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Sample records for safety margins due

  1. Safety margins in deterministic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorov, A.

    2011-01-01

    The concept of safety margins has acquired certain prominence in the attempts to demonstrate quantitatively the level of the nuclear power plant safety by means of deterministic analysis, especially when considering impacts from plant ageing and discovery issues. A number of international or industry publications exist that discuss various applications and interpretations of safety margins. The objective of this presentation is to bring together and examine in some detail, from the regulatory point of view, the safety margins that relate to deterministic safety analysis. In this paper, definitions of various safety margins are presented and discussed along with the regulatory expectations for them. Interrelationships of analysis input and output parameters with corresponding limits are explored. It is shown that the overall safety margin is composed of several components each having different origins and potential uses; in particular, margins associated with analysis output parameters are contrasted with margins linked to the analysis input. While these are separate, it is possible to influence output margins through the analysis input, and analysis method. Preserving safety margins is tantamount to maintaining safety. At the same time, efficiency of operation requires optimization of safety margins taking into account various technical and regulatory considerations. For this, basic definitions and rules for safety margins must be first established. (author)

  2. Task Group on Safety Margins Action Plan (SMAP). Safety Margins Action Plan - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrehor, Miroslav; Gavrilas, Mirela; Belac, Josef; Sairanen, Risto; Bruna, Giovanni; Reocreux, Michel; Touboul, Francoise; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B.; Park, Jong Seuk; Prosek, Andrej; Hortal, Javier; Sandervaag, Odbjoern; Zimmerman, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The international nuclear community has expressed concern that some changes in existing plants could challenge safety margins while fulfilling all the regulatory requirements. In 1998, NEA published a report by the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities on Future Nuclear Regulatory Challenges. The report recognized 'Safety margins during more exacting operating modes' as a technical issue with potential regulatory impact. Examples of plant changes that can cause such exacting operating modes include power up-rates, life extension or increased fuel burnup. In addition, the community recognized that the cumulative effects of simultaneous changes in a plant could be larger than the accumulation of the individual effects of each change. In response to these concerns, CSNI constituted the safety margins action plan (SMAP) task group with the following objectives: 'To agree on a framework for integrated assessments of the changes to the overall safety of the plant as a result of simultaneous changes in plant operation / condition; To develop a CSNI document which can be used by member countries to assess the effect of plant change on the overall safety of the plant; To share information and experience.' The two approaches to safety analysis, deterministic and probabilistic, use different methods and have been developed mostly independently of each other. This makes it difficult to assure consistency between them. As the trend to use information on risk (where the term risk means results of the PSA/PRA analysis) to support regulatory decisions is growing in many countries, it is necessary to develop a method of evaluating safety margin sufficiency that is applicable to both approaches and, whenever possible, integrated in a consistent way. Chapter 2 elaborates on the traditional view of safety margins and the means by which they are currently treated in deterministic analyses. This chapter also discusses the technical basis for safety limits as they are used today

  3. Pickering seismic safety margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghobarah, A.; Heidebrecht, A.C.; Tso, W.K.

    1992-06-01

    A study was conducted to recommend a methodology for the seismic safety margin review of existing Canadian CANDU nuclear generating stations such as Pickering A. The purpose of the seismic safety margin review is to determine whether the nuclear plant has sufficient seismic safety margin over its design basis to assure plant safety. In this review process, it is possible to identify the weak links which might limit the seismic performance of critical structures, systems and components. The proposed methodology is a modification the EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) approach. The methodology includes: the characterization of the site margin earthquake, the definition of the performance criteria for the elements of a success path, and the determination of the seismic withstand capacity. It is proposed that the margin earthquake be established on the basis of using historical records and the regional seismo-tectonic and site specific evaluations. The ability of the components and systems to withstand the margin earthquake is determined by database comparisons, inspection, analysis or testing. An implementation plan for the application of the methodology to the Pickering A NGS is prepared

  4. Safety margins in older adults increase with improved control of a dynamic object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Christopher J.; Sternad, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Older adults face decreasing motor capabilities due to pervasive neuromuscular degradations. As a consequence, errors in movement control increase. Thus, older individuals should maintain larger safety margins than younger adults. While this has been shown for object manipulation tasks, several reports on whole-body activities, such as posture and locomotion, demonstrate age-related reductions in safety margins. This is despite increased costs for control errors, such as a fall. We posit that this paradox could be explained by the dynamic challenge presented by the body or also an external object, and that age-related reductions in safety margins are in part due to a decreased ability to control dynamics. To test this conjecture we used a virtual ball-in-cup task that had challenging dynamics, yet afforded an explicit rendering of the physics and safety margin. The hypotheses were: (1) When manipulating an object with challenging dynamics, older adults have smaller safety margins than younger adults. (2) Older adults increase their safety margins with practice. Nine young and 10 healthy older adults practiced moving the virtual ball-in-cup to a target location in exactly 2 s. The accuracy and precision of the timing error quantified skill, and the ball energy relative to an escape threshold quantified the safety margin. Compared to the young adults, older adults had increased timing errors, greater variability, and decreased safety margins. With practice, both young and older adults improved their ability to control the object with decreased timing errors and variability, and increased their safety margins. These results suggest that safety margins are related to the ability to control dynamics, and may explain why in tasks with simple dynamics older adults use adequate safety margins, but in more complex tasks, safety margins may be inadequate. Further, the results indicate that task-specific training may improve safety margins in older adults. PMID:25071566

  5. Safety Margins in Older Adults Increase with Improved Control of a Dynamic Object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Hasson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Older adults face decreasing motor capabilities due to pervasive neuromuscular degradations. As a consequence errors in movement control increase. Thus, older individuals should maintain larger safety margins than younger adults. While this has been shown for object manipulation tasks, several reports on whole-body activities, such as posture and locomotion, however demonstrate age-related reductions in safety margins. This is despite increased costs for control errors, such as a fall. We posit that this paradox could be explained by the dynamic challenge presented by the body or an external object, and that age-related reductions in safety margins are in part due to a decreased ability to control dynamics. To test this conjecture we used a virtual ball-in-cup task that had challenging dynamics, yet afforded an explicit rendering of the physics and safety margin. The hypotheses were: 1 When manipulating an object with challenging dynamics, older adults have smaller safety margins than younger adults. 2 Older adults increase their safety margins with practice. Nine young and 10 healthy older adults practiced moving the virtual ball-in-cup to a target location in exactly two seconds. The accuracy and precision of the timing error quantified skill and the ball energy relative to an escape threshold quantified the safety margin. Compared to the young adults, older adults had increased timing errors, greater variability, and decreased safety margins. With practice, both young and older adults improved their ability to control the object with decreased timing errors and variability, and increased their safety margins. These results suggest that safety margins are related to the ability to control dynamics, and may explain why in tasks with simple dynamics older adults use adequate safety margins, but in more complex tasks, safety margins may be inadequate. Further, the results indicate that task-specific training may improve safety margins in older

  6. Quantifying Safety Margin Using the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David; Bucknor, Matthew; Brunett, Acacia; Nakayama, Marvin

    2015-04-26

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC), developed by Idaho National Laboratory as part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability Project, utilizes a probabilistic safety margin comparison between a load and capacity distribution, rather than a deterministic comparison between two values, as is usually done in best-estimate plus uncertainty analyses. The goal is to determine the failure probability, or in other words, the probability of the system load equaling or exceeding the system capacity. While this method has been used in pilot studies, there has been little work conducted investigating the statistical significance of the resulting failure probability. In particular, it is difficult to determine how many simulations are necessary to properly characterize the failure probability. This work uses classical (frequentist) statistics and confidence intervals to examine the impact in statistical accuracy when the number of simulations is varied. Two methods are proposed to establish confidence intervals related to the failure probability established using a RISMC analysis. The confidence interval provides information about the statistical accuracy of the method utilized to explore the uncertainty space, and offers a quantitative method to gauge the increase in statistical accuracy due to performing additional simulations.

  7. RISK-INFORMED SAFETY MARGIN CHARACTERIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, Nam; Szilard, Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    The concept of safety margins has served as a fundamental principle in the design and operation of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defined as the minimum distance between a system's 'loading' and its 'capacity', plant design and operation is predicated on ensuring an adequate safety margin for safety-significant parameters (e.g., fuel cladding temperature, containment pressure, etc.) is provided over the spectrum of anticipated plant operating, transient and accident conditions. To meet the anticipated challenges associated with extending the operational lifetimes of the current fleet of operating NPPs, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have developed a collaboration to conduct coordinated research to identify and address the technological challenges and opportunities that likely would affect the safe and economic operation of the existing NPP fleet over the postulated long-term time horizons. In this paper we describe a framework for developing and implementing a Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to evaluate and manage changes in plant safety margins over long time horizons

  8. Safety margins of operating reactors. Analysis of uncertainties and implications for decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Maintaining safety in the design and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is a very important task under the conditions of a challenging environment, affected by the deregulated electricity market and implementation of risk informed regulations. In Member States, advanced computer codes are widely used as safety analysis tools in the framework of licensing of new NPP projects, safety upgrading programmes of existing NPPs, periodic safety reviews, renewal of operating licences, use of the safety margins for reactor power uprating, better utilization of nuclear fuel and higher operational flexibility, for justification of lifetime extensions, development of new emergency operating procedures, analysis of operational events, and development of accident management programmes. The issue of inadequate quality of safety analysis is becoming important due to a general tendency to use advanced tools for better establishment and utilization of safety margins, while the existence of such margins assure that NPPs operate safely in all modes of operation and at all times. The most important safety margins relate to physical barriers against release of radioactive material, such as fuel matrix and fuel cladding, reactor coolant system boundary, and the containment. Typically, safety margins are determined with use of computational tools for safety analysis. Advanced best estimate computer codes are suggested e.g. in the IAEA Safety Guide on Safety Assessment and Verification for Nuclear Power Plants to be used for current safety analysis. Such computer codes require their careful application to avoid unjustified reduction in robustness of the reactor safety. The issue of uncertainties in safety analyses and their impact on evaluation of safety margins is addressed in a number of IAEA guidance documents, in particular in the Safety Report on Accident Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants. It is also discussed in various technical meetings and workshops devoted to this area. The

  9. Texas curve margin of safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This software can be used to assist with the assessment of margin of safety for a horizontal curve. It is intended for use by engineers and technicians responsible for safety analysis or management of rural highway pavement or traffic control devices...

  10. Time Safety Margin: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Air Education and Training Command Handbook 99-107, T-38 Road to Wings, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, July 2013. 65 This page was intentionally left...412TW-TIH-16-01 TIME SAFETY MARGIN: THEORY AND PRACTICE WILLIAM R. GRAY, III Chief Test Pilot USAF Test Pilot School SEPTEMBER 2016... Safety Margin: The01y and Practice) was submitted by the Commander, 4 I 2th Test Wing, Edwards AFB, Ca lifornia 93524-6843. Foreign announcement and

  11. Technical specification improvement through safety margin considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, R.C.; Jansen, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Westinghouse has developed an approach for utilizing safety analysis margin considerations to improve plant operability through technical specification revision. This approach relies on the identification and use of parameter interrelations and sensitivities to identify acceptable operating envelopes. This paper summarizes technical specification activities to date and presents the use of safety margin considerations as another viable method to obtain technical specification improvement

  12. Seismic safety margins research program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, F.J.; Smith, P.D.

    1978-01-01

    A multiyear seismic research program has been initiated at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This program, the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The program is designed to develop a probabilistic systems methodology for determining the seismic safety margins of nuclear power plants. Phase I, extending some 22 months, began in July 1978 at a funding level of approximately $4.3 million. Here we present an overview of the SSMRP. Included are discussions on the program objective, the approach to meet the program goal and objectives, end products, the probabilistic systems methodology, and planned activities for Phase I

  13. Containment safety margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Riesemann, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    Objective of the Containment Safety Margins program is the development and verification of methodologies which are capable of reliably predicting the ultimate load-carrying capability of light water reactor containment structures under accident and severe environments. The program was initiated in June 1980 at Sandia and this paper addresses the first phase of the program which is essentially a planning effort. Brief comments are made about the second phase, which will involve testing of containment models

  14. A dynamic probabilistic safety margin characterization approach in support of Integrated Deterministic and Probabilistic Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Maio, Francesco; Rai, Ajit; Zio, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) is to develop a methodology for estimating system safety margins in the presence of stochastic and epistemic uncertainties affecting the system dynamic behavior. This is useful to support decision-making for licensing purposes. In the present work, safety margin uncertainties are handled by Order Statistics (OS) (with both Bracketing and Coverage approaches) to jointly estimate percentiles of the distributions of the safety parameter and of the time required for it to reach these percentiles values during its dynamic evolution. The novelty of the proposed approach consists in the integration of dynamic aspects (i.e., timing of events) into the definition of a dynamic safety margin for a probabilistic Quantification of Margin and Uncertainties (QMU). The system here considered for demonstration purposes is the Lead–Bismuth Eutectic- eXperimental Accelerator Driven System (LBE-XADS). - Highlights: • We integrate dynamic aspects into the definition of a safety margins. • We consider stochastic and epistemic uncertainties affecting the system dynamics. • Uncertainties are handled by Order Statistics (OS). • We estimate the system grace time during accidental scenarios. • We apply the approach to an LBE-XADS accidental scenario.

  15. Seismic safety margin assessment program (Annual safety research report, JFY 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenichi; Iijima, Toru; Inagaki, Masakatsu; Taoka, Hideto; Hidaka, Shinjiro

    2011-01-01

    Seismic capacity test data, analysis method and evaluation code provided by Seismic Safety Margin Assessment Program have been utilized for the support of seismic back-check evaluation of existing plants. The summary of the program in 2010 is as follows. 1. Component seismic capacity test and quantitative seismic capacity evaluation. Many seismic capacity tests of various snubbers were conducted and quantitative seismic capacities were evaluated. One of the emergency diesel generator partial-model seismic capacity tests was conducted and quantitative seismic capacity was evaluated. Some of the analytical evaluations of piping-system seismic capacities were conducted. 2. Analysis method for minute evaluation of component seismic response. The difference of seismic response of large components such as primary containment vessel and reactor pressure vessel when they were coupled with 3-dimensional FEM building model or 1-dimensional lumped mass building model, was quantitatively evaluated. 3. Evaluation code for quantitative evaluation of seismic safety margin of systems, structures and components. As the example, quantitative evaluation of seismic safety margin of systems, structures and components were conducted for the reference plant. (author)

  16. Safety margin evaluation concepts for plant Up rates and life extension. Results of the OECD/NEA/CSNI working group on Safety Margin Action Plan (SMAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belac, J

    2006-01-01

    This presentation summarizes results of the OECD/NEA/CSNI working group on Safety Margin Action Plan (SMAP) aimed to develop generalized safety margin concept and means of its quantification for the process of evaluating plant safety in the frame of plant life extension and power up rating activities to be used by OECD member countries. (author)

  17. Anticipation and the adaptive control of safety margins in driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, M.; Meijman, T.F.; Rothengatter, J.A.

    Driving is a task that requires the timely detection of critical events and relevant changes in traffic circumstances. Adaptation of speed and safety margins allows drivers to control the time available to react to potential hazards. One of the basic safety margins in driving is the time headway

  18. Improving safety margin of LWRs by rethinking the emergency core cooling system criteria and safety system capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho, E-mail: euo@kaist.ac.kr; Kim, Bokyung, E-mail: bkkim2@kaist.ac.kr; NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Zircaloy embrittlement criteria can increase to 1370 °C for CP-ECR lower than 13%. • The draft ECCS criteria of U.S. NRC allow less than 5% in power margin. • The Japanese fracture-based criteria allow around 5% in power margin. • Increasing SIT inventory is effective in assuring safety margin for power uprates. - Abstract: This study investigates the engineering compatibility between emergency core cooling system criteria and safety water injection systems, in the pursuit of safety margin increase of light water reactors. This study proposes an acceptable temperature increase to 1370 °C as long as equivalent cladding reacted calculated by the Cathcart–Pawel equation is below 13%, after an extensive literature review. The influence of different ECCS criteria on the safety margin during large break loss of coolant accident is investigated for OPR-1000 by the system code MARS-KS, implemented with the KINS-REM method. The fracture-based emergency core cooling system (ECCS) criteria proposed in this study are shown to enable power margins up to 10%. In the meantime, the draft U.S. NRC’s embrittlement criteria (burnup-sensitive) and Japanese fracture-based criteria are shown to allow less than 5%, and around 5% of power margins, respectively. Increasing safety injection tank (SIT) water inventory is the key, yet convenient, way of assuring safety margin for power increase. More than 20% increase in the SIT water inventory is required to allow 15% power margins, for the U.S. NRC’s burnup-dependent embrittlement criteria. Controlling SIT water inventory would be a useful option that could allow the industrial desire to pursue power margins even under the recent atmosphere of imposing stricter ECCS criteria for the considerable burnup effects.

  19. Criticality safety margins for mixtures of fissionable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.; Mincey, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the determination of criticality safety margins, approximations for combinations of fissile and fissionable isotopes are sometimes used that go by names such as the rule of fractions or equivalency relations. Use of the rule of fractions to ensure criticality safety margins was discussed in an earlier paper. The purpose of this paper is to correct errors and to clarify some of the implications. Deviations of safety margins from those calculated by the rule of fractions are still noted; however, the deviations are less severe. Caution in applying such rules is still urged. In general, these approximations are based on American National Standard ANSI/ANS-8.15, Sec. 5.2. This section allows that ratios of material masses to their limits may be summed for fissile nuclides in aqueous solutions. It also allows the addition of nonfissile nuclides if an aqueous moderator is present and addresses the effects of infinite water or equivalent reflector. Water-reflected binary combinations of aqueous solutions of fissile materials, as well as binary combinations of fissile and fissionable metals, were considered. Some combinations were shown to significantly decrease the margin of subcriticality compared to the single-unit margins. In this study, it is confirmed that some combinations of metal units in an optimum geometry may significantly decrease the margin of subcriticality. For some combinations of aqueous solutions of fissile materials, the margin of subcriticality may also be reduced by very small amounts. The conclusion of Ref. 1 that analysts should be careful in applying equivalency relations for combining materials remains valid and sound advice. The ANSI/ANS standard, which allows the use of ratios of masses to their limits, applies to aqueous, fully water-reflected, single-unit solutions. Extensions to other situations should be considered with extreme care

  20. Safety margins associated with containment structures under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    A technical basis for assessing the true safety margins of containment structures involved with MARK I boiling water reactor reevaluation activities is presented. It is based on the results of a plane-strain, large displacement, elasto-plastic, finite-element analysis of a thin cylindrical shell subjected to external and internal pressure pulses. An analytical procedure is presented for estimating the ultimate load capacity of the thin shell structure, and subsequently, for quantifying the design margins of safety for the type of loads under consideration. For defining failure of structures, a finite strain failure criterion is derived that accounts for multiaxiality effects

  1. Improved Safety Margin Characterization of Risk from Loss of Offsite Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Paul [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Original intent: The original intent of this task was “support of the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characteristic (RISMC) methodology in order” “to address … efficiency of computation so that more accurate and cost-effective techniques can be used to address safety margin characterizations” (S. M. Hess et al., “Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization,” Procs. ICONE17, Brussels, July 2009, CD format). It was intended that “in Task 1 itself this improvement will be directed toward upon the very important issue of Loss of Offsite Power (LOOP) events,” more specifically toward the challenge of efficient computation of the multidimensional nonrecovery integral that has been discussed by many previous contributors to the theory of nuclear safety. It was further envisioned that “three different computational approaches will be explored,” corresponding to the three subtasks listed below; deliverables were tied to the individual subtasks.

  2. Analysis of safety margins for PuO2 containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Tomachevsky, E.

    1987-11-01

    In the regular manner the containers for PuO 2 transport are type B(U) and give satisfaction to the AIEA proofs. However the vigour of this conception's containers and the analysis of other radioactive containers permit to think that large safety margins exist. In this paper, the importance and the kind of these margins are studied [fr

  3. Improved Safety Margin Characterization of Risk from Loss of Offsite Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Original intent: The original intent of this task was ''support of the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characteristic (RISMC) methodology in order'' ''to address ... efficiency of computation so that more accurate and cost-effective techniques can be used to address safety margin characterizations'' (S. M. Hess et al., ''Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization,'' Procs. ICONE17, Brussels, July 2009, CD format). It was intended that ''in Task 1 itself this improvement will be directed toward upon the very important issue of Loss of Offsite Power (LOOP) events,'' more specifically toward the challenge of efficient computation of the multidimensional nonrecovery integral that has been discussed by many previous contributors to the theory of nuclear safety. It was further envisioned that ''three different computational approaches will be explored,'' corresponding to the three subtasks listed below; deliverables were tied to the individual subtasks.

  4. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  5. Safety assessment for the passive system of the nuclear power plants (NPPs) using safety margin estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tae-Ho; Lee, Un-Chul

    2010-01-01

    The probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for gas-cooled nuclear power plants has been investigated where the operational data are deficient, because there is not any commercial gas-cooled nuclear power plant. Therefore, it is necessary to use the statistical data for the basic event constructions. Several estimations for the safety margin are introduced for the quantification of the failure frequency in the basic event, which is made by the concept of the impact and affordability. Trend of probability of failure (TPF) and fuzzy converter (FC) are introduced using the safety margin, which shows the simplified and easy configurations for the event characteristics. The mass flow rate in the natural circulation is studied for the modeling. The potential energy in the gravity, the temperature and pressure in the heat conduction, and the heat transfer rate in the internal stored energy are also investigated. The values in the probability set are compared with those of the fuzzy set modeling. Non-linearity of the safety margin is expressed by the fuzziness of the membership function. This artificial intelligence analysis of the fuzzy set could enhance the reliability of the system comparing to the probabilistic analysis.

  6. Safety Margins and Their Economical Value in a De-regulated Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidard, Michel

    2002-01-01

    The definition of safety margins is sometimes ambiguous. Depending on assumptions used to evaluate the evolution of plant parameters and on acceptance criteria, the same design could well turn out to have positive, zero, or negative margin for the same operating situation. Very often, considering that an optimized reactor would have to operate with zero margin compared to at least one safety criterion, designers or utilities considered in their analyses penalizing assumptions. This was done for example either considering reduced component capability or very high core peaking factors, the latter generally exceeding by far what would be anticipated in perturbed situations. This approach has three major drawbacks: -having a reasonable understanding of the real importance of safety margins is difficult, -if a non-conservatism is identified in a methodology, there is a high risk of being in a no-compliance situation from a regulatory standpoint, -it leads to a limitation on allowable electrical output and constraints on technical specifications for example. In a regulated market, such a situation can be tolerable as the final customer has to pay the extra financial burden in any case. In a de-regulated market, the situation is significantly different. The final customer can choose his supplier, and is likely to go to those offering the best prices, i.e. those making optimal use of their available resources. There is so a need for better understanding of real plant capabilities. Revisiting assumptions used for evaluating safety margins is so highly recommended, if not imperative, to electricity companies. This will helpful to reshape company strategies in case of evolution of market conditions. (author)

  7. Implications of power uprates on safety margins of nuclear power plants. Report of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    The safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is based on the defence in depth concept, which relies on successive physical barriers (fuel matrix, cladding, primary system pressure boundary and containment) and other provisions to control radioactive materials and on multiple levels of protection against damage to these barriers. Deterministic safety analysis is an important tool for conforming the adequacy and efficiency of provisions within the defence in depth concept and is used to predict the response of an NPP in predetermined operational states. This type of safety analysis applies a specific set of rules and specific acceptance criteria. Deterministic analysis is typically focused on neutronic, thermohydraulic, radiological and structural aspects, which are often analysed with different computational tools. The advanced computational tools developed for deterministic safety analysis are used for better establishment and utilization of licensing margins or safety margins in consideration of analysis results. At the same time, the existence of such margins ensures that NPPs operate safely in all modes of operation and at all times. To properly assess and address the existing margins and to be able to take advantage of unnecessary conservatisms, state of the art analytical tools intended for safety assessment have been developed. Progress made in the development and application of modern codes for safety analysis and better understanding of phenomena involved in plant design and operation enable the analysts to determine safety margins in consideration of analysis results (licensing margins) with higher precision. There is a general tendency for utilities to take advantage of unnecessarily large conservatisms in safety analyses and to utilize them for reactor power uprates, better utilization of nuclear fuel, higher operational flexibility and for justification of lifetime extension. The present publication sets forth the results of a Technical Meeting on the

  8. Fracture mechanics characteristics and associated safety margins for integrity assessment; Bruchmechanische Kennwerte und zugeordnete Sicherheitsfaktoren bei Integritaetsanalysen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E.; Schuler, X.; Stumpfrock, L.; Silcher, H. [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA)

    2008-07-01

    Within the integrity assessment of components and structural members of plants safety margins have to be applied, whose magnitude depend on several factors. Important factors influencing the magnitude of the safety margins are as for instance: Material behaviour (ductile / brittle behaviour), the event to be considered (local deformation / fracture), possible consequences of failure (human health, environmental damage, economic consequences) and many others. One important factor also is the fact, how precisely and reliably the appropriate material characteristics can be determined and how precisely and reliably the components behaviour can be predicted and assessed by means of this material characteristic. In contemporary safety assessment procedures by means of fracture mechanics evaluation tools (e.g. [1]) a concept of partial safety margins is proposed for application. The basic idea with this procedure is that only those sources of uncertainty have to be considered, which are relevant or may be relevant for the structure to be considered. For this purpose each source of possible uncertainty has to be quantified individually, finally only those singular safety margins are superimposed to a total safety margin which are relevant. The more the uncertainties have to be taken into account, the total safety margin to be applied, consequently will be larger. If some sources of uncertainty can be eliminated totally or can be minimized (for instance by a more reliable calculational procedure of the component loading or by more precise material characteristics), the total safety margin can be reduced. In this contribution the different procedures for the definition of safety margins within the integrity assessment by means of fracture mechanics procedures will be discussed. (orig.)

  9. A soft-contact model for computing safety margins in human prehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tarkeshwar; Ambike, Satyajit

    2017-10-01

    The soft human digit tip forms contact with grasped objects over a finite area and applies a moment about an axis normal to the area. These moments are important for ensuring stability during precision grasping. However, the contribution of these moments to grasp stability is rarely investigated in prehension studies. The more popular hard-contact model assumes that the digits exert a force vector but no free moment on the grasped object. Many sensorimotor studies use this model and show that humans estimate friction coefficients to scale the normal force to grasp objects stably, i.e. the smoother the surface, the tighter the grasp. The difference between the applied normal force and the minimal normal force needed to prevent slipping is called safety margin and this index is widely used as a measure of grasp planning. Here, we define and quantify safety margin using a more realistic contact model that allows digits to apply both forces and moments. Specifically, we adapt a soft-contact model from robotics and demonstrate that the safety margin thus computed is a more accurate and robust index of grasp planning than its hard-contact variant. Previously, we have used the soft-contact model to propose two indices of grasp planning that show how humans account for the shape and inertial properties of an object. A soft-contact based safety margin offers complementary insights by quantifying how humans may account for surface properties of the object and skin tissue during grasp planning and execution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. System Guidelines for EMC Safety-Critical Circuits: Design, Selection, and Margin Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Demonstration of safety margins for critical points (circuits) has traditionally been required since it first became a part of systems-level Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) requirements of MIL-E-6051C. The goal of this document is to present cost-effective guidelines for ensuring adequate Electromagnetic Effects (EME) safety margins on spacecraft critical circuits. It is for the use of NASA and other government agencies and their contractors to prevent loss of life, loss of spacecraft, or unacceptable degradation. This document provides practical definition and treatment guidance to contain costs within affordable limits.

  11. Seismic safety margins research program. Project I SONGS 1 AFWS Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.; Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Cummings, G.E.; Wells, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The seismic qualification requirements of auxiliary feedwater systems (AFWS) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) were developed over a number of years. These are formalized in the publication General Design Criteria (Appendix A to 10CFR50). The full recognition of the system as an engineered safety feature did not occur until publication of the Standard Review Plan (1975). Efforts to determine how to backfit seismic requirements to earlier plants has been undertaken primarily in the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) for a limited number of operating reactors. Nuclear Reactor Research (RES) and NRR have requested LLNL to perform a probabilistic study on the AFWS of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) Unit 1 utilizing the tools developed by the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The main objectives of this project are to: identify the weak links of AFWS; compare the failure probabilities of SONGS 1 and Zion 1 AFWS: and compare the seismic responses due to different input spectra and design values

  12. ENSI’s synopsis concerning the enhancement of safety margins; Zusammenfassung des ENSI zur Erhöhung der Sicherheitsmargen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    This press release issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI discusses the results of its probabilistic safety analysis on the safety margins for Swiss nuclear power stations that was made after the Fukushima nuclear accident. External incidents such as earthquakes and flooding and their impact on the power stations are analysed by the ERSIM project concerning the enhancement of safety margins. Three shut-down scenarios are discussed. The safety margins with respect to earthquakes and flooding for all four nuclear power station sites are discussed in detail.

  13. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC): Integrated Treatment of Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainty in Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of 'margin' has a long history in nuclear licensing and in the codification of good engineering practices. However, some traditional applications of 'margin' have been carried out for surrogate scenarios (such as design basis scenarios), without regard to the actual frequencies of those scenarios, and have been carried out with in a systematically conservative fashion. This means that the effectiveness of the application of the margin concept is determined in part by the original choice of surrogates, and is limited in any case by the degree of conservatism imposed on the evaluation. In the RISMC project, which is part of the Department of Energy's 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program' (LWRSP), we are developing a risk-informed characterization of safety margin. Beginning with the traditional discussion of 'margin' in terms of a 'load' (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a 'capacity' (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system response. For example, the probabilistic load spectrum will reflect the frequency of challenges of a particular severity. Such a characterization is required if decision-making is to be informed optimally. However, in order to enable the quantification of probabilistic load spectra, existing analysis capability needs to be extended. Accordingly, the INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability whose design will allow for much more efficient parameter uncertainty analysis, and will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin.

  14. Safety margins and retrofit. The technical calculation perspective; Sicherheitsmargen durch Nachruestung aus Sicht der technischen Berechnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daichendt, Matthias [Kraftanlagen Heidelberg GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany). Systemtechnik - Technische Berechnungen

    2016-01-15

    Safety margins are an essential factor of the safety philosophy for nuclear power plants. They support to cover future requirements even today. The basic safety concept is one key topic as also aspects of process engineering, the dimensioning and mechanical analysis of systems and ageing management. Calculations with today's capabilities are an integral part of the determination of safety margins. They can be used to analyse and to assess retrofit measures.

  15. Evaluation of safety margin of packaging for radioactive materials transport during a severe fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles, P.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.; Grall, L.; Perrot, J.

    1986-06-01

    A high safety is obtained by International regulations on radioactive materials transport. It is obtained by packaging design adapted to the potential risk. An important accident to consider is fire for two reasons: the probability of fire occuring for time and temperature higher than conditions applied to type B packaging (800 deg C, 1/2 hr) is not negligible, particularly for air or maritime transport. Safety margins are studied by computation and experimental tests. This report presents results obtained for different types of packagings. Results show a large safety margin [fr

  16. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program: a concluding look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was started in 1978 with the goal of developing tools and data bases to compute the probability of earthquake - caused radioactive release from commercial nuclear power plants. These tools and data bases were to help NRC to assess seismic safety at nuclear plants. The methodology to be used was finalized in 1982 and applied to the Zion Nuclear Power Station. The SSMRP will be completed this year with the development of a more simplified method of analysis and a demonstration of its use on Zion. This simplified method is also being applied to a boiling-water-reactor, LaSalle

  17. Dose establishing a safety margin reduce local recurrence in subsegmental transarterial chemoembolization for small nodular hepatocellular carcinomas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun; Hur, Sae Beam; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a safety margin may affect local tumor recurrence (LTR) in subsegmental chemoembolization. In 101 patients with 128 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) nodules (1-3 cm in size and ≤ 3 in number), cone-beam CT-assisted subsegmental lipiodol chemoembolization was performed. Immediately thereafter, a non-contrast thin-section CT image was obtained to evaluate the presence or absence of intra-tumoral lipiodol uptake defect and safety margin. The effect of lipiodol uptake defect and safety margin on LTR was evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to indentify determinant factors of LTR. Of the 128 HCC nodules in 101 patients, 49 (38.3%) nodules in 40 patients showed LTR during follow-up period (median, 34.1 months). Cumulative 1- and 2-year LTR rates of nodules with lipiodol uptake defect (n = 27) and those without defect (n = 101) were 58.1% vs. 10.1% and 72.1% vs. 19.5%, respectively (p < 0.001). Among the 101 nodules without a defect, the 1- and 2-year cumulative LTR rates for nodules with complete safety margin (n = 52) and those with incomplete safety margin (n = 49) were 9.8% vs. 12.8% and 18.9% vs. 19.0% (p = 0.912). In multivariate analyses, ascites (p = 0.035), indistinct tumor margin on cone-beam CT (p = 0.039), heterogeneous lipiodol uptake (p = 0.023), and intra-tumoral lipiodol uptake defect (p < 0.001) were determinant factors of higher LTR. In lipiodol chemoembolization, the safety margin in completely lipiodolized nodule without defect will not affect LTR in small nodular HCCs

  18. Developing Probabilistic Safety Performance Margins for Unknown and Underappreciated Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Allan; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Everett, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Probabilistic safety requirements currently formulated or proposed for space systems, nuclear reactor systems, nuclear weapon systems, and other types of systems that have a low-probability potential for high-consequence accidents depend on showing that the probability of such accidents is below a specified safety threshold or goal. Verification of compliance depends heavily upon synthetic modeling techniques such as PRA. To determine whether or not a system meets its probabilistic requirements, it is necessary to consider whether there are significant risks that are not fully considered in the PRA either because they are not known at the time or because their importance is not fully understood. The ultimate objective is to establish a reasonable margin to account for the difference between known risks and actual risks in attempting to validate compliance with a probabilistic safety threshold or goal. In this paper, we examine data accumulated over the past 60 years from the space program, from nuclear reactor experience, from aircraft systems, and from human reliability experience to formulate guidelines for estimating probabilistic margins to account for risks that are initially unknown or underappreciated. The formulation includes a review of the safety literature to identify the principal causes of such risks.

