured through the combined use of procedures and engineered safety features together with a system of multiple protective barriers against the release of radioactivity. This approach is embodied in the concept of Design-Basis Accidents (DBA), which requires the designers to demonstrate that all credible accidents have been identified and that all safety equipment and procedures perform their functions extremely reliably. Particularly important functions are the automatic protection to shut the reactor down and to remove the decay heat while ensuring the integrity of the containment structure. Within the DBA concept, the so-called severe accidents were conveniently defined to be those accidents that lie beyond the DBA envelope; hence, they did not form part of the safety case. (author)

  6. Safety research for evolutionary light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacuci, D G [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Universitaetsbibliothek

    1996-12-01

    The development of nuclear energy has been characterized by a continuous evolution of the technological and philosophical underpinnings of reactor safety to enable operation of the plant without causing harm to either the plant operators or the public. Currently, the safety of a nuclear plant is assured through the combined use of procedures and engineered safety features together with a system of multiple protective barriers against the release of radioactivity. This approach is embodied in the concept of Design-Basis Accidents (DBA), which requires the designers to demonstrate that all credible accidents have been identified and that all safety equipment and procedures perform their functions extremely reliably. Particularly important functions are the automatic protection to shut the reactor down and to remove the decay heat while ensuring the integrity of the containment structure. Within the DBA concept, the so-called severe accidents were conveniently defined to be those accidents that lie beyond the DBA envelope; hence, they did not form part of the safety case. (author).

  7. Thermal hydraulic and safety analyses for Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, I.H.; Israr, M.; Pervez, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic and safety analysis of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel have been performed using computer code PARET. The present core comprises of 29 standard and 5 control fuel elements. Results of the thermal hydraulic analysis show that the core can be operated at a steady-state power level of 10 MW for a flow rate of 950 m 3 /h, with sufficient safety margins against ONB (onset of nucleate boiling) and DNB (departure from nucleate boiling). Safety analysis has been carried out for various modes of reactivity insertions. The events studied include: start-up accident; accidental drop of a fuel element in the core; flooding of a beam tube with water; removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation etc. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released and clad surface temperature etc. were calculated. The results indicate that the peak clad temperatures remain well below the clad melting temperature during these accidents. It is therefore concluded that the reactor can be safely operated at 10 MW without compromising safety. (author)

  8. Guide to the safety design examination about light water reactor facilities for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This guide was compiled to evaluate the validity of the design policy when the safety design is examined at the time of the application for approval of the installation of nuclear reactors. About 7 years has elapsed since the existing guide was established, and the more appropriate guide to evaluate the safety should be made on the basis of the knowledge and experience accumulated thereafter. The range of application of this guide is limited to the above described evaluation, and it is not intended as the general standard for the design of nuclear reactors. First, the definition of the words used in this guide is given. Then, the guide to the safety examination is described about the general matters of reactor facilities, nuclear reactors and the measuring and controlling system, reactor-stopping system, reactivity-controlling system and safety protection system, reactor-cooling system, reactor containment vessels, fuel handling and waste treatment system. Several matters which require attention in the application of this guide or the clarification of the significance and interpretation of the guide itself were found, therefore the explanation about them was added at the end of this guide. (Kako, I.)

  9. Safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents guidelines, approved by international consensus, for the safe utilization and modification of research reactors. While the Guide is most applicable to existing reactors, it is also recommended for use by organizations planning to put a new reactor into operation. 1 fig

  10. An overview-probabilistic safety analysis for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinlin; Peng Changhong

    2015-01-01

    For long-term application, Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) has proved to be a valuable tool for improving the safety and reliability of power reactors. In China, 'Nuclear safety and radioactive pollution prevention 'Twelfth Five Year Plan' and the 2020 vision' raises clearly that: to develop probabilistic safety analysis and aging evaluation for research reactors. Comparing with the power reactors, it reveals some specific features in research reactors: lower operating power, lower coolant temperature and pressure, etc. However, the core configurations may be changed very often and human actions play an important safety role in research reactors due to its specific experimental requirement. As a result, there is a necessary to conduct the PSA analysis of research reactors. This paper discusses the special characteristics related to the structure and operation and the methods to develop the PSA of research reactors, including initiating event analysis, event tree analysis, fault tree analysis, dependent failure analysis, human reliability analysis and quantification as well as the experimental and external event evaluation through the investigation of various research reactors and their PSAs home and abroad, to provide the current situation and features of research reactors PSAs. (author)

  11. Waste from decommissioning of research reactors and other small nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Small nuclear facilities were often built for research or pilot purposes. It includes the research reactors of various types and various aims (physics research, nuclear research, nuclear weapons development, materials testing reactor, isotope production, pilot plant, etc.) as well as laboratories, hot cells and accelerators used for a broad spectrum of research or production purposes. These installations are characterized not only by their size (reduced footprint) but also, and even mostly, by the very diversified type of materials, products and isotopes handled within these facilities. This large variety can sometimes enhance the difficulties encountered for the dismantling of such facilities. The presence of materials like beryllium, graphite, lead, PCBs, sodium, sometimes in relatively large quantities, are also challenges to be faced by the dismantlers of such facilities, because these types of waste are either toxic or no solutions are readily available for their conditioning or long term disposal. The paper will review what is currently done in different small nuclear facilities, and what are the remaining problems and challenges for future dismantling and waste management. The question of whether Research and Development for waste handling methods and processes is needed is still pending. Even for the dismantling operation itself, important improvements can be brought in the fields of characterization, decontamination, remote handling, etc. by further developments and innovative systems. The way of funding such facilities decommissioning will be reviewed as well as the very difficult cost estimation for such facilities, often one-of-a-kind. The aspects of radioprotection optimization (ALARA principle) and classical operators safety will also be highlighted, as well as the potential solutions or improvements. In fact, small nuclear facilities encounter often, when dismantling, the same problems as the large nuclear power plants, but have in

  12. A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitrich, L. W.

    1998-01-01

    The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop

  13. Operation and utilization of low power research reactor critical facility for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.K.; Karhadkar, C.G.

    2017-01-01

    An Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been designed and developed for maximum power generation from thorium considering large reserves of thorium. The design envisages using 54 pin MOX cluster with different enrichment of "2"3"3U and Pu in Thoria fuel pins. Theoretical models developed to neutron transport and the geometrical details of the reactor including all reactivity devices involve approximations in modelling, resulting in uncertainties. With a view to minimize these uncertainties, a low power research reactor Critical Facility was built in which cold clean fuel can be arranged in a desired and precise geometry. Different experiments conducted in this facility greatly contribute to understand and validate the physics design parameters

  14. International symposium on research reactor utilization, safety and management. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Symposium, considered as an important meeting of the owners and operators of research reactors as well as scientists concerned with problems of research reactors operation, management and safety covered the following topics: global and regional overview of research reactors, research reactors utilisation, research reactors safety, research reactors management, research reactors engineering. IAEA Research Reactors Database (RRDB) contains data concerning 291 operational research reactors, 247 shutdown reactors, 106 decommissioned reactors, 15 under construction and 15 new reactors planned. There is quite an even distribution of operational research reactors among 58 countries. Although about 66% of operational research reactors described in the RRDB are over 30 years old, the number of research reactors under construction or planned appears to have increased in recent years. According to the RRDB, the major applications of research reactors are in the field of neutron activation analysis, isotope production and neutron scattering work. Great concern was shown for several aspects of research reactors safety, especially since the average age of the operating research reactors is almost 30 years. Ageing problems involve more than the degradation of properties of the materials. Issues such as outdated equipment, lack of spare parts, outdating of the control and documentation systems related to the reactor, as well as budgetary limitations, affect the safety of some reactors. There are serious problems related to the spent fuel condition and the ageing of fuel storage facilities, in particular corrosion and leakage. The outstanding issues of concern are life extension of the spent fuel storage facilities and the future of take-back programmes of foreign research reactor fuels that will not be continued. A number of discussions related to safety requirements were focused on licensing and regulatory issues, especially in the case of older research reactors and those

  15. International symposium on research reactor utilization, safety and management. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The Symposium, considered as an important meeting of the owners and operators of research reactors as well as scientists concerned with problems of research reactors operation, management and safety covered the following topics: global and regional overview of research reactors, research reactors utilisation, research reactors safety, research reactors management, research reactors engineering. IAEA Research Reactors Database (RRDB) contains data concerning 291 operational research reactors, 247 shutdown reactors, 106 decommissioned reactors, 15 under construction and 15 new reactors planned. There is quite an even distribution of operational research reactors among 58 countries. Although about 66% of operational research reactors described in the RRDB are over 30 years old, the number of research reactors under construction or planned appears to have increased in recent years. According to the RRDB, the major applications of research reactors are in the field of neutron activation analysis, isotope production and neutron scattering work. Great concern was shown for several aspects of research reactors safety, especially since the average age of the operating research reactors is almost 30 years. Ageing problems involve more than the degradation of properties of the materials. Issues such as outdated equipment, lack of spare parts, outdating of the control and documentation systems related to the reactor, as well as budgetary limitations, affect the safety of some reactors. There are serious problems related to the spent fuel condition and the ageing of fuel storage facilities, in particular corrosion and leakage. The outstanding issues of concern are life extension of the spent fuel storage facilities and the future of take-back programmes of foreign research reactor fuels that will not be continued. A number of discussions related to safety requirements were focused on licensing and regulatory issues, especially in the case of older research reactors and those

  16. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A.; Papin, J.; Uhle, J.; Vitanza, C.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  17. Discussion of the use of the Dragon reactor as a facility for integral reactor physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutmann, H

    1972-06-05

    The purpose and use of the Dragon Reactor Experiment (DRE) has changed considerably during the years of its operation. The original purpose was to show that the principle of a High Temperature Reactor is sound and demonstrate its operation. After this achievement, the purpose of the Dragon reactor changed to the use as a fuel testing facility. During recent years, a new use of the DRE has been added to its use as a fuel testing facility, namely Fuel Element Design Testing. The current report covers reactor physics experiments aspects.

  18. Safety requirements in the design of research reactors: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Langman, V.J.

    2000-01-01

    In Canada, the formal development of safety requirements for the design of research reactors in general began under an inter-organizational Small Reactor Criteria Committee. This committee developed safety and licensing criteria for use by several small reactor projects in their licensing discussions with the Atomic Energy Control Board. The small reactor projects or facilities represented included the MAPLE-X10 reactor, the proposed SES-10 heating reactor and its prototype, the SDR reactor at the Whiteshell Laboratories, the Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (a.k.a., HANARO) in Korea, the SCORE project, and the McMaster University Nuclear Reactor. The top level set of criteria which form a safety philosophy and serve as a framework for more detailed developments was presented at an IAEA Conference in 1989. AECL continued this work to develop safety principles and design criteria for new small reactors. The first major application of this work has been to the design, safety analysis and licensing of the MAPLE 1 and 2 reactors for the MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor Project. This paper provides an overview of the safety principles and design criteria. Examples of an implementation of these safety principles and design criteria are drawn from the work to design the MAPLE 1 and 2 reactors. (author)

  19. Safety assessment of research reactors and preparation of the safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents guidelines, approved by international consensus, for the preparation, review and assessment of safety documentation for research reactors such as the Safety Analysis Report. While the Guide is most applicable to research reactors in the design and construction stage, it is also recommended for use during relicensing or reassessment of existing reactors

  20. Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Floto, H.; Jacobsen, U.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    1996-03-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities in 1995. The department`s research and development activities are organized in three research programmes: Radiation Protection, Reactor Safety, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the Research Reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the Educational Reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff`s participation in national and international committees. (au) 5 tabs., 21 ills.

  1. Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Floto, H.; Jacobsen, U.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    1996-03-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities in 1995. The department's research and development activities are organized in three research programmes: Radiation Protection, Reactor Safety, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the Research Reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the Educational Reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au) 5 tabs., 21 ills

  2. Safety evaluation of the NSRR facility relevant to the modification for improved pulse operation and preirradiated fuel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inabe, Teruo; Terakado, Yoshibumi; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hideo

    1988-11-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) is a pulse reactor for the inpile experiments to study the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions. The present operation modes of the NSRR consist of the steady state operation up to 300 kW and the natural pulse operation in which a sharp pulsed power is generated from substantially zero power level. In addition to these, two new modes of shaped pulse operation and combined pulse operation will be conducted in the near future as the improved pulse operations. A transient power up to 10 MW will be generated in the shaped pulse operation, and a combination of a transient power up to 10 MW and a sharp pulsed power will be generated in the combined pulse operation. Furthermore, preirradiated fuel rods will be employed in the future experiments whereas the present experiments are confined to the test specimens of unirradiated fuel rods. To provide for these programs, the fundamental design works relevant to the modification of the reactor facility including the reactor instrumentation and control systems and experimental provision were developed. The reactor safety evaluation is prerequisite for confirming the propriety of the fundamental design of the reactor facility from the safety point of view. The safety evaluation was therefore conducted postulating such events that would bring about abnormal conditions in the reactor facility. As a result of the safety evaluation, it has been confirmed as to the NSRR facility after modification that the anticipated transients, the postulated accidents, the major accident and the hypothetical accident do not result respectively in any serious safety problem and that the fundamental design principles and the reactor siting are adequate and acceptable. (author)

  3. IAEA activities in the field of research reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciuculescu, C.; Boado Magan, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities will be presented: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOC's); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors adopted by the Board of Governors on 8 March 2004, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors published on the IAEA website on February 2003 and the results obtained. (author)

  4. Decommissioning of Medical, Industrial and Research Facilities. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities where radioactive materials and sources are produced, received, used and stored. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations, particularly to those in developing countries (as such facilities are predominant in these countries), for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such facilities. The Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants meetings and a Technical Committee meeting

  5. Decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of medical, industrial and research facilities where radioactive materials and sources are produced, received, used and stored. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations, particularly to those in developing countries (as such facilities are predominant in these countries), for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such facilities. The Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants meetings and a Technical Committee meeting

  6. German Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seipel, H.G.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rittig, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program, which is part of the energy program of the Federal Republic of Germany, is presented in this article. The program, for which the Federal Minister of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany is responsible, is subdivided into the following four main problem areas, which in turn are subdivided into projects: (1) improvement of the operational safety and reliability of systems and components (projects: quality assurance, component safety); (2) analysis of the consequences of accidents (projects: emergency core cooling, containment, external impacts, pressure-vessel failure, core meltdown); (3) analysis of radiation exposure during operation, accident, and decommissioning (project: fission-product transport and radiation exposure); and (4) analysis of the risk created by the operation of nuclear power plants (project: risk and reliability). Various problems, which are included in the above-mentioned projects, are concurrently studied within the Heiss-Dampf Reaktor experiments

  7. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Hoshi, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Fujishiro, T.; Inabe, T.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental research program, named Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) Program, has been progressing in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a modified TRIGA-ACPR. This paper is prepared to describe the outline of the NSRR program. The purpose of the NSRR program is to examine the behaviors of fuel rods under various accidental conditions of power reactors so as to establish realistic safety criteria and to develop analytical models for prediction of fuel failures. We expect to contribute finally to the improvement of reactor design and fuel fabrication techniques based on these experimental results. The NSRR experiments will be performed in the large central experimental tube, which is one of the most excellent features of this reactor, using specially designed capsules or loops which can accommodate up to 49 BWR type test fuels. Many types of test fuels in various conditions will be examined by the NSRR program, such as BWR, PWR and FBR type fuels from the beginning of life to the end of life with and without simulated reactor internal structures. The experiments will be continued for more than 10 years divided into three phases. The first phase of the program will be devoted to the experiments pertaining to reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). In these experiments we will make use of the excellent pulsing capability of ACPR, which is expected to generate 100 MW-sec prompt energy release with 1.3 msec of minimum reactor period by 4.7 dollar reactivity insertion and to yield more than 280 cal/g-UO 2 heat deposit even in an approximately 10% enriched BWR type test fuel. (280 cal/g-UO 2 is believed enough heat deposit to cause fuel failure.) In general, heat flow behaviors from fuel meat to clad and from clad to coolant are very complex phenomena, but they are the key point in analyzing transient response of fuels. In the sudden heat transient conditions brought by pulsing, however, it will be possible to examine each phenomenon separately

  8. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, M; Hoshi, T; Ohnishi, N; Fujishiro, T; Inabe, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    1974-07-01

    An experimental research program, named Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) Program, has been progressing in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a modified TRIGA-ACPR. This paper is prepared to describe the outline of the NSRR program. The purpose of the NSRR program is to examine the behaviors of fuel rods under various accidental conditions of power reactors so as to establish realistic safety criteria and to develop analytical models for prediction of fuel failures. We expect to contribute finally to the improvement of reactor design and fuel fabrication techniques based on these experimental results. The NSRR experiments will be performed in the large central experimental tube, which is one of the most excellent features of this reactor, using specially designed capsules or loops which can accommodate up to 49 BWR type test fuels. Many types of test fuels in various conditions will be examined by the NSRR program, such as BWR, PWR and FBR type fuels from the beginning of life to the end of life with and without simulated reactor internal structures. The experiments will be continued for more than 10 years divided into three phases. The first phase of the program will be devoted to the experiments pertaining to reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). In these experiments we will make use of the excellent pulsing capability of ACPR, which is expected to generate 100 MW-sec prompt energy release with 1.3 msec of minimum reactor period by 4.7 dollar reactivity insertion and to yield more than 280 cal/g-UO{sub 2} heat deposit even in an approximately 10% enriched BWR type test fuel. (280 cal/g-UO{sub 2} is believed enough heat deposit to cause fuel failure.) In general, heat flow behaviors from fuel meat to clad and from clad to coolant are very complex phenomena, but they are the key point in analyzing transient response of fuels. In the sudden heat transient conditions brought by pulsing, however, it will be possible to examine each phenomenon

  9. Fast reactor test facilities in the US safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.; Dickerman, C.E.; Lennox, D.H.; Rose, D.

    1979-01-01

    The needs for safety information derivable from in-pile programs are reviewed, and the correlation made with existing and planned capability. In view of the current status of the U.S. breeder program, emphasis is given in the review to the impact of different fast breeder options on the required program and facilities. It is concluded that facility needs are somewhat independent of specific fast breeder concept, even though the relative emphasis on the various safety issues will differ. 8 refs

  10. Radiological safety design considerations for fusion research experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crase, K.W.; Singh, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    A wide variety of fusion research experiments are in the planning or construction stages. Two such experiments, the Nova Laser Fusion Facility and the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), are currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Although the plasma chamber vault for MFTF and the Nova target room will have thick concrete walls and roofs, the radiation safety problems are made complex by the numerous requirements for shield wall penetrations. This paper addresses radiation safety considerations for the MFTF and Nova experiments, and the need for integrated safety considerations and safety technology development during the planning stages of fusion experiments

  11. Neutron beam facilities at the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: On September 3rd 1997 the Australian Federal Government announced their decision to replace the HIFAR research reactor by 2005. The proposed reactor will be a multipurpose reactor with improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The neutron beam facilities are intended to cater for Australian scientific needs well into the 21st century. In the first stage of planning the neutron Beam Facilities at the replacement reactor, a Consultative Group was formed (BFCG) to determine the scientific capabilities of the new facility. Members of the group were drawn from academia, industry and government research laboratories. The BFCG submitted their report in April 1998, outlining the scientific priorities to be addressed. Cold and hot neutron sources are to be included, and cold and thermal neutron guides will be used to position most of the instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. In 2005 it is planned to have eight instruments installed with a further three to be developed by 2010, and seven spare instrument positions for development of new instruments over the life of the reactor. A beam facilities technical group (BFTG) was then formed to prepare the engineering specifications for the tendering process. The group consisted of some members of the BFCG, several scientists and engineers from ANSTO, and scientists from leading neutron scattering centres in Europe, USA and Japan. The BFTG looked in detail at the key components of the facility such as the thermal, cold and hot neutron sources, neutron collimators, neutron beam guides and overall requirements for the neutron guide hall. The report of the BFTG, completed in August 1998, was incorporated into the draft specifications for the reactor project, which were distributed to potential reactor vendors. An assessment of the first stage of reactor vendor submissions was completed in

  12. Inherent Safety Feature of Hybrid Low Power Research Reactor during Reactivity Induced Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, DongHyun; Yum, Soo Been; Hong, Sung Teak; Lim, In-Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hybrid low power research reactor(H-LPRR) is the new design concept of low power research reactor for critical facility as well as education and training. In the case of typical low power research reactor, the purposes of utilization are the experiments for education of nuclear engineering students, Neutron Activation Analysis(NAA) and radio-isotope production for research purpose. H-LPRR is a light-water cooled and moderated research reactor that uses rod-type LEU UO{sub 2} fuels same as those for commercial power plants. The maximum core thermal power is 70kW and, the core is placed in the bottom of open pool. There are 1 control rod and 2 shutdown rods in the core. It is designed to cool the core by natural convection, retain negative feedback coefficient for entire fuel periods and operate for 20 years without refueling. Inherent safety in H-LPRR is achieved by passive design features such as negative temperature feedback coefficient and core cooling by natural convection during normal and emergency conditions. The purpose of this study is to find out that the inherent safety characteristics of H-LPRR is able to control the power and protect the reactor from the RIA(Reactivity induced accident). RIA analysis was performed to investigate the inherent safety feature of H-LPRR. As a result, it was found that the reactor controls its power without fuel damage in the event and that the reactor remains safe states inherently. Therefore, it is believed that high degree of safety inheres in H-LPRR.

  13. Safety classification of systems, structures, and components for pool-type research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ryong [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety of nuclear facilities shall be designed, fabricated, erected, and tested to quality standards commensurate with the importance of the safety functions. Although SSC classification guidelines for nuclear power plants have been well established and applied, those for research reactors have been only recently established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Korea has operated a pool-type research reactor (the High Flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) and has recently exported another pool-type reactor (Jordan Research and Training Reactor), which is being built in Jordan. Korea also has a plan to build one more pool-type reactor, the Kijang Research Reactor, in Kijang, Busan. The safety classification of SSCs for pool-type research reactors is proposed in this paper based on the IAEA methodology. The proposal recommends that the SSCs of pool-type research reactors be categorized and classified on basis of their safety functions and safety significance. Because the SSCs in pool-type research reactors are not the pressure-retaining components, codes and standards for design of the SSCs following the safety classification can be selected in a graded approach.

  14. The regulation and licensing of research reactors and associated facilities in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weightman, M.W.; Willby, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) licenses nuclear facilities, including research reactors, on behalf of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The legislation, the regulatory organizations and the methods of operation that have been developed over the last 30 years result in a largely non-prescriptive form of control that is well suited to research reactors. The most important part of the regulatory system is the license and the attachment of conditions which it permits. These conditions require the licensee to prepare arrangements to control the safety of the facility. In doing so the licensee is encouraged to develop a 'safety culture' within its organization. This is particularly important for research reactors which may have limited staff resources and where the ability, and at times the need, to have access to the core is much greater than for nuclear power plants. Present day issues such as the ageing of nuclear facilities, public access to the rationale behind regulatory decisions, and the emergence of more stringent safety requirements, which include a need for quantified safety criteria, have been addressed by the NII. This paper explores the relevance of such issues to the regulation of research reactors. In particular, it discusses some of the factors associated with research reactors that should be considered in developing criteria for the tolerability of risk from these nuclear facilities. From a consideration of these factors, it is the authors' view that the range of tolerable risk to the public from the operation of new research reactors may be expected to be more stringent than similar criteria for new nuclear power plants, whereas the criteria for tolerable risk for research reactor workers are expected to be about the same as those for power reactor workers

  15. Steam--water mixing in nuclear reactor safety loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, S.A.; Schwarz, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    Computer models used to predict the response of reactors to hypothesized accidents necessarily incorporate approximating assumptions. To verify the models by comparing predicted and measured responses in test facilities, these assumptions must be confirmed to be realistic. Recent experiments in facilities capable of repeatedly duplicating the transient behavior of a pressurized water reactor undergoing a pipe rupture show that the assumption of complete water-steam mixing during the transient results in the predicted decompression being faster than that observed. Water reactor safety studies currently in progress include programs aimed at the verification of computer models or ''codes'' used to predict reactor system responses to various hypothesized accidents. The approach is to compare code predictions of transients with the actual test transients in experimental facilities. The purpose of this paper is to explain an important instance in which predictions and data are not in complete agreement and to indicate the significance to water reactor safety studies

  16. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderoni, P., E-mail: Pattrick.Calderoni@inl.gov [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-7113 (United States); Sharpe, J.; Shimada, M.; Denny, B.; Pawelko, B.; Schuetz, S.; Longhurst, G. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-7113 (United States); Hatano, Y.; Hara, M. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oya, Y. [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Otsuka, T.; Katayama, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Konishi, S.; Noborio, K.; Yamamoto, Y. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  17. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, J.; Shimada, M.; Denny, B.; Pawelko, B.; Schuetz, S.; Longhurst, G.; Hatano, Y.; Hara, M.; Oya, Y.; Otsuka, T.; Katayama, K.; Konishi, S.; Noborio, K.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  18. The neutron beam facility at the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Australian federal government gave ANSTO final approval to build a research reactor to replace HIFAR on August 25th 1999. The replacement reactor is to be a multipurpose reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and having improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The replacement reactor will commence operation in 2005 and will cater for Australian scientific, industrial and medical needs well into the 21st century. The scientific capabilities of the neutron beams at the replacement reactor are being developed in consultation with representatives from academia, industry and government research laboratories to provide a facility for condensed matter research in physics, chemistry, materials science, life sciences, engineering and earth sciences. Cold, thermal and hot neutron sources are to be installed, and neutron guides will be used to position most of the neutron beam instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. Eight instruments are planned for 2005, with a further three to be developed by 2010. A conceptual layout for the neutron beam facility is presented including the location of the planned suite of neutron beam instruments. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by an accredited reactor builder in a turnkey contract. Tenders have been called for December 1999, with selection of contractor planned by June 2000. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations in consultation with the user community and interested overseas scientists. The facility will be based, as far as possible, around a neutron guide hall that is be served by three thermal and three cold neutron guides. Efficient transportation of thermal and cold neutrons to the guide hall requires the use of modern super

  19. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  20. Code on the safety of nuclear research reactors: Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide the essential requirements and recommendations for the safe operation of research reactors, with emphasis on the supervisory and managerial aspects. However, the publication also provides some guidance and information on topics concerning all the organizations involved in operation. These objectives are expressed in terms of requirements and recommendations for the safe operation of research reactors. Emphasis is placed on the safety requirements that shall be met rather than on the ways in which they can be met. The requirements and recommendations may form the foundation necessary for a Member State to develop regulations and safety criteria for its research reactor programme.

