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Sample records for safety plan 233-s

  1. Site specific health and safety plan, 233-S decontamination and decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Fasso

    1997-12-31

    The deactivated 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility, located in the 200 Area at the Hanford Site, is the subject of this Health and Safety Plan.The 233-S Facility operated from January 1952 until July 1967 at which time the building entered the U.S. Department of Energy`s Surplus Facility Management Program as a retired facility. The facility has since undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. Additionally, the weather caused existing cracks in concrete structures of the building to lengthen, thereby increasing the potential for failed confinement of the radioactive material in the building. Differential settlement has also occurred causing portions of the facility to separate from the main building structure, increasing the potential for release of radioactive material to the environment. An expedited response is proposed to remove this threat and ensure protection of human health and the environment. On this premise it is intended that the 233-S Facility removal action be performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Time-Critical Project being conducted under the Pilot Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Initiative

  2. 233S Decommissioning Project Environmental Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoric, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    This Environmental Control Plan is for the 233S Decommissioning activities conducted under the removal action report for the 233S Decontamination and Demolition Project. The purpose of this ECP is to identify environmental requirements for the 233S project. The ECP is a compilation of existing environmental permit conditions, regulatory requirements, and environmental requirements applicable to the specific project or functional activity

  3. Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, 233-S Decontamination and Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    The 233-S Facility operated from January 1952 until July 1967, at which time the building entered the U.S. Department of Energy's Surplus Facility Management Program as a retired facility. The facility has since undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. A freeze and thaw cycle occurred at the Hanford Site during February 1996, which caused cracking failure of portions of the building roof. This resulted in significant infiltration of water into the facility, which creates a pathway for potential release of radioactive material into the environment (air and/or ground). Additionally, the weather caused existing cracks in concrete structures of the building to lengthen, thereby increasing the potential for failed confinement of the building's radioactive material. Differential settlement has also occurred, causing portions of the facility to separate from the main building structure, increasing the potential for release of radioactive material to the environment. An expedited response is proposed to remove this threat and ensure protection of human health and the environment

  4. Safety analysis for the 233-S decontamination and decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoren, S.

    1996-08-01

    Decommissioning of the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility (REDOX) is a proposed expedited response action that is regulated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Due to progressive physical deterioration of this facility, a decontamination and decommissioning plan is being considered for the immediate future. This safety analysis describes the proposed actions involved in this D ampersand D effort; identifies the radioactive material inventories involved; reviews site specific environmental characteristics and postulates an accident scenario that is evaluated to identify resultant effects

  5. Sampling and Analysis Plan for the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalic, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) provides the information and instructions to be used for sampling and analysis activities in the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility. The information and instructions herein are separated into three parts and address the Data Quality Objective (DQO) Summary Report, Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAP), and SAP

  6. ALARA Review of 233-S Process Hood D and D and Related Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    This document is an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review of design packages for planned work at the 233-S Facility. The ALARA review was initiated in accordance with the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) Integrated Environmental, Safety, and Health Management System (ISMS) workflow process

  7. 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility data quality objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encke, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    This document is a summary of the decision-making associated with the Data Quality Objective process that pertains to the characterization activities in the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility is located adjacent to, and north of, the REDOX Plant. The facility was used to concentrate the plutonium nitrate product solution from the REDOX facility. The 233-S Pipe Gallery, Control Room, SWP Change Room, Toilet, Equipment Room and the Electrical Cubicle are currently scheduled for decontamination and cleanout to support future demolition (D and D). Identification of the radiological contamination and presence of hazardous materials is needed to allow for disposal of the D and D debris

  8. Maine highway safety plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Each September 1, the MeBHS must provide NHTSA a comprehensive plan to reduce : traffic crashes and resulting deaths, injuries and property damage. The Highway Safety : Plan (HSP) serves as Maines application for available federal funds for these ...

  9. Criticality evaluation for the 233-S decontamination and decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This criticality evaluation document analyzes the potential of a criticality event as a result of decontaminating and decommissioning the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility. These calculations supplement the previous set of calculations performed under this same contract, which were performed on March 13, 1996. These calculations were performed using the same MCNP computer code as for the previous set; the validation calculations performed then are valid for this set as well. Hand calculations, using the method of Solid Angle, were also developed

  10. ALARA review for the decontamination and decommissioning of the 233-S pipe trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornish, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The 233-S Facility was completed in 1955 to expand plutonium production by further concentrating the plutonium nitrate product solution from the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Plant. The facility is radiologically contaminated because of operations and accidents. Isolation from REDOX and removal of the product transfer lines from the pipe trench is the second step in the decontamination and decommissioning of the entire 233-S Facility. The work scope is to isolate all piping from REDOX and then to remove all the piping/equipment from the pipe trench. The building is presently a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility. A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure No. 1.22, Planning Radiological Work, when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the pipe trench and the process fluid piping is unknown. The potential exists to exceed the level of loose surface contamination, which requires a formal ALARA review when opening the pipe trench and cutting of piping commences. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-009 Revision 1, 233-S Pipe Trench Decon and Pipe Removal

  11. Safety case plan 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-07-01

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy) Posiva is preparing to submit the construction license application for a spent fuel repository by the end of the year 2012. The long-term safety section supporting the license application is based on a safety case, which, according to the internationally adopted definition, is a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. In 2005, Posiva presented a plan to prepare such a safety case. The present report provides a revised plan of the safety case contents mentioned above. The update of the safety case plan takes into account the recommendations made by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) about improving the focus and further developing the plan. Accordingly, particular attention is given to the quality management of the safety case work, the management of uncertainties and the scenario methodology. The quality management is based on the ISO 9001:2000 standard process thinking enhanced with special features arising from STUK's YVL Guides. The safety case production process is divided into four main sub-processes. The conceptualisation and methodology sub-process defines the framework for the assessment. The critical data handling and modelling sub-process links Posiva's main technical and scientific activities to the production of the safety case. The assessment sub-process analyses the consequences of the evolution of the disposal system in various scenarios, classified either as part of the expected evolution or as disruptive scenarios. The compliance and confidence sub-process is responsible for final evaluation of compliance of the assessment results with the regulatory criteria and the overall confidence in the safety case. As in the previous safety case plan, the safety case will be based on several reports, but

  12. Passive neutron survey of the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    A passive neutron survey was performed at the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility (located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington) during late 1994 and early 1995. Four areas were surveyed: an abandoned filter box and pipe trench, column laydown trench, load-out hood, and process hood. The primary purpose of the survey was to identify locations that had plutonium to help direct decontamination and decommissioning activities. A secondary purpose of the survey was to determine the quantity of material when its presence was identified

  13. Fusion safety program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Holland, D.F.; Herring, J.S.

    1980-09-01

    The program plan consists of research that has been divided into 13 different areas. These areas focus on the radioactive inventories that are expected in fusion reactors, the energy sources potentially available to release a portion of these inventories, and analysis and design techniques to assess and ensure that the safety risks associated with operation of magnetic fusion facilities are acceptably low. The document presents both long-term program requirements that must be fulfilled as part of the commercialization of fusion power and a five-year plan for each of the 13 different program areas. Also presented is a general discussion of magnetic fusion reactor safety, a method for establishing priorities in the program, and specific priority ratings for each task in the five-year plan

  14. ALARA review for the decontamination and decommissioning of the 233-S P.R. can loadout and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornish, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The 233-S Facility was completed in 1955 to expand plutonium production by further concentrating the plutonium nitrate product solution from the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Plant. The facility is radiologically contaminated because of operations and accidents. The building is presently a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility. Disassembly of the loadout hood and its associated equipment may be done in parallel with the isolation of 233-S from REDOX via the pipe trench equipment removal. The work scope is to remove the entire loadout hood from the Product Receiver (P.R.) Can Loadout and Decon Room inside the 233-S Facility. A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure 1.22, Planning Radiological Work, when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the loadout hood and its associated equipment is unknown. The potential exists to exceed the level of loose surface contamination, which requires a formal ALARA review when opening the loadout hood and disassembly commences. This ALARA review is for the task instruction 1997-03-18-010 Revision 0, 233-S Loadout Hood Decon and Dismantlement

  15. PROJECT EXPERIENCE REPORT DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERLIN, G.T.; ORGILL, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the preparation, operations, innovative work practices, and lessons learned associated with demolition of the 2334 Plutonium Concentration Facility. This project represented the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent the first plutonium facility in the US. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to have been demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contaminated structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially available equipment, materials, and services, this project demonstrated that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or to construct large enclosures. This project utilized an excavator with concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, commercially available fixatives and dust suppressants, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Following a significant amount of preparation, actual demolition of the 233-S Facility began in October 2003 and was completed in late April 2004. The knowledge and experience gained on this project are important to the Hanford Site as additional plutonium processing facilities are scheduled for demolition in the near future. Other sites throughout the DOE Complex may also be faced with similar challenges. Numerous innovations and effective work practices were implemented on this project. Accordingly, a series of ''Lessons Learned and Innovative Practices Fact Sheets'' were developed and are included as an appendix to this report. This collection of fact sheets is not intended to capture every innovative work practice and lesson learned, but rather

  16. Final characterization report for the non-process areas of the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encke, D.B.; Harris, R.A.

    1997-04-01

    This report addresses the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility characterization survey data collected from January 21, 1997 through February 3, 1997. The characterization activities evaluated the radiological status and identified the hazardous materials locations. The scope of this report is limited to the nonprocess areas in the facility, which include the special work permit (SWP) change room, toilet, equipment room, electrical cubicle, control room, and pipe gallery. A portion of the roof (excluding the roof over the process hood and viewing room) was also included. Information in this report will be used to identify waste streams, provide specific chemical and radiological data to aid in planning decontamination and demolition activities, and allow proper disposal of the demolition debris, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980

  17. ALARA Review of the Activation/Repair of Fire Detectors in Zone Three at the 233-S Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornish, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure 1.22, 'Planning Radiological Work', when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the viewing room meets this criterion. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-005-8.3.3 (mini task instruction to a living work package), 'Instructions for D ampersand D Support of Fire Detector Troubleshooting and Minor Maintenance Work at 233-S,' and DynCorp 2G-98-7207C, '233-S Reconnect Smoke Detectors Zone 3.' The Radiological Work Permit (RWP) request broke these two task instructions into four separate tasks. The four tasks identified in the RWP request were used to estimate airborne concentrations and the total exposure

  18. Seismic safety research program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    This plan describes the safety issues, regulatory needs, and the research necessary to address these needs. The plan also discusses the relationship between current and proposed research within the NRC and research sponsored by other government agencies, universities, industry groups, professional societies, and foreign sources

  19. Planning for Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    From natural disasters to criminal violence, facilities officers are often called on to address campus safety and security issues beyond their usual responsibilities. Their experiences in coping with unanticipated events have produced a catalogue of lessons learned that can help them and their peers at other institutions who might face the same…

  20. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, K.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan (CHSP) is to provide specific guidance to all LBL employees and contractors who use hazardous chemicals. This Plan, when implemented, fulfills the requirements of both the Federal OSHA Laboratory Standard (29 CFR 1910.1450) for laboratory workers, and the Federal OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) for non-laboratory operations (e.g., shops). It sets forth safety procedures and describes how LBL employees are informed about the potential chemical hazards in their work areas so they can avoid harmful exposures and safeguard their health. Generally, communication of this Plan will occur through training and the Plan will serve as a the framework and reference guide for that training.

  1. Nuclear safety research master plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jae Joo; Yang, J. U.; Jun, Y. S. and others

    2001-06-01

    The SRMP (Safety Research Master Plan) is established to cope with the changes of nuclear industry environments. The tech. tree is developed according to the accident progress of the nuclear reactor. The 11 research fields are derived to cover the necessary technologies to ensure the safety of nuclear reactors. Based on the developed tech. tree, the following four main research fields are derived as the main safety research areas: 1. Integrated nuclear safety enhancement, 2. Thermal hydraulic experiment and assessment, 3. Severe accident management and experiment, and 4. The integrity of equipment and structure. The research frame and strategies are also recommended to enhance the efficiency of research activity, and to extend the applicability of research output.

  2. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The deactivated 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility (233-S Facility) is located in the 200 Area. The facility has undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. A rapid freeze and thaw cycle occurred at the Hanford Site during February 1996, which caused cracking to occur on portions of the building's roof. This has resulted in significantly infiltration of water into the facility, which provides a pathway for potential release of radioactive material into the environment (air and/or ground). The weather caused several existing cracks in the concrete portions of the structure to lengthen, increasing the potential for failed confinement of the radioactive material in the building. Differential settlement has also occurred, causing portions of the facility to separate from the main building structure thus creating a potential for release of radioactive material t the environment. An expedited removal action is proposed to ensure that a release from the 233-S Facility does not occur. The US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), in cooperation with the EPA, has prepared this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) pursuant to CERCLA. Based on the evaluation, RL has determined that hazardous substances in the 233-S Facility may present a potential threat to human health and/or the environment, and that an expedited removal action is warranted. The purpose of the EE/CA is to provide the framework for the evaluation and selection of a technology from a viable set of alternatives for a removal action

  3. Revised GCFR safety program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, A.P.; Boyack, B.E.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the recently revised gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) safety program plan. The activities under this plan are organized to support six lines of protection (LOPs) for protection of the public from postulated GCFR accidents. Each LOP provides an independent, sequential, quantifiable risk barrier between the public and the radiological hazards associated with postulated GCFR accidents. To implement a quantitative risk-based approach in identifying the important technology requirements for each LOP, frequency and consequence-limiting goals are allocated to each. To ensure that all necessary tasks are covered to achieve these goals, the program plan is broken into a work breakdown structure (WBS). Finally, the means by which the plan is being implemented are discussed

  4. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugg, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The 100, 200, 300 and 1100 Areas of the Hanford Site were placed on the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List in November 1989 under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Located in the 200 Area is the deactivated 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility (used in the REDOX process). The facility has undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. An expedited response is proposed to ensure protection of human health and the environment. The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Ecology, has prepared this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis pursuant to CERCLA. Based on the evaluation, RL has determined that hazardous substances in the 233-S Facility may present a potential threat to human health or the environment, and that an expedited removal action is warranted for decommissioning of the facility

  5. 78 FR 61251 - The National Public Transportation Safety Plan, the Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ...-0030] RIN 2132-AB20; 2132-AB07 The National Public Transportation Safety Plan, the Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan, and the Public Transportation Safety Certification Training Program; Transit... Public Transportation Safety Program (National Safety Program) and the requirements of the new transit...

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities

  7. Planned activities to improve safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 6 of the document contains some details about the planed activities to safety improvements

  8. EM Health and Safety Plan Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    This document contains information about the Health and Safety Plan Guidelines. Topics discussed include: Regulatory framework; key personnel; hazard assessment; training requirements; personal protective equipment; extreme temperature disorders or conditions; medical surveillance; exposure monitoring/air sampling; site control; decontamination; emergency response/contingency plan; emergency action plan; confined space entry; and spill containment.

  9. NPP Krsko Periodic Safety Review action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic Zabric, T.

    2006-01-01

    In the current, internationally accepted, safety philosophy Periodic Safety Reviews (PSRs) are comprehensive reviews aimed at the verification that an operating NPP remains safe when judged against current safety objectives and practices and that adequate arrangements are in place to maintain an acceptable level of safety. These reviews are complementary to the routine and special safety reviews. They are long time-scale reviews intended to deal with the cumulative effects of plant ageing, modifications, operating experience and technical developments, which are not so easily comprehended over the shorter time-scale routine of safety reviews. The review was completed in 2005 and the next period will see the implementation of the action plan including some plant upgrades. The action plan lists issues that should be implemented at NPP Krsko together with associated milestones. The milestones were assumed based on best estimate resource availability and their ends can be potentially floated. In some cases, multiple corrective measures may be postulated to provide resolution for a given safety issue. The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration by decree approved the first periodic safety review and the implementation plan of activities arising from it. The entire implementation plan must be carried out by 15 October 2010. Report on the second periodic safety review must be submitted by the NEK not later than 15 December 2013. (author)

  10. Cesium legacy safety project management work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    This Management Work Plan (MWP) describes the process flow, quality assurance controls, and the Environment, Safety, and Health requirements of the Cesium Legacy Safety Project. This MWP provides an overview of the project goals and methods for repackaging the non-conforming Type W overpacks and packaging the CsCl powder and pellets. This MWP is not intended to apply to other activities associated with the CsCl Legacy Safety Program (i.e., clean out of South Cell)

  11. 29 CFR 1915.502 - Fire safety plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... implement a written fire safety plan that covers all the actions that employers and employees must take to ensure employee safety in the event of a fire. (See Appendix A to this subpart for a Model Fire Safety... safety plan for their employees, and this plan must comply with the host employer's fire safety plan. ...

  12. Seismic safety research program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    This document presents a plan for seismic research to be performed by the Structural and Seismic Engineering Branch in the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The plan describes the regulatory needs and related research necessary to address the following issues: uncertainties in seismic hazard, earthquakes larger than the design basis, seismic vulnerabilities, shifts in building frequency, piping design, and the adequacy of current criteria and methods. In addition to presenting current and proposed research within the NRC, the plan discusses research sponsored by other domestic and foreign sources

  13. UMTRA Project environmental, health, and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The basic health and safety requirements established in this plan are designed to provide guidelines to be applied at all Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. Specific restrictions are given where necessary. However, an attempt has been made to provide guidelines which are generic in nature, and will allow for evaluation of site-specific conditions. Health and safety personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment when interpreting these guidelines to ensure the health and safety of project personnel and the general population. This UMTRA Project Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH ampersand S) Plan specifies the basic Federal health and safety standards and special DOE requirements applicable to this program. In addition, responsibilities in carrying out this plan are delineated. Some guidance on program requirements and radiation control and monitoring is also included. An Environmental, Health, and Safety Plan shall be developed as part of the remedial action plan for each mill site and associated disposal site. Special conditions at the site which may present potential health hazards will be described, and special areas that should should be addressed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) will be indicated. Site-specific EH ampersand S concerns will be addressed by special contract conditions in RAC subcontracts. 2 tabs

  14. Safety research plan, JFY 2013 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    As for the regulatory issues the governments or JNES considered necessary, JNES had updated every year 'safety research plan' in respective research areas necessary for solving the regulatory issues (safety research needs) and was conducting safety research to obtain the results, etc. 'Safety research plan, JFY 2013 Edition' was compiled aiming at promotion of appropriate reflection and flexible application of research achievements for tacking the regulatory issues taking account of importance and urgency dependent on trend of nuclear safety regulations as well as collective management of safety research and safety survey. 5 new research projects were established with 4 unified research projects and 6 terminated research projects. Finally modified safety research areas, subjects and research projects, JFY 2013 Edition were as follows: design review of nuclear power plant (7 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 19), control management of nuclear power plant (one subject having 4 research projects), nuclear fuel cycle (2 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 4), nuclear fuel cycle backend (2 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 5), nuclear emergency preparedness and response (3 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 7) and bases of nuclear safety technology (3 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 6). Safety reviews consisted of 6 projects in 3 areas extracting the regulatory issues. As for urgent research projects on the basis of the disaster at Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident, 7 research projects in 4 urgent subjects were as follows: examination for new safety regulation (4 research projects generalized in the above research projects), development of newly necessary evaluation methods (one research project generalized in the above research project), evaluation of the validity for the work for convergence at Fukushima

  15. LMFBR safety experiment facility planning and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, M.G.; Scott, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    In the past two years considerable effort has been placed on the planning and design of new facilities for the resolution of LMFBR safety issues. The paper reviews the key issues, the experiments needed to resolve them, and the design aspects of proposed new facilities. In addition, it presents a decision theory approach to selecting an optimal combination of modified and new facilities

  16. Sign up to Safety: developing a safety improvement plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dight, Carol; Peters, Hayley

    2015-04-01

    The Sign up to Safety (SutS) programme was launched in June 2014 by health secretary Jeremy Hunt. It focuses on listening to patients, carers and staff, learning from what they say when things go wrong, and then taking action to improve patient safety. The programme aims to make the NHS the safest healthcare system in the world by creating a culture devoted to continuous learning and improvement (NHS England 2014). Musgrove Park Hospital, part of Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust, was one of 12 NHS organisations that signed up to the SutS programme, making public its commitment to the national pledges to be 'open and transparent' and to develop a safety improvement plan. This paper describes the development of the strategy.

  17. Certification plan for safety and PRA codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffer, H.; Crowe, R.D.; Ades, M.J.

    1990-05-01

    A certification plan for computer codes used in Safety Analyses and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the operation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors has been prepared. An action matrix, checklists, and a time schedule have been included in the plan. These items identify what is required to achieve certification of the codes. A list of Safety Analysis and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SA ampersand PRA) computer codes covered by the certification plan has been assembled. A description of each of the codes was provided in Reference 4. The action matrix for the configuration control plan identifies code specific requirements that need to be met to achieve the certification plan's objectives. The checklist covers the specific procedures that are required to support the configuration control effort and supplement the software life cycle procedures based on QAP 20-1 (Reference 7). A qualification checklist for users establishes the minimum prerequisites and training for achieving levels of proficiency in using configuration controlled codes for critical parameter calculations

  18. UMTRA Project: Environment, Safety, and Health Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this UMTRA Project Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Plan to establish the policy, implementing requirements, and guidance for the UMTRA Project. The requirements and guidance identified in this plan are designed to provide technical direction to UMTRA Project contractors to assist in the development and implementation of their ES and H plans and programs for UMTRA Project work activities. Specific requirements set forth in this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan are intended to provide uniformity to the UMTRA Project's ES and H programs for processing sites, disposal sites, and vicinity properties. In all cases, this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan is intended to be consistent with applicable standards and regulations and to provide guidance that is generic in nature and will allow for contractors' evaluation of site or contract-specific ES and H conditions. This plan specifies the basic ES and H requirements applicable to UMTRA Project ES and H programs and delineates responsibilities for carrying out this plan. DOE and contractor ES and H personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment and apply a graded approach when interpreting these guidelines, based on the risk of operations

  19. Environment, Safety, Health and Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The mission of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) is the production of high qaulity uranium metal for use by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in Defense Programs. In order to accomplish this mission and to maintain the FMPC as a viable facility in the DOE production complex, the facility must be brought into full compliance with all federal and state regulations and industry standards for environmental protection and worker safety. Where past practices have resulted in environmental insult, a comprehensive program of remediation must be implemented. The purpose of this combined Environment, Safety, Health and Waste Management Plan is to provide a road map for achieving needed improvements. The plan is structured to provide a comprehensive projection from the current fiscal year (FY) through FY 1994 of the programs, projects and funding required to achieve compliance. To do this, the plan is subdivided into chapters which discuss the applicable regulations;project schedules and funding requirements;details of the various programs for environment, safety, health and waste management;details of the ongoing National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA);the quality assurance program and the environmental monitoring program. 14 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs

  20. PROJECT EXPERIENCE REPORT DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2004-01-01

    describe those that the project believes to be of most benefit to future DOE projects. These fact sheets cover a number of specific topics within the subject areas noted below: (1) Project Management; (2) Organization Structure and Responsibilities; (3) Demolition Approach and Equipment; (4) Planning and Scheduling; (5) Site Preparation and Infrastructure; (6) Radiological Controls; (7)Industrial Safety and Health; and (8) Waste Management

  1. Safety research basic plan of JNC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) formally succeeded to Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) on October, 1 1998. This report describes the basic plan for major program of JNC which consists of two parts: management philosophy of the new institute and the latest revised medium term program. In the first part, the primary mission of JNC is to perform its R and D concentrating on fast breeder reactor and its fuel cycle, and treatment and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, while at the same time giving special consideration to safety. In the second, individual programs in the new basic plan are discussed in detail. The outline and schedule of each program are also attached in the table form. (H. Itami)

  2. Environment, safety, and health regulatory implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    To identify, document, and maintain the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) regulatory requirements, the US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office tasked the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to develop a regulatory operating envelope for the UMTRA Project. The system selected for managing the UMTRA regulatory operating envelope data bass is based on the Integrated Project Control/Regulatory Compliance System (IPC/RCS) developed by WASTREN, Inc. (WASTREN, 1993). The IPC/RCS is a tool used for identifying regulatory and institutional requirements and indexing them to hardware, personnel, and program systems on a project. The IPC/RCS will be customized for the UMTRA Project surface remedial action and groundwater restoration programs. The purpose of this plan is to establish the process for implementing and maintaining the UMTRA Project's regulatory operating envelope, which involves identifying all applicable regulatory and institutional requirements and determining compliance status. The plan describes how the Project will identify ES ampersand H regulatory requirements, analyze applicability to the UMTRA Project, and evaluate UMTRA Project compliance status

  3. Task Group on Safety Margins Action Plan (SMAP). Safety Margins Action Plan - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrehor, Miroslav; Gavrilas, Mirela; Belac, Josef; Sairanen, Risto; Bruna, Giovanni; Reocreux, Michel; Touboul, Francoise; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B.; Park, Jong Seuk; Prosek, Andrej; Hortal, Javier; Sandervaag, Odbjoern; Zimmerman, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The international nuclear community has expressed concern that some changes in existing plants could challenge safety margins while fulfilling all the regulatory requirements. In 1998, NEA published a report by the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities on Future Nuclear Regulatory Challenges. The report recognized 'Safety margins during more exacting operating modes' as a technical issue with potential regulatory impact. Examples of plant changes that can cause such exacting operating modes include power up-rates, life extension or increased fuel burnup. In addition, the community recognized that the cumulative effects of simultaneous changes in a plant could be larger than the accumulation of the individual effects of each change. In response to these concerns, CSNI constituted the safety margins action plan (SMAP) task group with the following objectives: 'To agree on a framework for integrated assessments of the changes to the overall safety of the plant as a result of simultaneous changes in plant operation / condition; To develop a CSNI document which can be used by member countries to assess the effect of plant change on the overall safety of the plant; To share information and experience.' The two approaches to safety analysis, deterministic and probabilistic, use different methods and have been developed mostly independently of each other. This makes it difficult to assure consistency between them. As the trend to use information on risk (where the term risk means results of the PSA/PRA analysis) to support regulatory decisions is growing in many countries, it is necessary to develop a method of evaluating safety margin sufficiency that is applicable to both approaches and, whenever possible, integrated in a consistent way. Chapter 2 elaborates on the traditional view of safety margins and the means by which they are currently treated in deterministic analyses. This chapter also discusses the technical basis for safety limits as they are used today

  4. NIF special equipment construction health and safety plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, R.H.

    1997-07-28

    The purpose of this plan is to identify how the construction and deployment activities of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Special Equipment (SE) will be safely executed. This plan includes an identification of (1) the safety-related responsibilities of the SE people and their interaction with other organizations involved; (2) safety related requirements, policies, and documentation; (3) a list of the potential hazards unique to SE systems and the mechanisms that will be implemented to control them to acceptable levels; (4) a summary of Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) training requirements; and (5) requirements of contractor safety plans that will be developed and used by all SE contractors participating in site activities. This plan is a subsidiary document to the NIF Construction Safety Program (CSP) and is intended to compliment the requirements stated therein with additional details specific to the safety needs of the SE construction-related activities. If a conflict arises between these two documents, the CSP will supersede. It is important to note that this plan does not list all of the potential hazards and their controls because the design and safety analysis process is still ongoing. Additional safety issues win be addressed in the Final Safety Analysis Report, Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs), and other plans and procedures as described in Section 3.0 of this plan.

  5. NIF special equipment construction health and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to identify how the construction and deployment activities of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Special Equipment (SE) will be safely executed. This plan includes an identification of (1) the safety-related responsibilities of the SE people and their interaction with other organizations involved; (2) safety related requirements, policies, and documentation; (3) a list of the potential hazards unique to SE systems and the mechanisms that will be implemented to control them to acceptable levels; (4) a summary of Environmental Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) training requirements; and (5) requirements of contractor safety plans that will be developed and used by all SE contractors participating in site activities. This plan is a subsidiary document to the NIF Construction Safety Program (CSP) and is intended to compliment the requirements stated therein with additional details specific to the safety needs of the SE construction-related activities. If a conflict arises between these two documents, the CSP will supersede. It is important to note that this plan does not list all of the potential hazards and their controls because the design and safety analysis process is still ongoing. Additional safety issues win be addressed in the Final Safety Analysis Report, Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs), and other plans and procedures as described in Section 3.0 of this plan

  6. Sanitation health risk and safety planning in urban residential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this review paper was to determine the best sanitation health risk and safety planning approach for sustainable management of urban environment. This was achieved by reviewing the concept of sanitation safety planning as a tool. The review adopted exploratory research approach and used secondary data ...

  7. 49 CFR 1106.4 - The Safety Integration Plan process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Safety Integration Plan process. 1106.4 Section 1106.4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE... CONSIDERATION OF SAFETY INTEGRATION PLANS IN CASES INVOLVING RAILROAD CONSOLIDATIONS, MERGERS, AND ACQUISITIONS...

  8. Validation and verification plan for safety and PRA codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ades, M.J.; Crowe, R.D.; Toffer, H.

    1991-04-01

    This report discusses a verification and validation (V ampersand V) plan for computer codes used for safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment calculations. The present plan fulfills the commitments by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to the Department of Energy Savannah River Office (DOE-SRO) to bring the essential safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment codes in compliance with verification and validation requirements

  9. Russian Minatom nuclear safety research strategic plan. An international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1999-01-01

    An NEA study on safety research needs of Russian-designed reactors, carried out in 1996, strongly recommended that a strategic plan for safety research be developed with respect to Russian nuclear power plants. Such a plan was developed at the Russian International Nuclear Safety Centre (RINSC) of the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom). The Strategic Plan is designed to address high-priority safety-research needs, through a combination of domestic research, the application of appropriate foreign knowledge, and collaboration. It represents major progress toward developing a comprehensive and coherent safety-research programme for Russian nuclear power plants (NPPs). The NEA undertook its review of the Strategic Plan with the objective of providing independent verification on the scope, priority, and content of the research described in the Plan based upon the experience of the international group of experts. The principal conclusions of the review and the general comments of the NEA group are presented. (K.A.)

  10. Safety Standards Plan for Middlesex County Vocational & Technical High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Cy

    This vocational education safety standards plan outlines rules and regulations adopted by the Board of Education of Middlesex County Vocational and Technical High Schools. The first of eleven chapters presents demographics and a safety organization table for Middlesex County Vocational and Technical Schools. In chapter 2, six safety program…

  11. The Norwegian Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The Plan of Action underlies Norwegian activities in the field of international co-operation to enhance nuclear safety and prevent radioactive contamination from activities in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Geographically the highest priority has been given to support for safety measures in north-west Russia. This information brochure outlines the main content of the Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues and lists a number of associated measures and projects

  12. The Norwegian Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Plan of Action underlies Norwegian activities in the field of international co-operation to enhance nuclear safety and prevent radioactive contamination from activities in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Geographically the highest priority has been given to support for safety measures in north-west Russia. This information brochure outlines the main content of the Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues and lists a number of associated measures and projects.

  13. Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    This document announces the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) decision to modify the Hawaii State Plan's ``final approval'' determination under Section 18(e) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (the Act) and to transition to ``initial approval'' status. OSHA is reinstating concurrent federal enforcement authority over occupational safety and health issues in the private sector, which have been solely covered by the Hawaii State Plan since 1984.

  14. OCRWM [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] Safety Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The OCRWM Safety Plan sets forth management policies and general requirements for the safety of the public and of personnel associated with the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program (hereinafter called the ''Program''). It is applicable to all individuals and organizational elements of the Program, including all facilities and activities controlled by the Program pursuant to the Act, and to all phases of the Program. The plan defines the responsibilities assigned by the Director of the OCRWM to the various OCRWM line organizations, and to the contractors and the projects. It discusses the means by which safety policies and requirements will be communicated, and summarizes the applicable DOE Orders, and the procedures for reviewing, reporting, and evaluating safety problems. In addition, the OCRWM Safety Plan addresses DOE Orders applicable to occupational health and safety, worker protection, and public health and safety. OCRWM believes that it has an equally high level of commitment to both public safety and worker safety. The Plan also summarizes applicable NRC criteria and regulations that will be imposed through the formal licensing proceedings. While the Safety Plan sets forth OCRWM policy, it is not intended to be prescriptive in the details of implementation. Each OCRWM program element must develop and control its own set of detailed requirements for the protection of its workers and the public based on the principles set forth herein

  15. Research on the Evaluation System for Rural Public Safety Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming; SUN; Jianxin; YAN

    2014-01-01

    The indicator evaluation system is introduced to the study of rural public safety planning in this article.By researching the current rural public safety planning and environmental carrying capacity,we select some carrying capacity indicators influencing the rural public safety,such as land,population,ecological environment,water resources,infrastructure,economy and society,to establish the environmental carrying capacity indicator system.We standardize the indicators,use gray correlation analysis method to determine the weight of indicators,and make DEA evaluation of the indicator system,to obtain the evaluation results as the basis for decision making in rural safety planning,and provide scientific and quantified technical support for rural public safety planning.

  16. 49 CFR 659.25 - Annual review of system safety program plan and system security plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... system security plan. 659.25 Section 659.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... and system security plan. (a) The oversight agency shall require the rail transit agency to conduct an annual review of its system safety program plan and system security plan. (b) In the event the rail...

  17. High-heat tank safety issue resolution program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, O.S.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to provide a guide for selecting corrective actions that will mitigate and/or remediate the high-heat waste tank safety issue for single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This program plan also outlines the logic for selecting approaches and tasks to mitigate and resolve the high-heat safety issue. The identified safety issue for high-heat tank 241-C-106 involves the potential release of nuclear waste to the environment as the result of heat-induced structural damage to the tank's concrete, if forced cooling is interrupted for extended periods. Currently, forced ventilation with added water to promote thermal conductivity and evaporation cooling is used to cool the waste. At this time, the only viable solution identified to resolve this safety issue is the removal of heat generating waste in the tank. This solution is being aggressively pursued as the permanent solution to this safety issue and also to support the present waste retrieval plan. Tank 241-C-106 has been selected as the first SST for retrieval. The program plan has three parts. The first part establishes program objectives and defines safety issues, drivers, and resolution criteria and strategy. The second part evaluates the high-heat safety issue and its mitigation and remediation methods and alternatives according to resolution logic. The third part identifies major tasks and alternatives for mitigation and resolution of the safety issue. Selected tasks and best-estimate schedules are also summarized in the program plan

  18. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : safety data test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-17

    This report provides the safety data test plan for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing congestion by employing strat...

  19. Nuclear safety authority. Strategical planning 2005- 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear safety Authority (A.S.N.) provides, in the name of the state, the monitoring of nuclear safety and radiation protection to protect workers, patients, public and environment from the risks in relation with nuclear activities and more broadly with ionizing radiations, it contributes to citizens information in these areas. The ambition of A.S.N. is to carry out a successful, legitimate, credible nuclear monitoring, recognized by citizens and that constitutes an international reference. (N.C.)

  20. Work Plans 2011 – Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety

    2011-01-01

    The annual work plan for 2011 summaries activities for the Scientific Steering Committee and the 9 panels of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety (VKM). VKM carries out independent risk assessments for the Norwegian Food Safety Authority across the Authority’s field of responsibility as well as environmental risk assessments of genetically modified organisms for the Directorate for Nature Management.

  1. Supporting Fernald Site Closure with Integrated Health and Safety Plans as Documented Safety Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, S.; Brown, T.; Fisk, P.; Krach, F.; Klein, B.

    2004-01-01

    At the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) near Cincinnati, Ohio, environmental restoration activities are supported by Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs) that combine the required project-specific Health and Safety Plans, Safety Basis Requirements (SBRs), and Process Requirements (PRs) into single Integrated Health and Safety Plans (I-HASPs). These integrated DSAs employ Integrated Safety Management methodology in support of simplified restoration and remediation activities that, so far, have resulted in the decontamination and demolition (D and D) of over 200 structures, including eight major nuclear production plants. There is one of twelve nuclear facilities still remaining (Silos containing uranium ore residues) with its own safety basis documentation. This paper presents the status of the FCP's safety basis documentation program, illustrating that all of the former nuclear facilities and activities have now replaced. Basis of Interim Operations (BIOs) with I-HASPs as their safety basis during the closure process

  2. Overview of IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Action Plan represents a work programme to strengthen and improve nuclear safety world wide. The plan identifies actions for Member States and the IAEA. Success depends upon: • Cooperation between IAEA, Member States, and other stakeholders; • Availability of appropriate financial resources (MS voluntary contributions)

  3. Stress Tests Worldwide - IAEA Nuclear Safety Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA nuclear safety action plan relies on 11 important issues. 1) Safety assessments in light of the Fukushima accident: the IAEA secretariat will develop a methodology for stress tests against specific extreme natural hazards and will provide assistance for their implementation; 2) Strengthen existing IAEA peer reviews; 3) Emergency preparedness and response; 4) National Regulatory bodies in terms of independence and adequacy of human and financial resources; 5) The development of safety culture and scientific and technical capacity in Operating Organizations; 6) The upgrading of IAEA safety standards in a more efficient way; 7) A better implementation of relevant conventions concerning nuclear safety and nuclear accidents; 8) To provide a broad assistance on safety standard for countries embarking on a nuclear power program; 9) To facilitate the use of available information, expertise and techniques concerning radiation protection; 10) To enhance the transparency of nuclear industry; and 11) To promote the cooperation between member states in nuclear safety. (A.C.)

  4. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  5. Role of nuclear safety research and future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. S.; Lee, J. I.; Kang, S. C.; Park, Y. W.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. W.; Lee, C. J.; Park, Y. I.

    2000-01-01

    For promoting and improving nuclear safety research activities, this report gives an insight on the scope of safety research and its role in the safety management of nuclear installations, and suggests measures to adequately utilize the research results through taking an optimized role share among research organizations. Several measures such as cooperative planning of common research areas and proper role assignment, improvement of the interfaces among researchers, and reflection of end-users' opinion in the course of planning and conducting research to promote application of research results are identified. It is expected that the identified measures will contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safety research, if they are implemented after deliberating with the government and safety research organizations

  6. Safety and Inspection Planning of Older Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Ersdal, G.

    2007-01-01

    A basic assumption often made in risk/reliability based inspection planning is that a Bayesian approach can be used. This implies that probabilities of failure can be updated in a consistent way when new information (from inspections and repairs) becomes available. The Bayesian approach and a no-...

  7. Safety and Inspection Planning of Older Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Ersdal, G.

    2008-01-01

    A basic assumption often made in risk- and reliability-based inspection planning is that a Bayesian approach can be used. This implies that probabilities of failure can be updated in a consistent way when new information (from inspections and repairs) becomes available. The Bayesian approach and ...

  8. Software quality assurance plans for safety-critical software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liddle, P.

    2006-01-01

    Application software is defined as safety-critical if a fault in the software could prevent the system components from performing their nuclear-safety functions. Therefore, for nuclear-safety systems, the AREVA TELEPERM R XS (TXS) system is classified 1E, as defined in the Inst. of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Std 603-1998. The application software is classified as Software Integrity Level (SIL)-4, as defined in IEEE Std 7-4.3.2-2003. The AREVA NP Inc. Software Program Manual (SPM) describes the measures taken to ensure that the TELEPERM XS application software attains a level of quality commensurate with its importance to safety. The manual also describes how TELEPERM XS correctly performs the required safety functions and conforms to established technical and documentation requirements, conventions, rules, and standards. The program manual covers the requirements definition, detailed design, integration, and test phases for the TELEPERM XS application software, and supporting software created by AREVA NP Inc. The SPM is required for all safety-related TELEPERM XS system applications. The program comprises several basic plans and practices: 1. A Software Quality-Assurance Plan (SQAP) that describes the processes necessary to ensure that the software attains a level of quality commensurate with its importance to safety function. 2. A Software Safety Plan (SSP) that identifies the process to reasonably ensure that safety-critical software performs as intended during all abnormal conditions and events, and does not introduce any new hazards that could jeopardize the health and safety of the public. 3. A Software Verification and Validation (V and V) Plan that describes the method of ensuring the software is in accordance with the requirements. 4. A Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) that describes the method of maintaining the software in an identifiable state at all times. 5. A Software Operations and Maintenance Plan (SO and MP) that

  9. NIF conventional facilities construction health and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, D W

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Plan is to outline the minimum health and safety requirements to which all participating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and non-LLNL employees (excluding National Ignition Facility [NIF] specific contractors and subcontractors covered under the construction subcontract packages (e.g., CSP-9)-see Construction Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility [CSP] Section I.B. ''NIF Construction Contractors and Subcontractors'' for specifics) shall adhere to for preventing job-related injuries and illnesses during Conventional Facilities construction activities at the NIF Project. For the purpose of this Plan, the term ''LLNL and non-LLNL employees'' includes LLNL employees, LLNL Plant Operations staff and their contractors, supplemental labor, contract labor, labor-only contractors, vendors, DOE representatives, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, and others such as visitors, students, consultants etc., performing on-site work or services in support of the NIF Project. Based upon an activity level determination explained in Section 1.2.18, in this document, these organizations or individuals may be required by site management to prepare their own NIF site-specific safety plan. LLNL employees will normally not be expected to prepare a site-specific safety plan. This Plan also outlines job-specific exposures and construction site safety activities with which LLNL and non-LLNL employees shall comply

  10. IAEA Sets Up Team to Drive Nuclear Safety Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency is setting up a Nuclear Safety Action Team to oversee prompt implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety and ensure proper coordination among all stakeholders. The 12-point Action Plan, drawn up in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 13 September and endorsed by all 151 Member States at its General Conference last week. The team will work within the Agency's Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, headed by Deputy Director General Denis Flory, and will coordinate closely with the Director General's Office for Policy. ''The Action Plan requires immediate follow-up,'' Director General Yukiya Amano said. ''This compact, dedicated team will assist Deputy Director General Flory in implementing the measures agreed in the Action Plan.'' Gustavo Caruso, Head of the Regulatory Activities Section in the IAEA's Division of Installation Safety, has been designated as the team's Special Coordinator for the implementation of the Action Plan. The IAEA has already started implementing its responsibilities under the Action Plan, including development of an IAEA methodology for stress tests for nuclear power plants. The methodology will be ready in October. (IAEA)

  11. Simplifying documentation while approaching site closure: integrated health and safety plans as documented safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Tulanda

    2003-01-01

    At the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) near Cincinnati, Ohio, environmental restoration activities are supported by Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs) that combine the required project-specific Health and Safety Plans, Safety Basis Requirements (SBRs), and Process Requirements (PRs) into single Integrated Health and Safety Plans (I-HASPs). By isolating any remediation activities that deal with Enriched Restricted Materials, the SBRs and PRs assure that the hazard categories of former nuclear facilities undergoing remediation remain less than Nuclear. These integrated DSAs employ Integrated Safety Management methodology in support of simplified restoration and remediation activities that, so far, have resulted in the decontamination and demolition (D and D) of over 150 structures, including six major nuclear production plants. This paper presents the FCP method for maintaining safety basis documentation, using the D and D I-HASP as an example

  12. Safety planning for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.

    1979-01-01

    The article shows that compared to the many industries and other human activities, nuclear power stations are among the safest. A short description of the measures taken to prevent accidents and of the additional safety means entering into action if an accident does occur is presented. It is shown that in nuclear plants the death frequency following malfunctioning is 1 death in 100.000 years whereas deaths following other human activities is 1 in 2 to 100 years and following natural calamities like earthquakes and floods is 1 in 10 years. As an example it is shown that for a population of 15.000.000 living in a radius of 40 km around 100 power stations the average number of deaths will be of 2 per year as compared to 4200 from road accidents with the corresponding number of injuries of 20 and 375.000 respectively. (B.G.)