  19. Statistical margin to DNB safety analysis approach for LOFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed and used for LOFT thermal safety analysis to estimate the statistical margin to DNB for the hot rod, and to base safety analysis on desired DNB probability limits. This method is an advanced approach using response surface analysis methods, a very efficient experimental design, and a 2nd-order response surface equation with a 2nd-order error propagation analysis to define the MDNBR probability density function. Calculations for limiting transients were used in the response surface analysis thereby including transient interactions and trip uncertainties in the MDNBR probability density

  20. Methodology for the Assessment of Confidence in Safety Margin for Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagrale, D. B.; Prasad, M.; Rao, R. S.; Gaikwad, A.J., E-mail: avinashg@aerb.gov.in [Nuclear Safety Analysis Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    2014-10-15

    Deterministic Safety Analysis and Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) analyses are used concurrently to assess the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. The conventional deterministic analysis is conservative. The best estimate plus uncertainty analysis is increasingly being used for deterministic calculation in NPPs. The PSA methodology aims to be as realistic as possible while integrating information about accident phenomena, plant design, operating practices, component reliability and human behaviour. The peak clad temperature (PCT) distribution provides an insight into the confidence in safety margin for an initiating event. The paper deals with the concept of calculating the peak clad temperature with 95 percent confidence and 95 percent probability (PCT{sub 95/95}) in small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) and methodologies for assessing safety margin. Five input parameters mainly, nominal power level, decay power, fuel clad gap conductivity, fuel thermal conductivity and discharge coefficient, were selected. A Uniform probability density function was assigned to the uncertain parameters and these uncertainties are propagated using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) technique. The sampled data for 5 parameters were randomly mixed by LHS to obtain 25 input sets. A non-core damage accident sequence was selected from the SBLOCA event tree of a typical VVER study to estimate the PCTs and safety margin. A Kolmogorov– Smirnov goodness-of-fit test was carried out for PCTs. The smallest value of safety margin would indicate the robustness of the system with 95% confidence and 95% probability. Regression analysis was also carried out using 1000 sample size for the estimating PCTs. Mean, variance and finally safety margin were analysed. (author)

  1. Is it necessary to plan with safety margins for actively scanned proton therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, F.; Hug, E. B.; Lomax, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    In radiation therapy, a plan is robust if the calculated and the delivered dose are in agreement, even in the case of different uncertainties. The current practice is to use safety margins, expanding the clinical target volume sufficiently enough to account for treatment uncertainties. This, however, might not be ideal for proton therapy and in particular when using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans as degradation in the dose conformity could also be found in the middle of the target resulting from misalignments of highly in-field dose gradients. Single field uniform dose (SFUD) and IMPT plans have been calculated for different anatomical sites and the need for margins has been assessed by analyzing plan robustness to set-up and range uncertainties. We found that the use of safety margins is a good way to improve plan robustness for SFUD and IMPT plans with low in-field dose gradients but not necessarily for highly modulated IMPT plans for which only a marginal improvement in plan robustness could be detected through the definition of a planning target volume.

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway Technical Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Curtis; Rabiti, Cristian; Martineau, Richard; Szilard, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly ''over-design'' portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as ''safety margin.'' Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on ''engineering judgment.''

  3. Margins of safety provided by COSHH Essentials and the ILO Chemical Control Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachael M; Nicas, Mark

    2006-03-01

    COSHH Essentials, developed by the UK Health and Safety Executive, and the Chemical Control Toolkit (Toolkit) proposed by the International Labor Organization, are 'control banding' approaches to workplace risk management intended for use by proprietors of small and medium-sized businesses. Both systems group chemical substances into hazard bands based on toxicological endpoint and potency. COSSH Essentials uses the European Union's Risk-phrases (R-phrases), whereas the Toolkit uses R-phrases and the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. Each hazard band is associated with a range of airborne concentrations, termed exposure bands, which are to be attained by the implementation of recommended control technologies. Here we analyze the margin of safety afforded by the systems and, for each hazard band, define the minimal margin as the ratio of the minimum airborne concentration that produced the toxicological endpoint of interest in experimental animals to the maximum concentration in workplace air permitted by the exposure band. We found that the minimal margins were always occupational exposure limits, we argue that the minimal margins are better indicators of health protection. Further, given the small margins observed, we feel it is important that revisions of these systems provide the exposure bands to users, so as to permit evaluation of control technology capture efficiency.

  4. Safety Margin Assessment (SM2A): Stimulation for Further Development of BEPU Approaches?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    During recent years, many nuclear power plants underwent significant modifications, e.g. power up-rating. While compliance with all the deterministic acceptance criteria must be shown during the licensing process, the larger core inventory and the facts that the plant response might get closer to the limits after a power up-rate, suggest an increase of the core damage frequency (CDF) and other possible risk indicators. Hence, a framework to quantitatively assess a change in plant safety margin becomes very desirable. The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) mandated the Safety Margin Action Plan expert group (SMAP) to develop a framework for the assessment of such changes to safety margin. This framework combines PSA and the analytical techniques developed in BEPU. CSNI then mandated the SM2A expert group to especially explore the practicability of the SMAP framework. This pilot study was completed end of 2010. An increase of the (conditional) probability of exceedance for a surrogate acceptance limit (PCT) indicating core damage was successfully evaluated for the selected sequences from several initiating event trees, and it was found that only a restricted number of sequences need to be analyzed. Based on the insights gained from this study, areas of methodology improvement have been identified and related proposals for further R and D work will be discussed. (authors)

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Szilard, Ronaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  7. Example of a SWOV (Institute for Road Safety Research) safety study : "Avenida Marginal", Lisbon 1989.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.T.M.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the accident study on the Marginal Road between Alges and Cascais in Portugal. The aim of this study was to produce a philosophy for a strategy to select the best safety measures out of several which had already been proposed. The general point of departure in this philosophy is

  8. Reload safety evaluation of boron dilution accident related to shutdown margin proportional to boron concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Kyun; Lee, Ki Bog; Song, Jae Woong

    1993-06-01

    This report investigates the efficient safety evaluation method and analysis procedure on Boron Dilution Accident(BDA) under the proportional shutdown margin to boron concentration. Also investigated are problems caused by applying this shutdown margin limit. Through this investigation, the safety of Kori-3 Cycle-8, Yonggwang-2 Cycle-7, Kori-4 Cycle-8 and Yonggwang-1 Cycle-8 with respect to BDA is verified. In order to satisfy the shutdown margin requirement in the Technical Specifications, it is shown that the High Flux Alarm at Shutdown Setting for Kori-4 Cycle-8 and Yonggwang-1 Cycle-8 at Mode 5 should be set at 2 or the Technical Specification should be revised. (Author)

  9. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, M.

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements

  10. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

  11. Bootstrap and Order Statistics for Quantifying Thermal-Hydraulic Code Uncertainties in the Estimation of Safety Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Zio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the uncertainties affecting the safety margins estimated from thermal-hydraulic code calculations are captured quantitatively by resorting to the order statistics and the bootstrap technique. The proposed framework of analysis is applied to the estimation of the safety margin, with its confidence interval, of the maximum fuel cladding temperature reached during a complete group distribution blockage scenario in a RBMK-1500 nuclear reactor.

  12. Extensive formation of sinkholes in unconsolidated rock due to underground erosive removal of sand at a marginal batter of an opencast mine - causes, process and geotechnical safety measures. Grossflaechige Erdfallbildungen im Lockergestein durch unterirdische erosive Ausraeumung von Sand and einer Tagebauendboeschung - Ursachen, Verlauf und geotechnische Sicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, H

    1991-08-01

    When the ground water rose in the marginal batter of an opencast mine damage occurred. This was caused by the processes of internal erosion and suffusion in fine sand layers of slight thickness and by the disintegration of the overlying strata due to the formation of sinkholes. Effective safety measures involved lowering the ground-water level in the zone immediately in front of the area in question and installing an auxiliary filter unit at the marginal batter. (orig.).

  13. A new assessment method for demonstrating the sufficiency of the safety assessment and the safety margins of the geological disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohi, Takao; Kawasaki, Daisuke; Chiba, Tamotsu; Takase, Toshio; Hane, Koji

    2013-01-01

    A new method for demonstrating the sufficiency of the safety assessment and safety margins of the geological disposal system has been developed. The method is based on an existing comprehensive sensitivity analysis method and can systematically identify the successful conditions, under which the dose rate does not exceed specified safety criteria, using analytical solutions for nuclide migration and the results of a statistical analysis. The successful conditions were identified using three major variables. Furthermore, the successful conditions at the level of factors or parameters were obtained using relational equations between the variables and the factors or parameters making up these variables. In this study, the method was applied to the safety assessment of the geological disposal of transuranic waste in Japan. Based on the system response characteristics obtained from analytical solutions and on the successful conditions, the classification of the analytical conditions, the sufficiency of the safety assessment and the safety margins of the disposal system were then demonstrated. A new assessment procedure incorporating this method into the existing safety assessment approach is proposed in this study. Using this procedure, it is possible to conduct a series of safety assessment activities in a logical manner. (author)

  14. Seismic Margin of 500MWe PFBR Beyond Safe Shutdown Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajish, S.D.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: • Seismic design aspects of safety related systems and components of PFBR is discussed with a focus on reactor assembly components. • PFBR is situated in a low seismic area with a peak ground acceleration value of 0.156 g. • The design basis ground motion parameters for the seismic design are evaluated by deterministic method and confirmed by probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. • Review of the seismic design of various safety related systems and components indicate that margin is available to meet any demand due to an earthquake beyond SSE. • Reactor assembly vessels are the most critical components w.r.t seismic loading. • Minimum safety margin is 1.41 for plastic deformation and 1.46 against buckling. • From the preliminary investigation we come to the conclusion that PFBR can withstand an earthquake up to 0.22 g without violating any safety limits. • Additional margin can be estimated by detailed fragility analysis and seismic margin assessment methods

  15. Determination of safety margins for whole blood concentrations of alcohol and nineteen drugs in driving under the influence cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Lena; Strand, Dag Helge; Liane, Veronica Horpestad; Vindenes, Vigdis; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Aldrin, Magne

    2016-02-01

    Legislative limits for driving under the influence of 20 non-alcohol drugs were introduced in Norway in February 2012. Per se limits corresponding to blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of 0.2g/kg were established for 20 psychoactive drugs, and limits for graded sanctions corresponding to BACs of 0.5 and 1.2g/kg were determined for 13 of these drugs. This new legislation made it possible for the courts to make sentences based on the analytical results, similar to the situation for alcohol. To ensure that the reported concentration is as least as high as the true concentration, with a 99% safety level, safety margins had to be calculated for each of the substances. Diazepam, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and alcohol were used as model substances to establish a new model for estimating the safety margins. The model was compared with a previous used model established several years ago, by a similar yet much simpler model, and they were found to be in agreement. The measurement uncertainties depend on the standard batch used, the work list and the measurements' replicate. A Bayesian modelling approach was used to determine the parameters in the model, using a dataset of 4700 diazepam positive specimens and 5400 THC positive specimens. Different safety margins were considered for low and high concentration levels of diazepam (≤2μM (0.6mg/L) and >2μM) and THC (≤0.01μM (0.003mg/L) and >0.01μM). The safety margins were for diazepam 19.5% (≤2μM) and 34% (>2μM), for THC 19.5% (≤0.01μM) and 24.9% (>0.01μM). Concentration dependent safety margins for BAC were based on a dataset of 29500 alcohol positive specimens, and were in the range 10.4% (0.1g/kg) to 4.0% (4.0g/kg) at a 99% safety level. A simplified approach was used to establish safety margins for the compounds amphetamine, MDMA, methamphetamine, alprazolam, phenazepam, flunitrazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, oxazepam, buprenorphine, GHB, methadone, ketamine, cocaine, morphine, zolpidem and zopiclone. The

  16. An empirical assessment of driver motivation and emotional states in perceived safety margins under varied driving conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Kaber, David B

    2013-01-01

    Motivation models in driving behaviour postulate that driver motives and emotional states dictate risk tolerance under various traffic conditions. The present study used time and driver performance-based payment systems to manipulate motivation and risk-taking behaviour. Ten participants drove to a predefined location in a simulated driving environment. Traffic patterns (density and velocity) were manipulated to cause driver behaviour adjustments due to the need to conform with the social norms of the roadway. The driving environment complexity was investigated as a mediating factor in risk tolerance. Results revealed the performance-based payment system to closely relate to risk-taking behaviour as compared with the time-based payment system. Drivers conformed with social norms associated with specific traffic patterns. Higher roadway complexity led to a more conservative safety margins and speeds. This research contributes to the further development of motivational models of driver behaviour. This study provides empirical justification for two motivation factors in driver risk-taking decisions, including compliance with social norm and emotions triggered by incentives. Environment complexity was identified as a mediating factor in motivational behaviour model. This study also recommended safety margin measures sensitive to changes in driver risk tolerance.

  17. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Blanchard; R. Youngblood

    2012-04-01

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  18. Comparison of safety margins for leak-before-break assessment of 500 MWe PHWR straight pipes: using contemporary techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, Rohit; Bhasin, Vivek; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    The Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) Piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR is being performed using different well established techniques like R6 method (Nuclear Electric UK) and J-Tearing based methods (USNRC). These methods show that PHT piping has required safety margins and can be qualified for LBB. These analysis also showed that the piping has high fracture toughness and plastic collapse is the dominant mode of failure. To enhance the confidence in the results obtained from the above methods, further studies were done on the PHT piping. Procedures which predicted margins against plastic collapse were used. The analysis procedures used were Modified Limit Load Method, MPA Method (both from Germany), Moments Method (from Italy) and the Z-Factor method given in ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The safety margins obtained from these analysis satisfied the LBB requirements. A table was generated which compared the safety margins obtained using all the above mentioned procedures. This report presents the results of this study. (author)

  19. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities

  20. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I. Interim definition of terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    This report documents interim definitions of terms in the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). Intent is to establish a common-based terminology integral to the probabilistic methods that predict more realistically the behavior of nuclear power plants during an earthquake. These definitions are a response to a request by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards at its meeting held November 15-16, 1979

  1. Reliability-based approaches for safety margin assessment in the French nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardillon, E.; Barthelet, B.; Meister, E.; Cambefort, P.; Hornet, P.; Le Delliou, P.

    2003-01-01

    The prevention of the fast fracture damage of the mechanical equipment important for the safety of nuclear islands of the French PWR relies on deterministic rules. These rules include flaw acceptance criteria involving safety factors applied to characteristic values (implicit margins) of the physical variables. The sets of safety factors that are currently under application in the industrial analyses with the agreement of the Safety Authority, are distributed across the two main physical parameters and have partly been based on a semi-probabilistic approach. After presenting the generic probabilistic pro-codification approach this paper shows its application to the evaluation of the performances of the existing regulatory flaw acceptance criteria. This application can be carried out in a realistic manner or in a more simplified one. These two approaches are applied to representative mechanical components. Their results are consistent. (author)

  2. Safety margin improvement by adopting the feature of interleaving in 700 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Nrependra; Yadav, S.K.; Khan, T.A.; Dixit, A.; Singhal, Mukesh; Nair, Suma R.

    2015-01-01

    Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWRs) of 700 MWe are under construction at Kakrapar Atomic Power Project -3,4 and Rajasthan Atomic Power Project-7,8. These units have enhanced safety features with respect to standard IPHWRs. One of the enhanced features is interleaving of feeders/channels. In interleaved feeder configuration, each header located at either end of reactor gets connected to one quarter of core channels, which are uniformly distributed. The core is divided into two loops with feeder connected in interleaved fashioned. In this paper a comparative study has been performed between the two cases: 1) The core splits in two vertical halves and each vertical half is a loop of PHT (TAPS-3 and 4 Type configuration). 2) The core is divided into two loops with feeders/ channels connected in interleaved fashioned (700 MWe Configuration). LOCA studies have been performed for 700 MWe PHWR considering interleaving of feeders configuration using in-house developed computer code ATMIKA and 3-D neutron kinetics code IQS-3D. The issue of interleaving is closely linked to an inherent reactivity characteristic of PHWR reactors (viz., positive void reactivity coefficient) which leads to a power increase following a Large LOCA. In 700 MWe PHWR with intent to improve the safety margin, adopted the feature of interleaving of feeders which causes in reduction in the magnitude of void coefficient and results in reduction of peak power during LBLOCA. The systematic LBLOCA study demonstrates that interleaved configuration of feeder/channels of two loops has higher safety margins (i.e. with respect to peak power, prompt-criticality margin, adiabatic heat deposition on the fuel pins, sheath temperature excursion and clad oxidation) with regard to the effectiveness of shutdown system. (author)

  3. Seismic safety margin research program. Program plan, Revision II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Tokarz, F.J.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Cummings, G.E.; Chou, C.K.; Vagliente, V.N.; Johnson, J.J.; Dong, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    The document has been prepared pursuant to the second meeting of the Senior Research Review Group of the Seismic Safety Margin Research Program (SSMRP), which was held on June 15, 16, 1978. The major portion of the material contained in the document is descriptions of specific subtasks to be performed on the SSMRP. This is preceded by a brief discussion of the objective of the SSMRP and the approach to be used. Specific subtasks to be performed in Phase I of the SSMRP are as follows: (1) plant/site selection, (2) seismic input, (3) soil structure interaction, (4) structural building response, (5) structural sub-system response, (6) fragility, (7) system analysis, and (8) Phase II task definition

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

    2013-08-01

    The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

  5. Margins Associated with Loss of Assured Safety for Systems with Multiple Time-Dependent Failure Modes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helton, Jon C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie. [Engineering Mechanics Corp. of Columbus, OH (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Representations for margins associated with loss of assured safety (LOAS) for weak link (WL)/strong link (SL) systems involving multiple time-dependent failure modes are developed. The following topics are described: (i) defining properties for WLs and SLs, (ii) background on cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) for link failure time, link property value at link failure, and time at which LOAS occurs, (iii) CDFs for failure time margins defined by (time at which SL system fails) – (time at which WL system fails), (iv) CDFs for SL system property values at LOAS, (v) CDFs for WL/SL property value margins defined by (property value at which SL system fails) – (property value at which WL system fails), and (vi) CDFs for SL property value margins defined by (property value of failing SL at time of SL system failure) – (property value of this SL at time of WL system failure). Included in this presentation is a demonstration of a verification strategy based on defining and approximating the indicated margin results with (i) procedures based on formal integral representations and associated quadrature approximations and (ii) procedures based on algorithms for sampling-based approximations.

  6. Major structural response methods used in the seismic safety margins research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.K.; Lo, T.; Vagliente, V.

    1979-01-01

    In order to evaluate the conservatisms in present nuclear power plant seismic safety requirements, a probabilistic based systems model is being developed. This model will also be used to develop improved requirements. In Phase I of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP), this methodology will be developed for a specific nuclear power plant and used to perform probabilistic sensitivity studies to gain engineering insights into seismic safety requirements. Random variables in the structural response analysis area, or parameters which cause uncertainty in the response, are discussed and classified into three categories; i.e., material properties, structural dynamic characteristics and related modeling techniques, and analytical methods. The sensitivity studies are grouped into two categories; deterministic and probabilistic. In a system analysis, transfer functions in simple form are needed since there are too many responses which have to be calculated in a Monte Carlo simulation to use the usual straightforward calculation approach. Therefore, the development of these simple transfer functions is one of the important tasks in SSMRP. Simplified as well as classical transfer functions are discussed

  7. Margin improvement initiatives: realistic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, P.K.; Paquette, S. [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept., Kingston, ON (Canada); Cunning, T.A. [Department of National Defence, Ottawa, ON (Canada); French, C.; Bonin, H.W. [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept., Kingston, ON (Canada); Pandey, M. [Univ. of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Murchie, M. [Cameco Fuel Manufacturing, Port Hope, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    With reactor core aging, safety margins are particularly tight. Two realistic and practical approaches are proposed here to recover margins. The first project is related to the use of a small amount of neutron absorbers in CANDU Natural Uranium (NU) fuel bundles. Preliminary results indicate that the fuelling transient and subsequent reactivity peak can be lowered to improve the reactor's operating margins, with minimal impact on burnup when less than 1000 mg of absorbers is added to a fuel bundle. The second project involves the statistical analysis of fuel manufacturing data to demonstrate safety margins. Probability distributions are fitted to actual fuel manufacturing datasets provided by Cameco Fuel Manufacturing, Inc. They are used to generate input for ELESTRES and ELOCA. It is found that the fuel response distributions are far below industrial failure limits, implying that margin exists in the current fuel design. (author)

  8. Comparison of Safety Margin Generation Concepts in Image Guided Radiotherapy to Account for Daily Head and Neck Pose Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Markus; Stoiber, Eva Maria; Grimm, Sarah; Debus, Jürgen; Bendl, Rolf; Giske, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors allows a precise conformation of the high-dose region to clinical target volumes (CTVs) while respecting dose limits to organs a risk (OARs). Accurate patient setup reduces translational and rotational deviations between therapy planning and therapy delivery days. However, uncertainties in the shape of the CTV and OARs due to e.g. small pose variations in the highly deformable anatomy of the head and neck region can still compromise the dose conformation. Routinely applied safety margins around the CTV cause higher dose deposition in adjacent healthy tissue and should be kept as small as possible. In this work we evaluate and compare three approaches for margin generation 1) a clinically used approach with a constant isotropic 3 mm margin, 2) a previously proposed approach adopting a spatial model of the patient and 3) a newly developed approach adopting a biomechanical model of the patient. All approaches are retrospectively evaluated using a large patient cohort of over 500 fraction control CT images with heterogeneous pose changes. Automatic methods for finding landmark positions in the control CT images are combined with a patient specific biomechanical finite element model to evaluate the CTV deformation. The applied methods for deformation modeling show that the pose changes cause deformations in the target region with a mean motion magnitude of 1.80 mm. We found that the CTV size can be reduced by both variable margin approaches by 15.6% and 13.3% respectively, while maintaining the CTV coverage. With approach 3 an increase of target coverage was obtained. Variable margins increase target coverage, reduce risk to OARs and improve healthy tissue sparing at the same time.

  9. Co-ordination of growth, gas exchange and hydraulics define the carbon safety margin in tree species with contrasting drought strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P J; O'Grady, A P; Tissue, D T; Worledge, D; Pinkard, E A

    2014-05-01

    Gas exchange, growth, water transport and carbon (C) metabolism diminish during drought according to their respective sensitivities to declining water status. The timing of this sequence of declining physiological functions may determine how water and C relations compromise plant survival. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that the degree of asynchrony between declining C supply (photosynthesis) and C demand (growth and respiration) determines the rate and magnitude of changes in whole-plant non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) during drought. Two complementary experiments using two tree species (Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Pinus radiata D. Don) with contrasting drought response strategies were performed to (i) assess changes in radial stem growth, transpiration, leaf water potential and gas exchange in response to chronic drought, and (ii) evaluate the concomitant impacts of these drought responses on the temporal patterns of NSC during terminal drought. The three distinct phases of water stress were delineated by thresholds of growth cessation and stomatal closure that defined the 'carbon safety margin' (i.e., the difference between leaf water potential when growth is zero and leaf water potential when net photosynthesis is zero). A wider C safety margin in E. globulus was defined by an earlier cessation of growth relative to photosynthesis that reduced the demand for NSC while maintaining C acquisition. By contrast, the narrower C safety margin in P. radiata was characterized by a synchronous decline in growth and photosynthesis, whereby growth continued under a declining supply of NSC from photosynthesis. The narrower C safety margin in P. radiata was associated with declines in starch concentrations after ∼ 90 days of chronic drought and significant depletion of starch in all organs at mortality. The observed divergence in the sensitivity of drought responses is indicative of a potential trade-off between maintaining hydraulic safety and adequate C

  10. Handbook of nuclear power plant seismic fragilities, Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cover, L.E.; Bohn, M.P.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has a gola to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor were made. These calculations required a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most would be usable for other sites as well

  11. NRC Seismic Design Margins Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Budnitz, R.J.

    1985-08-01

    Recent studies estimate that seismically induced core melt comes mainly from earthquakes in the peak ground acceleration range from 2 to 4 times the safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) acceleration used in plant design. However, from the licensing perspective of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, there is a continuing need for consideration of the inherent quantitative seismic margins because of, among other things, the changing perceptions of the seismic hazard. This paper discusses a Seismic Design Margins Program Plan, developed under the auspices of the US NRC, that provides the technical basis for assessing the significance of design margins in terms of overall plant safety. The Plan will also identify potential weaknesses that might have to be addressed, and will recommend technical methods for assessing margins at existing plants. For the purposes of this program, a general definition of seismic design margin is expressed in terms of how much larger that the design basis earthquake an earthquake must be to compromise plant safety. In this context, margin needs to be determined at the plant, system/function, structure, and component levels. 14 refs., 1 fig

  12. Potential improvement of CANDU NPP safety margins by shortening the response time of shutdown systems using FPGA based implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingke She, E-mail: jshe2@uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Jin Jiang, E-mail: jjiang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative analysis of the safety margin improvement through thermalhydraulic simulation and analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of realizing the improvement by an FPGA-based SDS1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Verification of potential operating power upgrade without endangering the plant safety. - Abstract: The relationship between the peak values of critical reactor variables, such as neutronic power, inside a CANDU reactor and the speed of the response of its shutdown system has been analyzed in the event of a large loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The advantage of shortening the response time of the shutdown action has been demonstrated in term of the improved safety margin. A field programmable gate array (FPGA) platform has been chosen to implement such a shutdown system. Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulations have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept. Furthermore, connections between the speed of response of the shutdown system and the nominal operating power level of the reactor have been drawn to support for potential power upgrade for existing power plants.

  13. Quantification and Assessment of Interfraction Setup Errors Based on Cone Beam CT and Determination of Safety Margins for Radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Cubillos Mesías

    Full Text Available To quantify interfraction patient setup-errors for radiotherapy based on cone-beam computed tomography and suggest safety margins accordingly.Positioning vectors of pre-treatment cone-beam computed tomography for different treatment sites were collected (n = 9504. For each patient group the total average and standard deviation were calculated and the overall mean, systematic and random errors as well as safety margins were determined.The systematic (and random errors in the superior-inferior, left-right and anterior-posterior directions were: for prostate, 2.5(3.0, 2.6(3.9 and 2.9(3.9mm; for prostate bed, 1.7(2.0, 2.2(3.6 and 2.6(3.1mm; for cervix, 2.8(3.4, 2.3(4.6 and 3.2(3.9mm; for rectum, 1.6(3.1, 2.1(2.9 and 2.5(3.8mm; for anal, 1.7(3.7, 2.1(5.1 and 2.5(4.8mm; for head and neck, 1.9(2.3, 1.4(2.0 and 1.7(2.2mm; for brain, 1.0(1.5, 1.1(1.4 and 1.0(1.1mm; and for mediastinum, 3.3(4.6, 2.6(3.7 and 3.5(4.0mm. The CTV-to-PTV margins had the smallest value for brain (3.6, 3.7 and 3.3mm and the largest for mediastinum (11.5, 9.1 and 11.6mm. For pelvic treatments the means (and standard deviations were 7.3 (1.6, 8.5 (0.8 and 9.6 (0.8mm.Systematic and random setup-errors were smaller than 5mm. The largest errors were found for organs with higher motion probability. The suggested safety margins were comparable to published values in previous but often smaller studies.

  14. Hydraulic safety margins and embolism reversal in stems and leaves: Why are conifers and angiosperms so different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel M. Johnson; Katherine A. McCulloh; David R. Woodruff; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2012-01-01

    Angiosperm and coniferous tree species utilize a continuum of hydraulic strategies. Hydraulic safety margins (defined as differences between naturally occurring xylem pressures and pressures that would cause hydraulic dysfunction, or differences between pressures resulting in loss of hydraulic function in adjacent organs (e.g., stems vs. leaves) tend to be much greater...

  15. Effect of Smaller Left Ventricular Capture Threshold Safety Margins to Improve Device Longevity in Recipients of Cardiac Resynchronization-Defibrillation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Daniel A; Waks, Jonathan W; Collins, Robert; Kleckner, Karen; Kramer, Daniel B; Zimetbaum, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Device longevity in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is affected by the pacing capture threshold (PCT) and programmed pacing amplitude of the left ventricular (LV) pacing lead. The aims of this study were to evaluate the stability of LV pacing thresholds in a nationwide sample of CRT defibrillator recipients and to determine potential longevity improvements associated with a decrease in the LV safety margin while maintaining effective delivery of CRT. CRT defibrillator patients in the Medtronic CareLink database were eligible for inclusion. LV PCT stability was evaluated using ≥2 measurements over a 14-day period. Separately, a random sample of 7,250 patients with programmed right atrial and right ventricular amplitudes ≤2.5 V, LV thresholds ≤ 2.5 V, and LV pacing ≥90% were evaluated to estimate theoretical battery longevity improvement using LV safety margins of 0.5 and 1.5 V. Threshold stability analysis in 43,256 patients demonstrated LV PCT stability of 1 V had the greatest increases in battery life (mean increase 0.86 years, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 0.87). In conclusion, nearly all CRT defibrillator patients had LV PCT stability <1.0 V. Decreasing the LV safety margin from 1.5 to 0.5 V provided consistent delivery of CRT for most patients and significantly improved battery longevity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Seasonal Variability in Regional Ice Flow Due to Meltwater Injection Into the Shear Margins of Jakobshavn Isbræ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, J. P.; Lampkin, D. J.; Moon, T.

    2017-12-01

    The impact of meltwater injection into the shear margins of Jakobshavn Isbræ via drainage from water-filled crevasses on ice flow is examined. We use Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager panchromatic, high-resolution imagery to monitor the spatiotemporal variability of seven water-filled crevasse ponds during the summers of 2013 to 2015. The timing of drainage from water-filled crevasses coincides with an increase of 2 to 20% in measured ice velocity beyond Jakobshavn Isbræ shear margins, which we define as extramarginal ice velocity. Some water-filled crevasse groups demonstrate multiple drainage events within a single melt season. Numerical simulations show that hydrologic shear weakening due to water-filled crevasse drainage can accelerate extramarginal flow by as much as 35% within 10 km of the margins and enhance mass flux through the shear margins by 12%. This work demonstrates a novel mechanism through which surface melt can influence regional ice flow.

  17. Analysis of safety impacts from external flooding using the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) Toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Curtis L.; Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The existing fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impact of these factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This paper demonstrates how Idaho National Laboratory (INL) researchers use the RISMC Toolkit to investigate complex nuclear plant phenomena using RAVEN and RELAP-7. The analysis focused on a highly relevant topic currently facing some nuclear power plants – specifically flooding issues. This research and development looked at challenges to a hypothetical pressurized water reactor, including: (1) a potential loss of off-site power followed by the possible loss of all diesel generators (i.e., a station black-out event), (2) earthquake induced station-blackout, and (3) a potential earthquake induced tsunami flood. The analysis is performed by using a set of codes: a thermal-hydraulic code (RELAP-7), a flooding simulation tool (NEUTRINO) and a stochastic analysis tool (RAVEN) – these are currently under development at INL. Using RAVEN, we were able to perform multiple RELAP-7 simulation runs by changing specific parts of the model in order to reflect specific aspects of different scenarios, including both the failure and recovery of critical components. The simulation employed traditional statistical tools (such as Monte-Carlo sampling) and more advanced machine-learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to understand changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. Qualitative and quantitative results obtained gave a detailed picture of the issues associated with potential accident scenarios. These types of

  18. Structural safety - Is the safety margin measurable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-01-01

    In ensuring the structural safety of the nuclear components one must be aware of the uncertainties related to the material deorientation, loadings and other operational conditions, geometrical dimensions as well as the service environment. Furthermore, the validation of the analysis tools and procedures is of great importance in overall safety assessment of a pressure retaining component. In order to identify and quantify the concerns and risks arising from the uncertainties in the safety related issue intensive research is being carried out all over the world, in particular, on the ageing, plant life extension and management of old nuclear power plants. The presentation includes a general survey of the factors relevant to the assessment of safe and reliable operation of a nuclear component throughout its planned service life. Certain aspects are outlined based on the research work being carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT)(orig.)