  1. Safety re-assessment of AECL test and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited currently has four operating engineering test/research reactors of various sizes and ages; a new isotope-production reactor Maple-X10, under construction at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and a heating demonstration reactor, SDR, undergoing high-power commissioning at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE). The company is also performing design studies of small reactors for hot water and electricity production. The older reactors are ZED-2, PTR, NRX, and NRU; these range in age from 42 years (NRX) to 29 years (ZED-2). Since 1984, limited-scope safety re-assessments have been underway on three of these reactors (ZED-2, NRX AND NRU). ZED-2 and PTR are operated by the Reactor Physics Branch; all other reactors are operated by the respective site Reactor Operations Branches. For the older reactors the original safety reports produced were entirely deterministic in nature and based on the design-basis accident concept. The limited scope safety re-assessments for these older reactors, carried out over the past 5 years, have comprised both quantitative probabilistic safety-assessment techniques, such as event tree and fault analysis, and/or qualitative techniques, such as failure mode and effect analysis. The technique used for an individual assessment was dependent upon the specific scope required. This paper discusses the types of analyses carried out, specific insights/recommendations resulting from the analysis, and the plan for future analysis. In addition, during the last four years safety assessments have been carried out on the new isotope-, heat-, and electricity-producing reactors, as part of the safety design review, commissioning and licensing activities

  2. Application of Code Of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligam, A.S.; Ahmad Nabil Abd Rahim; Zarina Masood

    2014-01-01

    The implementation and the practices of the effective safety system at research reactors are important to ensure that the worker, public and environment do not receive any abnormal causes. Many international safety related support agencies for research reactor such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) providing guidelines that can be applied to enhance and strengthen the enforcement of safety namely Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor (IAEA/CODEOC/RR/2006). The excellent safety management, reliability, and maintainability of RTP reactor structures, coupled with personnel numerous lessons and experiences learned, Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI research reactor providing Nuclear Malaysia personnel and visitor the very safe working and visiting environment. This paper will discuss the status, practices and improvement strategies over the past few years. (author)

  3. Code on the safety of nuclear research reactors: Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of this publication is to provide a safety basis for the design of a research reactor and for the assessment of the design. Another objective is to cover certain aspects related to regulatory supervision, siting and quality assurance, as far as these are related to activities for the design of a research reactor. These objectives are expressed in terms of requirements and recommendations for the design of research reactors. Emphasis is placed on the safety requirements that shall be met rather than on ways in which they can be met. The requirements and recommendations may form the foundation necessary for a Member State to develop specific regulations and safety criteria for its research reactor programme.

  4. Safety research for LWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The current R and D activities are to be seen in connection with the LWR risk assessment studies. Two trends are emerging, of which the one concentrates more on BWR-specific problems, and the other on the efficiency or safety-related assessment of accident management activities. This annual report of 1988 reviews the progress of work done by the institutes and departments of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, (KfK), or on behalf of KfK by external institutions, in the field of safety research. The papers of this report present the state of work at the end of the year 1988. They are written in German, with an abstract in English. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Towards harmonised self assessment of research reactor safety status in operating organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchsteiger, C.; Boeck, H.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the development of a methodology and corresponding web-based tool for mapping and cross-comparing the safety approaches in European and other Research Reactor (RR) facilities in order to detect the principal similarities and differences. As an example, the performance of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for RRs is mapped, as follows: is PSA performed at all? (Yes/No); if so, is PSA mandatory or just recommended? (Yes/No); what is the scope of PSA?, its objective? and practical use? (set of more detailed questions), etc. In this way, information on different types of safety verification practices and requirements for RRs from Europe, Argentina, Australia, Canada, South Africa and the USA has been collected in a systematic way and included in the web-based benchmarking tool DARES (DAtabase for REsearch Reactor Safety). DARES has been developed and filled with sample data by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) together with members of the European Research Reactors Operator Group (RROG). A systematic mapping by using DARES in parallel to an international Working Group, consisting of both operators and authorities could be the starting point towards harmonisation of RR safety verification on an international level. In addition, the availability of a user-friendly Information System on the Internet such as DARES containing this information is considered a useful mechanism to exchange international experiences and practices in the area among qualified users. This approach is currently considered to be proposed to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAES) as one possible application of the recently adopted IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. The resulting process would be a self-assessment of the RR safety status in regulatory bodies and operating organisations relative to the guidance in the Code, practically realised and monitored by an Information System similar to DARES. (orig.)

  6. Nordic reactor safety research 1981-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheelsen, B.

    1986-01-01

    National resources in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden were put together with Nordic funds in the four-year research programme 1981-85 on selected areas of nuclear safety. The outcome of the programme, edited in four separate reports, is summarized, and important findings are listed in the areas of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), loss-of-coolant accidents with small breaks, heat-transfer correlations, and corrosion in the nuclear industry. (author)

  7. Proceedings of the international symposium on research reactor safety operations and modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The International Symposium on Research Reactor Safety, Operations and Modifications was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in cooperation with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited-Research Company. The main objectives of this Symposium were: (1) to exchange information and to discuss current perspectives and concerns relating to all aspects to research reactor safety, operations, and modifications; and, (2) to present views and to discuss future initiatives and directions for research reactor design, operations, utilization, and safety. The symposium topics included: research reactor programmes and experience; research reactor design safety and analysis; research reactor modifications and decommissioning; research reactor licensing; and new research reactors. These topics were covered during eight oral sessions and three poster sessions. These Proceedings include the full text of the 93 papers presented. The subject of Symposium was quite wide-ranging in that it covered essentially all aspects of research reactor safety, operations, and modifications. This was considered to be appropriate and timely given the 326 research reactors currently in operation in some 56 countries; given the degree of their utilization which ranges from pure and applied research to radioisotopes production to basic training and manpower development; and given that many of these reactors are undergoing extensive modifications, core conversions, power upratings, and are becoming the subject of safety reassessment and regulatory reviews. Although the Symposium covered many topics, the majority of papers and discussions tended to focus mainly on research reactor safety. This was seen as a clear sign of the continuing recognition of the fundamental importance of identifying and addressing, particularly through international cooperation, issues and concerns associated with research reactor safety

  8. The evaluation of research reactor TRIGA MARK II safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R.; Kozuh, M.; Mavko, B.

    1994-01-01

    In the paper the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of a research reactor is described. Five different initiating events were selected and analyzed with the use of event trees. Seven reactor systems were modeled with fault trees. Three groups of radiation releases were introduced - Success, Reactor-Hall, Environment - and their frequencies were estimated. The importance factors of initiating events, human errors and basic events were calculated regarding the consequence groups. (author)

  9. Core conversion effects on the safety analysis of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoussis, J.N.; Chrysochoides, N.G.; Papastergiou, C.N.

    1982-07-01

    The safety related parameters of the 5 MW Democritus research reactor that will be affected by the scheduled core conversion to use LEU instead of HEU are considered. The analysis of the safety related items involved in such a core conversion, mainly the consequences due to MCA, DBA, etc., is of a general nature and can, therefore, be applied to other similar pool type reactors as well. (T.A.)

  10. Neutron beam facilities at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane; Robinson, Robert; Hunter, Brett

    2001-01-01

    Australia is building a research reactor to replace the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the Replacement Research Reactor will be multipurpose with capabilities for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. It will be a pool-type reactor with thermal neutron flux (unperturbed) of 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec and a liquid D 2 cold neutron source. Cold and thermal neutron beams for neutron beam research will be provided at the reactor face and in a large neutron guide hall. Supermirror neutron guides will transport cold and thermal neutrons to the guide hall. The reactor and the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP S.E. under contract. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO, in consultation with the Australian user community. This status report includes a review the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a summary of progress to date. (author)

  11. The selection of probabilistic safety assessment techniques for non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vail, J.

    1992-01-01

    Historically, the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology of choice is the well known event tree/fault tree inductive technique. For reactor facilities is has stood the test of time. Some non-reactor nuclear facilities have found inductive methodologies difficult to apply. The stand-alone fault tree deductive technique has been used effectively to analyze risk in nuclear chemical processing facilities and waste handling facilities. The selection between the two choices suggest benefits from use of the deductive method for non-reactor facilities

  12. Safety regulations concerning instrumentation and control systems for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shanshoury, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    A brief study on the safety and reliability issues related to instrumentation and control systems in nuclear reactor plants is performed. In response, technical and strategic issues are used to accomplish instrumentation and control systems safety. For technical issues there are ; systems aspects of digital I and C technology, software quality assurance, common-mode software, failure potential, safety and reliability assessment methods, and human factors and human machine interfaces. The strategic issues are the case-by-case licensing process and the adequacy of the technical infrastructure. The purpose of this work was to review the reliability of the safety systems related to these technical issues for research reactors

  13. UK experience of safety requirements for thermal reactor stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.R.; Dale, G.C.; Tweedy, J.N.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarises the development of safety requirements since the first of the Generating Boards' Magnox reactors commenced operation in 1962 and includes A.G.R. safety together with the preparation of S.G.H.W.R. design safety criteria. It outlines the basic principles originally adopted and shows how safety assessment is a continuing process throughout the life of a reactor. Some description is given of the continuous effort over the years to obtain increased safety margins for existing and new reactors, taking into account the construction and operating experience, experimental information, and more sophisticated computer-aided design techniques which have become available. The main safeguards against risks arising from the Generating Boards' reactors are the achievement of high standards of design, construction and operation, in conjunction with comprehensive fault analyses to ensure that adequate protective equipment is provided. The most important analyses refer to faults which can lead to excessive fuel element temperatures arising from an increase in power or a reduction in cooling capacity. They include the possibility of unintended control rod withdrawal at power or at start-up, coolant flow failure, pressure circuit failure, loss of boiler feed water, and failure of electric power. The paper reviews the protective equipment, and the policy for reactor safety assessments which include application of maximum credible accident philosophy and later the limited use of reliability and probability methods. Some of the Generating Boards' reactors are now more than half way through their planned working lives and during this time safety protective equipment has occasionally been brought into operation, often for spurious reasons. The general performance, of safety equipment is reviewed particularly for incidents such as main turbo-alternator trip, circulator failure, fuel element failures and other similar events, and some problems which have given rise to

  14. Advanced nuclear reactor safety issues and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    On 18-20 February 2002, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organised, with the co-sponsorship of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and in collaboration with the European Commission (EC), a Workshop on Advanced Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues and Research Needs. Currently, advanced nuclear reactor projects range from the development of evolutionary and advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs to initial work to develop even further advanced designs which go beyond LWR technology (e.g. high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and liquid metal-cooled reactors). These advanced designs include a greater use of advanced technology and safety features than those employed in currently operating plants or approved designs. The objectives of the workshop were to: - facilitate early identification and resolution of safety issues by developing a consensus among participating countries on the identification of safety issues, the scope of research needed to address these issues and a potential approach to their resolution; - promote the preservation of knowledge and expertise on advanced reactor technology; - provide input to the Generation IV International Forum Technology Road-map. In addition, the workshop tried to link advancement of knowledge and understanding of advanced designs to the regulatory process, with emphasis on building public confidence. It also helped to document current views on advanced reactor safety and technology, thereby contributing to preserving knowledge and expertise before it is lost. (author)

  15. NRC/DAE reactor safety research Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    In 1976, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. This program has since grown from the conceptual stage to a useful, usable service for computer code development, code assessment, and experimentation groups in meeting the needs of the nuclear industry. Data from 20 facilities are now processed and permanently stored in the Data Bank, which utilizes the Control Data Corporation (CDC) CYBER 176 computer system located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). New data and data sources are continually being added to the Data Bank. In addition to providing data storage and access software, the Data Bank program supplies data entry, documentation, and training and advisory services to users and the NRC. Management of the NRC/DAE Data Bank is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc

  16. Complementary Safety Assessments for Research Reactors for the French Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassiotis, Christophe; Rigaud, Antoine; Evrard, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    The 'Autorite de surete nucleaire' (ASN) requested licensees to undertake stress tests, called complementary safety assessments (CSA), of their installations on May 5th 2011, following the accident that occurred in Japan on March 11th 2011. Their mission consisted in providing feedback on the consequences of potential extreme events. In this process, all the French facilities were divided into three categories of decreasing priority, depending on two main factors: on the one hand, their vulnerability to the various phenomena that led to the Fukushima accident, and on the other hand, the amount of radioactive elements that would be dispersed in the event of a failure of the safety functions. On the 79 high-priority facilities, only five of them are research or experimental reactors (including two currently shutdown or in decommissioning) and their operators (the 'Comissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives' (CEA) and the 'Institut Laue Langevin') submitted their reports to the ASN on September 15 th 2011. Concerning the lower-priority facilities, including three other facilities (two research reactors operated by the CEA and a facility operated by ITER Organization) the deadline was September 15 th 2012. Finally, the remaining facilities were not asked to submit a report yet, but they will have to do it later, mainly on the occasion of their next periodic safety review. The analyses of the cliff-edge effects, that may occur in extreme situations (exceptional scale event, combination of several disasters...), led to the definition of a hardened safety core concept by the 'Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire' (IRSN). This hardened safety core of structures, equipment and organizational measures must ensure the ultimate protection of the concerned facilities in extreme situations : it is designed to prevent severe accidents (or curb their progression), limit large scale releases for extreme accidents, and enables the operating teams to

  17. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and 'flooding' phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the 'surge line' and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008

  18. Education and research at the VR-1 Vrabec training reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.

    1993-01-01

    The results of 12 years' efforts devoted to the construction of the VR-1 ''Vrabec'' training reactor at the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague and to establishing the training reactor department, as well as the contribution of the training reactor facility to the teaching and scientific activities of the Faculty are presented in a comprehensive manner. The thesis is divided into 2 parts: (i) preconditions, reactor construction and commissioning, and constituting the reactor department, and (ii) basic and comprehensive information concerning the current utilization of the reactor for the benefit of students from various university level institutions. The prospects of scientific activities of the department are also outlined. Attention is paid to selected nuclear safety aspects of the reactor during operation and teaching of students, as well as to its innovated digital control system whose implementation is planned. The results achieved are compared with the initial goals and with similar experience abroad. (P.A.)

  19. Training and research reactor facility longevity extension program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriveau, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1943, over 550 training and research reactors have been in operation. According to statistics from the International Atomic Energy Agency, ∼325 training and research reactors are currently in service. This total includes a wide variety of designs covering a range of power and research capabilities located virtually around the world. A program has been established at General Atomics (GA) that is dedicated to the support of extended longevity of training and research reactor facilities. Aspects of this program include the following: (1) new instrumentation and control systems; (2) improved and upgraded nuclear monitoring and control channels; (3) facility testing, repair and upgrade services that include (a) pool or tank integrity, (b) cooling system, and (c) water purification system; (4) fuel element testing procedures and replacement; (5) control rod drive rebuilding and upgrades; (6) control and monitoring system calibration and repair service; (7) training services, including reactor operations, maintenance, instrumentation calibration, and repair; and (8) expanded or new uses such as neutron radiography and autoradiography, isotope production, nuclear medicine, activation analysis, and material properties modification

  20. Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    The Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) adopted the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors on 8 March 2004. The Board's action was the culmination of several years of work to develop the Code and obtain a consensus on its provisions. The process leading to the Code began in 1998, when the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) informed the Director General of concerns about the safety of research reactors. In 2000, INSAG recommended that the Secretariat begin developing an international protocol or a similar legal instrument to address those concerns. In September 2000, in resolution GC(44)/RES/14, the General Conference requested the Secretariat ''within its available resources, to continue work on exploring options to strengthen the international nuclear safety arrangements for civil research reactors, taking due account of input from INSAG and the views of other relevant bodies''. A working group convened by the Secretariat pursuant to that request recommended that ''the Agency consider establishing an international action plan for research reactors'' and that the action plan include preparation of a Code of Conduct ''that would clearly establish the desirable attributes for management of research reactor safety''. In September 2001, the Board requested that the Secretariat develop and implement, in conjunction with Member States, an international research reactor safety enhancement plan which included preparation of a Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. Subsequently, in resolution GC(45)/RES/10.A, the General Conference endorsed the Board's request. Pursuant to that request, a Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors was drafted at two meetings of an Open-ended Working Group of Legal and Technical Experts. This draft Code of Conduct was circulated to all Member States for comment. On the basis of the responses received, a revised draft of the Code was prepared by the Secretariat

  1. Application of probabilistic safety assessment to research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This document has been prepared to assist in the performance of a research reactor probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). It offers examples of experience gained by a number of Member States in carrying out PSA for research reactors. These examples are illustrative of the types of approach adopted, the problems that arise and the judgements entered into when conducting a PSA. The illustrative examples of experiences gained are discussed in a series of thirteen chapters which address some of the issues that arise in a PSA. The examples are not exhaustive and offer evidence of how other analyses have approached the task of preparing a PSA, for their particular plant. The principles should be capable of being utilised and the various issues which are discussed should be translated into the needs of the analyst. Each PSA will make its own demands on the analyst depending on the reactor and so the illustrations must only be used as guidance and not adopted as published, without critical appreciation. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Grading of Requirements for Radioactive Waste Activities in Nuclear Research Reactors: Radioisotope Production Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, Y.E.

    2017-01-01

    A graded approach is applicable in all stages of the life time of a research reactor. During the life time of a research reactor, any grading performed should not, in any manner, affect safety functions and operational limits and conditions are preserved, so that there are no undue radiological hazards to workers, public or environment. The grading of activities should be based on safety analyses, and regulatory requirements. Other elements to be considered in grading are the complexity and the maturity of the technology, operating experience associated with the activities and the stage in the life time of the facility. In order to ensure that proper and a de quate provision is made for the safety implications associated with the management and disposal of radioactive waste, the waste is characterized and classified. The general scheme for classifying radioactive waste as presented in the current study is based on considerations of long term safety, and thus, by implication, disposal of the waste. This classification provides a starting point for the grading of activities associated with the packaging and disposal of radioactive waste

  3. A safety decision analysis for Saudi Arabian nuclear research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Abdul-Fattah, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    Establishment of a nuclear research facility should be the first step in planning for introducing the nuclear energy to Saudi Arabia. The fuzzy set decision theory is selected among different decision theories to be applied for this analysis. Four research reactors from USA are selected for the present study. The IFDA computer code, based on the fuzzy set theory is applied. Results reveal that the FNR reactor is the best alternative for the case of Saudi Arabian nuclear research facility, and MITR is the second best. 17 refs

  4. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24

  5. Human performance analysis in the frame of probabilistic safety assessment of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcasiu, Mita; Nitoi, Mirela; Apostol, Minodora; Turcu, I.; Florescu, Gh.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The analysis of operating experience has identified the importance of human performance in reliability and safety of research reactors. In Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of nuclear facilities, human performance analysis (HPA) is used in order to estimate human error contribution to the failure of system components or functions. HPA is a qualitative and quantitative analysis of human actions identified for error-likely situations or accident-prone situations. Qualitative analysis is used to identify all man-machine interfaces that can lead to an accident, types of human interactions which may mitigate or exacerbate the accident, types of human errors and performance shaping factors. Quantitative analysis is used to develop estimates of human error probability as effects of human performance in reliability and safety. The goal of this paper is to accomplish a HPA in the PSA frame for research reactors. Human error probabilities estimated as results of human actions analysis could be included in system event tree and/or system fault tree. The achieved sensitivity analyses determine human performance sensibility at systematically variations both for dependencies level between human actions and for operator stress level. The necessary information was obtained from operating experience of research reactor TRIGA from INR Pitesti. The required data were obtained from generic data bases. (authors)

  6. Main safety lessons from 5-year operation of the renovated Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anh, T.H.; Lam, P.V.; An, T.K.; Khang, N.P.; Tan, D.Q.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents main safety related characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR), which was reconstructed in 1982 at the site of the former TRIGA Mark II, while retaining some of its structures. Experience acquired from reactor operation is analysed. The programme of investigations aimed at better ensuring nuclear safety of the reactor, together with some of its results are presented. Finally some propositions to improve the present situation are suggested. (Authors). (2 Tables, 2 fig.)

  7. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Hauptmanns, Ulrich [Department of Plant Design and Safety, Otto-Von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  8. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Hauptmanns, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  9. Nuclear power reactor safety research activities in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shendi; Huang Yucai; Xu Hanming; Zhang Zhongyue

    1994-01-01

    The power reactor safety research activities in CIAE are briefly reviewed. The research work performed in 1980's and 1990's is mainly emphasised, which is closely related to the design, construction and licensing review of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant and the safety review of Guangdong Nuclear Power Station. Major achievements in the area of thermohydraulics, nuclear fuel, probabilistic safety assessment and severe accident researches are summarized. The foreseeable research plan for the near future, relating to the design and construction of 600 MWe PWR NPP at Qinshan Site (phase II development) is outlined

  10. Research and development program in reactor safety for NUCLEBRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, R.B.; Resende Lobo, A.A. de; Horta, J.A.L.; Avelar Esteves, F. de; Lepecki, W.P.S.; Mohr, K.; Selvatici, E.

    1984-01-01

    With technical assistance from the IAEA, it was established recently an analytical and experimental Research and Development Program for NUCLEBRAS in the area of reactor safety. The main objectives of this program is to make possible, with low investments, the active participation of NUCLEBRAS in international PWR safety research. The analytical and experimental activities of the program are described with some detail, and the main results achieved up to now are presented. (Author) [pt

  11. The nuclear safety case for the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, A.; Garea, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the safety case being used in the licensing of Australia's Replacement Research Reactor. The reactor is a 20 MW pool-type research reactor and is being constructed at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre in Sydney's south. It will be owned and operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and will take over the duties currently performed by HIFAR, a DIDO-type reactor currently operating at the site. The safety case for the RRR considers all aspects of normal operation and anticipated occurrences and will be subject to periodic review and updated in line with evolving methodologies and modifications to plant and procedures. Its scope and degree of detail ensure that the risk posed to members of the public, operators and environment are all adequately low and well in the regulatory limits

  12. Physics constraints on the design of fast reactor safety test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.; Meneghetti, D.; Matos, J.; Snelgrove, J.; Shaftman, D.H.; Tzanos, C.; Lam, S.K.; Pennington, E.M.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses the physics foundations common to all fast reactor safety test facilities and the constraints which they impose on the design. While detailed design discussions are confined to the experience with six ANL designs, available data from other designs are used to confirm the validity of the considerations and to broaden the scope of the discussion. This helps to view the various designs as a unified effort, to define their potential capabilities, and to assess how they could best complement each other

  13. Validation of computer codes used in the safety analysis of Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, W.E.; Lee, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    AECL has embarked on a validation program for the suite of computer codes that it uses in performing the safety analyses for its research reactors. Current focus is on codes used for the analysis of the two MAPLE reactors under construction at Chalk River but the program will be extended to include additional codes that will be used for the Irradiation Research Facility. The program structure is similar to that used for the validation of codes used in the safety analyses for CANDU power reactors. (author)

  14. Yearly program of safety research for nuclear facilities and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The development of FBRs in Japan has steadily progressed, and subsequently to the experimental reactor 'Joyo' and the prototype reactor 'Monju', by promoting the construction of a demonstration reactor, the stage of verifying and acquiring skill of the electricity generation plant technology of practical scale, improving the performance and establishing the economical efficiency is about to begin. The development of FBRs in Japan has been advanced independently as a national project, and the method of preventing accidents in the actual reactors has been thoroughly taken. 'On the way of thinking in the safety evaluation of FBRs' was decided by the Nuclear Safety Commission. When the safety research from 1987 is systematized, as the constituents of safety logic, the way of thinking of the defense in depth, the way of thinking of the classification according to importance, the way of thinking of multilayer barriers against radioactive substances, and the way of thinking on severe accidents were investigated. The research concerning the decision of safety design and evaluation policy, and the safety research regarding accident prevention and relaxation, accident evaluation and severe accidents are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In June 1995, an OECD Support Group was set up to perform a broad study of the safety research needs of Russian-designed reactors. This Support Group was endorsed by the CSNI. The Support Group, which is composed of senior experts on safety research from several OECD countries and from Russia, prepared this Report. The Group reviewed the safety research performed to support Russian-designed reactors and set down its views on future needs. The review concentrates on the following main topics: Thermal-Hydraulics/Plant Transients for VVERs; Integrity of Equipment and Structures for VVERs; Severe Accidents for VVERs; Operational Safety Issues; Thermal-Hydraulics/Plant Transients for RBMKs; Integrity of Equipment and Structures for RBMKs; Severe Accidents for RBMKs. (K.A.)

  16. The neutron radiography facility at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali Pazirandeh

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Non-destructive testing in many fields of industry including detection of explosives, at the airports, testing for micro-cracks on airplane wings and turbine blades cracks is badly needed. Thermal neutron beam is one of preferable method to detect the micro-cracks, reveals the internal structure of components and explosives. The purpose of this paper is to present the neutron radiography facility at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR), Science and Technology Research Institute, and in particular to emphasize the industrial applications in wood industry, automobile engine inspection, minerals composition identification, turbine blade cracks detection. (author)

  17. Safety inspections to TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byszewski, W.

    1988-01-01

    The operational safety advisory programme was created to provide useful assistance and advice from an international perspective to research reactor operators and regulators on how to enhance operational safety and radiation protection on their reactors. Safety missions cover not only the operational safety of reactors themselves, but also the safety of associated experimental loops, isotope laboratories and other experimental facilities. Safety missions are also performed on request in other Member States which are interested in receiving impartial advice and assistance in order to enhance the safety of research reactors. The results of the inspections have shown that in some countries there are problems with radiation protection practices and nuclear safety. Very often the Safety Analysis Report is not updated, regulatory supervision needs clarification and improvement, maintenance procedures should be more formalised and records and reports are not maintained properly. In many cases population density around the facility has increased affecting the validity of the original safety analysis

  18. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  19. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D.A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.