  13. 78 FR 51754 - Request To Modify License by Replacing Security Plan With New Radiation Safety Plan; U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Replacing Security Plan With New Radiation Safety Plan; U.S. Department of the Army, Jefferson Proving... security plan with a new radiation safety plan. DATES: Submit comments by September 20, 2013. Requests for.... The proposed change is to modify License Condition No. 12 D which refers to the security plan of...

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmenal, Safety, and Health Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The 1990 Tiger Team Appraisal of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) revealed that neither Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) nor ORNL had a strategic plan for Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) activities. There were no detailed plans describing ORNL's mission, objectives, and strategies for ES ampersand H activities. A number of plans do exist that cover various aspects of ES ampersand H. Their scope ranges from multiyear program plans to annual audit schedules to compliance plans to action plans from specific audits. However, there is not a single document that identifies the plans and the objectives they are to address. This document describes the strategic plan for ORNL and provides the linkage among existing plans. It gives a brief description of the organization and management of ES ampersand H activities at ORNL. The plan identifies the general strategies to be taken by ORNL, using the overall guidance from Energy Systems in its corporate ES ampersand H Strategic Plan. It also identifies more detailed plans for implementation of these strategies, where appropriate

  15. Planning and evaluation of plant under safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strnad, H.

    1985-01-01

    Plant denotes a technical product characterized as being structured, complex, comprising the use of energy, and that of measuring, automatic control and monitoring systems to keep track of present, control and monitor processes. Particular attention is paid to methods of developing plant concepts, measures to exclude or detect risks, integration of safety engineering into the course of planning, safety concept and ergonomics in plant design. (DG) [de

  16. Tank farm health and safety plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickle, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    This Tank Farm Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the conduct of all operations and work activities at the Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms is provided in order to minimize health and safety risks to workers and other onsite personnel. The HASP accomplishes this objective by establishing requirements, providing general guidelines, and conveying farm and facility-specific hazard communication information. The HASP, in conjunction with the job-specific information required by the HASP, is provided also as a reference for use during the planning of work activities at the tank farms. This HASP applies to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), other prime contractors to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and subcontractors to WHC who may be involved in tank farm work activities. This plan is intended to be both a requirements document and a useful reference to aid tank farm workers in understanding the safety and health issues that are encountered in routine and nonroutine work activities. The HASP defines the health and safety responsibilities of personnel working at the tank farms. It has been prepared in recognition of and is consistent with National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)/Unlimited State Coast Guard (USCG)/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site Activities (NIOSH 1985); WHC-CM-4-3, Industrial Safety Manual, Volume 4, open-quotes Health and Safety Programs for Hazardous Waste Operations;close quotes 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; WHC-CM-1-1, Management Policies; and WHC-CM-1-3, Management Requirements and Procedures. When differences in governing regulations or policies exist, the more stringent requirements shall apply until the discrepancy can be resolved

  17. Tank farm health and safety plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickle, G.D.

    1995-03-29

    This Tank Farm Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the conduct of all operations and work activities at the Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms is provided in order to minimize health and safety risks to workers and other onsite personnel. The HASP accomplishes this objective by establishing requirements, providing general guidelines, and conveying farm and facility-specific hazard communication information. The HASP, in conjunction with the job-specific information required by the HASP, is provided also as a reference for use during the planning of work activities at the tank farms. This HASP applies to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), other prime contractors to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and subcontractors to WHC who may be involved in tank farm work activities. This plan is intended to be both a requirements document and a useful reference to aid tank farm workers in understanding the safety and health issues that are encountered in routine and nonroutine work activities. The HASP defines the health and safety responsibilities of personnel working at the tank farms. It has been prepared in recognition of and is consistent with National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)/Unlimited State Coast Guard (USCG)/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site Activities (NIOSH 1985); WHC-CM-4-3, Industrial Safety Manual, Volume 4, {open_quotes}Health and Safety Programs for Hazardous Waste Operations;{close_quotes} 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; WHC-CM-1-1, Management Policies; and WHC-CM-1-3, Management Requirements and Procedures. When differences in governing regulations or policies exist, the more stringent requirements shall apply until the discrepancy can be resolved.

  18. Russian MINATOM nuclear safety research strategic plan. An international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The 'Safety Research Strategic Plan for Russian Nuclear Power Plants' was published in draft form at the Russian International Nuclear Safety Centre (RINSC) by a working group of fifteen senior Russian experts. The Plan consists of 12 chapters, each addressing a specific technical area and containing a number of proposed research programmes and projects to advance the state-of-knowledge in that area. In part because a strong Recommendation to undertake such a Plan was made by the 1998 OECD/NEA study, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency was asked by the Director of RINSC and the Director of USINSC to organize an international review of the Plan when the English-language version became available in October, 1998. This report represents the results of that review. (R.P.)

  19. Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission: safety test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The intent of this safety test plan is to outline particular kinds of safety tests designed to produce information which would be useful in the safety analysis process. The program deals primarily with the response of the RTG to accident environments; accordingly two criteria were established: (1) safety tests should be performed for environments which are the most critical in terms of risk contribution; and (2) tests should be formulated to determine failure conditions for critical heat source components rather than observe heat source response in reference accident environments. To satisfy criterion 1. results of a recent safety study were used to rank various accidents in terms of expected source terms. Six kinds of tests were then proposed which would provide information meeting the second criterion

  20. Management implementation plan for a safety analysis and review system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulburt, D.A.; Berkey, B.D.

    1981-04-01

    The US Department of Energy has issued an Order, DOE 5481.1, which establishes uniform requirements for the preparation and review of Safety Analysis for DOE Operations. The Management Implementation Plan specified herein establishes the administrative procedures and technical requirements for implementing DOE 5481.1 to Operations under the cognizance of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This Implementation Plan is applicable to all present and future Operations under the cognizance of PETC. The Plan identifies those Operations for which DOE 5481.1 is applicable and those Operations for which no further analysis is required because the initial determination and review has concluded that DOE 5481.1 does not apply

  1. The advanced neutron source safety approach and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a user facility for all areas of neutron research proposed for construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The neutron source is planned to be a 350-MW research reactor. The reactor, currently in conceptual design, will belong to the United States Department of Energy (USDOE). The safety approach and planned elements of the safety program for the ANS are described. The safety approach is to incorporate USDOE requirements [which, by reference, include appropriate requirements from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and other national and state regulatory agencies] into the design, and to utilize probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques during design to achieve extremely low probability of severe core damage. The PRA has already begun and will continue throughout the design and construction of the reactor. Computer analyses will be conducted for a complete spectrum of accidental events, from anticipated events to very infrequent occurrences. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  2. The Advanced Neutron Source safety approach and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a user facility proposed for construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for all areas of neutron research. The neutron source is planned to be a 350-MW research reactor. The reactor, currently in conceptual design, will belong to the United States Department of Energy (USDOE). The safety approach and planned elements of the safety program for the ANS are described. The safety approach is to incorporate USDOE requirements (which, by reference, include appropriate requirements from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and other national and state regulatory agencies) into the design, and to utilize probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques during design to achieve extremely low probability of severe core damage. The PRA has already begun and will continue throughout the design and construction of the reactor. Computer analyses will be conducted for a complete spectrum of accidental events, from anticipated events to very infrequent occurrences

  3. Site Safety Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bainer, R.; Duarte, J.

    1993-07-01

    The safety policy of LLNL is to take every reasonable precaution in the performance of work to protect the environment and the health and safety of employees and the public, and to prevent property damage. With respect to hazardous agents, this protection is provided by limiting human exposures, releases to the environment, and contamination of property to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). It is the intent of this Plan to supply the broad outline for completing environmental investigations within ALARA guidelines. It may not be possible to determine actual working conditions in advance of the work; therefore, planning must allow the opportunity to provide a range of protection based upon actual working conditions. Requirements will be the least restrictive possible for a given set of circumstances, such that work can be completed in an efficient and timely fashion. Due to the relatively large size of the LLNL Site and the different types of activities underway, site-specific Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs) will be prepared to supplement activities not covered by this Plan. These site-specific OSPs provide the detailed information for each specific activity and act as an addendum to this Plan, which provides the general plan for LLNL Main Site operation.

  4. Plan for safety case of spent fuel repository at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.; Ikonen, A.T.K.

    2005-02-01

    Posiva aims to present the Safety Case supporting the construction license application of the spent fuel repository at Olkiluoto by 2012. An outline and preliminary assessments will be presented in 2009. Interim reporting and an update of the Safety Case plan will be presented in 2006, as required by the authorities. The KBS-3 disposal concept aims at long-term isolation and containment of spent fuel assemblies in durable copper-iron canisters emplaced in a repository to be constructed at a depth between 400 and 600 metres in crystalline bedrock. By 2012, studies on the KBS-3 disposal concept and site investigations at Olkiluoto will have been continued over about thirty years. The construction of an underground rock characterisation facility (called ONKALO) was started in June 2004. The investigations are carried out in close cooperation with the Swedish SKB developing and assessing the same disposal concept at candidate sites, resembling Olkiluoto, at the other side of the Baltic Sea. A safety case is the synthesis of evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety, and the level of expert confidence in the safety, of a planned repository. Posiva's Safety Case will be organised in a portfolio including ten main reports, which will be periodically updated according the overall schedule presented in the plan. The Site report describing the present state and past evolution of the Olkiluoto site, as well as the disturbances caused by the construction of ONKALO and the first stage of the repository, forms the geoscientific basis of the Safety Case. The engineering basis is provided by the reports on the Characteristics of spent fuel, Canister design, and Repository design. The Process report containing descriptions and analyses of features, events and processes potentially affecting the disposal system, and the report on the Evolution of site and repository form the scientific basis of the Safety Case. The latter report will describe and

  5. A plan for safety and integrity of research reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moatty, Mona S. Abdel; Khattab, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A plan for in-service inspection of research reactor components is put. ► Section XI of the ASME Code requirements is applied. ► Components subjected to inspection and their classes are defined. ► Flaw evaluation and its acceptance–rejection criteria are reviewed. ► A plan of repair or replacement is prepared. -- Abstract: Safety and integrity of a research reactor that has been operated over 40 years requires frequent and thorough inspection of all the safety-related components of the facility. The need of increasing the safety is the need of improving the reliability of its systems. Diligent and extensive planning of in-service inspection (ISI) of all reactor components has been imposed for satisfying the most stringent safety requirements. The Safeguards Officer's responsibilities of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code ASME Code have been applied. These represent the most extensive and time-consuming part of ISI program, and identify the components subjected to inspection and testing, methods of component classification, inspection and testing techniques, acceptance/rejection criteria, and the responsibilities. The paper focuses on ISI planning requirements for welded systems such as vessels, piping, valve bodies, pump casings, and control rod-housing parts. The weld in integral attachments for piping, pumps, and valves are considered too. These are taken in consideration of safety class (1, 2, 3, etc.), reactor age, and weld type. The parts involve in the frequency of inspection, the examination requirements for each inspection, the examination method are included. Moreover the flaw evaluation, the plan of repair or replacement, and the qualification of nondestructive examination personnel are considered

  6. Safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this TECDOC is to enhance the efficacy, quality and efficiency of the whole regulatory process. It provides advice on good practice administrative procedures for the regulatory process for preparation of applications, granting of authorizations, inspection, and enforcement. It also provides information on the development and use of standard safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection. The plans are intended to be used in conjunction with more detailed advice related to specific practices. In this sense, this TECDOC provides advice on a systematic approach to evaluations of protection and safety while other IAEA Safety Guides assist the user to distinguish between the acceptable and the unacceptable. This TECDOC covers administrative advice to facilitate the regulatory process governing authorization and inspection. It also covers the use of standard assessment and inspection plans and provides simplified plans for the more common, well established uses of radiation sources in medicine and industry, i.e. sources for irradiation facilities, industrial radiography, well logging, industrial gauging, unsealed sources in industry, X ray diagnosis, nuclear medicine, teletherapy and brachytherapy

  7. Safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this TECDOC is to enhance the efficacy, quality and efficiency of the whole regulatory process. It provides advice on good practice administrative procedures for the regulatory process for preparation of applications, granting of authorizations, inspection, and enforcement. It also provides information on the development and use of standard safety assessment plans for authorization and inspection. The plans are intended to be used in conjunction with more detailed advice related to specific practices. In this sense, this TECDOC provides advice on a systematic approach to evaluations of protection and safety while other IAEA Safety Guides assist the user to distinguish between the acceptable and the unacceptable. This TECDOC covers administrative advice to facilitate the regulatory process governing authorization and inspection. It also covers the use of standard assessment and inspection plans and provides simplified plans for the more common, well established uses of radiation sources in medicine and industry, i.e. sources for irradiation facilities, industrial radiography, well logging, industrial gauging, unsealed sources in industry, X ray diagnosis, nuclear medicine, teletherapy and brachytherapy

  8. Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, Matthew; Lachance, Jeff; Sofu, Tanju; Wigeland, Roald; Flanagan, George; Bari, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan reports conclude a multi-year expert elicitation process. All information included in the studies are publicly available and the reports are UUR. These reports are intended to guide SFR researchers in the safety and licensing arena to important and outstanding issues Two (and a half) projects have been funded based on the recommendations in this report: • Modernization of SAS4A; • Incorporation of Contain/LMR with MELCOR; • (Data recovery at INL and PNNL)

  9. Therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient: safety planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Bridget B; Homaifar, Beeta Y; Wortzel, Hal S

    2014-05-01

    This column is the fourth in a series describing a model for therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient. Previous columns presented an overview of the therapeutic risk management model, provided recommendations for how to augment risk assessment using structured assessments, and discussed the importance of risk stratification in terms of both severity and temporality. This final column in the series discusses the safety planning intervention as a critical component of therapeutic risk management of suicide risk. We first present concerns related to the relatively common practice of using no-suicide contracts to manage risk. We then present the safety planning intervention as an alternative approach and provide recommendations for how to use this innovative strategy to therapeutically mitigate risk in the suicidal patient.

  10. TWRS safety and technical integration risk management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fordham, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety and Technical Integration (STI) programmatic risk management program are to assess, analyze, and handle risks associated with TWRS STI responsibilities and to communicate information about the actions being taken and the results to enable decision making. The objective of this TWRS STI Risk Management Plan is to communicate a consistent approach to risk management that will be used by the organization

  11. Planning and architectural safety considerations in designing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konsowa, Ahmed A.

    2009-01-01

    To achieve optimum safety and to avoid possible hazards in nuclear power plants, considering architectural design fundamentals and all operating precautions is mandatory. There are some planning and architectural precautions should be considered to achieve a high quality design and construction of nuclear power plant with optimum safety. This paper highlights predicted hazards like fire, terrorism, aircraft crash attacks, adversaries, intruders, and earthquakes, proposing protective actions against these hazards that vary from preventing danger to evacuating and sheltering people in-place. For instance; using safeguards program to protect against sabotage, theft, and diversion. Also, site and building well design focusing on escape pathways, emergency exits, and evacuation zones, and the safety procedures such as; evacuation exercises and sheltering processes according to different emergency classifications. In addition, this paper mentions some important codes and regulations that control nuclear power plants design, and assessment methods that evaluate probable risks. (author)

  12. 77 FR 42462 - Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health; Proposed Modification of 18(e) Plan Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1952 [Docket ID. OSHA 2012-0029] RIN 1218-AC78 Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health; Proposed Modification of 18(e) Plan Approval AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of...

  13. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippet, W.A. II; Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP

  14. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippet, W.A. II (IT Corp., (United States)); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  15. Plan of Nordic research in nuclear safety 1994-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    A new four-year Nordic research programme in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection is to start in 1994 as a followup of several preceding Nordic programmes. It will include seven projects and a joint coordination function. The programme is intended to sustain a common understanding among safety authorities in the Nordic countries with respect to reactor safety and radiation protection. It mainly deals with questions that are actual within the Nordic region, but it may also include problems of concern to its eastern neighbours. Two of the projects deal with reactor safety, and one with radioactive waste. The other four projects are on environmental aspects: two of them deal with radioecology, and two with questions related to emergency preparedness. The programme is managed by the Nordic Committee for Safety Research, NKS, consisting of representatives from regulatory authorities, research bodies, and industry. Basic financing is provided by one consortium member from each of the five Nordic countries, whereby an annual budget of approximately 8 million Danish Kroner will be provided. Additional financing comes from sponsors interested in the programme as well as from those organizations taking part in the project work. Definite project plans are to be elaborated within the more general frames described in the present outline. The flexibility of the programme is enhanced by limiting the duration of individual activities to one or two years. This will make it possible to adjust the programme to actual needs in the Nordic countries. (au)

  16. 12 CFR 308.303 - Filing of safety and soundness compliance plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... time within which those steps will be taken. (c) Review of safety and soundness compliance plans... PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Submission and Review of Safety and Soundness Compliance Plans and... compliance plan. (a) Schedule for filing compliance plan—(1) In general. A bank shall file a written safety...

  17. 76 FR 17808 - Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0108] Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2011- 2013 AGENCY... availability. SUMMARY: This document announces the availability of the Final NHTSA Vehicle Safety and Fuel.... This Priority Plan is an update to the Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2009...

  18. Intersection planning in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information

  19. Land use planning in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information

  20. Reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned reactor safety research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The reactor safety research program, sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, is described in terms of its program objectives, current status, and future plans. Elements of safety research work applicable to water reactors, fast reactors, and gas cooled reactors are presented together with brief descriptions of current and planned test facilities. (U.S.)

  1. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI action plan requirements, unresolved safety issues, generic safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, a program was established whereby an annual NUREG report would be published on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was compiled and reported in three NUREG volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). This annual NUREG report combines these volumes into a single report and provides updated information as of September 30, 1991. The data contained in these NUREG reports are a product of the NRC's Safety Issues Management System (SIMS) database, which is maintained by the Project Management Staff in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and by NRC regional personnel. This report is to provide a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan Requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, and GSIs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. An additional purpose of this NUREG report is to serve as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  2. National plan to enhance aviation safety through human factors improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foushee, Clay

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this section of the plan is to establish a development and implementation strategy plan for improving safety and efficiency in the Air Traffic Control (ATC) system. These improvements will be achieved through the proper applications of human factors considerations to the present and future systems. The program will have four basic goals: (1) prepare for the future system through proper hiring and training; (2) develop a controller work station team concept (managing human errors); (3) understand and address the human factors implications of negative system results; and (4) define the proper division of responsibilities and interactions between the human and the machine in ATC systems. This plan addresses six program elements which together address the overall purpose. The six program elements are: (1) determine principles of human-centered automation that will enhance aviation safety and the efficiency of the air traffic controller; (2) provide new and/or enhanced methods and techniques to measure, assess, and improve human performance in the ATC environment; (3) determine system needs and methods for information transfer between and within controller teams and between controller teams and the cockpit; (4) determine how new controller work station technology can optimally be applied and integrated to enhance safety and efficiency; (5) assess training needs and develop improved techniques and strategies for selection, training, and evaluation of controllers; and (6) develop standards, methods, and procedures for the certification and validation of human engineering in the design, testing, and implementation of any hardware or software system element which affects information flow to or from the human.

  3. Work plan, health and safety plan, and site characterization for the Rust Spoil Area (D-106)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohrman, D.E.; Uziel, M.S.; Landguth, D.C.; Hawthorne, S.W.

    1990-06-01

    As part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Department of Energy's Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this work plan has been developed for the Rust Spoil Area (a solid waste disposal area). The work plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and will be implemented jointly by ORNL/MAD and the Y-12 Environmental Surveillance Section. This plan consists of four major sections: (1) a project description giving the scope and objectives of the investigation at the Rust Spoil Area; (2) field and sampling procedures describing sample documentation, soil sampling techniques, sample packaging and preservation, equipment decontamination, and disposal of investigation generated wastes; (3) sample analysis procedures detailing necessary analytical laboratory procedures to ensure the quality of chemical results from sample receipt through analysis and data reporting; and (4) a health and safety plan which describes general site hazards and particular hazards associated with specific tasks, assigns responsibilities, establishes personnel protection standards and mandatory safety procedures, and provides emergency information for contingencies that may arise during the course of field operations

  4. Groundwater well services site safety and health plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, B.G.

    1996-08-01

    This Site Specific Health and Safety Plan covers well servicing in support of the Environmental Restoration Contractor Groundwater Project. Well servicing is an important part of environmental restoration activities supporting several pump and treat facilities and assisting in evaluation and servicing of various groundwater wells throughout the Hanford Site. Remediation of contaminated groundwater is a major part of the ERC project. Well services tasks help enhance groundwater extraction/injection as well as maintain groundwater wells for sampling and other hydrologic testing and information gathering

  5. Stalking: A Multidimensional Framework for Assessment and Safety Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, T K; Walker, Robert

    2015-09-03

    Despite the high prevalence of stalking and the risk of harm it poses to victims, arrest rates, prosecutions, and convictions for stalking continue to be low in the United States. The overall goal of this article is to introduce a multidimensional framework of stalking that adds to the current literature by (1) providing a conceptual framework consistent with legal elements of many stalking statutes to facilitate assessment, communication, documentation, and safety planning for stalking several victims; (2) introducing a more systematic way of assessing course of conduct and the context of fear in stalking situations in order to increase the understanding of cumulative fear for stalking victims; (3) emphasizing the aspects of stalking harm that go beyond violence and that show how harm from stalking accumulates over time including life sabotage; and (4) discussing 12 risk factors derived from the overall multidimensional framework that can be used to describe the big picture of stalking and to facilitate safety planning for victims. Implications for future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. 12 CFR 30.4 - Filing of safety and soundness compliance plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... steps the bank will take to correct the deficiency and the time within which those steps will be taken. (c) Review of safety and soundness compliance plans. Within 30 days after receiving a safety and... AND SOUNDNESS STANDARDS § 30.4 Filing of safety and soundness compliance plan. (a) Schedule for filing...

  7. [Post-marketing drug safety-risk management plan(RMP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Asami; Hori, Akiko

    2013-03-01

    The Guidance for Risk Management Plan(RMP)was released by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in April 2012. The RMP consists of safety specifications, pharmacovigilance plans and risk minimization action plans. In this paper, we outline post-marketing drug safety operations in PMDA and the RMP, with examples of some anticancer drugs.

  8. National ignition facility environment, safety, and health management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The ES ampersand H Management Plan describes all of the environmental, safety, and health evaluations and reviews that must be carried out in support of the implementation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. It describes the policy, organizational responsibilities and interfaces, activities, and ES ampersand H documents that will be prepared by the Laboratory Project Office for the DOE. The only activity not described is the preparation of the NIF Project Specific Assessment (PSA), which is to be incorporated into the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (PEIS). This PSA is being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with input from the Laboratory participants. As the independent NEPA document preparers ANL is directly contracted by the DOE, and its deliverables and schedule are agreed to separately with DOE/OAK

  9. Jefferson Proving Ground, South of the Firing Line Health and Safety Plan, Volume 4

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1992-01-01

    .... The purpose of this Site Health and Safety Plan (SHSP) is to assign SECD personnel health and safety responsibilities, to prescribe mandatory operating procedures, and to establish personal-protective-equipment (PPE...

  10. Implementing 10 CFR 830 at the FEMP Silos: Nuclear Health and Safety Plans as Documented Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, Patricia; Rutherford, Lavon

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the Silos Project at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) is to safely remediate high-grade uranium ore residues (Silos 1 and 2) and metal oxide residues (Silo 3). The evolution of Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs) for these facilities has reflected the changes in remediation processes. The final stage in silos DSAs is an interpretation of 10 CFR 830 Safe Harbor Requirements that combines a Health and Safety Plan with nuclear safety requirements. This paper will address the development of a Nuclear Health and Safety Plan, or N-HASP

  11. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  12. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D.A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.

    2012-01-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  13. Planning report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    This document is a planning report for SKB's next assessment of long-term safety for a KBS 3 repository. The assessment, SR-Can, is to be finished by the end of 2005 and will be used for SKB's application to build an Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel. Apart from outlining the methodology, the report discusses the handling in SR-Can of a number of important issues regarding the near field, the geosphere, the biosphere, the climatic evolution etc. The Swedish nuclear safety and radiation protection authorities have recently issued regulations concerning the final disposal of nuclear waste. The principal compliance criterion states that the annual risk of harmful effects must not exceed 10 -6 for a representative individual in the group exposed to the greatest risk. There are also a number of requirements on methodological aspects of the safety assessment as well as on the contents of a safety report. The regulations are reproduced in an Appendix to this report. The primary safety function of the KBS 3 system is to completely isolate the spent nuclear fuel within copper canisters over the entire assessment period, which will be one million years in SR-Can. Should a canister be damaged, the secondary safety function is to retard any releases from the canisters. The main steps of the assessment are the following: 1. Qualitative system description, FEP processing: This step consists of defining a system boundary and of describing the system on a format suitable for the safety assessment. Databases of relevant features, events and processes influencing long-term safety are structured and used as one starting point for the assessment. 2. Initial state descriptions. 3. Process descriptions: In this step all identified processes within the system boundary involved in the long-term evolution of the system are described in detail. 4. Description of boundary conditions: This step is a broad description of the evolution of the boundaries of the system, focussing mainly

  14. Planning Document for an NBSR Conversion Safety Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond D. J.; Baek J.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2013-09-25

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR). The NBSR is a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a planning document for the conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to, and approved by, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before the reactor could be converted.This report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis herein is on the SAR chapters that require significant changes as a result of conversion, primarily Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis. The document provides information on the proposed design for the LEU fuel elements and identifies what information is still missing. This document is intended to assist ongoing fuel development efforts, and to provide a platform for the development of the final conversion SAR. This report contributes directly to the reactor conversion pillar of the GTRI program, but also acts as a boundary condition for the fuel development and fuel fabrication pillars.

  15. Safety and health five-year plan, Fiscal years 1995--1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE) to size and allocate funding to safety and health activities that protect workers and the public from harm. Although it is well recognized that virtually every aspect of an operation has health and safety implications, this effort is directed at identifying planned efforts specifically directed at health and safety. The initial effort, to compile information for the period covering FY 1994--1998, served two primary needs: (1) to document what was actually taking place in the DOE Complex, from a budget and resource utilization standpoint (how the complex was reacting to the calls for greater protection for workers and the public); and (2) to embark on an effort to utilize forward-looking management plans to allocate resources to meet safety and health needs (to begin to be proactive). It was recognized that it would take several years to achieve full acceptance and implementation of a single, DOE-wide approach toward planning for safety and health, and to develop plans that emphasized the benefits from both risk management and accident prevention strategies. This report, describing safety and health plans and budgets for FY 1995, reflects the increasing acceptance of risk-based strategies in the development of safety and health plans. More operations are using the prioritization methodology recommended for the safety and health planning process, and more operations have begun to review planned expenditures of resources to better assure that resources are allocated to the highest risk reduction activities

  16. 49 CFR 1106.3 - Actions for which Safety Integration Plan is required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Actions for which Safety Integration Plan is required. 1106.3 Section 1106.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... TRANSPORTATION BOARD CONSIDERATION OF SAFETY INTEGRATION PLANS IN CASES INVOLVING RAILROAD CONSOLIDATIONS...

  17. 49 CFR 244.11 - Contents of a Safety Integration Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contents of a Safety Integration Plan. 244.11 Section 244.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS ON SAFETY INTEGRATION PLANS GOVERNING RAILROAD...

  18. 78 FR 979 - Petition for Positive Train Control Safety Plan Approval and System Certification of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ...] Petition for Positive Train Control Safety Plan Approval and System Certification of the Electronic Train... the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) for Positive Train Control (PTC) Safety Plan (PTCSP) approval and system certification of the Electronic Train Management System (ETMS) as required by 49 U.S.C...

  19. Seismic safety margin research program. Program plan, Revision I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Tokarz, F.J.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Cummings, G.E.; Chou, C.K.; Vagliente, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    The overall objective of the SSMRP is to develop mathematical models that realistically predict the probability of radioactive releases from seismically induced events in nuclear power plants. These models will be used for four purposes: (1) To perform sensitivity studies to determine the weak links in seismic methodology. The weak links will then be improved by research and development. (2) To estimate the probability of release for a plant. It is believed that the major difficulty in the program will be to obtain acceptably small confidence limits on the probability of release. (3) To estimate the conservatisms in the Standard Review Plan (SRP) seismic design methodology. This will be done by comparing the results of the SRP methodology and the methodology resulting from the research and development in (1). (4) To develop an improved seismic design methodology based on probability. The Phase I objective proposed in this report is to develop mathematical models which will accomplish the purposes No. 1 and No. 2 with simplified assumptions such as linear elastic analysis, limited assessment on component fragility (considering only accident sequences leading to core melt), and simplified safety system

  20. A strategic approach for Water Safety Plans implementation in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jose M P

    2011-03-01

    Effective risk assessment and risk management approaches in public drinking water systems can benefit from a systematic process for hazards identification and effective management control based on the Water Safety Plan (WSP) concept. Good results from WSP development and implementation in a small number of Portuguese water utilities have shown that a more ambitious nationwide strategic approach to disseminate this methodology is needed. However, the establishment of strategic frameworks for systematic and organic scaling-up of WSP implementation at a national level requires major constraints to be overcome: lack of legislation and policies and the need for appropriate monitoring tools. This study presents a framework to inform future policy making by understanding the key constraints and needs related to institutional, organizational and research issues for WSP development and implementation in Portugal. This methodological contribution for WSP implementation can be replicated at a global scale. National health authorities and the Regulator may promote changes in legislation and policies. Independent global monitoring and benchmarking are adequate tools for measuring the progress over time and for comparing the performance of water utilities. Water utilities self-assessment must include performance improvement, operational monitoring and verification. Research and education and resources dissemination ensure knowledge acquisition and transfer.

  1. System Safety Program Plan for Project W-314, tank farm restoration and safe operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    This System Safety Program Plan (SSPP) outlines the safety analysis strategy for project W-314, ''Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations.'' Project W-314 will provide capital improvements to Hanford's existing Tank Farm facilities, with particular emphasis on infrastructure systems supporting safe operation of the double-shell activities related to the project's conceptual Design Phase, but is planned to be updated and maintained as a ''living document'' throughout the life of the project to reflect the current safety analysis planning for the Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations upgrades. This approved W-314 SSPP provides the basis for preparation/approval of all safety analysis documentation needed to support the project

  2. Planning report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    This document is a planning report for SKB's next assessment of long-term safety for a KBS 3 repository. The assessment, SR-Can, is to be finished by the end of 2005 and will be used for SKB's application to build an Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel. Apart from outlining the methodology, the report discusses the handling in SR-Can of a number of important issues regarding the near field, the geosphere, the biosphere, the climatic evolution etc. The Swedish nuclear safety and radiation protection authorities have recently issued regulations concerning the final disposal of nuclear waste. The principal compliance criterion states that the annual risk of harmful effects must not exceed 10{sup -6} for a representative individual in the group exposed to the greatest risk. There are also a number of requirements on methodological aspects of the safety assessment as well as on the contents of a safety report. The regulations are reproduced in an Appendix to this report. The primary safety function of the KBS 3 system is to completely isolate the spent nuclear fuel within copper canisters over the entire assessment period, which will be one million years in SR-Can. Should a canister be damaged, the secondary safety function is to retard any releases from the canisters. The main steps of the assessment are the following: 1. Qualitative system description, FEP processing: This step consists of defining a system boundary and of describing the system on a format suitable for the safety assessment. Databases of relevant features, events and processes influencing long-term safety are structured and used as one starting point for the assessment. 2. Initial state descriptions. 3. Process descriptions: In this step all identified processes within the system boundary involved in the long-term evolution of the system are described in detail. 4. Description of boundary conditions: This step is a broad description of the evolution of the boundaries of the system

  3. System safety program plan for the Isotope Brayton Ground Demonstration System (phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The safety engineering effort to be undertaken in achieving an acceptable level of safety in the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) development program is discussed. The safety organizational relationships, the methods to be used, the tasks to be completed, and the documentation to be published are described. The plan will be updated periodically as the need arises

  4. 77 FR 58488 - Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1952 [Docket ID. OSHA 2012-0029] RIN 1218-AC78 Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health AGENCY: Occupational... announces the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) decision to modify the Hawaii State...

  5. School Climate: An Essential Component of a Comprehensive School Safety Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The intentional assessment and management of school climate is an essential component of a comprehensive school safety plan. The value of this preventive aspect of school safety is often diminished as schools invest resources in physical security measures as a narrowly focused effort to increase school safety (Addington, 2009). This dissertation…

  6. Safety plan for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval system equipment development area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, T.J.; Jessmore, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    This plan establishes guidelines to minimize safety risks for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval project at the North Boulevard Annex (NBA). This plan has the dual purpose of minimizing safety risks to workers and visitors and of securing sensitive equipment from inadvertent damage by nonqualified personnel. This goal will be accomplished through physical control of work zones and through assigned responsibilities for project personnel. The scope of this plan is limited to establishing the working zone boundaries and entry requirements, and assigning responsibilities for project personnel. This plan does not supersede current safety organization responsibilities for the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area Transuranic (LSFA TRU) Arid outlined in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program; Tenant Manual; Idaho Falls Building Emergency Control Plan;; applicable Company Procedures; the attached Interface Agreement (Appendix A).

  7. Safety plan for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval system equipment development area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, T.J.; Jessmore, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    This plan establishes guidelines to minimize safety risks for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval project at the North Boulevard Annex (NBA). This plan has the dual purpose of minimizing safety risks to workers and visitors and of securing sensitive equipment from inadvertent damage by nonqualified personnel. This goal will be accomplished through physical control of work zones and through assigned responsibilities for project personnel. The scope of this plan is limited to establishing the working zone boundaries and entry requirements, and assigning responsibilities for project personnel. This plan does not supersede current safety organization responsibilities for the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area Transuranic (LSFA TRU) Arid outlined in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program; Tenant Manual; Idaho Falls Building Emergency Control Plan;; applicable Company Procedures; the attached Interface Agreement (Appendix A)

  8. 49 CFR 659.19 - System safety program plan: contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... implementation of the system safety program. (j) A description of the process used by the rail transit agency to... the rail transit agency to manage safety issues. (d) The process used to control changes to the system... hazard management program. (n) A description of the process used for facilities and equipment safety...

  9. Safety Improvement in Radiotherapy Treatment Plan. Planning vs Redundant Check vs in vivo Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Diaz, J.; Ascencion Ybarra, Y.; La Fuentes Rosales, L. de; Lara Mas, E.; Larrinaga Cortinas, E.

    2013-01-01

    In Cuba it is mandatory to have an independent monitor units check before any radiotherapy treatment is started. The main objective of this paper is to enhance the safety of the radiotherapy planning by developing and testing a practical tool to double check the monitor units calculation for external beam high energy photon therapy. A software for monitor units (MUs) verification was designed and coded. It considers the common in clinical practice isocentric set-ups. The in vivo dosimetry measurements were done with a silicon diode system for 6 MV photon beams to support the validation of the software. The results show a discrepancy within 5% between the 3 methods which is in accordance with international recommendations. (Author)

  10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health and Safety Long-Range Plan: Fiscal years 1989--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-01

    The health and safety of its personnel is the first concern of ORNL and its management. The ORNL Health and Safety Program has the responsibility for ensuring the health and safety of all individuals assigned to ORNL activities. This document outlines the principal aspects of the ORNL Health and Safety Long-Range Plan and provides a framework for management use in the future development of the health and safety program. Each section of this document is dedicated to one of the health and safety functions (i.e., health physics, industrial hygiene, occupational medicine, industrial safety, nuclear criticality safety, nuclear facility safety, transportation safety, fire protection, and emergency preparedness). Each section includes functional mission and objectives, program requirements and status, a summary of program needs, and program data and funding summary. Highlights of FY 1988 are included.

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health and Safety Long-Range Plan: Fiscal years 1989--1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The health and safety of its personnel is the first concern of ORNL and its management. The ORNL Health and Safety Program has the responsibility for ensuring the health and safety of all individuals assigned to ORNL activities. This document outlines the principal aspects of the ORNL Health and Safety Long-Range Plan and provides a framework for management use in the future development of the health and safety program. Each section of this document is dedicated to one of the health and safety functions (i.e., health physics, industrial hygiene, occupational medicine, industrial safety, nuclear criticality safety, nuclear facility safety, transportation safety, fire protection, and emergency preparedness). Each section includes functional mission and objectives, program requirements and status, a summary of program needs, and program data and funding summary. Highlights of FY 1988 are included

  12. The evolving role and care management approaches of safety-net medicaid managed care plans

    OpenAIRE

    Gusmano, Michael K.; Sparer, Michael S.; Brown, Lawrence D.; Rowe, Catherine; Gray, Bradford

    2002-01-01

    This article provides new empirical data about the viability and the care management activities of Medicaid managed-care plans sponsored by provider organizations that serve Medicaid and other low-income populations. Using survey and case study methods we studied these “safety-net” health plans in 1998 and 2000. Although the number of safety-net plans declined over this period, the surviving plans were larger and enjoying greater financial success than the plans we surveyed in 1998. We also f...

  13. Yearly plan of safety research on environmental radioactivity for 1996 - 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    'Yearly Plan of Safety Research on Environmental Radioactivity' proposed from the special meeting for safety research of environmental radioactivity on December 14, 1995 was investigated by Nuclear Safety Commission. And the safety research of environmental radioactivity in Japan was decided to be pursued according to the plan. The contents of this plan consisted of the purpose and the contents of research as well as the research period and the facilities to be done for each theme. The following themes were included; 1) study on environment·radiation dose and study on radiation exposure reduction. 2) study on biological effects of radiation. 3) study on internal exposure by specified nuclides. 4) study on medical measures for acute radiation exposure. 5) study on assessment of nuclear safety. 6) investigation on radioactivities released from various nuclear facilities in Japan to demonstrate their safety. (M.N.)

  14. Development of Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan for 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Sung; Kim, Woong Sik; Park, Dong Keuk; Kim, Ho Ki

    2006-01-01

    The Article 8-2 of Atomic Energy Act requires the government to establish Atomic Energy Promotion Plan every five years. It sets out national nuclear energy policies in a systematic and consistent way. The plan presents the goals and basic directions of national nuclear energy policies on the basis of current status and prospects. Both areas of utilization and safety management of nuclear energy are included and various projects and schedules are delineated based on the national policy directions. The safety management area in this plan deals with the overall safety and regulation policy. Its detail projects and schedule should be developed in separate plans by responsible ministries under the mediation of the MOST. As a regulatory authority, MOST is responsible for safety management area and its technical support organization, KINS has developed Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan as an implementation plan of safety area. This paper presents the development process and specific projects contained in the Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan which is under development now

  15. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  16. The evolving role and care management approaches of safety-net Medicaid managed care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmano, Michael K; Sparer, Michael S; Brown, Lawrence D; Rowe, Catherine; Gray, Bradford

    2002-12-01

    This article provides new empirical data about the viability and the care management activities of Medicaid managed-care plans sponsored by provider organizations that serve Medicaid and other low-income populations. Using survey and case study methods, we studied these "safety-net" health plans in 1998 and 2000. Although the number of safety-net plans declined over this period, the surviving plans were larger and enjoying greater financial success than the plans we surveyed in 1998. We also found that, based on a partnership with providers, safety-net plans are moving toward more sophisticated efforts to manage the care of their enrollees. Our study suggests that, with supportive state policies, safety-net plans are capable of remaining viable. Contracting with safety-net plans may not be an efficient mechanism for enabling Medicaid recipients to "enter the mainstream of American health care," but it may provide states with an effective way to manage and coordinate the care of Medicaid recipients, while helping to maintain the health care safety-net for the uninsured.

  17. The Influence of Laboratory Safety on Capital Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses state and federal legislation concerning the handling of dangerous materials and its impact on the design of college and university buildings. Lists federal legislation affecting laboratory safety, the objectives of each act, and the influence of each act on laboratory safety. (IRT)

  18. Capacity building in the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion and Future Challenges: • Momentum on Nuclear Safety; • To continue strengthening, developing, maintaining and implementing capacity building programmes, including education, training and exercises at the national, regional and international levels; • To ensure sufficient and competent human resources necessary to assume responsibility for safety; • To incorporate lessons learned from the accident based on the IEMs and IAEA Fukushima Report

  19. Safety evaluation by living probabilistic safety assessment. Procedures and applications for planning of operational activities and analysis of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Gunnar; Holmberg, J.

    1994-01-01

    Living Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a daily safety management system and it is based on a plant-specific PSA and supporting information systems. In the living use of PSA, plant status knowledge is used to represent actual plant safety status in monitoring or follow-up perspective. The PSA model must be able to express the risk at a given time and plant configuration. The process, to update the PSA model to represent the current or planned configuration and to use the model to evaluate and direct the changes in the configuration, is called living PSA programme. The main purposes to develop and increase the usefulness of living PSA are: Long term safety planning: To continue the risk assessment process started with the basic PSA by extending and improving the basic models and data to provide a general risk evaluation tool for analyzing the safety effects of changes in plant design and procedures. Risk planning of operational activities: To support the operational management by providing means for searching optimal operational maintenance and testing strategies from the safety point of view. The results provide support for risk decision making in the short term or in a planning mode. The operational limits and conditions given by technical specifications can be analyzed by evaluating the risk effects of alternative requirements in order to balance the requirements with respect to operational flexibility and plant economy. Risk analysis of operating experience: To provide a general risk evaluation tool for analyzing the safety effects of incidents and plant status changes. The analyses are used to: identify possible high risk situations, rank the occurred events from safety point of view, and get feedback from operational events for the identification of risk contributors. This report describes the methods, models and applications required to continue the process towards a living use of PSA. 19 tabs, 20 figs

  20. Focus State Roadway Departure Safety Plans and High Friction Surface Treatments Peer Exchange : an RPSCB Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This report summarizes the Focus State Roadway Departure Safety Plans and High Friction Surface Treatments Peer Exchange, held in Birmingham, Alabama, sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Safetys Roadway Safety Professi...