  19. Vertiefungskurs 2014. Safety margins in nuclear power plants. Identify, quantify and extend; Vertiefungskurs 2014 zum Thema ''Sicherheitsmargen in Kernkraftwerken. Identifizieren, quantifizieren, erweitern''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, Matthias

    2015-02-15

    Fifteen speakers dealt with the topic safety margins in nuclear power plants from different points of view at the ''Vertiefungskurs 2014'' of the Nuklearforum Schweiz in Olten, 4 and 5 November 2014. In the context of the ''Vertiefungskurs 2014'' the safety margins in power plants were considered and quantified and possible extensions have been discussed. The conference started with an in-depth introduction of the basis design of existing nuclear power plants. Thereafter speakers told about the main topics emergency preparedness, knowledge management and safety retrofit of nuclear power plants in operation.

  20. Robust Adaptation? Assessing the sensitivity of safety margins in flood defences to uncertainty in future simulations - a case study from Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Conor; Bastola, Satish; Sweeney, John

    2013-04-01

    Climate change impact and adaptation assessments have traditionally adopted a 'top-down' scenario based approach, where information from different Global Climate Models (GCMs) and emission scenarios are employed to develop impacts led adaptation strategies. Due to the tradeoffs in the computational cost and need to include a wide range of GCMs for fuller characterization of uncertainties, scenarios are better used for sensitivity testing and adaptation options appraisal. One common approach to adaptation that has been defined as robust is the use of safety margins. In this work the sensitivity of safety margins that have been adopted by the agency responsible for flood risk management in Ireland, to the uncertainty in future projections are examined. The sensitivity of fluvial flood risk to climate change is assessed for four Irish catchments using a large number of GCMs (17) forced with three emissions scenarios (SRES A1B, A2, B1) as input to four hydrological models. Both uncertainty within and between hydrological models is assessed using the GLUE framework. Regionalisation is achieved using a change factor method to infer changes in the parameters of a weather generator using monthly output from the GCMs, while flood frequency analysis is conducted using the method of probability weighted moments to fit the Generalised Extreme Value distribution to ~20,000 annual maxima series. The sensitivity of design margins to the uncertainty space considered is visualised using risk response surfaces. The hydrological sensitivity is measured as the percentage change in flood peak for specified recurrence intervals. Results indicate that there is a considerable residual risk associated with allowances of +20% when uncertainties are accounted for and that the risk of exceedence of design allowances is greatest for more extreme, low frequency events with considerable implication for critical infrastructure, e.g., culverts, bridges, flood defences whose designs are normally

  1. On the functional failures concept and probabilistic safety margins: challenges in application for evaluation of effectiveness of shutdown systems - 15318

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serghiuta, D.; Tholammakkil, J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of level-3 reliability approach and the concept of functional failure probability could provide the basis for defining a safety margin metric which would include a limit for the probability of functional failure, in line with the definition of a reliability-based design. It can also allow a quantification of level of confidence, by explicit modeling and quantification of uncertainties, and provide a better framework for representation of actual design and optimization of design margins within an integrated probabilistic-deterministic model. This paper reviews the attributes and challenges in application of functional failure concept in evaluation of risk-informed safety margins using as illustrative example the case of CANDU reactors shutdown systems effectiveness. A risk-informed formulation is first introduced for estimation of a reasonable limit for the functional failure probability using a Swiss cheese model. It is concluded that more research is needed in this area and a deterministic - probabilistic approach may be a reasonable intermediate step for evaluation of functional failure probability at the system level. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of CNSC, or any part thereof. (authors)

  2. Approach to uncertainty evaluation for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Katsunori

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear power plant safety used to be verified and confirmed through accident simulations using computer codes generally because it is very difficult to perform integrated experiments or tests for the verification and validation of the plant safety due to radioactive consequence, cost, and scaling to the actual plant. Traditionally the plant safety had been secured owing to the sufficient safety margin through the conservative assumptions and models to be applied to those simulations. Meanwhile the best-estimate analysis based on the realistic assumptions and models in support of the accumulated insights could be performed recently, inducing the reduction of safety margin in the analysis results and the increase of necessity to evaluate the reliability or uncertainty of the analysis results. This paper introduces an approach to evaluate the uncertainty of accident simulation and its results. (Note: This research had been done not in the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization but in the Tokyo Institute of Technology.) (author)

  3. Verification of Safety Margins of Battery Banks Capacity of Class 1E DC System in a Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukman, Abdulrauf; Zhu, Oon-Pyo

    2015-01-01

    According to Ref 'Station blackout (SBO) is generally a plant condition with complete loss of all alternating current (AC) power from off-site sources, from the main generator and from standby AC power sources important to safety to the essential and nonessential switchgear buses. Direct current (DC) power supplies and uninterruptible AC power supplies may be available as long as batteries can supply the loads, alternate AC power supplies are available'. The above IAEA document indicated the importance of batteries during SBO. Prior to the Fukushima accident, most batteries might be designed with coping capability of four hours. However, the accident showed the need for the coping capability to be increased to at least eight hours. The purpose of this research is to verify the safety capacity margin of the nuclear qualified battery banks of class 1E DC system and test the response to SBO using the load profile of a Korean design nuclear power plant (NPP). The capacity margins of class 1E batteries of DC power system batteries in a nuclear power plant were determined using the load profile of the plant. It was observed that if appropriate manufacturer Kt data are not available, the accuracy of the battery capacity might not be accurately calculated. The result obtained shows that the batteries have the coping capability of two hours for channel A and B, and eight hours for channel C and D. Also capacity margin as show in figure show a reasonable margin for each batteries of the DC system

  4. Application of the Integrated Safety Assessment methodology to safety margins. Dynamic Event Trees, Damage Domains and Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibánez, L.; Hortal, J.; Queral, C.; Gómez-Magán, J.; Sánchez-Perea, M.; Fernández, I.; Meléndez, E.; Expósito, A.; Izquierdo, J.M.; Gil, J.; Marrao, H.; Villalba-Jabonero, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Safety Assessment (ISA) methodology, developed by the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, has been applied to an analysis of Zion NPP for sequences with Loss of the Component Cooling Water System (CCWS). The ISA methodology proposal starts from the unfolding of the Dynamic Event Tree (DET). Results from this first step allow assessing the sequence delineation of standard Probabilistic Safety Analysis results. For some sequences of interest of the outlined DET, ISA then identifies the Damage Domain (DD). This is the region of uncertain times and/or parameters where a safety limit is exceeded, which indicates the occurrence of certain damage situation. This paper illustrates application of this concept obtained simulating sequences with MAAP and with TRACE. From information of simulation results of sequence transients belonging to the DD and the time-density probability distributions of the manual actions and of occurrence of stochastic phenomena, ISA integrates the dynamic reliability equations proposed to obtain the sequence contribution to the global Damage Exceedance Frequency (DEF). Reported results show a slight increase in the DEF for sequences investigated following a power uprate from 100% to 110%. This demonstrates the potential use of the method to help in the assessment of design modifications. - Highlights: • This paper illustrates an application of the ISA methodology to safety margins. • Dynamic Event Trees are useful tool for verifying the standard PSA Event Trees. • The ISA methodology takes into account the uncertainties in human action times. • The ISA methodology shows the Damage Exceedance Frequency increase in power uprates.

  5. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. (author)

  6. Average years of life lost due to breast and cervical cancer and the association with the marginalization index in Mexico in 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Claudio Alberto Dávila; Botero, Marcela Agudelo

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate average years of life lost due to breast and cervical cancer in Mexico in 2000 and 2010. Data on mortality in women aged between 20 and 84 years was obtained from the National Institute for Statistics and Geography. Age-specific mortality rates and average years of life lost, which is an estimate of the number of years that a person would have lived if he or she had not died prematurely, were estimated for both diseases. Data was disaggregated into five-year age groups and socioeconomic status based on the 2010 marginalization index obtained from the National Population Council. A decrease in average years of life lost due to cervical cancer (37.4%) and an increase in average years of life lost due breast cancer (8.9%) was observed during the period studied. Average years of life lost due to cervical cancer was greater among women living in areas with a high marginalization index, while average years of life lost due to breast cancer was greater in women from areas with a low marginalization index.

  7. A practical due diligence strategy for managing the safety of contractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catton, C.

    1998-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's Fossil Business has developed and implemented a practical program to ensure that the due diligence requirements for contractors are met, particularly in the health and safety area. Companies in the power generation business are hiring contractors to protect their competitive potential by having them perform specialty work outside the core business of generating electricity. The reasons behind this trend, and the need for companies to develop comprehensive contractor safety management systems to avoid legislative liability and cost overruns, and to have contractors work safely, are examined. The main elements of Ontario Hydro's Fossil Business Contractor Safety Management Program (contractor safety policy, contractor safety manual, contractor safety training, and a contractor safety performance database) are discussed. 2 figs., 2 appendices

  8. Average years of life lost due to breast and cervical cancer and the association with the marginalization index in Mexico in 2000 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Alberto Dávila Cervantes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to calculate average years of life lost due to breast and cervical cancer in Mexico in 2000 and 2010. Data on mortality in women aged between 20 and 84 years was obtained from the National Institute for Statistics and Geography. Age-specific mortality rates and average years of life lost, which is an estimate of the number of years that a person would have lived if he or she had not died prematurely, were estimated for both diseases. Data was disaggregated into five-year age groups and socioeconomic status based on the 2010 marginalization index obtained from the National Population Council. A decrease in average years of life lost due to cervical cancer (37.4% and an increase in average years of life lost due breast cancer (8.9% was observed during the period studied. Average years of life lost due to cervical cancer was greater among women living in areas with a high marginalization index, while average years of life lost due to breast cancer was greater in women from areas with a low marginalization index.

  9. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase 1. Project V. Structural sub-system response: subsystem response review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogelquist, J.; Kaul, M.K.; Koppe, R.; Tagart, S.W. Jr.; Thailer, H.; Uffer, R.

    1980-03-01

    This project is directed toward a portion of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program which includes one link in the seismic methodology chain. The link addressed here is the structural subsystem dynamic response which consists of those components and systems whose behavior is often determined decoupled from the major structural response. Typically the mathematical model utilized for the major structural response will include only the mass effects of the subsystem and the main model is used to produce the support motion inputs for subsystem seismic qualification. The main questions addressed in this report have to do with the seismic response uncertainty of safety-related components or equipment whose seismic qualification is performed by (a) analysis, (b) tests, or (c) combinations of analysis and tests, and where the seismic input is assumed to have no uncertainty

  10. Seismic and tsunami safety margin assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Nuclear Regulation Authority is going to establish new seismic and tsunami safety guidelines to increase the safety of NPPs. The main purpose of this research is testing structures/components important to safety and tsunami resistant structures/components, and evaluating the capacity of them against earthquake and tsunami. Those capacity data will be utilized for the seismic and tsunami back-fit review based on the new seismic and tsunami safety guidelines. The summary of the program in 2012 is as follows. 1. Component seismic capacity test and quantitative seismic capacity evaluation. PWR emergency diesel generator partial-model seismic capacity tests have been conducted and quantitative seismic capacities have been evaluated. 2. Seismic capacity evaluation of switching-station electric equipment. Existing seismic test data investigation, specification survey and seismic response analyses have been conducted. 3. Tsunami capacity evaluation of anti-inundation measure facilities. Tsunami pressure test have been conducted utilizing a small breakwater model and evaluated basic characteristics of tsunami pressure against seawall structure. (author)

  11. Seismic and tsunami safety margin assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Regulation Authority is going to establish new seismic and tsunami safety guidelines to increase the safety of NPPs. The main purpose of this research is testing structures/components important to safety and tsunami resistant structures/components, and evaluating the capacity of them against earthquake and tsunami. Those capacity data will be utilized for the seismic and tsunami back-fit review based on the new seismic and tsunami safety guidelines. The summary of the program in 2012 is as follows. 1. Component seismic capacity test and quantitative seismic capacity evaluation. PWR emergency diesel generator partial-model seismic capacity tests have been conducted and quantitative seismic capacities have been evaluated. 2. Seismic capacity evaluation of switching-station electric equipment. Existing seismic test data investigation, specification survey and seismic response analyses have been conducted. 3. Tsunami capacity evaluation of anti-inundation measure facilities. Tsunami pressure test have been conducted utilizing a small breakwater model and evaluated basic characteristics of tsunami pressure against seawall structure. (author)

  12. Design and safety aspects of nuclear district heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogli, R.; Mathews, D.; Pelloni, S.

    1989-01-01

    Extensive studies on the rationale, the potential and the technology of nuclear district heating have been performed in Switzerland. Beside economics the safety aspects were of primary importance. Due to the high costs to transport heat the heating reactor tend to be small and therefore, minimally staffed and located close to population centers. Stringed safety rules are therefore applying. Gas cooled reactors are well suited as district heating reactors since they have due to their characteristics several inherent features, significant safety margins and a remarkable radioactivity retention potential. Some ways to mitigate the effects of water ingress and graphite corrosion are under investigation. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs

  13. Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-12-15

    Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

  14. Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-01-01

    Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste

  15. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project VII. Systems analysis specification of computational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, I.B.; Kaul, M.K.; Post, R.I.; Tagart, S.W. Jr.; Vinson, T.J.

    1979-02-01

    An initial specification is presented of a computation approach for a probabilistic risk assessment model for use in the Seismic Safety Margin Research Program. This model encompasses the whole seismic calculational chain from seismic input through soil-structure interaction, transfer functions to the probability of component failure, integration of these failures into a system model and thereby estimate the probability of a release of radioactive material to the environment. It is intended that the primary use of this model will be in sensitivity studies to assess the potential conservatism of different modeling elements in the chain and to provide guidance on priorities for research in seismic design of nuclear power plants

  16. A novel respiratory motion compensation strategy combining gated beam delivery and mean target position concept - A compromise between small safety margins and long duty cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Kavanagh, Anthony; Webb, Steve; Brada, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel respiratory motion compensation strategy combining gated beam delivery with the mean target position (MTP) concept for pulmonary stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and methods: Four motion compensation strategies were compared for 10 targets with motion amplitudes between 6 mm and 31 mm: the internal target volume concept (plan ITV ); the MTP concept where safety margins were adapted based on 4D dose accumulation (plan MTP ); gated beam delivery without margins for motion compensation (plan gated ); a novel approach combining gating and the MTP concept (plan gated and MTP ). Results: For 5/10 targets with an average motion amplitude of 9 mm, the differences in the mean lung dose (MLD) between plan gated and plan MTP were gated and MTP . Despite significantly shorter duty cycles, plan gated reduced the MLD by gated and MTP . The MLD was increased by 18% in plan MTP compared to that of plan gated and MTP . Conclusions: For pulmonary targets with motion amplitudes >10-15 mm, the combination of gating and the MTP concept allowed small safety margins with simultaneous long duty cycles.

  17. Margins related to equipment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Safety margins related to design of reactor equipment are defined according to safety regulations. Advanced best estimate methods are proposed including some examples which were computed and compared to experimental results. Best estimate methods require greater computation effort and more material data but give better variable accuracy and need careful experimental validation. Simplified methods compared to the previous are less sensitive to material data, sometimes are more accurate but very long to elaborate

  18. Marginal kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Gopalakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for a medically eligible patient with end stage renal disease. The number of renal transplants has increased rapidly over the last two decades. However, the demand for organs has increased even more. This disparity between the availability of organs and waitlisted patients for transplants has forced many transplant centers across the world to use marginal kidneys and donors. We performed a Medline search to establish the current status of marginal kidney donors in the world. Transplant programs using marginal deceased renal grafts is well established. The focus is now on efforts to improve their results. Utilization of non-heart-beating donors is still in a plateau phase and comprises a minor percentage of deceased donations. The main concern is primary non-function of the renal graft apart from legal and ethical issues. Transplants with living donors outnumbered cadaveric transplants at many centers in the last decade. There has been an increased use of marginal living kidney donors with some acceptable medical risks. Our primary concern is the safety of the living donor. There is not enough scientific data available to quantify the risks involved for such donation. The definition of marginal living donor is still not clear and there are no uniform recommendations. The decision must be tailored to each donor who in turn should be actively involved at all levels of the decision-making process. In the current circumstances, our responsibility is very crucial in making decisions for either accepting or rejecting a marginal living donor.

  19. A generalized framework for assessment of safety margins in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilas, M.; Youngblood, B.; Prelewicz, D.; Meyer, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The protection of public health and safety, and the environment from inadvertent releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power plants relies on the implementation of the defense-in-depth strategy. The term defense-in-depth evolved historically, and thus its application has not always been uniform. The use of the term in the context of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) safety philosophy entails the reliance of a nuclear facility on successive compensatory measures in preventing accidents or mitigating damage caused by malfunctions, accidents, or naturally occurring events. The introduction of probabilistic risk analyses with NUREG-74/014 and subsequent evolution in risk assessment techniques, are leading to the implementation of risk informed regulation to ensure the safety of the public and the environment. Risk informed regulation minimizes the likelihood of overlooking potentially significant accident sequences while limiting unnecessary burdens imposed on licensees. The proposed framework merges fundamental elements of safety regulation: defense-in depth, safety margins and probabilistic risk. It formalizes the relationship between probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and data, and deterministic analyses in a manner consistent with NRC's defense-in-depth philosophy. Succinctly put, the likelihood and consequences of accident scenarios are considered simultaneously and quantified by a plant safety metric. The integration of these fundamental elements into a practically applicable safety framework is consistent with the NRC policy statement on use of probabilistic risk assessment methods and the November 2002 Regulatory Guide on risk informed decisions on plant-specific changes to the licensing basis. Safety information resulting from the application of the framework supersedes traditional safety figures of merit. Safety quantifiers, referred herein as safety indices, expand on the qualifier outcomes that currently accompany fault tree

  20. Assessment of occupational exposure due to external sources of radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. The three Safety Guides on occupational radiation protection are jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the International Labour Office. The Agency gratefully acknowledges the contribution of the European Commission to the development of the present Safety Guide. The present Safety Guide addresses the assessment of exposure due to external sources of radiation in the workplace. Such exposure can result from a number of sources within a workplace, and the monitoring of workers and the workplace in such situations is an integral part of any occupational radiation protection programme. The assessment of exposure due to external radiation sources depends critically upon knowledge of the radiation type and energy and the conditions of exposure. The present Safety Guide reflects the major changes over the past decade in international practice in external dose assessment

  1. Assessment of occupational exposure due to external sources of radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. The three Safety Guides on occupational radiation protection are jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the International Labour Office. The Agency gratefully acknowledges the contribution of the European Commission to the development of the present Safety Guide. The present Safety Guide addresses the assessment of exposure due to external sources of radiation in the workplace. Such exposure can result from a number of sources within a workplace, and the monitoring of workers and the workplace in such situations is an integral part of any occupational radiation protection programme. The assessment of exposure due to external radiation sources depends critically upon knowledge of the radiation type and energy and the conditions of exposure. The present Safety Guide reflects the major changes over the past decade in international practice in external dose assessment

  2. Assessment of occupational exposure due to external sources of radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. The three Safety Guides on occupational radiation protection are jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the International Labour Office. The Agency gratefully acknowledges the contribution of the European Commission to the development of the present Safety Guide. The present Safety Guide addresses the assessment of exposure due to external sources of radiation in the workplace. Such exposure can result from a number of sources within a workplace, and the monitoring of workers and the workplace in such situations is an integral part of any occupational radiation protection programme. The assessment of exposure due to external radiation sources depends critically upon knowledge of the radiation type and energy and the conditions of exposure. The present Safety Guide reflects the major changes over the past decade in international practice in external dose assessment

  3. Refining margins and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudouin, C.; Favennec, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Refining margins throughout the world have remained low in 1996. In Europe, in spite of an improvement, particularly during the last few weeks, they are still not high enough to finance new investments. Although the demand for petroleum products is increasing, experts are still sceptical about any rapid recovery due to prevailing overcapacity and to continuing capacity growth. After a historical review of margins and an analysis of margins by regions, we analyse refining over-capacities in Europe and the unbalances between production and demand. Then we discuss the current situation concerning barriers to the rationalization, agreements between oil companies, and the consequences on the future of refining capacities and margins. (author)

  4. Plant safety margin against frost damages has declined in Switzerland over the last four decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitasse, Yann; Schneider, Léonard; Klein, Geoffrey; Rixen, Christian; Rebetez, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Winters and early springs have become warmer over the last decades which has in turn promoted earlier plant development in temperate regions. While temperatures will on average continue to increase in the coming decades due to the rise of greenhouse gases concentration in the atmosphere, there is no consensus about how the occurrence of late spring frosts will change. If the frequency and the severity of late spring frosts remain unchanged in the future or advance less than vegetation onset, vulnerable plant organs (young leaves, flowers or dehardened buds) may be more exposed to frost damage. Here we analyzed long-term series of temperature data during the period 1975-2016 at 50 locations in Switzerland. We used different thresholds of growing degree days (GDD) as a proxy for spring phenology of fruit trees based on long-term series of phenological observations. Finally, we tested whether the time lag between the date when the GDD is reached and the latest occurrence of frost has changed over the study period. Overall we found that the safety margin against potential frost damage to plants has slightly decreased during the study period, irrespective of elevation (from 203 to 2283 m). Our results suggest that the cost for preventing frost damages on fruit trees could increase in the coming decades and the introduction of new varieties of fruit trees adapted to warmer climate should be carefully considered as they generally exhibit earlier spring phenology.

  5. Seismic margin analysis technique for nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choi, In Kil

    2001-04-01

    In general, the Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) and the Seismic Margin Assessment(SAM) are used for the evaluation of realistic seismic capacity of nuclear power plant structures. Seismic PRA is a systematic process to evaluate the seismic safety of nuclear power plant. In our country, SPRA has been used to perform the probabilistic safety assessment for the earthquake event. SMA is a simple and cost effective manner to quantify the seismic margin of individual structural elements. This study was performed to improve the reliability of SMA results and to confirm the assessment procedure. To achieve this goal, review for the current status of the techniques and procedures was performed. Two methodologies, CDFM (Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin) sponsored by NRC and FA (Fragility Analysis) sponsored by EPRI, were developed for the seismic margin review of NPP structures. FA method was originally developed for Seismic PRA. CDFM approach is more amenable to use by experienced design engineers including utility staff design engineers. In this study, detailed review on the procedures of CDFM and FA methodology was performed

  6. Summary report on the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was a program to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The SSMRP was the first effort to trace seismically induced failure modes in a reactor system down to the individual component level, and to take into account common-cause earthquake-induced failures at the component level. This report summarizes methods and results generated by SSMRP. The SSMRP method makes use of three computer codes, HAZARD, SMACS and SEISIM to calculate ground motion acceleration time histories, structure and component responses and failure, and radioactive release probabilities. To demonstrate the methodology, an analysis was done of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The median frequency of core melt was computed to be 3E-5 per year, with upper (90%) and lower (10%) bounds of 8E-4 and 6E-7 per year. The main contribution to risk came from earthquakes about 2 through 4 times the design basis earthquake level. Risk was dominated by structural and inter-building piping failures and loss of off-site power. Sensitivity studies were undertaken to test assumptions and modeling procedures relative to soil-structure interaction effects, feed-and-bleed cooling, and structural failures. Assumptions made could have an order-of-magnitude effect on core melt frequency. Also, guidelines were developed for simplifying the SSMRP method, and importance rankings were generated based on the Zion analysis. 56 refs., 6 figs

  7. Safety considerations of PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.H. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The safety of the central station pressurized water reactor is well established and substantiated by its excellent operating record. Operating data from 55 reactors of this type have established a record of safe operating history unparalleled by any modern large scale industry. The 186 plants under construction require a continuing commitment to maintain this outstanding record. The safety of the PWR has been further verified by the recently completed Reactor Safety Study (''Rasmussen'' Report). Not only has this study confirmed the exceptionally low risk associated with PWR operation, it has also introduced a valuable new tool in the decision making process. PWR designs, utilizing the philosophy of defense in depth, provide the bases for evaluating margins of safety. The design of the reactor coolant system, the containment system, emergency core cooling system and other related systems and components provide substantial margins of safety under both normal and postulated accident conditions even considering simultaneous effects of earthquakes and other environmental phenomena. Margins of safety in the assessment of various postulated accident conditions, with emphasis on the postulated loss of reactor coolant accident (LOCA), have been evaluated in depth as exemplified by the comprehensive ECCS rulemaking hearings followed by imposition of very conservative Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. When evaluated on an engineering best estimate approach, the significant margins to safety for a LOCA become more apparent. Extensive test programs have also substantiated margins to safety limits. These programs have included both separate effects and systems tests. Component testing has also been performed to substantiate performance levels under adverse combinations of environmental stress. The importance of utilizing past experience and of optimizing the deployment of incremental resources is self evident. Recent safety concerns have included specific areas such

  8. Improving safety margins for control room habitability, through heating/ventilation/air conditioning modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beach, D.R.; Fillingim, W.; Bell, G.; Eurich, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Fort Calhoun power station began operation in September 1973. Since that time, modifications to the plant have required the addition of a substantial number of electrical and control components in the control room, which has resulted in an increased heat load in this area. Additionally, NUREG-0737, Item III.D.3.4, imposed requirements on the ventilating system related to protection of personnel from the effects of toxic and radioactive gas releases, which were not considered in the original design. Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) has recently undertaken a major modification to the Fort Calhoun station control room ventilating system to improve the safety margins for control room habitability. The goals of the modification were to achieve adequate cooling capacity with fully redundant equipment, improve habitability under accident conditions, and eliminate several potential problems related to steam line break and equipment qualification. Additionally, the scope of the project grew as design problems emerged

  9. Risk insights from seismic margin reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the information that has been derived from the three seismic-margin reviews conducted so far, and the information that is potentially available from using the seismic-margin method more generally. There are two different methodologies for conducting seismic margin reviews of nuclear power plants, one developed under NRC sponsorship and one developed under sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute. Both methodologies will be covered in this paper. The paper begins with a summary of the steps necessary to complete a margin review, and will then outline the key technical difficulties that need to be addressed. After this introduction, the paper covers the safety and operational insights derived from the three seismic-margin reviews already completed: the NRC-sponsored review at Maine Yankee; the EPRI-sponsored review at Catawba; and the joint EPRI/NRC/utility effort at Hatch. The emphasis is on engineering insights, with attention to the aspects of the reviews that are easiest to perform and that provide the most readily available insights

  10. Implicit Treatment of Technical Specification and Thermal Hydraulic Parameter Uncertainties in Gaussian Process Model to Estimate Safety Margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Fynan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gaussian process model (GPM is a flexible surrogate model that can be used for nonparametric regression for multivariate problems. A unique feature of the GPM is that a prediction variance is automatically provided with the regression function. In this paper, we estimate the safety margin of a nuclear power plant by performing regression on the output of best-estimate simulations of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident with sampling of safety system configuration, sequence timing, technical specifications, and thermal hydraulic parameter uncertainties. The key aspect of our approach is that the GPM regression is only performed on the dominant input variables, the safety injection flow rate and the delay time for AC powered pumps to start representing sequence timing uncertainty, providing a predictive model for the peak clad temperature during a reflood phase. Other uncertainties are interpreted as contributors to the measurement noise of the code output and are implicitly treated in the GPM in the noise variance term, providing local uncertainty bounds for the peak clad temperature. We discuss the applicability of the foregoing method to reduce the use of conservative assumptions in best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU and Level 1 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA success criteria definitions while dealing with a large number of uncertainties.

  11. Modeling safety risk perception due to mobile phone distraction among four wheeler drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunathan Rajesh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is an increasing trend in the use of information and communication technology devices in new vehicles. Due to these increasing service facilities, driver distraction has become a major concern for transportation safety. To reduce safety risks, it is crucial to understand how distracting activities affect driver behavior at different levels of vehicle control. The objective of this work is to understand how the vehicle and driver characteristics influence mobile phone usage while driving and associated risk perception of road safety incidents. Based on literature review, a man–machine framework for distracted driving and a mobile phone distraction model is presented. The study highlights the findings from a questionnaire survey conducted in Kerala, India. The questionnaire uses a 5-point Likert scale. Responses from 1203 four-wheeler drivers are collected using random sampling approach. The questionnaire items associated with three driver-drive characteristics are: (i Human Factors (age, experience, emotional state, behavior of driver, (ii Driver space (meter, controls, light, heat, steering, actuators of vehicle, (iii Driving conditions (speed, distance, duration, traffic, signals. This mobile phone distraction model is tested using structural equation modeling procedure. The study indicates that among the three characteristics, ‘Human Factors’ has the highest influence on perceived distraction due to mobile phones. It is also observed that safety risk perception due to mobile phone usage while driving is moderate. The practical relevance of the study is to place emphasis on behavior-based controls and to focus on strategies leveraging perception of distraction due to mobile phones while driving.

  12. Quantification of microbial quality and safety in minimally processed foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwietering, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    To find a good equilibrium between quality and margin of safety of minimally processed foods, often various hurdles are used. Quantification of the kinetics should be used to approach an optimum processing and to select the main aspects. Due to many factors of which the exact quantitative effect is

  13. Continuous Assessment of Safety Margin for the 14-MW TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Georgescu, D.; Doru, O.

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of reactor safety implies analyses of the reactor and its systems response to a range of postulated initiating events (such as malfunction or failures of equipment, operator errors, external events and so on which could lead to either anticipated operational occurrences or to accident conditions. Decreasing in heat removal by the reactor cooling system may be considered as a process disturbance which may lead to a postulated initiating event. The cold source for the reactor cooling system, in case of TRIGA-14 MW reactor is the atmosphere by the secondary cooling towers. The ability to evacuate the heat produced by the reactor core ranges between the outlet temperature of the core flow and the outdoors temperature in air, which is subject to season and day variation. Selected values for safety limits, safety system settings and limiting condition(s) are derived from safety analysis and are consistent with the operational state of the reactor. When a limiting condition for safe operation is not satisfied, the operating personal is supposed to take the appropriate action(s) to ensure safety. Operating requirements and the safety system are presented. The reactor operating safety parameters from the main Data Acquisition System are transferred to an AT personal computer. These selected parameters are the following: - average inlet temperature which is calculated as an average temperature measured by 20 type K thermocouples distributed within a 4 x 5 matrix located on the top of the reactor core; - average outlet temperature which is calculated as an average record from 10 type K thermocouples placed in the outlet pipe; - average flow rate which is calculated as an average value from four transducers (two for the inlet flow rate and two for the outlet flow rate). Due to its high instability, this value is also filtered using a two-pole low-pass filter (software); - reactor thermal power value derivable from the previous parameters or obtained from the

  14. SSI sensitivity studies and model improvements for the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Benda, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US NRC-funded program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Its goal is to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. In Phase II of the SSMRP, the methodology was applied to the Zion nuclear power plant. Three topics in the SSI analysis of Zion were investigated and reported here - flexible foundation modeling, structure-to-structure interaction, and basemat uplift. The results of these investigations were incorporated in the SSMRP seismic risk analysis. 14 references, 51 figures, 13 tables

  15. PGSFR Core Thermal Design Procedure to Evaluate the Safety Margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Rock; Kim, Sang-Ji [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has performed a SFR design with the final goal of constructing a prototype plant by 2028. The main objective of the SFR prototype plant is to verify the TRU metal fuel performance, reactor operation, and transmutation ability of high-level wastes. The core thermal design is to ensure the safe fuel performance during the whole plant operation. Compared to the critical heat flux in typical light water reactors, nuclear fuel damage in SFR subassemblies arises from a creep induced failure. The creep limit is evaluated based on the maximum cladding temperature, power, neutron flux, and uncertainties in the design parameters, as shown in Fig. 1. In this work, the core thermal design procedures are compared to verify the present PGSFR methodology based on the nuclear plant design criteria/guidelines and previous SFR thermal design methods. The PGSFR core thermal design procedure is verified based on the nuclear plant design criteria/guidelines and previous methods in LWRs and SFRs. The present method aims to directly evaluate the fuel cladding failure and to assure more safety margin. The 2 uncertainty is similar to 95% one-side tolerance limit of 1.96 in LWRs. The HCFs, ITDP, and MCM reveal similar uncertainty propagation for cladding midwall temperature for typical SFR conditions. The present HCFs are mainly employed from the CRBR except the fuel-related uncertainty such as an incorrect fuel distribution. Preliminary PGSFR specific HCFs will be developed by the end of 2015.