    2012-01-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  20. Water reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsors confirmatory safety research on lightwater reactors in support of the NRC regulatory program. The principal responsibility of the NRC, as implemented through its regulatory program is to ensure that public health, public safety, and the environment are adequately protected. The NRC performs this function by defining conditions for the use of nuclear power and by ensuring through technical review, audit, and follow-up that these conditions are met. The NRC research program provides technical information, independent of the nuclear industry, to aid in discharging these regulatory responsibilities. The objectives of NRC's research program are the following: (1) to maintain a confirmatory research program that supports assurance of public health and safety, and public confidence in the regulatory program, (2) to provide objectively evaluated safety data and analytical methods that meet the needs of regulatory activities, (3) to provide better quantified estimates of the margins of safety for reactor systems, fuel cycle facilities, and transportation systems, (4) to establish a broad and coherent exchange of safety research information with other Federal agencies, industry, and foreign organization. Current and planned research toward these goals is described

  1. Safety-evaluation report related to renewal of the operating license for the Texas A and M University Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-128, License R-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) for a renewal of operating license number R-83 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Texas Engineering and Experiment Station of the Texas A and M University and is located on the campus in College Station, Brazos County, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Texas A and M University without endangering the health and safety of the public

  2. Research on the reactor physics and reactor safety of VVER reactors. AER Symposium 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliem, S.

    2017-09-15

    The selected paperscan be attributed to the following main subjects: Reactor start-up tests and use of corresponding data for code validation, code development and application, approaches for safety analyses, closure of nuclear fuel cycle, prospective reactor concepts.

  3. Criticality safety research on nuclear fuel cycle facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2004-07-01

    This paper present d s current status and future program of the criticality safety research on nuclear fuel cycle made by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Experimental research on solution fuel treated in reprocessing plant has been performed using two critical facilities, STACY and TRACY. Fundamental data of static and transient characteristics are accumulated for validation of criticality safety codes. Subcritical measurements are also made for developing a monitoring system for criticality safety. Criticality safety codes system for solution and power system, and evaluation method related to burnup credit are developed. (author)

  4. Evaluation of the Community's nuclear reactor safety research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Goedkoop, J.A.; Jaumotte, A.; Malhouitre, G.; Tomkins, B.; Zorzoli, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the 1980-85 CEC reactor safety programme prepared, at the invitation of the Commission, by a panel of six independent experts by means of examining the relevant document and by holding hearings with the responsible CEC staff. It contains the recommendations made by the panel on the following topics: the need for the JRC to continue to make its competence in the reactor safety field available to the Community; the importance of continuity in the JRC and shared-cost action programmes; the difficulty of developing reactor safety research programmes which satisfy the needs of users with diverse needs; the monitoring of the utilization of the research results; the maintenance of the JRC computer codes used by the Member States; the spin-off from research results being made available to other industrial sectors; the continued contact between the JRC researchers and the national experts; the coordination of LWR safety research with that of the Member States; and, the JRC work on fast breeders to be planned with regard to the R and D programmes of the Fast Reactor European Consortium

  5. Safety Committees for Argentinean Research Reactor - Regulatory Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, Carlos D.

    2009-01-01

    In the field of radiological and nuclear safety, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina controls three research reactors and three critical assemblies, by means of evaluations, audits and inspections, in order to ensure the fulfillment of the requirements established in the Licenses, in the Regulatory Standards and in the Mandatory Documentation in general. From the Nuclear Regulatory Authority's point of view, within the general process of research reactors safety management, the Operational Organization self verification of radiological and nuclear safety plays an outstanding role. In this aspect the ARN has established specific requirements in the Regulatory Standards, in the Operation Licenses and in the Operational Limits and Conditions. These requirements include the figure of different safety committees, which act as reviewers or advisers in diverse situations. This paper describes the main characteristics of the committees, their function, scope and the regulatory documents where the requirements are included. (author)

  6. Experience in using a research reactor for the training of power reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Arsenaut, L.J.

    1972-01-01

    A research reactor facility such as the one at the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital would have much to offer in the way of training reactor operators. Although most of the candidates for the course had either received previous training in the Westinghouse Reactor Operator Training Program, had operated nuclear submarine reactors or had operated power reactors, they were not offered the opportunity to perform the extensive manipulations of a reactor that a small research facility will allow. In addition the AEC recommends 10 research reactor startups per student as a prerequisite for a cold operator?s license and these can easily be obtained during the training period

  7. PANDA a multi-purpose thermal-hydraulics facility devoted to nuclear reactor containment safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the multi purpose facility PANDA devised for the safety analysis of nuclear reactor containment. The passive safety systems for LWRs have been explained with details about the PAssive Nachzerfallswärmeabfuhr und Druck-Abbau Testanlage (PANDA)

  8. European community light water reactor safety research projects. Experimental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Research programs on light water reactor safety currently carried out in the European Community are presented. They cover: accident conditions (LOCA, ECCS, core meltdown, external influences, etc...), fault and accident prevention and means of mitigation, normal operation conditions, on and off site implications and equipment under severe accident conditions, and miscellaneous subjects

  9. Personal neutron dosimetry at a research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.; Carinou, E.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2001-01-01

    Individual neutron monitoring presents several difficulties due to the differences in energy response of the dosemeters. In the present study, an individual dosemeter (TLD) calibration approach is attempted for the personnel of a research reactor facility. The neutron energy response function of the dosemeter was derived using the MCNP code. The results were verified by measurements to three different neutron spectra and were found to be in good agreement. Three different calibration curves were defined for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons. At the different working positions around the reactor, neutron spectra were defined using the Monte Carlo technique and ambient dose rate measurements were performed. An estimation of the neutrons energy is provided by the ratio of the different TLD pellets of each dosemeter in combination with the information concerning the worker's position; then the dose equivalent is deduced according to the appropriate calibration curve. (author)

  10. Current state of research on pressurized water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Schwarz, Michel; Roubaud, Sebastien; Lavarenne, Caroline; Mattei, Jean-Marie; Rigollet, Laurence; Scotti, Oona; Clement, Christophe; Lancieri, Maria; Gelis, Celine; Jacquemain, Didier; Bentaib, Ahmed; Nahas, Georges; Tarallo, Francois; Guilhem, Gilbert; Cattiaux, Gerard; Durville, Benoit; Mun, Christian; Delaval, Christine; Sollier, Thierry; Stelmaszyk, Jean-Marc; Jeffroy, Francois; Dechy, Nicolas; Chanton, Olivier; Tasset, Daniel; Pichancourt, Isabelle; Barre, Francois; Bruna, Gianni; Evrard, Jean-Michel; Gonzalez, Richard; Loiseau, Olivier; Queniart, Daniel; Vola, Didier; Goue, Georges; Lefevre, Odile

    2018-03-01

    For more than 40 years, IPSN then IRSN has conducted research and development on nuclear safety, specifically concerning pressurized water reactors, which are the reactor type used in France. This publication reports on the progress of this research and development in each area of study - loss-of-coolant accidents, core melt accidents, fires and external hazards, component aging, etc. -, the remaining uncertainties and, in some cases, new measures that should be developed to consolidate the safety of today's reactors and also those of tomorrow. A chapter of this report is also devoted to research into human and organizational factors, and the human and social sciences more generally. All of the work is reviewed in the light of the safety issues raised by feedback from major accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi, as well as the issues raised by assessments conducted, for example, as part of the ten-year reviews of safety at French nuclear reactors. Finally, through the subjects it discusses, this report illustrates the many partnerships and exchanges forged by IRSN with public, industrial and academic bodies both within Europe and internationally

  11. Classification of research reactors and discussion of thinking of safety regulation based on the classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chenxiu; Zhu Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Research reactors have different characteristics in the fields of reactor type, use, power level, design principle, operation model and safety performance, etc, and also have significant discrepancy in the aspect of nuclear safety regulation. This paper introduces classification of research reactors and discusses thinking of safety regulation based on the classification of research reactors. (authors)

  12. Safety system upgrades to a research reactor: A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarre, G.B.; Martin, W.G.

    2003-01-01

    The NRU (National Research Universal) reactor, located at the Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), first achieved criticality November 3, 1957. AECL continues to operate NRU for research to support safety and reliability studies for CANDU reactors and as a major supplier of medical radioisotopes. Following a detailed systematic review and assessment of NRU's design and the condition of its primary systems, AECL formally notified the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) predecessor - the Atomic Energy Control Board - in 1992 of its intention to upgrade NRU's safety systems. AECL proposed seven major upgrades to provide improvements in shutdown capability, heat removal, confinement, and reactor monitoring, particularly during and after a seismic event. From a CNSC perspective, these upgrades were necessary to meet modern safety standards. From the start of the upgrades project, the CNSC provided regulatory oversight aimed at ensuring that AECL maintained a structured approach to the upgrades. The elements of the approach include, but are not limited to, the determination of project milestones and target dates; the formalization of the design process and project quality assurance requirements; the requirements for updated documentation, including safety reports, safety notes and commissioning reports; and the approval and authorization process. This paper details, from a regulatory perspective, the structured approach used in approving the design, construction, commissioning and subsequent operation of safety system upgrades for an existing and operating research reactor, including the many challenges faced when attempting to balance the requirements of the upgrades project with AECL's need to keep NRU operating to meet its important research and production objectives. (author)

  13. The advanced neutron source - A world-class research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.; Meek, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    The advanced neutron source (ANS) is a new facility being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is based on a heavy-water-moderated reactor and extensive experiment and user-support facilities. The primary purpose of the ANS is to provide world-class facilities for neutron scattering research, isotope production, and materials irradiation in the United States. The neutrons provided by the reactor will be thermalized to produce sources of hot, thermal, cold, very cold, and ultracold neutrons usable at the experiment stations. Beams of cold neutrons will be directed into a large guide hall using neutron guide technology, greatly enhancing the number of research stations possible in the project. Fundamental and nuclear physics, materials analysis, and other research pro- grams will share the neutron beam facilities. Sufficient laboratory and office space will be provided to create an effective user-oriented environment

  14. Advanced nuclear reactor safety design technology research in NPIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.

    2014-01-01

    After the Fukushima accident happen, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) construction has been suspended in China for a time. Now the new regulatory rule has been proposed that the most advanced safety standard must be adopted for the new NPPs and practical elimination of large fission product release by design during the next five plans period. So the advanced reactor research is developing in China. NPIC is engaging on the ACP1000 and ACP100 (Small Module Reactor) design. The main design character will be introduced in this paper. The Passive Combined with Active (PCWA) design was adopted during the ACP1000 design to reduce the core damage frequency (CDF); the Cavity Injection System (CIS) is design to mitigation the consequence of the severe accident. Advance passive safety system was designed to ensure the long term residual heat removal during the Small Module Reactor (SMR). The SMR will be utilized to be the floating reactors, district heating reactor and so on. Besides, the Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory (LRSDT) also engaged on the fundamental thermal-hydraulic characteristic research in support of the system validation. (author)

  15. Research for the safety of existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teschendorff, Victor; Bruna, Giovanni B.; Gelder, Pieter de

    2007-01-01

    The essential role of research for maintaining the high safety standard for the existing nuclear installations is outlined in the context of internationally agreed needs. The three co-authoring Technical Safety Organisations are committed to continued safety research, recognising operational experience and new technologies as the main driving forces. The safety margin concept is introduced and new trends in traditional and new areas of safety research are identified. The importance of a sufficient experimental infrastructure and international co-operation in sustainable networks is highlighted. (orig.)

  16. French studies and research program in pressurized water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, J.

    1986-06-01

    The aim of researches developed now in France on water reactor safety is to obtain means and knowledge allowing to control accidental situations, including severe situations beyond design basis accidents. The main studies and researches concerning water reactors and described in this report are the following ones: core cooling accident and prevention of severe accidents, fuel behavior in accidental situation, behavior of the containment building, fission product transfer and releases in case of accident, problems related to equipment aging, and, methodology of risk analysis and ''human factor'' studies. Most of these studies follow an analytic approach of phenomena [fr

  17. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Safety overview and management function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, M.; Brodsky, R.S.; Frankhouser, W.L.

    1981-02-01

    The Under Secretary of Energy established the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee in October, 1979, in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident, to assess the adequacy of training of personnel at DOE nuclear facilities. Subsequently, in February, 1980, the charge to this Committee was modified to assess all implications of the Kemeny Commission report on TMI with regard to DOE nuclear reactors, excluding those in the Division of Naval Reactors. The modified charge was also limited, for the time being, to reactor facilities instead of all nuclear facilities. This report describes the portion of the revised assessment activities that was assigned to the Assessment Support Team

  18. Material accountancy and control practice at a research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Maurel, J.J.; Tromeur, Y.

    1982-01-01

    This session surveys the regulations, organization, and accountancy practice that compose the French State System of Accountancy and Control. Practical examples are discussed showing how inventories are verified at a critical assembly facility and at a materials testing reactor

  19. Project Experiences in Research Reactor Ageing Management, Modernization and Refurbishment. Report of a Technical Meeting on Research Reactor Ageing Management, Modernization and Refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-08-01

    Research reactors have played an important role in several scientific fields for around 60 years: in the development of nuclear science and technology; in the valuable generation of radioisotopes for various applications; and in the development of human resources and skills. Moreover, research reactors have been effectively utilized to support sustainable development in more than 60 countries worldwide. More than half of all operating research reactors are now over 40 years old, with many exceeding their originally conceived design life. The majority of operating research reactors face challenges due to the negative impacts of component and system ageing, which manifest in a number of forms. This situation was highlighted by a serious medical isotope supply crisis which peaked in mid-2010, when several major producing reactors underwent prolonged shutdowns due to extensive necessary overhauls of various systems. Several facilities have established a proactive systematic approach to managing ageing or mitigating its impact on safety and availability of isotopes. Others have tried to prevent or remedy the drawbacks of ageing on a case by case basis. Overall, a large body of knowledge related to ageing issues exists in many Member States. Collecting and sharing this information within the research reactor community can provide a solid foundation to develop a more systematic approach — that is, an ageing management programme to prevent negative consequences of ageing on the safety, and the operability and lifetime of operating, or even future, reactors. It may also help organizations to manage research reactors that have been in an extended shutdown state by ensuring that any required systems are operated and maintained in a safe manner prior to final decommissioning and disposal of fuel to safe storage facilities. Sharing experiences from projects undertaken to refurbish or replace equipment and systems, satisfy safety and regulatory requirements, improve

  20. Project Experiences in Research Reactor Ageing Management, Modernization and Refurbishment. Report of a Technical Meeting on Research Reactor Ageing Management, Modernization and Refurbishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    Research reactors have played an important role in several scientific fields for around 60 years: in the development of nuclear science and technology; in the valuable generation of radioisotopes for various applications; and in the development of human resources and skills. Moreover, research reactors have been effectively utilized to support sustainable development in more than 60 countries worldwide. More than half of all operating research reactors are now over 40 years old, with many exceeding their originally conceived design life. The majority of operating research reactors face challenges due to the negative impacts of component and system ageing, which manifest in a number of forms. This situation was highlighted by a serious medical isotope supply crisis which peaked in mid-2010, when several major producing reactors underwent prolonged shutdowns due to extensive necessary overhauls of various systems. Several facilities have established a proactive systematic approach to managing ageing or mitigating its impact on safety and availability of isotopes. Others have tried to prevent or remedy the drawbacks of ageing on a case by case basis. Overall, a large body of knowledge related to ageing issues exists in many Member States. Collecting and sharing this information within the research reactor community can provide a solid foundation to develop a more systematic approach — that is, an ageing management programme to prevent negative consequences of ageing on the safety, and the operability and lifetime of operating, or even future, reactors. It may also help organizations to manage research reactors that have been in an extended shutdown state by ensuring that any required systems are operated and maintained in a safe manner prior to final decommissioning and disposal of fuel to safe storage facilities. Sharing experiences from projects undertaken to refurbish or replace equipment and systems, satisfy safety and regulatory requirements, improve

  1. Storage experience in Hungary with fuel from research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, J.; Hargitai, T.

    1996-01-01

    In Hungary several critical assemblies, a training reactor and a research reactor have been in operation. The fuel used in the research and training reactors are of Soviet origin. Though spent fuel storage experience is fairly good, medium and long term storage solutions are needed. (author)

  2. French experience in research reactor fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, Daniele

    1996-01-01

    Since 1963 Transnucleaire has safely performed a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied suitable packaging for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive material from front-end and back-end products and for power or for research reactors. Transportation of spent fuel from power reactors are made on a regular and industrial basis, but this is not yet the case for the transport of spent fuel coming from research reactors. Each shipment is a permanent challenge and requires a reactive organization dealing with all the transportation issues. This presentation will explain the choices made by Transnucleaire and its associates to provide and optimize the corresponding services while remaining in full compliance with the applicable regulations and customer requirements. (author)

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.D.

    1998-12-01

    Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel.

  5. Selecting of key safety parameters in reactor nuclear safety supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Fan; Yu Hong

    2014-01-01

    The safety parameters indicate the operational states and safety of research reactor are the basis of nuclear safety supervision institution to carry out effective supervision to nuclear facilities. In this paper, the selecting of key safety parameters presented by the research reactor operating unit to National Nuclear Safety Administration that can express the research reactor operational states and safety when operational occurrence or nuclear accident happens, and the interrelationship between them are discussed. Analysis shows that, the key parameters to nuclear safety supervision of research reactor including design limits, operational limits and conditions, safety system settings, safety limits, acceptable limits and emergency action level etc. (authors)

  6. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs.

  7. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs

  8. Safety-related parameters for the MAPLE research reactor and a comparison with the IAEA generic 10-MW research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, P.A.; Lee, A.G.; Smith, H.J.; Ellis, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    A summary is presented of some of the principle safety-related physics parameters for the MAPLE Research Reactor, and a comparison with the IAEA Generic 10-MW Reactor is given. This provides a means to assess the operating conditions and fuelling requirements for safe operation of the MAPLE Research Reactor under accepted standards

  9. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-01-01

    operated infrequently for radioisotope production. Because the two irradiation programs compete by utilizing the same core locations, the issues should be resolved at a high level. (c) Cobalt-60 production uses the most valuable irradiation location in the ETRR-2 (the high neutron density flux-trap), but there seems to be no potential customer for the Co-60. Further, the low number of hours the reactor is operated per week precludes ever producing a marketable specific activity of Co-60. Accordingly, Co-60 production should be reevaluated. (d) ETRR-2 staff would benefit from additional training to successfully design new experiment facilities and utilize existing facilities more effectively. This training can include IAEA Fellowships, as well as topical DOE Sister Laboratory visits to gain experience using equipment and research tools at other research reactor facilities

  10. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64.

  11. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, V. M.; Sordi, G. M. A. A.; Moralles, M.; Filho, T. M.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64. (authors)

  12. Regulatory Approach to Safety of Long Time Operating Research Reactors in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapozhnikov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In the Russian Federation more than 60% of operating Nuclear Research Facilities (NRFs) are of age over 30 years old or their usage exceeds originally conceived continuous operation. In this regard, important areas of regulatory body activity are: 1) a systematic assessment of the actual state of structures, systems and components (SSCs) important to safety, 2) control of implementation of organizational and technical measures to mitigate ageing impact on the basis of programmes to manage reliability (service life) of SSCs, and 3) issues of facility modification/reconstruction in line with up-to-day safety requirements. The practice of licensing NRFs with long operating times shows that the national regulations are generally in compliance with IAEA recommendations for ageing management of research reactors. In operating organizations, the ageing management is being effectively provided as a part of the integrated management system for NRFs, including the monitoring of the reliability of SSCs, a methodology to detect their ageing, reporting and investigation of events, analysis of their root causes, and measures to prevent and mitigate ageing effects to safety. The report outlines a good practice of safety regulation of NRFs with long operating times and based on lessons learned from experience, including challenges for future improvement of ageing management

  13. Regulatory Approach to Safety of Long Time Operating Research Reactors in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapozhnikov, Alexander [Industrial and Nuclear Supervision Service, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    In the Russian Federation more than 60% of operating Nuclear Research Facilities (NRFs) are of age over 30 years old or their usage exceeds originally conceived continuous operation. In this regard, important areas of regulatory body activity are: 1) a systematic assessment of the actual state of structures, systems and components (SSCs) important to safety, 2) control of implementation of organizational and technical measures to mitigate ageing impact on the basis of programmes to manage reliability (service life) of SSCs, and 3) issues of facility modification/reconstruction in line with up-to-day safety requirements. The practice of licensing NRFs with long operating times shows that the national regulations are generally in compliance with IAEA recommendations for ageing management of research reactors. In operating organizations, the ageing management is being effectively provided as a part of the integrated management system for NRFs, including the monitoring of the reliability of SSCs, a methodology to detect their ageing, reporting and investigation of events, analysis of their root causes, and measures to prevent and mitigate ageing effects to safety. The report outlines a good practice of safety regulation of NRFs with long operating times and based on lessons learned from experience, including challenges for future improvement of ageing management.

  14. Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, Matthew; Lachance, Jeff; Sofu, Tanju; Wigeland, Roald; Flanagan, George; Bari, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan reports conclude a multi-year expert elicitation process. All information included in the studies are publicly available and the reports are UUR. These reports are intended to guide SFR researchers in the safety and licensing arena to important and outstanding issues Two (and a half) projects have been funded based on the recommendations in this report: • Modernization of SAS4A; • Incorporation of Contain/LMR with MELCOR; • (Data recovery at INL and PNNL)

  15. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramrattana, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the nineteenth symposium of atomic energy research on WWER reactor physics and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovszky, I.

    2009-10-01

    The present volume contains 55 papers, presented on the nineteenth symposium of atomic energy research, held in Varna, Bulgaria, 21-25 September 2009. The papers are presented in their original form, i. e. no corrections or modifications were carried out. The content of this volume is divided into thematic groups: Fuel Management, Spectral and Core Calculations, Core Surveillance and Monitoring, CFD Analysis, Reactor Dynamics Thermal Hydraulics and Safety Analysis, Physical Problems of Spent Fuel Decommissioning and Radwaste, Actinide Transmutation and Spent Fuel Disposal, Core Operation, Experiments and Code Validation - according to the presentation sequence on the Symposium. (Author)

  17. Operating Experience from Events Reported to the IAEA Incident Reporting System for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism in providing lessons learned from events and the associated corrective actions to prevent them, helping to improve safety at nuclear installations. The Incident Reporting System for Research Reactors (IRSRR), which is operated by the IAEA, is an important tool for international exchange of operating experience feedback for research reactors. The IRSRR reports contain information on events of safety significance with their root causes and lessons learned which help in reducing the occurrence of similar events at research reactors. To improve the effectiveness of the system, it is essential that national organizations demonstrate an appropriate interest for the timely reporting of events important to safety and share the information in the IRSRR database. At their biennial technical meetings, the IRSRR national coordinators recommended collecting the operating experience from the events reported to the IRSRR and disseminating it in an IAEA publication. This publication highlights the root causes, safety significance, lessons learned, corrective actions and the causal factors for the events reported to the IRSRR up to September 2014. The publication also contains relevant summary information on research reactor events from sources other than the IRSRR, operating experience feedback from the International Reporting System for Operating Experience considered relevant to research reactors, and a description of the elements of an operating experience programme as established by the IAEA safety standards. This publication will be of use to research reactor operating organizations, regulators and designers, and any other organizations or individuals involved in the safety of research reactors

  18. Panel plenary session: Status and future needs in the field of reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finzi, S.; Cicognani, G.; Heusener, G.; Geijzers, H.F.G.; Alonso-Santos, A.; Holtbecker, H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Status and future needs in the field of reactor safety research. Overviews are given of the nuclear programme in France and the Netherlands. Spanish and Italian reactor safety research both current and for the future is outlined. LWR safety and the continuation of the establishment of safety standards particularly for LMFBR reactors is discussed. The new framework for the research in reactor safety by the Commission of the European Communities for 1990-1994 is outlined. The discussion which followed is reported. (UK)

  19. Safety analysis calculations for research and test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S Y; MacDonald, R; MacFarlane, D [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1983-08-01

    The goal of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactor) Program at ANL is to provide technical means for conversion of research and test reactors from HEU (High-Enrichment Uranium) to LEU (Low-Enrichment Uranium) fuels. In exploring the feasibility of conversion, safety considerations are a prime concern; therefore, safety analyses must be performed for reactors undergoing the conversion. This requires thorough knowledge of the important safety parameters for different types of reactors for both HEU and LEU fuel. Appropriate computer codes are needed to predict transient reactor behavior under postulated accident conditions. In this discussion, safety issues for the two general types of reactors i.e., the plate-type (MTR-type) reactor and the rod-type (TRIGA-type) reactor, resulting from the changes associated with LEU vs. HEU fuels, are explored. The plate-type fuels are typically uranium aluminide (UAl{sub x}) compounds dispersed in aluminum and clad with aluminum. Moderation is provided by the water coolant. Self shut-down reactivity coefficients with EU fuel are entirely a result of coolant heating, whereas with LEU fuel there is an additional shut down contribution provided by the direct heating of the fuel due to the Doppler coefficient. In contrast, the rod-type (TRIGA) fuels are mixtures of zirconium hydride, uranium, and erbium. This fuel mixture is formed into rods ( {approx} 1 cm diameter) and clad with stainless steel or Incoloy. In the TRIGA fuel the self-shutdown reactivity is more complex, depending on heating of the fuel rather than the coolant. The two most important mechanisms in providing this feedback are: spectral hardening due to neutron interaction with the ZrH moderator as it is heated and Doppler broadening of resonances in erbium and U-238. Since these phenomena result directly from heating of the fuel, and do not depend on heat transfer to the moderator/coolant, the coefficients are prompt acting. Results of transient

  20. Thirteenth water reactor safety research information meeting: proceedings Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1986-02-01

    This six-volume report contains 151 papers out of the 178 that were presented at the Thirteenth Water Reactor Safety Research Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 22-25, 1985. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included thirty-one different papers presented by researchers from Japan, Canada and eight European countries. The title of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume presents information on: risk analysis PRA application; severe accident sequence analysis; risk analysis/dependent failure analysis; and industry safety research