  1. 48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., safety, and health into work planning and execution. 970.5223-1 Section 970.5223-1 Federal Acquisition... Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. As prescribed in 970.2303-3(b), insert the following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work Planning and...

  2. Evaluation procedure of software safety plan for digital I and C of KNGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jang Soo; Park, Jong Kyun; Lee, Ki Young; Kwon, Ki Choon; Kim, Jang Yeol; Cheon, Se Woo

    2000-05-01

    The development, use, and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor instrumentation and control (I and C) systems to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Korean next generation reactor (KNGR) software safety verification and validation (SSVV) task, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, which investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor I and C systems, and describes the engineering procedures for developing such a software. The purpose of this guideline is to give the software safety evaluator the trail map between the code and standards layer and the design methodology and documents layer for the software important to safety in nuclear power plants. Recently, the safety planning for safety-critical software systems is being recognized as the most important phase in the software life cycle, and being developed new regulatory positions and standards by the regulatory and the standardization organizations. The requirements for software important to safety of nuclear reactor are described in such positions and standards, for example, the new standard review plan (SRP), IEC 880 supplements, IEEE standard 1228-1994, IEEE standard 7-4.3.2-1993, and IAEA safety series No. 50-SG-D3 and D8. We presented the guidance for evaluating the safety plan of the software in the KNGR protection systems. The guideline consists of the regulatory requirements for software safety in chapter 2, the evaluation checklist of software safety plan in chapter3, and the evaluation results of KNGR software safety plan in chapter 4

  3. Evaluation procedure of software safety plan for digital I and C of KNGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Soo; Park, Jong Kyun; Lee, Ki Young; Kwon, Ki Choon; Kim, Jang Yeol; Cheon, Se Woo

    2000-05-01

    The development, use, and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor instrumentation and control (I and C) systems to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Korean next generation reactor (KNGR) software safety verification and validation (SSVV) task, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, which investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor I and C systems, and describes the engineering procedures for developing such a software. The purpose of this guideline is to give the software safety evaluator the trail map between the code and standards layer and the design methodology and documents layer for the software important to safety in nuclear power plants. Recently, the safety planning for safety-critical software systems is being recognized as the most important phase in the software life cycle, and being developed new regulatory positions and standards by the regulatory and the standardization organizations. The requirements for software important to safety of nuclear reactor are described in such positions and standards, for example, the new standard review plan (SRP), IEC 880 supplements, IEEE standard 1228-1994, IEEE standard 7-4.3.2-1993, and IAEA safety series No. 50-SG-D3 and D8. We presented the guidance for evaluating the safety plan of the software in the KNGR protection systems. The guideline consists of the regulatory requirements for software safety in chapter 2, the evaluation checklist of software safety plan in chapter3, and the evaluation results of KNGR software safety plan in chapter 4.

  4. A report on developing a checklist to assess company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture: final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijger, N.; Starren, H.; Keus, M.; Gort, J.; Vervoort, M.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the process of developing a checklist to asses company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture. These plans are part of a programme initiated by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment aiming at improving the safety performance of

  5. Implementing national nuclear safety plan at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yabin; Cui Shaozhang; Pan Fengguo; Zhang Lizhen; Shi Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    This study discusses the importance of nuclear power project design and engineering methods at the preliminary stage of its development on nuclear power plant's operational safety from the professional view. Specifically, we share our understanding of national nuclear safety plan's requirement on new reactor accident probability, technology, site selection, as well as building and improving nuclear safety culture and strengthening public participation, with a focus on plan's implications on preliminary stage of nuclear power project development. Last, we introduce China Huaneng Group's work on nuclear power project preliminary development and the experience accumulated during the process. By analyzing the siting philosophy of nuclear power plant and the necessity of building nuclear safety culture at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development, this study explicates how to fully implement the nuclear safety plan's requirements at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development. (authors)

  6. Connected vehicle pilot deployment program phase 1, safety management plan - Tampa (THEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This document presents the Safety Management Plan for the THEA Connected Vehicle (CV) Pilot Deployment. The THEA CV Pilot : Deployment goal is to advance and enable safe, interoperable, networked wireless communications among vehicles, the : infrastr...

  7. Integrated vehicle-based safety systems (IVBSS) : light vehicle platform field operational test data analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-22

    This document presents the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institutes plan to : perform analysis of data collected from the light vehicle platform field operational test of the : Integrated Vehicle-Based Safety Systems (IVBSS) progr...

  8. Integrated vehicle-based safety systems (IVBSS) : heavy truck platform field operational test data analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-23

    This document presents the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institutes plan to perform : analysis of data collected from the heavy truck platform field operational test of the Integrated Vehicle- : Based Safety Systems (IVBSS) progra...

  9. Preparation, review, and approval of implementation plans for nuclear safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This standard describes an acceptable method to prepare, review, and approve implementation plans for DOE Nuclear Safety requirements. DOE requirements are identified in DOE Rules, Orders, Notices, Immediate Action Directives, and Manuals

  10. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety-reliability program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a safety plan as part of an overall program plan for the design and development of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). This plan is intended to establish a logical framework for identifying the technology necessary to demonstrate that the requisite degree of public risk safety can be achieved economically. This plan provides a coherent system safety approach together with goals and success criterion as part of a unifying strategy for licensing a lead reactor plant in the near term. It is intended to provide guidance to program participants involved in producing a technology base for the HTGR that is fully responsive to safety consideration in the design, evaluation, licensing, public acceptance, and economic optimization of reactor systems.

  11. Using historical crash data as part of traffic work zone safety planning and project management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This funding enabled the project entitled, USING HISTORICAL CRASH DATA AS PART OF TRAFFIC WORK ZONE SAFETY : PLANNING AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES to address the following: : Evaluate current organizational strategies with respect to w...

  12. Savannah River Site management response plan for chemical safety vulnerability field assessment. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahal, E.J.; Murphy, S.L.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to identify potential chemical safety vulnerabilities in the DOE complex, the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Core Working Group issued a field verification assessment report. While the report concluded that Savannah River Site (SRS) is moving in a positive direction, the report also identified five chemical safety vulnerabilities with broad programmatic impact that are not easily nor quickly remedied. The May 1994 SRS Management Response Plan addressed the five SRS vulnerabilities identified in the field assessment report. The SRS response plan listed observations supporting the vulnerabilities and any actions taken or planned toward resolution. Many of the observations were resolved by simple explanations, such as the existence of implementation plans for Safety Analysis Report updates. Recognizing that correcting individual observations does not suffice in remedying the vulnerabilities, a task team was assembled to address the broader programmatic issues and to recommend corrective actions

  13. 77 FR 50727 - Configuration Management Plans for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... enhanced consensus practices for planning software configuration management (SCM) as described in the... testing of structures, systems, and components important to safety throughout the life of the unit. This...

  14. Prioritization of tasks in the draft LWR safety technology program plan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, E.Y.; Miller, W.J.; Parkinson, W.J.; Ritzman, R.L.; vonHerrmann, J.L.; Wood, P.J.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe both the approach taken and the results produced in the SAI effort to prioritize the tasks in the Sandia draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan. This work used the description of important safety issues developed in the Reactor Safety Study (2) to quantify the effect of safety improvements resulting from a research and development program on the risk from nuclear power plants. Costs of implementation of these safety improvements were also estimated to allow a presentation of the final results in a value (i.e., risk reduction) vs. impact (i.e., implementation costs) matrix

  15. ITER safety studies: starting the quality plan code AINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dies, J.; Rivas, J. C.; Bargallo, E.

    2010-01-01

    This contribution discusses the implementation of the Quality Plan AINA Code 2.0. The work has affected areas such as the life cycle model, the software reliability plan, the design of the equipment or software tools to use, and has finally produced a new code.

  16. Environmental restoration contractor facility safety plan -- MO-561 100-D site remediation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahoe, R.L.

    1996-11-01

    This safety plan is applicable to Environmental Restoration Contractor personnel who are permanently assigned to MO-561 or regularly work in the facility. The MO-561 Facility is located in the 100-D Area at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This plan will: (a) identify hazards potentially to be encountered by occupants of MO-561; (b) provide requirements and safeguards to ensure personnel safety and regulatory compliance; (c) provide information and actions necessary for proper emergency response

  17. Implementation plan for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsheim, G.L.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1992-12-01

    This document revises the original plan submitted in March 1991 for implementing the recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board in their Recommendation 90-7 to the US Department of Energy. Recommendation 90-7 addresses safety issues of concern for 24 single-shell, high-level radioactive waste tanks containing ferrocyanide compounds at the Hanford Site. The waste in these tanks is a potential safety concern because, under certain conditions involving elevated temperatures and low concentrations of nonparticipating diluents, ferrocyanide compounds in the presence of oxidizing materials can undergo a runaway (propagating) chemical reaction. This document describes those activities underway by the Hanford Site contractor responsible for waste tank safety that address each of the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7. This document also identifies the progress made on these activities since the beginning of the ferrocyanide safety program in September 1990. Revised schedules for planned activities are also included

  18. Integrated Environment and Safety and Health Management System (ISMS) Implementation Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MITCHELL, R.L.

    2000-01-10

    The Integrated Environment, Safety and Health Management System (ISMS) Implementation Project Plan serves as the project document to guide the Fluor Hanford, Inc (FHI) and Major Subcontractor (MSC) participants through the steps necessary to complete the integration of environment, safety, and health into management and work practices at all levels.

  19. 12 CFR 263.303 - Filing of safety and soundness compliance plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... member bank will take to correct the deficiency and the time within which those steps will be taken. (c... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES OF PRACTICE FOR HEARINGS Submission and Review of Safety and Soundness... safety and soundness compliance plan. (a) Schedule for filing compliance plan—(1) In general. A State...

  20. 76 FR 55056 - Toy Safety Standard: Strategic Outreach and Education Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... to test and certify to the toy safety standard. We plan to use traditional and social media to... testing and certification requirements for children's toys and toy chests and their compliance with ASTM... manufacturers of children's toys must ensure that covered toys are tested for compliance with the toy safety...

  1. Tank waste remediation system nuclear criticality safety inspection and assessment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAIL, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    This plan provides a management approved procedure for inspections and assessments of sufficient depth to validate that the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) facility complies with the requirements of the Project Hanford criticality safety program, NHF-PRO-334, ''Criticality Safety General, Requirements''

  2. Integrated Environment and Safety and Health Management System (ISMS) Implementation Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MITCHELL, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Integrated Environment, Safety and Health Management System (ISMS) Implementation Project Plan serves as the project document to guide the Fluor Hanford, Inc (FHI) and Major Subcontractor (MSC) participants through the steps necessary to complete the integration of environment, safety, and health into management and work practices at all levels

  3. Health and safety plan for characterization sampling of ETR and MTR facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.E.

    1994-10-01

    This health and safety plan establishes the procedures and requirements that will be used to minimize health and safety risks to persons performing Engineering Test Reactor and Materials Test Reactor characterization sampling activities, as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard, 29 CFR 1910.120. It contains information about the hazards involved in performing the tasks, and the specific actions and equipment that will be used to protect persons working at the site

  4. Quality plan for criticality safety calculations at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecora, D.

    1978-01-01

    The text of the plan is given, and some of the guidelines followed in writing it are discussed to aid others who may be faced with the same task. The plan is divided into four sections. The Introduction describes the general functions and purpose of the calculational program. The second section, Activities and Responsibilities, lists specific tasks and their purposes and assigns responsibility for performance. The third section references relevant documentation (e.g., ANSI standards), and the final section describes quality plans for specific functions

  5. Annual plan of research on safety techniques against low level radioactive wastes, FY1994-FY1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The safety research on the disposal of low level radioactive waste has been promoted based on the annual plan decided by the committee on radiative waste safety regulation of the Nuclear Safety Commission. Hereafter, the disposal of low level radioactive waste in ocean is never selected. As to the subjects of the safety research which should be carried out for five years from 1994, the necessity, the contents of research, the organs that carry out the research and so on were deliberated, and the results are made into the annual plan, therefore, it is reported. The way of thinking on the safety research, the contents for which efforts should be exerted as the safety research, and the matters to which attention should be paid are shown. As for the annual plan of safety research, the necessity and the outline of the safety research on the disposal in strata, the concrete subjects and their contents, and the necessity and the outline of the safety research on the reuse, the concrete subjects and their contents are reported. The radioactive waste is those produced by the operation of nuclear reactor facilities, those containing TRU nuclides and RI waste. (K.I.)

  6. 12 CFR 570.3 - Filing of safety and soundness compliance plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... compliance plan shall include a description of the steps the savings association will take to correct the deficiency and the time within which those steps will be taken. (c) Review of safety and soundness compliance... plan. (a) Schedule for filing compliance plan—(1) In general. A savings association shall file a...

  7. 49 CFR 236.907 - Product Safety Plan (PSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... addressed during the life cycle of the product, including maximum threshold limits for each hazard (for... accordance with other criteria if demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Associate Administrator for Safety... contractor employees and supervisors necessary to ensure the safe and proper installation, implementation...

  8. Energy Storage System Safety: Plan Review and Inspection Checklist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pam C (PNNL); Conover, David R (PNNL)

    2017-03-01

    Codes, standards, and regulations (CSR) governing the design, construction, installation, commissioning, and operation of the built environment are intended to protect the public health, safety, and welfare. While these documents change over time to address new technology and new safety challenges, there is generally some lag time between the introduction of a technology into the market and the time it is specifically covered in model codes and standards developed in the voluntary sector. After their development, there is also a timeframe of at least a year or two until the codes and standards are adopted. Until existing model codes and standards are updated or new ones are developed and then adopted, one seeking to deploy energy storage technologies or needing to verify the safety of an installation may be challenged in trying to apply currently implemented CSRs to an energy storage system (ESS). The Energy Storage System Guide for Compliance with Safety Codes and Standards1 (CG), developed in June 2016, is intended to help address the acceptability of the design and construction of stationary ESSs, their component parts, and the siting, installation, commissioning, operations, maintenance, and repair/renovation of ESS within the built environment.

  9. FOOD safety and hygiene - Systematic layout planning of food processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Donk, DP; Gaalman, G

    2004-01-01

    Hygiene and food safety have been dealt with from different fields of science such as biology and health, and from different angles such as HACCP and GMP. Little systematically ordered knowledge is available for the analysis of a layout, taking hygienic factors into account. HACCP and GMP are

  10. Developing tools for the safety specification in risk management plans: lessons learned from a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Andrew J P; Lettis, Sally; Chapman, Charlotte L; Evans, Stephen J W; Waller, Patrick C; Shakir, Saad; Payvandi, Nassrin; Murray, Alison B

    2008-05-01

    Following the adoption of the ICH E2E guideline, risk management plans (RMP) defining the cumulative safety experience and identifying limitations in safety information are now required for marketing authorisation applications (MAA). A collaborative research project was conducted to gain experience with tools for presenting and evaluating data in the safety specification. This paper presents those tools found to be useful and the lessons learned from their use. Archive data from a successful MAA were utilised. Methods were assessed for demonstrating the extent of clinical safety experience, evaluating the sensitivity of the clinical trial data to detect treatment differences and identifying safety signals from adverse event and laboratory data to define the extent of safety knowledge with the drug. The extent of clinical safety experience was demonstrated by plots of patient exposure over time. Adverse event data were presented using dot plots, which display the percentages of patients with the events of interest, the odds ratio, and 95% confidence interval. Power and confidence interval plots were utilised for evaluating the sensitivity of the clinical database to detect treatment differences. Box and whisker plots were used to display laboratory data. This project enabled us to identify new evidence-based methods for presenting and evaluating clinical safety data. These methods represent an advance in the way safety data from clinical trials can be analysed and presented. This project emphasises the importance of early and comprehensive planning of the safety package, including evaluation of the use of epidemiology data.

  11. Safety issue resolution strategy plan for inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, O.S.; Powers, T.B.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this strategy plan is to identify, confirm, and resolve safely issues associated with inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs) using a risk-based priority approach. Assumptions and processes to assess potential risks and operational concerns are documented in this report. Safety issue priorities are ranked based on a number of considerations including risk ranking and cost effectiveness. This plan specifies work scope and recommends schedules for activities related to resolving safety issues, such as collecting historical data, searching for authorization documents, performing Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) screening and evaluation, identifying safety issues, imposing operational controls and monitoring, characterizing waste contents, mitigating and resolving safety issues, and fulfilling other remediation requirements consistent with the overall Tank Waste Remediation System strategy. Recommendations for characterization and remediation are also recommended according to the order of importance and practical programmatic consideration

  12. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements, unresolved safety issues, generic safety issues, other multiplant action issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This report is to provide a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as Unresolved Safety Issues (USIs), Generic Safety Issues(GSIs), and other Multiplant Actions (MPAs) that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. An additional purpose of this NUREG report is to serve as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  13. TOWARDS FINANCING AND PLANNING ROAD SAFETY AUDIT OPERATIONS IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Adetunji ODELEYE, M.Sc.

    2000-01-01

    Finally, this paper suggests commissioning of a National Road Research Fund, with a view to developing an efficient road safety audit operational system. Also, the introduction of private initiatives and a Community-based Approach in road administration, as well as decentralization of road administration framework at all levels, will greatly help “engineer out” potentially unsafe features across Nigerian roads, towards a better road traffic environment in the 21st century.

  14. Access management in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information

  15. Route management in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information

  16. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., safety, and health into work planning and execution. 952.223-71 Section 952.223-71 Federal Acquisition... Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and... safety and health standards applicable to the work conditions of contractor and subcontractor employees...

  17. A hybrid simulation approach for integrating safety behavior into construction planning: An earthmoving case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yang Miang; Askar Ali, Mohamed Jawad

    2016-08-01

    One of the key challenges in improving construction safety and health is the management of safety behavior. From a system point of view, workers work unsafely due to system level issues such as poor safety culture, excessive production pressure, inadequate allocation of resources and time and lack of training. These systemic issues should be eradicated or minimized during planning. However, there is a lack of detailed planning tools to help managers assess the impact of their upstream decisions on worker safety behavior. Even though simulation had been used in construction planning, the review conducted in this study showed that construction safety management research had not been exploiting the potential of simulation techniques. Thus, a hybrid simulation framework is proposed to facilitate integration of safety management considerations into construction activity simulation. The hybrid framework consists of discrete event simulation (DES) as the core, but heterogeneous, interactive and intelligent (able to make decisions) agents replace traditional entities and resources. In addition, some of the cognitive processes and physiological aspects of agents are captured using system dynamics (SD) approach. The combination of DES, agent-based simulation (ABS) and SD allows a more "natural" representation of the complex dynamics in construction activities. The proposed hybrid framework was demonstrated using a hypothetical case study. In addition, due to the lack of application of factorial experiment approach in safety management simulation, the case study demonstrated sensitivity analysis and factorial experiment to guide future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High-heat tank safety issue resolution program plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, O.S.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to provide a guide for selecting corrective actions that will mitigate and/or remediate the high-heat waste tank safety issue for single-shell tank 241-C-106. The heat source of approximately 110,000 Btu/hr is the radioactive decay of the stored waste material (primarily 90 Sr) inadvertently transferred into the tank in the later 1960s. Currently, forced ventilation, with added water to promote thermal conductivity and evaporation cooling, is used for heat removal. The method is very effective and economical. At this time, the only viable solution identified to permanently resolve this safety issue is the removal of heat-generating waste in the tank. This solution is being aggressively pursued as the only remediation method to this safety issue, and tank 241-C-106 has been selected as the first single-shell tank for retrieval. The current cooling method and other alternatives are addressed in this program as means to mitigate this safety issue before retrieval. This program plan has three parts. The first part establishes program objectives and defines safety issue, drivers, and resolution criteria and strategy. The second part evaluates the high-heat safety issue and its mitigation and remediation methods and other alternatives according to resolution logic. The third part identifies major tasks and alternatives for mitigation and resolution of the safety issue. A table of best-estimate schedules for the key tasks is also included in this program plan

  19. [Implementation of a safety and health planning system in a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, F; Bravi, C; Dolcetti, L; Moretto, A; Palermo, A; Ronchin, M; Tonelli, F; Carrer, P

    2007-01-01

    University Hospital "L. Sacco" had started in 2006 a two-year project in order to set up a "Health and Safety Management System (HSMS)" referring to the technical guideline OHSAS 18001:1999 and the UNI and INAIL "Guidelines for a health and safety management system at workplace". So far, the following operations had been implemented: Setting up of a specific Commission within the Risk Management Committee; Identification and appointment of Departmental Representatives of HSMS; Carrying out of a training course addressed to Workers Representatives for Safety and Departmental Representatives of HSMS; Development of an Integrated Informative System for Prevention and Safety; Auditors qualification; Inspection of the Occupational Health Unit and the Prevention and Safety Service: reporting of critical situations and monitoring solutions adopted. Short term objectives are: Self-evaluation through check-lists of each department; Sharing of the Improvement Plan among the departments of the hospital; Planning of Health and Safety training activities in the framework of the Hospital Training Plan; Safety audit.

  20. Fire and evacuation drills make the CERN safety plans work

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Regular drills are a way of making sure that we are ready and able to react in the event of a fire or other adverse event. They are also a demanding test of all the technical and organisational measures in place to allow the quick and safe evacuation of buildings. Recently, large-scale drills took place in Building 40 and at Point 5 underground.   Group photo at Point 5, after the common evacuation drill. The ability to react to unexpected, adverse events relies in particular on training. This is why CERN’s safety teams organise regular drills. One of the most recent exercises took place on 26 March in Building 40. “Building 40 is a modern building fully equipped against fire, with two emergency exits in the central atrium. We also have 29 emergency guides distributed on each floor to guide people out of their offices,” says Kate Richardson, Territorial Safety Officer of the building. “The drills are very useful for testing the building's insta...

  1. Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Cipriano, D.J. Jr.; Uziel, M.S.; Kleinhans, K.R.; Tiner, P.F.

    1994-08-01

    This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This plan complies with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements found in 29 CFR 1910.120 and EM-40 guidelines for any activities dealing with hazardous waste operations and emergency response efforts and with OSHA requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.65. The policies and procedures in this plan apply to all Environmental Restoration sites and activities including employees of Energy Systems, subcontractors, and prime contractors performing work for the DOE ORNL ER Program. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health and safety and to the environment from event such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water

  2. Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Cipriano, D.J. Jr.; Uziel, M.S.; Kleinhans, K.R.; Tiner, P.F.

    1994-08-01

    This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This plan complies with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements found in 29 CFR 1910.120 and EM-40 guidelines for any activities dealing with hazardous waste operations and emergency response efforts and with OSHA requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.65. The policies and procedures in this plan apply to all Environmental Restoration sites and activities including employees of Energy Systems, subcontractors, and prime contractors performing work for the DOE ORNL ER Program. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health and safety and to the environment from event such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water.

  3. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements; unresolved safety issues; generic safety issues; other multiplant action issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, the NRC established a program for publishing an annual report on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was initially compiled and reported in three NUREG-series volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). The first annual supplement, which combined these volumes into a single report and presented updated information as of September 30, 1991, was published in December 1991. The second annual supplement, which provided updated information as of September 30, 1992, was published in December 1992. Supplement 2 also provided the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of other multiplant action (MPA) issues not related to TMI Action Plan requirements, USIs, or GSIs. This third annual NUREG report, Supplement 3, presents updated information as of September 30, 1993. This report gives a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, GSIs, and other MPAs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. Additionally, this report serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  4. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements, unresolved safety issues, generic safety issues, other multiplant action issues. Supplement 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, the NRC established a program for publishing an annual report on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was initially compiled and reported in three NUREG-series volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). The first annual supplement, which combined these volumes into a single report and presented updated information as of September 30, 1991, was published in December 1991. The second annual supplement, which provided updated information as of September 30, 1992, was published in December 1992. Supplement 2 also provided the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of other multiplant action (MPA) issues not related to TMI Action Plan requirements, USIs, or GSIs. Supplement 3 gives status as of September 30, 1993. This annual report, Supplement 4, presents updated information as of September 30, 1994. This report gives a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, GSIs, and other MPAs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. Additionally, this report serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  5. Waste convention regulatory impact on planning safety assessment for LILW disposal in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.; Subasic, D.; Lokner, V.

    2000-01-01

    Preparations for establishment of a LILW repository in Croatia have reached a point where a preliminary safety assessment for the prospective facility is being planned. The planning is not based upon the national regulatory framework, which does not require such an assessment at this early stage, but upon the interagency BSS and the IAEA RADWASS programme recommendations because the national regulations are being revised with express purpose to conform to the most recent international standards and good practices. The Waste Convention, which Croatia has ratified in the meantime, supports this approach in principle, but does not appear to have more tangible regulatory relevance for the safety assessment planning. Its actual requirements regarding safety analyses for a repository fall short of the specific assessment concepts practiced in this decade, and could have well been met by the old Croatian regulations from the mid-eighties. (author)

  6. Sexual Safety Planning as an HIV Prevention Strategy for Survivors of Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jill; Núñez, Ana; Spencer, Susan; Wolf, Judith; Robertson-James, Candace

    2016-06-01

    Victims of domestic violence (DV) are not only subject to physical and emotional abuse but may also be at increased risk for less recognized dangers from infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted pathogens. Because of the close link between DV and sexual risk, women need to be educated about the consequences of acquiring a life-threatening sexually transmitted infection, risk reduction measures, and how to access appropriate HIV services for diagnosis and treatment. It is therefore critical for DV workers to receive sufficient training about the link between DV and HIV risk so that sexual safety planning can be incorporated into activities with their clients in the same way as physical safety plans. In this article, we discuss how the Many Hands Working Together project provides interactive training for workers in DV and DV-affiliated agencies to increase their knowledge about HIV and teach sexual safety planning skills to achieve HIV risk reduction.

  7. Safety risk assessment using analytic hierarchy process (AHP) during planning and budgeting of construction projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminbakhsh, Saman; Gunduz, Murat; Sonmez, Rifat

    2013-09-01

    The inherent and unique risks on construction projects quite often present key challenges to contractors. Health and safety risks are among the most significant risks in construction projects since the construction industry is characterized by a relatively high injury and death rate compared to other industries. In construction project management, safety risk assessment is an important step toward identifying potential hazards and evaluating the risks associated with the hazards. Adequate prioritization of safety risks during risk assessment is crucial for planning, budgeting, and management of safety related risks. In this paper, a safety risk assessment framework is presented based on the theory of cost of safety (COS) model and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The main contribution of the proposed framework is that it presents a robust method for prioritization of safety risks in construction projects to create a rational budget and to set realistic goals without compromising safety. The framework provides a decision tool for the decision makers to determine the adequate accident/injury prevention investments while considering the funding limits. The proposed safety risk framework is illustrated using a real-life construction project and the advantages and limitations of the framework are discussed. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Safety demonstration test (SR-1/S1C-1) plan of HTTR (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Sakaba, Nariaki; Takada, Eiji; Tachibana, Yukio; Saito, Kenji; Furusawa, Takayuki; Sawa, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Safety demonstration tests in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) will be carried out in order to verify inherent safety features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor). The first phase of the safety demonstration tests includes the reactivity insertion test by the control rod withdrawal and the coolant flow reduction test by the circulator trip. In the second phase, accident simulation tests will be conducted. By comparison of their experimental and analytical results, the prediction capability of the safety evaluation codes such as the core and the plant dynamics codes will be improved and verified, which will contribute to establish the safety design and the safety evaluation technologies of the HTGRs. The results obtained through its safety demonstration tests will be also utilised for the establishment of the safety design guideline, the safety evaluation guideline, etc. This paper describes the test program of the overall safety demonstration tests and the test method, the test conditions and the results of the pre-test analysis of the reactivity insertion test and the partial gas circulator trip test planned in March 2003. (author)

  9. Committee on the safety of nuclear installations - Operating plan (2006 - 2009)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, NEA issued its Strategic Plan covering the period 2005-2009, addressing the NEA activities associated with nuclear safety and regulation. Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), which have the primary responsibility for activities in this area, have developed and issued a joint strategic plan covering this same time period. As requested in the Joint Strategic Plan, each committee is to prepare an operating plan which describes in more detail the committee's organisation, planned activities, priorities and operating procedures to be used to implement the Joint Strategic Plan. In effect, the Joint Strategic Plan defines what type of work CSNI should do, whereas the Operating Plan describes the overall work scope and how to accomplish it to meet the joint CSNI/CNRA Strategic Plan objectives and mission. The present Operating Plan follows and takes into account the outcome of a CSNI assessment group, which has evaluated the CSNI activities. The assessment group expressed appreciation for the CSNI role and activity, while making recommendations with regards to scope of work and way to operate in order to further improve efficiency. The main objectives of CSNI are to: - Keep all member countries involved in and abreast of developments in safety technology. - Review operating experience with the objective to identify safety issues that need to be addressed by new research. - Review the state-of-knowledge on selected topics of nuclear safety technology and safety assessment. - Promote training and research projects that serve to maintain competence in nuclear safety matters. - Promote research as needed to reach consensus on nuclear safety issues of common interest. - Consider the safety implications of scientific and technical developments. To accomplish these objectives, CSNI is organised into six permanent working groups (as described in Section II), each covering a different set of

  10. Seismic safety margin research program. Program plan, Revision II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Tokarz, F.J.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Cummings, G.E.; Chou, C.K.; Vagliente, V.N.; Johnson, J.J.; Dong, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    The document has been prepared pursuant to the second meeting of the Senior Research Review Group of the Seismic Safety Margin Research Program (SSMRP), which was held on June 15, 16, 1978. The major portion of the material contained in the document is descriptions of specific subtasks to be performed on the SSMRP. This is preceded by a brief discussion of the objective of the SSMRP and the approach to be used. Specific subtasks to be performed in Phase I of the SSMRP are as follows: (1) plant/site selection, (2) seismic input, (3) soil structure interaction, (4) structural building response, (5) structural sub-system response, (6) fragility, (7) system analysis, and (8) Phase II task definition

  11. Is it necessary to plan with safety margins for actively scanned proton therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, F.; Hug, E. B.; Lomax, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    In radiation therapy, a plan is robust if the calculated and the delivered dose are in agreement, even in the case of different uncertainties. The current practice is to use safety margins, expanding the clinical target volume sufficiently enough to account for treatment uncertainties. This, however, might not be ideal for proton therapy and in particular when using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans as degradation in the dose conformity could also be found in the middle of the target resulting from misalignments of highly in-field dose gradients. Single field uniform dose (SFUD) and IMPT plans have been calculated for different anatomical sites and the need for margins has been assessed by analyzing plan robustness to set-up and range uncertainties. We found that the use of safety margins is a good way to improve plan robustness for SFUD and IMPT plans with low in-field dose gradients but not necessarily for highly modulated IMPT plans for which only a marginal improvement in plan robustness could be detected through the definition of a planning target volume.

  12. Quadrant I RCRA Facility investigation work plan: Health and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report describes occupational health and safety issues at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Health effects from exposure to chemicals, vapors, drilling and sampling activities, as well as from ionizing radiations and protective measures are discussed

  13. Site specific health and safety plan for drilling in support of in situ redox manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, B.G.

    1997-02-01

    This document contains the Site Specific Health and Safety Plan for Drilling in support of the In Situ REDOX Manipulation in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Approximately eight wells will be drilled in the 100-D/DR Area using rotary, sonic, or cable tool drilling methods. Split-spoon sampling will be done in conjunction with the drilling. The drilling may be spread out over several months. Included in this document are checklists for health and safety procedures

  14. Planning and Preparing for Emergency Response to Transport Accidents Involving Radioactive Material. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on various aspects of emergency planning and preparedness for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material, including the assignment of responsibilities. It reflects the requirements specified in Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, and those of Safety Series No. 115, International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Framework for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 3. Responsibilities for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 4. Planning for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 5. Preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; Appendix I: Features of the transport regulations influencing emergency response to transport accidents; Appendix II: Preliminary emergency response reference matrix; Appendix III: Guide to suitable instrumentation; Appendix IV: Overview of emergency management for a transport accident involving radioactive material; Appendix V: Examples of response to transport accidents; Appendix VI: Example equipment kit for a radiation protection team; Annex I: Example of guidance on emergency response to carriers; Annex II: Emergency response guide.

  15. Updating a Strategic Highway Safety Plan : Learning from the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) - Proceedings from the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) Highway Safety Peer-to-Peer Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    On November 4, 2009, ITDs Office of Highway Operations and Safety partnered with the FHWA Office of Safety to host a one-day peer exchange. This event focused on the update of Idahos Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP), entitled Toward Zero...

  16. Safety margin evaluation concepts for plant Up rates and life extension. Results of the OECD/NEA/CSNI working group on Safety Margin Action Plan (SMAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belac, J

    2006-01-01

    This presentation summarizes results of the OECD/NEA/CSNI working group on Safety Margin Action Plan (SMAP) aimed to develop generalized safety margin concept and means of its quantification for the process of evaluating plant safety in the frame of plant life extension and power up rating activities to be used by OECD member countries. (author)

  17. Analisis Kepatuhan Supervisor Terhadap Implementasi Program Occupational Health & Safety (Ohs) Planned Inspection Di PT. Ccai

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah, Dewi; Ekawati, Ekawati; Widjasena, Baju

    2015-01-01

    The Government has issued Regulation Legislation No. 50 Year 2012 on Health and Safety Management System (SMK3). CCAI is a company that has implemented SMK3. The application of the CCAI SMK3 supported by K3 program one of them is OHS Planned Inspection. This study aimed to analyze the implementation of Occupational Health & Safety (OHS) program Planned Inspection in CCAI. The subjects of this study amounted to five people as the main informants and 2 as an informant triangulation. The res...

  18. Improving food safety in the supply chain: Integrating traceability in production and distribution planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunow, Martin; Rong, Aiying; Akkerman, Renzo

    2008-01-01

    on production and distribution planning. Here, we develop a methodology for production and distribution planning in food supply chains which minimizes production and logistics costs and at the same time reduces food safety concerns, limits the size of potential recalls, and satisfies product quality...... with traceability from the viewpoint of information system development and technology development such as radio frequency identification (RFID) and DNA-based techniques. However, traceability and its implications for food safety are thus far not incorporated in the standard operations management literature...

  19. Laser programs facility management plan for environment, safety, and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Laser Programs ES ampersand H policy is established by the Associate Director for Laser Programs. This FMP is one component of that policy. Laser Programs personnel design, construct and operate research and development equipment located in various Livermore and Site 300 buildings. The Programs include a variety of activities, primarily laser research and development, inertial confinement fusion, isotope separation, and an increasing emphasis on materials processing, imaging systems, and signal analysis. This FMP is a formal statement of responsibilities and controls to assure operational activities are conducted without harm to employees, the general public, or the environment. This plan identifies the hazards associated with operating a large research and development facility and is a vehicle to control and mitigate those hazards. Hazards include, but are not limited to: laser beams, hazardous and radioactive materials, criticality, ionizing radiation or x rays, high-voltage electrical equipment, chemicals, and powered machinery

  20. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-05-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  1. Aircraft accident analysis for emergency planning and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolosi, S.L.; Jordan, H.; Foti, D.; Mancuso, J.

    1996-01-01

    Potential aircraft accidents involving facilities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) are evaluated to assess their safety significance. This study addresses the probability and facility penetrability of aircraft accidents at the Site. The types of aircraft (large, small, etc.) that may credibly impact the Site determine the types of facilities that may be breached. The methodology used in this analysis follows elements of the draft Department of Energy Standard ''Accident Analysis for Aircraft Crash into Hazardous Facilities'' (July 1995). Key elements used are: the four-factor frequency equation for aircraft accidents; the distance criteria for consideration of airports, airways, and jet routes; the consideration of different types of aircraft; and the Modified National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) formula for projectile penetration, perforation, and minimum resistant thickness. The potential aircraft accident frequency for each type of aircraft applicable to the Site is estimated using a four-factor formula described in the draft Standard. The accident frequency is the product of the annual number of operations, probability of an accident, probability density function, and area. The annual number of operations is developed from site-specific and state-wide data

  2. Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, M.; Lachance, J.; Sofu, T.; Bari, R.; Flanagon, G.; Wigeland, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes potential research priorities for the US Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety related gaps in the available information, data and models needed to support the licensing of an SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology; accident sequences and initiators; source term characterization, codes and methods; and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this paper to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the applied technology access control designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust knowledge management and preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with applied technology and knowledge management. (author)

  3. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofu, Tanju; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R.; Wigeland, Roald; Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F.

    2012-01-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  4. 200-ZP-1 phase II and III IRM groundwater pump and treat site safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St. John, C.H.

    1996-07-01

    This safety plan covers operations, maintenance, and support activities related to the 200-ZP-1 Phase II and III Ground Water Pump- and-Treat Facility. The purpose of the facility is to extract carbon tetrachloride contaminated groundwater underlying the ZP-1 Operable Unit; separate the contaminant from the groundwater; and reintroduce the treated water to the aquifer. An air stripping methodology is employed to convert volatile organics to a vapor phase for absorption onto granular activated carbon. The automated process incorporates a variety of process and safety features that shut down the process system in the event that process or safety parameters are exceeded or compromised

  5. Safety in times of crises - the importance of industrial emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademacher, H.; Schulten, R.

    1989-01-01

    Technical and organizational precautions cannot always avoid everyday risks such as accidents, fire, explosions, and other critical situations which without appropriate countermeasures can easily develop into emergencies. While in recent years considerable efforts have been going into improving the technical safety of industrial plants particularly susceptible to accidents (e.g. the nuclear and chemical industry), organizational safety seems to have been neglected. An analysis of different accidents reveals human fallibility rather than technical failures to be causing damage in many cases. Industrial emergency plans are considered to be contributing to the improvement of organizational safety. (orig.) [de

  6. Phase II -- Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA): Safety and health action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, K.

    1994-09-01

    To establish guidelines for the implementation and administration of an injury and illness prevention program for PVUSA and to assign specific responsibilities for the execution of the program. To provide a basic Safety and Health Action Plan (hereinafter referred to as Plan) that assists management, supervision, and project personnel in the recognition, evaluation, and control of hazardous activities and/or conditions within their respective areas of responsibility.

  7. Identification of training and emergency-planning needs through job-safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltrie, J.

    1987-01-01

    Training and emergency-planning needs within the photovoltaic industry may be more accurately determined through the performance of detailed job-safety analysis. This paper outlines the four major components of such an analysis, namely operational review, hazards evaluation, personnel review and resources evaluation. It then shows how these may be developed into coherent training and planning recommendations, for both emergency and non-emergency situations.

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume 4. Safety and health plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The Safety and Health Plan recognizes the potential hazards associated with the Project and has been developed specifically to respond to these risks in a positive manner. Prevention, the primary objective of the Plan, starts with building safety controls into the process design and continues through engineering, construction, start-up, and operation of the Project facilities and equipment. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local health and safety laws, regulations, and codes throughout all Project phases is required and assured. The Plan requires that each major Project phase be thoroughly reviewed and analyzed to determine that those provisions required to assure the safety and health of all employees and the public, and to prevent property and equipment losses, have been provided. The Plan requires followup on those items or situations where corrective action needs were identified to assure that the action was taken and is effective. Emphasis is placed on loss prevention. Exhibit 1 provides a breakdown of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.'s (ASFI's) Loss Prevention Program. The Plan recognizes that the varied nature of the work is such as to require the services of skilled, trained, and responsible personnel who are aware of the hazards and know that the work can be done safely, if done correctly. Good operating practice is likewise safe operating practice. Training is provided to familiarize personnel with good operational practice, the general sequence of activities, reporting requirements, and above all, the concept that each step in the operating procedures must be successfully concluded before the following step can be safely initiated. The Plan provides for periodic review and evaluation of all safety and loss prevention activities at the plant and departmental levels.