  16. International demands for retrofitting, trends in the nuclear industry, safety margins, concepts and options for retrofit; Nachfrage nach Nachruestungen international; industrielle Trends; Rolle von Sicherheitsmargen, Nachruestkonzepte und -moeglichkeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Rolf; Stoll, Uwe; Grasnick, Claudius [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). E and P, P-G

    2016-02-15

    The serious accidents at Fukushima in 2011 pointed out the missing implementation of existing international safety standards for nuclear power plants as also new aspects for nuclear safety. The main safety aspects in the aftermath of Fukushima are: robustness against internal and external impacts; sufficient safety margins; prolonged periods for safety measures; inherent and passive systems and mechanisms; enhanced independent operation of the plant in case of external failures; independent long-term supply with AC; accident management procedures; enhanced retention of radionuclides. Technologies for retrofit are available and are under implementation with respect to the demands and options in the countries using nuclear power.

  17. Comparison of APR1400 safety between brake site and shin-Kori site Due to the difference in the climate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ho Joon; Lee, Jeong Ik; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2012-01-01

    Brake Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) is now under the construction based on APR1400 designed by Korean Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). APR1400 is a two loop pressurized water reactor, the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) US designed for about put of 4,000 MWt, with a corresponding electrical output of approximately 1,390 MWe. The first APR1400 (SKN 3 and 4) constructed in Shin-Kori, Korea has been modified according to the surrounding environment of the United Arab Emirates. In this paper, authors would like to compare safety issues between B NPP and Skin due to the changes of surroundings, since the site characteristics are very different. For instance, the mean annual air temperature in the UAE is 28 .deg. C and the peak air temperature was recorded as 48.8 .deg. C. Sea temperatures are varying from 17. deg. C in January to 35. deg. C in August, while that of Korea is in 9-16. deg. C range. Hot climate of UAE and the malfunction of HVAC system can lead the increasing of the water temperature in safety injection system (SIS). The heated water in SIS may affect the safety margin of the peak cladding temperature (PCT). The change of PCT and response time according to design basis accident scenarios such as large break LOCA are analyzed in detail. To evaluate such effect, Mars code was utilized to evaluate assumed condition by KAIST and the analyses of the results were carried out by Khalifa Univ.

  18. Additional costs to Finnish dairy farms due to occupational safety and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio Klen

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available The additional costs incurred by work safety measures to dairy farms were estimated by interviewing 95 dairy farmers and inspecting with them production buildings, machines and the need for personal protective devices at a commune. The present value of the implemented safety and health improvements rose to FIM 22 000 per farm in 1983. About FIM 17000 were due to the tractors, FIM 3 000 to the cow houses and FIM 2 000 to other machines and tools than tractors. The protective equipment of tractors caused the annual maintenance cost of FIM 4 350 and cow house FIM 650, if the interest rate were 10 %. The annual total cost was over FIM 6 000. The replacement value would have been about FIM 31 000 in 1983. If all deficiences still remaining in 1983 had been corrected at once, the total cost would have been about FIM 12000 per farm, which leads to an annual cost of FIM 3 100. As for still remaining deficiencies, the study suggested need for an annual cost of about FIM 1 500 due to personal protectors. Half of this sum was due to need for the acquisition of personal safety equipment for forest work. Correcting the safety and health deficiencies of the cowshed and agricultural machines would produce each an annual cost of about FIM 800 per farm. The present value of the labor protection investments in 1983 was FIM 22 000 per farm, and there still remained need to invest an additional FIM 12000 in order to eliminate the remaining deficiencies. So, the theoretical total of the annual maintenance cost would have been FIM 6 600—9 200 per farm depending on the interest rate. Because the study concerned only one commune, the results cannot be generalized to the whole country.

  19. Qualification of class 1e equipment: regulation, technological margins and test experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasco, Y.; Le Meur, M.; Henry, J.Y.; Droger, J.P.; Morange, E.; Roubault, J.

    1986-10-01

    French regulation requires licensee to qualify electrical equipment important to safety for service in nuclear power plants to ensure that the equipment can perform its safety function under the set of plausible operating conditions. The French regulatory texts entitled Fundamental safety rules have classified safety related electrical equipment in three main categories: k1, k2, k3, according to their location and operating conditions. The definition of a design basis accident test profile must account for margins applied to thermal hydraulic code outputs. Specific safety margins was added to cover uncertainties in qualification test representativity. Up to now, accidental sequence studies have shown the validity of such a qualification test profile. On the other hand, the results from post accident simulation tests have shown that it is useful not only to validate post accident operating life but also to reveal failures initiated during previous tests [fr

  20. Refining margins: recent trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudoin, C.; Favennec, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a business environment that was globally mediocre due primarily to the Asian crisis and to a mild winter in the northern hemisphere, the signs of improvement noted in the refining activity in 1996 were borne out in 1997. But the situation is not yet satisfactory in this sector: the low return on invested capital and the financing of environmental protection expenditure are giving cause for concern. In 1998, the drop in crude oil prices and the concomitant fall in petroleum product prices was ultimately rather favorable to margins. Two elements tended to put a damper on this relative optimism. First of all, margins continue to be extremely volatile and, secondly, the worsening of the economic and financial crisis observed during the summer made for a sharp decline in margins in all geographic regions, especially Asia. Since the beginning of 1999, refining margins are weak and utilization rates of refining capacities have decreased. (authors)

  1. Project margins of advanced reactor design WWER-500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogov, M.F.; Birukov, G.I.; Ershov, V.G.; Volkov, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    Project criteria for design of advanced WWER-500 reactor within design conditions are compared to the requirements of the Russian regulatory guides. Normal operation limits, safe operation limits for main anticipated operational occurrences and design limits accepted for design basis accidents are considered as in preliminary safety report. It is shown that the basic design criteria in the design of WWER-500 for the anticipated operational occurrences and for design basis accidents are more severe than required in the following regulatory guides General Safety Regulations for Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Safety Rules for Reactors of Nuclear Power Plants. This provides certain margins from safety point of view

  2. Material presented to advisory committee on reactor safeguards, subcommittee on extreme external phenomena, January 29-30, 1981, Los Angeles, California. Seismic safety margins research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Dong, R.G.; Johnson, J.J.; Wells, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The January 29-30, 1981, meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Subcommittee on Extreme External Phenomena, mark the close of Phase I efforts on the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). Presentations at the meeting focused on results produced. These included computer codes, response computations, failure and release probabilities, data bases, and fragilities and parameter characteristics

  3. Operational safety at the FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, Q.L.; Hagan, J.W.; Seeman, S.E.; Baker, S.M.

    1981-02-01

    An extensive operational nuclear safety program has been an integral part of the design, startup, and initial operating phases of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). During the design and construction of the facility, a program of independent safety overviews and analyses assured the provision of responsible safety margins within the plant, protective systems, and engineered safety features for protection of the public, operating staff, and the facility. The program is continuing through surveillance of operations to verify continued adherence to the established operating envelope and for timely identification of any trends potentially adverse to those margins. Experience from operation of FFTF is being utilized in the development of enhanced operational nuclear safety aids for application in follow-on breeder reactor power systems. The commendable plant and personnel safety experiences of FFTF through its startup and ascension to full power demonstrate the overall effectiveness of the FFTF operational nuclear safety program

  4. Differences in safety margins between nuclear and conventional design standards with regards to seismic hazard definition and design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgohary, M.; Saudy, A.; Orbovic, N.; Dejan, D.

    2006-01-01

    With the surging interest in new build nuclear all over the world and a permanent interest in earthquake resistance of nuclear plants, there is a need to quantify the safety margins in nuclear buildings design in comparison to conventional buildings in order to increase the public confidence in the safety of nuclear power plants. Nuclear (CAN3-N289 series) and conventional (NBCC 2005) seismic standards have different approaches regarding the design of civil structures. The origin of the differences lays in the safety philosophy behind the seismic nuclear and conventional standards. Conventional seismic codes contain the minimal requirement destined primarily to safeguard against major structural failure and loss of life. It doesn't limit damage to a certain acceptable degree or maintain function. Nuclear seismic code requires that structures, systems and components important to safety, withstand the effects of earthquakes. The requirement states that for equipment important to safety, both integrity and functionality should be ascertained. The seismic hazard is generally defined on the basis of the annual probability of exceedence (return period). There is a major difference on the return period and the confidence level for design earthquakes between the conventional and the nuclear seismic standards. The seismic design criteria of conventional structures are based on the use of Force Modification Factors to take into account the energy dissipation by incursion in non-elastic domain and the reserve of strength. The use of such factors to lower intentionally the seismic input is consistent with the safety philosophy of the conventional seismic standard which is the 'non collapse' rather than the integrity and/or the operability of the structures or components. Nuclear seismic standard requires that the structure remain in the elastic domain; energy dissipation by incursion in non-elastic domain is not allowed for design basis earthquake conditions. This is

  5. Evaluation of thermal margin for HANARO core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol; Chae, Hee Taek; Kim Heon Il; Lim, I. C.; Lee, C. S.; Kim, H

    1999-08-01

    During the commissioning and the start-up of the HANARO, various design parameters were confirmed and measured. For safer operation of HANARO and resolution of the CHF penalty issue which is one of unresolved licensing problems, thermal margins for normal and transient conditions were re-evaluated reflecting the commissioning and the start-up test results and the design modifications during operation. The re-evaluation shows that the HANARO meets the design criteria for ONB margin and fuel centerline temperature under normal condition. For upset condition, it also satisfies the safety limits for CHFR and fuel centerline temperature. (Author). 11 refs., 13 tabs., 4 figs.

  6. Operating plant safety analysis needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.Y.; Love, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective for nuclear power station owners is to operate and manage their plants safely. However, there is also a need to provide economical electric power, which requires that the unit be operated as efficiently as possible, consistent with the safety requirements. The objectives cited above can be achieved through the identification and use of available margins inherent in the plant design. As a result of conservative licensing and analytical approaches taken in the past, many of these margins may be found in the safety analysis limits within which plants currently operate. Improvements in the accuracy of the safety analysis, and a more realistic treatment of plant initial and boundary conditions, can make this margin available for a variety of uses which enhance plant performance, help to reduce O and M costs, and may help to extend licensed operation. Opportunities for improvement exist in several areas in the accident analysis normally performed for Chapter 15 of the FSAR. For example, recent modifications to the ECCS rule, 10CFR50.46 and Appendix K, allow use of margins previously unavailable in the analysis of the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). To take advantage of this regulatory change, new methods are being developed to analyze both the large and small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). As this margin is used, enhancements in the analysis of other transients will become necessary. The paper discusses accident analysis methods, future development needs, and analysis margin utilization in specific accident scenarios

  7. Single-Coil Defibrillator Leads Yield Satisfactory Defibrillation Safety Margin in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Hideo; Friedman, Paul A; Inoue, Yuko; Noda, Takashi; Aiba, Takeshi; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kamakura, Shiro; Kusano, Kengo; Espinosa, Raul E

    2016-09-23

    Single-coil defibrillator leads have gained favor because of their potential ease of extraction. However, a high defibrillation threshold remains a concern in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and in many cases, dual-coil leads have been used for this patient group. There is little data on using single-coil leads for HCM patients. We evaluated 20 patients with HCM who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) on the left side in combination with a dual-coil lead. Two sets of defibrillation tests were performed in each patient, one with the superior vena cava (SVC) coil "on" and one with the SVC coil "off". ICDs were programmed to deliver 25 joules (J) for the first attempt followed by maximum energy (35 J or 40 J). Shock impedance and shock pulse width at 25 J in each setting as well as the results of the shock were analyzed. All 25-J shocks in both settings successfully terminated ventricular fibrillation. However, shock impedance and pulse width increased substantially with the SVC coil programmed "off" compared with "on" (66.4±6.1 ohm and 14.0±1.3 ms "off" vs. 41.9±5.0 ohm and 9.3±0.8 ms "on", Psatisfactory safety margin for 35-J devices. Single-coil leads appear appropriate for left-sided implantation in this patient group. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2199-2203).

  8. EPR meeting international safety standards with margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurkiewicz, S.M.; Brauns, J.; Blombach, J.

    2005-01-01

    The EPR provides technology that offers a solution to the market's need for safe, economic power. The EPR was originally developed through a joint effort between Framatome ANP and Siemens by incorporating the best technological features from the French and German nuclear reactor fleets into a cost-competitive product capable of international licensing. As such, the EPR is a global product with commercial units currently being built in Finland at the Olkiluoto site, and planned for France, at the Flamanville site. Framatome ANP has recently proposed four EPR units to China in response to a request for vendor bids. In addition, Framatome ANP has announced their intent to pursue design certification with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper discusses how EPR's innovative safety philosophy ensures compliance with international safety standards for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). (author)

  9. EPR meeting international safety standards with margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurkiewicz, S.M.; Brauns, J.; Blombach, J.

    2005-01-01

    The EPR provides technology that offers a solution to the market's need for safe, economic power. The EPR was originally developed through a joint effort between Framatome ANP and Siemens by incorporating the best technological features from the French and German nuclear reactor fleets into a cost-competitive product capable of international licensing. As such, the EPR is a global product with commercial units currently being built in Finland at the Olkiluoto site, and planned for France, at the Flamanville site. Framatome ANP has recently proposed four EPR units to China in response to a request for vendor bids. In addition, Framatome ANP has announced their intent to pursue design certification in with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper discusses how EPR's innovative safety philosophy ensures compliance with international safety standards for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). (author)

  10. Nuclear power: Siting and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Openshaw, S.

    1986-01-01

    By 2030, half, or even two-thirds, of all electricity may be generated by nuclear power. Major reactor accidents are still expected to be rare occurrences, but nuclear safety is largely a matter of faith. Terrorist attacks, sabotage, and human error could cause a significant accident. Reactor siting can offer an additional, design-independent margin of safety. Remote geographical sites for new plants would minimize health risks, protect the industry from negative changes in public opinion concerning nuclear energy, and improve long-term public acceptance of nuclear power. U.K. siting practices usually do not consider the contribution to safety that could be obtained from remote sites. This book discusses the present trends of siting policies of nuclear power and their design-independent margin of safety

  11. Assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposure due to radioactive materials can occur as a result of various human activities. These include work associated with the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, scientific research, agriculture and industry, and occupations which involve the handling of materials containing enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In order to control this exposure, it is necessary to be able to assess the magnitude of the doses involved. Three interrelated Safety Guides, prepared jointly by the IAEA and the International Labour Office (ILO), provide guidance on the application of the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards with respect to occupational exposure. Reference [3] gives general advice on the exposure conditions for which monitoring programmes should be set up to assess radiation doses arising from external radiation and from intakes of radionuclides by workers. More specific guidance on the assessment of doses from external sources of radiation can be found in Ref. [4] and the present Safety Guide deals with intakes of radioactive materials. Recommendations related to occupational radiation protection have also been developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [5]. These and other current recommendations of the ICRP [6] have been taken into account in preparing this Safety Guide. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance for regulatory authorities on conducting assessments of intakes of radioactive material arising from occupational exposure. This Guide will also be useful to those concerned with the planning, management and operation of occupational monitoring programmes, and to those involved in the design of equipment for use in internal dosimetry and workplace monitoring

  12. Assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Occupational exposure due to radioactive materials can occur as a result of various human activities. These include work associated with the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, scientific research, agriculture and industry, and occupations which involve the handling of materials containing enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In order to control this exposure, it is necessary to be able to assess the magnitude of the doses involved. Three interrelated Safety Guides, prepared jointly by the IAEA and the International Labour Office (ILO), provide guidance on the application of the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards with respect to occupational exposure. Reference [3] gives general advice on the exposure conditions for which monitoring programmes should be set up to assess radiation doses arising from external radiation and from intakes of radionuclides by workers. More specific guidance on the assessment of doses from external sources of radiation can be found in Ref. [4] and the present Safety Guide deals with intakes of radioactive materials. Recommendations related to occupational radiation protection have also been developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [5]. These and other current recommendations of the ICRP [6] have been taken into account in preparing this Safety Guide. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance for regulatory authorities on conducting assessments of intakes of radioactive material arising from occupational exposure. This Guide will also be useful to those concerned with the planning, management and operation of occupational monitoring programmes, and to those involved in the design of equipment for use in internal dosimetry and workplace monitoring

  13. Assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposure due to radioactive materials can occur as a result of various human activities. These include work associated with the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, scientific research, agriculture and industry, and occupations which involve the handling of materials containing enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In order to control this exposure, it is necessary to be able to assess the magnitude of the doses involved. Three interrelated Safety Guides, prepared jointly by the IAEA and the International Labour Office (ILO), provide guidance on the application of the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards with respect to occupational exposure. Reference [3] gives general advice on the exposure conditions for which monitoring programmes should be set up to assess radiation doses arising from external radiation and from intakes of radionuclides by workers. More specific guidance on the assessment of doses from external sources of radiation can be found in Ref. [4] and the present Safety Guide deals with intakes of radioactive materials. Recommendations related to occupational radiation protection have also been developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [5]. These and other current recommendations of the ICRP [6] have been taken into account in preparing this Safety Guide. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance for regulatory authorities on conducting assessments of intakes of radioactive material arising from occupational exposure. This Guide will also be useful to those concerned with the planning, management and operation of occupational monitoring programmes, and to those involved in the design of equipment for use in internal dosimetry and workplace monitoring

  14. Assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure due to radioactive materials can occur as a result of various human activities. These include work associated with the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, scientific research, agriculture and industry, and occupations which involve the handling of materials containing enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In order to control this exposure, it is necessary to be able to assess the magnitude of the doses involved. Three interrelated Safety Guides, prepared jointly by the IAEA and the International Labour Office (ILO), provide guidance on the application of the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards with respect to occupational exposure. Reference [3] gives general advice on the exposure conditions for which monitoring programmes should be set up to assess radiation doses arising from external radiation and from intakes of radionuclides by workers. More specific guidance on the assessment of doses from external sources of radiation can be found in Ref. [4] and the present Safety Guide deals with intakes of radioactive materials. Recommendations related to occupational radiation protection have also been developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [5]. These and other current recommendations of the ICRP [6] have been taken into account in preparing this Safety Guide. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance for regulatory authorities on conducting assessments of intakes of radioactive material arising from occupational exposure. This Guide will also be useful to those concerned with the planning, management and operation of occupational monitoring programmes, and to those involved in the design of equipment for use in internal dosimetry and workplace monitoring

  15. Assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure due to radioactive materials can occur as a result of various human activities. These include work associated with the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, scientific research, agriculture and industry, and occupations which involve the handling of materials containing enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In order to control this exposure, it is necessary to be able to assess the magnitude of the doses involved. Three interrelated Safety Guides, prepared jointly by the IAEA and the International Labour Office (ILO), provide guidance on the application of the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards with respect to occupational exposure. Reference [3] gives general advice on the exposure conditions for which monitoring programmes should be set up to assess radiation doses arising from external radiation and from intakes of radionuclides by workers. More specific guidance on the assessment of doses from external sources of radiation can be found in Ref. [4] and the present Safety Guide deals with intakes of radioactive materials. Recommendations related to occupational radiation protection have also been developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [5]. These and other current recommendations of the ICRP [6] have been taken into account in preparing this Safety Guide. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance for regulatory authorities on conducting assessments of intakes of radioactive material arising from occupational exposure. This Guide will also be useful to those concerned with the planning, management and operation of occupational monitoring programmes, and to those involved in the design of equipment for use in internal dosimetry and workplace monitoring

  16. Safety issues of botanicals and botanical preparations in functional foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroes, R.; Walker, R.

    2004-01-01

    Although botanicals have played a role in the marketing of health products for ages, there is an increased interest today due to their perceived health benefits. Not only do consumers increasingly take charge of their health, but the scientific information and understanding of the beneficial health effects of bioactive substances in food, functional foods and food supplements have improved. Increasing use of these products has also led to concerns about their actual safety. Recorded cases of intoxications have triggered such concerns. The safety assessment of these substances is complicated by, amongst others, the variability of composition. Furthermore, consumption of such functional products is expected to produce physiological effects, which may lead to low margins of safety as the margin between exposure of such products and the safe level of intake are likely to be small. The safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations in food and food supplement should at least involve: - the characterisation and quality of the material, its quality control; - the intended use and consequent exposure; - history of use and exposure; - product comparison(s); - toxicological information gathering; - Risk characterisation/safety assessment; As a guidance tool, a decision tree approach is proposed to assist in determining the extent of data requirements based on the nature of the such product. This guidance tool in safety assessment was developed by an expert group of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), European Branch, and is currently in press. In this paper a summarised version of this tool is presented

  17. Perspective channel-type reactor with enhanced safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Grozdov, I.I.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Petrov, A.A.; Rozhdestvensky, M.I.; Cherkashov, Yu.M.

    1994-01-01

    Following the search for new design solutions to develop within the framework of channel trends the reactor with enhanced safety the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering has developed the design of the multiloop boiling water reactor (MKER). The MKER enhanced safety is attained when involving the inherent safety features, passive safety systems as well as the accident consequences confinement devices. The design realizes several advantages which are typical of the channel-type reactors, namely: The design desintegration simplifying the manufacture, control, equipment delivery and decreasing, versus the pressure vessel reactors, the accident effect if it proceeds in an explosive manner; small operating reactivity margin and fuel burnup increased due to continuous refuelling; fuel cycle flexibility allowing comparatively easily to adopt the reactor to the conjuncture of the country fuel balance; multiloop circuit of the main coolant which reduces the degree and effect of the accidents connected with the equipment and pipings rupture; monitoring of the channels and fuel assemblies leak-tightness. (orig.)

  18. ALWR - regulatory stabilization through simplicity, margin, and improved safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vine, G.; Gray, S.

    1989-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) program is discussed with respect to the following topics: fundamental acceptance criteria for the ALWR; program approach; utility steering committee technical guidance; safety principles; utility requirements document; design bases; generic safety issue resolution; reactor accidents prevention and mitigation; and programmatic plans

  19. Methods and Effects of Safety Enhancement in Korean PSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Gab; Park, Jong Woon

    2009-01-01

    Periodic Safety Review (PSR) is a comprehensive study on a nuclear power plant safety, taking into account aspects such as operational history, ageing, safety analyses and advances in code and standards since the time of construction. In Korea, PSRs have been performed for 20 units and have been effectively used to obtain an overall view of actual plant safety to determine reasonable and practical modifications that should be made in order to obtain a higher level of safety approaching that of modern plants. Among many safety enhancements achieved from Korean PSRs, new safety analyses are the important methods to confirm plant safety by increasing safety margin for specific safety issues. Methods and effects of safety enhancements applied in Korean PSRs are reviewed in this paper in light of new safety analyses to obtain additional safety margins

  20. Reactor safety research - results and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaschik, M.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed so far is an essential contribution to the determination of the safety margins of nuclear facilities and their systems and to the further development of safety engineering. The further development of safety engineering involves a shift of emphasis in reactor safety research towards event sequences beyond the design basis. The aim of this shift in emphasis is the further development of the preventive level. This is based on the fact that the conservative design of the operating and safety systems involves and essential safety potential. The R and D work is intended to help develop accident management measures and to take the plant back into the safe state even after severe accidents. In this context, it is necessary to make full use of the safety margins of the plant and to include the operating systems for coping with accidents. As a result of the aims, the research work approaches operating and plant-specific processes. (orig./DG) [de

  1. American National Standard: for safety in conducting subcritical neutron-multiplication measurements in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This standard provides safety guidance for conducting subcritical neutron-multiplication measurements where physical protection of personnel against the consequences of a criticality accident is not provided. The objectives of in-situ measurements are either to confirm an adequate safety margin or to improve an estimate of such a margin. The first objective may constitute a test of the criticality safety of a design that is based on calculations. The second may effect improved operating conditions by reducing the uncertainty of safety margins and providing guidance to new designs

  2. Uncertainty Margin of Void Packet Determination for Ultrasonic Test in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungchan; Sung, Jejung; Lee, Jongchan; Kim, Jonguk

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the uncertainty of the void packet determination is estimated and the conservatism is reviewed by comparing with realistic uncertainty of Heckle's uncertainty. The methodology of ISO GUM is fully applied to calculate uncertainty, combined uncertainty and effective degree of freedom. Here some results are achieved as below: Combined uncertainty(UT) : 4.98%, Combined uncertainty(Heckle) : 1.44%, Degree of freedom: 5 ∼ 15, Effective degree of freedom(UT): 24.11, Effective degree of freedom(Heckle): 28.54, K value of t-distribution(UT): 2.042, K value of t-distribution(Heckle): 2.04, The uncertainty of this study using UT is enough in the case of achieving conservatism when the void packet determination of the safety related system is determined. As result of this study, UT uncertainty is more conservative than the Heckle's realistic uncertainty. From these results, it is shown that UT method has the great safety margin in determining the void packet. In comparing UT uncertainty with realistic uncertainty, this study (UT) has the conservatism of more than 3.4 times. UT method is good method to determine the void packet of ECCS pipe and to achieve the safety margin. In a safety related system, a void packet determination is issued by US NRC through the Generic Letter 2008-01. In case of the safety function, ECCS, CSS, and RHR systems are affected by the void packet. The related study has been being carried out by KHNP since 2012. In this study, the void packet determination using a ultra sonic test method has been carried out in some sites. This paper shows the uncertainty of the method using the ultra sonic test. The key parameters are introduced and estimated. Specially, the measurement conservatism for NPP is introduced to show the uncertainty margin

  3. Uncertainty Margin of Void Packet Determination for Ultrasonic Test in NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seungchan; Sung, Jejung [Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Electricity Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jongchan; Kim, Jonguk [FNC Technology Co., LTD., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, the uncertainty of the void packet determination is estimated and the conservatism is reviewed by comparing with realistic uncertainty of Heckle's uncertainty. The methodology of ISO GUM is fully applied to calculate uncertainty, combined uncertainty and effective degree of freedom. Here some results are achieved as below: Combined uncertainty(UT) : 4.98%, Combined uncertainty(Heckle) : 1.44%, Degree of freedom: 5 ∼ 15, Effective degree of freedom(UT): 24.11, Effective degree of freedom(Heckle): 28.54, K value of t-distribution(UT): 2.042, K value of t-distribution(Heckle): 2.04, The uncertainty of this study using UT is enough in the case of achieving conservatism when the void packet determination of the safety related system is determined. As result of this study, UT uncertainty is more conservative than the Heckle's realistic uncertainty. From these results, it is shown that UT method has the great safety margin in determining the void packet. In comparing UT uncertainty with realistic uncertainty, this study (UT) has the conservatism of more than 3.4 times. UT method is good method to determine the void packet of ECCS pipe and to achieve the safety margin. In a safety related system, a void packet determination is issued by US NRC through the Generic Letter 2008-01. In case of the safety function, ECCS, CSS, and RHR systems are affected by the void packet. The related study has been being carried out by KHNP since 2012. In this study, the void packet determination using a ultra sonic test method has been carried out in some sites. This paper shows the uncertainty of the method using the ultra sonic test. The key parameters are introduced and estimated. Specially, the measurement conservatism for NPP is introduced to show the uncertainty margin.

  4. Preliminary safety evaluation for CSR1000 with passive safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pan; Gou, Junli; Shan, Jianqiang; Zhang, Bo; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The basic information of a Chinese SCWR concept CSR1000 is introduced. • An innovative passive safety system is proposed for CSR1000. • 6 Transients and 3 accidents are analysed with system code SCTRAN. • The passive safety systems greatly mitigate the consequences of these incidents. • The inherent safety of CSR1000 is enhanced. - Abstract: This paper describes the preliminary safety analysis of the Chinese Supercritical water cooled Reactor (CSR1000), which is proposed by Nuclear Power Institute of China (NPIC). The two-pass core design applied to CSR1000 decreases the fuel cladding temperature and flattens the power distribution of the core at normal operation condition. Each fuel assembly is made up of four sub-assemblies with downward-flow water rods, which is favorable to the core cooling during abnormal conditions due to the large water inventory of the water rods. Additionally, a passive safety system is proposed for CSR1000 to increase the safety reliability at abnormal conditions. In this paper, accidents of “pump seizure”, “loss of coolant flow accidents (LOFA)”, “core depressurization”, as well as some typical transients are analysed with code SCTRAN, which is a one-dimensional safety analysis code for SCWRs. The results indicate that the maximum cladding surface temperatures (MCST), which is the most important safety criterion, of the both passes in the mentioned incidents are all below the safety criterion by a large margin. The sensitivity analyses of the delay time of RCPs trip in “loss of offsite power” and the delay time of RMT actuation in “loss of coolant flowrate” were also included in this paper. The analyses have shown that the core design of CSR1000 is feasible and the proposed passive safety system is capable of mitigating the consequences of the selected abnormalities

  5. New engineering safety factors for Loviisa NPP core calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuopanportti, Jaakko; Saarinen, Simo; Lahtinen, Tuukka; Ekstroem, Karoliina [Fortum Power and Heat Ltd., Fortum (Finland)

    2017-09-15

    In Loviisa NPP, there are two limiting thermal margins called the enthalpy rise margin and the linear heat rate margin that are monitored during normal operation. Engineering safety factors are applied in determination of both of these factors. The factors take into account the effect of various manufacturing tolerances, impact of the irradiation and simulation uncertainties on the local heat rate and on the enthalpy of the coolant. The engineering factors were re-evaluated during 2015 and the factors were approved by the Finnish radiation and nuclear safety authority in 2016. The re-evaluation was performed by considering all of the identified phenomena that affect the local heat rate or the enthalpy of the coolant. This paper summarizes the work that was performed during the re-evaluation of the engineering safety factors and presents the results for each uncertainty component. The new engineering safety factors are 1.115 for the linear heat rate and 1.100 for the enthalpy rise margin when the old factors were 1.12 and 1.16, respectively. The new factors improve the fuel economy by about 1%.

  6. Guidelines for Safety Evaluation of a Potential for PWR Steam Generator Tube Failure due to Fluid elastic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Do, Kyu Sik; Sheen, Cheol [Nuclear System Evaluation Dept., Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    It was found that both SG tube rupture events occurred at North Anna Unit 1 in 1987 and at Mihama Unit 2 in 1991 were caused by a high cycle fatigue due to fluid elastic instability. Therefore, with regard to nuclear safety it is important to design the SG properly in a conservative manner so that the potential for SG U-tube failures due to fluid elastic instability can be minimized. This article provides guidelines for assessing the potential for SG U-tube damage due to fluid elastic instability. This article described guidelines for safety evaluation of a potential for PWR steam generator tube failure due to fluid elastic instability. The guidelines address the requirements for realistically performing the SG thermal-hydraulic analysis and the modal analysis of tubes as well as the criteria for conservatively determining the added mass, the damping ratio and the fluid elastic instability coefficient. The guidelines can be used to predict the potential SG tubes which are susceptible to failure due to fluid elastic instability at operating nuclear power plants and also to evaluate the safety and structural integrity of new SG designs at the licensing review stage. Failure of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator (SG) tube leads to a leakage of contaminated primary coolant to the secondary system, which has serious safety implications such as the potential for direct release of radioactive fission products to the environment and the loss of coolant. Excessive tube vibration excited by dynamic forces of internal or external fluid flow is called flow-induced vibration (FIV). Among the FIV mechanisms, the so-called fluid elastic instability of SG tubes in cross flow is the most important safety issue in the design of SGs because it may cause severe tube failure in a very short time.