  1. In-pile experimental facility needs for LMFR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Norio; Niwa, Hajime

    1994-01-01

    Although the achievement of the safety research during the past years has been significant, there still exists a strong need for future research, especially when there is prospect for future LMFR commercialization. In this paper, our current views are described on future research needs especially with a new in-pile experimental facility. The basic ideas and progress are outlined of a preliminary feasibility study. (author)

  2. Reactor physics experiments in PURNIMA sub critical facility coupled with 14 MeV neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Degweker, S.B.; Patel, Tarun; Bishnoi, Saroj; Adhikari, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems (ADSS) are attracting increasing worldwide attention due to their superior safety characteristics and their potential for burning actinide and fission product waste and energy production. A number of countries around the world have drawn up roadmaps/programs for development of ADSS. Indian interest in ADSS has an additional dimension, which is related to the planned utilization of our large thorium reserves for future nuclear energy generation. A programme for development of ADSS is taken up at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in India. This includes R and D activities for high current proton accelerator development, target development and Reactor Physics studies. As part of the ADSS Reactor Physics research programme, a sub-critical facility is coming up in BARC which will be coupled with an existing D-D/D-T neutron generator. Two types of cores are planned. In one of these, the sub-critical reactor assembly consists of natural uranium moderated by high density polyethylene (HDP) and reflected by BeO. The other consists of natural uranium moderated by light water. The maximum neutron yield of the neutron source with tritium target is around 10 10 neutron per sec. Various reactor physics experiments like measurement of the source strength, neutron flux distribution, buckling estimation and sub-critical source multiplication are planned. Apart from this, measurement of the total fission power and neutron spectrum will also be carried out. Mainly activation detectors will be used in all in-core neutron flux measurement. Measurement of the degree of sub-criticality by various deterministic and noise methods is planned. Helium detectors with advanced data acquisition card will be used for the neutron noise experiments. Noise characteristics of ADSS are expected to be different from that of traditional reactors due to the non-Poisson statistical features of the source. A new theory incorporating these features has been

  3. Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system -Research on the improvement of nuclear safety-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Park, Chun Kyeong; Yang, Seon Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan; Chun, Shee Yeong; Song, Cheol Hwa; Chun, Hyeong Gil; Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yeon; Cho, Yeong Ro; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyeong Ho

    1994-07-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the reactor safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. (Author)

  4. A review of the probabilistic safety assessment application to the TR-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goektepe, G.; Adalioglu, U.; Anac, H.; Sevdik, B.; Menteseoglu, S.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to the TR-2 Research Reactor is presented. The level 1 PSA application involved: selection of accident initiators, mitigating functions and system definitions, event tree constructions and quantification, fault tree constructions and quantification, human reliability, component failure data base development, dependent failure analysis. Each of the steps of the analysis given above is reviewed briefly with highlights from the selected results. PSA application is found to be a practical tool for research reactor safety due to intense involvement of human interactions in an experimental facility. Insights gained from the application of PSA methodology to the TR-2 research reactor led to a significant safety review of the system

  5. An overview of FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] contributions to Liquid Metal Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltar, A.E.; Padilla, A. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility has provided a very useful framework for testing the advances in Liquid Metal Reactor Safety Technology. During the licensing phase, the switch from a nonmechanistic bounding technique to the mechanistic approach was developed and implemented. During the operational phase, the consideration of new tests and core configurations led to use of the anticipated-transients-without-scram approach for beyond design basis events and the move towards passive safety. The future role of the Fast Flux Test Facility may involve additional passive safety and waste transmutation tests. 26 refs

  6. Upgrading of neutron radiography/tomography facility at research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Bar, Waleed; Mongy, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    A state-of-the-art neutron tomography imaging system was set up at the neutron radiography beam tube at the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) and was successfully commissioned in 2013. This study presents a set of tomographic experiments that demonstrate a high quality tomographic image formation. A computer technique for data processing and 3D image reconstruction was used to see inside a copy module of an ancient clay article provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The technique was also able to uncover tomographic imaging details of a mummified fish and provided a high resolution tomographic image of a defective fire valve. (orig.)

  7. Diamond Ordinance Radiation Facility (DORF) reactor operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieseler, Walter

    1970-01-01

    The Diamond Ordnance Radiation Facility Mark F Reactor is described and some of the problems encountered with its operation are discussed. In a period from reactor startup in September 1961 to June 1964, when the aluminum-clad core was changed to a stainless-steel clad core, a total of 30 fuel elements were removed from reactor service because of excessive growth. One leaking fuel element was detected during the lifetime of the aluminum- clad core. In June 1964, the core was changed to the stainless-steel-clad high hydride fuel elements. Since the installation of the stainless-steel-clad fuel element core, there has been a gradual decline of excess reactivity. Various theories were discussed as the cause but the investigations have resulted in no definitive conclusion that could account for the total reactivity loss

  8. Seismic qualification of safety class components in non-reactor nuclear facilities at Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocoma, E.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methods used during the walkdowns to compile as-built structural information to seismically qualify or verify the seismic adequacy of safety class components in the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex. The Plutonium finishing Plant is a non-reactor nuclear facility built during the 1950's and was designed to the Uniform Building Code criteria for both seismic and wind events. This facility is located at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site near Richland, Washington

  9. W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment centerline fuel thermocouple performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, S.C.; Henderson, J.M.

    1980-05-01

    The W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment is the fifth in a series of experiments sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the National Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) Safety Assurance Program. The experiments are being conducted under the direction of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). The irradiation phase of the W-1 SLSF experiment was conducted between May 27 and July 20, 1979, and terminated with incipient fuel pin cladding failure during the final boiling transient. Experimental hardware and facility performed as designed, allowing completion of all planned tests and test objectives. This paper focuses on high temperature in-fuel thermocouples and discusses their development, fabrication, and performance in the W-1 experiment

  10. Good Practices for Water Quality Management in Research Reactors and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Water is the most common fluid used to remove the heat produced in a research reactor (RR). It is also the most common media used to store spent fuel elements after being removed from the reactor core. Spent fuel is stored either in the at-reactor pool or in away-from-reactor wet facilities, where the fuel elements are maintained until submission to final disposal, or until the decay heat is low enough to allow migration to a dry storage facility. Maintaining high quality water is the most important factor in preventing degradation of aluminium clad fuel elements, and other structural components in water cooled research reactors. Excellent water quality in spent fuel wet storage facilities is essential to achieve optimum storage performance. Experience shows the remarkable success of many research reactors where the water chemistry has been well controlled. In these cases, aluminium clad fuel elements and aluminium pool liners show few, if any, signs of either localized or general corrosion, even after more than 30 years of exposure to research reactor water. In contrast, when water quality was allowed to degrade, the fuel clad and the structural parts of the reactor have been seriously corroded. The driving force to prepare this publication was the recognition that, even though a great deal of information on research reactor water quality is available in the open literature, no comprehensive report addressing the rationale of water quality management in research reactors has been published to date. This report is designed to provide a comprehensive catalogue of good practices for the management of water quality in research reactors. It also presents a brief description of the corrosion process that affects the components of a research reactor. Further, the report provides a basic understanding of water chemistry and its influence on the corrosion process; specifies requirements and operational limits for water purification systems of RRs; describes good practices

  11. Safety Management and Safety Culture Self Assessment of Kartini Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip, S., E-mail: syarip@batan.go.id [Centre for Accelerator and Material Process Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2014-10-15

    The self-assessment of safety culture and safety management status of Kartini research reactor is a step to foster safety culture and management by identifying good practices and areas for improvement, and also to improve reactor safety in a whole. The method used in this assessment is based on questionnaires provided by the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), then reviewed by experts. Based on the assessment and evaluation results, it can be concluded that there were several good practices in maintaining the safety status of Kartini reactor such as: reactor operators and radiation protection workers were aware and knowledgeable of the safety standards and policies that apply to their operation, readily accept constructive criticism from their management and from the inspectors of regulatory body that address safety performance. As a proof, for the last four years the number of inspection/audit findings from Regulatory Body (BAPETEN) tended to decrease while the reactor utilization and its operating hour increased. On the other hands there were also some comments and recommendations for improvement of reactor safety culture, such as that there should be more frequent open dialogues between employees and managers, to grow and attain a mutual support to achieve safety goals. (author)

  12. Research reactor standards and their impact on the TRIGA reactor community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society has established a standards committee devoted to writing standards for research reactors. This committee was formed in 1971 and has since that time written over 15 standards that cover all aspects of research reactor operation. The committee has representation from virtually every group concerned with research reactors and their operation. This organization includes University reactors, National laboratory reactors, Nuclear Regulatory commission, Department of Energy and private nuclear companies and insurers. Since its beginning the committee has developed standards in the following areas: Standard for the development of technical specifications for research reactors; Quality control for plate-type uranium-aluminium fuel elements; Records and reports for research reactors; Selection and training of personnel for research reactors; Review of experiments for research reactors; Research reactor site evaluation; Quality assurance program requirements for research reactors; Decommissioning of research reactors; Radiological control at research reactor facilities; Design objectives for and monitoring of systems controlling research reactor effluents; Physical security for research reactor facilities; Criteria for the reactor safety systems of research reactors; Emergency planning for research reactors; Fire protection program requirements for research reactors; Standard for administrative controls for research reactors. Besides writing the above standards, the committee is very active in using communications with the nuclear regulatory commission on proposed rules or positions which will affect the research reactor community

  13. Results on safety research for five years (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000). A field of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This safety research carried out by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) for five years ranged from 1996 to 2000 fiscal year, was performed according to the safety research basic plan (from 1996 to 2000 fiscal year) established on March, 1996 (revised again on May, 2000). This report was arranged on a field on power reactors (all subjects on fields of advanced conversion reactor and a subject on power reactor in a field of seismic resistant and probability theoretical safety evaluation) by combining its research results for five years ranged from 1996 to 2000 fiscal year with general outlines on the safety research basic plan. Here were shown outlines on the safety research basic plan, aims and subjects on safety research at a field of power reactors, a list of survey sheets on safety research result, and survey sheets on safety research results. The survey sheets containing research field, title, organization, researcher name, researching period, names of cooperative organization, using facilities, research outline, research results, established contents, application, and research trends, are ranged to 5 items on advanced conversion reactor, 29 items on high breeder reactor, 1 item on seismic resistance, and 5 items on probability theoretical safety evaluation. (G.K.)

  14. Research and development program for PWR safety at the CEA reactor thermal hydraulics laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, M.

    1995-01-01

    Since the start of the French electronuclear program, the three partners Fermate, EDF and Cea (DRN and IPSN) have devoted considerable effort to research and development for safety issues. In particular an important program on thermal hydraulics was initiated at the beginning of the seventies. It is illustrated by the development of the CATHARE thermalhydraulic safety code which includes physical models derived from a large experimental support program and the construction of the BETHSY integral facility which is aimed to assess both the CATHARE code and the physical relevance of the accident management procedures to be applied on reactors. The state of the art on this program is described with particular emphasis on the capabilities and the assessment of the last version of CATHARE and the lessons drawn from 50 BETHSY tests performed so far. The future plans for safety research cover the following strategy: - to solve the few problems identified on present computing tools and extend the assessment - to solve the few problems identified on present computing tools and extend the assessment - to perform safety studies on the basis of plant operation feedback - to contribute to treating the safety issues related to the future reactors and in particular the case of severe accidents which have to be taken into account from the design stage. The program on severe accidents is aimed to support the design studies performed by the industrial partners and to provide computing tools which model the various phases of severe accidents and will be validated on experiments performed with real and simulating materials. The main lines of the program are: - the development of the TOLBIAC 3D code for the thermal hydraulics of core melt pools, which will be validated against the Bali experiment presently under construction - the Sultan experiment, to study the capability of cooling by external flooding of the reactor vessel - the development of the MC-3D code for core melt

  15. Points of emphasis and objectives of reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewer, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor safety research is part of the presently running second programme on energy research and energy-engineering with which the Federal Government is connecting a whole bundle of economic and ecological aims: medium- and long-term assurance of energy supply, provision and efficient utilization of energy at favourable economic total costs, improvement of the technological performance, consideration of the requirements of the environmental protection, of the careful treatment of the resources, as well as of the protection of the population and personnel from the risks of conversion and use of energy. (orig.) [de

  16. Safety and regulatory researches on the SMART reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Wee Kyong; Chang, Moo Hee

    2000-01-01

    The 330 MW thermal power of integral pressurized water reactor, named SMART (System integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), is under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for seawater desalination application and electricity generation. The plant is expected to install near the population zone. Thus, the public around the plant should be in depth protected from the possible release of radioactive materials, and also the fresh water should be prevented from radioactivity contamination. Currently, in parallel with the design development, the regulatory research is being conducted to identify and resolve the safety concerns of the nuclear desalination plant. Until now, some general items to be considered in the safety aspects have been identified for the conceptual design of SMART. They include the use of proven technology, application of strengthening defense-in-depth, event categorization and selection, effects of desalination plant, and maintainability of major components. These cooperative researches with regulatory body in the design stage are expected to provide an opportunity to early resolve the safety concerns and eventually the licensing stability of the SMART design. (author)

  17. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor critical facility for Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Noriyuki

    1985-01-01

    The outline of the critical facility, its construction, the results of the basic studies and experiments on the graphite material, and the results obtained from the test conducted on the overall functions of the critical facility were reported. With the completion of the critical facility, it has been made possible to demonstrate the establishment of the manufacturing techniques and product-quality guarantee for extremely pure isotropic graphite in addition to the reliability of the structural design and analytical techniques for the main unit of the critical facility. It is expected that the present facility will prove instrumental in the verification of the nuclear safety of the very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor and in the acquisition of experimental data on the reactor physics pertaining to the improvement of the reactor characteristics. The tasks which remain to be accomplished hereafter are the improvements of the performance and quality features with regard to the oxidization of graphite, the heat-resisting structural materials, and the welded structures. (Kubozono, M.)

  18. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Jeff B; Marshall, Frances M [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd R [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  19. New research facilities at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.C.; Rhyne, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia is investing its resources for a significant expansion of the research capabilities and utilization of MURR to provide it the opportunity to deliver on its obligation to become the nation's premier educational institution in nuclear-related fields and so that it can provide scientific personnel and a state-of-the-art research test bed to support the national need for highly trained graduates in nuclear science and engineering

  20. A Design of Alarm System in a Research Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jaekwan; Jang, Gwisook; Seo, Sangmun; Suh, Yongsuk

    2013-01-01

    The digital alarm system has become an indispensable design to process a large amount of alarms of power plants. Korean research reactor operated for decades maintains a hybrid alarm system with both an analog annunciator and a digital alarm display. In this design, several alarms are indicated on an analog panel and digital display, respectively, and it requires more attention and effort of the operators. As proven in power plants, a centralized alarm system design is necessary for a new research reactor. However, the number of alarms and operators in a research reactor is significantly lesser than power plants. Thus, simplification should be considered as an important factor for the operation efficiency. This paper introduces a simplified alarm system. As advances in information technology, fully digitalized alarm systems have been applied to power plants. In a new research reactor, it will be more useful than an analog or hybrid configuration installed in research reactors decades ago. However, the simplification feature should be considered as an important factor because the number of alarms and number of operators in a research reactor is significantly lesser than in power plants

  1. Reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  2. Development of new irradiation facility for BWR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yuji; Magome, Hirokatsu; Iida, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    In JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), about the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel and the stress corrosion cracking of reactor core composition apparatus concerning the long-term use of the light water reactor (BWR), in order to check the influence of the temperature, pressure, and water quality, etc on BWR condition. The water environmental control facility which performs irradiation assisted stress corrosion-cracking (IASCC) evaluation under BWR irradiation environment was fabricated in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor). This report is described the outline of manufacture of the water environmental control facility for doing an irradiation test using the saturation temperature capsule after JMTR re-operation. (author)

  3. A neutron tomography facility at a low power research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Körner, S; Von Tobel, P; Rauch, H

    2001-01-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) provides a very efficient tool in the field of non-destructive testing as well as for many applications in fundamental research. A neutron beam penetrating a specimen is attenuated by the sample material and detected by a two-dimensional (2D) imaging device. The image contains information about materials and structure inside the sample because neutrons are attenuated according to the basic law of radiation attenuation. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, as for example, hydrogen and boron, but penetrate many heavy materials. Therefore, NR can yield important information not obtainable by more traditional methods. Nevertheless, there are many aspects of structure, both quantitative and qualitative, that are not accessible from 2D transmission images. Hence, there is an interest in three-dimensional neutron imaging. At the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Austria a neutron tomography facility has been installed. The neutron flux at ...

  4. Safety Assessment for Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  5. Safety Assessment for Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  6. State of arts and outlook of research reactor safety management promoted by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaofeng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the recent activities of IAEA on the research reactor safety, and the trends in the future. According to the present situation of national research reactors, some suggestions are proposed for the cooperation with IAEA on research reactor safety. (author)

  7. Outline of the safety research results, in the power reactor field, fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has promoted the safety research in fiscal year of 1996 according to the Fundamental Research on Safety Research (fiscal year 1996 to 2000) prepared on March, 1996. Here is described on the research results in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5 years programme, and whole outline of the fundamental research on safety research, on the power reactor field (whole problems on the new nuclear converter and the fast breeder reactor field and problems relating to the power reactor in the safety for earthquake and probability theoretical safety evaluation field). (G.K.)

  8. Self assessment of safety culture in HANARO using the code of conduct on the safety of research reactor by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, I.C.; Hwang, S.Y.; Woo, J.S.; Lee, M.; Jun, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The safety culture in HANARO was self-assessed in accordance with the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor drafted by IAEA. From 2002, IAEA has worked on the development of the Code of Conduct to achieve and maintain high level of nuclear safety in research reactors worldwide through the enhancement of national measures and international co-operation including, where appropriate, safety related technical cooperation. It defines the role of the state, the role of the regulatory body, the role of the operating organization and the role of the IAEA. As for the role of operating organization, the code specifies general requirements in assessment and verification of safety, financial and human resources, quality assurance, human factors, radiation protection and emergency preparedness. It also defines the role of operating organization for safety of research reactor in siting, design, operation, maintenance, modification and utilization as well. All of these items are the subjects for safety culture implementation, which means the Code could be a guideline for an operating organization to assess its safety culture. The self-assessment of safety culture in HANARO was made by using the sections of the Code describing the role of the operating organization for safety of research reactor. The major assessment items and the practices in HANARO for each items are as follow: The SAR of HANARO was reviewed by the regulatory body before the construction and the fuel loading of HANARO. Major design modifications and new installation of utilization facility needs the approval from regulatory body and safety assessment is a requirement for the approval. The Tech. Spec. for HANARO Operation specifies the analysis, surveillance, testing and inspection for HANARO operation. The reactor operation is mainly supported by the government and partly by nuclear R and D fund. The education and training of operation staff are one of major tasks of operating organization

  9. Ageing of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, many of the research institutions were centred on a research reactor facility as main technological asset and major source of neutrons for research. Important achievements were made in time in these research institutions for development of nuclear materials technology and nuclear safety for nuclear energy. At present, ageing of nuclear research facilities among these research reactors and ageing of staff are considerable factors of reduction of competence in research centres. The safe way of mitigation of this trend deals with ageing management by so called, for power reactors, Plant Life Management and new investments in staff as investments in research, or in future resources of competence. A programmatic approach of ageing of research reactors in correlation with their actual and future utilisation, will be used as a basis for safety evaluation and future spending. (author)

  10. Management of the Interface between Nuclear Safety and Security for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide technical guidelines and practical information to assist Member States, operating organizations and regulatory bodies, on the basis of international good practices, and to manage the interface between nuclear safety and security at research reactor facilities in an integrated and coordinated manner. The publication was developed based on input from IAEA technical and consultants' meetings held between 2013 and 2015

  11. Management of historical waste from research reactors: the Dutch experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Heek, Aliki; Metz, Bert; Janssen, Bas; Groothuis, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Most radioactive waste emerges as well-defined waste streams from operating power reactors. The management of this is an on-going practice, based on comprehensive (IAEA) guidelines. A special waste category however consists of the historical waste from research reactors, mostly originating from various experiments in the early years of the nuclear era. Removal of the waste from the research site, often required by law, raises challenges: the waste packages must fulfill the acceptance criteria from the receiving storage site as well as the criteria for nuclear transports. Often the aged waste containers do not fulfill today's requirements anymore, and their contents are not well documented. Therefore removal of historical waste requires advanced characterization, sorting, sustainable repackaging and sometimes conditioning of the waste. This paper describes the Dutch experience of a historical waste removal campaign from the Petten High Flux research reactor. The reactor is still in operation, but Dutch legislation asks for central storage of all radioactive waste at the COVRA site in Vlissingen since the availability of the high- and intermediate-level waste storage facility HABOG in 2004. In order to comply with COVRA's acceptance criteria, the complex and mixed inventory of intermediate and low level waste must be characterized and conditioned, identifying the relevant nuclides and their activities. Sorting and segregation of the waste in a Hot Cell offers the possibility to reduce the environmental footprint of the historical waste, by repackaging it into different classes of intermediate and low level waste. In this way, most of the waste volume can be separated into lower level categories not needing to be stored in the HABOG, but in the less demanding LOG facility for low-level waste instead. The characterization and sorting is done on the basis of a combination of gamma scanning with high energy resolution of the closed waste canister and low

  12. Multi purpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, V.K.; Sasidharan, K.; Sengupta, Samiran; Singh, Tej

    2006-01-01

    At present Dhruva and Cirus reactors provide the majority of research reactor based facilities to cater to the various needs of a vast pool of researchers in the field of material sciences, physics, chemistry, bio sciences, research and development work for nuclear power plants and production of radio isotopes. With a view to further consolidate and expand the scope of research and development in nuclear and allied sciences, a new 20 MWt multi purpose research reactor is being designed. This paper describes some of the design features and safety aspects of this reactor

  13. Activity of safety review for the facilities using nuclear material (2). Safety review results and maintenance experiences for hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagai, Tomio; Fujishima, Tadatsune; Mizukoshi, Yasutaka; Sakamoto, Naoki; Ohmori, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    In the site of O-arai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), five hot laboratories for post-irradiation examination and development of plutonium fuels are operated more than 30 years. A safety review method for preventive maintenance on these hot laboratories includes test facilities and devices are established in 2003. After that, the safety review of these facilities and devices are done and taken the necessary maintenance based on the results in each year. In 2008, 372 test facilities and devices in these hot laboratories were checked and reviewed by this method. As a results of the safety review, repair issues of 38 facilities of above 372 facilities were resolved. This report shows the review results and maintenance experiences based on the results. (author)

  14. Current Status of Periodic Safety Review of HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjin; Ahn, Guk-Hoon; Lee, Choong Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A PSR for a research reactor became a legal requirement as the Nuclear Safety Act was amended and came into effect in 2014. This paper describes the current status and methodology of the first Periodic Safety Review (PSR) of HANARO that is being performed. The legal requirements, work plan, and process of implementing a PSR are described. Because this is the first PSR for a research reactor, it is our understating that the operating organization and regulatory body should communicate well with each other to complete the PSR in a timely manner. The first PSR of HANARO is under way. In order to achieve a successful result, activities of the operation organization such as scheduling, maintaining consistency in input data for review, and reviewing the PSR reports that will require intensive resources should be well planned. This means the operating organization needs to incorporate appropriate measures to ensure the transfer of knowledge and expertise arising from the PSR via a contractor to the operation organization. It is desirable for the Regulatory Body to be involved in all stage of the PSR to prevent any waste of resources and minimize the potential for a reworking of the PSR and the need for an additional assessment and review as recommended by foreign experts.

  15. Improvement of research reactor sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Paunoiu, C.; Toma, C.; Preda, M.; Ionila, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Research Reactors as is well known have numerous applications in a wide range of science technology, nuclear power development, medicine, to enumerate only the most important. The requirements of clients and stack-holders are fluctuating for the reasons out of control of Research Reactor Operating Organization, which may ensure with priority the safety of facility and nuclear installation. Sustainability of Research Reactor encompasses several aspects which finally are concentrated on safety of Research Reactor and economical aspects concerning operational expenses and income from external resources. Ensuring sustainability is a continuous, permanent activity and also it requests a strategic approach. The TRIGA - 14 MW Research Reactor detains a 30 years experience of safe utilization with good performance indicators. In the last 4 years the reactor benefited of a large investment project for modernization, thus ensuring the previous performances and opening new perspectives for power increase and for new applications. The previous core conversion from LEU to HEU fuel accomplished in 2006 ensures the utilization of reactor based on new qualified European supplier of TRIGA LEU fuel. Due to reduction of number of performed research reactors, the 14 MW TRIGA modernized reactor will play a significant role for the following two decades. (author)

  16. DOE's foreign research reactor transportation services contract: Perspective and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, John

    1997-01-01

    DOE committed to low- and moderate-income countries participating in the foreign research reactor spent fuel returns program that the United States government would provide for the transportation of the spent fuel. In fulfillment of that commitment, DOE entered into transportation services contracts with qualified, private-sector firms. NAC will discuss its experience as a transportation services provider, including range of services available to the foreign reactors, advantages to DOE and to the foreign research reactors, access to contract services by high income countries and potential advantages, and experience with initial tasks performed under the contract. (author)

  17. Safety features and research needs of westinghouse advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Winters, J.W.; Cummins, W.E.; Bruschi, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The three Westinghouse advanced reactors - AP600, AP1000 and IRIS - are at different levels of readiness. AP600 has received a Design Certification, its larger size version AP1000 is currently in the design certification process and IRIS has just completed its conceptual design and will initiate soon a licensing pre-application. The safety features of the passive designs AP600/AP1000 are presented, followed by the features of the more revolutionary IRIS, a small size modular integral reactor. A discussion of the IRIS safety by design approach is given. The AP600/AP1000 design certification is backed by completed testing and development which is summarized, together with a research program currently in progress which will extend AP600 severe accident test data to AP1000 conditions. While IRIS will of course rely on applicable AP600/1000 data, a very extensive testing campaign is being planned to address all the unique aspects of its design. Finally, IRIS plans to use a risk-informed approach in its licensing process. (authors)

  18. Cost effective safety enhancements for research reactors in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan - results of a joint program with US DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, O.K.; Carlson, R.B.; Rakhmanov, A.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Chernyaev, V.; Chakrov, P.