  9. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission 2003-2004 estimates. Part III - report on plans and priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Commission replace the Atomic Energy Control Board in 2000 as Canada's independent agency which regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security, and the environment. This report is an individual expenditure plan that provides details on a business line basis and contains information on objectives, initiatives, and planned results, including links to related resource requirements over a three-year period. It also provides details on human resource requirements, major capital projects, grants and contributions, and net program costs. Introductory sections with a minister's message are followed by sections giving a departmental or organization overview; plans, results, activities, resources, and initiatives, as applicable; and financial information

  10. K Basin sludge packaging design criteria (PDC) and safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) approval plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbin, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    This document delineates the plan for preparation, review, and approval of the Packaging Design Crieteria for the K Basin Sludge Transportation System and the Associated on-site Safety Analysis Report for Packaging. The transportation system addressed in the subject documents will be used to transport sludge from the K Basins using bulk packaging

  11. K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) approval plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document delineates the plan for preparation, review, and approval of the K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Packaging Design Criteria (PDC) document and the on-site Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The packaging addressed in these documents is used to transport SNF in a Multi- canister Overpack (MCO) configuration

  12. The Dutch Bicycle Master Plan and road safety : measures to be taken.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, P.C. & Blokpoel, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Bicycle Master Plan was launched in 1990 and concluded in 1996. To mark its conclusion, a study was carried out to assess developments in road safety for cyclists. An overview of future measures was also compiled. Since 1950, there have been three broad periods: (1) 1950-1975: an increase in the

  13. Food safety assurance systems: Microbiological testing, sampling plans, and microbiological criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.; Ross, T.; Gorris, L.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological criteria give information about the quality or safety of foods. A key component of a microbiological criterion is the sampling plan. Considering: (1) the generally low level of pathogens that are deemed tolerable in foods, (2) large batch sizes, and (3) potentially substantial

  14. Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Office of Reactor Safety. Research plans for the period 1997-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    Office of Reactor Safety research is carried out within the following areas: Safety evaluation, Safety analysis, MTO, Materials and chemistry, Non-Destructive Testing, Strength of materials, Thermohydraulics, Nuclear fuel, Serious accidents and Process control. Research is carried out to fulfill SKIs overall goals in accordance with the directives from the Swedish government and parliament, in particular to be a driving force in safety related work when justified by operating experience, research results and technical progress, towards licensees as well as in international cooperation in safety; to promote the maintenance and development of competence in the safety related work at the SKI as well as the licensees and generally in the country, and as a specific role for the Office of Reactor Safety as designated in the internal routines to take initiative to encourage and carry out research into areas of importance for the Office as well as ensuring that research results are disseminated and used both within SKI and in the general work concerning nuclear safety. Research efforts within the Office of Reactor safety are carried out in the form of separate projects which form part of the priority work plans. Project managers, the necessary personnel resources and the budget for each year are included in the Annual Plan and the work is followed up in the same manner as other efforts. Research is performed in different ways, that can vary from laboratory studies to more consultative efforts, and be organised in many different ways such as examination projects, post-graduate studies, work sponsored at research institutes and companies in Sweden and abroad, collaboration in larger international projects, and participation in conferences which provide an important contribution to keeping SKI personnel informed within their specialist areas

  15. Health and Safety Management Plan for the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This Health and Safety Management Plan (HSMP) presents safety and health policies and a project health and safety organizational structure designed to minimize potential risks of harm to personnel performing activities associated with Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS). The objectives of the Pu SPS are to design, fabricate, install, and startup of a glovebox system for the safe repackaging of plutonium oxides and metals, with a requirement of a 50-year storage period. This HSMP is intended as an initial project health and safety submittal as part of a three phase effort to address health and safety issues related to personnel working the Pu SPS project. Phase 1 includes this HSMP and sets up the basic approach to health and safety on the project and addresses health and safety issues related to the engineering and design effort. Phase 2 will include the Site Specific Construction health and Safety Plan (SSCHSP). Phase 3 will include an additional addendum to this HSMP and address health and safety issues associated with the start up and on-site test phase of the project. This initial submittal of the HSMP is intended to address those activities anticipated to be performed during phase 1 of the project. This HSMP is intended to be a living document which shall be modified as information regarding the individual tasks associated with the project becomes available. These modifications will be in the form of addenda to be submitted prior to the initiation of each phase of the project. For additional work authorized under this project this HSMP will be modified as described in section 1.4

  16. Overview criteria for the environmental, safety and health evaluation of remedial action project planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenner, R.D.; Denham, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    Overview criteria (i.e., subject areas requiring review) for evaluating remedial action project plans with respect to environmental, safety and health issues were developed as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Operational Safety, technical support project. Nineteen elements were identified as criteria that should be addressed during the planning process of a remedial action (decontamination and decommissioning) project. The scope was interpreted broadly enough to include such environmental, safety and health issues as public image, legal obligation and quality assurance, as well as more obvious concerns such as those involving the direct protection of public and worker health. The nineteen elements are discussed along with suggested ways to use a data management software system to organize and report results

  17. Overheads, Safety Analysis and Engineering FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.3.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiVincenzo, E.P.

    1994-09-27

    The Safety Analysis & Engineering (SA&E) department provides core competency for safety analysis and risk documentation that supports achievement of the goals and mission as described in the Hanford Mission Plan, Volume I, Site Guidance (DOE-RL 1993). SA&E operations are integrated into the programs that plan and conduct safe waste management, environmental restoration, and operational activities. SA&E personnel are key members of task teams assigned to eliminate urgent risks and inherent threats that exist at the Hanford Site. Key to ensuring protection of public health and safety, and that of onsite workers, are the products and services provided by the department. SA&E will continue to provide a leadership role throughout the DOE complex with innovative, cost-effective approaches to ensuring safety during environmental cleanup operations. The SA&E mission is to provide support to direct program operations through safety analysis and risk documentation and to maintain an infrastructure responsive to the evolutionary climate at the Hanford Site. SA&E will maintain the appropriate skills mix necessary to fulfill the customers need to conduct all operations in a safe and cost-effective manner while ensuring the safety of the public and the onsite worker.

  18. RISMC Advanced Safety Analysis Project Plan – FY 2015 - FY 2019

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In this report, a project plan is developed, focused on industry applications, using Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) tools and methods applied to realistic, relevant, and current interest issues to the operating nuclear fleet. RISMC focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. This set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. The proposed plan will focus on application of the RISMC toolkit, in particular, solving realistic problems of important current issues to the nuclear industry, in collaboration with plant owners and operators to demonstrate the usefulness of these tools in decision making.

  19. Overheads, Safety Analysis and Engineering FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.3.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiVincenzo, E.P.

    1994-01-01

    The Safety Analysis ampersand Engineering (SA ampersand E) department provides core competency for safety analysis and risk documentation that supports achievement of the goals and mission as described in the Hanford Mission Plan, Volume I, Site Guidance (DOE-RL 1993). SA ampersand E operations are integrated into the programs that plan and conduct safe waste management, environmental restoration, and operational activities. SA ampersand E personnel are key members of task teams assigned to eliminate urgent risks and inherent threats that exist at the Hanford Site. Key to ensuring protection of public health and safety, and that of onsite workers, are the products and services provided by the department. SA ampersand E will continue to provide a leadership role throughout the DOE complex with innovative, cost-effective approaches to ensuring safety during environmental cleanup operations. The SA ampersand E mission is to provide support to direct program operations through safety analysis and risk documentation and to maintain an infrastructure responsive to the evolutionary climate at the Hanford Site. SA ampersand E will maintain the appropriate skills mix necessary to fulfill the customers need to conduct all operations in a safe and cost-effective manner while ensuring the safety of the public and the onsite worker

  20. Safety evaluation report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Watts Bar Nuclear Performance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This safety evaluation report on the information submitted by the Tennessee Valley Authority in its Nuclear Performance Plan for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant and in supporting documents has been prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff. The plan addresses the plant-specific corrective actions as part of the recovery program for licensing of Unit 1. The staff will be monitoring and inspecting the implementation of the programs. The plan does not address all licensing matters that will be required for fuel load and operation of Unit 1. Those remaining licensing matters have been addressed in previous safety evaluations or will be addressed in accordance with routing NRC licensing practices. 97 refs

  1. Bechtel Hanford, Inc./ERC team health and safety plan Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, S.R.

    1996-02-01

    A comprehensive safety and health program is essential for reducing work-related injuries and illnesses while maintaining a safe and health work environment. This document establishes Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI)/Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) team requirements, policies, and procedures and provides preliminary guidance to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) subcontractor for use in preparing essential safety and health documents. This health and safety plan (HASP) defines potential safety and health issues associated with operating and maintaining the ERDF. A site-specific HASP shall be developed by the ERDF subcontractor and shall be implemented before operations and maintenance work can proceed. An activity hazard analysis (AHA) shall also be developed to provide procedures to identify, assess, and control hazards or potential incidents associated with specific operations and maintenance activities

  2. Using Groupware to Gather and Analyze Intelligence in a Public Setting: Development of Integral Safety Plans in an Electronic Meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Vennix, J.A.M.; Vriens, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of groupware to support local governments in activities in the intelligence cycle. Local governments in The Netherlands have a central role in developing integral safety plans for their district. However, in the implementation of safety plans the contribution of

  3. Annual plan of research on safety techniques against low level radioactive wastes, 1984-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of the countermeasures for treating and disposing radioactive wastes has become an important subject for promoting the utilization of atomic energy. Especially as to low level radioactive wastes, the cumulative quantity has reached about 460,000 in terms of 200 l drums as of the end of March, 1983, and accompanying the development of the utilization of atomic energy, its rapid increase is expected. So far, as for the disposal of low level radioactive wastes, the research and development and the preparation of safety criteria and safety evaluation techniques have been carried out, following the basic policy of the Atomic Energy Commission to execute land disposal and ocean disposal in combination, first to make the test disposal after preliminary safety evaluation, and to shift to the full scale disposal based on the results. The annual plan was decided on July 22, 1983, and the first revision was carried out this time, therefore, it is reported here. The basic policy of establishing this annual plan, and the annual plan for safety technique research are described. (Kako, I.)

  4. Voluntary research results for five years along the master plan on nuclear safety research. FY 2001 - 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshinori

    2006-05-01

    Safety Research has been conducted from FY 2001 to FY 2005 according to the Master Plan on Nuclear Safety Research (FY 2001-2005) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency which took over former Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. This report shows the voluntary research results for five years conducted from FY 2001 to FY 2005 according to the Master Plan on Nuclear Safety Research (FY 2001-2005). (author)

  5. Patient safety in the care of mentally ill people in Switzerland: Action plan 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Aline; Mascherek, Anna C; Schwappach, David L B

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patient safety in mental healthcare has not attracted great attention yet, although the burden and the prevalence of mental diseases are high. The risk of errors with potential for harm of patients, such as aggression against self and others or non-drug treatment errors is particularly high in this vulnerable group. Aim: To develop priority topics and strategies for action to foster patient safety in mental healthcare. Method: The Swiss patient safety foundation together with experts conducted round table discussions and a Delphi questionnaire to define topics along the treatment pathway, and to prioritise these topics. Finally, fields of action were developed. Results: An action plan was developed including the definition and prioritization of 9 topics where errors may occur. A global rating task revealed errors concerning diagnostics and structural errors as most important. This led to the development of 4 fields of action (awareness raising, research, implementation, and education and training) including practice-oriented potential starting points to enhance patient safety. Conclusions: The action plan highlights issues of high concern for patient safety in mental healthcare. It serves as a starting point for the development of strategies for action as well as of concrete activities.

  6. A plan for safety evaluation of tsunamis at the Uljin nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. K.; Lee, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    The sites of many nuclear and thermal power plants are located along the coast line to obtain necessary cooling water. Therefore, they are vulnerable to coastal disasters like tsunamis. The safety evaluation on tsunamis of the site of Uljin nuclear power plants was performed with the maximum potential earthquake magnitude and related fault parameters in 1986. But according to the results of recent research, the possibility was suggested that the earthquake which has bigger magnitude than was expected is likely to happen in the seismic gaps near Akita, Japan. Therefore, a plan for safety evaluation of tsunamis at the Uljin nuclear power plants was laid out

  7. INFLUENCE OF PLANNING, ORGANIZATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS AND REGULATION ON ROAD TRAFFIC SAFETY OF PEDESTRIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Kuharenok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on planning, organizational characteristics and regulation modes at  the regulated pedestrian crossings, located out of crossroads in the street and road network of Minsk. Some regularities pertaining to the influence of the investigated characteristics on road traffic safety of pedestrians are revealed in the paper. Practical offers on increase of road traffic safety of pedestrians in the Republic of Belarus have been developed on the basis of the executed investigations and cited in the paper. 

  8. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site

  9. Planning and preparing for emergency response to transport accidents involving radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance to the public authorities and others (including consignors, carriers and emergency response authorities) who are responsible for developing and establishing emergency arrangements for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material. It may assist those concerned with establishing the capability to respond to such transport emergencies. It provides guidance for those Member States whose involvement with radioactive material is just beginning. It also provides guidance for those Member States that have already developed their radioactive material industries and the attendant emergency plans but that may need to review and improve these plans

  10. Water reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsors confirmatory safety research on lightwater reactors in support of the NRC regulatory program. The principal responsibility of the NRC, as implemented through its regulatory program is to ensure that public health, public safety, and the environment are adequately protected. The NRC performs this function by defining conditions for the use of nuclear power and by ensuring through technical review, audit, and follow-up that these conditions are met. The NRC research program provides technical information, independent of the nuclear industry, to aid in discharging these regulatory responsibilities. The objectives of NRC's research program are the following: (1) to maintain a confirmatory research program that supports assurance of public health and safety, and public confidence in the regulatory program, (2) to provide objectively evaluated safety data and analytical methods that meet the needs of regulatory activities, (3) to provide better quantified estimates of the margins of safety for reactor systems, fuel cycle facilities, and transportation systems, (4) to establish a broad and coherent exchange of safety research information with other Federal agencies, industry, and foreign organization. Current and planned research toward these goals is described

  11. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification review plan - 7/29/99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to verify the implementation status of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) for the River Protection Project (RPP) facilities managed by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and operated by Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC). This review will also ascertain whether within RPP facilities and operations the work planning and execution processes are in place and functioning to effectively protect the health and safety of the workers, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The RPP ISMS should support the Hanford Strategic Plan (DOERL-96-92) to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy waste and deploy science and technology while incorporating the ISMS central theme to ''Do work safely'' and protect human health and the environment

  12. Safety evaluation report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Browns Ferry nuclear performance plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) on the information submitted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its Nuclear Performance Plan, through Revision 2, for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant and in supporting documents has been prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory commission staff. The Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant consists of three boiling-water reactors at a site in Limestone County, Alabama. The plan addresses the plant-specific concerns requiring resolution before the startup of Unit 2. The staff will inspect implementation of those TVA programs that address these concerns. Where systems are common to Units 1 and 2 or to Units 2 and 3, the staff safety evaluations of those systems are included herein. 85 refs

  13. Radiation safety analysis and action plans for NSRRC top-up operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.-P.; Sheu, R.-J.; Liu, Joseph C.; Chen, C.-R.; Chang, F.-D.; Kao, S.-P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the radiation safety analysis and action plans for the upcoming top-up operation at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC). Electron beam loss scenarios and consequence of beam lifetime and injection efficiency have been studied. Dose assessment was conducted based on measurement and Monte Carlo simulation results. Radiation safety action plans such as upgrading the shielding of the injection section, enlarging the exclusion zones of the straight section beamlines, installing new interlock system for top-up operation and most importantly improving the injection efficiency have been scheduled. The goal is to keep present dose limit of 2 mSv/y and make top-up operation feasible at normal user's run of year 2006

  14. Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, S.

    1994-05-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. This document describes the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality requirements for conducting BWID activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Topics discussed in this report, as they apply to BWID operations, include Federal, State of Idaho, and Environmental Protection Agency regulations, Health and Safety Plans, Quality Program Plans, Data Quality Objectives, and training and job hazard analysis. Finally, a discussion is given on CERCLA criteria and System and Performance audits as they apply to the BWID Program

  15. National nuclear power plant safety research 2011-2014. SAFIR2014 framework plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A country utilising nuclear energy is presumed to possess a sufficient infrastructure to cover the education and research in this field, besides the operating organisations of the plants and a regulatory body. The starting point of public nuclear safety research programmes is that they provide the necessary conditions for retaining the knowledge needed for ensuring the continuance of safe and economic use of nuclear power, for development of new know-how and for participation in international cooperation. In fact, the Finnish organisations engaged in research in this sector have been an important resource which the various ministries, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) and the power companies have had at their disposal. Ministry of employment and the economy appointed a group to write the Framework Plan of the new programme. This report contains a proposal for the general outline of the programme, entitled as SAFIR2014 (SAfety of Nuclear Power Plants - Finnish National Research Programme). The plan has been made for the period 2011-2014, but it is based on safety challenges identified for a longer time span as well. Olkiluoto 3, the new nuclear power plant unit under construction and new decisions-in-principle have also been taken into account in the plan. The safety challenges set by the existing plants and the new projects, as well as the ensuing research needs do, however, converge to a great extent. The research programme is strongly based on the Chapter 7a of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act. The construction of new power plant units will increase the need for experts in the field in Finland. At the same time, the retirement of the existing experts is continuing. These factors together will call for more education and training, in which active research activities play a key role. This situation also makes long-term safety research face a great challenge. The Framework Plan aims to define the important research needs related to the safety

  16. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-03-01

    This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

  17. Reliability and safety program plan outline for the operational phase of a waste isolation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammer, H.G.; Wood, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A Reliability and Safety Program plan outline has been prepared for the operational phase of a Waste Isolation Facility. The program includes major functions of risk assessment, technical support activities, quality assurance, operational safety, configuration monitoring, reliability analysis and support and coordination meetings. Detailed activity or task descriptions are included for each function. Activities are time-phased and presented in the PERT format for scheduling and interactions. Task descriptions include manloading, travel, and computer time estimates to provide data for future costing. The program outlined here will be used to provide guidance from a reliability and safety standpoint to design, procurement, construction, and operation of repositories for nuclear waste. These repositories are to be constructed under the National Waste Terminal Storage program under the direction of the Office of Waste Isolation, Union Carbide Corp. Nuclear Division

  18. HACCP and water safety plans in Icelandic water supply: preliminary evaluation of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdóttir, María J; Gissurarson, Loftur R

    2008-09-01

    Icelandic waterworks first began implementing hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) as a preventive approach for water safety management in 1997. Since then implementation has been ongoing and currently about 68% of the Icelandic population enjoy drinking water from waterworks with a water safety plan based on HACCP. Preliminary evaluation of the success of HACCP implementation was undertaken in association with some of the waterworks that had implemented HACCP. The evaluation revealed that compliance with drinking water quality standards improved considerably following the implementation of HACCP. In response to their findings, waterworks implemented a large number of corrective actions to improve water safety. The study revealed some limitations for some, but not all, waterworks in relation to inadequate external and internal auditing and a lack of oversight by health authorities. Future studies should entail a more comprehensive study of the experience with the use of HACCP with the purpose of developing tools to promote continuing success.

  19. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable

  20. RISMC advanced safety analysis project plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L; Youngblood, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (@@@why is this important?@@@) that will make the case for stakeholder's use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable @@use case@@@ demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  1. Safety evaluation report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Browns Ferry Nuclear Performance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) was prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and represents the second and last supplement (SSER 2) to the staff's original SER published as Volume 3 of NUREG-1232 in April 1989. Supplement 1 of Volume 3 of NUREG-1232 (SSER 1) was published in October 1989. Like its predecessors, SSER 2 is composed of numerous safety evaluations by the staff regarding specific elements contained in the Browns Ferry Nuclear Performance Plan (BFNPP), Volume 3 (up to and including Revision 2), submitted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN). The Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant consists of three boiling-water reactors (BWRs) at a site in Limestone County, Alabama. The BFNPP describes the corrective action plans and commitments made by TVA to resolve deficiencies with its nuclear programs before the startup of Unit 2. The staff has inspected and will continue to inspect TVA's implementation of these BFNPP corrective action plans that address staff concerns about TVA's nuclear program. SSER 2 documents the NRC staff's safety evaluations and conclusions for those elements of the BFNPP that were not previously addressed by the staff or that remained open as a result of unresolved issues identified by the staff in previous SERs and inspections

  2. Nordic nuclear safety research. Summary report for 1995. Plans for 1996 and 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research) is a cooperative body in nuclear safety and radiation protection. Its purpose is to carry out cost-effective Nordic projects, thus producing research results, exercises, information, recommendations, manuals and other types of background material, to be used by decision makers and other concerned staff members at authorities and within the nuclear industry. This is the annual report for 1995. The report also contains plans for the rest of the program period. The program comprises four major fields of research: reactor safety; radioactive waste; radioecology; and emergency preparedness. Finland and Sweden presently operate a total of 16 power producing reactors. Denmark, Norway and Sweden operate research reactors. There is a plant for nuclear fuel manufacture in Sweden. All five Nordic countries have intermediate waste storage facilities. In addition, there are a number of power, research and naval reactors and other nuclear installations in Nordic surroundings, both in Eastern and Western Europe. Hence, nuclear safety, radiation protection, waste management, environmental impact and emergency preparedness issues are of common interest to all Nordic countries. Environmental impact of radioactive releases is studied in two radioecology projects. The project on marine radioecology, including sediment research (EKO-1), includes sampling, analysis and modeling. These are also key issues in the project on long ecological half-lives in semi-natural systems (EKO-2). The transfer of the seven presently ongoing projects are summarized in this report by the project leaders, both in terms of results in 1995 and plans for 1996/97. (EG)

  3. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program. Task, OU 1-03 and OU 4-10 Track 2 investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippet, W.A. II [IT Corp., (United States); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG&G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  4. Draft IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with paragraphs 23 and 24 of the Declaration adopted by the Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety held on 20-24 June 2011, the Director General was requested to prepare and present to the Board of Governors and the General Conference at their September 2011 meetings a report on the Ministerial Conference and a draft Action Plan, building on the Ministerial Declaration, the conclusions and recommendations of the working sessions of the Ministerial Conference and the expertise and knowledge available therein, and to facilitate consultations among Member States on the draft Action Plan. This draft Action Plan is the result of an extensive process of consultations with Member States and responds to the request contained in the Ministerial Declaration.

  5. Planning the Unplanned Experiment: Assessing the Efficacy of Standards for Safety Critical Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graydon, Patrick J.; Holloway, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We need well-founded means of determining whether software is t for use in safety-critical applications. While software in industries such as aviation has an excellent safety record, the fact that software aws have contributed to deaths illustrates the need for justi ably high con dence in software. It is often argued that software is t for safety-critical use because it conforms to a standard for software in safety-critical systems. But little is known about whether such standards `work.' Reliance upon a standard without knowing whether it works is an experiment; without collecting data to assess the standard, this experiment is unplanned. This paper reports on a workshop intended to explore how standards could practicably be assessed. Planning the Unplanned Experiment: Assessing the Ecacy of Standards for Safety Critical Software (AESSCS) was held on 13 May 2014 in conjunction with the European Dependable Computing Conference (EDCC). We summarize and elaborate on the workshop's discussion of the topic, including both the presented positions and the dialogue that ensued.

  6. Planning the Unplanned Experiment: Towards Assessing the Efficacy of Standards for Safety-Critical Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graydon, Patrick J.; Holloway, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Safe use of software in safety-critical applications requires well-founded means of determining whether software is fit for such use. While software in industries such as aviation has a good safety record, little is known about whether standards for software in safety-critical applications 'work' (or even what that means). It is often (implicitly) argued that software is fit for safety-critical use because it conforms to an appropriate standard. Without knowing whether a standard works, such reliance is an experiment; without carefully collecting assessment data, that experiment is unplanned. To help plan the experiment, we organized a workshop to develop practical ideas for assessing software safety standards. In this paper, we relate and elaborate on the workshop discussion, which revealed subtle but important study design considerations and practical barriers to collecting appropriate historical data and recruiting appropriate experimental subjects. We discuss assessing standards as written and as applied, several candidate definitions for what it means for a standard to 'work,' and key assessment strategies and study techniques and the pros and cons of each. Finally, we conclude with thoughts about the kinds of research that will be required and how academia, industry, and regulators might collaborate to overcome the noted barriers.

  7. Study on European Nuclear Safety Practices during Planned Outages at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The present project was aimed at providing: a description of the current status of nuclear safety practices during planned outages at nuclear power plants followed in Europe; the criteria for the safety analysis of future reactors at the design stage; proposing a set of recommendations on good practices and criteria leading to the improvement of nuclear safety during those conditions. The work was organised in 3 phases: Collecting data on current practices; Analysis of questionnaire answers and drawing up of safety good practices references and recommendations; Collecting relevant ideas related to the future reactors at design stage (European Pressurised Water Reactor, European Passive Plant project, European Utilities Requirements and Utilities Requirement Document project). The key element of the performed work was the detailed questionnaire, based on bibliographical review, expert experience and outage practices available in the working team. Different safety areas and activities were covered: outage context; nuclear safety; outage strategy, organisation and control; operating feedback; use of Probabilistic Safety Assessment. The questionnaire was answered by 12 European nuclear power plants, representing 9 different European countries and three different types of reactors (Pressurised Water Reactor, Boiling Water Reactor and Water Water Energy Reactor). Conclusions were drawn under the following headers: Organisational survey and generalities Organisational effectiveness Quality of maintenance Quality of operation Engineering support, management of modification Specific aspects Each analysed subject includes the following topics: Questions background with a summary and the aim of the questions. Current status, that describes common practices, as derived from the answers to the questionnaire, and some examples of good specific practices. Identified good practices. (author)

  8. The World Health Organization's water safety plan is much more than just an integrated drinking water quality management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, F C

    2010-01-01

    South Africa is a country of contrasts with far ranging variations in climate, precipitation rates, cultures, demographics, housing levels, education, wealth and skills levels. These differences have an impact on water services delivery as do expectations, affordability and available resources. Although South Africa has made much progress in supplying drinking water, the same cannot be said regarding water quality throughout the country. A concerted effort is currently underway to correct this situation and as part of this drive, water safety plans (WSP) are promoted. Rand Water, the largest water services provider in South Africa, used the World Health Organization (WHO) WSP framework as a guide for the development of its own WSP which was implemented in 2003. Through the process of implementation, Rand Water found the WHO WSP to be much more than just another integrated quality system.

  9. The strategic plan for the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Following the request from the NEA that all the committees should develop Strategic Plans and the report of the Effectiveness Review Group (ERG) on the effectiveness of CSNI's activities, CSNI created a Strategic Planning Group to review their working processes. In developing a five year rolling Strategic Plan, the Group has considered the need for more top-down direction by CSNI, stricter control on time limited Task Groups and improved communications including timely review and publication of reports. The Strategic Planning Group, after reviewing the current work structure of CSNI and the current technical issues as laid out in the SESAR series of reports and the CNRA report on Regulatory Effectiveness, have made the following recommendations. The basic elements of the CSNI will continue to be the Principal Working Groups, which will be known in future simply as Working Groups. The number of Working Groups and their areas of expertise will be reviewed periodically when the strategic plan undergoes a review. It is recommended that this Plan be reviewed every five years. In order to provide better top-down direction by the CSNI, it is recommended that a small Programme Review Group (PRG) be created. The PRG will assist the CSNI Bureau to review proposals from the Working Groups, and enable the review of major reports to ensure high quality. To ensure timely management of projects and reviews of proposals and reports it is recommended that CSNI have a second full meeting in early summer. It is recommended that Special Expert Groups (SEGs) be created reporting directly to CSNI. These Groups would deal with issues that cut across the disciplines of more than one Working Group and be assigned clear time-limited mandates. The creation of SEGs on Fuel Safety Margins and on Human and Organisational Factors is proposed at this time. Restructuring of the five Principal Working Groups into four Working Groups is recommended. This would be accomplished by merging the former

  10. Utah ITS/CVO business plan : using technology to maximize highway safety and improve government and industry productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This plan was produced to maximize highway safety and increase government and industry productivity through the application of Intelligent Transportation System/Commercial Vehicle Operations (ITS/CVO) technologies to support regulatory and enforcemen...

  11. Urban planning, traffic planning and traffic safety of pedestrians and cyclists : report presented to the 1979 Road Research Symposium on Safety of Pedestrians and Cyclists, OECD Headquarters, Paris, 14-16 May 1979. Session III: Physical Countermeasures; Subsession III.1: Urban planning and traffic planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, F.C.M.

    1979-01-01

    The traffic safety of pedestrians and cyclists can be improved by means of urban planning and traffic planning, as one of the possibilities. This paper discusses the framework of these measures and activities and also the effects on the field of traffic planning. Chapter I show that it is not

  12. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation

  13. THE ROLE OF NAVIGATIONAL AIDS IN FLIGHT SAFETY MANAGEMENT WITHIN ICAO GLOBAL AIR NAVIGATION PLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim V. Vurobyov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the global civil aviation is provided on the basis of the ICAO Communication and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management Concept, which has determined the basic strategy for further commercial flight management effectiveness improvement. On the basis of this concept a Global Air Navigation Plan has been developed by ICAO recently. The core strategies of CNS/ATM concept were specified and combined into so-called blocks. Thus the term Global Aviation System block upgrade has been introduced. At the same time, GANP states that the introduction of new procedures and flight management systems will inevitably affect flight safety. Accordingly, there is a task of flight safety management level maintaining, or even increasing within the Global Air Navigation Plan implementation. Various air navigational aids play a significant role in the process as they are directly associated with the new systems and structures introduction.This breeds the new global challenge of flight safety management level change assessment during the introduction of new procedures and systems connected with the use of both navigational aids and instruments. Some aspects of this problem solution are covered in the article.

  14. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety in the frame of the Chernobyl shelter Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, V.; Demchyuk, A.; Kilochitska, T.; Redko, V. [State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine, SNRCU, Arsenalna St. 9/11, Kyiv (Ukraine); Bogorinski, P. [GRS/IPSN-RISKAUDIT, Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Germany); Vasilchenko, V.; Erickson, L.; Kadkin, E.; Kondratyev, S.; Kutina, L.; Smyshliaeva, S. [SSTC NRS, Stusa St. 35-37, 03142, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2003-07-01

    Since 1998 the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) has been carried out on the Chernobyl NPP Unit 4 (the object Shelter - OS). The State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine (SNRCU) recognizes the exceptional importance of successful and efficient SIP implementation and acts accordingly in regulation, licensing, and inspection. Technical support of the SNRCU in SIP licensing are provided by the State Scientific and Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SSTC) and the SIP Licensing Consultant (LC) representing RISKAUDIT IPSN/GRS International and SCIENTECH, Inc. Support of the SNRCU is also provided by the International Consultative Committee of Regulatory Bodies (ICCRB). ICCRB members represent regulatory authorities from nine European countries, Canada and the U.S. Summarizing the information above, it can be stated that a sound basis has been created for the licensing process for SIP. The approach for using the regulatory base has been determined. It ensures the establishment of safety objectives and gives ChNPP the freedom of optimal choice of specific technical decisions. The License has been issued for OS-related activities and a number of documents have been developed to conduct an effective and high quality authorization process: the Licensing Process; Recommendations on single SSR, Licensing Plan for SIP. The Order of State Safety Supervision for SIP has been approved. Working groups are functioning, whose purposes are to coordinate actions of participants in authorization activities, including ChNPP, SNRCU, and other RA.

  15. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety in the frame of the Chernobyl shelter Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.; Demchyuk, A.; Kilochitska, T.; Redko, V.; Bogorinski, P.; Vasilchenko, V.; Erickson, L.; Kadkin, E.; Kondratyev, S.; Kutina, L.; Smyshliaeva, S.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1998 the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) has been carried out on the Chernobyl NPP Unit 4 (the object Shelter - OS). The State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine (SNRCU) recognizes the exceptional importance of successful and efficient SIP implementation and acts accordingly in regulation, licensing, and inspection. Technical support of the SNRCU in SIP licensing are provided by the State Scientific and Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SSTC) and the SIP Licensing Consultant (LC) representing RISKAUDIT IPSN/GRS International and SCIENTECH, Inc. Support of the SNRCU is also provided by the International Consultative Committee of Regulatory Bodies (ICCRB). ICCRB members represent regulatory authorities from nine European countries, Canada and the U.S. Summarizing the information above, it can be stated that a sound basis has been created for the licensing process for SIP. The approach for using the regulatory base has been determined. It ensures the establishment of safety objectives and gives ChNPP the freedom of optimal choice of specific technical decisions. The License has been issued for OS-related activities and a number of documents have been developed to conduct an effective and high quality authorization process: the Licensing Process; Recommendations on single SSR, Licensing Plan for SIP. The Order of State Safety Supervision for SIP has been approved. Working groups are functioning, whose purposes are to coordinate actions of participants in authorization activities, including ChNPP, SNRCU, and other RA

  16. The Nordic programme for nuclear safety 1990-1993. Plan for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    In 1993 the fourth Nordic Nuclear Safety Research programme will be concluded with final reports on all of the eighteen projects. Each report will contain the results of the work carried out which has taken four years to complete and, at the same time, give a more general survey of the Northern countries' competence within the fields of emergency readiness in situations of abnormal radiation, radioactive waste and its disposal, radioecology and nuclear reactor safety - accessibility of appropriate information. Some of the reports will be published in the form of reference books or in the form of databases of direct assistance to the authorities. A number of seminars will be held so that the results and professional level of the reports can be discussed. The coordinators' and project leaders' plans for these activities are presented with the the amounts of money that project organizers have asked the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research programme to finance them with. During 1993 the plans for the programme starting in 1994 must be laid, and future researchers, project leaders, involved organizations and sponsors determined. (AB)

  17. A tailored online safety and health intervention for women experiencing intimate partner violence: the iCAN Plan 4 Safety randomized controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Ford-Gilboe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV threatens the safety and health of women worldwide. Safety planning is a widely recommended, evidence-based intervention for women experiencing IPV, yet fewer than 1 in 5 Canadian women access safety planning through domestic violence services. Rural, Indigenous, racialized, and immigrant women, those who prioritize their privacy, and/or women who have partners other than men, face unique safety risks and access barriers. Online IPV interventions tailored to the unique features of women’s lives, and to maximize choice and control, have potential to reduce access barriers, and improve fit and inclusiveness, maximizing effectiveness of these interventions for diverse groups. Methods/Design In this double blind randomized controlled trial, 450 Canadian women who have experienced IPV in the previous 6 months will be randomized to either a tailored, interactive online safety and health intervention (iCAN Plan 4 Safety or general online safety information (usual care. iCAN engages women in activities designed to increase their awareness of safety risks, reflect on their plans for their relationships and priorities, and create a personalize action plan of strategies and resources for addressing their safety and health concerns. Self-reported outcome measures will be collected at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months post-baseline. Primary outcomes are depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, Revised and PTSD Symptoms (PTSD Checklist, Civilian Version. Secondary outcomes include helpful safety actions, safety planning self-efficacy, mastery, and decisional conflict. In-depth qualitative interviews with approximately 60 women who have completed the trial and website utilization data will be used to explore women’s engagement with the intervention and processes of change. Discussion This trial will contribute timely evidence about the effectiveness of online safety and

  18. The technical approach: The IAEA action plan on the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, A.; Wrixon, A.; Ortiz-Lopez, P.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the measures to strengthen international co-operation in nuclear, radiation and waste safety, the report refers to the implementation of the Action Plan for the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials. Starting with background information, the report references the main results of the Dijon Conference and of General Conference resolution GC(42)/RES/12 in September 1998, describing the actions taken by the Secretariat pursuant such resolution and also by the Board of Governors, in its sessions of March and September 1999, as well as by the General Conference, in October 1999 when by resolution GC(43)/RES/10 the Action Plan was endorsed and the Secretariat was urged to implement it. Finally, the report provides information on the status of implementation of the seven areas covered by the Action Plan and on the suggested further actions to be carried out for its implementation taking into account the decisions of the Board in its meeting of 11 September 2000 and the resolutions GC(44)/RES/11, GC(44)/RES/13 and GC(44)/RES/16 of the forty-fourth regular session of the General Conference. (author)

  19. Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S ampersand H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures

  20. Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

  1. Understanding safety and production risks in rail engineering planning and protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John R; Ryan, Brendan; Schock, Alex; Ferreira, Pedro; Smith, Stuart; Pitsopoulos, Julia

    2009-07-01

    Much of the published human factors work on risk is to do with safety and within this is concerned with prediction and analysis of human error and with human reliability assessment. Less has been published on human factors contributions to understanding and managing project, business, engineering and other forms of risk and still less jointly assessing risk to do with broad issues of 'safety' and broad issues of 'production' or 'performance'. This paper contains a general commentary on human factors and assessment of risk of various kinds, in the context of the aims of ergonomics and concerns about being too risk averse. The paper then describes a specific project, in rail engineering, where the notion of a human factors case has been employed to analyse engineering functions and related human factors issues. A human factors issues register for potential system disturbances has been developed, prior to a human factors risk assessment, which jointly covers safety and production (engineering delivery) concerns. The paper concludes with a commentary on the potential relevance of a resilience engineering perspective to understanding rail engineering systems risk. Design, planning and management of complex systems will increasingly have to address the issue of making trade-offs between safety and production, and ergonomics should be central to this. The paper addresses the relevant issues and does so in an under-published domain - rail systems engineering work.

  2. [Patient safety culture in hospitals: experiences in planning, organising and conducting a survey among hospital staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vegten, Amanda; Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Giuliani, Francesca; Manser, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the first hospital-wide survey on patient safety climate, involving all staff (medical and non-medical), in the German-speaking area. Its aim is to share our experiences with planning, organising and conducting this survey. The study was performed at the university hospital in Zurich and had a response rate of 46.8% (2,897 valid questionnaires). The survey instrument ("Patientensicherheitsklimainventar") was based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (AHRQ). Primarily it allowed for assessing the current patient safety climate as well as identifying specific areas for improvement and creating a hospital-wide awareness and acceptance for patient safety issues and interventions (e.g., the introduction of a Critical Incident Reporting System [CIRS]). We discuss the basic principles and the feedback concept guiding the organisation of the overall project. Critical to the success of this project were the guaranteed anonymity of the respondents, adequate communication through well-established channels within the organisation and the commitment of the management across all project phases. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Standard review plan for reviewing safety analysis reports for dry metallic spent fuel storage casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Cask Standard Review Plan (CSRP) has been prepared as guidance to be used in the review of Cask Safety Analysis Reports (CSARs) for storage packages. The principal purpose of the CSRP is to assure the quality and uniformity of storage cask reviews and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of reviews. The CSRP also sets forth solutions and approaches determined to be acceptable in the past by the NRC staff in dealing with a specific safety issue or safety-related design area. These solutions and approaches are presented in this form so that reviewers can take consistent and well-understood positions as the same safety issues arise in future cases. An applicant submitting a CSAR does not have to follow the solutions or approaches presented in the CSRP. However, applicants should recognize that the NRC staff has spent substantial time and effort in reviewing and developing their positions for the issues. A corresponding amount of time and effort will probably be required to review and accept new or different solutions and approaches

  4. 49 CFR 244.15 - Subjects to be addressed in a Safety Integration Plan not involving an amalgamation of operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subjects to be addressed in a Safety Integration... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS ON SAFETY INTEGRATION PLANS GOVERNING RAILROAD CONSOLIDATIONS, MERGERS, AND...

  5. HAZWOPER work plan and site safety and health plan for the Alpha characterization project at the solid waste storage area 4 bathtubbing trench at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This work plan/site safety and health plan is for the alpha sampling project at the Solid Waste Storage Area 4 bathtubbing trench. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. This activity will fall under the scope of 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. Work will be conducted in accordance with requirements as stipulated in the ORNL HAZWOPER Program Manual and applicable ORNL; Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.; and U.S. Department of Energy policies and procedures. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project. Unforeseeable site conditions or changes in scope of work may warrant a reassessment of the stated protection levels and controls. All adjustments to the plan must have prior approval by the safety and health disciplines signing the original plan

  6. Safety Evaluation report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Sequoyah nuclear performance plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) on the information submitted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its Sequoyah Nuclear Performance Plan, through Revision 2, and supporting documents has been prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff. The plan addresses the plant-specific concerns requiring resolution before startup of either of the Sequoyah units. In particular, the SER addresses required actions for Unit 2 restart. In many cases, the programmatic aspects for Unit 1 are identical to those for Unit 2; the staff will conduct inspections of implementation of those programs. Where the Unit 1 program is different, the staff evaluation will be provided in a supplement to this SER. On the basis of its review, the staff concludes that Sequoyah-specific issues have been resolved to the extent that would support restart of Sequoyah Unit 2

  7. Automated and connected vehicle (AV/CV) test bed to improve transit, bicycle, and pedestrian safety : concept of operations plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document presents the Concept of Operations (ConOps) Plan for the Automated and Connected Vehicle (AV/CV) Test Bed to Improve Transit, Bicycle, and Pedestrian Safety. As illustrated in Figure 1, the plan presents the overarching vision and goals...

  8. Standard Review Plan for the review of safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants: LWR edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) is prepared for the guidance of staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation in performing safety reviews of applications to construct or operate nuclear power plants. The principal purpose of the SRP is to assure the quality and uniformity of staff reviews and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of reviews. It is also a purpose of the SRP to make information about regulatory matters widely available and to improve communication and understanding of the staff review process by interested members of the public and the nuclear power industry. The safety review is primarily based on the information provided by an applicant in a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The SAR must be sufficiently detailed to permit the staff to determine whether the plant can be built and operated without undue risk to the health and safety of the public. The SAR is the principal document in which the applicant provides the information needed to understand the basis upon which this conclusion has been reached. The individual SRP sections address, in detail, who performs the review, the matters that are reviewed, the basis for review, how the review is accomplished, and the conclusions that are sought. The safety review is performed by 25 primary branches. One of the objectives of the SRP is to assign the review responsibilities to the various branches and to define the sometimes complex interfaces between them. Each SRP section identifies the branch that has the primary review responsibility for that section. In some review areas the primary branch may require support, and the branches that are assigned these secondary review responsibilities are also identified for each SRP section

  9. UMTRA project office federal employee occupational safety and health program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document establishes the Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health (FEOSH) Program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. This program will ensure compliance with applicable requirements of DOE Order 3790.1B and DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Order 3790.lA. FEOSH Program responsibilities delegated by the DOE-AL to the UMTRA Project Office by AL Order 3790.1A also are assigned. The UMTRA Project Office has developed the UMTRA Project Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan (DOE, 1992), which establishes the basic programmatic ES ampersand H requirements for all participants on the UMTRA Project. The ES ampersand H plan is designed primarily to cover remedial action activities at UMTRA sites and defines the ES ampersand H responsibilities of both the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors. The UMTRA FEOSH Program described herein is a subset of the overall UMTRA ES ampersand H program and covers only federal employees working on the UMTRA Project

  10. The Emergency Action Plan of the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin Cuarteto, M.; Camarma, J. R.; Martin Calvarro, J. M

    2007-01-01

    The Spanish Nuclear safety Council (CSN) has assigned by law among others the function to coordinate the measures of support and answer to nuclear emergency situations for all the aspects related with nuclear safety and radiological protection. Integrating and coordinating the different organisations public and private companies whose aid is necessary for the fulfilment of the functions attributed to the Regulatory Body. In order to suitable perform this function, CSN has equipped itself with an Emergency Action Plan that structures the response organization, establishes responsibility levels, incorporates basic performance procedures and includes capabilities to face the nuclear and radiological emergencies considering the external supports, resulting from the collaboration agreements with public institutions and private companies. To accomplish the above mentioned Emergency Action Plan, CSN has established and implanted a formation and training and re-training program for the organization response for emergencies and has update an operative centre (Emergency Room called Salem), equipped with infrastructures, tools and communication and operative systems that incorporate the more advanced technologies available to date. (Author)

  11. Survivorship Care Plan Information Needs: Perspectives of Safety-Net Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Nancy J; Napoles, Tessa M; Banks, Priscilla J; Orenstein, Fern S; Luce, Judith A; Joseph, Galen

    2016-01-01

    Despite the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) 2005 recommendation, few care organizations have instituted standard survivorship care plans (SCPs). Low health literacy and low English proficiency are important factors to consider in SCP development. Our study aimed to identify information needs and survivorship care plan preferences of low literacy, multi-lingual patients to support the transition from oncology to primary care and ongoing learning in survivorship. We conducted focus groups in five languages with African American, Latina, Russian, Filipina, White, and Chinese medically underserved breast cancer patients. Topics explored included the transition to primary care, access to information, knowledge of treatment history, and perspectives on SCPs. Analysis of focus group data identified three themes: 1) the need for information and education on the transition between "active treatment" and "survivorship"; 2) information needed (and often not obtained) from providers; and 3) perspectives on SCP content and delivery. Our data point to the need to develop a process as well as written information for medically underserved breast cancer patients. An SCP document will not replace direct communication with providers about treatment, symptom management and transition, a communication that is missing in participating safety-net patients' experiences of cancer care. Women turned to peer support and community-based organizations in the absence of information from providers. "Clear and effective" communication of survivorship care for safety-net patients requires dedicated staff trained to address wide-ranging information needs and uncertainties.