  7. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program: Phase II program plan (FY 83-FY 84)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Cover, L.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Shieh, L.C.; Shukla, S.N.; Wells, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is an NRC-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its goal is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The analysis procedure is based upon a state-of-the-art evaluation of the current seismic analysis and design process and explicitly includes the uncertainties inherent in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. As currently planned, the SSMRP will be completed in September, 1984. This document presents the program plan for work to be done during the remainder of the program. In Phase I of the SSMRP, the necessary tools (both computer codes and data bases) for performing a detailed seismic risk analysis were identified and developed. Demonstration calculations were performed on the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. In the remainder of the program (Phase II) work will be concentrated on developing a simplified SSMRP methodology for routine probabilistic risk assessments, quantitative validation of the tools developed and application of the simplified methodology to a Boiling Water Reactor. (The Zion plant is a pressurized water reactor.) In addition, considerable effort will be devoted to making the codes and data bases easily accessible to the public

  8. Operational margin monitoring system for boiling water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutomi, S.; Takigawa, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-line operational margin monitoring system which has been developed for boiling water reactor power plants to improve safety, reliability, and quality of reactor operation. The system consists of a steady-state core status prediction module, a transient analysis module, a stability analysis module, and an evaluation and guidance module. This system quantitatively evaluates the thermal margin during abnormal transients as well as the stability margin, which cannot be evaluated by direct monitoring of the plant parameters, either for the current operational state or for a predicted operating state that may be brought about by the intended operation. This system also gives operator guidance as to appropriate or alternate operations when the operating state has or will become marginless

  9. Soil-structure interaction for transient loads due to safety relief valve discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, W.S.; Tsai, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    Dynamic responses of BWR Mark II containment structures subjected to axisymmetric transient pressure loadings due to simultaneous safety relief valve discharges were investigated using finite element analysis, including the soil-structure interaction effect. To properly consider the soil-structure interaction effect, a simplified lumped parameter foundation model and axisymmetric finite element foundation model with viscous boundary impedance are used. Analytical results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the simplified foundation model and to exhibit the dynamic response behavior of the structure as the transient loading frequency and the foundation rigidity vary. The impact of the dynamic structural response due to this type of loading on the equipment design is also discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Seismic margin reviews of nuclear power plants: Identification of important functions and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassinos, P.G.; Moore, D.L.; Amico, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The results from the review of the seven utility-sponsored seismic PRAs plus the Zion SSMRP have been used to develop some insights regarding the importance of various systems and functions to seismic margins. By taking this information and combining it with the fragility insights we can develop some functional/systemic screening guideline for margin studies. This screening approach will greatly reduce the scope of the analysis. It is possible only to come to conclusions regarding the importance of plant systems and safety functions for PWRs, for which six plants were studied. For PWRs, it is possible to categorize plant safety functions as belonging to one of two groups, one of which is important to the assessment of seismic margins and one of which is not. The important functional group involves only two functions that must be considered for estimating seismic margin. These two functions are shutting down the nuclear reaction and providing cooling to the reactor core in the time period immediately following the seismic event (that is, the injection phase or pre-residual heat removal time period). It is possible to reasonably estimate the seismic margin of the plant by performing a study only involving the analysis of the plant systems and structure which are required in order to perform the two functions. Such analysis must include an assessment of a complete set of seismic initiating events. (orig./HP)

  11. Influence of Crack Morphology on Leak Before Break Margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weilin Zang

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the deterministic LBB-margins for different pipe systems in a Swedish PWR-plant and using different crack morphology parameters. Results: - The influence of crack morphology on Leak Before Break (LBB) margins is studied. The subject of the report is a number of LBB-submittals to SKI where deterministic LBB-margins are reported. These submittals typically uses a surface roughness of 0.0762 mm (300 microinch) and number of turns equal to zero and an in-house code for the leak rate evaluations. The present report has shown that these conditions give the largest LBB-margins both in terms of the quotient between the critical crack length and the leakage crack size and for the leak rate margin. - Crack morphology parameters have a strong influence on the leak rate evaluations. Using the SQUIRT code and more recent recommendations for crack morphology parameters, it is shown that in many cases the evaluated margins, using 1 gpm as the reference leak rate detection limit, are below the safety factor of 2 on crack size and 10 on leak rate, which is generally required for LBB approval. - The effect of including weld residual stresses on the LBB margins is also investigated. It is shown that for the two examples studied, weld residual stresses were important for the small diameter thin wall pipe whereas it was negligible for the large diameter thick wall pipe which had a self-balanced weld residual stress distribution

  12. K-effective as a measure of criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venner, J.; Haley, R.M.; Bowden, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the relation between the neutron multiplication of a system, k-effective, and critical parameters. It aims to investigate whether k-effective is always the most appropriate measure of safety. For simple systems handbook data can be effectively utilized, applying a safety factor to critical masses. In such situations, the criticality safety margin is readily apparent. However, more complex systems may use the calculated value of neutron multiplication to assess the criticality safety of the system under investigation. A problem arises because there is no exact consistency between k-effective and the physical margin of subcriticality, in terms of parameters such as mass. In the UK, commonly accepted safety criteria are applied to limit the k-effective of the system being assessed. These margins of subcriticality have no definitive justification to support the values chosen and might be considered rather arbitrary in nature. This paper aims to answer this question of suitability by investigating the relation between k-effective and the physical critical parameters for a wide range of systems. It concludes that the safety criteria currently applied in the UK are valid, but some difference exists between safety factors applied to the mass of fissile material present and the corresponding value of k-effective. (author)

  13. Centrifugal Compressor Surge Margin Improved With Diffuser Hub Surface Air Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability is an important parameter in the design of compressors for aircraft gas turbine engines. Compression system instabilities can cause compressor surge, which may lead to the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. The margin of safety is typically referred to as "surge margin." Achieving the highest possible level of surge margin while meeting design point performance objectives is the goal of the compressor designer. However, performance goals often must be compromised in order to achieve adequate levels of surge margin. Techniques to improve surge margin will permit more aggressive compressor designs. Centrifugal compressor surge margin improvement was demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by injecting air into the vaned diffuser of a 4:1-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor. Tests were performed using injector nozzles located on the diffuser hub surface of a vane-island diffuser in the vaneless region between the impeller trailing edge and the diffuser-vane leading edge. The nozzle flow path and discharge shape were designed to produce an air stream that remained tangent to the hub surface as it traveled into the diffuser passage. Injector nozzles were located near the leading edge of 23 of the 24 diffuser vanes. One passage did not contain an injector so that instrumentation located in that passage would be preserved. Several orientations of the injected stream relative to the diffuser vane leading edge were tested over a range of injected flow rates. Only steady flow (nonpulsed) air injection was tested. At 100 percent of the design speed, a 15-percent improvement in the baseline surge margin was achieved with a nozzle orientation that produced a jet that was bisected by the diffuser vane leading edge. Other orientations also improved the baseline surge margin. Tests were conducted at speeds below the

  14. Development of Safety Review Guide for the Periodic Safety Review of Reactor Vessel Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeongsoon; Ko, Hanok; Kim, Seonjae; Jhung, Myungjo

    2013-01-01

    Aging management of the reactor vessel internals (RVIs) is one of the important issues for long-term operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Safety review on the assessment and management of the RVI aging is conducted through the process of a periodic safety review (PSR). The regulatory body should check that reactor facilities sustain safety functions in light of degradation due to aging and that the operator of a nuclear power reactor establishes and implements management program to deal with degradation due to aging in order to guarantee the safety functions and the safety margin as a result of PSR. KINS(Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) has utilized safety review guides (SRG) which provide guidance to KINS staffs in performing safety reviews in order to assure the quality and uniformity of staff safety reviews. The KINS SRGs for the continued operation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) published in 2006 contain areas of review regarding aging management of RVIs in chapter 2 (III.2.15, Appendix 2.0.1). However unlike the SRGs for the continued operation, KINS has not officially published the SRGs for the PSR of PWRs, but published them as a form of the research report. In addition to that, the report provides almost same review procedures for aging assessment and management of RVIs with the ones provided in the SRGs for the continued operation, it cannot provide review guidance specific to PSRs. Therefore, a PSR safety review guide should be developed for RVIs in PWRs. In this study, a draft PSR safety review guide for reactor vessel internals in PWRs is developed and provided. In this paper, a draft PSR safety review guide for reactor vessel internals (PSR SRG-RVIs) in PWRs is introduced and main contents of the draft are provided. However, since the PSR safety review guides for areas other than RVIs in the pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are expected to be developed in the near future, the draft PSR SRG-RVIs should be revisited to be compatible with

  15. Method for evaluation of risk due to seismic related design and construction errors based on past reactor experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Cuesta, M.; Okrent, D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for quantification of risk due to seismic related design and construction errors in nuclear power plants, based on information available on errors discovered in the past. For the purposes of this paper, an error is defined as any event that causes the seismic safety margins of a nuclear power plant to be smaller than implied by current regulatory requirements and industry common practice. Also, the actual reduction in the safety margins caused by the error will be called a deficiency. The method is based on a theoretical model of errors, called a deficiency logic diagram. First, an ultimate cause is present. This ultimate cause is consumated as a specific instance, called originating error. As originating errors may occur in actions to be applied a number of times, a deficiency generation system may be involved. Quality assurance activities will hopefully identify most of these deficiencies, requesting their disposition. However, the quality assurance program is not perfect and some operating plant deficiencies may persist, causing different levels of impact to the plant logic. The paper provides a way of extrapolating information about errors discovered in plants under construction in order to assess the risk due to errors that have not been discovered

  16. Seismic margin assessment of spanish nuclear power plants: a perspective from industry and regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Monge, Juan; Beltran, Francisco; Sanchez-Cabanero, Jose G.

    2001-01-01

    The worldwide experience with probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) of nuclear power plants shows that the risk derived from earthquakes can be a significant contributor to core damage frequency in some instances. As a consequence, no severe accident safety assessment can be considered complete without giving, due consideration to seismic risk. This fact has been recognized by some regulators. in particular, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), who has included seismic risk assessment in its severe accident policy. The NRC severe accident policy was adopted by the Spanish nuclear regulator. the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN). As a result. all plants in Spain were asked to perform a seismic risk analysis according to Supplements No. 4 and 5 of Generic Letter 88-20 and NUREG-1407, which included the containment failure analysis. At present in Spain there arc nine operating reactors at seven sites: six Westinghouse-PWR, two GE-BWR and one Siemens/KW U-PWR. The vintages are very different: the oldest plant started commercial operation in 1968 and the most recent, in 1988. In this framework, the Spanish Owners Group (SOG) proposed to CSN in 1994 to carry out the seismic risk analysis of the plants using seismic margin methodologies. This kind of methods requires, as a starting point, the definition of a seismic margin earthquake (SNIE), also called review level earthquake (RLL). For this purpose, tile SOG sponsored a general Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) for the seven Spanish sites. The results of this PSHA were used by the SOG to define tile RLE and the scope of the study for each plant (binning of plants). The proposal was submitted to the CSN for evaluation. The CSN evaluation was based on the NRC practical experience and was helped by the technical advise of US Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The review showed that the uncertainties on seismic hazard had not been fully captured and that it would have been justified to consider a

  17. Shutdown Safety in NEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluhak, Mario; Senegovic, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Industry performance analysis since 2004 has revealed that 23% of the events reported to WANO occurred during outage periods. Given the fact that a plant is in the outage only 5 percent of the time, this emphasizes the importance of shutdown safety and measures station staffs undertake to maintain effective barriers to safety margins during the outage. Back in 1990s, the industry adopted guidance to meet safety requirements by focusing on safety functions. Both WANO and INPO released various documents, reports and guidelines to help accomplish those requirements. However, in the last decade inadequate 'defence in depth' has led to several events affecting shutdown safety and challenging one of the most important nuclear safety principles: 'The special characteristics of nuclear technology are taken into account in all decisions and actions. Reactivity control, continuity of core cooling, and integrity of fission product barriers are valued as essential, distinguishing attributes of nuclear station work environment'. NEK has recognized the importance of 'defence in depth'Industry performance analysis since 2004 has revealed that 23% of the events reported to WANO occurred during outage periods. Given the fact that a plant is in the outage only 5 percent of the time, this emphasizes the importance of shutdown safety and measures station staffs undertake to maintain effective barriers to safety margins during the outage. Back in 1990s, the industry adopted guidance to meet safety requirements by focusing on safety functions. Both WANO and INPO released various documents, reports and guidelines to help accomplish those requirements. However, in the last decade inadequate 'defence in depth' has led to several events affecting shutdown safety and challenging one of the most important nuclear safety principles: 'The special characteristics of nuclear technology are taken into account in all decisions and actions. Reactivity

  18. 93-106, 2015 93 Multilevel random effect and marginal models

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multilevel random effect and marginal models for longitudinal data ... and random effect models that take the correlation among measurements of the same subject ... comparing the level of redness, pain and irritability ... clinical trial evaluating the safety profile of a new .... likelihood-based methods to compare models and.

  19. Biological impact of geometric uncertainties: what margin is needed for intra-hepatic tumors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Liu, Wen-Shan; Wu, Andrew; Mah, Dennis; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Hong, Linda; Yaparpalvi, Ravi; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the biological impact on different proposed margin recipes for the same geometric uncertainties for intra-hepatic tumors with different tumor cell types or clinical stages. Three different margin recipes based on tumor motion were applied to sixteen IMRT plans with a total of twenty two intra-hepatic tumors. One recipe used the full amplitude of motion measured from patients to generate margins. A second used 70% of the full amplitude of motion, while the third had no margin for motion. The biological effects of geometric uncertainty in these three situations were evaluated with Equivalent Uniform Doses (EUD) for various survival fractions at 2 Gy (SF 2 ). There was no significant difference in the biological impact between the full motion margin and the 70% motion margin. Also, there was no significant difference between different tumor cell types. When the margin for motion was eliminated, the difference of the biological impact was significant among different cell types due to geometric uncertainties. Elimination of the motion margin requires dose escalation to compensate for the biological dose reduction due to the geometric misses during treatment. Both patient-based margins of full motion and of 70% motion are sufficient to prevent serious dosimetric error. Clinical implementation of margin reduction should consider the tumor sensitivity to radiation

  20. Refining prices and margins in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favennec, J.P.; Baudoin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a business environment that was globally mediocre due primarily to the Asian crisis and to a mild winter in the northern hemisphere, the signs of improvement noted in the refining activity in 1996 were borne out in 1997. But the situation is not yet satisfactory in this sector: the low return on invested capital and the financing of environmental protection expenditure are giving cause for concern. In 1998, the drop in crude oil prices and the concomitant fall in petroleum product prices was ultimately rather favorable to margins. Two elements tended to put a damper on this relative optimism. First of all, margins continue to be extremely volatile and, secondly, the worsening of the economic and financial crisis observed during the summer made for a sharp decline in margins in all geographic regions, especially Asia

  1. Study on seismic design margin based upon inelastic shaking test of the piping and support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Takami; Eto, Kazutoshi; Ikeda, Kazutoyo; Yoshii, Toshiaki; Kondo, Masami; Tai, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, according to the revised Regulatory Guide for Aseismic Design of Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities, September 2006, criteria of design basis earthquakes of Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities become more severe. Then, evaluating seismic design margin took on a great importance and it has been profoundly discussed. Since seismic safety is one of the major key issues of nuclear power plant safety, it has been demonstrated that nuclear piping system possesses large safety margins by various durability test reports for piping in ultimate conditions. Though the knowledge of safety margin has been accumulated from these reports, there still remain some technical uncertainties about the phenomenon when both piping and support structures show inelastic behavior in extremely high seismic excitation level. In order to obtain the influences of inelastic behavior of the support structures to the whole piping system response when both piping and support structures show inelastic behavior, we examined seismic proving tests and we conducted simulation analyses for the piping system which focused on the inelastic behavior of the support to the whole piping system response. This paper introduces major results of the seismic shaking tests of the piping and support system and the simulation analyses of these tests. (author)

  2. Safety margin evaluation of pre-stressed concrete nuclear containment vessel model with BARC code ULCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, S.M.; Patnaik, R.; Ramanujam, S.; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Ultimate load capacity assessment of nuclear containments has been a thrust research area for Indian pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) power programme. For containment safety assessment of Indian PHWRs a finite element code ULCA was developed at BARC, Trombay. This code has been extensively benchmarked with experimental results and for prediction of safety margins of Indian PHWRs. The present paper highlights the analysis results for prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) tested at Sandia National Labs, USA in a round robin analysis activity co-sponsored by Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Japan and the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Three levels of failure pressure predictions namely the upper bound, the most probable and the lower bound (all with 90% confidence) were made as per the requirements of the round robin analysis activity. The most likely failure pressure is predicted to be in the range of 2.95 Pd to 3.15 Pd (Pd = design pressure of 0.39 MPa for the PCCV model) depending on the type of liners used in the construction of the PCCV model. The lower bound value of the ultimate pressure of 2.80 Pd and the upper bound of the ultimate pressure of 3.45 Pd are also predicted from the analysis. These limiting values depend on the assumptions of the analysis for simulating the concrete tendon interaction and the strain hardening characteristics of the steel members. The experimental test has been recently concluded at Sandia Laboratory and the peak pressure reached during the test is 3.3 Pd that is enveloped by our upper bound prediction of 3.45 Pd and is close to the predicted most likely pressure of 3.15 Pd

  3. Safety issues on advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, H.; Krebs, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    In the recent years a general discussion has started whether unsolved safety issues are related to advanced fuel. Advanced fuel is in this context a summary of features like high burnup, improved clad materials, low leakage loading pattern with high peaking factors etc. The design basis accidents RIA and Loca are of special interest for this discussion. From the Siemens point of view RIA is not a safety issue. There are sufficient margins between the enthalpy rise calculated by modern 3D methods and the fuel failures which occurred in RIA simulation tests when the effect of pulse width is taken into account. The evaluation of possible uncertainties for the established Loca criteria (17% equivalent corrosion, 1200 C clad temperature) for high burnup makes sense. But fuel with high burnup has significantly lower peaking factors than fuel with lower burnup. This gives sufficient margin counterbalancing possible uncertainties. In contrast to the above incomplete control rod insertion at higher burnup is potentially a real safety issue. Although Siemens fuel was not affected by the reported incidents they addressed the problem and checked that they have sufficient design margin for their fuel. (orig.) [de

  4. Evaluation of Thermal Margin Analysis Models for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyong Won; Kwon, Hyuk; Hwang, Dae Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Thermal margin of SMART would be analyzed by three different methods. The first method is subchannel analysis by MATRA-S code and it would be a reference data for the other two methods. The second method is an on-line few channel analysis by FAST code that would be integrated into SCOPS/SCOMS. The last one is a single channel module analysis by safety analysis. Several thermal margin analysis models for SMART reactor core by subchannel analysis were setup and tested. We adopted a strategy of single stage analysis for thermal analysis of SMART reactor core. The model should represent characteristics of the SMART reactor core including hot channel. The model should be simple as possible to be evaluated within reasonable time and cost

  5. Reactor system safety assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattson, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy of reactor safety is that design should follow established and conservative engineering practices, there should be safety margins in all modes of plant operation, special systems should be provided for accidents, and safety systems should have redundant components. This philosophy provides ''defense in depth.'' Additionally, the safety of nuclear power plants relies on ''safety systems'' to assure acceptable response to design basis events. Operating experience has shown the need to study plant response to more frequent upset conditions and to account for the influence of operators and non-safety systems on overall performance. Defense in depth is being supplemented by risk and reliability assessment

  6. Assessment of margins with respect to pressurized thermal shock for the 3 loop plants of the French program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalet, C.; Haussaire, P.; Houssin, B.; Vagner, J.

    1983-08-01

    Presentation of the FRAMATOME and EDF program on pressurized thermal shock which objectives are to demonstrate that present and older French reactor vessels have adequate safety margins and to provide recommendations of feasible plant specific modifications, both technically and economically. Phase I consists in a thorough analysis of pressure and temperature transients that the R.P.V. beltine could undergo during plant operations; phase II is the fracture mechanics analysis; phase III estimates the safety margins available during normal, upset, emergency and faulted conditions

  7. Determinants of banks’ net interest margins in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Rizdak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzes the main determinants of the net interest margin of banks operating in Central and Eastern European (CEE countries in the period from 1999 to 2010. The results reveal several main drivers of net interest margins in the CEE. Prior to 2008 the net interest margins declined primarily due to strong capital inflows and stable macroeconomic environment. In the crisis period, significant rise in government debt accompanied by the increase in macroeconomic risks and abating capital inflows were pushing margins up while other factors such as low credit demand, higher capitalization and significantly increased share of non-performing loans pressured banks’ margins down. The results also confirm the important contribution of higher efficiency to lowering banks’ margins.

  8. The integrated code system CASCADE-3D for advanced core design and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufert, A.; Van de Velde, A.

    1999-01-01

    The new program system CASCADE-3D (Core Analysis and Safety Codes for Advanced Design Evaluation) links some of Siemens advanced code packages for in-core fuel management and accident analysis: SAV95, PANBOX/COBRA and RELAP5. Consequently by using CASCADE-3D the potential of modern fuel assemblies and in-core fuel management strategies can be much better utilized because safety margins which had been reduced due to conservative methods are now predicted more accurately. By this innovative code system the customers can now take full advantage of the recent progress in fuel assembly design and in-core fuel management.(author)

  9. Development of Audit Calculation Methodology for RIA Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joosuk; Kim, Gwanyoung; Woo, Swengwoong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The interim criteria contain more stringent limits than previous ones. For example, pellet-to-cladding mechanical interaction(PCMI) was introduced as a new failure criteria. And both short-term (e.g. fuel-to coolant interaction, rod burst) and long-term(e.g., fuel rod ballooning, flow blockage) phenomena should be addressed for core coolability assurance. For dose calculations, transient-induced fission gas release has to be accounted additionally. Traditionally, the approved RIA analysis methodologies for licensing application are developed based on conservative approach. But newly introduced safety criteria tend to reduce the margins to the criteria. Thereby, licensees are trying to improve the margins by utilizing a less conservative approach. In this situation, to cope with this trend, a new audit calculation methodology needs to be developed. In this paper, the new methodology, which is currently under developing in KINS, was introduced. For the development of audit calculation methodology of RIA safety analysis based on the realistic evaluation approach, preliminary calculation by utilizing the best estimate code has been done on the initial core of APR1400. Followings are main conclusions. - With the assumption of single full-strength control rod ejection in HZP condition, rod failure due to PCMI is not predicted. - And coolability can be assured in view of entalphy and fuel melting. - But, rod failure due to DNBR is expected, and there is possibility of fuel failure at the rated power conditions also.

  10. Fuel safety criteria and review by OECD / CSNI task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Doesburg, W.

    1999-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: with the advent of advanced fuel and core designs, and the implementation of more accurate (best estimate or statistical) design and analysis methods, there is a general feeling that safety margins have been or are being reduced. Historically, fuel safety margins were defined by adding conservatism to the safety limits, which in turn were also fixed in a conservative manner, here, the expression 'conservatism' expresses the fact that bounding or limiting numbers were chosen for model parameters, plant and fuel design data, and fuel operating history values. Unfortunately, as these conservatisms were not quantified (or quantifiable), the amount of safety available or the reduction thereof is difficult to substantiate. For the regulator, it is important to know the margin available with the utilities' request for approval of new fuel or methods; likewise, for the utility and vendor it is important to know what margins exist and what they are based on, to identify in which direction they can make further progress and optimize fuel and fuel cycle cost. Naturally, each party involved will have to decide on how much margin should be in place, to establish operational criteria and ensure that these can actually be met during operation. To assess the margins issue, safety criteria themselves need to be reviewed first. Most - if not all - of the currently existing safety criteria were established during the 60's and early 70's, and verified against experiments with fuel available at that time - mostly at zero exposure. Of course, verification was performed as designs progressed in later years, primarily with the aim to be able to prove that safety criteria were adequate as long as the said conservatisms would be retained, and not with the aim to reestablish limits. The mandate to the OECD/CSNI/PWG2 Task Force on Fuel Safety Criteria (TFFSC) is to assess the adequacy of existing fuel safety criteria, in view of the 'new design' elements (new

  11. Due diligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghera, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act requires that every employer shall ensure the health and safety of workers in the workplace. Issues regarding the practices at workplaces and how they should reflect the standards of due diligence were discussed. Due diligence was described as being the need for employers to identify hazards in the workplace and to take active steps to prevent workers from potentially dangerous incidents. The paper discussed various aspects of due diligence including policy, training, procedures, measurement and enforcement. The consequences of contravening the OHS Act were also described

  12. Study on structural seismic margin and probabilistic seismic risk. Development of a structural capacity-seismic risk diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Masato; Ohtori, Yasuki; Hirata, Kazuta

    2010-01-01

    Seismic margin is extremely important index and information when we evaluate and account seismic safety of critical structures, systems and components quantitatively. Therefore, it is required that electric power companies evaluate the seismic margin of each plant in back-check of nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic margin of structures is usually defined as a structural capacity margin corresponding to design earthquake ground motion. However, there is little agreement as to the definition of the seismic margin and we have no knowledge about a relationship between the seismic margin and seismic risk (annual failure probability) which is obtained in PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment). The purpose of this report is to discuss a definition of structural seismic margin and to develop a diagram which can identify a relation between seismic margin and seismic risk. The main results of this paper are described as follows: (1) We develop seismic margin which is defined based on the fact that intensity of earthquake ground motion is more appropriate than the conventional definition (i.e., the response-based seismic margin) for the following reasons: -seismic margin based on earthquake ground motion is invariant where different typed structures are considered, -stakeholders can understand the seismic margin based on the earthquake ground motion better than the response-based one. (2) The developed seismic margin-risk diagram facilitates us to judge easily whether we need to perform detailed probabilistic risk analysis or only deterministic analysis, given that the reference risk level although information on the uncertainty parameter beta is not obtained. (3) We have performed numerical simulations based on the developed method for four sites in Japan. The structural capacity-risk diagram differs depending on each location because the diagram is greatly influenced by seismic hazard information for a target site. Furthermore, the required structural capacity

  13. Safety in conducting subcritical neutron-multiplication measurements in situ (Revision of N16.3-1969) - approved 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The standard provides safety guidance for conducting subcritical neutron-multiplication measurements where physical protection of personnel against the consequences of a criticality accident is not provided. The objectives of in situ measurements are either to confirm an adequate safety margin or to improve an estimate of such a margin. The first objective may constitute a test of the criticality safety of a design that is based on calculations. The second may effect improved operating conditions by reducing the uncertainty of safety margins and providing guidance to new designs

  14. High temperature reactor safety and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Charles, J.

    1975-01-01

    High-temperature reactors are endowed with favorable safety and environmental factors resulting from inherent design, main-component safety margins, and conventional safety systems. The combination of such characteristics, along with high yields, prove in addition, that such reactors are plagued with few problems, can be installed near users, and broaden the recourse to specific power, therefore fitting well within a natural environment [fr

  15. Aviation safety and maintenance under major organizational changes, investigating non-existing accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ivonne A; Nordskag, Arve O; Myhre, Grete; Halvorsen, Kåre

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the following questions: Do concurrent organizational changes have a direct impact on aviation maintenance and safety, if so, how can this be measured? These questions were part of the investigation carried out by the Accident Investigation Board, Norway (AIBN). The AIBN investigated whether Norwegian aviation safety had been affected due to major organizational changes between 2000 and 2004. The main concern was the reduction in safety margins and its consequences. This paper presents a summary of the techniques used and explains how they were applied in three airlines and by two offshore helicopter operators. The paper also discusses the development of safety related indicators in the aviation industry. In addition, there is a summary of the lessons learned and safety recommendations. The Norwegian Ministry of Transport has required all players in the aviation industry to follow up the findings and recommendations of the AIBN study.

  16. Removing unreasonable conservatisms in DOE safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BISHOP, G.E.

    1999-01-01

    While nuclear safety analyses must always be conservative, invoking excessive conservatisms does not provide additional margins of safety. Rather, beyond a fairly narrow point, conservatisms skew a facility's true safety envelope by exaggerating risks and creating unreasonable bounds on what is required for safety. The conservatism has itself become unreasonable. A thorough review of the assumptions and methodologies contained in a facility's safety analysis can provide substantial reward, reducing both construction and operational costs without compromising actual safety

  17. Effect of Margin Designs on the Marginal Adaptation of Zirconia Copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Syed Rashid; Al Ajmi, Mohammed Ginan; Al Dhafyan, Mohammed; Jomah, Abdulrehman; Abualsaud, Haytham; Almashali, Mazen

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of Shoulder versus Chamfer margin design on the marginal adaptation of zirconia (Zr) copings. 40 extracted molar teeth were mounted in resin and prepared for zirconia crowns with two margin preparation designs (20=Shoulder and 20=Chamfer). The copings were manufactured by Cercon® (DeguDent GmbH, Germany) using the CAD/CAM system for each tooth. They were tried on each tooth, cemented, thermocycled, re-embedded in resin and were subsequently cross sectioned centrally into two equal mesial and distal halves. They were examined under electron microscope at 200 X magnification and the measurements were recorded at 5 predetermined points in micrometers (µm). The o verall mean marginal gap for the two groups was found to be 206.98+42.78µm with Shoulder margin design (Marginal Gap=199.50+40.72µm) having better adaptation compared to Chamfer (Marginal Gap=214.46+44.85µm). The independent-samples t-test showed a statistically non-significant difference (p=.113) between the means of marginal gap for Shoulder and Chamfer margin designs and the measurements were recorded at 5 predetermined points for the two groups. The Chamfer margin design appeared to offer the same adaptation results as the Shoulder margin design.

  18. An integrated software system for core design and safety analyses: Cascade-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan De Velde, A.; Finnemann, H.; Hahn, T.; Merk, S.

    1999-01-01

    The new Siemens program system CASCADE-3D (Core Analysis and Safety Codes for Advanced Design Evaluation) links some of the most advanced code packages for in-core fuel management and accident analysis: SAV95, PANBOX/COBRA and RELAP5. Consequently by using CASCADE-3D the potential of modern fuel assemblies and in-core fuel management strategies can be much better utilized because safety margins which had been reduced due to conservative methods are now predicted more accurately. By this innovative code system the customers can now take full advantage of the recent progress in fuel assembly design and in-core fuel management. (authors)

  19. Univariate decision tree induction using maximum margin classification

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, Olcay Taner

    2012-01-01

    In many pattern recognition applications, first decision trees are used due to their simplicity and easily interpretable nature. In this paper, we propose a new decision tree learning algorithm called univariate margin tree where, for each continuous attribute, the best split is found using convex optimization. Our simulation results on 47 data sets show that the novel margin tree classifier performs at least as good as C4.5 and linear discriminant tree (LDT) with a similar time complexity. F...

  20. Evaluation of reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-04-15

    Although the operation of nuclear reactors has a remarkably good record of safety, the prevention of possible reactor accidents is one of the major factors that atomic planners have to contend with. At the same time, excessive caution may breed an attitude that hampers progress, either by resisting new development or by demanding unnecessarily elaborate and expensive precautions out of proportion to the actual hazards involved. The best course obviously is to determine the possible dangers and adopt adequate measures for their prevention, providing of course, for a reasonable margin of error in judging the hazards and the effectiveness of the measures. The greater the expert understanding and thoroughness with which this is done, the narrower need the margin be. This is the basic idea behind the evaluation of reactor safety

  1. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  2. An approximate marginal logistic distribution for the analysis of longitudinal ordinal data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooraee, Nazanin; Abegaz, Fentaw; Ormel, Johan; Wit, Ernst; van den Heuvel, Edwin R

    Subject-specific and marginal models have been developed for the analysis of longitudinal ordinal data. Subject-specific models often lack a population-average interpretation of the model parameters due to the conditional formulation of random intercepts and slopes. Marginal models frequently lack

  3. The operator's role and safety functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, W.R.; Finnicum, D.J.; Hubbard, F.R.; Musick, C.R.; Walzer, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear power plant can be thought of as a single system with two major subsystems: equipment and people. Both play important roles in nuclear safety. Whereas, in the past, the role of equipment had been emphasized in nuclear safety, the accident at Three Mile Island and its subsequent investigations point out the vital role of the operator. This paper outlines the operator's roles in nuclear safety and suggests how the concept of safety functions can be used to reduce economic losses and increase safety margins. (auth)

  4. Additional safety assessment of ITER - Addition safety investigation of the INB ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This assessment aims at re-assessing safety margins in the light of events which occurred in Fukushima Daiichi, i.e. extreme natural events challenging the safety of installations. After a presentation of some characteristics of the ITER installation (location, activities, buildings, premise detritiation systems, electric supply, handling means, radioactive materials, chemical products, nuclear risks, specific risks), the report addresses the installation robustness by identifying cliff-edge effect risks which can be related to a loss of confinement of radioactive materials, explosions, a significant increase of exposure level, a possible effect on water sheets, and so on. The next part addresses the various aspects related to a seismic risk: installation sizing (assessment methodology, seismic risk characterization in Cadarache), sizing protection measures, installation compliance, and margin assessment. External flooding is the next addressed risk: installation sizing with respect to this specific risk, protection measures, installation compliance, margin assessment, and studied additional measures. Other extreme natural phenomena are considered (meteorological conditions, earthquake and flood) which may have effects on other installations (dam, canal). Then, the report addresses technical risks like the loss of electric supplies and cooling systems, the way a crisis is managed in terms of technical and human means and organization in different typical accidental cases. Subcontracting practices are also discussed. A synthesis proposes an overview of this additional safety assessment and discusses the impact which could have additional measures which could be implemented

  5. Confinement margins for ignition and driven operation in Iter Eda ID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, J.