    2004-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of International Nuclear Safety and Cooperation established the Integrated Research Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (IRRSEP) in February 2002 to support U.S. nonproliferation goals by implementing safety upgrades, or assisting with the safe shutdown and decommissioning of foreign test and research reactors which present security concerns. IRRSEP's key program components are: Phase I: Self-evaluation by facility using provided checklists followed by prioritization to identify the 20 highest risk facilities; Phase II: Site visits with technical evaluation to finalize a list of projects that will enhance safety consistent with IAEA observations; Phase III: Corrective measures to implement the projects. Phases I, II and III are accomplished on a rolling basis, such that work is ongoing at three or four reactors per year. IRRSEP's key objective is to resolve the highest-priority nuclear safety issues at the most vulnerable foreign research reactors as quickly as possible. The prioritization methodology employed identified which research reactors fell into this category. The corrective measures mutually developed with the host facility are based on the premise of developing a sustainable infrastructure within each country to deal with its own nuclear material safety, security, and response issues in the future. IRRSEP also assists in creating an international framework of cooperation and openness between research and test reactor operators, and national and international regulators. The initial projects under IRRSEP are underway at research reactors in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Romania. This paper focuses on the projects undertaken at the WWR-K research reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Alatau, Kazakhstan and the WWR-SM research reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Ulugbek, Uzbekistan. These projects demonstrate the success and cost effectiveness of the IRRSEP program

  19. Cost effective safety enhancements for research reactors in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan - results of a joint program with US DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, O.K.; Carlson, R.B.; Rakhmanov, A.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Chernyaev, V.; Chakrov, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The US Department of Energy's Office of International Nuclear Safety and Cooperation established the Integrated Research Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (IRRSEP) in February 2002 to support U.S. nonproliferation goals by (1) implementing safety upgrades, or (2) assisting with the safe shutdown and decommissioning of foreign test and research reactors which present security concerns. IRRSEP's key program components are: Phase I: Self-evaluation by facility using provided checklists followed by prioritization to identify the 20 highest risk facilities; Phase II: Site visits with technical evaluation to finalize a list of projects that will enhance safety consistent with IAEA observations; Phase III: Corrective measures to implement the projects. Phases I, II and III are accomplished on a rolling basis, such that work is ongoing at three or four reactors per year. IRRSEP's key objective is to resolve the highest-priority nuclear safety issues at the most vulnerable foreign research reactors as quickly as possible. The prioritization methodology employed identified which research reactors fell into this category. The corrective measures mutually developed with the host facility are based on the premise of developing a sustainable infrastructure within each country to deal with its own nuclear material safety, security, and response issues in the future. IRRSEP also assists in creating an international framework of cooperation and openness between research and test reactor operators, and national and international regulators. The initial projects under IRRSEP are underway at research reactors in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Romania. This paper focuses on the projects undertaken at the WWR-K research reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Alatau, Kazakhstan and the WWR-SM research reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Ulugbek, Uzbekistan. These projects demonstrate the success and cost effectiveness of the IRRSEP program

  20. PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHENG, L.; HANSON, A.; DIAMOND, D.; XU, J.; CAREW, J.; RORER, D.

    2004-01-01

    Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D 2 O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed with the MCNP code to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim safety arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim safety arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the core

  1. Nuclear reactor safety research since Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynatt, F.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially

  2. Nuclear reactor safety research since three mile island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynatt, F R

    1982-04-09

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially.

  3. Research reactors for the social safety and prosperous neutron use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    The present status of nuclear reactors in Japan and the world was briefly described in this report. Aiming to construct a background of stable future society dependent on nuclear energy, the necessity to establish an organization for research reactors in Japan was pointed out. There are a total of 468 reactors in the world, but only 248 of them are running at present and most of them are superannuated. In Japan, 15 research reactors are running and 8 of them are under collaborative utilization, but not a few of them have various problems. In the education of atomic energy, a reactor is dispensable for understanding its working principle through practice learning. Furthermore, a research reactor has important roles for development of power reactor in addition to various basic studies such as activation analysis, fission track, biological irradiation, neutron scattering, etc. Application of a reactor has been also progressing in industrial and medical fields. However, operation of the reactors has become more and more difficult in Japan because of a large running cost and a lack of residential consensus for nuclear reactor. Here, the author proposed an establishment of organization of research reactor in order to promote utilization of a reactor in the field of education, rearing of professionals and science and engineering. (M.N.)

  4. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  5. Research reactor decommissioning experience - concrete removal and disposal -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Mark R.; Gardner, Frederick W.

    1990-01-01

    Removal and disposal of neutron activated concrete from biological shields is the most significant operational task associated with research reactor decommissioning. During the period of 1985 thru 1989 Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. was the prime contractor for complete dismantlement and decommissioning of the Northrop TRIGA Mark F, the Virginia Tech Argonaut, and the Michigan State University TRIGA Mark I Reactor Facilities. This paper discusses operational requirements, methods employed, and results of the concrete removal, packaging, transport and disposal operations for these (3) research reactor decommissioning projects. Methods employed for each are compared. Disposal of concrete above and below regulatory release limits for unrestricted use are discussed. This study concludes that activated reactor biological shield concrete can be safely removed and buried under current regulations

  6. Probabilistic safety assessment of the PLUTO Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, J.F.; Coates, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary finding of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) carried out in support of a licensing submission are presented. The research reactor, a 25 MW highly enriched thermal reactor moderated and cooled by D 2 O, is housed in a steel containment building equipped with an active extract system to mitigate any possible release. A full PSA (to level 3) was performed based on the current operational plant making as much use of the plant operational records as possible. A medium sized event tree-fault tree approach was used to allow realistic modelling of operator actions. For reasons of practicality only plant damage states of core melt, fuel damage, and tritium release were defined, all release accident sequences being assigned to one of these states. Prior to discharge to the environment the releases were further sub-divided dependent upon the success of the active extract system. The individual and societal risks were calculated taking account of meterological and demographic conditions. The provisional results indicate that the core melt frequency is in the region of 1 x 10 -4 /yr, the dominant contributor being an unisolatable gross leakage beyond the capabilities of the recovery systems. The core melt frequency is comparable with those of power reactors of a similar age; however, the core inventory and hence release is much smaller; therefore the consequences are much reduced. The risk to an individual at any fixed location 100 m from the plant is assessed as 1 x 10 -6 ; the societal risk is estimated as 6 x 10 -4 . The main contributor to the dose received is from the released iodine. Additional benefit is being obtained from the PSA in several ways: the insights obtained into the function and operation are being incorporated into the operational safety document, whilst the source term results are being used to assist in the refurbishment/improvement of the active extract system

  7. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissani, M; O' Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    provide color-enhanced gemstones but is operated infrequently for radioisotope production. Because the two irradiation programs compete by utilizing the same core locations, the issues should be resolved at a high level. (c) Cobalt-60 production uses the most valuable irradiation location in the ETRR-2 (the high neutron density flux-trap), but there seems to be no potential customer for the Co-60. Further, the low number of hours the reactor is operated per week precludes ever producing a marketable specific activity of Co-60. Accordingly, Co-60 production should be reevaluated. (d) ETRR-2 staff would benefit from additional training to successfully design new experiment facilities and utilize existing facilities more effectively. This training can include IAEA Fellowships, as well as topical DOE Sister Laboratory visits to gain experience using equipment and research tools at other research reactor facilities.

  8. Status and some safety philosophies of the China advanced research reactor CARR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzheng Yuan

    2001-01-01

    The existing two research reactors, HWRR (heavy water research reactor) and SPR (swimming pool reactor), have been operated by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) since, respectively, 1958 and 1964, and are both in extending service and facing the aging problem. It is expected that they will be out of service successively in the beginning decade of the 21 st century. A new, high performance and multipurpose research reactor called China advanced research reactor (CARR) will replace these two reactors. This new reactor adopts the concept of inverse neutron trap compact core structure with light water as coolant and heavy water as the outer reflector. Its design goal is as follows: under the nuclear power of 60MW, the maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux in peripheral D 2 O reflector not less than 8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 . s while in central experimental channel, if the central cell to be replaced by an experimental channel, the corresponding value not less than 1 x 10 15 n/cm 2 . s. The main applications for this research reactor will cover RI production, neutron scattering experiments, NAA and its applications, neutron photography, NTD for monocrystaline silicon and applications on reactor engineering technology. By the end of 1999, the preliminary design of CARR was completed, then the draft of preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) was submitted to the relevant authority at the end of 2000 for being reviewed. Now, the CARR project has entered the detail design phase and safety reviewing procedure for obtaining the construction permit from the relevant licensing authority. This paper will only briefly introduce some aspects of safety philosophy of CARR design and PSAR. (orig.)

  9. 'Experience with decommissioning of research and test reactors at Argonne National Laboratory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Yule, T.J.; Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    A large number of research reactors around the world have reached the end of their useful operational life. Many of these are kept in a controlled storage mode awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). At Argonne National Laboratory located near Chicago in the United States of America, significant experience has been gained in the D and D of research and test reactors. These experiences span the entire range of activities in D and D - from planning and characterization of the facilities to the eventual disposition of all waste. A multifaceted D nd D program has been in progress at the Argonne National Laboratory - East site for nearly a decade. The program consists of three elements: - D and D of nuclear facilities on the site that have reached the end of their useful life; - Development and demonstrations of technologies that help in safe and cost effective D and D; - Presentation of training courses in D and D practices. Nuclear reactor facilities have been constructed and operated at the ANL-E site since the earliest days of nuclear power. As a result, a number of these early reactors reached end-of-life long before reactors on other sites and were ready for D and D earlier. They presented an excellent set of test beds on which D and D practices and technologies could be demonstrated in environments that were similar to commercial reactors, but considerably less hazardous. As shown, four reactor facilities, plutonium contaminated glove boxes and hot cells, a cyclotron facility and assorted other nuclear related facilities have been decommissioned in this program. The overall cost of the program has been modest relative to the cost of comparable projects undertaken both in the U.S. and abroad. The safety record throughout the program was excellent. Complementing the actual operations, a set of D and D technologies are being developed. These include robotic methods of tool handling and operation, chemical and laser decontamination techniques, sensors

  10. General principles of nuclear safety management related to research reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banciu, Ortenzia; Vladescu, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    The paper contents the general principles applicable to the decommissioning of research reactors to ensure a proper nuclear safety management, during both decommissioning activities and post decommissioning period. The main objective of decommissioning is to ensure the protection of workers, population and environment against all radiological and non-radiological hazards that could result after a reactor shutdown and dismantling. In the same time, it is necessary, by some proper provisions, to limit the effect of decommissioning for the future generation, according to the new Romanian, IAEA and EU Norms and Regulations. Assurance of nuclear safety during decommissioning process involves, in the first step, to establish of some safety principles and requirements to be taken into account during whole process. In the same time, it is necessary to perform a series of analyses to ensure that the whole process is conducted in a planned and safe manner. The general principles proposed for a proper management of safety during research reactor decommissioning are as follows: - Set-up of all operations included in a Decommissioning Plan; - Set-up and qualitative evaluation of safety problems, which could appear during normal decommissioning process, both radiological and nonradiological risks for workers and public; - Set-up of accident list related to decommissioning process the events that could appear both due to some abnormal working conditions and to some on-site and off-site events like fires, explosions, flooding, earthquake, etc.); - Development and qualitative/ quantitative evaluation of scenarios for each incidents; - Development (and evaluation) of safety indicator system. The safety indicators are the most important tools used to assess the level of nuclear safety during decommissioning process, to discover the weak points and to establish safety measures. The paper contains also, a safety case evaluation (description of facility according to the decommissioning

  11. Conceptual design of a mirror reactor for a fusion engineering research facility (FERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.; Burleigh, R.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Dexter, W.L.; Hamilton, G.W.; Harvey, A.R.; Hickman, R.G.; Hoffman, M.A.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Moir, R.W.; Nelson, R.L.; Pittenger, L.C.; Smith, B.H.; Taylor, C.E.; Werner, R.W.; Wilcox, T.P.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a small mirror fusion reactor for a Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF). The reactor produces 3.4 MW of fusion power and a useful neutron flux of about 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 . Superconducting ''yin-yang'' coils are used, and the plasma is sustained by injection of energetic neutral D 0 and T 0 . Conceptual layouts are given for the reactor, its major components, and supporting facilities. (author)

  12. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the

  13. Ohmically heated toroidal experiment (OHTE) mobile ignition test reactor facility concept study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.; Watts, K.D.; Piscitella, R.R.; Sekot, J.P.; Drexler, R.L.

    1983-02-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the use of an existing nuclear test complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the assembly, testing, and remote maintenance of the ohmically heated toroidal experiment (OHTE) compact reactor. The portable reactor concept is described and its application to OHTE testing and maintenance requirements is developed. Pertinent INEL facilities are described and several test system configurations that apply to these facilities are developed and evaluated

  14. Safety analysis of the Los Alamos critical experiments facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, H.C.

    1975-10-01

    The safety of Pajarito Site critical assembly operations depends upon protection built into the facility, upon knowledgeable personnel, and upon good practice as defined by operating procedures and experimental plans. Distance, supplemented by shielding in some cases, would protect personnel against an extreme accident generating 10 19 fissions. During the facility's 28-year history, the direct cost of criticality accidents has translated to a risk of less than $200 per year

  15. Surveys of research projects concerning nuclear facility safety, financed by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Protection and Reactor Safety, 1989. (14. annual report on SR-projects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    Each progress report is a collection of individual reports, categorized by subject matter. They are a documentation of the contractor's progress, rendered by themselves on standardized forms, published, for the sake of general information on progress made in investigations concerning reactor safety, by the project attendance department of the GRS. The individual reports have serial numbers. Each report includes particulars of the objective, work carried out, results obtained and plans for project continuation. (orig.) [de

  16. Research and development on reduced-moderation light water reactor with passive safety features (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Akie, Hiroshi; Kugo, Teruhiko; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Kureta, Masatoshi; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Araya, Fumimasa; Okajima, Shigeaki; Okumura, Keisuke; Suzuki, Motoe; Mineo, Hideaki; Nakatsuka, Toru

    2004-06-01

    The present report contains the achievement of 'Research and Development on Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features', which was performed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Hitachi Ltd., Japan Atomic Power Company and Tokyo Institute of Technology in FY2000-2002 as the innovative and viable nuclear energy technology (IVNET) development project operated by the Institute of Applied Energy (IAE). In the present project, the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) has been developed to ensure sustainable energy supply and to solve the recent problems of nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle, such as economical competitiveness, effective use of plutonium and reduction of spent fuel storage. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as high burnup, long operation cycle, multiple recycling of plutonium (Pu) and effective utilization of uranium resources based on accumulated LWR technologies. Our development target is 'Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features' with innovative technologies to achieve above mentioned requirement. Electric power is selected as 300 MWe considering anticipated size required for future deployment. The reactor core consists of MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement to increase the conversion ratio. Design targets of the core specification are conversion ratio more than unity, negative void reactivity feedback coefficient to assure safety, discharged burnup more than 60 GWd/t and operation cycle more than 2 years. As for the reactor system, a small size natural circulation BWR with passive safety systems is adopted to increase safety and reduce construction cost. The results obtained are as follows: As regards core design study, core design was performed to meet the goal. Sequence of startup operation was constructed for the RMWR. As the plant design, plant system was designed to achieve enhanced economy using passive safety system effectively. In

  17. Sodium Loop Safety Facility W-2 experiment fuel pin rupture detection system. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Kirchner, T.L.; Meyers, S.C.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-2 experiment is to characterize the combined effects of a preconditioned full-length fuel column and slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions on breeder reactor (BR) fuel pin cladding failures. The W-2 experiment will meet this objective by providing data in two technological areas: (1) time and location of cladding failure, and (2) early post-failure test fuel behavior. The test involves a seven pin, prototypic full-length fast test reactor (FTR) fuel pin bundle which will be subjected to a simulated unprotected 5 cents/s reactivity transient overpower event. The outer six pins will provide the necessary prototypic thermal-hydraulic environment for the center pin.

  18. Sodium Loop Safety Facility W-2 experiment fuel pin rupture detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Kirchner, T.L.; Meyers, S.C.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-2 experiment is to characterize the combined effects of a preconditioned full-length fuel column and slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions on breeder reactor (BR) fuel pin cladding failures. The W-2 experiment will meet this objective by providing data in two technological areas: (1) time and location of cladding failure, and (2) early post-failure test fuel behavior. The test involves a seven pin, prototypic full-length fast test reactor (FTR) fuel pin bundle which will be subjected to a simulated unprotected 5 cents/s reactivity transient overpower event. The outer six pins will provide the necessary prototypic thermal-hydraulic environment for the center pin

  19. Reports and operational engineering: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochman, A.; Washburn, B.W.

    1981-02-01

    The Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, established via an October 24, 1979 memorandum from the Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary, was instructed to review the ''Kemeny Commission'' recommendations and to identify possible implications for DOE's nuclear facilities. As a result of this review, the Committee recommended that DOE carry out assessments in seven categories. The assessments would address specific topics identified for each category as delineated in the NFPQT ''Guidelines for Assessing the Safe Operation of DOE-Owned Reactors,'' dated May 7, 1980. The Committee recognized that similar assessments had been ongoing in the DOE program and safety overview organizations since the Three Mile Island nuclear accident and it was the Committee's intent to use the results of those ongoing assessments as an input to their evaluations. This information would be supplemented by additional studies consisting of the subject-related documents used at each reactor facility studied, and an on-site review of these reactor facilities by professional personnel within the Department of Energy, its operating contractors and independent consultants. 1 tab

  20. Activities on safety for the cross-cutting issue of research reactors in the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Boado Magan, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety and implemented by the Engineering Safety Section through its Research Reactor Safety Unit. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities are discussed in this paper: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOCs); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the (Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors) INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors developed, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors conducted in the year 2002 and the results obtained. (author)

  1. Experience relevant to safety obtained from reactor decommissioning operations in the French Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraudel, B.; Langlois, G.

    1979-01-01

    From among the nuclear facilities constructed in France the authors cite eight large reactors, ranging from critical assemblies to power reactors, that have been finally shut-down since 1965. A brief account is given of the way in which the various operations were carried out after the final control rod drop, a distinction being drawn between the shut-down proper and the containment and dismantling work. A description is also given, from the technical and regulatory standpoint, of the final stage attained, and mention is made of French safety arrangements and of the part played by the safety services during decommissioning operations. Among the lessons derived from French experience, the authors mention the completion of operations without any serious safety problems, and with guarantees for the protection of personnel and the population as a whole, by conventional techniques; the advantage of planning decommissioning operations from the very beginning of construction of the facilities; and the importance of filing descriptive documents. In view of the experience gained, the French Atomic Energy Commission has devised internal procedures for facilitating the application of regulations governing the shut-down and decommissioning phases, which are aimed at preserving surveillance procedures similar to those in force during normal operation. (author)

  2. Reference equilibrium core with central flux irradiation facility for Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israr, M.; Shami, Qamar-ud-din; Pervez, S.

    1997-11-01

    In order to assess various core parameters a reference equilibrium core with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel for Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) was assembled. Due to increased volume of reference core, the average neutron flux reduced as compared to the first higher power operation. To get a higher neutron flux an irradiation facility was created in centre of the reference equilibrium core where the advantage of the neutron flux peaking was taken. Various low power experiments were performed in order to evaluate control rods worth and neutron flux mapping inside the core. The neutron flux inside the central irradiation facility almost doubled. With this arrangement reactor operation time was cut down from 72 hours to 48 hours for the production of the required specific radioactivity. (author)

  3. Safety management at nuclear installations with research reactors. A comparison of five European installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troen, H.; Lauridsen, B.

    1997-11-01

    Five European institutions with nuclear research reactors were visited to compare safety management among institutions similar to Risoe. Risoe is a National Laboratory and the main activities are research and development. In 1996 it was decided to look into safety management at Risoe again; the last revision was in 1972. The purpose was to make it more efficient and to emphasise, that the responsibility lies in the operating organisation. Information such as nuclear facilities at the institutions, the safety management organisation, emergency preparedness, and lists of radiation doses to the employees from the years 1995 and 1996 is given in the report. Also international requirements and recommendations are given in short. Furthermore the report contains some reflections on the development in safety management organisations in resent years and the conclusions drawn from the information gathered

  4. Russian Federation: Passive Safety Components for Lead-Cooled Reactor Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkulov, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    There is a specific range of engineered features used traditionally in nuclear technology. As a rule, main reactivity control systems use conventional active actuators with solid-body control members and/or liquid systems with active injection of liquid absorber. Other operation principles are normally chosen for additional systems. Currently, the traditional approach to improving the reliability of a reactor facility suggests an increase in the number of safety components and systems which provide for mutual assurance or assist each other. There is a great variety of additional reactivity control members designed for the reactor facility control and shutdown, including hydrodynamic members in the form of rods (acting from the coolant flow); floating-type members (absorbers and displacers); storage-type and liquid members (used in separate channels); bulk members (pebble absorber); gas-based members (with a gas absorber); shape-memory members and others. Hydrodynamic systems were introduced at Beloyarsk NPP Units 1 and 2 and proposed for use in other facility designs, Gases and bulk materials have not been commonly accepted: the former because of the high cost of high-efficiency gaseous absorbers, and the latter because of the complecated monitoring of the bulk material position. It is rather difficult and not always necessary to use the same engineering approaches in new lead-cooled reactor facilities as in traditional ones. Similarly to the development of traditional safety systems, passive safety components (devices) shall be designed according to the essential requirements of the nuclear regulations of the Russian Federation

  5. Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Office of Reactor Safety. Research plans for the period 1997-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    Office of Reactor Safety research is carried out within the following areas: Safety evaluation, Safety analysis, MTO, Materials and chemistry, Non-Destructive Testing, Strength of materials, Thermohydraulics, Nuclear fuel, Serious accidents and Process control. Research is carried out to fulfill SKIs overall goals in accordance with the directives from the Swedish government and parliament, in particular to be a driving force in safety related work when justified by operating experience, research results and technical progress, towards licensees as well as in international cooperation in safety; to promote the maintenance and development of competence in the safety related work at the SKI as well as the licensees and generally in the country, and as a specific role for the Office of Reactor Safety as designated in the internal routines to take initiative to encourage and carry out research into areas of importance for the Office as well as ensuring that research results are disseminated and used both within SKI and in the general work concerning nuclear safety. Research efforts within the Office of Reactor safety are carried out in the form of separate projects which form part of the priority work plans. Project managers, the necessary personnel resources and the budget for each year are included in the Annual Plan and the work is followed up in the same manner as other efforts. Research is performed in different ways, that can vary from laboratory studies to more consultative efforts, and be organised in many different ways such as examination projects, post-graduate studies, work sponsored at research institutes and companies in Sweden and abroad, collaboration in larger international projects, and participation in conferences which provide an important contribution to keeping SKI personnel informed within their specialist areas

  6. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  7. Safety requirements and safety experience of nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnurer, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    Peaceful use of nuclear energy within the F.R.G. is rapidly growing. The Energy Programme of the Federal Government forecasts a capacity of up to 50.000 MW in 1985. Whereas most of this capacity will be of the LWR-Type, other activities are related to LMFBR - and HTGR - development, nuclear ships, and facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle. Safety of nuclear energy is the pacemaker for the realization of nuclear programmes and projects. Due to a very high population - and industrialisation density, safety has the priority before economical aspects. Safety requirements are therefore extremely stringent, which will be shown for the legal, the technical as well as for the organizational area. They apply for each nuclear facility, its site and the nuclear energy system as a whole. Regulatory procedures differ from many other countries, assigning executive power to state authorities, which are supervised by the Federal Government. Another particularity of the regulatory process is the large scope of involvement of independent experts within the licensing procedures. The developement of national safety requirements in different countries generates a necessity to collaborate and harmonize safety and radiation protection measures, at least for facilities in border areas, to adopt international standards and to assist nuclear developing countries. However, different nationally, regional or local situations might raise problems. Safety experience with nuclear facilities can be concluded from the positive construction and operation experience, including also a few accidents and incidents and the conclusions, which have been drawn for the respective factilities and others of similar design. Another tool for safety assessments will be risk analyses, which are under development by German experts. Final, a scope of future problems and developments shows, that safety of nuclear installations - which has reached a high performance - nevertheless imposes further tasks to be solved

  8. Reactor safety instrumentation of Paks NPP (experience and perspective)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elo, S.; Hamar, K.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of the existing control and protection systems in nuclear power plants use old analog technology and design philosophy. Maintenance and the procurement of spare parts is becoming increasingly difficult. In general there is an age degradation concern. Aging degradation in nuclear power plants must be effectively managed to avoid a loss of vital safety function, shutdown of the station, a reduced power generation, or any failure leading to expensive repair. Even with the best efforts in developing reliable and long life instrumentation and control systems for nuclear power plants it is expected that these systems for most plants will require replacements during the life of the plants. The instrumentation and control system of the nuclear power plants designed during the 70's and constructed in the 80's went out-of-date since nuclear safety is not a static concept and the digital computer technology has undergone rapid improvements during the 70's and 80's. Simultaneously the operation and the maintenance of the I ampersand C system of those plants described above becomes more and more difficult and expensive. In this context the pure quality of the former Soviet designed process instrumentation system increases the needs of upgrading this system. The author reviews the main design characteristics of the reactor safety instrumentation of the Paks NPP. Further he attempts to convey the perspective on upgrading the reactor safety instrumentation as seen by the HAEC and its Nuclear Safety Inspectorate

  9. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Westinghouse research reactor at Zion, Illinois (Docket No. 50-87)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report, for the application filed by the Westinghouse Electric Company, for renewal of operating license number R-119 to continue to operate the research reactor, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is operated by Westinghouse and is located in Zion, Illinois. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by Westinghouse without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Improvements at the biological shielding of BNCT research facility in the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Gregorio Soares de

    2011-01-01

    The technique of neutron capture in boron is a promising technique in cancer treatment, it uses the high LET particles from the reaction 10 B (n, α) 7 Li to destroy cancer cells.The development of this technique began in the mid-'50s and even today it is the object of study and research in various centers around the world, Brazil has built a facility that aims to conduct research in BNCT, this facility is located next to irradiation channel number three at the research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 and has a biological shielding designed to meet the radiation protection standards. This biological shielding was developed to allow them to conduct experiments with the reactor at maximum power, so it is not necessary to turn on and off the reactor to irradiate samples. However, when the channel is opened for experiments the background radiation in the experiments salon increases and this background variation makes it impossible to perform measurements in a neutron diffraction research that utilizes the irradiation channel number six. This study aims to further improve the shielding in order to minimize the variation of background making it possible to perform the research facility in BNCT without interfering with the action of the research group of the irradiation channel number six. To reach this purpose, the code MCNP5, dosimeters and activation detectors were used to plan improvements in the biological shielding. It was calculated with the help of the code an improvement that can reduce the average heat flow in 71.2% ± 13 and verified experimentally a mean reduce of 70 ± 9% in dose due to thermal neutrons. (author)

  11. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Moon Kee; Park, Choon Kyung; Yang, Sun Kyoo; Chun, Se Yung; Song, Chul Hwa; Jun, Hyung Kil; Jung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yun; Cho, Yung Roh; Min, Kyung Hoh; Jung, Jang Hwan; Jang, Suk Kyoo; Kim, Bok Deuk; Kim, Wooi Kyung; Huh, Jin; Kim, Sook Kwan; Moon, Sang Kee; Lee, Sang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. In this research, test facilities simulating the primary coolant system and safety system are being constructed for the design verification tests of the existing and advanced nuclear power plant. 97 figs, 14 tabs, 65 refs. (Author).