  12. Site health and safety plan/work plan for further characterization of waste drums at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abston, J.P.; Burman, S.N.; Jones, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    The health and safety plan/work plan describes a strategy for characterizing the contents of 172 liquid waste and 33 solid waste drums. It also addresses the control measures that will be taken to (1) prevent or minimize any adverse impact on the environment or personnel safety and health and (2) meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. When writing this document, the authors considered past experiences, recommendations, and best management practices to minimize possible hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or unplanned releases of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water

  13. Interactive software automates personalized radiation safety plans for Na131I therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Marvin I; Ghesani, Munir

    2002-11-01

    NRC regulations have liberalized the criteria for release from control of patients administered radioactive materials but require written radiation safety instruction if another individual is expected to receive more than 1 mSv. This necessitates calculation of expected doses, even when the calculated maximum likely dose is well below the 5 mSv release criterion. NRC interpretations of the regulation provide the biokinetic model to be used to evaluate the release criterion for patients administered Na131I, but do not provide guidance as to either the specifics of minimizing the dose of others or the length of time restrictions should remain in effect. Interactive software has been developed to facilitate creation of radiation safety plans tailored to patients' expected interactions. Day-by-day and cumulative effective exposures at several separation distances, including sleeping, are presented in grid format in a graphic interface. In an interview session, the patient proposes daily contacts, which are entered separately for each individual by point-and-click operation. Total dose estimates are accumulated and modified while negotiating contact schedules, guided by suggested age-specific limits. The software produces printed radiation safety recommendations specific to the clinical, dosing, and social situations and reflective of the patient's choice of combinations of close contact with others. It has been used in treating more than 100 patients and has been found to be very useful and well received.

  14. Planning maximum extraction of a safety pillar in the Most surface mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helis, P; Hess, L; Kubiznak, K [SHR - Banske Projekty, Teplice (Czechoslovakia)

    1990-11-01

    Discusses planned coal surface mining in the Most mine in the area of the Hnevin safety pillar with coal reserves amounting to about 7.5 Mt. The following aspects are evaluated: coal reserves and their distribution in the pillar, coal seam thickness and dip angles, water conditions, water influx rates, mechanical properties of the overburden and strata situated in the seam floor, slope stability and hazards of landslides, effects of water influx on landslide hazards, types of bucket wheel excavators used for overburden removal and mining, types of belt conveyors used for mine haulage, stackers, position of mining equipment in the mine. A scheme developed by Banske Projekty Teplice for partial extraction of the safety pillar would result in extraction of 4.5 Mt coal. About 1.7 Mt coal would be left in a safety coal layer about 10.0 m thick situated in the floor in zones with landslide hazards. KU 300 bucket wheel excavators, belt conveyors 1,200 mm wide and ZP 2,500 stackers would be used. 4 refs.

  15. Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abston, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to health and safety (H and S) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all GAAT operations in the NTF and STF. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities identifies s part of the GAAT are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices in order to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air. This plan explains additional task-specific health and safety requirements such as the Site Safety and health Addendum and Activity Hazard Analysis, which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

  16. Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abston, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to health and safety (H and S) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all GAAT operations in the NTF and STF. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities identifies s part of the GAAT are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices in order to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air. This plan explains additional task-specific health and safety requirements such as the Site Safety and health Addendum and Activity Hazard Analysis, which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures

  17. Application of safety standards and rules in the Shelter Implementation Plan at the destroyed power unit of Chernobyl NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthold, A.; Bogorinski, P.; Bykov, V.; Redko, V.; Erickson, L.; Kadkin, Ye.; Kondratiev, S.; Simonov, I.; Smyshliaieva, S.; Yesipenko, Yu.

    2002-01-01

    This report deals with the application of safety standards and rules to the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) measures. Since 1998 this plan is being implemented at the Chornobyl NPP destroyed unit (which is now known as the Shelter). It includes a set of various tasks whose performance will help partially achieve the established safety objectives. The Regulatory Authority should establish for the Shelter safety goals, principles, and criteria in general, while the Operator of the Shelter is free to independently select the optimum method for their implementation. The Operator of the Shelter must demonstrate (in safety analysis report) that established safety goals are achieved and safety principles and criteria are met. Safety goals, principles, and criteria established for radioactive waste management are reasonable to apply in measures provided for by SIP. However, due to the unique nature of the Shelter, some criteria should not be applied directly and in full scope. Norms and rules on radiation protection should be applied in full scope. The specifics of radiation protection during each Shelter-related activity are considered individually. Safety standards and rules related to technical aspects are reasonable only as a basis. Effective resolution of specific technical issues associated with safety assurance is achieved through interaction between the Operator and the Regulatory Authority during design of SIP structures and systems. Hence, effectiveness of the licensing process plays an important role in the success of the SIP.(author)

  18. Population-based health promotion perspective for older driver safety: Conceptual framework to intervention plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Sherrilene; Lopez, Ellen DS; Winter, Sandra; Awadzi, Kezia D; Ferree, Nita; Garvan, Cynthia W

    2007-01-01

    The topic of motor vehicle crashes among the elderly is dynamic and multi-faceted requiring a comprehensive and synergistic approach to intervention planning. This approach must be based on the values of a given population as well as health statistics and asserted through community, organizational and policy strategies. An integrated summary of the predictors (quantitative research), and views (qualitative research) of the older drivers and their stakeholders, does not currently exist. This study provided an explicit socio-ecological view explaining the interrelation of possible causative factors, an integrated summary of these causative factors, and empirical guidelines for developing public health interventions to promote older driver safety. Using a mixed methods approach, we were able to compare and integrate main findings from a national crash dataset with perspectives of stakeholders. We identified: 11 multi-causal factors for safe elderly driving; the importance of the environmental factors - previously underrated in the literature- interacting with behavioral and health factors; and the interrelatedness among many socio-ecological factors. For the first time, to our knowledge, we conceptualized the fundamental elements of a multi-causal health promotion plan, with measurable intermediate and long-term outcomes. After completing the detailed plan we will test the effectiveness of this intervention on multiple levels. PMID:18225470

  19. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Nuclear safety; (2) Industrial and health safety; (3) Radiation safety; and Fire protection

  20. Preliminary safety evaluation, based on initial site investigation data. Planning document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, Allan

    2002-12-01

    This report is a planning document for the preliminary safety evaluations (PSE) to be carried out at the end of the initial stage of SKBs ongoing site investigations for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The main purposes of the evaluations are to determine whether earlier judgements of the suitability of the candidate area for a deep repository with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of borehole data and to provide feed-back to continued site investigations and site specific repository design. The preliminary safety evaluations will be carried out by a safety assessment group, based on a site model, being part of a site description, provided by a site modelling group and a repository layout within that model suggested by a repository engineering group. The site model contains the geometric features of the site as well as properties of the host rock. Several alternative interpretations of the site data will likely be suggested. Also the biosphere is included in the site model. A first task for the PSE will be to compare the rock properties described in the site model to previously established criteria for a suitable host rock. This report gives an example of such a comparison. In order to provide more detailed feedback, a number of thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical analyses of the site will also be included in the evaluation. The selection of analyses is derived from the set of geosphere and biosphere analyses preliminarily planned for the comprehensive safety assessment named SR-SITE, which will be based on a complete site investigation. The selection is dictated primarily by the expected feedback to continued site investigations and by the availability of data after the PSE. The repository engineering group will consider several safety related factors in suggesting a repository layout: Thermal calculations will be made to determine a minimum distance between canisters avoiding canister surface temperatures above 100 deg C

  1. Krsko NPP Quality Assurance Plan Application to Nuclear Safety Upgrade Projects (PCFV System and PAR System)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscan, Romeo; Fifnja, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) has undertaken Nuclear Safety Upgrade Projects as a safety improvement driven by the lessons learned from the Fukushima-Daiichi Accident. Among other projects, new modification 1008-VA-L Passive Containment Filtered Vent (PCFV) System has been installed which acts as the last barrier minimizing the release of radioactive material into the environment in case of failure of all safety systems, and to insure containment integrity during beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). In addition, modification 1002-GH-L Severe Accident Hydrogen Control System (PAR) has been implemented to prevent and mitigate the consequences of explosive gas generation (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) in case of reactor core melting. To ensure containment integrity for all design basis accidents (DBA) and BDBA conditions, NEK has eliminated existing safety-related electrical recombiners, replaced them with two safety-related passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs) and added 20 new PARs designed for the BDBA conditions. Krsko NPP Quality Assurance Plan has been applied to Nuclear Safety Upgrade Projects (PCFV System and PAR System) through the following activities: · Internal audit of modification process was performed. · Supplier audits were performed to evaluate QA program efficiency of the main design organization and engineering organizations. · Evaluation and approval of Suppliers were performed. · QA engineer was involved in the review and approval of 1008-VA-L and 1002-GH-L modification documentation (Conceptual Design Package, Design Modification Package, Installation Package, Field Design Change Request, Problem/Deficiency Report, and Final Documentation Package). · Purchasing documentation for modifications 1008-VA-L and 1002-GH-L (technical specifications, purchase orders) has been verified and approved by QA. · QA and QC engineers were involved in oversight of production and testing of the new 1008-VA-L and 1002-GH-L plant components.

  2. Water Safety Plan on cruise ships: A promising tool to prevent waterborne diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara A., E-mail: mouchtourib@med.uth.gr [Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Bartlett, Christopher L.R. [University College London, Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Diskin, Arthur [Royal Caribbean Cruise Line, Miami (United States); Hadjichristodoulou, Christos [Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    2012-07-01

    Background: Legionella spp. and other waterborne pathogens have been isolated from various water systems on land based premises as well as on ships and cases of Legionnaires' disease have been associated with both sites. Peculiarities of cruise ships water systems make the risk management a challenging process. The World Health Organization suggests a Water Safety Plan (WSP) as the best approach to mitigate risks and hazards such as Legionella spp. and others. Objectives: To develop WSP on a cruise ship and discuss challenges, perspectives and key issues to success. Methods: Hazards and hazardous events were identified and risk assessment was conducted of the ship water system. Ship company management, policies and procedures were reviewed, site visits were conducted, findings and observations were recorded and discussed with engineers and key crew members were interviewed. Results: A total of 53 hazards and hazardous events were taken into consideration for the risk assessment and additional essential barriers were established when needed. Most of them concerned control measures for biofilm development and Legionella spp. contamination. A total of 29 operational limits were defined. Supplementary verification and supportive programs were established. Conclusions: Application of the WSP to ship water systems, including potable water, recreational water facilities and decorative water features and fountains, is expected to improve water management on ships. The success of a WSP depends on support from senior management, commitment of the Captain and crew members, correct execution of all steps of a risk assessment and practicality and applicability in routine operation. The WSP provides to shipping industry a new approach and a move toward evidence based water safety policy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We conducted risk assessment and developed a Water Safety Plan on a cruise ship. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 53 hazards and hazardous events were

  3. Water Safety Plan on cruise ships: A promising tool to prevent waterborne diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara A.; Bartlett, Christopher L.R.; Diskin, Arthur; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Background: Legionella spp. and other waterborne pathogens have been isolated from various water systems on land based premises as well as on ships and cases of Legionnaires' disease have been associated with both sites. Peculiarities of cruise ships water systems make the risk management a challenging process. The World Health Organization suggests a Water Safety Plan (WSP) as the best approach to mitigate risks and hazards such as Legionella spp. and others. Objectives: To develop WSP on a cruise ship and discuss challenges, perspectives and key issues to success. Methods: Hazards and hazardous events were identified and risk assessment was conducted of the ship water system. Ship company management, policies and procedures were reviewed, site visits were conducted, findings and observations were recorded and discussed with engineers and key crew members were interviewed. Results: A total of 53 hazards and hazardous events were taken into consideration for the risk assessment and additional essential barriers were established when needed. Most of them concerned control measures for biofilm development and Legionella spp. contamination. A total of 29 operational limits were defined. Supplementary verification and supportive programs were established. Conclusions: Application of the WSP to ship water systems, including potable water, recreational water facilities and decorative water features and fountains, is expected to improve water management on ships. The success of a WSP depends on support from senior management, commitment of the Captain and crew members, correct execution of all steps of a risk assessment and practicality and applicability in routine operation. The WSP provides to shipping industry a new approach and a move toward evidence based water safety policy. - Highlights: ► We conducted risk assessment and developed a Water Safety Plan on a cruise ship. ► 53 hazards and hazardous events were taken into consideration for the risk assessment.

  4. Evaluation of the probabilistic safety assessment portfolio for NSD. Plan of work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim is to use the research portfolio evaluation protocol developed by HSL to evaluate the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) portfolio, both to draw conclusions about the PSA portfolio and as a pilot study to show the suitability of the evaluation protocol. The objectives of the work are: (1) To collect sufficient information to carry out a preliminary review of the portfolio; (2) o produce a plan of work detailing the time and costs to carry out a full evaluation of the PSA portfolio; (3) to evaluate the PSA portfolio of research; (4) to produce a report of the evaluation of the PSA portfolio; (5) if necessary, to make changes to the methodology in light of the experience gained in the evaluation of the PSA research portfolio. This report completes objectives 1 and 2. It details the plan of work for the evaluation of the PSA research portfolio. The plan has shown that the evaluation of the PSA research portfolio has many difficulties to overcome. It is suitable as a pilot study to show the suitability of the portfolio evaluation protocol and will provide valuable information that can be used to improve it. The evaluation of the PSA portfolio will require a considerable amount of time and effort to complete. The task analysis has shown it to be of the order of Pound Sterling 25k and to take two months to complete after this preliminary data collection. The plan to evaluate the PSA research portfolio detailed in this report should be carried out and the lessons learned by carrying out this pilot study should be used to improve the evaluation protocol

  5. Population-based health promotion perspective for older driver safety: Conceptual framework to intervention plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherrilene Classen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sherrilene Classen1,2, Ellen DS Lopez3, Sandra Winter2, Kezia D Awadzi4, Nita Ferree5, Cynthia W Garvan61Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions (CPHHP, University of Florida (UF, Gainesville, FL, USA; 2PhD Program in Rehabilitation Science, CPHHP, UF Gainesville, FL, USA; 3Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health, CPHHP, UF, Gainesville, FL, USA; 4Department of Health Services Research, Management, and Policy, CPHHP, UF, Gainesville, FL, USA; 5Health Science Center Libraries, UF, Gainesville, FL, USA; 6Division of Biostatistics, College of Medicine, UF, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: The topic of motor vehicle crashes among the elderly is dynamic and multi-faceted requiring a comprehensive and synergistic approach to intervention planning. This approach must be based on the values of a given population as well as health statistics and asserted through community, organizational and policy strategies. An integrated summary of the predictors (quantitative research, and views (qualitative research of the older drivers and their stakeholders, does not currently exist. This study provided an explicit socio-ecological view explaining the interrelation of possible causative factors, an integrated summary of these causative factors, and empirical guidelines for developing public health interventions to promote older driver safety. Using a mixed methods approach, we were able to compare and integrate main findings from a national crash dataset with perspectives of stakeholders. We identified: 11 multi-causal factors for safe elderly driving; the importance of the environmental factors - previously underrated in the literature- interacting with behavioral and health factors; and the interrelatedness among many socio-ecological factors. For the first time, to our knowledge, we conceptualized the fundamental elements of a multi-causal health promotion plan, with measurable intermediate and long

  6. Health safety planning for possible accidental exposures of workers and population in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strambi, E.; Trenta, G.; Muzzi, A.

    1986-01-01

    Unforeseen radiation exposures may be caused by technical or human faults in the utilization of radioactive devices, namely radionuclide sources, as well as from the peaceful uses of nuclear energy; the first instance is in general the more common one. The paper discusses the principal basis for health intervention planning in the case of possible accidental exposures of workers and/or the population to ionizing radiation, also with reference to hypothetical accidents at nuclear power stations. For this last purpose an important aspect is the definition of the 'source term' problem. The main differences existing between 'conventional' and radiation emergencies in the pre-planning of technical and health safety operations are discussed. Even if the general organizational planning is based on similar operating structures, radiation emergencies require a somewhat different approach. Besides the specialized aspects of prophylaxis and therapy which are needed in these cases, radiation emergencies call for a comparison of the social cost, the possible health detriment induced by health-related countermeasures and the specific radiation risk in a single case. In many instances, furthermore, a key role may also be played by psychological factors. Following this philosophy, a flexible organization plan has been drawn up, which consists of three-steps as follows: (1) local and/or regional level; (2) national level; (3) European or international level. For the first two levels, besides the possibility of utilizing health services, there is provision to arrange them into structures of increasing complexity, using modular, integrated and fixed operative units to adapt the intervention to specific aspects of each accident or emergency. The third level is represented by the WHO International Centre of Radiopathology (ICR) in Paris. An official agreement was recently signed by the ENEA and the Centre. (author)

  7. Quality assurance program plan for 324 Building B-Cell safety cleanout project (BCCP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanke, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) provides information on how the Quality Assurance Program is implemented for the 324 Building B-Cell Safety Cleanout Project (BCCP). This QAPP is responsive to the Westinghouse Hanford Company Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, WHC-SP-1131, for 10 CFR 830.120, Nuclear Safety Management, Quality Assurance Requirements; and DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance. This QAPP supersedes PNNL PNL-MA-70 QAP Quality Assurance Plan No. WTC-050 Rev. 2, issue date May 3, 1996. This QAPP has been developed specifically for the BCCP. It applies to those items and tasks which affect the completion of activities identified in the work breakdown structure of the Project Management Plan (PMP). These activities include all aspects of decontaminating B-Cell and project related operations within the 324 Building as it relates to the specific activities of this project. General facility activities (i.e. 324 Building Operations) are covered in the Building 324 QAPP. In addition, this QAPP supports the related quality assurance activities addressed in CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, and HSRCM-1, Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual, The 324 Building is currently transitioning from being a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) managed facility to a B and W Hanford Company (BWHC) managed facility. During this transition process existing, PNNL procedures and documents will be utilized until replaced by BWHC procedures and documents. These documents conform to the requirements found in PNL-MA-70, Quality Assurance Manual and PNL-MA-8 1, Hazardous Materials Shipping Manual. The Quality Assurance Program Index (QAPI) contained in Table 1 provides a matrix which shows how project activities relate to 10 CFR 83 0.120 and 5700.6C criteria. Quality Assurance program requirements will be addressed separate from the requirements specified in this document. Other Hanford Site organizations/companies may be

  8. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.

    1994-12-28

    This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI`s EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area.

  9. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.

    1994-01-01

    This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI's EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85 degrees to 95 degrees C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area

  10. Review of domestic and international experience on optimization of tests planning for safety related systems at NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalozubov, V.I.; Komarov, Yu.A.; Kolykanov, V.N.; Kochneva, V.Yu.; Gablaya, T.V.

    2009-01-01

    There are represented the basic requirements of normative and operating documents on test periodicity of safety related systems at NPPs, sets out the theoretical methods of test optimization of the technical systems, and analyses foreign engineering methods for changing test periodicity of the NPP systems. Based on this review analyses further tasks are formulated for improvement of the methodical base of optimization of tests planning for safety related systems

  11. Measuring the Impacts of Water Safety Plans in the Asia-Pacific Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Kumpel

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effectiveness of Water Safety Plans (WSP implemented in 99 water supply systems across 12 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. An impact assessment methodology including 36 indicators was developed based on a conceptual framework proposed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC and before/after data were collected between November 2014 and June 2016. WSPs were associated with infrastructure improvements at the vast majority (82 of participating sites and to increased financial support at 37 sites. In addition, significant changes were observed in operations and management practices, number of water safety-related meetings, unaccounted-for water, water quality testing activities, and monitoring of consumer satisfaction. However, the study also revealed challenges in the implementation of WSPs, including financial constraints and insufficient capacity. Finally, this study provided an opportunity to test the impact assessment methodology itself, and a series of recommendations are made to improve the approach (indicators, study design, data collection methods for evaluating WSPs.

  12. Irradiation Test Plan and Safety Analysis of the Fatigue Capsule(05S-05K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Kim, B. G.; Kang, Y. H.; Choo, K. N.; Sohn, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Shin, Y. T.; Seo, C. K

    2007-01-15

    In this report, the design, fabrication, the out-pile test and the irradiation test plan of the fatigue capsule 05S-05K were described and the safety aspect during the design, fabrication and irradiation test was reviewed. A cyclic load device necessary for the fatigue test was newly designed and manufactured. By using the cyclic load device the performance test and the preliminary fatigue test were performed with STS316L specimen of {phi}1.8 mm x 12.5 mm gage length under the same condition(550 .deg. C) as the temperature of the specimen during the irradiation test. As a result of the test, the fracture of the specimen occurs at a total of 70,120 cycles, at which the displacement was 2.02 mm. The reactivity effect was reviewed and an analysis for the structural and thermal integrity was performed to review the safety of the capsule, which will be irradiated at a temperature higher than 550 .deg. C And the thermal analysis shows that the temperatures of the parts are less than the melting temperatures of the corresponding materials. The structural analysis considering this temperature shows that the combined stress on the outer tube is less than the allowable stress limits and so the structural integrity is maintained.

  13. Safety Evaluation Report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Browns Ferry Nuclear Performance Plan: Browns Ferry Unit 2 restart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) on the information submitted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its Nuclear Performance Plan, through Revision 2, for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Station and in supporting documents has been prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff. The plan addresses the plant-specific concerns requiring resolution before startup of Unit 2. The staff will inspect implementation of those programs. Where systems are common to Units 1 and 2 or to Units 2 and 3, the staff safety evaluations of those systems are included herein. 3 refs

  14. 76 FR 38267 - The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's 2011-2016 Strategic Plan: Raising the Safety Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) address: http://www.regulations.gov . Fax: 202-493-2251. Mail: Docket Management Facility (M-30), U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room... transport and logistics supply chain in improving CMV safety factors. This is a holistic view of safety that...

  15. Implementation of a safety action plan: reduction of the dose limits in a research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deworm, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Belgian Regulations require an annual Action Plan to improve the Safety and health conditions of works. Taking into consideration the preliminary versions of the new ICRP-recommendations, the 1990 Action Plan of the Belgian research Centre aimed to reduce the personal dose limit to 20 mSv/year and the annual collective dose by 10%. Major means used in the campaign were sensibility through information, consultation between hierarchy and executors and the application of a policy of discouragement at certain limits. As a result, the maximum level reaches was 16.5 mSv, while only 7 people received a dose above 10 mSv (of 219 who received a measurable dose, mean value 3,4 mSv). This success is due to the commitment at all levels of responsibilities. In 1991, the 20 mSv-limit is imposed as an obligation by the management, and a feasibility study to impose 10 mSv in near future is being undertaken. (author)

  16. Development of a strategic plan for food security and safety in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Myriam; Laird, Brian; Douglas, Vasiliki; Van Pelt, Linda; Archie, Diane; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-01-01

    Current social and environmental changes in the Arctic challenge the health and well-being of its residents. Developing evidence-informed adaptive measures in response to these changes is a priority for communities, governments and researchers. To develop strategic planning to promote food security and food safety in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR), Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada. A qualitative study using group discussions during a workshop. A regional workshop gathered Inuit organizations and community representatives, university-based researchers from the Inuit Health Survey (IHS) and NWT governmental organizations. Discussions were structured around the findings from the IHS. For each key area, programs and activities were identified and prioritized by group discussion and voting. The working group developed a vision for future research and intervention, which is to empower communities to promote health, well-being and environmental sustainability in the ISR. The group elaborated missions for the region that address the following issues: (a) capacity building within communities; (b) promotion of the use of traditional foods to address food security; (c) research to better understand the linkages between diseases and contaminants in traditional foods, market foods and lifestyle choices; (d) and promotion of affordable housing. Five programs to address each key area were developed as follows: harvest support and traditional food sharing; education and promotion; governance and policy; research; and housing. Concrete activities were identified to guide future research and intervention projects. The results of the planning workshop provide a blueprint for future research and intervention projects.

  17. Water Safety Plan for drinking water risk management: the case study of Mortara (Pavia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Sorlini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Water Safety Plan (WSP approach is an iterative method focused on analyzing the risks of water contamination in a drinking water supply system, from catchment to consumer, in order to protect human health. This approach is aimed at identifying and drastically reducing water contamination in the entire drinking water system, through the identification and mitigation or, if possible, elimination of all factors that may cause a chemical, physical, microbiological and radiological risk for water. This study developed a proposal of WSP for the drinking water supply system (DWSS of Mortara, Italy, in order to understand which are the preliminary evaluation aspects to be considered in the elaboration of a WSP. The DWSS of Mortara (a town of 15,500 inhabitants, located in northern Italy consists of three drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs, considering the following main contaminants: arsenic, iron, manganese and ammonia. Potential hazardous events and associated hazards were identified in each part of the water supply system. The risk assessment was carried out following the semi quantitative approach. The WSP proposal for Mortara was very useful not only as a risk mitigation approach, but also as a cost-effective tool for water suppliers. Furthermore, this approach will reduce public health risk, ensure a better compliance of water quality parameters with regulatory requirements, increase confidence of consumers and municipal authorities, and improve resource management due to intervention planning. Further, some new control measures are proposed by the WSP team within this work.

  18. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program: Phase II program plan (FY 83-FY 84)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Cover, L.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Shieh, L.C.; Shukla, S.N.; Wells, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is an NRC-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its goal is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The analysis procedure is based upon a state-of-the-art evaluation of the current seismic analysis and design process and explicitly includes the uncertainties inherent in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. As currently planned, the SSMRP will be completed in September, 1984. This document presents the program plan for work to be done during the remainder of the program. In Phase I of the SSMRP, the necessary tools (both computer codes and data bases) for performing a detailed seismic risk analysis were identified and developed. Demonstration calculations were performed on the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. In the remainder of the program (Phase II) work will be concentrated on developing a simplified SSMRP methodology for routine probabilistic risk assessments, quantitative validation of the tools developed and application of the simplified methodology to a Boiling Water Reactor. (The Zion plant is a pressurized water reactor.) In addition, considerable effort will be devoted to making the codes and data bases easily accessible to the public

  19. Water safety plan at the Saharawi refugee camps in Tindouf (Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. García

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1975, about 165,000 people from Western Sahara are living as refugees in the Sahara Desert near Tindouf (Algeria. Available water resources come from deep boreholes located up to tens of kilometers away from the settlements of the population, bulk water is treated in reverse osmosis plants and by chlorination systems and, after, distributed through a network of taps and water tankers. Water supply system complexity and extreme conditions force the elaboration of a Water Safety Plan, aiming to guarantee appropriate provision and quality of water. The plan follows a risk assessment methodology and establishes control mechanisms to minimize risk impacts, which are compiled in six action protocols for infrastructures and water quality monitoring. As a novel contribution, the proposed methodology developed in the refugee camps incorporates besides the conventional water quality assessment concepts, the analysis of the volume of supplied water, linked with some water-washed diseases. Since the end of 2014, those protocols have begun to be applied obtaining results that have a positive effect on the life quality of refugees.

  20. A business planning model to identify new safety net clinic locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, James; Helton, Jeffrey; DelliFraine, Jami; Dotson, Ebbin; Watts, Carolyn; Love, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Community health clinics serving the poor and underserved are geographically expanding due to changes in U.S. health care policy. This paper describes the experience of a collaborative alliance of health care providers in a large metropolitan area who develop a conceptual and mathematical decision model to guide decisions on expanding its network of community health clinics. Community stakeholders participated in a collaborative process that defined constructs they deemed important in guiding decisions on the location of community health clinics. This collaboration also defined key variables within each construct. Scores for variables within each construct were then totaled and weighted into a community-specific optimal space planning equation. This analysis relied entirely on secondary data available from published sources. The model built from this collaboration revolved around the constructs of demand, sustainability, and competition. It used publicly available data defining variables within each construct to arrive at an optimal location that maximized demand and sustainability and minimized competition. This is a model that safety net clinic planners and community stakeholders can use to analyze demographic and utilization data to optimize capacity expansion to serve uninsured and Medicaid populations. Communities can use this innovative model to develop a locally relevant clinic location-planning framework.

  1. Ongoing and planned fuel safety research in NEA member states - Compiled from SEGFSM Members' Contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    This report is in response to an action placed on SEGFSM members to compile ongoing and planned fuel safety research in NEA member states with the aim of providing CSNI an overview on related R and D international programmes and projects, along with the identification of current and future needs and priorities. A questionnaire was distributed to SEGFSM members on 18 October 2000, requesting them to identify fuel safety research programmes and to provide information on achievements and future plans. The questionnaire required respondents to provide information on the ongoing R and D programmes under the following headings: Title; Research Laboratory/Sponsor(s); Objectives/Goals; Status of Work; Brief description/presentation of the main results achieved; Future plans; References. Replies were received from organizations in the following countries: Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Korea, Norway (Halden Reactor Project), Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA. The report is based on the information provided in the replies received, as a consequence it cannot be viewed as comprehensive; programmes may well be in progress in addition to those detailed here. It is also possible that the detailed results of some programmes may remain proprietary and therefore not available in the short term. The report is organized in topic sections relating to: fuel and clad studies, integral fuel rod tests and PIE, LOCA and RIA studies including whole rods and bundles as well as single effects studies of fuel and cladding, code development for both steady state and transient fuel behaviour, thermal hydraulics, reactor physics codes and finally severe accident studies. The main issues for the current generation of reactors are those of high burn-up performance in normal operations, LOCA and RIA conditions and the main goal for the industry is to consolidate the safety issues to bring all countries up to a licensed discharge burn-up of ∼60 MWd/kg in

  2. Guidance for implementing an environmental, safety and health assurance program. Volume 2. A model plan for environmental, safety and health staff audits and appraisals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, A.C.

    1980-09-01

    This is 1 of 15 documents designed to illustrate how an Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) Assurance Program may be implemented. The generic definition of ES and H Assurance Programs is given in a companion document entitled An Environmental, Safety and Health Assurance Program Standard. This document is concerned with ES and H audit and appraisal activities of an ES and H Staff Organization as they might be performed in an institution whose ES and H program is based upon the ES and H Assurance Program Standard. An annotated model plan for ES and H Staff audits and appraisals is presented and discussed

  3. Guidance for implementing an environmental, safety, and health-assurance program. Volume 15. A model plan for line organization environmental, safety, and health-assurance programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, A.C.; Trauth, C.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This is 1 of 15 documents designed to illustrate how an Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) Assurance Program may be implemented. The generic definition of ES and H Assurance Programs is given in a companion document entitled An Environmental, Safety and Health Assurance Program Standard. This particular document presents a model operational-level ES and H Assurance Program that may be used as a guide by an operational-level organization in developing its own plan. The model presented here reflects the guidance given in the total series of 15 documents.

  4. Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, S.N.; Landguth, D.C.; Uziel, M.S.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Tiner, P.F.

    1992-05-01

    As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL and will be implemented by ORNL/MAD. Major components of the plan include (1) a quality assurance project plan that describes the scope and objectives of ORNL/MAD activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, assigns responsibilities, and provides emergency information for contingencies that may arise during field operations; (2) sampling and analysis sections; (3) a site-specific health and safety section that describes general site hazards, hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements, and mandatory safety procedures; (4) procedures and requirements for equipment decontamination and responsibilities for generated wastes, waste management, and contamination control; and (5) a discussion of form completion and reporting required to document activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site

  5. Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Landguth, D.C.; Uziel, M.S.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Tiner, P.F.

    1992-05-01

    As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL and will be implemented by ORNL/MAD. Major components of the plan include (1) a quality assurance project plan that describes the scope and objectives of ORNL/MAD activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, assigns responsibilities, and provides emergency information for contingencies that may arise during field operations; (2) sampling and analysis sections; (3) a site-specific health and safety section that describes general site hazards, hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements, and mandatory safety procedures; (4) procedures and requirements for equipment decontamination and responsibilities for generated wastes, waste management, and contamination control; and (5) a discussion of form completion and reporting required to document activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site.

  6. Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Landguth, D.C.; Uziel, M.S.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Tiner, P.F.

    1992-05-01

    As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL and will be implemented by ORNL/MAD. Major components of the plan include (1) a quality assurance project plan that describes the scope and objectives of ORNL/MAD activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, assigns responsibilities, and provides emergency information for contingencies that may arise during field operations; (2) sampling and analysis sections; (3) a site-specific health and safety section that describes general site hazards, hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements, and mandatory safety procedures; (4) procedures and requirements for equipment decontamination and responsibilities for generated wastes, waste management, and contamination control; and (5) a discussion of form completion and reporting required to document activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site.

  7. Standard Review Plan for the review of safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants, Revision No. 7 to Section 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Revision No. 1 to Section 9 of the Standard Review Plan incorporates changes that have been developed since the original issuance in September 1975, many of which are editorial in nature, to reflect current staff practice in the review of safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants

  8. 75 FR 36773 - Pipeline Safety: Updating Facility Response Plans in Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... have been, or are subsequently relocated to the Gulf to respond to the Deepwater Horizon event should.... PHMSA-2010-0175] Pipeline Safety: Updating Facility Response Plans in Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil... 194. In light of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, which has resulted in the...

  9. Development of a Reality-Based Multimedia Case Study Teaching Method and Its Effect on Students' Planned Food Safety Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Caitlin M.; Stevenson, Clinton D.

    2017-01-01

    There is opportunity to decrease the frequency of foodborne illnesses by improving food safety competencies and planned behaviors of college students before they begin careers in the food industry. The objectives of this study were to (1) develop a multimedia case study teaching method that provides real world context for food science education;…

  10. Engineering task plan for the annual revision of the rotary mode core sampling system safety equipment list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan addresses an effort to provide an update to the RMCS Systems 3 and 4 SEL and DCM in order to incorporate the changes to the authorization basis implemented by HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, Rev. 0 (Draft), Addendum 5 , Safety Analysis for Rotary Mode Core Sampling. Responsibilities, task description, cost estimate, and schedule are presented

  11. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES ampersand H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES ampersand H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES ampersand H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements

  12. Water Safety Plan on cruise ships: a promising tool to prevent waterborne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Bartlett, Christopher L R; Diskin, Arthur; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2012-07-01

    Legionella spp. and other waterborne pathogens have been isolated from various water systems on land based premises as well as on ships and cases of Legionnaires' disease have been associated with both sites. Peculiarities of cruise ships water systems make the risk management a challenging process. The World Health Organization suggests a Water Safety Plan (WSP) as the best approach to mitigate risks and hazards such as Legionella spp. and others. To develop WSP on a cruise ship and discuss challenges, perspectives and key issues to success. Hazards and hazardous events were identified and risk assessment was conducted of the ship water system. Ship company management, policies and procedures were reviewed, site visits were conducted, findings and observations were recorded and discussed with engineers and key crew members were interviewed. A total of 53 hazards and hazardous events were taken into consideration for the risk assessment and additional essential barriers were established when needed. Most of them concerned control measures for biofilm development and Legionella spp. contamination. A total of 29 operational limits were defined. Supplementary verification and supportive programs were established. Application of the WSP to ship water systems, including potable water, recreational water facilities and decorative water features and fountains, is expected to improve water management on ships. The success of a WSP depends on support from senior management, commitment of the Captain and crew members, correct execution of all steps of a risk assessment and practicality and applicability in routine operation. The WSP provides to shipping industry a new approach and a move toward evidence based water safety policy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  14. Nevada State plan; final approval determination. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. Final State plan approval--Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-18

    This document amends OSHA's regulations to reflect the Assistant Secretary's decision granting final approval to the Nevada State plan. As a result of this affirmative determination under section 18(e) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Federal OSHA's standards and enforcement authority no longer apply to occupational safety and health issues covered by the Nevada plan, and authority for Federal concurrent jurisdiction is relinquished. Federal enforcement jurisdiction is retained over any private sector maritime employment, private sector employers on Indian land, and any contractors or subcontractors on any Federal establishment where the land is exclusive Federal jurisdiction. Federal jurisdiction remains in effect with respect to Federal government employers and employees. Federal OSHA will also retain authority for coverage of the United States Postal Service (USPS), including USPS employees, contract employees, and contractor-operated facilities engaged in USPS mail operations.

  15. Development of a strategic plan for food security and safety in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Fillion

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current social and environmental changes in the Arctic challenge the health and well-being of its residents. Developing evidence-informed adaptive measures in response to these changes is a priority for communities, governments and researchers. Objectives: To develop strategic planning to promote food security and food safety in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR, Northwest Territories (NWT, Canada. Design: A qualitative study using group discussions during a workshop. Methods: A regional workshop gathered Inuit organizations and community representatives, university-based researchers from the Inuit Health Survey (IHS and NWT governmental organizations. Discussions were structured around the findings from the IHS. For each key area, programs and activities were identified and prioritized by group discussion and voting. Results: The working group developed a vision for future research and intervention, which is to empower communities to promote health, well-being and environmental sustainability in the ISR. The group elaborated missions for the region that address the following issues: (a capacity building within communities; (b promotion of the use of traditional foods to address food security; (c research to better understand the linkages between diseases and contaminants in traditional foods, market foods and lifestyle choices; (d and promotion of affordable housing. Five programs to address each key area were developed as follows: harvest support and traditional food sharing; education and promotion; governance and policy; research; and housing. Concrete activities were identified to guide future research and intervention projects. Conclusions: The results of the planning workshop provide a blueprint for future research and intervention projects.

  16. Assessment of water supply system and water quality of Lighvan village using water safety plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Pourakbar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Continuous expansion of potable water pollution sources is one of the main concerns of water suppliers, therefore measures such as water safety plan (WSP, have been taken into account to control these sources of pollution. The aim of this study was to identify probable risks and threatening hazards to drinking water quality in Lighvan village along with assessment of bank filtration of the village. Methods: In the present study all risks and probable hazards were identified and ranked. For each of these cases, practical suggestions for removing or controlling them were given. To assess potable water quality in Lighvan village, sampling was done from different parts of the village and physicochemical parameters were measured. To assess the efficiency of bank filtration system of the village, independent t test was used to compare average values of parameters in river and treated water. Results: One of the probable sources of pollution in this study was domestic wastewater which threatens water quality. The results of this study show that bank filtration efficiency in water supply of the village is acceptable. Conclusion: Although Bank filtration imposes fewer expenses on governments, it provides suitable water for drinking and other uses. However, it should be noted that application of these systems should be done after a thorough study of water pollution level, types of water pollutants, soil properties of the area, soil percolation and system distance from pollutant sources.

  17. Reconciling Patient Safety and Epistemic Humility: An Ethical Use of Opioid Treatment Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anita

    2017-05-01

    In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Joshua Rager and Peter Schwartz suggest using opioid treatment agreements as public health monitoring tools to inform patients about "the requirements entailed by undergoing opioid therapy," rather than as contractual agreements to alter patients' individual behavior or to benefit them directly. Because Rager and Schwartz's argument presents suspected OTA violations as a justification to stop providing opioids yet does not highlight the broader epistemic and systemic context within which clinicians prescribe these medications, their proposal may perpetuate a climate of distrust and stigmatization without correcting systemic factors that may have placed patients and others at risk in the first place. Given the context of epistemic uncertainty regarding opioid safety and efficacy, insufficient training for opioid prescribers, and inadequate patient education, I propose replacing OTAs, which have a narrow focus on patient behaviors, with opioid treatment plans, which would promote mutual, collaborative, and shared decision-making on the most appropriate pain management program. An OTP can be ethically justified as a tool to prevent and treat iatrogenic addiction under a specific paradigm-one that adopts a default position of professional epistemic humility and holds all collaborative parties accountable in chronic pain management. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  18. Sustainability of Water Safety Plans Developed in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Rondi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, the drinking water supply is still an open issue. In sub-Saharan Africa, only 68% of the population has access to improved sources of drinking water. Moreover, some regions are affected by geogenic contaminants (e.g., fluoride and arsenic and the lack of access to sanitation facilities and hygiene practices causes high microbiological contamination of drinking water in the supply chain. The Water Safety Plan (WSP approach introduced by the World Health Organisation (WHO in 2004 is now under development in several developing countries in order to face up to these issues. The WSP approach was elaborated within two cooperation projects implemented in rural areas of Burkina Faso and Senegal by two Italian NGOs (Non-Governmental Organisations. In order to evaluate its sustainability, a questionnaire based on five different sustainability elements and a cost and time consumption evaluation were carried out and applied in both the case studies. Results demonstrated that the questionnaire can provide a useful and interesting overview regarding the sustainability of the WSP; however, further surveys in the field are recommended for gathering more information. Time and costs related to the WSP elaboration, implementation, and management were demonstrated not to be negligible and above all strongly dependent on water quality and the water supply system complexity.

  19. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report of the Senior Inspector for the Nuclear Safety, analyses the nuclear safety at EDF for the year 1999 and proposes twelve subjects of consideration to progress. Five technical documents are also provided and discussed concerning the nuclear power plants maintenance and safety (thermal fatigue, vibration fatigue, assisted control and instrumentation of the N4 bearing, 1300 MW reactors containment and time of life of power plants). (A.L.B.)

  20. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project Integrated Safety Management System phase I and II Verification Review Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARTER, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commits to accomplishing its mission safely. To ensure this objective is met, DOE issued DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and incorporated safety management into the DOE Acquisition Regulations ([DEAR] 48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 90.5204-78). Integrated Safety Management (ISM) requires contractors to integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels so that missions are achieved while protecting the public, the worker, and the environment. The contractor is required to describe the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to be used to implement the safety performance objective

  1. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project Integrated Safety Management System phase I and II Verification Review Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARTER, R.P.