    1995-09-01

    Preliminary calculations for ITER EDA ID have been performed using the 1/2D thermal equilibrium code HELIOS. It is found that: - The maximum ignition margin for ITER ID (29%) is 6% less than for ITER OD (35%) and 5% less than for ITER CDA (34%). - Decreasing the ration τ * He /τ E from the nominal value 10 to a value of 5 gives a 12% gain in the maximum ignition margin. Increasing the ration from 10 to 15 causes a 22% loss in the margin. Furthermore, ignited equilibria non longer exist for τ * He /τ E ≥ 17.6. - Operation in driven mode with 50 MW of external power increases the confinement capability by 13%. With 100 MW, the improvement is 24%. - Lowering the fusion power from 1500 to 1000 MW slightly improves the maximum ignition margin (+5%) and allows operation below the Greenwald density limit. - A 10% reduction of the toroidal magnetic field with a correlative diminution of the plasma current for constant safety factor operation, causes a dramatic reduction (-18%) of the maximum ignition margin. - A fraction of neon of 0.68% would completely suppress the ignition margin. Furthermore, ignited equilibria, with the nominal fusion power and τ * He /τ E , no longer exist when the neon fraction exceeds 0.75%. (Author). 2 refs., 10 figs

  6. The stability margin on EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Ping, Qian; Bao-Nian, Wan; Biao, Shen; Bing-Jia, Xiao; Walker, M.L.; Humphreys, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) is the first full superconducting tokamak with a D-shaped cross-sectional plasma presently in operation. Its poloidal coils are relatively far from the plasma due to the necessary thermal isolation from the superconducting magnets, which leads to relatively weaker coupling between plasma and poloidal field. This may cause more difficulties in controlling the vertical instability by using the poloidal coils. The measured growth rates of vertical stability are compared with theoretical calculations, based on a rigid plasma model. Poloidal beta and internal inductance are varied to investigate their effects on the stability margin by changing the values of parameters α n and γ n (Howl et al 1992 Phys. Fluids B 4 1724), with plasma shape fixed to be a configuration with k = 1.9 and δ = 0.5. A number of ways of studying the stability margin are investigated. Among them, changing the values of parameters κ and l i is shown to be the most effective way to increase the stability margin. Finally, a guideline of stability margin M s (κ, l i , A) to a new discharge scenario showing whether plasmas can be stabilized is also presented in this paper

  7. History of aviation safety; the satisfying sighs of relief due to developments in Aviation safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, J.A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    ”Aviation safety is an Integral part of my career. Being part of TU Delft’s impressive record of research on Aviation safety, my career has been with a sense of purpose and a responsibility to equip students to deal with the status quo challenges on Aviation safety, developments, Investigations and

  8. Analysis of addition of the safety rods at RSG-GAS core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S, Tukiran; S, Tagor Malem; K, Iman

    2002-01-01

    The silicide fuel loading of the RSG-GAS core is planned to increase from 250 gU to 300 gU. Increasing of fuel loading will prolong the operation cycle length from 25 days to 32,5 days, but ability of reactivity compensation by control rods system decreased because the reactivity shut-down margin is available only 1,03 %, expectation is 2.2 %. One of solutions is added two safety control rods in B-3 and G-10 positions the aim of installing two safety rods (BKP) in RSG-GAS core is to increase core safety margin. So before using the safety control rods in the RSG-GAS core, it is necessary to know its performance, one of the tests showing its performance is to measure the reactivity of the safety control rods. Measurement of safety control rods were done to know each reactivity worth of safety control rods at middle cycle so that the safety rod be used in the RSG-GAS core. Measurement done by using calibration control rods with couple compensation method which always using in the RSG-GAS core to measure the existing control rods. The results of measurement showed that two safety rods (BKP01 and BKP02) have reactivity worth of 93.5 cent and 87.5 cent, respectively. the total reactivity worth of safety control rods is 1.38%. So the two safety rods can be used to increase safety margin of the RSG-GAS core if the fuel is exchanged to 300 gU of loading

  9. Thermal hydraulic And RSG-Gas Core Reactivity Characteristics Due To Cold Water Insertion Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastuti, Endiah Puji; Suparlina, Lily; Tukiran

    2000-01-01

    Under normal operating condition,the primary coolant is circulated by 2 out of the 3 primary coolant pumps. Unnecessary operation of the reserve pump would result in a temperatur decrease of the primary coolant by less than 5 o C. the corresponding increase of reactivity amounts to Δρ ≤0,1 %. The analysis was done using silicide core configuration data with 3.55 gU /cm 3 fuel loading. The calculation model was done with and without automatic control rod. The calculation results for the worst case condition, shows that reactor reached the maximum power 28.52 MW at 81.1 seconds, after the accident occurred. The maximal fuel element, cladding and outlet coolant temperatures are 148.3 o C,142.1 o C, and 75.7 o C, respectively. Safety margins for DNBR and flow instability reached 1.25 and 4.20, respectively. Comparing to the RSG-GAS safety margin at transient condition reguirement >1.48, RSG-GAS has enough safety margin if the power trip executed at 114% of 25 MW

  10. Nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the main safety aspects of the French nuclear energy programme and of the general safety organization is followed by a discussion on the current thinking in CEA on some important safety issues. As far as methodology is concerned, the use of probabilistic analysis in the licensing procedure is being extensively developed. Reactor safety research is aimed at a better knowledge of the safety margins involved in the present designs of both PWRs and LMFBRs. A greater emphasis should be put during the next years in the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle installations, including waste disposals. Finally, it is suggested that further international cooperation in the field of nuclear safety should be developed in order to insure for all countries the very high safety level which has been achieved up till now. (author)

  11. Veblen effect, marginal utility of money, and money illusion

    OpenAIRE

    Malakhov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    The paper discovers microeconomic mechanism of Veblen effect as well as of Giffen case as results of the negative marginal utility of money. The marginal utility of consumption also becomes negative. The total consumption-leisure utility is increased due to the increase in leisure time. This overall effect results in the phenomenon of money illusion on the macroeconomic level. This general effect has deep historical and institutional grounds and, in order to minimize its disequilibrium econom...

  12. Safety related experience in FFTF startup and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.E.; Halverson, T.G.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1982-06-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor operating at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Richland, Washington, to conduct fuels and materials testing in support of the US LMFBR program. Startup and initial power ascension testing of the facility involved a comprehensive series of readiness reviews and acceptance tests, many of which relate to the inherent safety of the plant. Included are physics measurements, natural circulation, integrated containment leakage, shielding effectiveness, fuel failure detection, and plant protection system tests. Described are the measurements taken to confirm the design safety margins upon which the operating authorization of the plant was based. These measurements demonstrate that large margins of safety are available in the FFTF design

  13. Quantifying reactor safety margins: Part 1: An overview of the code scaling, applicability, and uncertainty evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.; Duffey, R.B.; Griffith, P.

    1988-01-01

    In August 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved the final version of a revised rule on the acceptance of emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) entitled ''Emergency Core Cooling System; Revisions to Acceptance Criteria.'' The revised rule states an alternate ECCS performance analysis, based on best-estimate methods, may be used to provide more realistic estimates of plant safety margins, provided the licensee quantifies the uncertainty of the estimates and included that uncertainty when comparing the calculated results with prescribed acceptance limits. To support the revised ECCS rule, the NRC and its contractors and consultants have developed and demonstrated a method called the Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) evaluation methodology. It is an auditable, traceable, and practical method for combining quantitative analyses and expert opinions to arrive at computed values of uncertainty. This paper provides an overview of the CSAU evaluation methodology and its application to a postulated cold-leg, large-break loss-of-coolant accident in a Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactor with 17 /times/ 17 fuel. The code selected for this demonstration of the CSAU methodology was TRAC-PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Plant/site selection and data collection (Project I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Project I of Phase I of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) comprised two parts: the selection of a representative nuclear power plant/site for study in Phase I and the collection of data needed by the other SSMRP projects. Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was selected for the SSMRP Phase I studies. Unit 1 of the Zion plant has been validated as a good choice for the Phase I study plant. Although no single nuclear power plant can represent all such plants equally well, selection criteria were developed to maximize the generic implications of Phase I of the SSMRP. On the basis of the selection criteria, the Zion plant and its site were found to be reasonably representative of operating and future plants with regard to its nuclear steam supply system; the type of containment structure (prestressed concrete); its electrical capacity (1100 MWe); its location (the Midwest); the peak seismic acceleration used for design (0.17g); and the properties of the underlying soil (the low-strain shear-wave velocity is 1650 ft/s in a 50- to 100-ft-thick layer of soil overlying sedimentary bedrock). (author)

  15. Quantification of design margins and safety factors based on the prediction uncertainty in tritium production rate from fusion integral experiments of the USDOE/JAERI collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Konno, C.; Maekawa, F.; Ikeda, Y.; Kosako, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Mori, T.; Maekawa, H.

    1995-01-01

    Several fusion integral experiments were performed within a collaboration between the USA and Japan on fusion breeder neutronics aimed at verifying the prediction accuracy of key neutronics parameters in a fusion reactor blanket based on current neutron transport codes and basic nuclear databases. The focus has been on the tritium production rate (TRP) as an important design parameter to resolve the issue of tritium self-sufficiency in a fusion reactor. In this paper, the calculational and experimental uncertainties (errors) in local TPR in each experiment performed i were interpolated and propagated to estimate the prediction uncertainty u i in the line-integrated TPR and its standard deviation σ i . The measured data are based on Li-glass and NE213 detectors. From the quantities u i and σ i , normalized density functions (NDFs) were constructed, considering all the experiments and their associated analyses performed independently by the UCLA and JAERI. Several statistical parameters were derived, including the mean prediction uncertainties u and the possible spread ±σ u around them. Design margins and safety factors were derived from these NDFs. Distinction was made between the results obtained by UCLA and JAERI and between calculational results based on the discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods. The prediction uncertainties, their standard deviations and the design margins and safety factors were derived for the line-integrated TPR from Li-6 T 6 , and Li-7 T 7 . These parameters were used to estimate the corresponding uncertainties and safety factor for the line-integrated TPR from natural lithium T n . (orig.)

  16. Matthew and marginality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis C. Duling

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores marginality theory as it was first proposed in  the social sciences, that is related to persons caught between two competing cultures (Park; Stonequist, and, then, as it was developed in sociology as related to the poor (Germani and in anthropology as it was related to involuntary marginality and voluntary marginality (Victor Turner. It then examines a (normative scheme' in antiquity that creates involuntary marginality at the macrosocial level, namely, Lenski's social stratification model in an agrarian society, and indicates how Matthean language might fit with a sample inventory  of socioreligious roles. Next, it examines some (normative schemes' in  antiquity for voluntary margi-nality at the microsocial level, namely, groups, and examines how the Matthean gospel would fit based on indications of factions and leaders. The article ,shows that the author of the Gospel of Matthew has an ideology of (voluntary marginality', but his gospel includes some hope for (involuntary  marginals' in  the  real world, though it is somewhat tempered. It also suggests that the writer of the Gospel is a (marginal man', especially in the sense defined by the early theorists (Park; Stone-quist.

  17. Jules Horowitz reactor - Complementary safety assessment in the light of the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This CSA (Complementary Safety Assessment) analyses the robustness of the Jules Horowitz reactor (RJH) to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident and proposes a series of improvements. RJH is being built on the Cadarache CEA's site. Robustness is the ability for the facility to withstand events beyond the level for which the facility was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accident sequence (cliff edge effect). Safety is not only a matter of design or of engineered systems, it is also a matter of organization. So issues like RJH's crisis organization, the organization of radiation protection, and work organization via subcontracting are also taken into consideration. This report is divided into 9 main chapters: 1) main features of the RJH facility, 2) identification of cliff edge risks and of equipment essential for safety, 3) earthquake risk, 4) flood risk, 5) risks due to other extreme natural disasters, 6) the loss of electrical power supplies and of cooling systems, 7) management of severe accidents, 8) subcontracting policy, 9) synthesis and list of improvements. This study shows a globally good robustness of the RJH for the considered risks. Nevertheless it can considered relevant to increase the robustness of the plant on a few points: -) to increase the seismic safety margins of some pieces of equipment, -) to increase the robustness of the internal electrical power supplies, -) to increase the fuel cooling capacity, and -) to improve the management of the post-accidental period. (A.C.)

  18. Safety system function trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes research to develop risk-based indicators of plant safety performance. One measure of the safety-performance of operating nuclear power plants is the unavailability of important safety systems. Brookhaven National Laboratory and Science Applications International Corporation are evaluating ways to aggregate train-level or component-level data to provide such an indicator. This type of indicator would respond to changes in plant safety margins faster than the currently used indicator of safety system unavailability (i.e., safety system failures reported in licensee event reports). Trends in the proposed indicator would be one indication of trends in plant safety performance and maintenance effectiveness. This paper summarizes the basis for such an indicator, identifies technical issues to be resolved, and illustrates the potential usefullness of such indicators by means of computer simulations and case studies

  19. Generic analyses for evaluation of low Charpy upper-shelf energy effects on safety margins against fracture of reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    Appendix G to 10 CFR Part 50 requires that reactor pressure vessel beltline material maintain Charpy upper-shelf energies of no less than 50 ft-lb during the plant operating life, unless it is demonstrated in a manner approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), that lower values of Charpy upper-shelf energy provide margins of safety against fracture equivalent to those in Appendix G to Section XI of the ASME Code. Analyses based on acceptance criteria and analysis methods adopted in the ASME Code Case N-512 are described herein. Additional information on material properties was provided by the NRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Materials Engineering Branch. These cases, specified by the NRC, represent generic applications to boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor vessels. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 140

  20. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    fuels as well as the applied methodologies. The IRSN proceeds in a relevant and independent assessment of the submitted safety reports. To achieve this goal and maintain over time an independent and relevant assessment capability, the IRSN relies on the excellence of its experts and on state of art techniques and knowledge. The IRSN contributes by its work in key area to cutting edge research and development in order to drive nuclear industry towards making the best use of scientific and technological progress for improving safety, environmental protection and health. To maintain at all times the state of the art knowledge and the operational expertise necessary to deal efficiently with major nuclear accident consequences, the IRSN carries out, on the one hand, its own research and development programs to gain accurate knowledge on still unknown phenomena for safety analysis. On the other hand, the IRSN works out its own scientific calculation methodologies involving industrial calculation chain. Concerning more particularly the 'two-phase flows' thematic, The ISRN must correctly simulate the primary fluid behavior in the reactor in normal operation as well as in accidental situations, to estimate if, in such situations, the core reactor state is fully safe and any safety risk is undergone The research and development programs launched at the ISRN on two-phase flows gather work on advanced thermohydraulic configurations encounter in various reactor states (normal operation or accidental situations), in particular: (i)The estimation of the margin to the critical heat flux in normal operation (DNBR), (ii) The pressurized thermal shock, which is due to mechanical important constraints in the reactor vessel resulting from the injection of a cold fluid in case of emergency cooling (PTS), (iii) The reactivity insertion accident (RIA), (iv) The loss of coolant accident (LOCA), (vi) The accidents in spent-fuel pools and (vii) The severe accident, which could lead to core

  1. Thermal margin model for transition core of KSNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahm, Kee Yil; Lim, Jong Seon; Park, Sung Kew; Chun, Chong Kuk; Hwang, Sun Tack

    2004-01-01

    The PLUS7 fuel was developed with mixing vane grids for KSNP. For the transition core partly loaded with the PLUS7 fuels, the procedure to set up the optimum thermal margin model of the transition core was suggested by introducing AOPM concept into the screening method which determines the limiting assembly. According to the procedure, the optimum thermal margin model of the first transition core was set up by using a part of nuclear data for the first transition and the homogeneous core with PLUS7 fuels. The generic thermal margin model of PLUS7 fuel was generated with the AOPM of 138%. The overpower penalties on the first transition core were calculated to be 1.0 and 0.98 on the limiting assembly and the generic thermal margin model, respectively. It is not usual case to impose the overpower penalty on reload cores. It is considered that the lack of channel flow due to the difference of pressure drop between PLUS7 and STD fuels results in the decrease of DNBR. The AOPM of the first transition core is evaluated to be about 135% by using the optimum generic thermal margin model which involves the generic thermal margin model and the total overpower penalty. The STD fuel is not included among limiting assembly candidates in the second transition core, because they have much lower pin power than PLUS7 fuels. The reduced number of STD fuels near the limiting assembly candidates the flow from the limiting assembly to increase the thermal margin for the second transition core. It is expected that cycle specific overpower penalties increase the thermal margin for the transition core. Using the procedure to set up the optimum thermal margin model makes sure that the enhanced thermal margin of PLUS7 fuel can be sufficiently applied to not only the homogeneous core but also the transition core

  2. US nuclear safety. Review and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanauer, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with the evolution of reactor safety principles, design bases, regulatory requirements, and experience in the United States. Safety concerns have evolved over the years, from reactivity transients and shut-down systems, to blowdowns and containment, to severe design basis accidents and mitigating systems, to the performance of actual materials, systems and humans. The primary safety concerns of one epoch have been superseded in considerable measure by those of later times. Successive plateaus of technical understanding are achieved by solutions being found to earlier problems. Design studies, research, operating experience and regulatory imperatives all contribute to the increased understanding and thus to the safety improvements adopted and accepted. The improvement of safety with time, and the ability of existing reactors to operate safely in the face of new concerns, has confirmed the correctness and usefulness of the defence-in-depth approach and safety margins used in safety design in the United States of America. A regulatory programme such as the one in the United States justifies its great cost by its important contributions to safety. Yet only the designers, constructors and operators of nuclear power plants can actually achieve public safety. The regulatory programme audits, assesses and spot-checks the actual work. Since neither materials nor human beings are flawless, mistakes will be made; that is why defence-in-depth and safety margins are provided. The regulatory programme should enhance safety by decreasing the frequency of uncorrected mistakes. Maintenance of public safety also requires technical and managerial competence and attention in the organizations responsible for nuclear plants as well as regulatory organizations. (author)

  3. Testing for marginal linear effects in quantile regression

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Huixia Judy

    2017-10-23

    The paper develops a new marginal testing procedure to detect significant predictors that are associated with the conditional quantiles of a scalar response. The idea is to fit the marginal quantile regression on each predictor one at a time, and then to base the test on the t-statistics that are associated with the most predictive predictors. A resampling method is devised to calibrate this test statistic, which has non-regular limiting behaviour due to the selection of the most predictive variables. Asymptotic validity of the procedure is established in a general quantile regression setting in which the marginal quantile regression models can be misspecified. Even though a fixed dimension is assumed to derive the asymptotic results, the test proposed is applicable and computationally feasible for large dimensional predictors. The method is more flexible than existing marginal screening test methods based on mean regression and has the added advantage of being robust against outliers in the response. The approach is illustrated by using an application to a human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance data set.

  4. Testing for marginal linear effects in quantile regression

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Huixia Judy; McKeague, Ian W.; Qian, Min

    2017-01-01

    The paper develops a new marginal testing procedure to detect significant predictors that are associated with the conditional quantiles of a scalar response. The idea is to fit the marginal quantile regression on each predictor one at a time, and then to base the test on the t-statistics that are associated with the most predictive predictors. A resampling method is devised to calibrate this test statistic, which has non-regular limiting behaviour due to the selection of the most predictive variables. Asymptotic validity of the procedure is established in a general quantile regression setting in which the marginal quantile regression models can be misspecified. Even though a fixed dimension is assumed to derive the asymptotic results, the test proposed is applicable and computationally feasible for large dimensional predictors. The method is more flexible than existing marginal screening test methods based on mean regression and has the added advantage of being robust against outliers in the response. The approach is illustrated by using an application to a human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance data set.

  5. Risk evaluation method for faults by engineering approach. (2) Application concept of margin analysis utilizing accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Masanobu; Kanaida, Syuuji; Kamiya, Kouichi; Sato, Kunihiko; Kuroiwa, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the fault displacement on the facility should to be evaluated not only by the activity of the fault but also by obtaining risk information by considering scenarios including such as the frequency and the degree of the hazard, which should be an appropriate approach for nuclear safety. An applicable concept of margin analysis utilizing accident sequences for evaluating the influence of the fault displacement is proposed. By use of this analysis, we can evaluate of the safety functions and margin for core damage, verify the efficiency of equipment of portable type and make a decision to take additional measures to reduce the risk by using obtained risk information. (author)

  6. Volcanic passive margins: another way to break up continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, L; Burov, E B; Werner, P

    2015-10-07

    Two major types of passive margins are recognized, i.e. volcanic and non-volcanic, without proposing distinctive mechanisms for their formation. Volcanic passive margins are associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic, and represent distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces, in which regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere. In contrast with non-volcanic margins, continentward-dipping detachment faults accommodate crustal necking at both conjugate volcanic margins. These faults root on a two-layer deformed ductile crust that appears to be partly of igneous nature. This lower crust is exhumed up to the bottom of the syn-extension extrusives at the outer parts of the margin. Our numerical modelling suggests that strengthening of deep continental crust during early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere away from a central continental block, which becomes thinner with time due to the flow-induced mechanical erosion acting at its base. Crustal-scale faults dipping continentward are rooted over this flowing material, thus isolating micro-continents within the future oceanic domain. Pure-shear type deformation affects the bulk lithosphere at VPMs until continental breakup, and the geometry of the margin is closely related to the dynamics of an active and melting mantle.

  7. Additional safety assessment of common means or support of the Marcoule centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This report first presents some characteristics of the Marcoule centre: location and environment, base nuclear installations and other installations, technical installations and installations classified for protection of the environment which could affect the safety of nearby installations, demographic and industrial environment and risks generated for the site's installations, general description of crisis management means. The second part addresses situations to be considered, functional needs related to additional safety assessments, needs in terms of support functions, and critical structures and equipment. The next parts address the seismic risk (structure and equipment sizing, margin assessment, flooding due to an earthquake, loss of electric supply due to an earthquake), the flooding risk (flooding sources, main alarm measures, structure and equipment sizing and availability for crisis management during a flooding from different origins), other extreme phenomena (lightning, hail, wind, external fire), the loss of electric supplies and the loss of cooling systems, the organisation of accident management, and subcontracting practices

  8. Analysis and study on core power capability with margin method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tongxian; Wu Lei; Yu Yingrui; Zhou Jinman

    2015-01-01

    Core power capability analysis focuses on the power distribution control of reactor within the given mode of operation, for the purpose of defining the allowed normal operating space so that Condition Ⅰ maneuvering flexibility is maintained and Condition Ⅱ occurrences are adequately protected by the reactor protection system. For the traditional core power capability analysis methods, such as synthesis method or advanced three dimension method, usually calculate the key safety parameters of the power distribution, and then verify that these parameters meet the design criteria. For PWR with on-line power distribution monitoring system, core power capability analysis calculates the most power level which just meets the design criteria. On the base of 3D FAC method of Westinghouse, the calculation model of core power capability analysis with margin method is introduced to provide reference for engineers. The core power capability analysis of specific burnup of Sanmen NPP is performed with the margin method. The results demonstrate the rationality of the margin method. The calculation model of the margin method not only helps engineers to master the core power capability analysis for AP1000, but also provides reference for engineers for core power capability analysis of other PWR with on-line power distribution monitoring system. (authors)

  9. Assessment of the safety of Ulchin nuclear power plant in the event of tsunami using parametric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kang, Keum Seok

    2011-01-01

    Previous evaluations of the safety of the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant in the event of a tsunami have the shortcoming of uncertainty of the tsunami sources. To address this uncertainty, maximum and minimum wave heights at the intake of Ulchin NPP have been estimated through a parametric study, and then assessment of the safety margin for the intake has been carried out. From the simulation results for the Ulchin NPP site, it can be seen that the coefficient of eddy viscosity considerably affects wave height at the inside of the breakwater. In addition, assessment of the safety margin shows that almost all of the intake water pumps have a safety margin over 2 m, and Ulchin NPP site seems to be safe in the event of a tsunami according to this parametric study, although parts of the CWPs rarely have a margin for the minimum wave height

  10. Data Analysis Approaches for the Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization Toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelli, Diego; Alfonsi, Andrea; Maljovec, Daniel P.; Parisi, Carlo; Cogliati, Joshua J.; Talbot, Paul W.; Smith, Curtis L.; Rabiti, Cristian; Picoco, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, several numerical simulation codes have been employed to simulate accident dynamics (e.g., RELAP5-3D, RELAP-7, MELCOR, MAAP). In order to evaluate the impact of uncertainties into accident dynamics, several stochastic methodologies have been coupled with these codes. These stochastic methods range from classical Monte-Carlo and Latin Hypercube sampling to stochastic polynomial methods. Similar approaches have been introduced into the risk and safety community where stochastic methods (such as RAVEN, ADAPT, MCDET, ADS) have been coupled with safety analysis codes in order to evaluate the safety impact of timing and sequencing of events. These approaches are usually called Dynamic PRA or simulation-based PRA methods. These uncertainties and safety methods usually generate a large number of simulation runs (database storage may be on the order of gigabytes or higher). The scope of this paper is to present a broad overview of methods and algorithms that can be used to analyze and extract information from large data sets containing time dependent data. In this context, ''extracting information'' means constructing input-output correlations, finding commonalities, and identifying outliers. Some of the algorithms presented here have been developed or are under development within the RAVEN statistical framework.

  11. Data Analysis Approaches for the Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Parisi, Carlo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Picoco, Claudia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    In the past decades, several numerical simulation codes have been employed to simulate accident dynamics (e.g., RELAP5-3D, RELAP-7, MELCOR, MAAP). In order to evaluate the impact of uncertainties into accident dynamics, several stochastic methodologies have been coupled with these codes. These stochastic methods range from classical Monte-Carlo and Latin Hypercube sampling to stochastic polynomial methods. Similar approaches have been introduced into the risk and safety community where stochastic methods (such as RAVEN, ADAPT, MCDET, ADS) have been coupled with safety analysis codes in order to evaluate the safety impact of timing and sequencing of events. These approaches are usually called Dynamic PRA or simulation-based PRA methods. These uncertainties and safety methods usually generate a large number of simulation runs (database storage may be on the order of gigabytes or higher). The scope of this paper is to present a broad overview of methods and algorithms that can be used to analyze and extract information from large data sets containing time dependent data. In this context, “extracting information” means constructing input-output correlations, finding commonalities, and identifying outliers. Some of the algorithms presented here have been developed or are under development within the RAVEN statistical framework.

  12. Geophysical constraints on geodynamical processes at convergent margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Shulgin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Convergent margins, being the boundaries between colliding lithospheric plates, form the most disastrous areas in the world due to intensive, strong seismicity and volcanism. We review global geophysical data in order to illustrate the effects of the plate tectonic processes at convergent margins......, at least, one of the plates is oceanic. However, the oldest oceanic plate in the Pacific ocean has the smallest convergence rate. (2) The presence of an oceanic plate is, in general, required for generation of high-magnitude (M>8.0) earthquakes and for generating intermediate and deep seismicity along...... to shallow mantle levels....

  13. A quantitative evaluation of seismic margin of typical sodium piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Masaki

    1999-05-01

    It is widely recognized that the current seismic design methods for piping involve a large amount of safety margin. From this viewpoint, a series of seismic analyses and evaluations with various design codes were made on typical LMFBR main sodium piping systems. Actual capability against seismic loads were also estimated on the piping systems. Margins contained in the current codes were quantified based on these results, and potential benefits and impacts to the piping seismic design were assessed on possible mitigation of the current code allowables. From the study, the following points were clarified; 1) A combination of inelastic time history analysis and true (without margin)strength capability allows several to twenty times as large seismic load compared with the allowable load with the current methods. 2) The new rule of the ASME is relatively compatible with the results of inelastic analysis evaluation. Hence, this new rule might be a goal for the mitigation of seismic design rule. 3) With this mitigation, seismic design accommodation such as equipping with a large number of seismic supports may become unnecessary. (author)

  14. Evaluation of thermal margin during BWR neutron flux oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Yutaka; Takigawa, Yukio; Chuman, Kazuto; Ebata, Shigeo

    1992-01-01

    Fuel integrity is very important, from the view point of nuclear power plant safety. Recently, neutron flux oscillations were observed at several BWR plants. The present paper describes the evaluations of the thermal margin during BWR neutron flux oscillations, using a three-dimensional transient code. The thermal margin is evaluated as MCPR (minimum critical power ratio). The LaSalle-2 event was simulated and the MCPR during the event was evaluated. It was a core-wide oscillation, at which a large neutron flux oscillation amplitude was observed. The results indicate that the MCPR had a sufficient margin with regard to the design limit. A regional oscillation mode, which is different from a core-wide oscillation, was simulated and the MCPR response was compared with that for the LaSalle-2 event. The MCPR decrement is greater in the regional oscillation, than in the core wide -oscillation, because of the sensitivity difference in a flow-to-power gain. A study was carried out about regional oscillation detectability, from the MCPR response view point. Even in a hypothetically severe case, the regional oscillation is detectable by LPRM signals. (author)

  15. Reactor safety research - visible demonstrations and credible computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenstein, W B; Divakaruni, S M

    1985-11-01

    EPRI has been conducting nuclear safety research for a number of years with the primary goal of assuring the safety and reliability of the nuclear plants. The visibility is emphasized by sponsoring or participating in large scale test demonstrations to credibly support the complex computations that are the basis for quantification of safety margins. Recognizing the success of the airline industry in receiving favorable public perception, the authors compare the design and operation practices of the airline industry with those of the nuclear industry practices to identify the elements contributing to public concerns and unfavorable perceptions. In this paper, authors emphasize the importance of proper communications of research results to the public in a manner that non-specialists understand. Further, EPRI supported research and results in the areas of source term, seismic and structural engineering research, analysis using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), quantification of safety margins, digital technology development and implementation, and plant transient and performance evaluations are discussed in the paper. (orig./HP).

  16. Reactor safety research - visible demonstrations and credible computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.; Divakaruni, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    EPRI has been conducting nuclear safety research for a number of years with the primary goal of assuring the safety and reliability of the nuclear plants. The visibility is emphasized by sponsoring or participating in large scale test demonstrations to credibly support the complex computations that are the basis for quantification of safety margins. Recognizing the success of the airline industry in receiving favorable public perception, the authors compare the design and operation practices of the airline industry with those of the nuclear industry practices to identify the elements contributing to public concerns and unfavorable perceptions. In this paper, authors emphasize the importance of proper communications of research results to the public in a manner that non-specialists understand. Further, EPRI supported research and results in the areas of source term, seismic and structural engineering research, analysis using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), quantification of safety margins, digital technology development and implementation, and plant transient and performance evaluations are discussed in the paper. (orig./HP)

  17. A procedure for safety assessment of components with cracks - Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.; Bergman, M.; Brickstad, B.; Dahlberg, L.; Nilsson, F.; Sattari-Far, I.

    1996-01-01

    In this handbook a procedure is described which can be used both for assessment of detected cracks or crack like defects or for defect tolerance analysis. The procedure can be used to calculate possible crack growth due to fatigue or stress corrosion and to calculate the reserve margin for failure due to fracture and plastic collapse. For ductile materials, the procedure gives the reserve margin for initiation of stable crack growth. Thus, an extra reserve margin, unknown to size, exists for failure in components made of ductile materials. The procedure was developed for operative use with the following objectives in mind: The procedure should be able to handle both linear and non-linear problems without any a priori division; The procedure shall ensure uniqueness of the safety assessment; The procedure should be well defined and easy to use; The conservatism of the procedure should be well validated; The handbook that documents the procedure should be so complete that for most assessments access to any other fracture mechanics literature should not be necessary. The method utilized is based on the R6-method developed at Nuclear Electric plc. This method can in principle be used for all metallic materials. It is, however, more extensively verified for steel alloys only. The method is not intended for use in temperatures where creep deformation is of importance. The first edition of the handbook was released in 1990 and the second in 1991. This third edition has been extensively revised. A Windows-based program (SACC) has been developed which can perform the assessments described in the book including calculation of crack growth due to stress corrosion and fatigue. 52 refs., 27 figs., 35 tabs

  18. Geophysical constraints on geodynamic processes at convergent margins: A global perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Shulgin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Convergent margins, being the boundaries between colliding lithospheric plates, form the most disastrous areas in the world due to intensive, strong seismicity and volcanism. We review global geophysical data in order to illustrate the effects of the plate tectonic processes at convergent margins on the crustal and upper mantle structure, seismicity, and geometry of subducting slab. We present global maps of free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies, heat flow, seismicity, seismic Vs anomalies in the upper mantle, and plate convergence rate, as well as 20 profiles across different convergent margins. A global analysis of these data for three types of convergent margins, formed by ocean-ocean, ocean-continent, and continent-continent collisions, allows us to recognize the following patterns. (1) Plate convergence rate depends on the type of convergent margins and it is significantly larger when, at least, one of the plates is oceanic. However, the oldest oceanic plate in the Pacific ocean has the smallest convergence rate. (2) The presence of an oceanic plate is, in general, required for generation of high-magnitude (M N 8.0) earthquakes and for generating intermediate and deep seismicity along the convergent margins. When oceanic slabs subduct beneath a continent, a gap in the seismogenic zone exists at depths between ca. 250 km and 500 km. Given that the seismogenic zone terminates at ca. 200 km depth in case of continent-continent collision, we propose oceanic origin of subducting slabs beneath the Zagros, the Pamir, and the Vrancea zone. (3) Dip angle of the subducting slab in continent-ocean collision does not correlate neither with the age of subducting oceanic slab, nor with the convergence rate. For ocean-ocean subduction, clear trends are recognized: steeply dipping slabs are characteristic of young subducting plates and of oceanic plates with high convergence rate, with slab rotation towards a near-vertical dip angle at depths below ca. 500 km at very high

  19. Marginal and happy? The need for uniqueness predicts the adjustment of marginal immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrosse, Régine; de la Sablonnière, Roxane; Rossignac-Milon, Maya

    2015-12-01

    Marginalization is often presented as the strategy associated with the worst adjustment for immigrants. This study identifies a critical variable that buffers marginal immigrants from the negative effects of marginalization on adjustment: The need for uniqueness. In three studies, we surveyed immigrants recruited on university campuses (n = 119, n = 116) and in the field (n = 61). Among marginal immigrants, a higher need for uniqueness predicted higher self-esteem (Study 1), affect (Study 2), and life satisfaction (Study 3), and marginally higher happiness (Study 2) and self-esteem (Study 3). No relationship between the need for uniqueness and adjustment was found among non-marginal immigrants. The adaptive value of the need for uniqueness for marginal immigrants is discussed. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  20. A Network Diffusion Model of Food Safety Scare Behavior considering Information Transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingqiang Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study constructs the network diffusion model of food safety scare behavior under the effect of information transparency and examines the network topology and evolution characteristics of food safety scare behavior in a numerical simulation. The main conclusions of this study are as follows. (1 Under the effect of information transparency, the network degree distribution of food safety scare behavior diffusion demonstrates the decreasing characteristics of diminishing margins. (2 Food safety scare behavior diffusion increases with the information dissemination rate and consumer concern about food safety incidents and shows the characteristics of monotone increasing. And with the increasing of the government food safety supervision information transparency and media food safety supervision information transparency, the whole is declining characteristic of diminishing marginal. In addition, the extinction of food safety scare behavior cannot be achieved gradually given a single regulation of government food safety supervision information transparency and media food safety supervision information transparency. (3 The interaction effects between improving government food safety supervision information transparency or media food safety supervision information transparency and declining consumer concerns about food safety incidents or information transmission rate can engender the suppression of food safety scare behavior diffusion.