  12. Application of fuzzy set theory for safety culture and safety management assessment of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Hauptmanns, U.

    2000-01-01

    The safety culture status of nuclear power plant is usually assessed through interview and/or discussions with personnel and management in plant, and an assessment of the pertinent documentation. The approach for safety culture assessment described in IAEA Safety Series, make uses of a questionnaire composed of questions which require 'Yes' or 'No' as an answer. Hence, it is basically a check-list approach which is quite common for safety assessments in industry. Such a procedure ignores the fact that the expert answering the question usually has knowledge which goes far beyond a mere binary answer. Additionally, many situations cannot readily be described in such restricted terms. Therefore, it was developed a checklist consisting of questions which are formulated such that they require more than a simple 'yes' or 'no' as an answer. This allows one to exploit the expert knowledge of the analyst appropriately by asking him to qualify the degree of compliance of each of the topics examined. The method presented has proved useful in assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of the research reactor. The safety culture status and the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is rated as 'average'. The method is also flexible and allows one to add questions to existing areas or to introduce new areas covering related topics

  13. Fuel safety research 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a part of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The new laboratory was organized by combining three pre-existing laboratories, Reactivity Accident Laboratory, Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of Severe Accident Research Laboratory. The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory becomes to be in charge of all fuel safety research in JAERI. Various experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). The research activities in year 2000 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, failure of high burnup BWR fuel rod under RIA conditions, data on the behavior of hydrided Zircaloy cladding under LOCA conditions and FP release data from VEGA experiments at very high temperature/pressure condition. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2000 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  14. The Budapest research reactor as an advanced research facility for the early 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovszky, I.

    2001-01-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, Hungary's first nuclear facility was originally put into operation in 1959. The reactor serves for: basic and applied research, technological and commercial applications, education and training. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research. This unique research possibility is used by a broad user community of Europe. Eight instruments for neutron scattering, radiography and activation analyses are already used, others (e.g. time of flight spectrometer, neutron reflectometer) are being installed. The majority of these instruments will get a much improved utilization when the cold neutron source is put into operation. In 1999 the Budapest Research Reactor was operated for 3129 full power hours in 14 periods. The normal operation period took 234 hours (starting Monday noon and finishing Thursday morning). The entire production for the year 1999 was 1302 MW days. This is a slightly reduced value, due to the installation of the cold neutron source. For the year 2000 a somewhat longer operation is foreseen (near to 4000 hours), as the cold neutron source will be operational. The operation of the reactor is foreseen at least up to the end of the first decade of the 21 st century. (author)

  15. Flooding Experiments and Modeling for Improved Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solmos, M.; Hogan, K.J.; VIerow, K.

    2008-01-01

    Countercurrent two-phase flow and 'flooding' phenomena in light water reactor systems are being investigated experimentally and analytically to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. The aspects that will be better clarified are the effects of condensation and tube inclination on flooding in large diameter tubes. The current project aims to improve the level of understanding of flooding mechanisms and to develop an analysis model for more accurate evaluations of flooding in the pressurizer surge line of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Interest in flooding has recently increased because Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) in the AP600 pressurizer surge line can affect the vessel refill rate following a small break LOCA and because analysis of hypothetical severe accidents with the current flooding models in reactor safety codes shows that these models represent the largest uncertainty in analysis of steam generator tube creep rupture. During a hypothetical station blackout without auxiliary feedwater recovery, should the hot leg become voided, the pressurizer liquid will drain to the hot leg and flooding may occur in the surge line. The flooding model heavily influences the pressurizer emptying rate and the potential for surge line structural failure due to overheating and creep rupture. The air-water test results in vertical tubes are presented in this paper along with a semi-empirical correlation for the onset of flooding. The unique aspects of the study include careful experimentation on large-diameter tubes and an integrated program in which air-water testing provides benchmark knowledge and visualization data from which to conduct steam-water testing

  16. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-05-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  17. Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, M.; Lachance, J.; Sofu, T.; Bari, R.; Flanagon, G.; Wigeland, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes potential research priorities for the US Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety related gaps in the available information, data and models needed to support the licensing of an SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology; accident sequences and initiators; source term characterization, codes and methods; and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this paper to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the applied technology access control designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust knowledge management and preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with applied technology and knowledge management. (author)

  18. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofu, Tanju; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R.; Wigeland, Roald; Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F.

    2012-01-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  19. Criticality safety studies involved in actions to improve conditions for storing 'RA' research reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.; Marinkovic, N.

    1998-01-01

    A project has recently been initiated by the VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences to improve conditions in the spent fuel storage pool at the 6.5 MW research reactor RA, as well as to consider transferring this spent fuel into a new dry storage facility built for the purpose. Since quantity and contents of fissile material in the spent fuel storage at the RA reactor are such that possibility of criticality accident can not be a priori excluded, according to standards and regulations for handling fissile material outside a reactor, before any action is undertaken subcriticality should be proven under normal, as well as under credible abnormal conditions. To perform this task, comprehensive nuclear criticality safety studies had to be performed. (author)

  20. PANDA: a Large Scale Multi-Purpose Test Facility for LWR Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreier, Joerg; Paladino, Domenico; Huggenberger, Max; Andreani, Michele [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Yadigaroglu, George [ETH Zuerich, Technoparkstrasse 1, Einstein 22- CH-8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    PANDA is a large-scale multi-purpose thermal-hydraulics test facility, built and operated by PSI. Due to its modular structure, PANDA provides flexibility for a variety of applications, ranging from integral containment system investigations, primary system tests, component experiments to large-scale separate-effects tests. For many applications, the experimental results are directly used for example for concept demonstrations or for the characterisation of phenomena or components, but all the experimental data generated in the various test campaigns is unique and was or/and will still be widely used for the validation and improvement of a variety of computer codes, including codes with 3D capabilities, for reactor safety analysis. The paper provides an overview of the already completed and on-going research programs performed in the PANDA facility in the different area of applications, including the main results and conclusions of the investigations. In particular the advanced passive containment cooling system concept investigations of the SBWR, ESBWR as well as of the SWR1000 in relation to various aspects are presented and the main findings are summarised. Finally the goals, planned investigations and expected results of the on-going OECD project SETH-2 are presented. (authors)

  1. PANDA: a Large Scale Multi-Purpose Test Facility for LWR Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, Joerg; Paladino, Domenico; Huggenberger, Max; Andreani, Michele; Yadigaroglu, George

    2008-01-01

    PANDA is a large-scale multi-purpose thermal-hydraulics test facility, built and operated by PSI. Due to its modular structure, PANDA provides flexibility for a variety of applications, ranging from integral containment system investigations, primary system tests, component experiments to large-scale separate-effects tests. For many applications, the experimental results are directly used for example for concept demonstrations or for the characterisation of phenomena or components, but all the experimental data generated in the various test campaigns is unique and was or/and will still be widely used for the validation and improvement of a variety of computer codes, including codes with 3D capabilities, for reactor safety analysis. The paper provides an overview of the already completed and on-going research programs performed in the PANDA facility in the different area of applications, including the main results and conclusions of the investigations. In particular the advanced passive containment cooling system concept investigations of the SBWR, ESBWR as well as of the SWR1000 in relation to various aspects are presented and the main findings are summarised. Finally the goals, planned investigations and expected results of the on-going OECD project SETH-2 are presented. (authors)

  2. Modernization of Safety and Control Instrumentation of the IEA-R1 Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Carvalho, P.V., E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN), National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The research reactor IEA-R1 located in the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), São Paulo, Brazil, obtained its first criticality on 16 September 1957 and since then has served the scientific and medical community in the performance of experiments in applied nuclear physics, as well as the provision of radioisotopes for production of radiopharmaceuticals. The reactor produces radioisotopes {sup 82}Br and {sup 41}Ar for special processes in industrial inspection and {sup 192}Ir and {sup 198}Au as sources of radiation used in brachytherapy, {sup 153}Sm for pain relief in patients with bone metastasis, and calibrated sources of {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 57}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 241}Am and {sup 152}Eu used in medical clinics and hospitals practicing nuclear medicine and research laboratories. Services are offered in regular non-destructive testing by neutron radiography, neutron irradiation of silicon for phosphorous doping and other various irradiations with neutrons. The reactor is responsible for producing approximately 70% of radiopharmaceutical {sup 131}I used in Brazil, which saves about US$ 800 000 annually for the country. After more than 50 years of use, most of its equipment and systems have been modernized, and recently the reactor power was increased to 5 MW in order to enhance radioisotope production capability. However, the control room and nuclear instrumentation system used for reactor safety have operated more than 30 years and require constant maintenance. Many equipment and electronic components are obsolete, and replacements are not available in the market. The modernization of the nuclear safety and control instrumentation systems of IEA-R1 is being carried out with consideration for the internationally recognized criteria for safety and reliable reactor operations and the latest developments in nuclear electronic technology. The project for the new reactor instrumentation system specifies three wide range neutron monitoring

  3. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    type of reactors: low power reactors, graphite and natural uranium reactors, heavy water and natural uranium reactors (with water, gas or heavy water as coolant), heavy water and enriched uranium reactors, 'kettle' type reactors, pool type reactors and high power reactors. Finally, additional factors are considered as the correlation of the reactor type with the research program, safety considerations, size of the construction and economical considerations. (M.P.)

  4. Applied research and service activities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The University Of Missouri operates MURR to provide an intense source of neutron and gamma radiation for research and applications by experimenters from its four campuses and by experimenters from other universities, government and industry. The 10 MW reactor, which has been operating an average of 155 hours per week for the past eight years, produces thermal neutron fluxes up to 6-7x10 14 n/cm 2 -s in the central flux trap and beamport source fluxes of up to 1.2x10 14 n/cm 2 -s. The mission of the reactor facility, to promote research, education and service, is the same as the overall mission of the university and therefore, applied research and service supported by industrial firms have been welcomed. The university recognized after a few years of reactor operation that in order to build utilization, it would be necessary to develop in-house research programs including people, equipment and activity so that potential users could more easily and quickly obtain the results needed. Nine research areas have been developed to create a broadly based program to support the level of activity needed to justify the cost of operating the facility. Applied research and service generate financial support for about one-half of the annual budget. The applied and service programs provide strong motivation for university/industry association in addition to the income generated. (author)

  5. Data acquisition for the Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment P4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.D.; Kraimer, M.R.; Wilson, R.E.; Gilbert, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Data acquisition for the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment P4 used three computers for the continuous collection of data and two computers for the routing and displaying of data. Four of these computer systems were located at the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) site, in Idaho, to access sensor signals from the analog to digital interfaces. The fifth system was located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in Illinois, and was used mainly for display and storage of data. All display computers were connected together using the DECNET software package. The transmission of data was managed over a dedicated phone line using 9600 baud long distance modems. A stand-alone high speed data acquisition system was also used to record data during planned reactor transients

  6. Experience on the demonstration of safety for older reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facer, R.

    2001-01-01

    The UK's oldest reactors are still operating. Built during the 1950's and commissioned between 1956 and 1960, eight reactors continue to provide electricity and process steam. It is still economically justified to keep them running. In addition to the economic considerations it is also necessary to justify that they can still continue to operate safely. This paper provides a brief review of how the Operator of these stations has justified the safety of operation to date and how they expect to continue to justify their operation for several more years. It is appropriate to consider why the Operator wishes to keep the plant operating. Among the most important reasons are that: The plant is built and paid for, Running costs are relatively low process steam is available for the adjacent sites It is a commercially viable electricity producer It is a reliable electricity source The operators have developed programmes for safety review of the plant and introduced a Continuing Operation Programme which had two main requirements which were, the demonstration of continuing acceptable safety the ensurance of commercial viability. (author)

  7. Achievements and future directions in the reactors physics and nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrache, Ion

    2001-01-01

    A historical overlook is presented with respect to inception and development of reactor physics research and on the job training in Romania. First these activities were carried out at the Institute for Atomic Physics and Institute for Power Reactors (IRNE) in Bucharest and afterward at the Institute for Nuclear Technologies, later on transformed in the Institute of Nuclear Research at Pitesti. CYBER Computer installed at Pitesti allowed formation in as early as 1971 reactor specialists who worked out computer programs for neutron physics calculations. These specialists were able to assimilate the characteristic of CANDU 6 type reactor as well as the AECL methodology of simulating processes of CANDU reactor physics. At present four programs are under way. These are: 1. The nuclear reactor physics; 2. The nuclear facility safety; 3. Safety analyses for the transport and radioactive waste disposal; 4. Analyses for radiation shielding and biological protection. There are presented results of the work associated to the CANDU type reactor: 1. Adapting and improving the code system for neutron and thermohydraulic calculation for CANDU type reactor, as supplied by AECL; 2. The IRNE manual for CANDU reactor neutron designing; 3. Final sizing of shim rods of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2; 4. Tests and measurements of reactor physics at the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioning; 5. Simulation and independent analysis of thermosiphoning carried out at Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioning; 6. Static and dynamical response of the detectors in the CANDU reactor core and their time evolution following the burnup in the neutron flux and their ageing effects; 7. PSA studies at Unit 1; 8. Safety analyses for the radioactive waste disposal at Saligny repository. Also, reported are the results of the work associated to the TRIGA reactor, as follows: 1. Flux measurements and neutron computations necessary in the reactor commissioning; 2. Cleaning up controversial issues relating to neutron flux

  8. First start-up of nuclear criticality safety experiment facility for uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qingfu; Shi Yongqian; Shen Leisheng; Hu Dingsheng; Zhao Shouzhi; He Tao; Sun Zheng; Lin Shenghuo; Yao Shigui

    2005-01-01

    The uranyl nitrate solution experiment facility for the research on nuclear criticality safety is described. The nuclear fuel loading steps in the first start-up for water-reflected core are presented. During the experiments, the critical volume of uranyl nitrate solution was determined as 20479.62 mL with count rate inverse extrapolation method, reactivity interpolation method, and steady power method. By calculation, critical mass of 235 U was derived as 1579.184 g from experimental data. The worth of control rods was also calibrated in the first start-up of the facility. (authors)

  9. List of reports in reactor safety research by BMFT, EPRI, JSTA, and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from the United States of America and from Japan concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  10. RETU The Finnish research programme on reactor safety 1995-1998. Final Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanttola, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Reactor Safety (RETU, 1995-1998) research programme concentrated on search of safe limits for nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of nuclear power plants. The total volume of the programme was 100 person years and funding FIM 58 million. This symposium report summarises the research fields, the objectives and the main results obtained. In the field of operational margins of a nuclear reactor, the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel was studied both in normal operation and during power transients. The static and dynamic reactor analysis codes were developed and validated to cope with new fuel designs and complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients. Advanced flow models and numerical solution methods for the dynamics codes were developed and tested. Research on accident management developed and validated calculation methods needed to plan preventive measures and to train the personnel to severe accident mitigation. Efforts were made to reduce uncertainties in phenomena important in severe accidents and to study actions planned for accident management. The programme included experimental work, but also participation in large international tests. The Finnish thermal-hydraulic test facility PACTEL was used extensively for the evaluation of the VVER-440 plant accident behaviour, for the validation of the accident analysis computer codes and for the testing of passive safety system concepts for future plant designs. In risk management probabilistic methods were developed for safety related decision making and for complex event sequences. Effects of maintenance on safety were studied and effective methods for assessment of human reliability and safety critical organisations were searched. To enhance human competencies in control of complex environments, practical tools for training and continuous learning were worked out, and methods to evaluate appropriateness of control room design were developed. (orig)

  11. Experimental research on pressurized water reactor(PWR) safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Su; Chae, Sung Ki; Chang, Won Pyo

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this research is to analyze the experimental results already performed in BETHSY facility of CEA France and to establish essential technologies for the future implementation of both such an experiment and computer code assessment, which are not undergoing in Korea so far. The contents of the present study are divided into 2 categories; namely, analysis of the BETHSY experimental data received from CEA, and CATHARE computer code simulation for the selected experiments, i.e. 'Natural Circulation(Test 4.3a)' and '2 Cold Leg Break'. The later studies are performed under the aims of CATHARE assessment as well as qualification of KOSAC code developing at KAERI, which is the subject in the next year and will concern an adequacy of KOSAC for the prediction of low flow natural circulation and a small break transients. (Author)

  12. The INEL Tritium Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Tritium Research Facility (TRF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a small, multi-user facility dedicated to research into processes and phenomena associated with interaction of hydrogen isotopes with other materials. Focusing on bench-scale experiments, the main objectives include resolution of issues related to tritium safety in fusion reactors and the science and technology pertinent to some of those issues. In this report the TRF and many of its capabilities will be described. Work presently or recently underway there will be discussed, and the implications of that work to the development of fusion energy systems will be considered. (orig.)

  13. The INEL Tritium Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The Tritium Research Facility (TRF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a small, multi-user facility dedicated to research into processes and phenomena associated with interaction of hydrogen isotopes with other materials. Focusing on bench-scale experiments, the main objectives include resolution of issues related to tritium safety in fusion reactors and the science and technology pertinent to some of those issues. In this report the TRF and many of its capabilities will be described. Work presently or recently underway there will be discussed, and the implications of that work to the development of fusion energy systems will be considered. (orig.).

  14. Planning and management for the decommissioning of research reactors and other small nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Many research reactors and other small nuclear facilities throughout the world date from the original nuclear research programmes in the Member States. Consequently, a large number of these plants have either been retired from service or will soon reach the end of their useful lives and are likely to become significant decommissioning tasks for those Members States. In recognition of this situation and in response to considerable interest shown by Member States, the IAEA has produced this document on planning and management for the decommissioning of research reactors and other small nuclear facilities. While not directed specifically at large nuclear installations, it is likely that much of the information presented will also be of interest to those involved in the decommissioning of such facilities. Current views, information and experience on the planning and management of decommissioning projects in Member States were collected and assessed during a Technical Committee Meeting held by the IAEA in Vienna from 29 July to 2 August 1991. It was attended by 22 participants from 14 Member States and one international organization. 28 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Collective statement on major nuclear safety research facilities and programmes at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear safety research remains necessary, since nuclear power programmes are dynamic. In addition to maintaining in-depth competencies, its aim is to provide information to plant designers, operators and regulators in support of the resolution of safety issues, to strengthen confidence in their solution and their implementation, and also to anticipate problems of potential significance. New fields of research open up as a result of plant ageing, plant life extension, plant up-rating, optimisation of plant economics and the associated need to further reduce uncertainties in safety margins quantification. The safety evaluation of future reactor systems being developed or considered in several Member countries also requires new research efforts. Accordingly, Member countries are encouraged to support efforts to maintain key research data, facilities and programmes through national support of international co-operation and funding. This should be under-pinned by development of short-, medium- and long-term strategic visions of the needs of the nuclear safety research community, including a strong component of international collaboration given the international nature of nuclear safety issues. (author)

  16. Reactor core conversion studies of Ghana: Research Reactor-1 and proposal for addition of safety rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odoi, H.C.

    2014-06-01

    The inclusion of an additional safety rod in conjunction with a core conversion study of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) was carried out using neutronics, thermal hydraulics and burnup codes. The study is based on a recommendation by Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARP) mission to incorporate a safety rod to the reactor safety system as well as the need to replace the reactor fuel with LEU. Conversion from one fuel type to another requires a complete re-evaluation of the safety analysis. Changes to the reactivity worth, shutdown margin, power density and material properties must be taken into account, and appropriate modifications made. Neutronics analysis including burnup was studied followed by thermal hydraulics analyses which comprise steady state and transients. Four computer codes were used for the analysis; MCNP, REBUS, PLTEP and PARET. The neutronics analysis revealed that the LEU core must be operated at 34 Kw in order to attain the flux of 1.0E12 n/cm 2 .s as the nominal flux of the HEU core. The auxiliary safety rod placed at a modified irradiation site gives a better worth than the cadmium capsules. For core excess reactivity of 4 mk, 348 fuel pins would be appropriate for the GHARR-1 LEU core. Results indicate that flux level of 1.0E12 n/cm 2 .s in the inner irradiation channel will not be compromised, if the power of the LEU core is increased to 34 kW. The GHARR-1 core using LEU-U0 2 -12.5% fuel can be operated for 23 shim cycles, with cycles length 2.5 years, for over 57 years at the 17 kW power level. All 23 LEU cycles meet the ∼ 4.0 mk excess reactivity required at the beginning of cycle . For comparison, the MNSR HEU reference core can also be operated for 23 shim cycles, but with a cycle length of 2.0 years for just over 46 years at 15.0kW power level. It is observed that the GHARR-1 core with LEU UO 2 fuel enriched to 12.5% and a power level of 34 kW can be operated ∼25% longer than the current HEU core operated at

  17. Energy deposition measurements in fast reactor safety experiments with fission thermocouple detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Scott, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    The investigation of phenomena occurring in in-pile fast reactor safety experiments requires an accurate measurement of the time dependent energy depositions within the fissile material. At Sandia Laboratories thin-film fission thermocouples are being developed for this purpose. These detectors have high temperature capabilities (400 to 500 0 C), are sodium compatible, and have milli-second time response. A significant advantage of these detectors for use as energy deposition monitors is that they produce an output voltage which is directly dependent on the temperature of a small chip of fissile material within the detectors. However, heat losses within the detector make it necessary to correct the response of the detector to determine the energy deposition. A method of correcting the detector response which uses an inverse convolution procedure has been developed and successfully tested with experimental data obtained in the Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) and in the Annular Core Research Reactor

  18. Artificial neural network for research reactor safety status monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varde, P.V.

    2001-01-01

    During reactor upset/abnormal conditions, emphasis is placed on plant operator's ability to quickly identify the problem and perform diagnosis and initiate recovery action to ensure safety of the plant. However, the reliability of human action is adversely affected at the time of crisis, due to the time stress and psychological factors. Availability of operational aids capable of monitoring the status of the plant and quickly identifying the deviation from normal operation is expected to significantly improve the operator reliability. Artificial Neural Network (based on Back Propagation Algorithm) has been developed and applied for reactor safety status monitoring, as part of an Operator Support System. ANN has been trained for 14 different plant states using 42 input symptom patterns. Recall tests performed on the ANN show that the system was able to identify the plant state with reasonable accuracy. (author)

  19. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.

    The people of Ontario have begun to receive the benefits of a low cost, assured supply of electrical energy from CANDU nuclear stations. This indigenous energy source also has excellent safety characteristics. Safety has been one of the central themes of the CANDU development program from its very beginning. A great deal of work has been done to establish that public risks are small. However, safety design criteria are now undergoing extensive review, with a real prospect of more stringent requirements being applied in the future. Considering the newness of the technology it is not surprising that a consensus does not yet exist; this makes it imperative to discuss the issues. It is time to examine the policies and practice of reactor safety management in Canada to decide whether or not further restrictions are justified in the light of current knowledge

  20. NRX and NRU reactor research facilities and irradiation and examination charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-08-01

    This report details the irradiation and examination charges on the NRX and NRU reactors at the Chalk River Nuclear Labs. It describes the NRX and NRU research facilities available to external users. It describes the various experimental holes and loops available for research. It also outlines the method used to calculate the facilities charges and the procedure for applying to use the facilities as well as the billing procedures.

  1. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, first half of fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 57 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as neutron radiography using a research reactor, measurement of Zr/Hf ratio in zirconium, interstitial germanium atoms in thermal neutron irradiation study, measurement of induced radioactivity due to neutrons in Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombings, properties of semiconductor electrons in radiation study, induction of mutation in crops by neutron irradiation and utilization for breeding, thermal fluorescence mechanism of alkali halide and MgO single crystals, atomic configuration in PZT rhombohedron phase, modulated structure of Cu-Co alloys, excitation of nuclei by positron annihilation and others. (Kako, I.)

  2. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.G.; Sousa, M.; Santos, J.P.; Fernandes, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1 MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard.

  3. New safety performance indicators for safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta Vital, J.L.; Castillo, R.G.; Olivera, J.