    1999-11-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commits to accomplishing its mission safely. To ensure this objective is met, DOE issued DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and incorporated safety management into the DOE Acquisition Regulations ([DEAR] 48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 90.5204-78). Integrated Safety Management (ISM) requires contractors to integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels so that missions are achieved while protecting the public, the worker, and the environment. The contractor is required to describe the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to be used to implement the safety performance objective.

  2. Comprehensive development plans for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Korea and preliminary safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kang Il; Kim, Jin Hyeong; Kwon, Mi Jin; Jeong, Mi Seon; Hong, Sung Wook; Park, Jin Beak [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The disposal facility in Gyeongju is planning to dispose of 800,000 packages of low- and intermediate- level radioactive waste. This facility will be developed as a complex disposal facility that has various types of disposal facilities and accompanying management. In this study, based on the comprehensive development plan of the disposal facility, a preliminary post-closure safety assessment is performed to predict the phase development of the total capacity for the 800,000 packages to be disposed of at the site. The results for each scenario meet the performance target of the disposal facility. The assessment revealed that there is a significant impact of the inventory of intermediate-level radionuclide waste on the safety evaluation. Due to this finding, we introduce a disposal limit value for intermediate-level radioactive waste. With stepwise development of safety case, this development plan will increase the safety of disposal facilities by reducing uncertainties within the future development of the underground silo disposal facilities.

  3. Program plan for evaluation of the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank safety issue at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsheim, G.L.; Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    This document describes the background, priorities, strategy and logic, and task descriptions for the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank Safety Program. The Ferrocyanide Safety Program was established in 1990 to provide resolution of a major safety issue identified for 24 high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site

  4. A Template Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence Survivors’ Experiences of Animal Maltreatment: Implications for Safety Planning and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Elizabeth A.; Cody, Anna M.; McDonald, Shelby Elaine; Nicotera, Nicole; Ascione, Frank R.; Williams, James Herbert

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the intersection of intimate partner violence (IPV) and animal cruelty in an ethnically diverse sample of 103 pet-owning IPV survivors recruited from community-based domestic violence programs. Template analysis revealed five themes: (a) Animal Maltreatment by Partner as a Tactic of Coercive Power and Control, (b) Animal Maltreatment by Partner as Discipline or Punishment of Pet, (c) Animal Maltreatment by Children, (d) Emotional and Psychological Impact of Animal Maltreatment Exposure, and (e) Pets as an Obstacle to Effective Safety Planning. Results demonstrate the potential impact of animal maltreatment exposure on women and child IPV survivors’ health and safety. PMID:29332521

  5. A Template Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence Survivors' Experiences of Animal Maltreatment: Implications for Safety Planning and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Elizabeth A; Cody, Anna M; McDonald, Shelby Elaine; Nicotera, Nicole; Ascione, Frank R; Williams, James Herbert

    2018-03-01

    This study explores the intersection of intimate partner violence (IPV) and animal cruelty in an ethnically diverse sample of 103 pet-owning IPV survivors recruited from community-based domestic violence programs. Template analysis revealed five themes: (a) Animal Maltreatment by Partner as a Tactic of Coercive Power and Control, (b) Animal Maltreatment by Partner as Discipline or Punishment of Pet, (c) Animal Maltreatment by Children, (d) Emotional and Psychological Impact of Animal Maltreatment Exposure, and (e) Pets as an Obstacle to Effective Safety Planning. Results demonstrate the potential impact of animal maltreatment exposure on women and child IPV survivors' health and safety.

  6. Evolution of a holistic systems approach to planning and managing road safety: the Victorian case study, 1970-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Carlyn; Johnston, Ian R; Howard, Eric

    2018-06-01

    The Victorian Safe System approach to road safety slowly evolved from a combination of the Swedish Vision Zero philosophy and the Sustainable Safety model developed by the Dutch. The Safe System approach reframes the way in which road safety is viewed and managed. This paper presents a case study of the institutional change required to underpin the transformation to a holistic approach to planning and managing road safety in Victoria, Australia. The adoption and implementation of a Safe System approach require strong institutional leadership and close cooperation among all the key agencies involved, and Victoria was fortunate in that it had a long history of strong interagency mechanisms in place. However, the challenges in the implementation of the Safe System strategy in Victoria are generally neither technical nor scientific; they are predominantly social and political. While many governments purport to develop strategies based on Safe System thinking, on-the-ground action still very much depends on what politicians perceive to be publicly acceptable, and Victoria is no exception. This is a case study of the complexity of institutional change and is presented in the hope that the lessons may prove useful for others seeking to adopt more holistic planning and management of road safety. There is still much work to be done in Victoria, but the institutional cultural shift has taken root. Ongoing efforts must be continued to achieve alert and compliant road users; however, major underpinning benefits will be achieved through focusing on road network safety improvements (achieving forgiving infrastructure, such as wire rope barriers) in conjunction with reviews of posted speed limits (to be set in response to the level of protection offered by the road infrastructure) and by the progressive introduction into the fleet of modern vehicle safety features. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights

  7. IAEA Mission Sees Safety Commitment at Finland's New Olkiluoto Reactor Before Planned Start in December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team of experts observed a commitment to safety by the operator of Unit 3 at Finland’s Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plant, ahead of the Evolutionary Pressurised Water Reactor’s (EPR) planned connection to the grid in December. The team also identified areas for further enhancements as the operator prepares to put the reactor online. The Pre-Operational Safety Review Team (Pre-OSART) concluded an 18-day mission today to assess operational safety at the 1600 MW reactor, located about 280 km northwest of the capital, Helsinki. Finland has engaged France’s Areva SA together with Germany’s Siemens to construct and commission the unit. The operator is Teollisuuden Voima (TVO). Pre-OSART missions aim to improve operational safety by objectively assessing safety performance using the IAEA’s safety standards and proposing recommendations for improvement where appropriate. The review covered the areas of leadership and management for safety; training and qualification; operations; maintenance; technical support; operating experience; radiation protection; chemistry; emergency preparedness and response; accident management; and commissioning. The team identified a number of good practices that will be shared with the nuclear industry globally, including: • The plant has developed and implemented an efficient system for improving knowledge and skills of staff members. • The plant has developed and validated a unique method for performing suspended solids analysis using a microscope, imaging software and a digital camera. • The plant has introduced a system for systematically assessing nuclear safety culture in the plant supplier organization during construction and commissioning. The mission made several recommendations to improve operational safety, including: • Plant management should set appropriate expectations, communicate them to staff and reinforce them in the field. • The plant should improve the

  8. A performance improvement plan to increase nurse adherence to use of medication safety software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriloff, Carrie

    2012-08-01

    Nurses can protect patients receiving intravenous (IV) medication by using medication safety software to program "smart" pumps to administer IV medications. After a patient safety event identified inconsistent use of medication safety software by nurses, a performance improvement team implemented the Deming Cycle performance improvement methodology. The combined use of improved direct care nurse communication, programming strategies, staff education, medication safety champions, adherence monitoring, and technology acquisition resulted in a statistically significant (p < .001) increase in nurse adherence to using medication safety software from 28% to above 85%, exceeding national benchmark adherence rates (Cohen, Cooke, Husch & Woodley, 2007; Carefusion, 2011). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  10. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air

  11. Additional safety assessments, follow-up of stress tests of the French nuclear power stations. Action plan of the nuclear safety authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document presents the French national action plan defined by the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) in compliance with the recommendations made by the ENSREG (European nuclear safety regulators group). It refers to decisions taken at the national level after the Fukushima accident, recommendations after European stress tests, and recommendations after the extraordinary meeting of contracting parties at the Convention on Nuclear Safety of August 2012. For different topics, this document recalls the recommendations made by the peer review, indicates the ASN's opinion and progress or ASN's requirements for different power stations. The first part addresses the recommendations made by peers and based on the European review. Topics concern natural hazards (effects, detection, inspections and controls related to earthquakes, margin assessment with respect to flooding and natural hazards), the loss of safety systems (cooling systems, electricity supplies, actions, instruments, training, and so on), the management of a severe accident (reference levels, measures, guides, exercises, training, management of contaminated water, radiation protection, premises). The second part deals with topics addressed within the frame of the Convention: national organisations, organisations in an emergency and post-accidental situation, international cooperation. A third part addresses the follow-up of additional measures issued by the ASN

  12. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI.

  13. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S ampersand A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S ampersand A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway Technical Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Curtis; Rabiti, Cristian; Martineau, Richard; Szilard, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly ''over-design'' portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as ''safety margin.'' Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on ''engineering judgment.''

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Szilard, Ronaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  16. Health and Safety Plan for Operations Performed for the Environmental Restoration Program: Task, Characterization of Potential Waste Sources at Auxiliary Reactor Area-1 Operable Unit 5--07 site ARA-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, S.L.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-06-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the ERP. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP

  17. Health and Safety Plan for Operations Performed for the Environmental Restoration Program: Task, Characterization of Potential Waste Sources at Auxiliary Reactor Area-1 Operable Unit 5--07 site ARA-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, S.L.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-06-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the ERP. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  18. Health and Safety Plan for Operations Performed for the Environmental Restoration Program: Task, Characterization of Potential Waste Sources at Auxiliary Reactor Area-1 Operable Unit 5--07 site ARA-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, S.L.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-06-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG&G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the ERP. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  19. ENHANCED PROACTIVE PLANNING APPROACH: A CRUCIAL TO AN IMPROVED WORKERS’ SAFETY IN WESTERN NIGERIA SMALL SCALE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.O. ADEYEMI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated managements’ proactive planning approach (PPA to enhance safety among workers in South-western Nigeria small scale industry (SSI. The main objective was to rate the managements’ efforts at eliminating risk among their employees. By worker participatory and psychological survey approach, three tools were used; workplace observation (visual, management safety culture (questionnaire and managers interviews (oral. The survey included 200 workers, 120 supervisors and 80 managers, in 82 SSI. Four steps to a safety proactive action plans (PAP, (looking for clues, prioritization of identified potential hazard, making improvements to eliminate the risk and follow up, were rated by employees on a scale from 0 to 5. Paired t-test was used to appraise the significant difference between the managers’ mean scores rated by the supervisors and other workers. 77.1% of workers and 64.2% supervisors rated their managers as either “not done at all” or “poorly done”. Workers’ scores for managers PPA had statistically significantly lower ratings (mean=1.09, SEM = 0.22 compared to that of the supervisors rating (mean= 1.55, SEM = 0.32, with t (14 = -1.185, p = 0.784. There is a closed poor performance perception gaps, of managers’ PPA, of the two groups of employees. It can be concluded that safety is not emphasized, by managers of SSI, as overriding priority and this may have contributed to high reported injuries among their workforce. Courses to enhance managements’ understanding for inclusion of safety among the leading priorities becomes necessary. This will reduce work-related risks and promotes occupational safety and health among the group of workers.

  20. 78 FR 47014 - Configuration Management Plans for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    .... ML12354A524. 3. Revision 1 of RG 1.170, ``Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software used in Safety... is in ADAMS at Accession No. ML12354A531. 4. Revision 1 of RG 1.171, ``Software Unit Testing for... Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION...

  1. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the soil and sediment task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, V.L.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    This document is a site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist (WP/HSC) for a task of the Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation (WAG 2 RI ampersand SI). Title 29 CFR Part 1910.120 requires that a health and safety program plan that includes site- and task-specific information be completed to ensure conformance with health- and safety-related requirements. To meet this requirement, the health and safety program plan for each WAG 2 RI ampersand SI field task must include (1) the general health and safety program plan for all WAG 2 RI ampersand SI field activities and (2) a WP/HSC for that particular field task. These two components, along with all applicable referenced procedures, must be kept together at the work site and distributed to field personnel as required. The general health and safety program plan is the Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169). The WP/HSCs are being issued as supplements to ORNL/ER-169

  2. Multi-criteria Generation-Expansion Planning with Carbon dioxide emissions and Nuclear Safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hun Gyu; Kim, Young Chang

    2010-01-01

    A multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) method is developed to aid decision makers in Generation Expansion planning and management. Traditionally, the prime objective of an electric utility's generation-expansion planning has been to determine the minimum cost supply plans that meet expected demands over a planning horizon (typically 10 to 30 years). Today, however, the nature of decision environments has changed substantially. Increased policy attention is given to solve the multiple tradeoff function including environmental and social factors as well as economic one related to nuclear power expansion. In order to deal with this MCDM problem, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Model is applied

  3. Health and Safety Work Plan for Sampling Colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, J.D.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project.

  4. Health and Safety Work Plan for Sampling Colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, J.D.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project

  5. Implementation of Water Safety Plans (WSPs): A Case Study in the Coastal Area in Semarang City, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiyono; Ginandjar, P.; Saraswati, L. D.; Pangestuti, D. R.; Martini; Jati, S. P.

    2018-02-01

    An area of 508.28 hectares in North Semarang is flooded by tidal inundation, including Bandarharjo village, which could affect water quality in the area. People in Bandarharjo use safe water from deep groundwater, without disinfection process. More than 90% of water samples in the Bandaharjo village had poor bacteriological quality. The aimed of the research was to describe the implementation of Water Safety Plans (WSPs) program in Bandarharjo village. This was a descriptive study with steps for implementations adopted the guidelines and tools of the World Health Organization. The steps consist of introducing WSPs program, team building, training the team, examination of water safety before risk assessment, risk assessment, minor repair I, examination of water safety risk, minor repair II (after monitoring). Data were analyzed using descriptive methods. WSPs program has been introduced and formed WSPs team, and the training of the team has been conducted. The team was able to conduct risks assessment, planned the activities, examined water quality, conduct minor repair and monitoring at the source, distribution, and households connection. The WSPs program could be implemented in the coastal area in Semarang, however regularly supervision and some adjustment are needed.

  6. Kentucky Peer Exchange : Strategic Highway Safety Plans (SHSPs) - An RSPCB Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes a peer exchange hosted by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) and the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) on June 16-17, 2015, in Frankfort, KY. The event included peer representatives from the Georgia Department of...

  7. Nevada Peer Exchange : Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) Implementation - An RSPCB Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) hosted a peer exchange March 4 and 5, 2015, in Carson City, : NV, with support from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Safety. In addition to FHWA and : NDOT staff, representatives from ...

  8. Systems Engineering Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safety Operations, Project W-314

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan for Project W-314 has been prepared within the guidelines of HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, TWRS Systems Engineering Management Plan. The activities within this SEMP have been tailored, in accordance with the TWRS SEMP and DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management, to meet the needs of the project

  9. Midwife-assisted planned home birth: an essential component of improving the safety of childbirth in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayyabu, Aliyu Labaran; Murtala, Yusuf; Grünebaum, Amos; McCullough, Laurence B; Arabin, Birgit; Levene, Malcolm I; Brent, Robert L; Monni, Giovanni; Sen, Cihat; Makatsariya, Alexander; Chervenak, Frank A

    2018-05-29

    Hospital births, when compared to out-of-hospital births, have generally led to not only a significantly reduced maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity but also an increase in certain interventions. A trend seems to be emerging, especially in the US where some women are requesting home births, which creates ethical challenges for obstetricians and the health care organizations and policy makers. In the developing world, a completely different reality exists. Home births constitute the majority of deliveries in the developing world. There are severe limitations in terms of facilities, health personnel and deeply entrenched cultural and socio-economic conditions militating against hospital births. As a consequence, maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity remain the highest, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Midwife-assisted planned home birth therefore has a major role to play in increasing the safety of childbirth in SSA. The objective of this paper is to propose a model that can be used to improve the safety of childbirth in low resource countries and to outline why midwife assisted planned home birth with coordination of hospitals is the preferred alternative to unassisted or inadequately assisted planned home birth in SSA.

  10. Safety Evaluation Report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Revised Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The TVA Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan addresses those corporate concerns identified by the NRC staff. Because much of the TVA corporate plan is programmatic, its effectiveness depends on its implementation, and the NRC staff plans to closely monitor this implementation. The NRC staff will address site-specific concerns in subsequent SERs on each volume of the Nuclear Performance Plan. On the basis of its review, the NRC staff finds TVA's revised Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan (Revision 4) acceptable. The NRC staff concludes that the organization and staffing of TVA's Office of Nuclear Power and the programmatic improvements in place or under way are sufficient, if implemented properly, to resolve the problems at the corporate level that led to issuance of the 10 CFR 50.54(f) letter dated September 17, 1985, and to support continuing TVA nuclear activities, including plant operations. 19 refs., 3 figs

  11. Regulatory inspection activities related to inspection planning, plant maintenance and assessment of safety. Proceedings of an international workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Binnebeek, J. J. [AIB-Vincotte Nuclear - AVN, Avenue du Roi, 157, B-1060 Brussels (Belgium); Aubrey, Richard; Grandame, Melvyn [Atomic Energy Control Board - AECB, P.O. Box 1046, Station B, 280 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada); Aro, Ilari [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety - STUK, P.O. Box 14, FIN-00881 Helsinki (Finland); Balloffet, Yves [DRIRE Rhone Alpes, 146, rue Pierre Corneille, 69426 Lyon CEDEX 03 (France); Klonk, Hartmut [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Postbox 10 01 49, 38201 Salzgitter 1 (Germany); Manzella, Pietro [A.N.P.A., Via V. Brancati, 48, 1-00144 Roma EUR (Italy); Koizumi, Hiroyoshi [Tech. Stan. Dept. - JAPEIC, Shin-Toranomon Bldg., 1-5-11, Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107 (Japan); Bouvrie, E.C. des [Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment, Nuclear Safety Dept. KFD, P.O. Box 90804, 2509 LV The Hague (Netherlands); Forsberg, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate - SKI, Klarabergsviadukten 90, S-10658 Stockholm (Sweden); Lang, Hans-Guenter [Section Plant Coordination and Inspection, Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate - HSK, CH-5232 Villigen-HSK (Switzerland); Mehew, Robert; Warren, Thomas; Woodhouse, Paul [Health and Safety Executive - NII, St. Peter' s House, Balliol Road, Bootle, Merseyside L20 3LZ (United Kingdom); Gallo, Robert M. [Special Inspection Branch, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - US NRC, Mail Stop 0-9A1, Washington, DC 20555 (United States); Campbell, Rob [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA))

    1997-07-01

    The NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established Working Groups and Groups of Experts in specialised topics. CNRA believes that safety inspections are a major element in the regulatory authority's efforts to ensure the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Considering the importance of these issues, the Committee has established a special Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The purpose of WGIP, is to facilitate the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA Member countries. This was the 3. international workshop held by the WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. The focus of this workshop was on 3 main topics; Inspection Planning, Plant Maintenance and Assessment of Safety. This document presents the proceedings from the workshop, including: workshop programme, results and conclusions, papers and presentations and the list of participants. The main purpose of the Workshop is to provide a forum of exchange of information on the regulatory inspection activities.

  12. Regulatory inspection activities related to inspection planning, plant maintenance and assessment of safety. Proceedings of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Binnebeek, J.J.; Aubrey, Richard; Grandame, Melvyn; Aro, Ilari; Balloffet, Yves; Klonk, Hartmut; Manzella, Pietro; Koizumi, Hiroyoshi; Bouvrie, E.C. des; Forsberg, Staffan; Lang, Hans-Guenter; Mehew, Robert; Warren, Thomas; Woodhouse, Paul; Gallo, Robert M.; Campbell, Rob; )

    1997-01-01

    The NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established Working Groups and Groups of Experts in specialised topics. CNRA believes that safety inspections are a major element in the regulatory authority's efforts to ensure the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Considering the importance of these issues, the Committee has established a special Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The purpose of WGIP, is to facilitate the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA Member countries. This was the 3. international workshop held by the WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. The focus of this workshop was on 3 main topics; Inspection Planning, Plant Maintenance and Assessment of Safety. This document presents the proceedings from the workshop, including: workshop programme, results and conclusions, papers and presentations and the list of participants. The main purpose of the Workshop is to provide a forum of exchange of information on the regulatory inspection activities

  13. Environment, safety, health, and quality plan for the TRU- Contaminated Arid Soils Project of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, L.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. LSFA supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The TRU-Contaminated Arid Soils project is being conducted under the auspices of the LSFA Program. This document describes the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality requirements for conducting LSFA/Arid Soils activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Topics discussed in this report, as they apply to LSFA/Arid Soils operations, include Federal, State of Idaho, and Environmental Protection Agency regulations, Health and Safety Plans, Quality Program, Data Quality Objectives, and training and job hazard analysis. Finally, a discussion is given on CERCLA criteria and system and performance audits as they apply to the LSFA Program

  14. Diabetes Health Information Technology Innovation to Improve Quality of Life for Health Plan Members in Urban Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Handley, Margaret A.; Sarkar, Urmimala; Quan, Judy; Pfeifer, Kelly; Soria, Catalina; Schillinger, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Safety net systems need innovative diabetes self-management programs for linguistically diverse patients. A low-income government-sponsored managed care plan implemented a 27-week automated telephone self-management support (ATSM) / health coaching intervention for English, Spanish-, and Cantonese-speaking members from four publicly-funded clinics in a practice-based research network. Compared to waitlist, immediate intervention participants had greater 6-month improvements in overall diabetes self-care behaviors (standardized effect size [ES] 0.29, pimproving patient-reported self-management and may also improve some outcomes. PMID:24594561

  15. Plan for research to improve the safety of light-water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    This is the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's first annual report to Congress on recommendations for research on improving the safety of light-water nuclear power plants. Suggestions for reactor safety research were identified in, or received from, various sources, including the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, the NRC regulatory staff, and the consultants to the Research Review Group. After an initial screening to eliminate those not related to improved reactor safety, all the suggestions were consolidated into research topics. It is recommended that the following research projects be carried out: alternate containment concepts, especially vented containments; alternate decay heat removal concepts, especially add-on bunkered systems; alternate emergency core cooling concepts; improved in-plant accident response; and advanced seismic designs

  16. Planning exercise for the resolution of high level waste tank safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunting, J.; Saveland, J.

    1992-01-01

    Several conditions have been found to exist within high level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford site which could lead to uncontrolled exothermic reactions and/or to the release of tank contents into the environment. These conditions have led to the establishment of four priority 1 safety issues for the Hanford tanks. Resolution of these safety issues will require the coordinated efforts of professionals in chemical, nuclear, operations, safety, and other technical areas. A coordinated and integrated approach is necessary in order to achieve resolution in the shortest possible time, while ensuring that the steps taken do not complicate the later jobs of vitrification and ultimate disposal. This paper describes the purpose, process, and results of an effort to develop a suggested approach. (author)

  17. A risk characterization of safety research areas for integral fast reactor program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Hill, D.J.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Tibbrook, R.W.; Wei, T.Y.; Wright, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper characterizes the areas of integral fast reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure to critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR safety and related base technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorities

  18. A risk characterization of safety research areas for Integral Fast Reactor program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Hill, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper characterizes the areas of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure of critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR Safety and related Base Technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorites

  19. Development of a statewide motorcycle safety plan for Texas : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this research project was to develop a statewide plan to reduce motorcycle crashes and : injuries in the state of Texas. The project included a review of published literature on current and proposed : countermeasures for reducing the...

  20. Kazakhstan center of nuclear technology safety. Approach of work, possibilities and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibaeva, I.L; Romanenko, O.G.; Cherepnin, Yu. S.; Planchon, H.P; Imel, G; Newton, D.

    2000-01-01

    NTSC was created in November, 1997 as an association of experts in all the areas of nuclear and radiation safety and radioactive materials handling The main goal of creation is investigation of safety aspects of nuclear power in the Republic of Kazakhstan, taking into account the interests of environment and human health protection in the regions of nuclear industry units allocation. The Center was created with support and special cooperation with the US, has grown and developed cooperative ties with several other countries.In the report are enumerate the main directions of NTSC activity, general directions of cooperation, current and completed activity, planing activity

  1. Risk management for drinking water safety in low and middle income countries - cultural influences on water safety plan (WSP) implementation in urban water utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Yahya Y; Parker, Alison; Smith, Jennifer A; Pollard, Simon J T

    2017-01-15

    We investigated cultural influences on the implementation of water safety plans (WSPs) using case studies from WSP pilots in India, Uganda and Jamaica. A comprehensive thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews (n=150 utility customers, n=32 WSP 'implementers' and n=9 WSP 'promoters'), field observations and related documents revealed 12 cultural themes, offered as 'enabling', 'limiting', or 'neutral', that influence WSP implementation in urban water utilities to varying extents. Aspects such as a 'deliver first, safety later' mind set; supply system knowledge management and storage practices; and non-compliance are deemed influential. Emergent themes of cultural influence (ET1 to ET12) are discussed by reference to the risk management, development studies and institutional culture literatures; by reference to their positive, negative or neutral influence on WSP implementation. The results have implications for the utility endorsement of WSPs, for the impact of organisational cultures on WSP implementation; for the scale-up of pilot studies; and they support repeated calls from practitioner communities for cultural attentiveness during WSP design. Findings on organisational cultures mirror those from utilities in higher income nations implementing WSPs - leadership, advocacy among promoters and customers (not just implementers) and purposeful knowledge management are critical to WSP success. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  3. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  4. Safety research in the field of energy production. Plan for continued Nordic projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstroem, P E [Statens Vattenfallsverk, Stockholm (Sweden); Berg, J [Institutt for Atomenergi, Kjeller (Norway); Eckered, T [Statens Kaernkraftinspektion, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1980-01-01

    NGS, an ad hoc group of the Nordic Co-ordination Committee for Atomic Energy, has prepared this survey of proposed cooperative projects as a continuation of previous projects. New areas to be given priority are:- reactor safety, environmental effects in energy production and human reliability. Continued projects are:- quality assurance, radioactive waste and radioecology. (JIW)

  5. Iowa's Comprehensive Highway Safety Plan - Review and Update : an RSPCB Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This report provides a summary of a two-part peer exchange sponsored by the Iowa : Department of Transportation (Iowa DOT) and the Iowa Governors Traffic Safety : Bureau (GTSB). Part one of the peer exchange offered a web conference designed to : ...

  6. Alternative development and action plan for the atomic safety regulation instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Ahn, S. K.; Ham, Y. S.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study to provide highly practical model to regulation agency. Since nuclear power safety regulation has different characteristics, compared to general regulation, it is important to have new point of view and approach. But application possibility for regulation that guarantees the 'perfect safety' is very low. Therefore, it is important establish nuclear power safety regulation that is realistic as well as safety securing. In order to establish high quality regulation, evaluation of existing regulation must be done first. Thus in this study, 6 standards to evaluate existing regulation are suggested. They are clearness, efficiency, flexibility, reliability, responsibility and political consideration. Also, strategies to complement the weak points of regulatory governance, regulatory sunset, regulatory map, regulatory negotiation, regulatory benefit cost analysis, etc. These strategies can be applied all in one regulation, and can strategically be selected for application. After analyzing the result if case analysis on nuclear furnace regulation for research study, agreement was made that it is most efficient to consider in the order if clearness reliability, flexibility, confidence, political consideration, administrative efficiency and economic efficiency

  7. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the sediment transport modeling task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    This site-specific Work Plan/Health and Safety Checklist (WP/HSC) is a supplement to the general health and safety plan (HASP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 remedial investigation and site investigation (WAG 2 RI ampersand SI) activities [Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169)] and provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 RI ampersand SI Sediment Transport Modeling Task. This WP/HSC identifies specific site operations, site hazards, and any recommendations by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) health and safety organizations [i.e., Industrial Hygiene (IH), Health Physics (HP), and/or Industrial Safety] that would contribute to the safe completion of the WAG 2 RI ampersand SI. Together, the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI ampersand SI (ORNL/ER-169) and the completed site-specific WP/HSC meet the health and safety planning requirements specified by 29 CFR 1910.120 and the ORNL Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Program Manual. In addition to the health and safety information provided in the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI ampersand SI, details concerning the site-specific task are elaborated in this site-specific WP/HSC, and both documents, as well as all pertinent procedures referenced therein, will be reviewed by all field personnel prior to beginning operations

  8. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects of fission reactors are considered - control, heat removal and containment. Brief descriptions of the reactor accidents at the SL-1 reactor (1961), Windscale (1957), Browns Ferry (1975), Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986) are given. The idea of inherently safe reactor designs is discussed. Safety assessment is considered under the headings of preliminary hazard analysis, failure mode analysis, event trees, fault trees, common mode failure and probabalistic risk assessments. These latter can result in a series of risk distributions linked to specific groups of fault sequences and specific consequences. A frequency-consequence diagram is shown. Fatal accident incidence rates in different countries including the United Kingdom for various industries are quoted. The incidence of fatal cancers from occupational exposure to chemicals is tabulated. Human factors and the acceptability of risk are considered. (U.K.)

  9. MULTI-AGENT MODEL OF SAFETY MANAGEMENT IN PLANNING PROJECTS FOR THE CREATION OF OBJECTS WITH MASS STAY OF PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Богданович ЗАЧКО

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In today's conditions, with increasing of the scale of industrialization the Ukraine's major cities, also increases the threat of emergency situations (ES, disasters and accidents at the objects with the mass stay of people (OMSP. Inadequate level of paying attention to the exploitation of OMSP at all stages of the project lifecycle gives its tangible negative consequences. The analysis of statistics for the last 5-10 years has shown the significant growth of dynamics of mortality after emergencies on enterprises, which shows that in most cases the cause of these deaths is the lack of strict management consistency across all hierarchy management structure that is the project-oriented management, ignorance the rules of fire safety at the workplace, lack of automatic fire alarm systems and alarm systems and extinguishing, especially in the regional context. Therefore, the definition of the concept of objects with the mass stay of people using safety-oriented approach will allow them to identify and ultimately increase security at such objectsIn the article the literary analysis of the available scientific studies. Developed multi-agent safety management model in planning projects for the creation of objects with the mass stay of people.

  10. Observations and lessons learnt from more than a decade of water safety planning in South-East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, David

    2017-09-01

    In many countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) South-East Asia Region, drinking water is not used directly from the tap and faecal contamination of water sources is prevalent. As reflected in Sustainable Development Goal 6, access to safer drinking water is one of the most successful ways of preventing disease. The WHO Water Safety Framework promotes the use of water safety plans (WSPs), which are structured tools that help identify and mitigate potential risks throughout a water-supply system, from the water source to the point of use. WSPs not only help prevent outbreaks of acute and chronic waterborne diseases but also improve water-supply management and performance. During the past 12 years, through the direct and indirect work of a water quality partnership supported by the Australian Government, more than 5000 urban and rural WSPs have been implemented in the region. An impact assessment based on pre- and post-WSP surveys suggests that WSPs have improved system operations and management, infrastructure and performance; leveraged donor funds; increased stakeholder communication and collaboration; increased testing of water quality; and increased monitoring of consumer satisfaction. These achievements, and their sustainability, are being achieved through national legislation and regulatory frameworks for water supply, including quality standards for drinking water; national training tools and extensive training of sector professionals and creation of WSP experts; model WSPs; WSP auditing systems; and the institution of longterm training and support. More than a decade of water safety planning using the WSP approach has shown that supplying safe drinking water at the tap throughout the WHO South-East Asia Region is a realistic goal.

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Peko, D. [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Farmer, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rempe, J. [Rempe and Associates LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Humrickhouse, P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Brien, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Robb, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauntt, R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Osborn, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 multi-unit accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Fukushima), the nuclear community has been reassessing certain safety assumptions about nuclear reactor plant design, operations and emergency actions, particularly with respect to extreme events that might occur and that are beyond each plant’s current design basis. Because of our significant domestic investment in nuclear reactor technology (99 operating reactors in the fleet of commercial LWRs with five under construction), the United States has been a major leader internationally in these activities. The U.S. nuclear industry is voluntarily pursuing a number of additional safety initiatives. The NRC continues to evaluate and, where deemed appropriate, establish new requirements for ensuring adequate protection of public health and safety in the occurrence of low probability events at nuclear plants; (e.g., mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events initiated by external events like seismic or flooding initiators). The DOE has also played a major role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident. Initially, DOE worked with the Japanese and the international community to help develop a more complete understanding of the Fukushima accident progression and its consequences, and to respond to various safety concerns emerging from uncertainties about the nature of and the effects from the accident. DOE R&D activities are focused on providing scientific and technical insights, data, analyses methods that ultimately support industry efforts to enhance safety. These activities are expected to further enhance the safety performance of currently operating U.S. nuclear power plants as well as better characterize the safety performance of future U.S. plants. In pursuing this area of R&D, DOE recognizes that the commercial nuclear industry is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of licensed nuclear facilities. As such, industry is considered the primary

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 multi-unit accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Fukushima), the nuclear community has been reassessing certain safety assumptions about nuclear reactor plant design, operations and emergency actions, particularly with respect to extreme events that might occur and that are beyond each plant’s current design basis. Because of our significant domestic investment in nuclear reactor technology (99 operating reactors in the fleet of commercial LWRs with five under construction), the United States has been a major leader internationally in these activities. The U.S. nuclear industry is voluntarily pursuing a number of additional safety initiatives. The NRC continues to evaluate and, where deemed appropriate, establish new requirements for ensuring adequate protection of public health and safety in the occurrence of low probability events at nuclear plants; (e.g., mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events initiated by external events like seismic or flooding initiators). The DOE has also played a major role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident. Initially, DOE worked with the Japanese and the international community to help develop a more complete understanding of the Fukushima accident progression and its consequences, and to respond to various safety concerns emerging from uncertainties about the nature of and the effects from the accident. DOE R&D activities are focused on providing scientific and technical insights, data, analyses methods that ultimately support industry efforts to enhance safety. These activities are expected to further enhance the safety performance of currently operating U.S. nuclear power plants as well as better characterize the safety performance of future U.S. plants. In pursuing this area of R&D, DOE recognizes that the commercial nuclear industry is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of licensed nuclear facilities. As such, industry is considered the primary

  13. Multi-Organizational Collaborative Public Safety and Security Planning for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    intermediaries bridging the gap between safety and security officials. The OCS also had the closest relationship to the three main organizations in the...a clearly shared mission and boundary-spanning personnel that are able to bridge organizational cultures and adapt to the complex challenges...commandement et contrôle) et le transfert des connaissances à partir d’événements semblables passés ou en fonction d’événements futurs. Pendant

  14. High-Poverty Urban High School Students' Plans for Higher Education: Weaving Their Own Safety Nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem; Drotos, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates high-poverty urban high school students' views of and plans regarding higher education, using Bourdieu's theory of reproduction in education as theoretical framework. Interview data from 76 students from six high-poverty urban schools in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States were analyzed using…

  15. Office of River Protection Integrated Safety Management System Phase 1 Verification Corrective Action Plan; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CLARK, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to demonstrate the OW planned and/or completed actions to implement ISMS as well as prepare for the RPP ISMS Phase II Verification scheduled for August, 1999. This Plan collates implied or explicit ORP actions identified in several key ISMS documents and aligns those actions and responsibilities perceived necessary to appropriately disposition all ISM Phase II preparation activities specific to the ORP. The objective will be to complete or disposition the corrective actions prior to the commencement of the ISMS Phase II Verification. Improvement products/tasks not slated for completion prior to the RPP Phase II verification will be incorporated as corrective actions into the Strategic System Execution Plan (SSEP) Gap Analysis. Many of the business and management systems that were reviewed in the ISMS Phase I verification are being modified to support the ORP transition and are being assessed through the SSEP. The actions and processes identified in the SSEP will support the development of the ORP and continued ISMS implementation as committed to be complete by end of FY-2000

  16. Office of River Protection Integrated Safety Management System Phase 1 Verification Corrective Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CLARK, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to demonstrate the OW planned and/or completed actions to implement ISMS as well as prepare for the RPP ISMS Phase II Verification scheduled for August, 1999. This Plan collates implied or explicit ORP actions identified in several key ISMS documents and aligns those actions and responsibilities perceived necessary to appropriately disposition all ISM Phase II preparation activities specific to the ORP. The objective will be to complete or disposition the corrective actions prior to the commencement of the ISMS Phase II Verification. Improvement products/tasks not slated for completion prior to the RPP Phase II verification will be incorporated as corrective actions into the Strategic System Execution Plan (SSEP) Gap Analysis. Many of the business and management systems that were reviewed in the ISMS Phase I verification are being modified to support the ORP transition and are being assessed through the SSEP. The actions and processes identified in the SSEP will support the development of the ORP and continued ISMS implementation as committed to be complete by end of FY-2000

  17. Site specific health and safety plan, 100-HR-3 pump and treat. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, B.G.

    1996-06-01

    The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit encompasses groundwater contamination underlying the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminate is chromium VI. The sources of chromium contamination resulted from the use of sodium dichromate during past reactor operations. The purpose of the 100-HR-3 Pump-and-Treat system is to pump contaminated groundwater through aboveground ion exchange resin and then return the treated waster to the aquifer. This plan covers operation, maintenance, repairs, and pump removal/installation

  18. Kilowatt isotope power system. Phase II plan. Volume V. Safety, quality assurance and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of a Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) was begun in 1975 for the purpose of satisfying the power requirements of satellites in the 1980's. The KIPS is a 238 PuO 2 -fueled organic Rankine cycle turbine power system to provide a design output of 500 to 2000 W. Included in this volume are: launch and flight safety considerations; quality assurance techniques and procedures to be followed through system fabrication, assembly and inspection; and the reliability program made up of reliability prediction analysis, failure mode analysis and criticality analysis

  19. Faster-than-real-time robot simulation for plan development and robot safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, C.D. III; Dalton, R.; Ogles, J.; Tulenko, J.S.; Zhou, X.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Florida, in cooperation with the Universities of Texas, Tennessee, and Michigan and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is developing an advanced robotic system for the US Department of Energy under the University Program for Robotics for Advanced Reactors. As part of this program, the University of Florida has been pursuing the development of a faster-than-real-time robotic simulation program for planning and control of mobile robotic operations to ensure the efficient and safe operation of mobile robots in nuclear power plants and other hazardous environments

  20. Innovative Activities to Ensure Safety: Strategy and Plans to Implement Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, S.; Tikhonov, N.; Yuzhakov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Russian operating organization Concern Rosenergoatom established a program for a knowledge management (KM) implementation in the organization as part of ROSATOM State Corporation KM activities. The plan includes activities both in the framework of the classic knowledge management cycle: detection, preservation, retention, sharing and transfer, as well as creation of new knowledge such as training programs for the construction of new nuclear power plants. The approach embraces key techniques overviewed in IAEA documents on KM, and ROSATOM’s strategical focus on the commercial use of R&D results and corporate knowledge and, thus, contribute to safe, reliable and efficient operation of NPPs. (author

  1. Health and safety work plan for sampling colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, J.D.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-07-01

    This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid sampling project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. This activity will fall under the scope of 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. Work will be conducted in accordance with requirements as stipulated in the ORNL HAZWOPER Program manual, and applicable ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and US Department of Energy (DOE) policies and procedures

  2. The Identification of Xenobiotics in the New UK Context of Drinking Water Safety Planning and Related Environmental Legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, C. R.; Keirle, R. S.; Lobley, A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent European environmental legislation (the Water Framework Directive, the Environmental Liability Directive, and the REACH Regulation) should provide better protection of terrestrial water bodies but their focus is on the more conspicuous pollutants, as opposed to the large number of xenobiotic micro-pollutants that are increasingly being detected in the urban water cycle. The development of Drinking Water Safety Plans (DWSPs), as promoted by the World Health Organization, utilises a proactive risk assessment-risk management approach that necessarily should include micro-pollutants, although currently in the UK micro-pollutants have largely been ignored. The generic assessment of the risks posed by micro-pollutants is proposed and will require a consensus on analytical screening methods, sampling points and frequencies, and a method for prioritising concern, and would enable DWSPs to take fuller account of the risks posed

  3. HANFORD PLUTONIUM FINISHG PLAN (PFP) COMPLETES PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION KEY SAFETY ISSUES CLOSED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    A long and intense effort to stabilize and repackage nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium-bearing leftovers from defense production and nuclear experiments concluded successfully in February, bringing universal congratulations to the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The victorious stabilization and packaging endeavor at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), managed and operated by prime contractor Fluor Hanford, Inc., finished ahead of all milestones in Hanford's cleanup agreement with regulators, and before deadlines set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), a part of the federal Executive Branch that oversees special nuclear materials. The PFP stabilization and packaging project also completed under budget for its four-year tenure, and has been nominated for a DOE Secretarial Award. It won the Project of the Year Award in the local chapter competition of the Project Management Institute, and is being considered for awards at the regional and national level

  4. Annotated bibliography of safety-related occurrences in nuclear power plans as reported in 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1975-05-01

    All abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants reported in 1974 are reviewed and summarized. This bibliography covers the individual reports on each of the 1421 abnormal occurrences reported to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as well as some 455 other documents pertaining to these and other events of note. The review is intended to provide insight as to where additional effort can be expended to improve operations in nuclear power plants. The individual reports, abstracted by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, concern incidents and failures, design or construction deficiencies, and noncompliance citations for license violations. A bibliography is included which contains 100-word abstracts of each incident. For convenience, the bibliography is organized according to type of facility as follows: boiling-water reactors; pressurized-water reactors; non-water-cooled power reactors; and reactors, general. Key-word and permuted-title indexes are provided for each section. (U.S.)

  5. Understanding determinants of government and consumer behavior relative to product safety : an application of the theory of planned behavior to China and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Domke, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The following thesis applies Icek Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior to explain consumer and government response to safety of Chinese-made products sold in China and the United States. The thesis relies on secondary data as it considers the responses and actions relative to product safety by four different groups: Chinese government, U.S. government, Chinese consumers and U.S. consumers. Increased globalization has heightened the need for a better understanding and agreement...