  1. Inquiry relating to safety due to modification of usage of nuclear fuel material (establishment of waste safety testing facility) in Tokai Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Application was made to the director of the Science and Technology Agency (STA) for the license relating to the modification of usage of nuclear fuel material (the establishment of waste safety testing facility) from the director of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on November 30, 1978. After passing through the safety evaluation in the Nuclear Safety Bureau of STA, inquiry was conducted to the head of the Atomic Energy Safety Commission (AESC) on June 6, 1979, from the director of the STA. The head of AESC directed to conduct the safety examination to the head of the Nuclear Fuel Safety Examination Specialist Committee on June 7, 1979. The content of the modification of usage of nuclear fuel material is the establishment of waste safety testing facility to study and test the safety relating to the treatment and disposal of high level radioactive liquid wastes due to the reprocessing of spent fuel. As for the results of the safety examination, the siting of the waste safety testing facility which is located in the Tokai Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and the test plan of the glass solidification of high level radioactive liquid are presented as the outline of the study plan. The building, main equipments including six cells, the isolation room and the glove box, the storage, and the disposal facilities for gas, liquid and solid wastes are explained as the outline of the facilities. Concerning the items from the viewpoint of safety, aseismatic design, slightly vacuum operation, shielding, decay heat removal, fire protection, explosion protection, criticality management, radiation management and environmental effect were evaluated, and the safety was confirmed. (Nakai, Y.)

  2. Research for the safety of existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teschendorff, Victor; Bruna, Giovanni B.; Gelder, Pieter de

    2007-01-01

    The essential role of research for maintaining the high safety standard for the existing nuclear installations is outlined in the context of internationally agreed needs. The three co-authoring Technical Safety Organisations are committed to continued safety research, recognising operational experience and new technologies as the main driving forces. The safety margin concept is introduced and new trends in traditional and new areas of safety research are identified. The importance of a sufficient experimental infrastructure and international co-operation in sustainable networks is highlighted. (orig.)

  3. Sustainable food production in marginal lands—Case of GDLA member countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabbir A. Shahid

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable food production in the changing climate and dwindling water resources in the Global Dry Land Alliance (GDLA member countries is a real challenge, especially when considering marginal lands in dryland systems. The definition of marginal land is very vague and defined from different perspectives (pragmatism about marginal lands. Dryland itself indicates "marginality" due to water stress. In general, the abandoned agriculture land where food production is not economical, and has low inherent productivity potential is considered marginal; however, a land may be marginal for agriculture but vital for grazing. In this paper attempts have been made to give review of literature (water stress, extent of marginal saline lands, marginality. Policy matters (development of soil, water and agriculture strategies that GDLA and member countries should consider for future sustainable food production in their countries, including but not limited to, assessment of land resources for agriculture potential, defining, mapping and characterizing marginal lands, and use of innovative technologies (conservation agriculture, climate smart agriculture, integrated soil reclamation program and capacity building for food production, are discussed. The international perception (FAO, UNEP, CGIAR on marginal lands is also described. An innovative approach of using national biocapacity and ecological footprint is used to assess marginality of GDLA member countries. Ecological overshoot (using 1.5 earth planets and biocapacity debtor and creditor countries are highlighted. Challenges and best management practices for food production in marginal lands are included. Other important issues, like leasing land abroad, GDLA strategic food reserves and best management practices, innovative ideas for food production are shared. Finally recommendations are drafted for actions by GDLA, its member countries and the partners.

  4. Safety-I, Safety-II and Resilience Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Mary; Deutsch, Ellen S

    2015-12-01

    In the quest to continually improve the health care delivered to patients, it is important to understand "what went wrong," also known as Safety-I, when there are undesired outcomes, but it is also important to understand, and optimize "what went right," also known as Safety-II. The difference between Safety-I and Safety-II are philosophical as well as pragmatic. Improving health care delivery involves understanding that health care delivery is a complex adaptive system; components of that system impact, and are impacted by, the actions of other components of the system. Challenges to optimal care include regular, irregular and unexampled threats. This article addresses the dangers of brittleness and miscalibration, as well as the value of adaptive capacity and margin. These qualities can, respectively, detract from or contribute to the emergence of organizational resilience. Resilience is characterized by the ability to monitor, react, anticipate, and learn. Finally, this article celebrates the importance of humans, who make use of system capabilities and proactively mitigate the effects of system limitations to contribute to successful outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. International conference on topical issues in nuclear installation safety: Continuous improvement of nuclear safety in a changing world. Book of contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Papers presented at this conference where devoted to the following NPP safety related topical issues: Changing environments - coping with diversity and globalisation; Operating experience - managing changes effectively; Regulatory management systems - adapting to changes in the environment; Long term operations - maintaining safety margins while extending plant lifetime.

  6. Introduction of the Amendment of IAEA Safety Requirements Reflected Lessons Learned from Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang-Kyu; Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Sun-Hae; Cheong, Jae-Hak [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    for the design basis for the installation and their associated uncertainties; consideration of hazards due to surface faulting and flooding; monitoring of hazards and periodic review of site specific hazards; strengthening the prevention of unacceptable radiological consequences to the public and the environment; preventing severe accident through strengthening the plant design basis, including strengthening the independence of level four of defense in- depth, consideration of external hazards and sufficient margins; periodic safety review; emergency preparedness; feedback of operating experience. The following examples of the IAEA requirements to mitigate the consequences of DECs are: role of the government and the regulatory body for emergency preparedness and response, strengthening severe accident mitigation measures; well defined and updated accident management program.

  7. Considerations about an administrative ''margin of prognosis''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tettinger, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    The investigation is concerned with the limitations of certain judicial concepts, and the descretion of the appropriate administrative authorities to interpret them, especially in the area of necessary precautionary measures with regard to nuclear power plants safety. Thereby the question arises, whether by interpreting undefined judicial concepts (such as ''the status of science and technology'', e.g. section 1 sub-section 2, number 3 of the Atomic Energy Law), administrative authorities should be given a flexible margin of judgement which could not be examined, by the administrative courts, especially in view of risk analysis and risk assessments. Diverging opinions in legal literature and the administration of justice will be presented and critically analyzed. The author argues for an integral administrative procedure. Controlling the licensing of nuclear power plants, which - if need be - should only be limited by a ''plausibility control'' in cases where several security-safety related technical solutions appear acceptable. (WBI) [de

  8. Safety design of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yu; Zhang Lian; Du Shenghua; Zhao Jiayu

    1984-01-01

    Safety issues have been greatly emphasized through the design of the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant. Reasonable safety margine has been taken into account in the plant design parameters, the design incorporated various safeguard systems, such as engineering safety feature systems, safety protection systems and the features to resist natural catastrophes, e. g. earthquake, hurricanes, tide and so on. Preliminary safety analysis and environmental effect assessment have been done and anti-accident provisions and emergency policy were carefully considered. Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant safety related systems are designed in accordance with the common international standards established in the late 70's, as well as the existing engineering standard of China

  9. Barriers to Education for the Marginalized Adult Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Sarah; Brown, Jason; Johnson, Andrew; Rodger, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examines barriers to adult education by the marginalized adult learner. We adopted an inclusive approach by interviewing potential adult learners who had not participated in adult education programs due to illiteracy. Five overlapping themes related to barriers emerged and were categorized as: family values and…

  10. Transient safety performance of the PRISM innovative liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, P.M.; Dubberley, A.E.; Rhow, S.K.; Wu, T.

    1988-01-01

    The PRISM sodium-cooled reactor concept utilizes passive safety characteristics and modularity to increase performance margins, improve licensability, reduce owner's risk and reduce costs. The relatively small size of each reactor module (471 MWt) facilitates the use of passive self-shutdown and shutdown heat removal features, which permit design simplification and reduction of safety-related systems. Key to the transient performance is the inherent negative reactivity feedback characteristics of the core design resulting from the use of metal (U-Pu-Zr) swing, and very low control rod runout worth. Selected beyond design basis events relying only on these core design features are analyzed and the design margins summarized to demonstrate the advancement in reactor safety achieved with the PRISM design concept

  11. Model-Based Systems Engineering Approach to Managing Mass Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung H.; Bayer, Todd J.; Cole, Bjorn; Cooke, Brian; Dekens, Frank; Delp, Christopher; Lam, Doris

    2012-01-01

    When designing a flight system from concept through implementation, one of the fundamental systems engineering tasks ismanaging the mass margin and a mass equipment list (MEL) of the flight system. While generating a MEL and computing a mass margin is conceptually a trivial task, maintaining consistent and correct MELs and mass margins can be challenging due to the current practices of maintaining duplicate information in various forms, such as diagrams and tables, and in various media, such as files and emails. We have overcome this challenge through a model-based systems engineering (MBSE) approach within which we allow only a single-source-of-truth. In this paper we describe the modeling patternsused to capture the single-source-of-truth and the views that have been developed for the Europa Habitability Mission (EHM) project, a mission concept study, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  12. Advances made in French safety studies on pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelce, J.

    1979-01-01

    The programme of French safety studies on reactors is supposed to be known in its main outlines. A few recent results, obtained in different fields are presented. They concern the safety margins evaluation, the contamination transfer and the effect of external aggressions

  13. Use of response envelopes for seismic margin assessment of reinforced concrete walls and slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ile, Nicolas; Frau, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.frau@cea.fr

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Proposal of a method for application of the elliptical envelope to RC shell elements. • Proposal of new algorithms for the seismic margin evaluation for RC shell elements. • Verification of a RC wall 3D structure, using the proposed assessment approach. - Abstract: Seismic safety evaluations of existing nuclear facilities are usually based on the assumption of structural linearity. For the design basis earthquake (DBE), it is reasonable to apply a conventional evaluation of the seismic safety of building structures and carry out a linear elastic analysis to assess the load effects on structural elements. Estimating the seismic capacity of a structural element requires an estimation of the critical combination of responses acting in this structural element and compare this combination with the capacity of the element. By exploiting the response-spectrum-based procedure for predicting the response envelopes in linear structures formulated by Menun and Der Kiureghian (2000a), algorithms are developed for the seismic margin assessment of reinforced concrete shell finite elements. These algorithms facilitate the comparison of the response-spectrum-based envelopes to prescribed capacity surfaces for the purpose of assessing the safety margin of this kind of structures. The practical application of elliptical response envelopes in case of shell finite elements is based on the use of layer models such as those developed by Marti (1990), which transfer the generalized stress field to three layers under the assumption that the two outer layers carry membrane forces and the internal layer carries only the out-of-plane shears. The utility of the assessment approach is discussed with reference to a case study of a 3D structure made of reinforced concrete walls.

  14. Use of response envelopes for seismic margin assessment of reinforced concrete walls and slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ile, Nicolas; Frau, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposal of a method for application of the elliptical envelope to RC shell elements. • Proposal of new algorithms for the seismic margin evaluation for RC shell elements. • Verification of a RC wall 3D structure, using the proposed assessment approach. - Abstract: Seismic safety evaluations of existing nuclear facilities are usually based on the assumption of structural linearity. For the design basis earthquake (DBE), it is reasonable to apply a conventional evaluation of the seismic safety of building structures and carry out a linear elastic analysis to assess the load effects on structural elements. Estimating the seismic capacity of a structural element requires an estimation of the critical combination of responses acting in this structural element and compare this combination with the capacity of the element. By exploiting the response-spectrum-based procedure for predicting the response envelopes in linear structures formulated by Menun and Der Kiureghian (2000a), algorithms are developed for the seismic margin assessment of reinforced concrete shell finite elements. These algorithms facilitate the comparison of the response-spectrum-based envelopes to prescribed capacity surfaces for the purpose of assessing the safety margin of this kind of structures. The practical application of elliptical response envelopes in case of shell finite elements is based on the use of layer models such as those developed by Marti (1990), which transfer the generalized stress field to three layers under the assumption that the two outer layers carry membrane forces and the internal layer carries only the out-of-plane shears. The utility of the assessment approach is discussed with reference to a case study of a 3D structure made of reinforced concrete walls.

  15. Safety margin in irradiation of colorectal liver metastases: assessment of the control dose of micrometastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidensticker Max

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Micrometastases of colorectal liver metastases are present in up to 50% of lesions. In this study we sought to determine the threshold dose for local control of occult micrometastases in patients undergoing CT (computed tomography-guided brachytherapy of colorectal liver metastases. Materials and methods Nineteen patients demonstrated 34 local tumor recurrences originating from micrometastases after CT-guided brachytherapy of 27 colorectal liver metastases. We considered a local tumor recurrence as originating from a micrometastasis if tumor regrowth occurred adjacent to a formerly irradiated lesion and the distance of the 3D isocenter of the new lesion was ≤ 23.5 mm from the previous tumor margin. Follow-up MRI was fused with the planning-CT and dosimetry data. Two reviewers independently indicated the dose exposure at the isocenter of the micrometastases. Statistical analysis included an analysis of variance (ANOVA using backward selection. 95% tolerance intervals with coverage of 87.5 and 75% of the data of the normal distribution were calculated. Results The median distance of the micrometastases to the margin of the originating colorectal metastases was 8.75 mm (1-21 mm. Dose exposure at the isocenter was 12.25 Gy (7-19.8 in median. We stratified according to the distance from the isocenter to the initial tumor margin: ≤ 9 mm, > 9-15 mm and > 15 mm. The median dose in the according isocenters was 13.18, 11.6 and 11.85 Gy. The threshold dose failing to prevent micrometastasis growth was sigificantly higher in a subgroup of lesions with ≤ 9 mm distance as compared to > 15 mm (13.18 vs 11.85 Gy. Adjuvant chemotherapy correlated with greater distance of micrometastasis growth to the tumor but not with the threshold dose. Conclusion To prevent loss of local tumor control by continuous growth of micrometastases a threshold dose of 15,4 Gy (single fraction should be delivered at a distance of 21 mm to the gross tumor

  16. EPRI program in water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.; Gelhaus, F.; Gopalakrishnan, A.

    1975-01-01

    The basis for EPRI's water reactor safety program is twofold. First is compilation and development of fundamental background data necessary for quantified light-water reactor (LWR) safety assurance appraisals. Second is development of realistic and experimentally bench-marked analytical procedures. The results are expected either to confirm the safety margins in current operating parameters, and to identify overly conservative controls, or, in some cases, to provide a basis for improvements to further minimize uncertainties in expected performance. Achievement of these objectives requires the synthesis of related current and projected experimental-analytical projects toward establishment of an experimentally-based analysis for the assurance of safety for LWRs

  17. Path to development of quantitative safety goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.; Houghton, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    There is a growing interest in defining numerical safety goals for nuclear power plants as exemplified by an ACRS recommendation. This paper proposes a lower frequency limit of approximately 10 -4 /reactor-year for design basis events. Below this frequency, down, to a small frequency such as 10 -5 /reactor-year, safety margin can be provided by, say, site emergency plans. Accident sequences below 10 -5 should not impact public safety, but it is prudent that safety research programs examine sequences with significant consequences. Once tentatively agreed upon, quantitative safety goals together with associated implementation tools would be factored into regulatory and design processes

  18. The Accident Analysis Due to Reactivity Insertion of RSG GAS 3.55 g U/cc Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endiah Puji-Hastuti; Surbakti, Tukiran

    2004-01-01

    The fuels of RSG-GAS reactor was changed from uranium oxide with 250 g U of loading or 2.96 g U/cc of fuel loading to uranium silicide with the same loading. The silicide fuels can be used in higher density, staying longer in the reactor core and hence having a longer cycle length. The silicide fuel in RSG-GAS core was made up in step-wise by using mixed up core Firstly, it was used silicide fuel with 250 g U of loading and then, silicide fuel with 300 g U of loading (3.55 g U/cc of fuel loading). In every step-wise of fuel loading, it must be analyzed its safety margin. In this occasion, the reactivity accident of RSG-GAS core with 300 g U of silicide fuel loading is analyzed. The calculation was done using EUREKA-2/RR code available at P2TRR. The calculation was done by reactivity insertion at start up and power rangers. The worst case accident is transient due to control rod with drawl failure at start up by means of lowest initial power (0.1 W), either in power range. From all cases which have been done, the results of analysis showed that there is no anomaly and safety margin break at RSG-GAS core with 300 g U silicide fuel loading. (author)

  19. On the marginally relevant operator in z=2 Lifshitz holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holsheimer, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    We study holographic renormalization and RG flow in a strongly-coupled Lifshitz-type theory in 2+1 dimensions with dynamical exponent z=2. The bottom-up gravity dual we use is 3+1 dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to a massive vector field. This model contains a marginally relevant operator around the Lifshitz fixed point. We show how holographic renormalization works in the presence of this marginally relevant operator without the need to introduce explicitly cutoff-dependent counterterms. A simple closed-form expression is found for the renormalized on-shell action. We also discuss how asymptotically Lifshitz geometries flow to AdS in the interior due to the marginally relevant operator. We study the behavior of the renormalized entanglement entropy and confirm that it decreases monotonically along the Lifshitz-to-AdS RG flow

  20. EFFICIENT QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF JUMP PROCESSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR FOOD SAFETY

    OpenAIRE

    Nganje, William E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper develops a dynamic framework for efficient quantitative risk assessment from the simplest general risk, combining three parameters (contamination, exposure, and dose response) in a Kataoka safety-first model and a Poisson probability representing the uncertainty effect or jump processes associated with food safety. Analysis indicates that incorporating jump processes in food safety risk assessment provides more efficient cost/risk tradeoffs. Nevertheless, increased margin of safety...

  1. Medical abortion: understanding perspectives of rural and marginalized women from rural South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri, B Subha; Ravindran, T K Sundari

    2012-09-01

    To understand how rural and other groups of marginalized women define safe abortion; their perspectives and concerns regarding medical abortion (MA); and what factors affect their access to safe abortion. Focus group discussions were held with various groups of rural and marginalized women in Tamil Nadu to understand their perspectives and concerns on abortion, especially MA. Nearly a decade after mifepristone was approved for abortion in India, most study participants had never heard of MA. When they learned of the method, most preferred it over other methods of abortion. The women also had questions and concerns about the method and recommendations on how services should be provided. Their definition of a "safe abortion" included criteria beyond medical safety. They placed a high priority on "social safety," including confidentiality and privacy. In their view, factors affecting access to safe abortion and choice of provider included cost, assurance of secrecy, promptness of service provision, and absence of provider gatekeeping and provider-imposed conditions for receiving services. Women's preference for MA shows the potential of this technology to address the problem of unsafe abortion in India. Women need better access to information and services to realize this potential, however. Women's preferences regarding information dissemination and service provision need to be taken into account if policies and programs are to be truly responsive to the needs of marginalized women. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. "We call ourselves marginalized"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nanna Jordt

    2014-01-01

    of the people we refer to as marginalized. In this paper, I discuss how young secondary school graduates from a pastoralist community in Kenya use and negotiate indigeneity, marginal identity, and experiences of marginalization in social navigations aimed at broadening their current and future opportunities. I...

  3. Thermal margin comparison between DAM and simple model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jeonghun; Yook, Daesik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The nuclear industry in Korea, has considered using a detail analysis model (DAM), which described each rod, to get more thermal margin with the design a dry storage facility for nuclear spent fuel (NSF). A DAM is proposed and a thermal analysis to determine the cladding integrity is performed using test conditions with a homogenized NSF assembly analysis model(Simple model). The result show that according to USA safety criteria, temperature of canister surface has to keep below 500 K in normal condition and 630 K in excess condition. A commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) called ANSYS Fluent version 14.5 was used.

  4. Evaluation of common mode failure of safety functions for limiting fault events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezendes, J.P.; Hyde, A.W.

    2004-01-01

    The draft U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) policy on digital protection system software requires all Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) to be evaluated assuming a hypothetical common mode failure (CMF) which incapacitates the normal automatic initiation of safety functions. The System 80 + ALWR has been evaluated for such hypothetical conditions. The results show that the diverse automatic and manual protective systems in System 80 + provide ample safety performance margins relative to core coolability, offsite radiological releases. Reactor Coolant System (RCS) pressurization and containment integrity. This deterministic evaluation served to quantify the significant inherent safety margins in the System 80 + Standard Plant design even in the event of this extremely low probability scenario of a common mode failure. (author)

  5. Summary of LWR safety research in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murley, T.E.; Tong, L.S.; Bennett, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's water reactor safety research program is described and the basic results are presented. The USNRC water reactor safety research program consists of five basic research areas: integrity of vessel and piping, thermal-hydraulic test, fuel rod behaviour, code development and verification, and reactor operational safety. Results from the vessel and piping integrity research have demonstrated the high safety margins in scaled vessels and the analytical procedures for calculating vessel behaviour under pressure. Non-destructive examination techniques are being improved. Work is also proceeding to define the material constituents to reduce the susceptibility of irradiation embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking. The thermal-hydraulic tests have covered the various phases of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and activation of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). These tests have led to the development of engineering correlations to describe the phenomena to further quantify the safety margins in commercial nuclear power plants. Specifically, this paper presents selected experimental data and analytical predictions from the initial tests in LOFT and SEMISCALE. Comparisons and evaluations are made between the data and analytical predictions. Significant results and conclusions are presented regarding the behaviour of emergency core cooling systems in a LOCA environment: the ability to predict LOCA-type experiments over a scaling range of thirty and the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of components such as pumps in an integral system LOCA environment. The fuel behaviour research has provided valuable information on decay heat, cladding oxidation, fuel rod behaviour and fuel metling. Both the decay heat and the cladding oxidation have been shown to be lower than assumed in the licensing evaluations. The fuel behaviour and thermo-hydraulic research is being integrated into computer codes to be used to provide additional

  6. Single-Center Experience Using Marginal Liver Grafts in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, P-J; Yu, Y-D; Yoon, Y-I; Kim, S-R; Kim, D-S

    2018-05-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is an established therapeutic modality for patients with end-stage liver disease. The use of marginal donors has become more common worldwide due to the sharp increase in recipients, with a consequent shortage of suitable organs. We analyzed our single-center experience over the last 8 years in LT to evaluate the outcomes of using so-called "marginal donors." We retrospectively analyzed the database of all LTs performed at our institution from 2009 to 2017. Only patients undergoing deceased-donor LTs were analyzed. Marginal grafts were defined as livers from donors >60 years of age, livers from donors with serum sodium levels >155 mEq, graft steatosis >30%, livers with cold ischemia time ≥12 hours, livers from donors who were hepatitis B or C virus positive, livers recovered from donation after cardiac death, and livers split between 2 recipients. Patients receiving marginal grafts (marginal group) were compared with patients receiving standard grafts (standard group). A total of 106 patients underwent deceased-donor LT. There were 55 patients in the standard group and 51 patients in the marginal group. There were no significant differences in terms of age, sex, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, underlying liver disease, presence of hepatocellular carcinoma, and hospital stay between the 2 groups. Although the incidence of acute cellular rejection, cytomegalovirus infection, and postoperative complications was similar between the 2 groups, the incidence of early allograft dysfunction was higher in the marginal group. With a median follow-up of 26 months, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall and graft (death-censored) survivals in the marginal group were 85.5%, 75%, and 69.2% and 85.9%, 83.6%, and 77.2%, respectively. Patient overall survival and graft survival (death-censored) were significantly lower in the marginal group (P = .023 and P = .048, respectively). On multivariate analysis, receiving a marginal graft (hazard ratio [HR

  7. Marginal Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hecke, Martin

    2013-03-01

    All around us, things are falling apart. The foam on our cappuccinos appears solid, but gentle stirring irreversibly changes its shape. Skin, a biological fiber network, is firm when you pinch it, but soft under light touch. Sand mimics a solid when we walk on the beach but a liquid when we pour it out of our shoes. Crucially, a marginal point separates the rigid or jammed state from the mechanical vacuum (freely flowing) state - at their marginal points, soft materials are neither solid nor liquid. Here I will show how the marginal point gives birth to a third sector of soft matter physics: intrinsically nonlinear mechanics. I will illustrate this with shock waves in weakly compressed granular media, the nonlinear rheology of foams, and the nonlinear mechanics of weakly connected elastic networks.

  8. An assessment of seismic margins in nuclear plant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.P.; Jaquay, K.R.; Chokshi, N.C.; Terao, D.

    1995-01-01

    Interim results of an ongoing program to assist the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing regulatory positions on the seismic analyses of piping and overall safety margins of piping systems are reported. Results of reviews of previous seismic testing, primarily the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/NRC Piping and Fitting Dynamic Reliability Program, and assessments of the ASME Code, Section III, piping seismic design criteria as revised by the 1994 Addenda are reported. Major issues are identified herein only. Technical details are to be provided elsewhere. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs

  9. Marginalization of the Youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal

    2009-01-01

    The article is based on a key note speach in Bielefeld on the subject "welfare state and marginalized youth", focusing upon the high ambition of expanding schooling in Denmark from 9 to 12 years. The unintended effect may be a new kind of marginalization.......The article is based on a key note speach in Bielefeld on the subject "welfare state and marginalized youth", focusing upon the high ambition of expanding schooling in Denmark from 9 to 12 years. The unintended effect may be a new kind of marginalization....

  10. Convexity and Marginal Vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, S.; Hamers, H.J.M.; Norde, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we construct sets of marginal vectors of a TU game with the property that if the marginal vectors from these sets are core elements, then the game is convex.This approach leads to new upperbounds on the number of marginal vectors needed to characterize convexity.An other result is that

  11. Design trade-offs in view of safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, G.; Kishida, K.; Inoue, T.

    1978-01-01

    In view of resolving conflicting demands of cost, safety, flexibility of operation and design margins, safety design of various plant systems is discussed referring to their weight on construction costs. An influence of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) and loss of piping integrity (LOPI) on plant design and thus on construction materials is discussed, in optimising future commercial FBR plants. (author)

  12. Contributions to knowledge of the continental margin of Uruguay. Uruguayan continental margin: Physiographic and seismic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F

    2014-01-01

    This work is about the kind of continental margins such as a )Atlantic type passive margins which can be hard or soft b) An active or Pacific margins that because of the very frequent earthquakes develop a morphology dominated by tectonic processes. The Uruguayan continental margin belongs to a soft Atlantic margin

  13. Fixing soft margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kofman (Paul); A. Vaal, de (Albert); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractNon-parametric tolerance limits are employed to calculate soft margins such as advocated in Williamson's target zone proposal. In particular, the tradeoff between softness and zone width is quantified. This may be helpful in choosing appropriate margins. Furthermore, it offers

  14. Overview of seismic margin insights gained from seismic PRA results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Sues, R.H.; Campbell, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted under NRC and EPRI sponsorship in which published seismic PRAs were reviewed in order to gain insight to the seismic margins inherent in existing nuclear plants. The approach taken was to examine the fragilities of those components which have been found to be dominant contributors to seismic risk at plants in low-to-moderate seismic regions (SSE levels between 0.12g and 0.25g). It is concluded that there is significant margin inherent in the capacity of most critical components above the plant design basis. For ground motions less than about 0.3g, the predominant sources of seismic risk are loss of offsite power coupled with random failure of the emergency diesels, non-recoverable circuit breaker trip due to relay chatter, unanchored equipment, unreinforced non-load bearing block walls, vertical water storage tanks, systems interactions and possibly soil liquefaction. Recommendations as to which components should be reviewed in seismic margin studies for margin earthquakes less than 0.3g, between 0.3g and 0.5g, and greater than 0.5g, developed by the NRC expert panel on the quantification of seismic margins (based on the review of past PRA data, earthquake experience data, and their own personal experience) are presented

  15. SOCIAL MARGINALIZATION AND HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjana Bogdanović

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The 20th century was characterized by special improvement in health. The aim of WHO’s policy EQUITY IN HEALTH is to enable equal accessibility and equal high quality of health care for all citizens. More or less some social groups have stayed out of many social systems even out of health care system in the condition of social marginalization. Phenomenon of social marginalization is characterized by dynamics. Marginalized persons have lack of control over their life and available resources. Social marginalization stands for a stroke on health and makes the health status worse. Low socio-economic level dramatically influences people’s health status, therefore, poverty and illness work together. Characteristic marginalized groups are: Roma people, people with AIDS, prisoners, persons with development disorders, persons with mental health disorders, refugees, homosexual people, delinquents, prostitutes, drug consumers, homeless…There is a mutual responsibility of community and marginalized individuals in trying to resolve the problem. Health and other problems could be solved only by multisector approach to well-designed programs.

  16. Indian Ocean margins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A

    in the latter two areas. Some of these fluxes are expected to be substantial in the case of Indonesian continental margins and probably also across the eastern coasts of Africa not covered in this chapter. However, a dearth of information makes these margins...

  17. Marginalized zero-inflated negative binomial regression with application to dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisser, John S; Das, Kalyan; Long, D Leann; Divaris, Kimon

    2016-05-10

    The zero-inflated negative binomial regression model (ZINB) is often employed in diverse fields such as dentistry, health care utilization, highway safety, and medicine to examine relationships between exposures of interest and overdispersed count outcomes exhibiting many zeros. The regression coefficients of ZINB have latent class interpretations for a susceptible subpopulation at risk for the disease/condition under study with counts generated from a negative binomial distribution and for a non-susceptible subpopulation that provides only zero counts. The ZINB parameters, however, are not well-suited for estimating overall exposure effects, specifically, in quantifying the effect of an explanatory variable in the overall mixture population. In this paper, a marginalized zero-inflated negative binomial regression (MZINB) model for independent responses is proposed to model the population marginal mean count directly, providing straightforward inference for overall exposure effects based on maximum likelihood estimation. Through simulation studies, the finite sample performance of MZINB is compared with marginalized zero-inflated Poisson, Poisson, and negative binomial regression. The MZINB model is applied in the evaluation of a school-based fluoride mouthrinse program on dental caries in 677 children. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The ASN and nuclear facilities: towards a strengthening of safety margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    The new measures taken by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) as a consequence of the complementary safety assessments performed recently on nuclear facilities are reviewed in this article. The main measures are the following. Concerning EDF: -) the setting of a hard core of measures in order to assure a few safety-vital functions in any case, for instance one of this measures is to bunker some of the emergency diesel sets; -) the setting of a rapid intervention force able to provide any damaged nuclear plant with extra means in cooling and power in a very short time; -) a better training of the staff in case of severe accident. Concerning AREVA: the setting of robust means to assure the water supply of the fuel pool at La Hague plant and the setting of efficient means to mitigate the consequences of a leak of ClF 3 , HF, UF 6 in the premises of Eurodif, Socatri, TU5, GB 2 and Comurhex. Concerning CEA: -) the removal of fissile materials from the Masurca facility, -) the setting up of improved means concerning flood and sodium fires at the Phenix reactor, -) the setting up of improved means concerning the loss of coolant at the Osiris reactor, -) the setting up of improved means in case of flood, earthquake and loss of coolant at the Jules Horowitz reactor. (A.C.)