    2002-01-01

    The paper shows the Cuban experience on implementing geological disposal of radioactive waste and the necessity for identifying new safety performance indicators for the safety assessment (SA) of radioactive waste disposal facilities. The selected indicator was the concentration of natural radioactive elements (U, Ra, Th, K) in the Cuban geologic environment. We have carried out a group of investigations, which have allowed characterising the concentration for the whole Country, creating a wide database where this indicator is associated with the lithology. The main lithologies in Cuba are: the sedimentary rocks (70 percent of national occurrence), which are present in the three regions (limestone and lutite), and finally the igneous and metamorphic rocks. The results show the concentrations ranges of the natural radionuclides associated fundamentally to the variation in the lithology and geographical area of the Country. In Cuba, the higher concentration (ppm) of Uranium and Radium are referenced to the Central region associated to Skarn, while for Thorium (ppm) and Potassium (%), in the East region the concentration peaks in Tuffs have been found. The concentrations ranges obtained are preliminary, they characterise the behaviour of this parameter for the Cuban geology, but they do not represent limits for safety assessment purposes yet. Also other factors should be taken into account as the assessment context, time scales and others assumptions before establishing the final concentration limits for the natural radionuclides as a radiological and nuclear safety performance indicator complementary to dose and risk for safety assessment for radiological and nuclear facilities. (author)

  4. Development of a computational database for application in Probabilistic Safety Analysis of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Vagner dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the computational database that was developed to store technical information and process data on component operation, failure and maintenance for the nuclear research reactors located at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN), in São Paulo, Brazil. Data extracted from this database may be applied in the Probabilistic Safety Analysis of these research reactors or in less complex quantitative assessments related to safety, reliability, availability and maintainability of these facilities. This database may be accessed by users of the corporate network, named IPEN intranet. Professionals who require the access to the database must be duly registered by the system administrator, so that they will be able to consult and handle the information. The logical model adopted to represent the database structure is an entity-relationship model, which is in accordance with the protocols installed in IPEN intranet. The open-source relational database management system called MySQL, which is based on the Structured Query Language (SQL), was used in the development of this work. The PHP programming language was adopted to allow users to handle the database. Finally, the main result of this work was the creation a web application for the component reliability database named PSADB, specifically developed for the research reactors of IPEN; furthermore, the database management system provides relevant information efficiently. (author)

  5. Feasibility study to develop BNCT facility at the Indonesian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, H.

    2001-01-01

    A survey on the Indonesian research reactors and its supporting facilities has been done in order to check the possibility to install BNCT facility. Oncologists from several hospitals have been informing about the BNCT treatment for tumours and they give a positive response to support utilisation of the BNCT facility. Several aspects required to support the BNCT treatment have also been identified and related activities on that matter soon will be initiated. The interim result in our survey indicated that utilisation of the 30 MW Multipurpose reactor would not be possible from the technical point of view. Further study will be concentrated on the TRIGA reactor and an epithermal neutron beam facility at the thermal column of this reactor will be designed for further work. (author)

  6. Application of the Dragon reactor experiment to the safety evaluation of current HTR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, F.P.O.; Faircloth, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    An important component of the confidence required for the safety assessment of high-temperature reactors is the experimental proof of phenomena such as fission product release or core corrosion. The most convincing experiments are those carried out in a reactor. This paper outlines the scope of experiments relevant to safety which can be done in the Dragon Reactor Experiment and describes as an example the experimental campaign and the current outcome of the work on validating the predictions of caesium release and migration. (author)

  7. Buff book 1: status summary report, water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Management Report, to provide information for monitoring and controlling the progress of LWR Safety Research Projects Associated with the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and other agencies and organizations engaged in nuclear safety research. It utilizes data pertaining to project schedules, cost, and status which have been integrated into a network-based management information system, The purpose of this publication is to provide a vehicle for review of the current status and overall progress of the safety Research Program from a managerial point of view

  8. On exposure of workers in nuclear reactor facilities for test and in nuclear reactor facilities in research and development stage in fiscal 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Law for Regulation on Nuclear Reactor requires the operators of nuclear reactors that the exposure dose of workers engaged in work for nuclear reactors should not exceed the limits specified in official notices that are issued based on the Law. The present article summarizes the contents of the Report on Radiation Management in 1988 submitted by the operators of nuclear reactor facilities for test and those of nuclear reactor facilities in research and development stage based on the Law, and the Report on Management of Exposure Dose of Workers submitted by them based on administrative notices. The reports demonstrate that the exposure of workers was below the permissible exposure dose in 1988 in all nuclear reactor facilities. The article presents data on the distribution of exposure dose among workers in all facilities with a nuclear reactor for test, and data on personal exposure of employees and non-employees and overall exposure of all workers in the facilities of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. (N.K.)

  9. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 61 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as radioactivation analysis of trace elements in rocks and minerals, anodic oxidation films of GaAs and structure, measurement of yield of uranium isotopes produced by reactor neutron irradiation of thorium, geochemical study of trace elements in hydrosphere by radio-activation analysis, various diseases and variation of elements in rat furs, Moessbauer spectroscopic study of gold compounds with singular coupling by Au-197, measurement of grass-eating quantity and rate of digestion of cows using Au and Eu, sickness biochemical study of trace elements in hair samples of patients and others. (Kako, I.)

  10. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of two main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  11. Organisation of safety research programmes and infrastructure for existing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micaelli, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviewed the main drivers of safety research, noting that challenging research is an excellent means to preserve know-how and professional skills. International efforts such the NEA-CSNI joint projects are an efficient means to support experimental infrastructure for safety research, while providing useful experimental results. Other initiatives, e.g. within the EU, aimed at developing networks of international expertise and infrastructure were also mentioned. (author)

  12. Recent performance experience with US light water reactor self-actuating safety and relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, C.G.

    1996-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been a number of operating reactor events involving performance of primary and secondary safety and relief valves in U.S. Light Water Reactors. There are several different types of safety and relief valves installed for overpressure protection of various safety systems throughout a typical nuclear power plant. The following discussion is limited to those valves in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and main steam systems of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and in the RCS of boiling water reactors (BWR), all of which are self-actuating having a setpoint controlled by a spring-loaded disk acting against system fluid pressure. The following discussion relates some of the significant recent experience involving operating reactor events or various testing data. Some of the more unusual and interesting operating events or test data involving some of these designs are included, in addition to some involving a number of similar events and those which have generic applicability.

  13. A description of the Canadian irradiation-research facility proposed to replace the NRU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A G; Lidstone, R F; Bishop, W E; Talbot, E F; McIlwain, H [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-31

    To replace the aging NRU reactor, AECL has developed the concept for a dual-purpose national Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) that tests fuel and materials for CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactors and performs materials research using extracted neutron beams. The IRF includes a MAPLE reactor in a containment building, experimental facilities, and support facilities. At a nominal reactor power of 40 MW{sub t}, the IRF will generate powers up to 1 MW in natural-uranium CANDU bundles, fast-neutron fluxes up to 1.4 x 10{sup 18} n{center_dot}m{sup -2}{center_dot}s{sup -1} in Zr-alloy specimens, and thermal-neutron fluxes matching those available to the NRU beam tubes. (author). 9 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  14. Siting of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop criteria for siting and the site-related design basis for research reactors. The concepts presented in this document are intended as recommendations for new reactors and are not suggested for backfitting purposes for facilities already in existence. In siting research reactors serious consideration is given to minimizing the effects of the site on the reactor and the reactor on the site and the potential impact of the reactor on the environment. In this document guidance is first provided on the evaluation of the radiological impact of the installation under normal reactor operation and accident conditions. A classification of research reactors in groups is then proposed, together with a different approach for each group, to take into account the relevant safety problems associated with facilities of different characteristics. Guidance is also provided for both extreme natural events and for man-induced external events which could affect the safe operation of the reactor. Extreme natural events include earthquakes, flooding for river or coastal sites and extreme meteorological phenomena. The feasibility of emergency planning is finally considered for each group of reactors

  15. The University of Missouri Research Reactor facility can melter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.B. Jr.; Olson, O.L.; Stevens, R.; Brugger, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), a waste compacting system for reducing the volume of radioactive aluminum cans has been designed, built and put into operation. In MURR's programs of producing radioisotopes and transmutation doping of silicon, a large volume of radioactive aluminum cans is generated. The Can Melter System (CMS) consists of a sorting station, a can masher, an electric furnace and a gas fired furnace. This system reduces the cans and other radioactive metal into barrels of solid metal close to theoretical density. The CMS has been in operation at the MURR now for over two years. Twelve hundred cu ft of cans and other metals have been reduced into 150 cu ft of shipable waste. The construction cost of the CMS was $4950.84 plus 1680 man hours of labor, and the operating cost of the CMS is $18/lb. The radiation exposure to the operator is 8.6 mR/cu ft. The yearly operating savings is $30,000. 20 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Safety analysis calculations for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; MacDonald, R.; MacFarlane, D.

    1983-01-01

    Safety issues for the two general types of reactors, i.e., the plate-type (MTR-type) reactor and the rod-type (TRIGA-type) reactor, resulting from the changes associated with LEU vs HEU fuels, are explored. The plate-type fuels are typically uranium aluminide (UAl/sub x/) compounds dispersed in aluminum and clad with aluminum. Moderation is provided by the water coolant. Self shut-down reactivity coefficients with HEU fuel are entirely a result of coolant heating, whereas with LEU fuel there is an additional shut down contribution provided by the direct heating of the fuel due to the Doppler coefficient. In contrast, the rod-type (TRIGA) fuels are mixtures of zirconium hydride, uranium, and erbium. This fuel mixture is formed into rods (approx. 1 cm diameter) and clad with stainless steel or Incoloy. In the TRIGA fuel the self-shutdown reactivity is more complex, depending on heating of the fuel rather than the coolant. Results of transient calculations performed with existing computer codes, most suited for each type of reactor, are presented

  17. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    Theses of proceedings of the 9 Topical Meeting on problems of nuclear power plant safety are presented. Reports include results of neutron-physical experiments carried out for reactor safety justification. Concepts of advanced reactors with improved safety are considered. Results of researches on fuel cycles are given too

  18. Operational experience of decommissioning techniques for research reactors in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, M.R.; McCool, T.M.

    2002-01-01

    In previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted by the IAEA no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. As experience was gained and technology advanced it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. It was within this context that a CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1997 to 2001. This paper considers the experience gained from the decommissioning of two research reactors during the course of the CRP namely: (a) the ICI Triga Mk I reactor at Billingham UK which was largely complete by the end of the research project and (b) the Argonaut 100 reactor at the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor centre at East Kilbride in Scotland which is currently is the early stages of dismantling/site operations. It is the intention of this paper with reference to the two case studies outlined above to compare the actual implementation of these works against the original proposals and identify areas that were found to be problematical and/or identify any lessons learnt. (author)

  19. Best Safety Practices for the Operation of Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M. [Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-07-01

    A survey on administrative, organisational and technical aspects for the safe and efficient operation of a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II research reactor is given. The replacement of the I and C system is discussed, maintenance procedures are presented and the fuel management is described. (author)

  20. Best Safety Practices for the Operation of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2002-01-01

    A survey on administrative, organisational and technical aspects for the safe and efficient operation of a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II research reactor is given. The replacement of the I and C system is discussed, maintenance procedures are presented and the fuel management is described. (author)

  1. Safety and authorizations relating to the use of new fuel in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.-C.; Abou Yehia, H.

    1999-01-01

    After giving a brief reminder of the procedure applied in France for granting licences to modify research reactors, we outline in this paper the main safety aspects associated with using new fuel in these reactors. Finally, by way of an example, we focus on the procedure followed for converting the cores of the OSIRIS (70 MW) and ISIS (700 kW) reactors to U 3 Si 2 Al fuel and the conclusions of the corresponding safety assessments. (author)

  2. French experience in design, operation and revamping of nuclear research reactors, in support of advanced reactors development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Bergeonneau, P.; Merchie, F.; Minguet, J.L.; Rousselle, P.

    1996-01-01

    The French nuclear program is strongly based on the R and D work performed in the CEA nuclear research centers and particularly on the various experimental programs carried out in its research reactors in the frame of cooperative actions between the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Framatome and Electricite de France (EDF). Several types of research reactors have been built by Technicatome and CEA to carry out successfully this considerable R and D work on fuels and materials, among them the socalled Materials Testing Reactors (MTR) SILOE (35 MW) and OSIRIS (70 MW) which are indeed very well suited for technological irradiations. Their simple and flexible design and the large irradiation space available around the core, the SILOE and OSIRIS reactors can be shared by several types of applications such as fuel and material testings for nuclear power plants, radioisotopes production, silicon doping and fundamental research. It is worthwhile recalling that Technicatome and CEA have also built research reactors fully dedicated to safety experimental studies, such as the CABRI, SCARABEE and PHEBUS reactors at Cadarache, and others dedicated to fundamental research such as ORPHEE (14 MW) and the Reacteur a Haut Flux -High Flux Reactor- (RHF 57 MW). This paper will present some of the most significant conceptual and design features of all these reactors as well as the main improvements brought to most of them in the last years. Based on this wide experience, CEA and Technicatome have specially designed for export a new multipurpose research reactor named SIRIUS, with two versions depending on the utilization spectrum and the power range (5 MW to 30 MW). At last, CEA has recently launched the preliminary project study of a new MTR, the Jules Horowitz Reactor, to meet the future needs of fuels and materials irradiations in the next 4 or 5 decades, in support of the French long term nuclear power program. (J.P.N.)

  3. Experimental facility of innovative types as the laboratory analog of research reactor experimental device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, A.A.; Androsenko, P.A.; Zabud'ko, A.N.; Kremenetskij, A.K.; Nikolaev, A.N.; Trykov, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper analyses capability of creating laboratory analogs of complex experimental facilities at research reactors utilizing power radionuclide neutron sources fabricated in industrial conditions. Some experimental and calculational investigations of neutron-physical characteristics are presented, which have been attained at the RIZ research reactor laboratory analog. Experimental results are supplemented by calculational investigations, fulfilled by means of the BRAND three-dimensional computational complex and the ROZ-6 one-dimensional program. 4 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  5. USA NRC/RSR Data Bank System and Reactor Safety Research Data Repository (RSRDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskewitz, B.F.; Bankert, S.F.

    1979-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through its Division of Reactor Safety Research (RSR) of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the NRC/RSR Data Bank Program to collect, process, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. An increasing number of requests for data and/or calculations generated by NRC Contractors led to the initiation of the program which allows timely and direct access to water reactor safety data in a manner most useful to the user. The program consists of three main elements: data sources, service organizations, and a data repository

  6. The upgrading of the cyclic neutron activation analysis facility at the Dalat research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Doanh Ho; Manh Dung Ho; Quang Thien Tran; Dong Vu Cao; Thanh Viet Ha

    2018-01-01

    The cyclic neutron activation analysis (CNAA) facility based on a pneumatic transfer system for short irradiation and rapid counting has recently been upgraded at the Dalat research reactor. The original facility was only designed for single irradiation. Therefore, this work has aimed to upgrade both hardware and software for the cyclic irradiation. In this paper, the upgrading of the facility for CNAA was described. Irradiation time of the facility were calibrated, thereby reducing irradiation time to seconds with precision. The accuracy and sensitivity of CNAA based-on the upgraded facility were assessed by determination of some short-lived nuclides. (author)

  7. Yearly program of safety research in nuclear power facilities from fiscal 1981 to 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear safety research plans for nuclear power facilities and others from fiscal 1981 to 1985 are presented for the following areas: the safety of LWR fuel, loss-of-coolant accidents, the structural safety of LWR installations, the reduction of radioactive material release from nuclear power facilities, the stochastic safety evaluation of nuclear power facilities, the aseismicity of nuclear power facilities, the safety of nuclear fuel facilities, and the safety of nuclear fuel transport vessels. In the respective areas, the needs for research and the outline of research works are summarized. Then, about the major research works in each area, the purpose, contents, term and responsible institution of the research are given. (Mori, K.)

  8. Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable.

  9. Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable

  10. Natural circulation in a VVER reactor geometry: Experiments with the PACTEL facility and Cathare simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raussi, P.; Kainulainen, S. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland); Kouhia, J. [VTT Energy, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    There are some 40 reactors based on the VVER design in use. Database available for computer code assessment for VVER reactors is rather limited. Experiments were conducted to study natural circulation behaviour in the PACTEL facility, a medium-scale integral test loop patterned after VVER pressurized water reactors. Flow behaviour over a range of coolant inventories was studied with a small-break experiment. In the small-break experiments, flow stagnation and system repressurization were observed when the water level in the upper plenum fell below the entrances to the hot legs. The cause was attributed to the hot leg loop seals, which are a unique feature of the VVER geometry. At low primary inventories, core cooling was achieved through the boiler-condenser mode. The experiment was simulated using French thermalhydraulic system code CATHARE.

  11. 3 MW TRIGA Research Reactor facility of BAEC and its Utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, N.I.; Bhuiyan, S.I.; Wadud Mondal, M.A.; Ahmed, F.U.; Islam, M.N.; Hossain, S.M.; Ahmed, K.; Zulquarnain, A.; Abedin, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The paper briefly describes the Utilisation of 3 MW TRIGA Research Reactor of BAEC for neutron beam research, neutron activation analysis are isotope production. It includes the installation of the triple axis neutron spectrometer at the radial piercing beam port and a neutron radiography set-up at the tangential beam port and their uses for material analysis and condensed matter research and material testing. Nuclear and magnetic structures of some ferrites have been studied in powder diffraction method in the double axis mode. SANS technique with double crystal diffraction known as Bonse and Hart's method has been adopted in an experiment with alumina sample. The neutron radiography set-up and its use in the detection of corrosion in alumina have been reported. Determination of arsenic concentration in drinking water from tube well via Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and production of radioiodine-131 by dry distillation method are presented. Our experience on the removal of N-16 decay tank because of the leakage of coolant and bringing the research reactor back to operational by-passing the decay tank have been focussed. A possible reconfiguration of the existing TRIGA core, without exceeding the safety margins, providing additional irradiation channel and upgrading the neutron flux for increased radioisotope production has been attempted. Cross section library ENDF/B-VI and JENDL3.2, code NJOY94.10, WIMSD package, 3-D code CITATION, PARET and Monte Carlo code MCNP4B2 have been employed to achieve the objective. (author)

  12. 3 MW TRIGA Research Reactor facility of BAEC and its Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molla, N.I.; Bhuiyan, S.I.; Wadud Mondal, M.A.; Ahmed, F.U.; Islam, M.N.; Hossain, S.M.; Ahmed, K.; Zulquarnain, A.; Abedin, Z. [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    1999-08-01

    The paper briefly describes the Utilisation of 3 MW TRIGA Research Reactor of BAEC for neutron beam research, neutron activation analysis are isotope production. It includes the installation of the triple axis neutron spectrometer at the radial piercing beam port and a neutron radiography set-up at the tangential beam port and their uses for material analysis and condensed matter research and material testing. Nuclear and magnetic structures of some ferrites have been studied in powder diffraction method in the double axis mode. SANS technique with double crystal diffraction known as Bonse and Hart's method has been adopted in an experiment with alumina sample. The neutron radiography set-up and its use in the detection of corrosion in alumina have been reported. Determination of arsenic concentration in drinking water from tube well via Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and production of radioiodine-131 by dry distillation method are presented. Our experience on the removal of N-16 decay tank because of the leakage of coolant and bringing the research reactor back to operational by-passing the decay tank have been focussed. A possible reconfiguration of the existing TRIGA core, without exceeding the safety margins, providing additional irradiation channel and upgrading the neutron flux for increased radioisotope production has been attempted. Cross section library ENDF/B-VI and JENDL3.2, code NJOY94.10, WIMSD package, 3-D code CITATION, PARET and Monte Carlo code MCNP4B2 have been employed to achieve the objective. (author)

  13. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Procedures, operations and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toto, G.; Lindgren, A.J.

    1981-02-01

    The 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island commercial nuclear power plant has led to a number of studies of nuclear reactors, in both the public and private sectors. One of these is that of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, which has outlined tasks for assessment of 13 reactors owned by DOE and operated by contractors. This report covers one of the tasks, the assessment of procedures, operations, and maintenance at the DOE reactor facilities, based on a review of actual documents used at the reactor sites

  14. On exposure management of workers in nuclear reactor facilities for test and in nuclear reactor facilities in research and development stage in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Law of Regulation on Nuclear Reactor requires the operators of nuclear reactors that the exposure dose of workers engaged in work for nuclear reactors should not exceed the limits specified in official notices that are issued based on the Law. The present article summarizes the contents of the Report on Radiation Management in 1993 submitted by the operators of nuclear reactor facilities for test and those of nuclear reactor facilities in research and development stage based on the Law, and the Report on Management of Exposure Dose of Workers submitted by them based on administrative notices. The reports demonstrate that the the exposure of workers was below the permissible exposure dose in 1993 in all nuclear reactor facilities. The article presents data on the distribution of exposure dose among workers in all facilities with a nuclear reactor for test, and data on personal exposure of employees and non-employees and overall exposure of all workers in the facilities of JAERI and PNC. (J.P.N.)

  15. Safety Culture Evaluation at Research Reactors of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, M.A.; Saeed, A.; Shah, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of safety culture was presented by IAEA in document INSAG-4 (1991), delineated as “assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establish that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance”. The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of safety culture at research reactors of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). Evaluating the safety culture of a particular organization poses some challenges which can be resolved by using safety culture evaluation models like those of Sachein (1992) and Harber-Barrier(1998). In PAEC, safety culture is the integral part of management system which not only promotes safety culture throughout the organization but also enhances its significance. To strengthen the safety culture, PAEC is also participating in a number of international and regional meetings of IAEA regarding safety culture. PAEC and the national regulator Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) are also arranging workshops, peer reviews, sharing operational experiences and interacting with IAEA missions to enhance its capabilities in the field of safety culture. The Directorate General of Safety (DOS) is a corporate office of PAEC for safety and regulatory matters. DOS is in the process of implementing a program to evaluate safety culture at nuclear installations of PAEC to ensure that safety culture is included as a vital segment of the Integral Management System of the establishment. In this regard, training sessions and lectures on safety culture evaluation are normally conducted in PAEC for awareness and enhancement of the safety culture program. Safety culture is also addressed in PNRA Regulations like PAK-909 and PAK-913. In this paper we will focus on the safety culture evaluation in our research reactors, i.e., PARR-1 and PARR-2. The evaluation results will be based on observations, interviews of employees, group discussions

  16. An Integrated Management System (IMS) for JM-1 SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor in Jamaica: experiences in documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Since the first criticality in March 1984, the Jamaica SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the University of the West Indies, Mona located in the department of the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS) has operated for approximately 52% of the lifetime of the existing core configuration. The 20kW pool type research reactor has been primarily used for neutron activation analysis in environmental, agricultural, geochemical, health-related studies and mineral exploration in Jamaica. The involvement of the JM-1 reactor for research and teaching activities has segued into commercial applications which, coupled with the current core conversion programme from HEU to LEU, has demanded the implementation of management systems to satisfy regulatory requirements and assure compliance with internationally defined quality standards. At ICENS, documentation related to the Quality Management System aspect of an Integrated Management System (IMS) is well underway. The quality system will incorporate operational and nuclear safety, training, maintenance, design, utilization, occupational health and safety, quality service, and environmental management for its Nuclear Analytical Laboratory, NAL. The IMS is being designed to meet the requirements of the IAEA GS-R-3 with additional controls from international standards including: ISO/IEC 17025:2005, ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004 and OHSAS 18001:2007. This paper reports on the experiences of the documentation process in a low power reactor facility characterized by limited human resource, where innovative mechanisms of system automation and modeling are included to increase productivity and efficiency. (author)

  17. An Integrated Management System (IMS) for JM-1 SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor in Jamaica: experiences in documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, T., E-mail: traceyann.warner02@uwimona.edu.jm [Univ. of West Indies, Mona (Jamaica)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first criticality in March 1984, the Jamaica SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the University of the West Indies, Mona located in the department of the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS) has operated for approximately 52% of the lifetime of the existing core configuration. The 20kW pool type research reactor has been primarily used for neutron activation analysis in environmental, agricultural, geochemical, health-related studies and mineral exploration in Jamaica. The involvement of the JM-1 reactor for research and teaching activities has segued into commercial applications which, coupled with the current core conversion programme from HEU to LEU, has demanded the implementation of management systems to satisfy regulatory requirements and assure compliance with internationally defined quality standards. At ICENS, documentation related to the Quality Management System aspect of an Integrated Management System (IMS) is well underway. The quality system will incorporate operational and nuclear safety, training, maintenance, design, utilization, occupational health and safety, quality service, and environmental management for its Nuclear Analytical Laboratory, NAL. The IMS is being designed to meet the requirements of the IAEA GS-R-3 with additional controls from international standards including: ISO/IEC 17025:2005, ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004 and OHSAS 18001:2007. This paper reports on the experiences of the documentation process in a low power reactor facility characterized by limited human resource, where innovative mechanisms of system automation and modeling are included to increase productivity and efficiency. (author)

  18. Application of best estimate thermalhydraulic codes for the safety analysis of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adorni, M.; Bousbia-salah, A.; D'Auria, F.; Hamidouche, T.

    2006-01-01

    An established international expertise in relation to computational tools, procedures for their application including Best Estimate (BE) methods supported by uncertainty evaluation, and comprehensive experimental database exists within the safety technology of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The importance of transferring NPP safety technology tools and methods to RR safety technology has been noted in recent IAEA activities. However, the ranges of parameters of interest to RR are different from those for NPP: this is namely true for fuel composition, system pressure, adopted materials and overall system geometric configuration. The large variety of research reactors prevented so far the achievement of systematic and detailed lists of initiating events based upon qualified Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies with results endorsed by the international community. However, bounding and generalized lists of events are available from IAEA documents and can be considered for deeper studies in the area. In the area of acceptance criteria, established standards accepted by the international community are available. Therefore no major effort is needed, but an effort appears worthwhile to check that those standards are adopted and that the related thresholds are fulfilled. The importance of suitable experimental assessment is recognized. A large amount of data exists as the kinetic dynamic core behaviour form SPERT reactors tests. However, not all data are accessible to all institutions and the relationship between the range of parameters of experiments and the range of parameters relevant to RR technology is not always established. However, code-assessment through relevant set of experimental data are recorded and properly stored. An established technology exists for development, qualification and application of system thermal-hydraulics codes suitable to be adopted for accident analysis in research reactors. This derives from NPP technology. The applicability of

  19. Status of research reactors in China. Their utilization and safety upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hanming; Jin Huajin

    2000-01-01

    The main research reactors in China basically consist of several old reactors including HWRR, HFETR, SPR, MJTR and MNSR. Except the last one, all the other reactors operate at a high power density and represent themselves as main tools in China for engineering testing, radioactive isotope production, and neutron scattering research. The research and production activities by these reactors are briefed. Main equipment and research topics for neutron scattering are described. The production of radioisotope is summarized. Safety upgrading activities in recent years taken by these old reactors are described, which make the safety feature of each reactor significantly improved and on the whole more close to (even not completely consistent) with the targets set by the modern safety regulation. Since a new multi-purpose research reactor CARR is expected available around the year of 2005, a schedule about the construction of new reactor, reforming or decommissioning of old reactors and smoothly transition of research and production activities from old to new reactor during the coming years has been under careful planning. A suggestion of potential international cooperation items has been preliminarily given. (author)

  20. Accidents and failures in reactor facilities for test and research and reactor facilities in the stage of research and development in fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The number of accidents and failures reported in fiscal year 1987 in conformity with the law on the regulation of nuclear reactors and others was three. One case occurred during operation, and two cases occurred in shutdown state. One case was caused by improper construction management, and two cases were due to improper maintenance management. The effect of radioactivity to the surrounding environment of reactor facilities due to these accidents and failures did not arise. These occurred in the NSRR of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Tokai), the experimental FBR Joyo and the ATR Fugen Power Station of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. In addition to these, the light troubles reported on the basis of the notice from the director of Science and Technology Agency dated September 1, 1981, were three cases. (K.I.)