  6. A systems perspective of managing error recovery and tactical re-planning of operating teams in safety critical domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogiannis, Tom

    2011-04-01

    Research in human error has provided useful tools for designing procedures, training, and intelligent interfaces that trap errors at an early stage. However, this "error prevention" policy may not be entirely successful because human errors will inevitably occur. This requires that the error management process (e.g., detection, diagnosis and correction) must also be supported. Research has focused almost exclusively on error detection; little is known about error recovery, especially in the context of safety critical systems. The aim of this paper is to develop a research framework that integrates error recovery strategies employed by experienced practitioners in handling their own errors. A control theoretic model of human performance was used to integrate error recovery strategies assembled from reviews of the literature, analyses of near misses from aviation and command & control domains, and observations of abnormal situations training at air traffic control facilities. The method of system dynamics has been used to analyze and compare error recovery strategies in terms of patterns of interaction, system affordances, and types of recovery plans. System dynamics offer a promising basis for studying the nature of error recovery management in the context of team interactions and system characteristics. The proposed taxonomy of error recovery strategies can help human factors and safety experts to develop resilient system designs and training solutions for managing human errors in unforeseen situations; it may also help incident investigators to explore why people's actions and assessments were not corrected at the time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES ampersand H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES ampersand H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES ampersand H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project

  8. Addendum to the health and safety plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Wilson, K.A.

    1995-08-01

    There are three purposes for this addendum to the health and safety plan for Waste Area Grouping 6. The first purpose is to provide record of a corrective action response concerning an occurrence on WAG 6 in October 1994 (ORO-MMES-ENVRES-1994-0016.) This occurrence involved a precautionary evacuation of subcontractor field crews due to malfunctioning monitor alarms for organic vapors. The corrective action is to revise the WAG 6 Site health and safety plan to improve communications during emergency events. The second purpose is to incorporate any outstanding health and safety issues not addressed in the original health and safety plan for WAG 6 document (ORNL/ER-183). The only variance of note is tritium air monitoring in the Tumulus building. The tritium air monitor is added in this addendum as monitoring equipment for WAG 6 with description of action level and calibration. The third purpose of this addendum is to satisfy a condition of approval for the pending Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment (NCSA) pertaining to KEMA fuel storage at WAG 6. This approval condition requires the following: ''The location of the KEMA burial shall be recorded and maintained in a controlled document that identifies the quantity and the general physical conditions at the time of the entombment with an admonishment to obtain nuclear criticality safety guidance before altering the burial condition.'' In order to satisfy the approval, this document must be controlled. The predecessor to the pending NCSA is NSR No. 0002WM22001

  9. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response

  10. Site specific health and safety plan, 100-HR-3 pump and treat. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St John, C.H.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-HR-3 Pump and Treat system is a groundwater remedial action to remove Hexavalent Chromium (Cr+6) from the groundwater underlying the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. This plan covers operation, maintenance, repairs, resin exchange and equipment removal/installation. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit addresses groundwater underlying the 100-D Area. The primary groundwater contaminant is Chromium +6. The chromium contamination resulted from the use of sodium dichromate during past reactor operations. Sodium dichromate was used to treat reactor coolant water during reactor operations. The purpose of this Pump and Treat system is to pump contaminated groundwater through above ground ion exchange resin and then return treated water to aquifer. Chromium levels extracted from the wells are anticipated to range in the low parts per billion (∼50 ppb) which is the drinking water limit for Cr+6

  11. Objective 1: Extend Life, Improve Performance, and Maintain Safety of the Current Fleet Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Youngblood

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60 year operating licenses. Figure E 1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap has organized its activities in accordance with four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document describes how Objective 1 and the LWRS Program will be implemented. The existing U.S. nuclear fleet has a remarkable safety and performance record and today accounts for 70% of the low greenhouse

  12. Objective 1: Extend Life, Improve Performance, and Maintain Safety of the Current Fleet Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Youngblood

    2011-02-01

    Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60 year operating licenses. Figure E 1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap has organized its activities in accordance with four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document describes how Objective 1 and the LWRS Program will be implemented. The existing U.S. nuclear fleet has a remarkable safety and performance record and today accounts for 70% of the low greenhouse

  13. Objective 1: Extend Life, Improve Performance, and Maintain Safety of the Current Fleet; Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60 year operating licenses. Figure E 1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development (R and D) Roadmap has organized its activities in accordance with four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document describes how Objective 1 and the LWRS Program will be implemented. The existing U.S. nuclear fleet has a remarkable safety and performance record and today accounts for 70% of the low greenhouse

  14. Standard Review Plan for the review of safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants, updates. Irregular repts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) is prepared for the guidance of staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation in performing safety reviews of applications to construct or operate nuclear power plants. The principal purpose of the SRP is to assure the quality and uniformity of staff reviews, and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of reviews. It is also a purpose of the SRP to make information about regulatory matters widely available and to improve communication and understanding of the staff review process by interested members of the public and the nuclear power industry. The Standard Review Plan is written so as to cover a variety of site conditions and plant designs. Each section is written to provide the complete procedure and all acceptance criteria for all of the areas of review pertinent to that section. However, for any given application, the staff reviewers may select and emphasize particular aspects of each SRP section as is appropriate for the application

  15. Planning and Building Qualifiable Embedded Systems: Safety and Risk Properties Assessment for a Large and Complex System with Embedded Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, N.; Lopes, R.; Barbosa, R.

    2012-01-01

    Systems based on embedded components and applications are today used in all markets. They are planned and developed by all types of institutions with different types of background experience, multidisciplinary teams and all types of capability and maturity levels. Organisational/engineering maturity has an impact on all aspects of the engineering of large and complex systems. An embedded system is a specific computer system designed to perform one or more dedicated functions, usually with real-time constraints. It is generally integrated as part of a more complex device typically composed of specific hardware such as sensors and actuators. This article presents an experimented technique to evaluate the organisation, processes, system and software engineering practices, methods, tools and the planned/produced artefacts themselves, leading towards certification/qualification. The safety and risk assessment of such core and complex systems is explained, described on a step-by- step manner, while presenting the main results and conclusions of the application of the technique to a real case study.

  16. Safety and quality management and administration Fiscal Year 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    The mission of the Emergency, Safety, and Quality Services (ESQ) management and Program Integration is to provide leadership for the ESQ Department, coordinate business management activities of the ESQ department, and the programs it supports, as well as to plan organize, direct, and control other activities that require department-wide coordination. Primary activities include providing strategic and business planning and reporting support to ESQ management; developing and documenting ESQ management systems and procedures; coordinating ESQ`s self-assessment and Award Fee self evaluation efforts; coordinating the ESQ departments`s communication, total quality, cost savings, and productivity efforts; and tracking ESQ commitments and staffing data. This program element also provides program direction and performance assessment for the ESH&Q division of ICF KH. The ESH&Q Division educates ICF KH management and employees to protect personnel and the environment; identifies, interprets and inspects to requirements; provides administrative and field support; performs final acceptance of construction; assesses effectiveness of ICF KH programs and processes, and performs baseline ESH&Q assessments.

  17. Safety and quality management and administration Fiscal Year 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    The mission of the Emergency, Safety, and Quality Services (ESQ) management and Program Integration is to provide leadership for the ESQ Department, coordinate business management activities of the ESQ department, and the programs it supports, as well as to plan organize, direct, and control other activities that require department-wide coordination. Primary activities include providing strategic and business planning and reporting support to ESQ management; developing and documenting ESQ management systems and procedures; coordinating ESQ's self-assessment and Award Fee self evaluation efforts; coordinating the ESQ departments's communication, total quality, cost savings, and productivity efforts; and tracking ESQ commitments and staffing data. This program element also provides program direction and performance assessment for the ESH ampersand Q division of ICF KH. The ESH ampersand Q Division educates ICF KH management and employees to protect personnel and the environment; identifies, interprets and inspects to requirements; provides administrative and field support; performs final acceptance of construction; assesses effectiveness of ICF KH programs and processes, and performs baseline ESH ampersand Q assessments

  18. Practical application of the International Safety Regime in NW Russia: experience from the Norwegian plan of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, Malgorzata K.; Kiselev, Mikhail; Kochetkov, Oleg; Shandala, Natalya; Smith, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) and the Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA) of the Russian Federation have a collaboration programme which forms part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action to improve radiation and nuclear safety in Northwest Russia. The programme seeks to support an efficient and effective regulatory supervision process over the management of the nuclear legacy, taking account of the Russian regulatory framework but also taking advantage of recommendations and guidance from the evolving international safety regime. This paper will present the substantial advances made within that programme, describing on-going progress within specific projects and setting out the value arising from wider involvement in the programme of other organisations such as the IAEA and NATO, as well as the technical support derived from other national agencies and technical organisations. This has been the first opportunity for such international regulatory interaction at the operational level. Specific projects are concerned with the management of the nuclear legacy in Northwest Russia. These include the remediation of previous military facilities, and related spent fuel and radioactive waste management, at the Shore Technical Bases (now designated as Sites of Temporary Storage) at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha. New regulatory guidance documents have been developed, involving major technical inputs from the State Research Centre-Institute of Biophysics, as well as review and advice on relevant good practice in other countries provided by other technical support organisations. Current projects due to complete in 2007 and to be reported upon in the full paper involve development of new regulatory guidance on Very Low-Level Waste management, specifically for the licensing and operation of new VLLW disposal facilities; optimisation of operational radiation protection during remediation, particularly in areas of high ambient radiation dose

  19. Implication of spot position error on plan quality and patient safety in pencil-beam-scanning proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Juan; Beltran, Chris J., E-mail: beltran.chris@mayo.edu; Herman, Michael G. [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively and systematically assess dosimetric effects induced by spot positioning error as a function of spot spacing (SS) on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan quality and to facilitate evaluation of safety tolerance limits on spot position. Methods: Spot position errors (PE) ranging from 1 to 2 mm were simulated. Simple plans were created on a water phantom, and IMPT plans were calculated on two pediatric patients with a brain tumor of 28 and 3 cc, respectively, using a commercial planning system. For the phantom, a uniform dose was delivered to targets located at different depths from 10 to 20 cm with various field sizes from 2{sup 2} to 15{sup 2} cm{sup 2}. Two nominal spot sizes, 4.0 and 6.6 mm of 1 σ in water at isocenter, were used for treatment planning. The SS ranged from 0.5 σ to 1.5 σ, which is 2–6 mm for the small spot size and 3.3–9.9 mm for the large spot size. Various perturbation scenarios of a single spot error and systematic and random multiple spot errors were studied. To quantify the dosimetric effects, percent dose error (PDE) depth profiles and the value of percent dose error at the maximum dose difference (PDE [ΔDmax]) were used for evaluation. Results: A pair of hot and cold spots was created per spot shift. PDE[ΔDmax] is found to be a complex function of PE, SS, spot size, depth, and global spot distribution that can be well defined in simple models. For volumetric targets, the PDE [ΔDmax] is not noticeably affected by the change of field size or target volume within the studied ranges. In general, reducing SS decreased the dose error. For the facility studied, given a single spot error with a PE of 1.2 mm and for both spot sizes, a SS of 1σ resulted in a 2% maximum dose error; a SS larger than 1.25 σ substantially increased the dose error and its sensitivity to PE. A similar trend was observed in multiple spot errors (both systematic and random errors). Systematic PE can lead to noticeable hot

  20. Present status and future plan on LMFBR steam generator safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Hiromi; Kuroha, Mitsuo

    1985-01-01

    The results of the sodium-water reaction test which has been carried out for the safety evaluation of the water leak phenomena in the steam generators for the prototype FBR were summarized. This is related to the behavior of minute leak, the behavior of wear and damage propagation of neighboring tubes due to small and medium leaking jets, and the pressure/flow phenomena occurring at the time of large leak. Moreover, this is related to the development of analysis codes, the development of water leak-detecting system, and the development of the techniques for treating reaction products remaining in the system at the time of accidents. Also the research and development required hereafter for determining the basic specification of the steam generators for a demonstration FBR and future FBRs and reducing the cost were examined. The water leaks in the steam generators for FBRs have been reported in the Fermi reactor of USA, the PFR of Great Britain, the BN-350 of USSR, the Phenix reactor of France and so on. In Japan, the sodium-water reaction has been well understood, and the facilities for the countremeasures to it have been established. The sodium-water reaction phenomena, the present status of sodium-water reaction research and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. A case study of identify importance of land use planning in road safety, Benidorm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casares Blanco, J.; Sanchez Galiano, J.C.; Fernandez Aracil, P.; Ortuño Padilla, A.

    2016-07-01

    This research analyses how urban form, land use and urban density, may influence the incidence of traffic-related crashes injuries and deaths. It begins with a theoretical overview of studies which deal with the study of the relationship between urban patterns and road safety. Next, it details the development of a database of crash incidence and urban form at the district level for the city of Benidorm (Alicante, Spain) in 2010. Subsequently, it is developed a negative binomial approach for intra-city motor vehicle crash analysis. One-year crash data for Benidorm (the fourth largest tourism destination of Spain, after Barcelona, Madrid and San Bartolomé de Tirajana, and exclusively tourist-oriented city) are analyzed using a geographic information system (GIS) to generate relevant inputs for the analysis. In general, the study finds that a strong land use mix results on fewer road accidents, whereas accidents are more common but less severe in areas of high urban density. Finally, pedestrian accidents research showed that rural and low density environment is related to an important road accident numbers unlike tourism-oriented zones, much more safe for them. Based on these findings, the paper discusses the implications for urban design practice. (Author)

  2. Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour to examine health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkin, Samuel; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

    2015-08-01

    Safe medication practices depend upon, not only on individual responsibilities, but also effective communication and collaboration between members of the medication team. However, measurement of these skills is fraught with conceptual and practical difficulties. The aims of this study were to explore the utility of a Theory of Planned Behaviour-based questionnaire to predict health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice; and to determine the contribution of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions. A descriptive cross-sectional survey based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour was designed and tested. A convenience sample of 65 undergraduate pharmacy, nursing and medicine students from one semi-metropolitan Australian university were recruited for the study. Participants' behavioural intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety were measured using an online version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour Medication Safety Questionnaire. The Questionnaire had good internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.844. The three predictor variables of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control accounted for between 30 and 46% of the variance in behavioural intention; this is a strong prediction in comparison to previous studies using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Data analysis also indicated that attitude was the most significant predictor of participants' intention to collaborate with other team members to improve medication safety. The results from this study provide preliminary support for the Theory of Planned Behaviour-Medication Safety Questionnaire as a valid instrument for examining health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated approach to fire safety at the Krsko nuclear power plant - fire protection action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambright, J.A.; Cerjak, J.; Spiler, J.; Ioannidi, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (NPP Krsko) is a Westinghouse design, single-unit, 1882 Megawatt thermal (MWt), two-loop, pressurized water nuclear power plant. The fire protection program at NPP Krsko has been reviewed and reports issued recommending changes and modifications to the program, plant systems and structures. Three reports were issued, the NPP Krsko Fire Hazard Analysis (Safe Shout down Separation Analysis Report), the ICISA Analysis of Core Damage Frequency Due to Fire at the NPP Krsko and IPEEE (Individual Plant External Event Examination) related to fire risk. The Fire Hazard Analysis Report utilizes a compliance - based deterministic approach to identification of fire area hazards. This report focuses on strict compliance from the perspective of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), standards, guidelines and acceptance criteria and does not consider variations to comply with the intent of the regulations. The probabilistic analysis methide used in the ICISA and IPEEE report utilizes a risk based nad intent based approach in determining critical at-risk fire areas. NPP Krsko has already completed the following suggestions/recommendations from the above and OSART reports in order to comply with Appendix R: Installation of smoke detectors in the Control Room; Installation of Emergency Lighting in some plant areas and of Remote Shout down panels; Extension of Sound Power Communication System; Installation of Fire Annunciator Panel at the On-site Fire Brigade Station; Installation of Smoke Detection System in the (a) Main Control Room Panels, (b) Essential Service Water Building. (c) Component Cooling Building pump area, chiller area and HVAC area, (d) Auxiliary Building Safety pump rooms, (e) Fuel Handling room, (f) Intermediate Building AFFW area and compressor room, and (g) Tadwaste building; inclusion of Auxiliary operators in the Fire Brigade; training of Fire Brigade Members in Plant Operation (9 week course); Development of Fire Door Inspection and

  4. Development of planning level transportation safety tools using Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadayeghi, Alireza; Shalaby, Amer S; Persaud, Bhagwant N

    2010-03-01

    A common technique used for the calibration of collision prediction models is the Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM) procedure with the assumption of Negative Binomial or Poisson error distribution. In this technique, fixed coefficients that represent the average relationship between the dependent variable and each explanatory variable are estimated. However, the stationary relationship assumed may hide some important spatial factors of the number of collisions at a particular traffic analysis zone. Consequently, the accuracy of such models for explaining the relationship between the dependent variable and the explanatory variables may be suspected since collision frequency is likely influenced by many spatially defined factors such as land use, demographic characteristics, and traffic volume patterns. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the spatial variations in the relationship between the number of zonal collisions and potential transportation planning predictors, using the Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression modeling technique. The secondary objective is to build on knowledge comparing the accuracy of Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression models to that of Generalized Linear Models. The results show that the Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression models are useful for capturing spatially dependent relationships and generally perform better than the conventional Generalized Linear Models. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Safety against releases in severe accidents. Annual report 1996. Project plan 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The work scope of the RAK-2 project is divided into three sub-projects: RAK-2.1 Severe Accident Phenomenology; RAK-2.2 Computerised Accident Management; RAK-2.3 Reactors In Nordic Surroundings. The work in subproject 1 progresses roughly according to budget and time schedule. Some adjustments in the technical work scope were made during 1996. Main tasks of RAK-2.1 in 1996: Complete recriticality studies for Nordic BWRs; Investigate phenomena related to late phase melt progression; Issue and NKS Final Technical Report on KTH experiments. Main tasks of RAK-2.2 in 1996: CAMS would be further developed with signal validation, tracking simulation, state identification and PSA and risk monitoring applications; Carry out a feasibility study for development of a PWR version of CAMS in collaboration with EdF, France; Use CAMS in the Halden Man-Machine laboratory to perform human factor studies. Main tasks of RAK-2.3 in 1996: Collect and report data from the British reactor types AGR, MAGNOX and PWR; Make a report on accidents in nuclear ships; Put the collected data together in a common data base covering neighbour reactors treated in SIK-3 and RAK-2.3; Update the data in the former SIK-3 report if needed. The work in project 2 progresses according to plans. The data collection of British reactors with in sub-project 3 has been delayed significantly due to difficulty of obtaining information from some of the British utilities, but the problems are expected to be solved by the end of 1997. (EG)

  6. Smartphone-based safety planning and self-monitoring for suicidal patients : Rationale and study protocol of the CASPAR (Continuous Assessment for Suicide Prevention And Research) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuij, Chani; van Ballegooijen, Wouter; Ruwaard, Jeroen; de Beurs, Derek; Mokkenstorm, Jan; van Duijn, Erik; de Winter, Remco F.P.; O'Connor, Rory C.; Smit, Jan H.; Riper, Heleen; Kerkhof, Ad

    2018-01-01

    Background: It remains difficult to predict and prevent suicidal behaviour, despite growing understanding of the aetiology of suicidality. Clinical guidelines recommend that health care professionals develop a safety plan in collaboration with their high-risk patients, to lower the imminent risk of

  7. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C. M.; El-Messidi, O. E.; Cowser, D. K.; Kannard, J. R.; Carvin, R. T.; Will, III, A. S.; Clark, Jr., C.; Garland, S. B.

    1993-05-01

    This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements.

  8. Systematic review of qualitative literature on occupational health and safety legislation and regulatory enforcement planning and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEachen, Ellen; Kosny, Agnieszka; Ståhl, Christian; O'Hagan, Fergal; Redgrift, Lisa; Sanford, Sarah; Carrasco, Christine; Tompa, Emile; Mahood, Quenby

    2016-01-01

    The ability of occupational health and safety (OHS) legislation and regulatory enforcement to prevent workplace injuries and illnesses is contingent on political, economic, and organizational conditions. This systematic review of qualitative research articles considers how OHS legislation and regulatory enforcement are planned and implemented. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed, English-language articles published between 1990 and 2013 yielded 11 947 articles. We identified 34 qualitative articles as relevant, 18 of which passed our quality assessment and proceeded to meta-ethnographic synthesis. The synthesis yielded four main themes: OHS regulation formation, regulation challenges, inspector organization, and worker representation in OHS. It illuminates how OHS legislation can be based on normative suppositions about worker and employer behavior and shaped by economic and political resources of parties. It also shows how implementation of OHS legislation is affected by "general duty" law, agency coordination, resourcing of inspectorates, and ability of workers to participate in the system. The review identifies methodological gaps and identifies promising areas for further research in "grey" zones of legislation implementation.

  9. Pedestrian safety action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    In 2005, Arizona ranked 5th among states in pedestrian fatalities per 100,000 residents, with 164 : pedestrian fatalities on Arizonas roadwaysa nearly 30 percent increase from 2003 levels. To reduce : the number of pedestrian crashes in Arizona...

  10. Motorcoach safety action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Motorcoach travel is a very safe mode of highway transportation in the : United States, transporting 750 million passengers per year. Despite this, : over the past 10 years, motorcoach crashes have resulted in an average of 19 : motorcoach occupant f...

  11. Using a Modified Theory of Planned Behavior to Examine Adolescents' Workplace Safety and Health Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behavioral Intention: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Rebecca J; Toland, Michael D; Okun, Andrea H; Rojas-Guyler, Liliana; Bernard, Amy L

    2018-03-31

    Work, a defining feature of adolescence in the United States, has many benefits. Work also has risks, as adolescents experience a higher rate of serious job-related injuries compared to adults. Talking Safety, a free curriculum from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, is one tool educators may adopt to provide teens with essential workplace safety and health education. Adolescents (N = 2503; female, 50.1%; Hispanic, 50.0%) in a large urban school district received Talking Safety from their eighth-grade science teachers. This study used a modified theory of planned behavior (which included a knowledge construct), to examine students' pre- and post-intervention scores on workplace safety and health knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, and behavioral intention to enact job safety skills. The results from confirmatory factor analyses indicate three unique dimensions reflecting the theory, with a separate knowledge factor. Reliability estimates are ω ≥ .83. The findings from the structural equation models demonstrate that all paths, except pre- to posttest behavioral intention, are statistically significant. Self-efficacy is the largest contributor to the total effect of these associations. As hypothesized, knowledge has indirect effects on behavioral intention. Hispanic students scored lower at posttest on all but the behavioral intention measure, possibly suggesting the need for tailored materials to reach some teens. Overall the findings support the use of a modified theory of planned behavior to evaluate the effectiveness of a foundational workplace safety and health curriculum. This study may inform future efforts to ensure that safe and healthy work becomes integral to the adolescent experience.

  12. Segurança e produção: um modelo para o planejamento e controle integrado Safety and production: an integrated planning and control model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcisio A. Saurin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta um modelo de planejamento e controle da segurança no trabalho (PCS integrado ao processo de planejamento e controle da produção (PCP. O modelo foi desenvolvido por meio de dois estudos empíricos em obras industriais, adotando-se a pesquisa ação como estratégia de pesquisa. Os requisitos de segurança são integrados ao PCP em três níveis hierárquicos deste processo. No nível de longo prazo, o planejamento da segurança é configurado pelo desenvolvimento de análises preliminares de risco dos processos construtivos. A atualização e detalhamento da implantação destes planos é então feita por meio de sua integração aos níveis de médio e curto prazo do PCP.This paper presents a safety planning and control model (SPC that has been integrated to the production planning and control process. The model was developed through two action research empirical studies in industrial construction projects. Safety requirements are integrated into three hierarchical levels of planning and control process. At the long-term level, safety planning is featured by preliminary hazard analysis of construction processes. These plans are updated and detailed through its integration into both medium-term and short-term planning levels.

  13. The affordable care act and family planning services: the effect of optional medicaid expansion on safety net programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanese, Bethany G; Oglesby, Willie H

    2016-01-01

    Title X of the Public Health Service Act provides funding for a range of reproductive health services, with a priority given to low-income persons. Now that many of these services are provided to larger numbers of people with low-income since the passage of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion, questions remain on the continued need for the Title X program. The current project highlights the importance of these safety net programs. To help inform this policy issue, research was conducted to examine the revenue and service changes for Title X per state and compare those findings to the states' Medicaid expansion and demographics. The dataset include publicly available data from 2013 and 2014 Family Planning Annual Reports (FPAR). Paired samples differences of means t-tests were then used to compare the means of family planning participation rates for 2013 and 2014 across the different categories for Medicaid expansion states and non-expansion states. The ACA has had an impact on Title X services, but the link is not as direct as previously thought. The findings indicate that all states' Title X funded clinics lost revenue; however, expansion states fared better than non-expansion states. While the general statements from the FPAR National surveys certainly are supported in that Title X providers have decreased in number and scope of services, which has led to the decrease in total clients, these variations are not evenly applied across the states. The ACA has very likely had an impact on Title X services, but the link is not as obvious as previously thought. Title X funded clinics have helped increase access to health insurance at a greater rate in expansion states than non-expansion states. There was much concern from advocates that with the projected increased revenue from Medicaid and private insurance, that Title X programs could be deemed unnecessary. However, this revenue increase has yet to actually pan out. Title X still helps fill a much needed

  14. Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air

  15. Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  16. ITER safety studies: starting the quality plan code AINA; Estudios de seguridad de ITER: Puesta en marcha del plan de calidad del Codigo AINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dies, J.; Rivas, J. C.; Bargallo, E.

    2010-07-01

    This contribution discusses the implementation of the Quality Plan AINA Code 2.0. The work has affected areas such as the life cycle model, the software reliability plan, the design of the equipment or software tools to use, and has finally produced a new code.

  17. The effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytics in patients with acute intracranial haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ker, Katharine; Prieto-Merino, David; Sprigg, Nikola; Mahmood, Abda; Bath, Philip; Kang Law, Zhe; Flaherty, Katie; Roberts, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Antifibrinolytic Trialists Collaboration aims to increase knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic treatment by conducting individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses of randomised trials. This article presents the statistical analysis plan for an IPD meta-analysis of the effects of antifibrinolytics for acute intracranial haemorrhage. Methods: The protocol for the IPD meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016052155). We will conduct a...

  18. Safety demonstration test (SR-3/S1C-3/S2C-3/SF-2) plan using the HTTR. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Sakaba, Nariaki; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Takada, Eiji; Tochio, Daisuke; Ohwada, Hiroyuki

    2005-03-01

    Safety demonstration tests using the HTTR are to be conducted from the FY2002 to verify the inherent safety features and to improve the safety design and evaluation technologies for HTGRs, as well as to contribute to not only the commercial HTGRs but also the research and development for the VHTR that is one of the Generation IV reactor candidates. This paper describes the reactivity insertion test (SR-3), the coolant flow reduction test by tripping of gas circulators (S1C-3, S2C-3), and the partial flow loss of coolant test (SF-2) planned in March 2005 with their detailed test method, procedure and results of pre-test analysis. From the analytical results, it was verified that the negative reactivity feedback effect of the core brings the reactor power safely to a stable level without a reactor scram. (author)

  19. Health and safety plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HASP) addresses the health and safety (H&S) concerns and requirements for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be collected from effluent following treatment tests of extraction columns, algal mats, and mature wetlands supplied by surface water locations and existing groundwater monitoring well locations. The project Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the project description, technical objectives, procedures, and planned work activities in greater detail. It is the responsibility of the project managers, field manager, and site health and safety officer (SHSO) to determine that the requirements of this HASP are sufficiently protective. If it is determined that the requirements of this HASP are not sufficiently protective, a field change order(s) (FCO) will be prepared. FCOs will include a completed job hazard analysis or similar worksheet to ensure complete hazard assessment. FCOs must be approved by the Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) project manager, EMEF H&S manager, subcontractor project or field manager, and subcontractor H&S representative. As a minimum, FCOs will be prepared if additional tasks will be performed or if contaminant exposure is anticipated.

  20. Health and safety plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HASP) addresses the health and safety (H ampersand S) concerns and requirements for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be collected from effluent following treatment tests of extraction columns, algal mats, and mature wetlands supplied by surface water locations and existing groundwater monitoring well locations. The project Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the project description, technical objectives, procedures, and planned work activities in greater detail. It is the responsibility of the project managers, field manager, and site health and safety officer (SHSO) to determine that the requirements of this HASP are sufficiently protective. If it is determined that the requirements of this HASP are not sufficiently protective, a field change order(s) (FCO) will be prepared. FCOs will include a completed job hazard analysis or similar worksheet to ensure complete hazard assessment. FCOs must be approved by the Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) project manager, EMEF H ampersand S manager, subcontractor project or field manager, and subcontractor H ampersand S representative. As a minimum, FCOs will be prepared if additional tasks will be performed or if contaminant exposure is anticipated

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  2. Integrated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP) for the Ports and Waterways Safety System (PAWSS) Project - A Level I Major Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    This Integrated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP) serves as the master logistics planning document that describes necessary logistic activities, assigns responsibility for those activities, and establishes a schedule for completion. It is one of the init...

  3. Electrical safety code manual a plan language guide to national electrical code, OSHA and NFPA 70E

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Kimberley

    2010-01-01

    Safety in any workplace is extremely important. In the case of the electrical industry, safety is critical and the codes and regulations which determine safe practices are both diverse and complicated. Employers, electricians, electrical system designers, inspectors, engineers and architects must comply with safety standards listed in the National Electrical Code, OSHA and NFPA 70E. Unfortunately, the publications which list these safety requirements are written in very technically advanced terms and the average person has an extremely difficult time understanding exactly what they need to

  4. Planning the Safety of Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Registry Initiative (SAFARI) as a Collaborative Pan-Stakeholder Critical Path Registry Model: a Cardiac Safety Research Consortium "Incubator" Think Tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Sana M; Calkins, Hugh; Eloff, Benjamin C; Packer, Douglas L; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Hammill, Stephen C; Natale, Andrea; Page, Richard L; Prystowsky, Eric; Jackman, Warren M; Stevenson, William G; Waldo, Albert L; Wilber, David; Kowey, Peter; Yaross, Marcia S; Mark, Daniel B; Reiffel, James; Finkle, John K; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Pinnow, Ellen; Sager, Phillip; Sedrakyan, Art; Canos, Daniel; Gross, Thomas; Berliner, Elise; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major public health problem in the United States that is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Of the therapeutic modalities available to treat AF, the use of percutaneous catheter ablation of AF is expanding rapidly. Randomized clinical trials examining the efficacy and safety of AF ablation are currently underway; however, such trials can only partially determine the safety and durability of the effect of the procedure in routine clinical practice, in more complex patients, and over a broader range of techniques and operator experience. These limitations of randomized trials of AF ablation, particularly with regard to safety issues, could be addressed using a synergistically structured national registry, which is the intention of the SAFARI. To facilitate discussions about objectives, challenges, and steps for such a registry, the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium and the Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, in collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration, the American College of Cardiology, and the Heart Rhythm Society, organized a Think Tank meeting of experts in the field. Other participants included the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the AdvaMed AF working group, and additional industry representatives. The meeting took place on April 27 to 28, 2009, at the US Food and Drug Administration headquarters in Silver Spring, MD. This article summarizes the issues and directions presented and discussed at the meeting. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fundamental plan of atomic energy development and utilization in fiscal year 1986 related to atomic energy safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission decided to report to the Prime Minister after having determined this matter by assuming the passage of the budget draft for fiscal year 1986 as the prerequisite. As the fundamental policy, in order to cope with the advance of atomic energy development and utilization, such as the promotion of nuclear power generation and the construction of a prototype FBR, a demonstration ATR, a reprocessing plant and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities, it is required to perfect the measures for ensuring the safety of atomic energy. For this purpose, the perfecting of the function of Nuclear Safety Commission and the system for safety examination, inspection and operation management and supervision in Government organs, the improvement of the quality of operators, the safety regulation of radioactive waste treatment and disposal, and the perfecting of the laws related to the regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel and nuclear reacters are carried out. The research on the engineering safety of LWRs, the reactors of new types and reprocessing facilities, the research on the prevention of radiation injuries and the research on the safety of radioactive wastes are advanced. The establishment of nuclear fuel cycle, and the research on reactor decommissioning, the development of new type reactors and nuclear fusion are promoted from the viewpoint of safety. (Kako, I.)

  6. Emergency planning and the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH/Seveso II) Directive: An approach to determine the public safety zone for toxic cloud releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Mahony, Mary T.; Doolan, Donal; O'Sullivan, Alice; Hession, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The EU Control of Major Accidents Hazards Directive (Seveso II) requires an external emergency plan for each top tier site. This paper sets out a method to build the protection of public health into emergency planning for Seveso sites in the EU. The method involves the review of Seveso site details prescribed under the directive. The site safety report sets out the potential accident scenarios. The safety report's worst-case scenario, and chemical involved, is used as the basis for the external emergency plan. A decision was needed on the appropriate threshold value to use as the level of concern to protect public health. The definitions of the regulatory standards (air quality standards and occupational standards) in use were studied, how they are derived and for what purpose. The 10 min acute exposure guideline level (AEGL) for a chemical is recommended as the threshold value to inform decisions taken to protect public health from toxic cloud releases. The area delimited by AEGL 1 defines the population who may be concerned about being exposed. They need information based on comprehensive risk assessment. The area delimited by AEGL 2 defines the population for long-term surveillance when indicated and may include first responders. The area delimited by AEGL 3 defines the population who may present acutely to the medical services. It ensures that the emergency responders site themselves safely. A standard methodology facilitates discussions with plant operators and concerned public. Examples show how the methodology can be adapted to suit explosive risk and response to fire

  7. Standard Review Plan for the review of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility: Safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (NUREG-1200) provides guidance to staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards who perform safety reviews of applications to construct and operate low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The SRP ensures the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews and presents a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of the staff reviews. The SRP makes information about the regulatory licensing process widely available and serves to improve the understanding of the staff's review process by interested members of the public and the industry. Each individual SRP addresses the responsibilities of persons performing the review, the matters that are reviewed, the Commission's regulations and acceptance criteria necessary for the review, how the review is accomplished, the conclusions that are appropriate, and the implementation requirements

  8. Standard review plan for the review of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility: Safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (NUREG-1200) provides guidance to staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards who perform safety reviews of applications to construct and operate low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The SRP ensures the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews and presents a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of the staff reviews. The SRP makes information about the regulatory licensing process widely available and serves to improve the understanding of the staff's review process by interested members of the public and the nuclear power industry. Each individual SRP addresses the responsibilities of persons performing the review, the matters that are reviewed, the Commission's regulations and acceptance criteria necessary for the review, how the review is accomplished, the conclusions that are appropriate, and the implementation requirements

  9. Health and safety plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-24

    This health and safety plan sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in the removal action project at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges. This project will be conducted in a manner that ensures the protection of the safety and health of workers, the public, and the environment. The purpose of this removal action is to address lead-contaminated soil and reduce a potential risk to human health and the environment. This site is an operable unit within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. The removal action will contribute to early source actions within the watershed. The project will accomplish this through the removal of lead-contaminated soil in the target areas of the two small arms firing ranges. The primary hazards include temperature extremes, equipment operation, noise, potential lead exposure, uneven and slippery working surfaces, and insects.

  10. Health and safety plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This health and safety plan sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in the removal action project at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges. This project will be conducted in a manner that ensures the protection of the safety and health of workers, the public, and the environment. The purpose of this removal action is to address lead-contaminated soil and reduce a potential risk to human health and the environment. This site is an operable unit within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. The removal action will contribute to early source actions within the watershed. The project will accomplish this through the removal of lead-contaminated soil in the target areas of the two small arms firing ranges. The primary hazards include temperature extremes, equipment operation, noise, potential lead exposure, uneven and slippery working surfaces, and insects

  11. Health and safety manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    The manual consists of the following chapters: general policies and administration; the Environmental Health and Safety Department; the Medical Services Department: biological hazards; chemical safety; confined space entry; cryogenic safety; electrical safety; emergency plans; engineering and construction; evacuations, trenching, and shoring; fire safety; gases, flammable and compressed; guarding, mechanical; ladders and scaffolds, work surfaces; laser safety; materials handling and storage; noise; personal protective equipment; pressure safety; radiation safety, ionizing and non-ionizing; sanitation; seismic safety; training, environmental health and safety; tools, power and hand-operated; traffic and transportation; and warning signs and devices

  12. Integration of Nevada Test Site (NTS) Work Control Programs and Incorporating Integrated Safety Management (ISM) into Activity Level Work Planning and Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinney, Mike; Breen, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This session will examine a method developed by Federal and Contractor personnel at the Nevada Site Office (NSO) to improve the planning and execution of work activities utilizing an Activity Level Work Control process in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2004-1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations. The process was initially developed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2007, and implementation is commencing during the fourth quarter of FY 2008. This process will significantly enhance the flexibility and the appropriate rigor in the performance of work activities

  13. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  14. Final Site Safety and Health Plan for Phase II RCRA Facility Investigation Fort Benjamin Harrison Marion County, Indiana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ..., representativeness, completeness, and comparability of its data are known and documented. To essure that responsibility is met uniformly, each party must prepare a written QA Project Plan (QAPjP...

  15. 76 FR 11681 - Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band; New 800 MHz Band Plan for Puerto Rico...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... (USVI). This action is necessary to meet the Commission's goals to improve public safety communications... Accordingly, it is ordered, pursuant to Sections 4(i) and 332 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended... March 21, 2011. Sprint Nextel and relocating incumbents may agree to conduct face-to-face negotiations...

  16. 49 CFR 244.13 - Subjects to be addressed in a Safety Integration Plan involving an amalgamation of operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transaction: (a) Corporate culture. Each applicant shall: (1) Identify and describe differences for each safety-related area between the corporate cultures of the railroads involved in the transaction; (2... step-by-step measures, the integration of these corporate cultures and the manner in which it will...

  17. Driver and Traffic Safety Education: A Lesson Plan for the Residents of Gracewood State School and Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Jonathan L.

    Outlined is a course of driver education and traffic safety taught to retarded residents of a state institution. Stressed is the importance of driver education for residents able to leave the institution. The philosophy of the program is given to emphasize individualizing instruction, instructing students who possess the potential for driving,…

  18. Health and safety plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This HASP describes the process for identifying the requirements, written safety documentation, and procedures for protecting personnel involved in the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project. Objective of this project is to place 19 former isotope production facilities at ORNL in a safe condition in anticipation of an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance

  19. Health and safety plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-28

    This health and safety plan sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in the Lead Source Removal Project at the Former YS-86O Firing Ranges. This project will be conducted in a manner that ensures the protection of the safety and health of workers, the public, and the environment. The purpose of this removal action is to address lead contaminated soil and reduce a potential risk to human health and the environment. This site is an operable unit within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. The removal action will contribute to early source actions within the watershed. The project will accomplish this through the removal of lead-contaminated soil in the target areas of the two small arms firing ranges. This plan covers the removal actions at the Former YS-86O Firing Ranges. These actions involve the excavation of lead-contaminated soils, the removal of the concrete trench and macadam (asphalt) paths, verification/confirmation sampling, grading and revegetation. The primary hazards include temperature extremes, equipment operation, noise, potential lead exposure, uneven and slippery working surfaces, and insects.

  20. Health and safety plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This health and safety plan sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in the Lead Source Removal Project at the Former YS-86O Firing Ranges. This project will be conducted in a manner that ensures the protection of the safety and health of workers, the public, and the environment. The purpose of this removal action is to address lead contaminated soil and reduce a potential risk to human health and the environment. This site is an operable unit within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. The removal action will contribute to early source actions within the watershed. The project will accomplish this through the removal of lead-contaminated soil in the target areas of the two small arms firing ranges. This plan covers the removal actions at the Former YS-86O Firing Ranges. These actions involve the excavation of lead-contaminated soils, the removal of the concrete trench and macadam (asphalt) paths, verification/confirmation sampling, grading and revegetation. The primary hazards include temperature extremes, equipment operation, noise, potential lead exposure, uneven and slippery working surfaces, and insects

  1. Safety upgrading of Novi Han Repository under IAEA TC Project BUL/4/005 achievements and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, I.

    2003-01-01

    The report presents the safety upgrading of the Novi Han Repository under the IAEA TC Project BUL/4/005. The Project covers: identification of radionuclide inventory; characterisation of the disposal vaults; site characterisation; safety assessment; upgrading of the monitoring and radiation control; selection of treatment and conditioning processes and a conceptual design for a new waste processing and storage facility and other direct measures for safety improvement. The current inventory is identified and presented in the report. Schemes of the vault for solid wastes and vault for biological wastes are given, demonstrating reinforced concrete, stainless steel lining, and hydro insulation are presented. Several studies for safety assessment are made between 1997 and 2003. The operational safety assessment for disposal in existing facilities gives the annual risk for: spilling of waste package during upload (7.58.10 -9 ); spilling of waste package in transport accident (2.90.10 -9 ); fire scenario (3.50.10 - 1 3 ); radionuclide release due to flooding or earthquake (5.05.10 -4 ). The monitoring radiation control is upgraded according to the regulatory guidance and covered the site, restricted zone (1 km) and supervised zone (5 km). The types of analyses made are: Direct measurement of the dose rate -TLD; Direct measurements of the dose rate - portable surveillance monitors; In situ gamma spectrometry; Gamma spectrometry; Gross beta, gross alpha; Liquid scintillation spectrometry. The analyses show no transfer od radionuclides to the environment. The individual radiation control shows no evidence for specific radiation pathology. The operational radiation control service premises and transport vehicles. The following is measured: gamma dose rate; beta exposure; alpha exposure; neutron radiation; contamination level. Under the development is a detailed technical design supply of equipment for characterization of waste, including hot cell for control over high level

  2. Guidance for the design and management of a maintenance plan to assure safety and improve the predictability of a DOE nuclear irradiation facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, R.S.; Kryter, R.C.; Shepard, R.L.; Smith, O.L.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Rowan, W.J.

    1994-10-01

    A program is recommended for planning the maintenance of DOE nuclear facilities that will help safety and enhance availability throughout a facility's life cycle. While investigating the requirements for maintenance activities, a major difference was identified between the strategy suitable for a conventional power reactor and one for a research reactor facility: the latter should provide a high degree of predicted availability (referred to hereafter as ''predictability'') to its users, whereas the former should maximize total energy production. These differing operating goals necessitate different maintenance strategies. A strategy for scheduling research reactor facility operation and shutdown for maintenance must balance safety, reliability,and predicted availability. The approach developed here is based on three major elements: (1) a probabilistic risk analysis of the balance between assured reliability and predictability (presented in Appendix C), (2) an assessment of the safety and operational impact of maintenance activities applied to various components of the facility, and (3) a data base of historical and operational information on the performance and requirements for maintenance of various components. These factors are integrated into a set of guidelines for designing a new highly maintainable facility, for preparing flexible schedules for improved maintenance of existing facilities, and for anticipating the maintenance required to extend the life of an aging facility. Although tailored to research reactor facilities, the methodology has broader applicability and may therefore be used to improved the maintenance of power reactors, particularly in anticipation of peak load demands

  3. Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived

  4. FY 1993 Ferrocyanide Tank Safety Project: Effects of Aging on Ferrocyanide Wastes test plan for the remainder of FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilga, M.A.; Schiefelbein, G.F.