  1. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Utah (Docket No. 50-407)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Utah (UU) for a renewal of operating license R-126 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Utah and is located on its campus in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  2. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Maryland (Docket No. 50-166)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Maryland (UMD) for a renewal of operating license R-70 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Maryland and is located at a site in College Park, Prince Georges County, Maryland. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UMD without endangering the health and safety of the public

  3. Severe accident assessment. Results of the reactor safety research project VAHTI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sairanen, R.

    1997-10-01

    The report provides a summary of the publicly funded nuclear reactor safety research project Severe Accident Management (VAHTI). The project has been conducted at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) during the years 1994-96. The main objective was to assist the severe accident management programmes of the Finnish nuclear power plants. The project was divided into five work packages: (1) thermal hydraulic validation of the APROS code, (2) core melt progression within a BWR pressure vessel, (3) failure mode of the BWR pressure vessel, (4) Aerosol behaviour experiments, and (5) development of a computerized severe accident training tool

  4. Concerning control of radiation exposure to workers in nuclear reactor facilities for testing and nuclear reactor facilities in research and development phase (fiscal 1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear reactor operator is required by the Nuclear Reactor Control Law to ensure that the radiation dose to workers engaged in the operations of his nuclear reactor is controlled below the permissible exposure doses that are specified in notifications issued based on the Law. The present note briefly summarizes the data given in the Reports on Radiation Control, which have been submitted according to the Nuclear Reactor Control Law by the operators of nuclear reactor facilities for testing and those in the research and development phase, and the Reports on Control of Radiation Exposure to Workers submitted in accordance with the applicable administrative notices. According to these reports, the measured exposure to workers in 1987 were below the above-mentioned permissible exposure doses in all these nuclear facilities. The 1986 and 1987 measurements of radiation exposure dose to workers in nuclear reactor facilities for testing are tabulated. The measurements cover dose distribution among the facilities' personnel and workers of contractors. They also cover the total exposure dose for all workers in each of four plants operated under the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. (N.K.)

  5. Catalogue and classification of technical safety standards, rules and regulations for nuclear power reactors and nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtner, N.; Becker, K.; Bashir, M.

    1977-01-01

    The present report is an up-dated version of the report 'Catalogue and Classification of Technical Safety Rules for Light-water Reactors and Reprocessing Plants' edited under code No EUR 5362e, August 1975. Like the first version of the report, it constitutes a catalogue and classification of standards, rules and regulations on land-based nuclear power reactors and fuel cycle facilities. The reasons for the classification system used are given and discussed

  6. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Cold neutron PGAA facility developments at university research reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, K.; Rios-Martinez, C.

    2005-01-01

    The PGAA applications can be enhanced by using subthermal neutrons, cold neutrons at university research reactors. Only two cold neutron beam facilities were developed at the U.S. university research reactors, namely at Cornell University and the University of Texas at Austin. Both facilities used mesitylene moderator. The mesitylene moderator in the Cornell Cold Neutron Beam Facility (CNBF) was cooled by a helium cryorefrigerator via copper cold fingers to maintain the moderator below 30 K at full power reactor operation. Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) also uses mesitylene moderator that is cooled by a cryorefrigerator via a neon thermosiphon. The operation of the TCNS is based on a helium cryorefrigerator, which liquefies neon gas in a 3-m long thermosiphon. The thermosiphon cools and maintains mesitylene moderator at about 30 K in a chamber. Neutrons streaming through the mesitylene chamber are moderated and thus reduce their energy to produce a cold neutron distribution. (author)

  8. List of reports on reactor safety research from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 65 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as Moessbauer spectroscopic study of ferrocene and its derivative iodides by I-129, decomposition of cadmium telluride during heat treatment, element distribution in resource living things and environmental substances produced in northern ocean, radioactivation analysis of trace elements in blood of tumor-bearing animals, radioactivation analysis of noble metal elements in geochemical samples, relaxation phenomena by gamma-gamma perturbation angle correlation, separation of components in Allende meteorite and their radioactivation analysis, measurement of cross section of Pa-231 (n, gamma) reaction and others. (Kako, I.)

  10. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, first half of fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 47 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as diffusion of impurities ion-implanted in silicon into natural oxide films, origin of igneous rocks by trace element distribution study, element distribution in black ore and its accompanying rocks and origin of black ore, reprocessing of molten salt fuel of thorium group, forerunning martensite transformation of Fe-Pt invar alloy, change of nucleic acid component to recoil tritium at cryogenic temperature, gamma irradiation effect of KC1 containing Pb 2+ , radiation effect on cadmium halide crystals and impurity metallic ions and others. (Kako, I.)

  11. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Ruben Calabrese

    1999-01-01

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  12. Fusion Reactor Safety Research Program annual report, FY-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the program is the development, coordination, and execution of activities related to magnetic fusion devices and reactors that will: (a) identify and evaluate potential hazards, (b) assess and disclose potential environmental impacts, and (c) develop design standards and criteria that eliminate, mitigate, or reduce those hazards and impacts. The program will provide a sound basis for licensing fusion reactors. Included in this report are portions of four reports from two outside contractors, discussions of the several areas in which EG and G Idaho is conducting research activities, a discussion of proposed program plan development, mention of special tasks, a review of fusion technology program coordination by EG and G with other laboratories, and a brief view of proposed FY-80 activities

  13. List of reports on reactor safety research by the BMFT and the USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research which have been collected in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list or reports appears quarterly. This edition contains all reports as registered from January through March 1977. (orig./HK) [de

  14. Progress report - list of reports from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  15. List of reports from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC concerning reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. According to the cooperation in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig.) [de

  16. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeraraghaven, N.

    1990-01-01

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  17. Reactor safety research - visible demonstrations and credible computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenstein, W B; Divakaruni, S M

    1985-11-01

    EPRI has been conducting nuclear safety research for a number of years with the primary goal of assuring the safety and reliability of the nuclear plants. The visibility is emphasized by sponsoring or participating in large scale test demonstrations to credibly support the complex computations that are the basis for quantification of safety margins. Recognizing the success of the airline industry in receiving favorable public perception, the authors compare the design and operation practices of the airline industry with those of the nuclear industry practices to identify the elements contributing to public concerns and unfavorable perceptions. In this paper, authors emphasize the importance of proper communications of research results to the public in a manner that non-specialists understand. Further, EPRI supported research and results in the areas of source term, seismic and structural engineering research, analysis using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), quantification of safety margins, digital technology development and implementation, and plant transient and performance evaluations are discussed in the paper. (orig./HP).

  18. Reactor safety research - visible demonstrations and credible computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.; Divakaruni, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    EPRI has been conducting nuclear safety research for a number of years with the primary goal of assuring the safety and reliability of the nuclear plants. The visibility is emphasized by sponsoring or participating in large scale test demonstrations to credibly support the complex computations that are the basis for quantification of safety margins. Recognizing the success of the airline industry in receiving favorable public perception, the authors compare the design and operation practices of the airline industry with those of the nuclear industry practices to identify the elements contributing to public concerns and unfavorable perceptions. In this paper, authors emphasize the importance of proper communications of research results to the public in a manner that non-specialists understand. Further, EPRI supported research and results in the areas of source term, seismic and structural engineering research, analysis using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), quantification of safety margins, digital technology development and implementation, and plant transient and performance evaluations are discussed in the paper. (orig./HP)

  19. Reports of reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. the individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by he FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRS 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  20. Experience in arranging shipments of spent fuel assemblies of commercial and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, S.; Barinkov, O.; Eshcherkin, A.; Lozhnikov, V.; Smirnov, A.

    2008-01-01

    At present the key activities of Sosny Company are to inspect physical conditions, handle and arrange shipment of SFA including failed SFA. In 2003 after obtaining the license of Gosatomnadzor (Rostechnadzor now) entitled to handle nuclear materials in the process of their shipment, Sosny Company started preparing certification and arranging SFA shipment on its own. About 40 shipments of SFA were performed with participation of Sosny Company. Experience in handling failed SFA - an example of development of a new technology could be the transport and technological scheme of RBMK-1000 SFA shipment from Leningradskaya NPP that was designed by Sosny Company. TUK-11 cask was selected for this shipment. The example of change of transport and technological scheme is modification of the technology for handling and shipment of WWER-440 SFA from Kola NPP. Experience in arranging transportation - based on the results of development of logistics schemes for shipping SFA of reactor facilities Sosny Company justified and implemented composition of mixed trains containing rail cars of many types that enabled to perform shipment more efficiently in time and cost. Experience in arranging handling and shipment of research reactor SFA - over the past years the activity of Sosny Company was aimed at implementing international Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) program. Since equipment of the majority of research centers doesn't allow for the large casks to be accepted and loaded, special casks of less mass and dimensions are used to ship SFA from research reactors. In RRRFR program it is assumed to use different casks for RR SFA such as Russian TUK- 19, TUK-128 and foreign SKODA VPVR/M and NAC-LWT. At present Sosny Company is involved in coordination of the efforts of the affected organizations in creating the type 'C' package for RR SFA in the RF. Conclusion: Under conditions of constant increase of the requirements to shipment safety and complication of regulations of all

  1. Probabilistic safety assessment of Tehran Research Reactor using systems analysis programs for hands-on integrated reliability evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, M.H.; Nematollahi, M.R.; Sepanloo, K.

    2004-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment application is found to be a practical tool for research reactor safety due to intense involvement of human interactions in an experimental facility. In this document the application of the probabilistic safety assessment to the Tehran Research Reactor is presented. The level 1 practicabilities safety assessment application involved: Familiarization with the plant, selection of accident initiators, mitigating functions and system definitions, event tree constructions and quantifications, fault tree constructions and quantification, human reliability, component failure data base development and dependent failure analysis. Each of the steps of the analysis given above is discussed with highlights from the selected results. Quantification of the constructed models is done using systems analysis programs for hands-on integrated reliability evaluations software

  2. RADON-type disposal facility safety case for the co-ordinated research project on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (ISAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guskov, A.; Batanjieva, B.; Kozak, M.W.; Torres-Vidal, C.

    2002-01-01

    The ISAM safety assessment methodology was applied to RADON-type facilities. The assessments conducted through the ISAM project were among the first conducted for these kinds of facilities. These assessments are anticipated to lead to significantly improved levels of safety in countries with such facilities. Experience gained though this RADON-type Safety Case was already used in Russia while developing national regulatory documents. (author)

  3. Safety Evaluation Report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Texas for a construction permit and operating license to construct and operate a TRIGA research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Texas and is located at the university's Balcones Research Center, about 7 miles (11.6 km) north of the main campus in Austin, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can be constructed and operated by the University of Texas without endangering the health and safety of the public

  4. Self-sustainability of a research reactor facility with neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilian, C.; Kennedy, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term self-sustainability of a small reactor facility is possible because there is a large demand for non-destructive chemical analysis of bulk materials that can only be achieved with neutron activation analysis (NAA). The Ecole Polytechnique Montreal SLOWPOKE Reactor Facility has achieved self-sustainability for over twenty years, benefiting from the extreme reliability, ease of use and stable neutron flux of the SLOWPOKE reactor. The industrial clientele developed slowly over the years, mainly because of research users of the facility. A reliable NAA service with flexibility, high accuracy and fast turn-around time was achieved by developing an efficient NAA system, using a combination of the relative and k0 standardisation methods. The techniques were optimized to meet the specific needs of the client, such as low detection limit or high accuracy at high concentration. New marketing strategies are presented, which aim at a more rapid expansion. (author)

  5. Optimization of the irradiation beam in the BNCT research facility at IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Vinicius Alexandre de

    2014-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapeutic technique for the treatment of some types of cancer whose useful energy comes from a nuclear reaction that occurs when thermal neutron impinges upon a Boron-10 atom. In Brazil there is a research facility built along the beam hole number 3 of the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN, which was designed to perform BNCT research experiments. For a good performance of the technique, the irradiation beam should be mostly composed of thermal neutrons with a minimum as possible gamma and above thermal neutron components. This work aims to monitor and evaluate the irradiation beam on the sample irradiation position through the use of activation detectors (activation foils) and also to propose, through simulation using the radiation transport code, MCNP, new sets of moderators and filters which shall deliver better irradiation fields at the irradiation sample position In this work, a simulation methodology, based on a MCNP card, known as wwg (weight window generation) was studied, and the neutron energy spectrum has been experimentally discriminated at 5 energy ranges by using a new set o activation foils. It also has been concluded that the BNCT research facility has the required thermal neutron flux to perform studies in the area and it has a great potential for improvement for tailoring the irradiation field. (author)

  6. TRIGA Research Reactor Conversion to LEU and Modernization of Safety Related Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanda, R. M. [Institute for Nuclear Research Piteşti (SCN-Piteşti), Piteşti (Romania)

    2014-08-15

    The USA and IAEA proposed an international programme to reduce the enrichment of uranium in research reactors by converting nuclear fuel containing HEU into fuel containing 20% enriched uranium. The Government of Romania joined the programme and actively supported political, scientific, technical and economic actions that led to the conversion of the active area of the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Research in Piteşti in May 2006. This confirmed the continuity of the Romanian Government’s non-proliferation policy and their active support of international cooperation. Conversion of the Piteşti research reactor was made possible by completion of milestones in the Research Agreement for Reactor Conversion, a contract signed with the US Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory. This agreement provided scientific and technical support and the possibility of delivery of all HEU TRIGA fuel to the United States. Additionally, about 65% of the fresh LEU fuel needed to start the conversion was delivered in the period 1992–1994. Furthermore, conversion was promoted through IAEA Technical Cooperation project ROM/4/024 project funded primarily by the United States that supported technical and scientific efforts and the delivery of the remaining required LEU nuclear fuel to complete the conversion. Nuclear fuel to complete the conversion was made by the French company CERCA with a tripartite contract among the IAEA, CERCA and Romania. The contract was funded by the US Department of Energy with a voluntary contribution by the Romanian Government. The contract stipulated manufacturing and delivery of LEU fuel by CERCA with compliance measures for quality, delivery schedule and safety requirements set by IAEA standards and Romanian legislation. The project was supported by the ongoing technical cooperation, safeguards, legal and procurement assistance of the IAEA, in particular its Department of Nuclear Safety. For Romanian research, the

  7. Incidents in nuclear research reactor examined by deterministic probability and probabilistic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the potential risks submitted by the incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, were used, the Incident Report System for Research Reactor and Research Reactor Data Base. For this type of assessment was used the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA), within a confidence level of 90% and the Deterministic Probability Analysis (DPA). To obtain the results of calculations of probabilities for PSA, were used the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC - 636. The development of the calculations of probabilities for PSA was used the program Scilab version 5.1.1, free access, executable on Windows and Linux platforms. A specific program to get the results of probability was developed within the main program Scilab 5.1.1., for two distributions Fischer and Chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90%. Using the Sordi equations and Origin 6.0 program, were obtained the maximum admissible doses related to satisfy the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP, and were also obtained these maximum doses graphically (figure 1) resulting from the calculations of probabilities x maximum admissible doses. It was found that the reliability of the results of probability is related to the operational experience (reactor x year and fractions) and that the larger it is, greater the confidence in the outcome. Finally, a suggested list of future work to complement this paper was gathered. (author)

  8. Radiological safety experience in nuclear fuel cycle operations at Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushparaja; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Subramaniam, G.

    2000-01-01

    Activities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, cover nuclear fuel cycle operations based on natural uranium as the fuel. The facilities include: plant for purification and production of nuclear grade uranium metal, fuel fabrication, research reactor operation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management in each stage. Comprehensive radiation protection programmes for assessment and monitoring of radiological impact of these operations, both in occupational and public environment, have been operating in BARC since beginning. These programmes, based on the 1990 ICRP Recommendations as prescribed by national regulatory body, the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), are being successfully implemented by the Health, Safety and Environment Group, BARC. Radiation Hazards Control Units attached to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities provide radiation safety surveillance to the various operations. The radiation monitoring programme consists of measurement and control of external exposures by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), hand-held and installed instruments, and internal exposures by bioassay and direct whole body counting using shadow shield counter for beta gamma emitters and phoswich detector based system for plutonium. In addition, an environmental monitoring programme is in place to assess public exposures resulting from the operation of these facilities. The programme involves analysis of various matrices in the environment such as bay water, salt, fish, sediment and computation of resulting public exposures. Based on the operating experience in these plants, improved educating and training programmes for plant operators, have been designed. This, together with the application of new technologies have brought down individual as well as average doses of occupational workers. The environmental releases remain a small fraction of the authorised limits. The operating health physics experience in some of these facilities is discussed in this paper

  9. Relevance of passive safety testing at the fast flux test facility to advanced liquid metal reactors - 5127

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, D.W.; Omberg, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Significant cost and safety improvements can be realized in advanced liquid metal reactor (LMR) designs by emphasizing inherent or passive safety through crediting the beneficial reactivity feedbacks associated with core and structural movement. This passive safety approach was adopted for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and an experimental program was conducted to characterize the structural reactivity feedback. Testing at the Rapsodie and EBR-II reactors had demonstrated the beneficial effect of reactivity feedback caused by changes in fuel temperature and core geometry mechanisms in a liquid metal fast reactor in a holistic sense. The FFTF passive safety testing program was developed to examine how specific design elements influenced dynamic reactivity feedback in response to a reactivity input and to demonstrate the scalability of reactivity feedback results from smaller cores like Rapsodie and EBR-II to reactor cores that were more prototypic in scale to reactors of current interest. The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Technology program is in the process of preserving, protecting, securing, and placing in electronic format information and data from the FFTF, including the core configurations and data collected during the passive safety tests. Evaluation of these actual test data could provide insight to improve analytical methods which may be used to support future licensing applications for LMRs. (authors)

  10. High temperature engineering research facilities and experiments in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodochigov, N.G.; Kuzavkov, N.G.; Sukharev, Y.P.; Chudin, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the characteristics of the experimental facilities and experiments in the Russian Federation: the HTGR neutron-physical investigation facilities ASTRA and GROG; facilities for fuel, graphite and other elements irradiation; and thermal hydraulics experimental facilities. The overview is presented in the form of copies of overhead sheets

  11. Safety Culture and Best Practices at Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, Keith [PPPL

    2014-05-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  12. Public's right to information: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokely, E.

    1981-02-01

    The events at TMI prompted the Under Secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE) to establish the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee. This Committee was assigned the task of assessing the adequacy of nuclear facility personnel qualification and training at DOE-owned reactors in light of the Three Mile Island accident. The Committee was also asked to review recommendations and identify possible implications for DOE's nuclear facilities

  13. List of the reports from reactor safety research of the BMFT and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-02-01

    This list presents a survey of reports from the FRG and USA issued on special problems of reactor safety research. The problems include emergency core cooling, the containment during loss of coolant, core meltdown, component safety, external impacts, risk and reliability, quality assurance, fission product transport, radiation exposure, as well as the LWR, HTR and the fast sodium-cooled reactor in general. (orig./HK) [de

  14. Part I. Fuel-motion diagnostics in support of fast-reactor safety experiments. Part II. Fission product detection system in support of fast reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devolpi, A.; Doerner, R.C.; Fink, C.L.; Regis, J.P.; Rhodes, E.A.; Stanford, G.S.; Braid, T.H.; Boyar, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    In all destructive fast-reactor safety experiments at TREAT, fuel motion and cladding failure have been monitored by the fast-neutron/gamma-ray hodoscope, providing experimental results that are directly applicable to design, modeling, and validation in fast-reactor safety. Hodoscope contributions to the safety program can be considered to fall into several groupings: pre-failure fuel motion, cladding failure, post-failure fuel motion, steel blockages, pretest and posttest radiography, axial-power-profile variations, and power-coupling monitoring. High-quality results in fuel motion have been achieved, and motion sequences have been reconstructed in qualitative and quantitative visual forms. A collimated detection system has been used to observe fission products in the upper regions of a test loop in the TREAT reactor. Particular regions of the loop are targeted through any of five channels in a rotatable assembly in a horizontal hole through the biological shield. A well-type neutron detector, optimized for delayed neutrons, and two GeLi gamma ray spectrometers have been used in several experiments. Data are presented showing a time history of the transport of Dn emitters, of gamma spectra identifying volatile fission products deposited as aerosols, and of fission gas isotopes released from the coolant

  15. BNFL's experience in the sea transport of irradiated research reactor fuel to the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, I.A.; Porter, I.

    2000-01-01

    BNFL provides worldwide transport for a wide range of nuclear materials. BNFL Transport manages an unique fleet of vessels, designed, built, and operated to the highest safety standards, including the highest rating within the INF Code recommended by the International Maritime Organisation. The company has some 20 years of experience of transporting irradiated research reactor fuel in support of the United States' programme for returning US obligated fuel from around the world. Between 1977 and 1988 BNFL performed 11 shipments of irradiated research reactor fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the US. Since 1997, a further 3 shipments have been performed as part of an ongoing programme for Japanese research reactor operators. Where possible, shipments of fuel from European countries such as Sweden and Spain have been combined with those from Japan for delivery to the US. (author)

  16. Reactor operation safety information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  17. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniskevich, Y.N.; Vasilenko, V.A.; Zasukha, V.K.; Migrov, Y.A.; Khabensky, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.)

  18. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniskevich, Y.N.; Vasilenko, V.A.; Zasukha, V.K.; Migrov, Y.A.; Khabensky, V.B. [Research Inst. of Technology NITI (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.). 5 refs.

  19. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniskevich, Y N; Vasilenko, V A; Zasukha, V K; Migrov, Y A; Khabensky, V B [Research Inst. of Technology NITI (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.). 5 refs.

  20. Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-04-01

    This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water reactors (LWRs) and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  1. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the research program on reactor safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks also projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Reports of research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of his research program on reactor safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks also projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Safety concept of high-temperature reactors based on the experience with AVR and THTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachholz, Winfried; Kroeger, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany a reactor is considered safe if verification has been furnished that the requirements contained in paragraph 7 of the Federal German Atomic Energy Act are met for this reactor: demonstration of sufficient precautions against damage required according to the actual state of the art, and especially compliance with the dose rate limits for normal operation and accidental conditions. These requirements result in a deterministic multi-stage safety concept with specified requirements for the engineered safety systems. In recent years, proposals for enhanced safety of nuclear power reactors or a radical change in safety philosophy have been made. This is characterised by 'inherently safe', 'super safe' and similar slogans. A quantitative definition of these requirements has not yet been established, but it is clear as a common objective that the event of beyond design basis accidents evacuation, relocation, and large scale contamination of ground should not occur. As a consequence of the Chernobyl accident the safety of all the NPPs in Germany has been reviewed. This analysis was completed for the THTR reactor in 1988. The same has been done for AVR reactor. The final evaluation of the HTR specific safety features have been fully confirmed. The HTR concepts under development are based on this experience. The HTR-Modul unit is currently being designed

  4. Research and development studies on the seismic behaviour of the PEC fast reactor (safety analysis detailed report no. 8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelli, A.; Forni, M.; Masoni, P.; Maresca, G.; Castoldi, A.; Muzzi, F. [ENEA, Rome (Italy); Ansaldo Spa, Genoa [Italy; ISMES Spa, Bergamo [Italy

    1988-01-15

    This paper presents the main features and results of the numerical and experimental studies that were carried out by ENEA (Italian Commission for Alternative Energy Sources) for the seismic verification of the Italian PEC fast reactor test facility. More precisely, the paper focuses on the wide-ranging research and development programme that has been performed (and recently completed) on the reactor building, the reactor-block, the main vessel, the core and the shutdown system. The needs of these detailed studies are stressed and the feed-backs on the design, necessary safisfy the seismic safety requirements, are recalled. The general validity of the analyses in the framework of the research and development activities for nuclear reactor is also pointed out.

  5. Reactor system safety assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattson, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy of reactor safety is that design should follow established and conservative engineering practices, there should be safety margins in all modes of plant operation, special systems should be provided for accidents, and safety systems should have redundant components. This philosophy provides ''defense in depth.'' Additionally, the safety of nuclear power plants relies on ''safety systems'' to assure acceptable response to design basis events. Operating experience has shown the need to study plant response to more frequent upset conditions and to account for the influence of operators and non-safety systems on overall performance. Defense in depth is being supplemented by risk and reliability assessment

  6. Description of the PIE facility for research reactors irradiated fuels in CNEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisca, A.; Coronel, R.; Homberger, V.; Quinteros, A.; Ratner, M.

    2002-01-01

    The PIE Facility (LAPEP), located at the Ezeiza Atomic Center (CAE), was designed to carry out destructive and non-destructive post-irradiation examinations (PIE) on research and power reactor spent fuels, reactor internals and other irradiated materials, and to perform studies related with: Station lifetime extension; Fuel performance; Development of new fuels; and Failures and determination of their causes. LAPEP is a relevant facilit