    1993-06-01

    Researchers in the Hanford Ferrocyanide Task Team are studying safety issues associated with ferrocyanide precipitates in single shell waste storage tanks (SST). Ferrocyanide is a stable complex of ferrous, ion and cyanide ion that is considered nontoxic because it does not dissociate readily in aqueous solutions. However, in the laboratory at temperatures in excess of 180 degrees C and in the presence of oxidizers such as nitrates and nitrites, dry ferrocyanide and ferrocyanide waste stimulants can be made to react exothermically. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is part of the Waste Tank Safety Program at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The purpose of the WHC program is to (1) maintain the ferrocyanide tanks with minimal risk of an accident, (2) select one or more strategies to assure safe storage, and (3) close out the unreviewed safety question (USQ). Tank ferrocyanide wastes were exposed to highly alkaline wastes from subsequent processing operations. Chemical reactions with caustic may have changed the ferrocyanide materials during 40 years of storage in the SSTs. Research in the open-quotes Effects of Aging on Ferrocyanide Wastesclose quotes task is targeted at studying aging of ferrocyanide tank simulants and other ferrocyanide materials to obtain a better understanding of how tank materials may have changed over the years. The research objective in this project is to determine the solubility and hydrolysis characteristics of simulated ferrocyanide tank wastes in alkaline media. The behavior of ferrocyanide simulant wastes is being determined by performing chemical reactions under conditions that might mimic the potential ranges in SST environments. Experiments are conducted at high pH, at high ionic strength, and in the presence of gamma radiation. Verification of simulant study findings by comparison with results with actual waste will also be required

  5. A study for the domestic application plan of the Generic Safety Issue(GSI) for the Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Un Chul; Jang, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Kyung; Lee, Doo Yong; Park, Chang Hwan

    2002-03-01

    In this study, a base work to construct the database of the domestic and foreign GSls were done through performing the deviation of GSls for the PHWR by investigating the development trend of international joint studies and the GSls of 4 countries as the PHWR state and examined the IAEA acceptance of GSls classification for the GSls of Canada, Korea Republic of, Argentina and India. We evaluated the possibility of application of the safety Issue for PHWR by investigating causes, contents and follow-up measures of each items. To evaluate the domestic application validity of the safety issue, We made the investigation matrix for the safety issue of each countries and also are reflecting new results in investigation matrix by examining IAEA PHWR GSI development trend. We intended to derive the GSls which are most appropriate in our PHWR by examining every issues. the derived GSls are divided into the design parts and the operation parts. And they have to be solved as soon as possible

  6. Program management plan for the conduct of a research, development, and demonstration program for improving the safety of nuclear powerplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    Congress passed Public Law 96-567, Nuclear Safety Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1980, (hereafter referred to as the Act) to provide for an accelerated and coordinated program of light water reactor safety research, development, and demonstration to be carried out by the Department of Energy. In order to assure that this program would be compatible with the needs of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated its response to Section 4 of the Act by conducting individual information gathering meetings with NRC and a wide cross section of the nuclear industry. The Department received recommendations on needs of what type of activities would and would not be appropriate for the Department to assist in satisfying these needs. Based on the evaluation of these inputs, it is concluded that the Department's ongoing Light Water Reactor (LWR) safety program is responsive to the Act. Specifically, the Department's ongoing program includes tasks in the areas of regulatory assessment, risk assessment, fission product source term, and emergency preparedness as well as providing technical assistance to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) to improve training of nuclear power personnel. These were among the very high priority efforts that were identified as necessary and appropriate for support by the Department

  7. A study for the domestic application plan of the Generic Safety Issue(GSI) for the Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Un Chul; Jang, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Kyung; Lee, Doo Yong; Park, Chang Hwan [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    In this study, a base work to construct the database of the domestic and foreign GSls were done through performing the deviation of GSls for the PHWR by investigating the development trend of international joint studies and the GSls of 4 countries as the PHWR state and examined the IAEA acceptance of GSls classification for the GSls of Canada, Korea Republic of, Argentina and India. We evaluated the possibility of application of the safety Issue for PHWR by investigating causes, contents and follow-up measures of each items. To evaluate the domestic application validity of the safety issue, We made the investigation matrix for the safety issue of each countries and also are reflecting new results in investigation matrix by examining IAEA PHWR GSI development trend. We intended to derive the GSls which are most appropriate in our PHWR by examining every issues. the derived GSls are divided into the design parts and the operation parts. And they have to be solved as soon as possible.

  8. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) product removal can containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnside, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Six Product Removal (PR) Cans and Containers are located within the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Each can is expected to contain a maximum of 3 g of residual radioactive material, consisting mainly of plutonium isotopes. The PR Can Containers were previously authorized by HNF-SD-TP-SEP-064, Rev. 0 (Boettger 1997), for the interarea transport of up to 3 g of plutonium. The purpose of this safety evaluation for packaging is to allow the transport of six PR Cans with their Containers from the Plutonium Finishing Plant to the 233 S Evaporator Facility. This safety evaluation for packaging is authorized for use until April 29, 1999, or until the shipment is made, whichever happens first

  9. Site Safety and Health Plan (Phase 3) for the treatability study for in situ vitrification at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    This plan is to be implemented for Phase III ISV operations and post operations sampling. Two previous project phases involving site characterization have been completed and required their own site specific health and safety plans. Project activities will take place at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Purpose of this document is to establish standard health and safety procedures for ORNL project personnel and contractor employees in performance of this work. Site activities shall be performed in accordance with Energy Systems safety and health policies and procedures, DOE orders, Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards 29 CFR Part 1910 and 1926; applicable United States Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and consensus standards. Where the word ``shall`` is used, the provisions of this plan are mandatory. Specific requirements of regulations and orders have been incorporated into this plan in accordance with applicability. Included from 29 CFR are 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; 1910.146, Permit Required - Confined Space; 1910.1200, Hazard Communication; DOE Orders requirements of 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards; 5480.11, Radiation Protection; and N5480.6, Radiological Control Manual. In addition, guidance and policy will be followed as described in the Environmental Restoration Program Health and Safety Plan. The levels of personal protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from reference documents and site characterization data. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project.

  10. Site Safety and Health Plan (Phase 3) for the treatability study for in situ vitrification at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    This plan is to be implemented for Phase III ISV operations and post operations sampling. Two previous project phases involving site characterization have been completed and required their own site specific health and safety plans. Project activities will take place at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Purpose of this document is to establish standard health and safety procedures for ORNL project personnel and contractor employees in performance of this work. Site activities shall be performed in accordance with Energy Systems safety and health policies and procedures, DOE orders, Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards 29 CFR Part 1910 and 1926; applicable United States Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and consensus standards. Where the word ''shall'' is used, the provisions of this plan are mandatory. Specific requirements of regulations and orders have been incorporated into this plan in accordance with applicability. Included from 29 CFR are 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; 1910.146, Permit Required - Confined Space; 1910.1200, Hazard Communication; DOE Orders requirements of 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards; 5480.11, Radiation Protection; and N5480.6, Radiological Control Manual. In addition, guidance and policy will be followed as described in the Environmental Restoration Program Health and Safety Plan. The levels of personal protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from reference documents and site characterization data. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project

  11. Safety against releases in severe accidents. Annual report 1996. Project plan 1997; Saekerhet mot utslaepp vid reaktorhaverier. Aarsrapport 1996. Plans 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The work scope of the RAK-2 project is divided into three sub-projects: RAK-2.1 Severe Accident Phenomenology; RAK-2.2 Computerised Accident Management; RAK-2.3 Reactors In Nordic Surroundings. The work in subproject 1 progresses roughly according to budget and time schedule. Some adjustments in the technical work scope were made during 1996. Main tasks of RAK-2.1 in 1996: Complete recriticality studies for Nordic BWRs; Investigate phenomena related to late phase melt progression; Issue and NKS Final Technical Report on KTH experiments. Main tasks of RAK-2.2 in 1996: CAMS would be further developed with signal validation, tracking simulation, state identification and PSA and risk monitoring applications; Carry out a feasibility study for development of a PWR version of CAMS in collaboration with EdF, France; Use CAMS in the Halden Man-Machine laboratory to perform human factor studies. Main tasks of RAK-2.3 in 1996: Collect and report data from the British reactor types AGR, MAGNOX and PWR; Make a report on accidents in nuclear ships; Put the collected data together in a common data base covering neighbour reactors treated in SIK-3 and RAK-2.3; Update the data in the former SIK-3 report if needed. The work in project 2 progresses according to plans. The data collection of British reactors with in sub-project 3 has been delayed significantly due to difficulty of obtaining information from some of the British utilities, but the problems are expected to be solved by the end of 1997. (EG).

  12. Inspection planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korosec, D.; Levstek, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) division of nuclear and radiological safety inspection has developed systematic approach to their inspections. To be efficient in their efforts regarding regular and other types of inspections, in past years, the inspection plan has been developed. It is yearly based and organized on a such systematic way, that all areas of nuclear safety important activities of the licensee are covered. The inspection plan assures appropriate preparation for conducting the inspections, allows the overview of the progress regarding the areas to be covered during the year. Depending on the licensee activities and nature of facility (nuclear power plant, research reactor, radioactive waste storage, others), the plan has different levels of intensity of inspections and also their frequency. One of the basic approaches of the plan is to cover all nuclear and radiological important activities on such way, that all regulatory requests are fulfilled. In addition, the inspection plan is a good tool to improve inspection effectiveness based on previous experience and allows to have the oversight of the current status of fulfillment of planned inspections. Future improvement of the plan is necessary in the light of newest achievements on this field in the nuclear world, that means, new types of inspections are planned and will be incorporated into plan in next year.(author)

  13. Nordic nuclear safety research program 1994-1997. Project coordination incl. SAM-4 general information issues. Report 1996. Plans for 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research) is a cooperative body in nuclear safety, radiation protection and emergency preparedness. Its purpose is to carry out cost-effective Nordic projects, thus producing research results, exercises, information, recommendations, manuals etc., to be used by decision makers and other concerned staff members at authorities and within the nuclear industry. This is the annual report for 1996, the third year of the fifth four-year NKS program (1994-1997). The report also contains plans for the rest of the program period, including budget proposals. The following major fields of research have been identified: reactor safety; radioactive waste; radioecology; emergency preparedness; and information issues. A total of nine projects are now under way within that framework. One project (RAK-1) is dedicated to reactor safety strategies: how to avoid serious accidents. A parallel project (RAK-2) deals with minimizing releases in case of an accident. When can an overheated reactor core still be water-cooled? What might be the consequences of the cooling? All Nordic countries have long-lived low and medium level radioactive waste that requires final disposal. One project (AFA-1) addresses that issue. Environmental impact of radioactive releases is studied in two radioecology projects. The project on marine radioecology, including sediment research (EKO-1), encompasses sampling, analysis and modeling. These are also key issues in the project on long ecological half-lives in semi-natural systems (EKO-2). The transfer of radioactive cesium and strontium in the chains soil - vegetation - sheep and mushroom - roe deer is studied, along with freshwater systems. Long-term doses to main is the ultimate output from the obtained models. Another aspect of environmental impact is emergency preparedness. A recently started project, EKO-5, addresses the issue of early planning for cleanup operations following a fallout. 'Early' in this context means within the

  14. Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES ampersand H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing)

  15. Resolution of the reactor vessel materials toughness safety issue; Task Action Plan A-11; Appendices C-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    The central problem in the Unresolved Safety Issue A-11, 'Reactor Vessel Materials Toughness,' was to provide guidance in performing analyses for reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) which fail to meet the toughness requirements during service life as a result of neutron radiation embrittlement. A technical team of recognized experts was organized to assist the NRC staff in addressing the problem. Using the foundation of the tearing modulus concept, which has been developed under earlier NRC sponsorship, relationships were obtained which provided approximate solutions to the RPV fracture problem with assumed beltline region flaws. Volume I of this report is a brief presentation of the problem and the results; Volume II provides the detailed technical foundations

  16. Feasibility of a Video-Based Advance Care Planning Website to Facilitate Group Visits among Diverse Adults from a Safety-Net Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Carly; Lum, Hillary D; Wistar, Emily; Horton, Claire; Sudore, Rebecca L

    2018-02-20

    Primary care providers in safety-net settings often do not have time to discuss advance care planning (ACP). Group visits (GV) may be an efficient means to provide ACP education. To assess the feasibility and impact of a video-based website to facilitate GVs to engage diverse adults in ACP. Feasibility pilot among patients who were ≥55 years of age from two primary care clinics in a Northern California safety-net setting. Participants attended two 90-minute GVs and viewed the five steps of the movie version of the PREPARE website ( www.prepareforyourcare.org ) concerning surrogates, values, and discussing wishes in video format. Two clinician facilitators were available to encourage participation. We assessed pre-to-post ACP knowledge, whether participants designated a surrogate or completed an advance directive (AD), and acceptability of GVs and PREPARE materials. We conducted two GVs with 22 participants. Mean age was 64 years (±7), 55% were women, 73% nonwhite, and 55% had limited literacy. Knowledge improved about surrogate designation (46% correct pre vs. 85% post, p = 0.01) and discussing decisions with others (59% vs. 90%, p = 0.01). Surrogate designation increased (48% vs. 85%, p = 0.01) and there was a trend toward AD completion (9% vs. 24%, p = 0.21). Participants rated the GVs and PREPARE materials a mean of 8 (±3.1) on a 10-point acceptability scale. Using the PREPARE movie to facilitate ACP GVs for diverse adults in safety net, primary care settings is feasible and shows potential for increasing ACP engagement.

  17. NRC program for the resolution of generic issues related to nuclear power plants. (Includes plans for the resolution of ''unresolved safety issues'' pursuant to Section 210 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    This report provides a description of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Program for the Resolution of Generic Issues Related to Nuclear Power Plants. The NRC program is of considerably broader scope than the ''Unresolved Safety Issues Plan'' required by Section 210. The NRC program does include plans for the resolution of ''Unresolved Safety Issues''; however, in addition, it includes generic tasks for the resolution of environmental issues, for the development of improvements in the reactor licensing process and for consideration of less conservative design criteria or operating limitations in areas where over conservatisms may be unnecessarily restrictive or costly

  18. [Design of a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan to assure the safety of a bologna product produced by a meat processing plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Rached, Lizet; Ascanio, Norelis; Hernández, Pilar

    2004-03-01

    The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) is a systematic integral program used to identify and estimate the hazards (microbiological, chemical and physical) and the risks generated during the primary production, processing, storage, distribution, expense and consumption of foods. To establish a program of HACCP has advantages, being some of them: to emphasize more in the prevention than in the detection, to diminish the costs, to minimize the risk of manufacturing faulty products, to allow bigger trust to the management, to strengthen the national and international competitiveness, among others. The present work is a proposal based on the design of an HACCP program to guarantee the safety of the Bologna Special Type elaborated by a meat products industry, through the determination of hazards (microbiological, chemical or physical), the identification of critical control points (CCP), the establishment of critical limits, plan corrective actions and the establishment of documentation and verification procedures. The used methodology was based in the application of the seven basic principles settled down by the Codex Alimentarius, obtaining the design of this program. In view of the fact that recently the meat products are linked with pathogens like E. coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, these were contemplated as microbiological hazard for the establishment of the HACCP plan whose application will guarantee the obtaining of a safe product.

  19. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

  20. Integrated Safety in ''SARAF'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickstein, P.; Grof, Y.; Machlev, M.; Pernick, A.

    2004-01-01

    As of the very early stages of the accelerator project at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center ''SARAF'' a safety group was established which has been an inseparable participant in the planning and design of the new facility. The safety group comprises of teams responsible for the shielding, radiation protection and general industrial safety aspects of ''SARAF''. The safety group prepared and documented the safety envelope for the accelerator, dealing with the safety requirements and guidelines for the first, pre-operational, stages of the project. The safety envelope, though based upon generic principles, took into account the accelerator features and the expected modes of operation. The safety envelope was prepared in a hierarchical structure, containing Basic Principles, Basic Guidelines, General Principles for Safety Implementation, Safety Requirements and Safety Underlining Issues. The above safety envelope applies to the entire facility, which entails the accelerator itself and the experimental areas and associated plant and equipment utilizing and supporting the production of the accelerated particle beams

  1. Applying the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) approach to a large pragmatic study involving safety net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coury, Jennifer; Schneider, Jennifer L; Rivelli, Jennifer S; Petrik, Amanda F; Seibel, Evelyn; D'Agostini, Brieshon; Taplin, Stephen H; Green, Beverly B; Coronado, Gloria D

    2017-06-19

    The Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle is a commonly used improvement process in health care settings, although its documented use in pragmatic clinical research is rare. A recent pragmatic clinical research study, called the Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (STOP CRC), used this process to optimize the research implementation of an automated colon cancer screening outreach program in intervention clinics. We describe the process of using this PDSA approach, the selection of PDSA topics by clinic leaders, and project leaders' reactions to using PDSA in pragmatic research. STOP CRC is a cluster-randomized pragmatic study that aims to test the effectiveness of a direct-mail fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) program involving eight Federally Qualified Health Centers in Oregon and California. We and a practice improvement specialist trained in the PDSA process delivered structured presentations to leaders of these centers; the presentations addressed how to apply the PDSA process to improve implementation of a mailed outreach program offering colorectal cancer screening through FIT tests. Center leaders submitted PDSA plans and delivered reports via webinar at quarterly meetings of the project's advisory board. Project staff conducted one-on-one, 45-min interviews with project leads from each health center to assess the reaction to and value of the PDSA process in supporting the implementation of STOP CRC. Clinic-selected PDSA activities included refining the intervention staffing model, improving outreach materials, and changing workflow steps. Common benefits of using PDSA cycles in pragmatic research were that it provided a structure for staff to focus on improving the program and it allowed staff to test the change they wanted to see. A commonly reported challenge was measuring the success of the PDSA process with the available electronic medical record tools. Understanding how the PDSA process can be applied to pragmatic

  2. Structured nursing communication on interdisciplinary acute care teams improves perceptions of safety, efficiency, understanding of care plan and teamwork as well as job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausvik, Christian; Lautar, Ashley; Miller, Lisa; Pallerla, Harini; Schlaudecker, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, accurate, and timely communication is required for quality health care and is strongly linked to health care staff job satisfaction. Developing ways to improve communication is key to increasing quality of care, and interdisciplinary care teams allow for improved communication among health care professionals. This study examines the patient- and family-centered use of structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds (SIBR) on an acute care for the elderly (ACE) unit in a 555-bed metropolitan community hospital. This mixed methods study surveyed 24 nurses, therapists, patient care assistants, and social workers to measure perceptions of teamwork, communication, understanding of the plan for the day, safety, efficiency, and job satisfaction. A similar survey was administered to a control group of 38 of the same staff categories on different units in the same hospital. The control group units utilized traditional physician-centric rounding. Significant differences were found in each category between the SIBR staff on the ACE unit and the control staff. Nurse job satisfaction is an important marker of retention and recruitment, and improved communication may be an important aspect of increasing this satisfaction. Furthermore, improved communication is key to maintaining a safe hospital environment with quality patient care. Interdisciplinary team rounds that take place at the bedside improve both nursing satisfaction and related communication markers of quality and safety, and may help to achieve higher nurse retention and safer patient care. These results point to the interconnectedness and dual benefit to both job satisfaction and patient quality of care that can come from enhancements to team communication.

  3. Using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as an instrument of water resource management: a case study from a GIS-based Water Safety Plan in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienand, I; Nolting, U; Kistemann, T

    2009-01-01

    Following international developments and the new WHO Drinking Water Guidelines (WHO 2004) a process-orientated concept for risk, monitoring and incident management has been developed and implemented in this study. The concept will be reviewed with special consideration for resource protection (first barrier of the multi-barrier system) and in turn, for the Water Safety Plan (WSP) which adequately considers-beyond the current framework of legal requirements-possible new hygienic-microbiologically relevant risks (especially emerging pathogens) for the drinking water supply. The development of a WSP within the framework of risk, monitoring and incident management includes the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). In the present study, GIS was used for visualization and spatial analysis in decisive steps in the WSP. The detailed process of GIS-supported implementation included the identification of local participants and their tasks and interactions as an essential part of risk management. A detailed ecological investigation of drinking water conditions in the catchment area was conducted in addition to hazard identification, risk assessment and the monitoring of control measures. The main task of our study was to find out in which steps of the WSP the implementation of GIS could be integrated as a useful, and perhaps even an essential tool.

  4. ENSI's view on NTB-10-01 'Evaluation of the geological documents for the provisional safety assessment in SGT Stage 2' - Sectoral Plan 'Deep Geological Disposal'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    As a preliminary action ahead of Stage 2 in the Sectoral Plan 'Deep Geological Disposal' ('Sachplan Geologische Tiefenlager': SGT) the bodies in charge of the management of the radioactive wastes have to determine, together with the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI), which complementary investigations are needed for the provisional safety assessment of the foreseen repositories. In particular, comparisons between the different sites must be possible. If some doubts remain, new investigations have to be conducted. In SGT Stage 1 the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) stated that a time period of 100'000 years shall be considered for the storage of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (SMA) and of 1 million years for the storage of high-level wastes (HAA). In SGT Stage 2, considerations about possible modifications of the biosphere during the considered time periods for SMA as well as for HAA have to be included. In what regards the host rock, ENSI declares that the dataset describing the Opalinus clay is sufficient for the site-specific safety analyses. What regards the Wellenberg site for a SMA repository, ENSI has earlier analysed the license request of the NAGRA. For the Mergel formations of the Helveticum, NAGRA conducted a complete safety analysis. ENSI considers the knowledge acquired for these rock types as sufficient for the technical safety comparisons in SGT Stage 2. The knowledge of the rock 'Brauner Dogger' is correct but some more information about the lithostratigraphy and the biostratigraphy is requested. The understanding of the effect of the rock density reduction on the hydraulic conductibility of Opalinus clay and Mergel formations is accurate enough for the comparisons in SGT Stage 2. For the 'Brauner Dogger', comparable data are missing, but the proposed thickness of 300 m of the host rock offers a sufficient protection against density reduction effects. Concerning the behaviour of the

  5. Aviation Safety Issues Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    2009-01-01

    The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

  6. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  7. Structured nursing communication on interdisciplinary acute care teams improves perceptions of safety, efficiency, understanding of care plan and teamwork as well as job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gausvik C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Christian Gausvik,1 Ashley Lautar,2 Lisa Miller,2 Harini Pallerla,3 Jeffrey Schlaudecker4,5 1University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 2The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 5Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program, University of Cincinnati/The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Efficient, accurate, and timely communication is required for quality health care and is strongly linked to health care staff job satisfaction. Developing ways to improve communication is key to increasing quality of care, and interdisciplinary care teams allow for improved communication among health care professionals. This study examines the patient- and family-centered use of structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds (SIBR on an acute care for the elderly (ACE unit in a 555-bed metropolitan community hospital. This mixed methods study surveyed 24 nurses, therapists, patient care assistants, and social workers to measure perceptions of teamwork, communication, understanding of the plan for the day, safety, efficiency, and job satisfaction. A similar survey was administered to a control group of 38 of the same staff categories on different units in the same hospital. The control group units utilized traditional physician-centric rounding. Significant differences were found in each category between the SIBR staff on the ACE unit and the control staff. Nurse job satisfaction is an important marker of retention and recruitment, and improved communication may be an important aspect of increasing this satisfaction. Furthermore, improved communication is key to maintaining a safe hospital environment with quality patient care. Interdisciplinary team rounds that take place at the bedside improve both nursing satisfaction and related communication markers of quality and safety, and may help to achieve higher nurse retention and safer

  8. The effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytics in patients with acute intracranial haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Ker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Antifibrinolytic Trialists Collaboration aims to increase knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic treatment by conducting individual patient data (IPD meta-analyses of randomised trials. This article presents the statistical analysis plan for an IPD meta-analysis of the effects of antifibrinolytics for acute intracranial haemorrhage. Methods: The protocol for the IPD meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016052155. We will conduct an individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with 1000 patients or more assessing the effects of antifibrinolytics in acute intracranial haemorrhage. We will assess the effect on two co-primary outcomes: 1 Death in hospital within 30 days of randomisation, and 2 Death  or dependency at final follow-up within 90 days of randomisation. The co-primary outcomes will be limited to patients treated within three hours of injury or stroke onset. We will report treatment effects using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We use logistic regression models to examine how the effect of antifibrinolytics vary by time to treatment, severity of intracranial bleeding, and age. We will also examine the effect of antifibrinolytics on secondary outcomes including death, dependency, vascular occlusive events, seizures, and neurological outcomes. Secondary outcomes will be assessed in all patients irrespective of time of treatment. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusions: This IPD meta-analysis will examine important clinical questions about the effects of antifibrinolytic treatment in patients with intracranial haemorrhage that cannot be answered using aggregate data. With IPD we can examine how effects vary by time to treatment, bleeding severity, and age, to gain better understanding of the balance of benefit and harms on which to base recommendations for practice.

  9. The effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytics in patients with acute intracranial haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Ker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Antifibrinolytic Trialists Collaboration aims to increase knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic treatment by conducting individual patient data (IPD meta-analyses of randomised trials. This article presents the statistical analysis plan for an IPD meta-analysis of the effects of antifibrinolytics for acute intracranial haemorrhage. Methods: The protocol for the IPD meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016052155. We will conduct an individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with 1000 patients or more assessing the effects of antifibrinolytics in acute intracranial haemorrhage. We will assess the effect on two co-primary outcomes: 1 death in hospital at end of trial follow-up, and 2 death in hospital or dependency at end of trial follow-up. The co-primary outcomes will be limited to patients treated within three hours of injury or stroke onset. We will report treatment effects using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We use logistic regression models to examine how the effect of antifibrinolytics vary by time to treatment, severity of intracranial bleeding, and age. We will also examine the effect of antifibrinolytics on secondary outcomes including death, dependency, vascular occlusive events, seizures, and neurological outcomes. Secondary outcomes will be assessed in all patients irrespective of time of treatment. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusions: This IPD meta-analysis will examine important clinical questions about the effects of antifibrinolytic treatment in patients with intracranial haemorrhage that cannot be answered using aggregate data. With IPD we can examine how effects vary by time to treatment, bleeding severity, and age, to gain better understanding of the balance of benefit and harms on which to base recommendations for practice.

  10. The effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytics in patients with acute intracranial haemorrhage: statistical analysis plan for an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, Katharine; Prieto-Merino, David; Sprigg, Nikola; Mahmood, Abda; Bath, Philip; Kang Law, Zhe; Flaherty, Katie; Roberts, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction : The Antifibrinolytic Trialists Collaboration aims to increase knowledge about the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic treatment by conducting individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses of randomised trials. This article presents the statistical analysis plan for an IPD meta-analysis of the effects of antifibrinolytics for acute intracranial haemorrhage. Methods : The protocol for the IPD meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016052155). We will conduct an individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with 1000 patients or more assessing the effects of antifibrinolytics in acute intracranial haemorrhage. We will assess the effect on two co-primary outcomes: 1) death in hospital at end of trial follow-up, and 2) death in hospital or dependency at end of trial follow-up. The co-primary outcomes will be limited to patients treated within three hours of injury or stroke onset. We will report treatment effects using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We use logistic regression models to examine how the effect of antifibrinolytics vary by time to treatment, severity of intracranial bleeding, and age. We will also examine the effect of antifibrinolytics on secondary outcomes including death, dependency, vascular occlusive events, seizures, and neurological outcomes. Secondary outcomes will be assessed in all patients irrespective of time of treatment. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusions : This IPD meta-analysis will examine important clinical questions about the effects of antifibrinolytic treatment in patients with intracranial haemorrhage that cannot be answered using aggregate data. With IPD we can examine how effects vary by time to treatment, bleeding severity, and age, to gain better understanding of the balance of benefit and harms on which to base recommendations for practice.

  11. Operation safety at Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltobriukh, G.

    1999-01-01

    An improvement of operational safety at Ignalina NPP covers: improvement of management structure and safety culture; symptom-based emergency operating procedures; staff training and full scope simulator; program of components ageing; metal inspection; improvement of fire safety. The first plan of Ignalina NPP Safety culture development for 1997 purposed to the SAR recommendation implementation was prepared and approved by the General Director

  12. Playground Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Fall Prevention Playground Safety Poisoning Prevention Road Traffic Safety Sports Safety Get Email Updates To receive ... at the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Playground Safety website . References U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Injuries and ...

  13. Environment, Health, and Safety - Construction Subcontractors Documents |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Environment, Health, and Safety - Construction Subcontractors Documents Environment Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) requirements are understood by construction subcontractors and with these requirements before submitting proposals and/or environment, health and safety plans for the

  14. Patient Safety Threat - Syringe Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Stakeholder Meeting December 2009 The One & Only Campaign Patient Notification Toolkit Developing Documents for a Patient Notification Planning Media and Communication Strategies Writing for the Media Spokesperson Preparation Planning the ...

  15. Planificación e implementación de la Seguridad Sostenible en Holanda = Planning and implementation of Sustainable Safety in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, F.C.M. Aarts, L.T. & Bax, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    From the early 1990s Holland has been developing a concept of sustainable road safety to tackle the risks Inherent to mobility. Subsequent to introducing the sustainable safety concept in 1992, a series of steps were taken to apply measures in line with the Dutch concept. The most important step was

  16. Nuclear power reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon, G.A.

    1976-10-01

    This report is based on the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited submission to the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning on the safety of CANDU reactors. It discusses normal operating conditions, postulated accident conditions, and safety systems. The release of radioactivity under normal and accident conditions is compared to the limits set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. (author)

  17. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 4. Radiological emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report reviews the state of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California. Attention is given to the role of Federal agencies, particularly the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in planning for both on and off site emergency measures and to the role of State and local agencies for off site planning. The relationship between these various authorities is considered. Existing emergency plans for nuclear power plants operating or being constructed in California are summarized. The developing role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission is examined

  18. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis.

  19. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis

  20. Safety of mechanical devices. Safety of automation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, G.; Schweizer, G.; Kapp, K.

    1985-01-01

    The paper deals with the classic procedures of safety engineering in the sectors mechanical engineering, electrical and energy engineering, construction and transport, medicine technology and process technology. Particular stress is laid on the safety of automation systems, control technology, protection of mechanical devices, reactor safety, mechanical constructions, transport systems, railway signalling devices, road traffic and protection at work in chemical plans. (DG) [de

  1. Internet plan and planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahriman Emina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper discuss specific features of internet plan as well as planning as management process in general in the contemporary environment. No need to stress out that marketing plan and marketing planning is core activity in approaching to market. At the same time, there are a lot specific c request in preparing marketing plan comparing to business planning due to marketing plan is an essential part. The importance of internet plan and planning rely on specific features of the internet network but as a part of general corporate as well as marketing strategy.

  2. 11. Strategic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    There are several types of planning processes and plans, including strategic, operational, tactical, and contingency. For this document, operational planning includes tactical planning. This chapter examines the strategic planning process and includes an introduction into disaster response plans. "A strategic plan is an outline of steps designed with the goals of the entire organisation as a whole in mind, rather than with the goals of specific divisions or departments". Strategic planning includes all measures taken to provide a broad picture of what must be achieved and in which order, including how to organise a system capable of achieving the overall goals. Strategic planning often is done pre-event, based on previous experience and expertise. The strategic planning for disasters converts needs into a strategic plan of action. Strategic plans detail the goals that must be achieved. The process of converting needs into plans has been deconstructed into its components and includes consideration of: (1) disaster response plans; (2) interventions underway or planned; (3) available resources; (4) current status vs. pre-event status; (5) history and experience of the planners; and (6) access to the affected population. These factors are tempered by the local: (a) geography; (b) climate; (c) culture; (d) safety; and (e) practicality. The planning process consumes resources (costs). All plans must be adapted to the actual conditions--things never happen exactly as planned.

  3. Progress of nuclear safety research. 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Sasajima, Hideo; Nishiyama, Yutaka (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-10-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy or the Safety Research Annual Plan issued by the Japanese government. The safety research at JAERI concerns the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 1999 through March 2001. (author)

  4. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  5. Nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  6. Power plants and safety 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The papers of this volume deal with the whole range of safety issues from planning and construction to the operation of power plants, and discuss also issues like availability and safety of power plants, protective clothes and their incommodating effect, alternatives for rendering hot-water generators safe and the safety philosophy in steam turbine engineering. (HAG) [de

  7. Seismic Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagling, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Seismic Safety Guide provides facilities managers with practical guidelines for administering a comprehensive earthquake safety program. Most facilities managers, unfamiliar with earthquake engineering, tend to look for answers in techniques more sophisticated than required to solve the actual problems in earthquake safety. Often the approach to solutions to these problems is so academic, legalistic, and financially overwhelming that mitigation of actual seismic hazards simply does not get done in a timely, cost-effective way. The objective of the Guide is to provide practical advice about earthquake safety so that managers and engineers can get the job done without falling into common pitfalls, prolonged diagnosis, and unnecessary costs. It is comprehensive with respect to earthquakes in that it covers the most important aspects of natural hazards, site planning, rehabilitation of existing buildings, design of new facilities, operational safety, emergency planning, non-structural elements, life lines, and risk management. 5 references

  8. Concerning safety issue associated with approval of modification of plan for reprocessing facilities of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (reply to inquiry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    In response to an inquiry on the title issue received on Sept. 16, 1988, the Nuclear Safety Commission made an adequate study and submitted the findings to the Prime Minister on Oct. 20. the relevant modifications include the installation of combustion facilities comprising two furnaces to replace the existing facilities, and the addition of uranyl nitrate solution receiving equipment to the existing facilities for plutonium conversion technology development. The study addressed the effect of the modifications on the safety of the facilities and the environment. The combustion facilities, equipment and underground seepage water tank are designed in accordance with the applicable anti-earthquake standards. The facilities will be constructed of incombustible of flame-retardant materials. Equipment in the facilities will be used under negative pressure to prevent counterflow. Adequate measures will be taken for shielding, exposure control, waste disposal, etc. It is concluded that the modifications will not affect the safety of the reprocessing facilities. (Nogami, K.).

  9. Concerning safety issue associated with approval of modification of plan for reprocessing facilities of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (reply to inquiry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In response to an inquiry on the title issue received on Sept. 16, 1988, the Nuclear Safety Commission made an adequate study and submitted the findings to the Prime Minister on Oct. 20. the relevant modifications include the installation of combustion facilities comprising two furnaces to replace the existing facilities, and the addition of uranyl nitrate solution receiving equipment to the existing facilities for plutonium conversion technology development. The study addressed the effect of the modifications on the safety of the facilities and the environment. The combustion facilities, equipment and underground seepage water tank are designed in accordance with the applicable anti-earthquake standards. The facilities will be constructed of incombustible of flame-retardant materials. Equipment in the facilities will be used under negative pressure to prevent counterflow. Adequate measures will be taken for shielding, exposure control, waste disposal, etc. It is concluded that the modifications will not affect the safety of the reprocessing facilities. (Nogami, K.)

  10. Integrating Metropolitan Planning Organizations into the State's Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) : Proceedings from the Federal Highway Administration's Peer-to-Peer Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This report provides a summary of a peer exchange sponsored by the Association of New York State Metropolitan Planning Organizations (NYSMPO) and the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT). It also includes proposed next steps developed...

  11. Auto Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Auto Safety KidsHealth / For Parents / Auto Safety What's in this ... by teaching some basic rules. Importance of Child Safety Seats Using a child safety seat (car seat) ...

  12. U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Boating Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiatives Carbon Monoxide Life Jacket Wear / Wearing your Life Jacket Float Planning Regulations State Boating Laws Navigation Rules Recalls & Safety Defects Manufacturers Identification Consumer Safety Defect ...

  13. Study of industry safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Pil Su

    1987-06-01

    This book deals with general remarks, industrial accidents, statistics of industrial accidents, unsafe actions, making machinery and facilities safe, safe activities, having working environment safe, survey of industrial accidents and analysis of causes, system of safety management and operations, safety management planning, safety education, human engineering such as human-machines system, system safety, and costs of disaster losses. It lastly adds individual protective equipment and working clothes including protect equipment for eyes, face, hands, arms and feet.

  14. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, the organization concerned with worldwide nuclear safety has produced two international conventions to provide (1) prompt notification of nuclear accidents and (2) procedures to facilitate mutual assistance during an emergency. IAEA has also expanded operational safety review team missions, enhanced information exchange on operational safety events at nuclear power plants, and planned a review of its nuclear safety standards to ensure that they include the lessons learned from the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident. However, there appears to be a nearly unanimous belief among IAEA members that may attempt to impose international safety standards verified by an international inspection program would infringe on national sovereignty. Although several Western European countries have proposed establishing binding safety standards and inspections, no specific plant have been made; IAEA's member states are unlikely to adopt such standards and an inspection program

  15. 'Shelter' object safety. Structural aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivosheev, P.I.; Nemchinov, Yu.I.; Bambura, A.N.; Sokolov, A.P.; Shenderovich, V.Ya.; Vasyagin, R.V.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Shcherbin, V.N.; Rud'ko, V.M.; Tokarevskij, V.V.; Belousov, E.L.; Khejger, D.; Gorodetskij, L.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997 the group of the international experts including Ukrainian organizations and 'Shelter' Object ChNPP are developed the plan of SO transformation into ecological safe status (plan SIP). The realization of the plan was carried out on basis of international tender. The results of structural aspects of SO safety and it transformation into ecological safe state (ESS) are resented in this report

  16. Staying Secure for School Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngkin, Minu

    2012-01-01

    Proper planning and preventive maintenance can increase school security and return on investment. Preventive maintenance begins with planning. Through careful planning, education institutions can determine what is working and if any equipment, hardware or software needs to be replaced or upgraded. When reviewing a school's safety and security…

  17. Environmental development plan: magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the planning and management requirements and schedules needed to evaluate and assess the environmental, health and safety (EH and S) aspects of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program (MFE). Environment is defined to include the environmental, health (occupational and public), and safety aspects

  18. SU-F-T-387: A Novel Optimization Technique for Field in Field (FIF) Chestwall Radiation Therapy Using a Single Plan to Improve Delivery Safety and Treatment Planning Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabibian, A; Kim, A; Rose, J; Alvelo, M; Perel, C; Laiken, K; Sheth, N [Bayonne Medical Center, Bayonne, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A novel optimization technique was developed for field-in-field (FIF) chestwall radiotherapy using bolus every other day. The dosimetry was compared to currently used optimization. Methods: The prior five patients treated at our clinic to the chestwall and supraclavicular nodes with a mono-isocentric four-field arrangement were selected for this study. The prescription was 5040 cGy in 28 fractions, 5 mm bolus every other day on the tangent fields, 6 and/or 10 MV x-rays, and multileaf collimation.Novelly, tangents FIF segments were forward planned optimized based on the composite bolus and non-bolus dose distribution simultaneously. The prescription was spilt into 14 fractions for both bolus and non-bolus tangents. The same segments and monitor units were used for the bolus and non-bolus treatment. The plan was optimized until the desired coverage was achieved, minimized 105% hotspots, and a maximum dose of less than 108%. Each tangential field had less than 5 segments.Comparison plans were generated using FIF optimization with the same dosimetric goals, but using only the non-bolus calculation for FIF optimization. The non-bolus fields were then copied and bolus was applied. The same segments and monitor units were used for the bolus and non-bolus segments. Results: The prescription coverage of the chestwall, as defined by RTOG guidelines, was on average 51.8% for the plans that optimized bolus and non-bolus treatments simultaneous (SB) and 43.8% for the plans optimized to the non-bolus treatments (NB). Chestwall coverage of 90% prescription averaged to 80.4% for SB and 79.6% for NB plans. The volume receiving 105% of the prescription was 1.9% for SB and 0.8% for NB plans on average. Conclusion: Simultaneously optimizing for bolus and non-bolus treatments noticeably improves prescription coverage of the chestwall while maintaining similar hotspots and 90% prescription coverage in comparison to optimizing only to non-bolus treatments.

  19. SU-F-T-387: A Novel Optimization Technique for Field in Field (FIF) Chestwall Radiation Therapy Using a Single Plan to Improve Delivery Safety and Treatment Planning Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabibian, A; Kim, A; Rose, J; Alvelo, M; Perel, C; Laiken, K; Sheth, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A novel optimization technique was developed for field-in-field (FIF) chestwall radiotherapy using bolus every other day. The dosimetry was compared to currently used optimization. Methods: The prior five patients treated at our clinic to the chestwall and supraclavicular nodes with a mono-isocentric four-field arrangement were selected for this study. The prescription was 5040 cGy in 28 fractions, 5 mm bolus every other day on the tangent fields, 6 and/or 10 MV x-rays, and multileaf collimation.Novelly, tangents FIF segments were forward planned optimized based on the composite bolus and non-bolus dose distribution simultaneously. The prescription was spilt into 14 fractions for both bolus and non-bolus tangents. The same segments and monitor units were used for the bolus and non-bolus treatment. The plan was optimized until the desired coverage was achieved, minimized 105% hotspots, and a maximum dose of less than 108%. Each tangential field had less than 5 segments.Comparison plans were generated using FIF optimization with the same dosimetric goals, but using only the non-bolus calculation for FIF optimization. The non-bolus fields were then copied and bolus was applied. The same segments and monitor units were used for the bolus and non-bolus segments. Results: The prescription coverage of the chestwall, as defined by RTOG guidelines, was on average 51.8% for the plans that optimized bolus and non-bolus treatments simultaneous (SB) and 43.8% for the plans optimized to the non-bolus treatments (NB). Chestwall coverage of 90% prescription averaged to 80.4% for SB and 79.6% for NB plans. The volume receiving 105% of the prescription was 1.9% for SB and 0.8% for NB plans on average. Conclusion: Simultaneously optimizing for bolus and non-bolus treatments noticeably improves prescription coverage of the chestwall while maintaining similar hotspots and 90% prescription coverage in comparison to optimizing only to non-bolus treatments.

  20. Interstate 80 freight corridor analysis : current freight traffic, trends and projections in special consideration of Wyoming policy-makers in planning, engineering, highway safety and enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    "This report is the result of a two-part study intended to provide input to WYDOTs long-term planning process for the I-80 facility. The first phase of the study involved an on-the-ground freight survey of over 2,000 truckers traveling eastbound a...