  19. Complementary safety assessment in the light of the Fukushima accident - Laue Langevin Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbriere; Caillot; Bidet

    2012-01-01

    This CSA (Complementary Safety Assessment) analyses the robustness of the Grenoble High Flux reactor to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident and proposes a series of improvements. Robustness is the ability for the facility to withstand events beyond the level for which the facility was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accident sequence (cliff edge effect). Safety is not only a matter of design or of engineered systems, it is also a matter of organization. So issues like crisis organization and work organization via subcontracting are also taken into consideration. This report is divided into 9 main chapters: 1) main features of the high flux reactor, 2) macroscopic study of safety, identification of structures and equipment essential to safety, 3) earthquake risk, 4) flood risk, 5) risks due to other extreme natural disasters, 6) the loss of electrical power supplies and of cooling systems, 7) management of severe accidents, 8) subcontracting policy, 9) synthesis and improvements. This study confirms the robustness of the facility and a series of improvements and modifications is proposed to face very unlikely situations (especially plurality of failures) that were not taken into account in baseline safety studies. (A.C.)

  20. Studies on correlation of positive surgical margin with clinicopathological factors and prognoses in breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Out of 484 cases with breast conserving surgery between April 1989 and March 1999, surgical procedures of 34 cases were changed to total mastectomy due to positive surgical margins. In this study we evaluated a clinical significance of surgical margin in relation to clinicopathological factors and prognoses. Ninety-nine cases (20.5%) had positive margins that were judged when cancer cells existed within 5 mm from margin. In multivariate analysis of factors for surgical margin, EIC-comedo status, ly, located site, proliferative activity, and age were significant and independent factors. Regarding local recurrence, positive margin, age, ER and proliferative activity were significant factors in multivariate analysis, especially in cases not receiving postoperative radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for patients with positive surgical margin. And patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates. Therefore, it is suggested that surgical margin may not reflect survival, although it is a significant factor for local recurrence. (author)

  1. Studies on correlation of positive surgical margin with clinicopathological factors and prognoses in breast conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Out of 484 cases with breast conserving surgery between April 1989 and March 1999, surgical procedures of 34 cases were changed to total mastectomy due to positive surgical margins. In this study we evaluated a clinical significance of surgical margin in relation to clinicopathological factors and prognoses. Ninety-nine cases (20.5%) had positive margins that were judged when cancer cells existed within 5 mm from margin. In multivariate analysis of factors for surgical margin, EIC-comedo status, ly, located site, proliferative activity, and age were significant and independent factors. Regarding local recurrence, positive margin, age, ER and proliferative activity were significant factors in multivariate analysis, especially in cases not receiving postoperative radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for patients with positive surgical margin. And patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates. Therefore, it is suggested that surgical margin may not reflect survival, although it is a significant factor for local recurrence. (author)

  2. Periodic safety analyses; Les essais periodiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouffon, A; Zermizoglou, R

    1990-12-01

    The IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-S8 devoted to 'Safety Aspects of Foundations of Nuclear Power Plants' indicates that operator of a NPP should establish a program for inspection of safe operation during construction, start-up and service life of the plant for obtaining data needed for estimating the life time of structures and components. At the same time the program should ensure that the safety margins are appropriate. Periodic safety analysis are an important part of the safety inspection program. Periodic safety reports is a method for testing the whole system or a part of the safety system following the precise criteria. Periodic safety analyses are not meant for qualification of the plant components. Separate analyses are devoted to: start-up, qualification of components and materials, and aging. All these analyses are described in this presentation. The last chapter describes the experience obtained for PWR-900 and PWR-1300 units from 1986-1989.

  3. Seismic analysis response factors and design margins of piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, L.C.; Tsai, N.C.; Yang, M.S.; Wong, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the simplified methods project of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program is to develop a simplified seismic risk methodology for general use. The goal is to reduce seismic PRA costs to roughly 60 man-months over a 6 to 8 month period, without compromising the quality of the product. To achieve the goal, it is necessary to simplify the calculational procedure of the seismic response. The response factor approach serves this purpose. The response factor relates the median level response to the design data. Through a literature survey, we identified the various seismic analysis methods adopted in the U.S. nuclear industry for the piping system. A series of seismic response calculations was performed. The response factors and their variabilities for each method of analysis were computed. A sensitivity study of the effect of piping damping, in-structure response spectra envelop method, and analysis method was conducted. In addition, design margins, which relate the best-estimate response to the design data, are also presented

  4. Multidecadal fCO2 Increase Along the United States Southeast Coastal Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Janet J.; Wang, Hongjie; Vargas, Rodrigo; Cai, Wei-Jun

    2017-12-01

    Coastal margins could be hotspots for acidification due to terrestrial-influenced CO2 sources. Currently there are no long-term (>20 years) records from biologically important coastal environments that could demonstrate sea surface CO2 fugacity (fCO2) and pH trends. Here, multidecadal fCO2 trends are calculated from underway and moored time series observations along the United States southeast coastal margin, also referred to as the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). fCO2 trends across the SAB, derived from ˜26 years of cruises and ˜9.5 years from a moored time series, range from 3.0 to 4.5 µatm yr-1, and are greater than the open ocean increases. The pH decline related to the fCO2 increases could be as much as -0.004 yr-1; a rate greater than that expected from atmospheric-influenced pH alone. We provide evidence that fCO2 increases and pH decreases on an ocean margin can be faster than those predicted for the open ocean from atmospheric influence alone. We conclude that a substantial fCO2 increase across the marginal SAB is due to both increasing temperature on the middle and outer shelves, but to lateral land-ocean interactions in the coastal zone and on inner shelf.

  5. Central-marginal population dynamics in species invasions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinfeng eGuo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The species’ range limits and associated central-marginal (C-M; i.e., from species range center to margin population dynamics continue to draw increasing attention because of their importance for current emerging issues such as biotic invasions and epidemic diseases under global change. Previous studies have mainly focused on species borders and C-M process in natural settings for native species. More recently, growing efforts are devoted to examine the C-M patterns and process for invasive species partly due to their relatively short history, highly dynamic populations, and management implications. Here I examine recent findings and information gaps related to (1 the C-M population dynamics linked to species invasions, and (2 the possible effects of climate change and land use on the C-M patterns and processes. Unlike most native species that are relatively stable (some even having contracting populations or ranges, many invasive species are still spreading fast and form new distribution or abundance centers. Because of the strong nonlinearity of population demographic or vital rates (i.e. birth, death, immigration and emigration across the C-M gradients and the increased complexity of species ranges due to habitat fragmentation, multiple introductions, range-wide C-M comparisons and simulation involving multiple vital rates are needed in the future.

  6. On marginal regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, H.N.

    1991-01-01

    On applying the marginal regeneration concept to the drainage of free liquid films, problems are encountered: the films do not show a "neck" of minimum thickness at the film/border transition; and the causes of the direction dependence of the marginal regeneration are unclear. Both problems can be

  7. Non-tumor enhancement at the surgical margin on CT after the removal of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Michito; Hosoya, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Kohichi; Yamada, Kiyotada

    1992-01-01

    Marginal enhancement is occasionally seen at the surgical margin on CT after the total removal of brain tumors. This enhancement disappears in due time, and therefore we call it non-tumor enhancement. It is often difficult, however, to differentiate non-tumor enhancement from tumor recurrence. In this study, we attempted to determine the characteristics of non-tumor enhancement. The subjects of the study consisted of 15 patients with astrocytoma and one with metastatic tumor in whom sequential CT scans had been performed after total removal of the tumor. Based on the observation of these sequential CT scans, the characteristics of non-tumor enhancement were presumed to be as follows: (1) In four cases, enhancement at the surgical margin persisted more than four months after surgery and then disappeared. Therefore, these cases were considered non-tumor enhancement. Prolonged duration of enhancement such as that in these cases is not necessarily due to recurrence. Marginal enhancement within 3 mm in thickness and with a well-demarcated border like that of a flax is likely to be non-tumor enhancement. (author)

  8. Various types of reported seismic margins and their uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear power plant structures and safety-related systems have been generally designed conservatively for a safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) and more conservatively for a smaller operating basis earthquake (OBE). Depending upon the relative conservatism of the design criteria, either the SSE or the OBE will control the design. In recent years, increasing knowledge in the geoscience field has led to a better understanding that, although highly unlikely, it is possible for the nuclear power plant to be subjected to earthquake ground motion greater than the ground motion for which the plant was designed. For this reason, interest has developed in demonstrating that nuclear plant structures and safety-related systems can safely withstand earthquake ground motion larger than their design earthquake ground motions (SSE and OBE). Within this paper, this larger-than-design earthquake ground motion will be called the seismic margin earthquake (SME) to distinguish it from the design earthquakes. The goal is to determine the performance of already-designed structures, components, and systems when subjected to the SME. Different and generally more liberal criteria should be used when evaluating the performance of structures, components and systems for the SME than were used in design. Retrofit, and redesign, should only be contemplated if one cannot show a seismic margin greater than unity for the SME using these more liberal criteria. In other words, the SME is not a design earthquake. It is not a replacement for the SSE and generally has nothing to do with design. The SME is a performance-check earthquake

  9. Evaluation of LBB margin of nuclear piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Oh, Yeong Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, In Seob; Kim, Yong Seon; Lee, Joo Seok

    1999-04-01

    Most of previous elastic-plastic fracture studies for LBB assessment of low alloy steel piping have been focused on base metals and weld metals. In contract, the heat affected zone of welded pipe has not been studied in detail primarily because the size of heat affected zone in welded pipe os too small to make specimens for mechanical properties measurement. When structural members are joined by welding, the base metal is heated to its melting point and then cooled rapidly. As a result of this very severe thermal cycle, mechanical properties in the heat affected zone can be degraded by grain coarsening, the precipitation and the segregation of trace impurities. In this study, a thermal and microstructural analysis is performed, and mechanical properties are measured for the weld heat affected zone of SA106Gr.C low allowed piping steel. In addition, inter critical annealing treatment. in two-phase (alpha+gamma) region was performed to investigate the possibilities of improving the toughness and reducing dynamic strain aging (DSA) susceptibility for giving allowable LBB safety margins. From the results, intercritical annealing is shown to give a smaller ductility loss due to DSA than the case of as-received material. Furthermore, the intercritical annealing was able to increase the impact toughness by a factor of 1.5 compared to the as-received material

  10. Evaluation of LBB margin of nuclear piping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Oh, Yeong Jin; Lim, Jun [Seoul Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Seob; Kim, Yong Seon; Lee, Joo Seok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-15

    Most of previous elastic-plastic fracture studies for LBB assessment of low alloy steel piping have been focused on base metals and weld metals. In contract, the heat affected zone of welded pipe has not been studied in detail primarily because the size of heat affected zone in welded pipe os too small to make specimens for mechanical properties measurement. When structural members are joined by welding, the base metal is heated to its melting point and then cooled rapidly. As a result of this very severe thermal cycle, mechanical properties in the heat affected zone can be degraded by grain coarsening, the precipitation and the segregation of trace impurities. In this study, a thermal and microstructural analysis is performed, and mechanical properties are measured for the weld heat affected zone of SA106Gr.C low allowed piping steel. In addition, inter critical annealing treatment. in two-phase (alpha+gamma) region was performed to investigate the possibilities of improving the toughness and reducing dynamic strain aging (DSA) susceptibility for giving allowable LBB safety margins. From the results, intercritical annealing is shown to give a smaller ductility loss due to DSA than the case of as-received material. Furthermore, the intercritical annealing was able to increase the impact toughness by a factor of 1.5 compared to the as-received material.

  11. Correlation between safety climate and contractor safety assessment programs in construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparer, Emily H; Murphy, Lauren A; Taylor, Kathryn M; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-12-01

    Contractor safety assessment programs (CSAPs) measure safety performance by integrating multiple data sources together; however, the relationship between these measures of safety performance and safety climate within the construction industry is unknown. Four hundred and one construction workers employed by 68 companies on 26 sites and 11 safety managers employed by 11 companies completed brief surveys containing a nine-item safety climate scale developed for the construction industry. CSAP scores from ConstructSecure, Inc., an online CSAP database, classified these 68 companies as high or low scorers, with the median score of the sample population as the threshold. Spearman rank correlations evaluated the association between the CSAP score and the safety climate score at the individual level, as well as with various grouping methodologies. In addition, Spearman correlations evaluated the comparison between manager-assessed safety climate and worker-assessed safety climate. There were no statistically significant differences between safety climate scores reported by workers in the high and low CSAP groups. There were, at best, weak correlations between workers' safety climate scores and the company CSAP scores, with marginal statistical significance with two groupings of the data. There were also no significant differences between the manager-assessed safety climate and the worker-assessed safety climate scores. A CSAP safety performance score does not appear to capture safety climate, as measured in this study. The nature of safety climate in construction is complex, which may be reflective of the challenges in measuring safety climate within this industry. Am. J. Ind. Med. 56:1463-1472, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Indigenous women's voices: marginalization and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgson, Joan E; Struthers, Roxanne

    2005-10-01

    Marginalization may affect health care delivery. Ways in which indigenous women experienced marginalization were examined. Data from 57 indigenous women (18 to 65 years) were analyzed for themes. Three themes emerged: historical trauma as lived marginalization, biculturalism experienced as marginalization, and interacting within a complex health care system. Experienced marginalization reflected participants' unique perspective and were congruent with previous research. It is necessary for health care providers to assess the detrimental impact of marginalization on the health status of individuals and/or communities.

  13. Holocene sea level fluctuations on western Indian continental margin: An update

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nigam, R.; Nair, R.R.; Rajagopalan, G.

    A new Holocene curve is generated for the western Indian continental margin. While constructing this curve careful selection of the dates were made by giving due considerations to the genetic characteristics of the dated material. This new curve...

  14. Reactivity Accidents in CAREM-25 Core with and Without Safety Systems Actuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, Marcelo; Vertullo, Alicia; Schlamp, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    A reactivity accident in CAREM core can be provoked by different initiating events, a cold water injection in pressure vessel, a secondary side steam line breakage and a failure in the absorbing rods drive system.The present work analyses inadverted control rod withdraws transients.Maximum worth control rod (2.5 $) at normal velocity (1 cm/s) is adopted for the simulations (Reactivity ramp of 0.018 $/s).Different scenarios considering actuation of first shutdown system (FSS), second shutdown system (SSS) and selflimiting conditions were modeled.Results of the accident with actuation of FSS show that safety margins are well above critical values (DNBR and CPR).In the cases with failure of the FSS and success of SSS or selflimited, safety margins are below critical values, however, the SSS provides a reduction of elapsed time under advised margins

  15. Developing tools to identify marginal lands and assess their potential for bioenergy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatsidas, Spyridon; Gounaris, Nikolaos; Dimitriadis, Elias; Rettenmaier, Nils; Schmidt, Tobias; Vlachaki, Despoina

    2017-04-01

    The term "marginal land" is currently intertwined in discussions about bioenergy although its definition is neither specific nor firm. The uncertainty arising from marginal land classification and quantification is one of the major constraining factors for its potential use. The clarification of political aims, i.e. "what should be supported?" is also an important constraining factor. Many approaches have been developed to identify marginal lands, based on various definitions according to the management goals. Concerns have been frequently raised regarding the impacts of marginal land use on environment, ecosystem services and sustainability. Current tools of soil quality and land potentials assessment fail to meet the needs of marginal land identification and exploitation for biomass production, due to the lack of comprehensive analysis of interrelated land functions and their quantitative evaluation. Land marginality is determined by dynamic characteristics in many cases and may therefore constitute a transitional state, which requires reassessment in due time. Also, marginal land should not be considered simply a dormant natural resource waiting to be used, since it may already provide multiple benefits and services to society relating to wildlife, biodiversity, carbon sequestration, etc. The consequences of cultivating such lands need to be fully addressed to present a balanced view of their sustainable potential for bioenergy. This framework is the basis for the development of the SEEMLA tools, which aim at supporting the identification, assessment, management of marginal lands in Europe and the decision-making for sustainable biomass production of them using appropriate bioenergy crops. The tools comprise two applications, a web-based one (independent of spatial data) and a GIS-based application (land regionalization on the basis of spatial data), which both incorporate: - Land resource characteristics, restricting the cultivation of agricultural crops but

  16. Marginal Models for Categorial Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma, W.P.; Rudas, T.

    2002-01-01

    Statistical models defined by imposing restrictions on marginal distributions of contingency tables have received considerable attention recently. This paper introduces a general definition of marginal log-linear parameters and describes conditions for a marginal log-linear parameter to be a smooth

  17. Export Margins, Price and Quantity of Belarus’s Export Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otamurodov Shavkat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the sources of Belarus’s export growth and decomposes export growth into extensive and intensive margins. This study also aims to determine export margins for intermediate and final goods and to determine the price and quantity components of the intensive export margin. In order to achieve the desired objectives, we use two methods for decomposing export growth, the count method and the export shares method. We analyse Belarus's export growth using export data at the HS-6 digit level for the 2004-2014 period. Our results show that Belarus's exports grew mainly due to growth in the price margin during the studied period 2004-2014. However, the extensive margin was important in export growth to some extent. Comparing the growth rate across final and intermediate goods reveals that although the share of final products in Belarus’s exports is not very big (18.9% in 2014, the average annual growth in exports of final products is higher than that of intermediate goods. Our investigation also shows that Belarus produces a wide range of commodities, but the share of the most of these commodities is not large; its exports depend on a restricted range of commodities. Moreover, most of the commodities are exported to Russia and Ukraine. Our results give us reason to assume that finding new markets for their new products is one of the main challenges for developing countries wishing to increase their exports by an extensive margin. This has important implications for how policy makers promote the trade and diversification of exports.

  18. Safety of huge systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Jiro.

    1995-01-01

    Recently accompanying the development of engineering technology, huge systems tend to be constructed. The disaster countermeasures of huge cities become large problems as the concentration of population into cities is conspicuous. To make the expected value of loss small, the knowledge of reliability engineering is applied. In reliability engineering, even if a part of structures fails, the safety as a whole system must be ensured, therefore, the design having margin is carried out. The degree of margin is called redundancy. However, such design concept makes the structure of a system complex, and as the structure is complex, the possibility of causing human errors becomes high. At the time of huge system design, the concept of fail-safe is effective, but simple design must be kept in mind. The accident in Mihama No. 2 plant of Kansai Electric Power Co. and the accident in Chernobyl nuclear power station, and the accident of Boeing B737 airliner and the fatigue breakdown are described. The importance of safety culture was emphasized as the method of preventing human errors. Man-system interface and management system are discussed. (K.I.)

  19. Accountable Accounting: Carbon-Based Management on Marginal Lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. DiRocco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Substantial discussion exists concerning the best land use options for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG emissions on marginal land. Emissions-mitigating land use options include displacement of fossil fuels via biofuel production and afforestation. Comparing C recovery dynamics under these different options is crucial to assessing the efficacy of offset programs. In this paper, we focus on forest recovery on marginal land, and show that there is substantial inaccuracy and discrepancy in the literature concerning carbon accumulation. We find that uncertainty in carbon accumulation occurs in estimations of carbon stocks and models of carbon dynamics over time. We suggest that analyses to date have been largely unsuccessful at determining reliable trends in site recovery due to broad land use categories, a failure to consider the effect of current and post-restoration management, and problems with meta-analysis. Understanding of C recovery could be greatly improved with increased data collection on pre-restoration site quality, prior land use history, and management practices as well as increased methodological standardization. Finally, given the current and likely future uncertainty in C dynamics, we recommend carbon mitigation potential should not be the only environmental service driving land use decisions on marginal lands.

  20. Determination of safety margins for creep loaded primary circuit components in case of loss of pressure accidents of a HTR plant (SR 383)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitbach, G.; Ahmed, K.; Over, H.; Schubert, F.; Nickel, H.

    1991-10-01

    The wall thickness of tubes in high temperature plants must be limited in such a way that pressure differences can not produce unadmissible deformations. For HTR (PNP-Plant) the postulated loss of secondary pressure is one of the considered accidents. In that case the tubes of the heat exchangers are loaded by the outher pressure of the primary coolant. So the risk of a creep collapse is given. The report is related to experimental and theoretical work for the creep collapse phenomena. HTR relevant tube geometries of the high temperature alloys NiCr22Co12Mo (INCONEL 617) and X10NiCrAlTi 32 20 (INCOLOY 800) were tested at temperatures of 900 and 950deg C and outer pressure loads in the range 40 bars. The experimental results are compared with theoretically computed values and discussed. The problem of safety margin is treated. Further, simplified procedures are developed for the estimation of the collapse time. (orig.) [de

  1. Increasing safety of a robotic system for inner ear surgery using probabilistic error modeling near vital anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Neal P.; Siebold, Michael A.; Mitchell, Jason E.; Blachon, Gregoire S.; Balachandran, Ramya; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Webster, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Safe and effective planning for robotic surgery that involves cutting or ablation of tissue must consider all potential sources of error when determining how close the tool may come to vital anatomy. A pre-operative plan that does not adequately consider potential deviations from ideal system behavior may lead to patient injury. Conversely, a plan that is overly conservative may result in ineffective or incomplete performance of the task. Thus, enforcing simple, uniform-thickness safety margins around vital anatomy is insufficient in the presence of spatially varying, anisotropic error. Prior work has used registration error to determine a variable-thickness safety margin around vital structures that must be approached during mastoidectomy but ultimately preserved. In this paper, these methods are extended to incorporate image distortion and physical robot errors, including kinematic errors and deflections of the robot. These additional sources of error are discussed and stochastic models for a bone-attached robot for otologic surgery are developed. An algorithm for generating appropriate safety margins based on a desired probability of preserving the underlying anatomical structure is presented. Simulations are performed on a CT scan of a cadaver head and safety margins are calculated around several critical structures for planning of a robotic mastoidectomy.

  2. Fuel safety criteria technical review - Results of OECD/CSNI/PWG2 Task Force on Fuel Safety Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollasky, N.; Valtonen, K.; Hache, G.; Gross, H.; Bakker, K.; Recio, M.; Bart, G.; Zimmermann, M.; Van Doesburg, W.; Killeen, J.; Meyer, R.O.; Speis, T.

    2000-01-01

    With the advent of advanced fuel and core designs, the adoption of more aggressive operational modes and the implementation of more accurate (best estimate or statistical) design and analysis methods, there is a concern if safety margins have remained adequate. Most - if not all - of the currently existing safety criteria were established during the 60's and early 70's, and verified against experiments with fuel that was available at that time, mostly with unirradiated specimens. Verification was of course performed as designs progressed in later years, however mostly with the aim to be able to prove that these designs adequately complied with existing criteria, and not to establish new limits. The OECD/CSNI/PWG2 Task Force on Fuel Safety Criteria (TFFSC) was therefore given the mandate to technically review the existing fuel safety criteria, focusing on the 'new design' elements (new fuel and core design, cladding materials, manufacturing processes, high burnup, MOX, etc.) introduced by the industry. It should also identify if additional efforts may be required (experimental, analytical) to ensure that the basis for fuel safety criteria is adequate to address the relevant safety issues. In this report, fuel-related criteria are discussed without attempting to categorize them according to event type or risk significance. For each of these 20 criteria, we present a brief description of the criterion as it is used in several applications along with the rationale for having such a criterion. New design elements, such as different cladding materials, higher burnup, and the use of MOX fuels, can affect fuel-related margins and, in some cases, the criteria themselves. Some of the more important effects are mentioned in order to indicate whether the criteria need to be re-evaluated. The discussion may not cover all possible effects, but should be sufficient to identify those criteria that need to be addressed. A summary of these discussions is given in Section 7. As part

  3. Digital Margins : How spatially and socially marginalized communities deal with digital exclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salemink, Koen

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance of the Internet as a means of communication has transformed economies and societies. For spatially and socially marginalized communities, this transformation has resulted in digital exclusion and further marginalization. This book presents a study of two kinds of

  4. French Approach for Long Term Storage Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, Jacob; Carreton, Jean-Pierre; Lizot, Marie Therese; Lhomme, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    IRSN presents its statement regarding long-term storage facilities; in France, the regulatory documents do not define the long term duration. The storage facility lifetime can only be appreciated according to the needs and materials stored therein. However, the magnitude of the long-term can be estimated at a few hundred years compared to a few decades for current storage. Usually, in France, construction of storage facilities is driven from the necessity various necessities, linked to the management of radioactive material (eg spent fuel) and to the management of radioactive waste. Because of the variety of 'stored materials and objects' (fission product solutions, plutonium oxide powders, activated solids, drums containing technological waste, spent fuel...), a great number of storage facility design solutions have been developed (surface, subsurface areas, dry or wet conditions...) in the World. After describing the main functions of a storage facility, IRSN displays the safety principles and the associated design principles. The specific design principles applied to particular storage (dry or wet spent fuel storage, depleted uranium or reprocessed uranium storage, plutonium storage, waste containing tritium storage, HLW and ILLW storage...) are also presented. Finally, the concerns due to the long-term duration storage and related safety assessment are developed. After discussing these issues, IRSN displays its statement. The authorization procedures governing the facility lifetime are similar to those of any basic nuclear installation, the continuation of the facility operation remaining subject to periodic safety reviews (in France, every 10 years). The applicant safety cases have to show, that the safety requirements are always met; this requires, at minimum, to take into account at the design stage, comfortable design margins. (author)

  5. Product Safety Culture: A New Variant of Safety Culture?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhanyiova, L.; Flin, R.; Irwin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Product safety culture is a new research area which concerns user safety rather than worker or process safety. The concept appears to have emerged after the investigation into the Nimrod aircraft accident (Haddon-Cave, 2009) which echoed aspects of NASA’s Challenger and Columbia crashes. In these cases, through a blend of human and organizational failures, the culture deteriorated to the extent of damaging product integrity, resulting in user fatalities. Haddon-Cave noted that it was due to a failure in leadership and organizational safety culture that accidents such as the Nimrod happened, where the aircraft exploded due to several serious technical failures, preceded by deficiencies in the safety case. Now some organizations are starting to measure product safety culture. This is important in day-to-day life as well, where a product failure as a result of poor organizational safety culture, can cause user harm or death, as in the case of Takata airbags scandal in 2015. Eight people have lost their lives and many were injured. According to investigation reports this was due to the company’s safety malpractices of fixing faulty airbags and proceeding to install them in vehicles, as well as secretly conducting tests to assess the integrity of their product and then deleting the data and denying safety issues as a result of the company’s cost-cutting policies. As such, organizational culture, specifically the applications of safety culture, can have far-reaching consequences beyond the workplace of an organization.

  6. Informing practice regarding marginalization: the application of the Koci Marginality Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koci, Anne Floyd; McFarlane, Judith; Nava, Angeles; Gilroy, Heidi; Maddoux, John

    2012-12-01

    The 49th World Health Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) declared violence as the leading worldwide public health problem with a focus on the increase in the incidence of injuries to women. Violence against women is an international epidemic with specific instruments required to measure the impact on women's functioning. This article describes the application of the Koci Marginality Index (KMI), a 5-item scale to measure marginality, to the baseline data of a seven-year prospective study of 300 abused women: 150 first time users of a shelter and 150 first time applicants for a protection order from the justice system. Validity and reliability of the Koci Marginality Index and its usefulness for best clinical practice and for policy decisions for abused women's health are discussed. The 49th World Health Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) declared violence as the leading worldwide public health problem and focused on the increase in the incidence of injuries to women (Krug et al., 2002 ). Violence against women in the form of intimate partner violence (IPV) is costly in terms of dollars and health. In the United States in 2003, estimated costs of IPV approached $8.3 billion (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2011). Outcomes related to severity of IPV vary but in 2003 victims suffering severe IPV lost nearly 8 million days of paid work, and greater than 5 million days of household productivity annually (CDC, 2011). Besides the evident financial cost of IPV, research confirms that exposure to IPV impacts a woman's health immediately and in the long-term (Breiding, Black, & Ryan, 2008 ; Campbell, 2002 ; CDC, 2011). Such sequela adversely affect the health of women and may increase their marginalization, a concept akin to isolation that may further increase negative effects on health outcomes. Immigrant women are at high risk for IPV (Erez, 2002 ) and those without documentation are at higher risk for marginalization (Montalvo

  7. Experience of RIA safety analyses performance for NPP Temelin core arranged with TVSA-T fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukov, S.A.; Lizorkin, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    The contents of the presentation are as follows: 1. Definition of categories for initiating events; 2. Acceptance criteria for safety assessment; 3. Main aspects of safety assessment methodology; 4. Main stages of calculation analysis; 5. Interface with other parts of the core design; 6. Codes used for calculation; 6.1 Main performances of code package TIGR-1; 6.2 Main performances of code BIPR-7A; 7. TIGR-1 accounting of design margins in calculation of fuel rod powers; 8. Peculiar features of Instrumentation and Control System for Temelin NPP; 9. Calculations; 10. Checklist of margin data important for reload safety assessment. (P.A.)

  8. Safety Criteria and Standards for Bearing Capacity of Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the evaluation standards of factor of safety for foundation stability analysis. The problem of foundation stability is analyzed via the methods of risk analysis of engineering structures and reliability-based design, and the factor of safety for foundation stability is determined by using bearing capacity safety-factor method (BSFM and strength safety-factor method (SSFM. Based on a typical example, the admissible factors of safety were calibrated with a target reliability index specified in relevant standards. Two safety criteria and their standards of bearing capacity of foundation for these two methods (BSFM and SSFM were established. The universality of the safety criteria and their standards for foundation reliability was verified based on the concept of the ratio of safety margin (RSM.

  9. Nuclear criticality safety handbook. Version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, Version 2 essentially includes the description of the Supplement Report to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, released in 1995, into the first version of Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, published in 1988. The following two points are new: (1) exemplifying safety margins related to modelled dissolution and extraction processes, (2) describing evaluation methods and alarm system for criticality accidents. Revision is made based on previous studies for the chapter that treats modelling the fuel system: e.g., the fuel grain size that the system can be regarded as homogeneous, non-uniformity effect of fuel solution, and burnup credit. This revision solves the inconsistencies found in the first version between the evaluation of errors found in JACS code system and criticality condition data that were calculated based on the evaluation. (author)

  10. RISMC Advanced Safety Analysis Project Plan – FY 2015 - FY 2019

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In this report, a project plan is developed, focused on industry applications, using Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) tools and methods applied to realistic, relevant, and current interest issues to the operating nuclear fleet. RISMC focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. This set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. The proposed plan will focus on application of the RISMC toolkit, in particular, solving realistic problems of important current issues to the nuclear industry, in collaboration with plant owners and operators to demonstrate the usefulness of these tools in decision making.

  11. Seismic structural fragility investigation for the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. Seismic safety margins research program (phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.

    1981-10-01

    An evaluation of the seismic capacity of the essential structures for the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was conducted as part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The structures included the reactor containment building, the turbine/auxiliary building, and the crib house (intake structure). The evaluation was devoted to seismically induced failures rather than those resulting from combined Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) or other extreme load combinations. The seismic loads used in the investigation were based on elastic analyses. The loads for the reactor containment and turbine/auxiliary buildings were developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory using time history analyses. The loads used for the crib house were the original seismic design loads developed by Sargent and Lundy. No non-linear seismic analyses were conducted. The seismic capacity of the structures accounted for the actual concrete and steel material properties including the aging of the concrete. Median centered properties were used throughout the evaluation including levels of damping considered appropriate for structures close to collapse as compared to the more conservative values used for design. The inelastic effects were accounted for using ductility modified response spectrum techniques based on system ductility ratios expected for structures near collapse. Sources of both inherent randomness and uncertainties resulting from lack of knowledge or approximations in analytical modelling were considered in developing the dispersion of the structural dynamic characteristics. Coefficients of variation were developed assuming lognormal distributions for all variables. The earthquake levels for many of the seismically induced failure modes are so high as to be considered physically incredible. (author)

  12. A symmetric safety valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtraw, Dallas; Palmer, Karen; Kahn, Danny

    2010-01-01

    How to set policy in the presence of uncertainty has been central in debates over climate policy. Concern about costs has motivated the proposal for a cap-and-trade program for carbon dioxide, with a 'safety valve' that would mitigate against spikes in the cost of emission reductions by introducing additional emission allowances into the market when marginal costs rise above the specified allowance price level. We find two significant problems, both stemming from the asymmetry of an instrument that mitigates only against a price increase. One is that most important examples of price volatility in cap-and-trade programs have occurred not when prices spiked, but instead when allowance prices collapsed. Second, a single-sided safety valve may have unintended consequences for investment. We illustrate that a symmetric safety valve provides environmental and welfare improvements relative to the conventional one-sided approach.

  13. Convergent tectonics and coastal upwelling: a history of the Peru continental margin ( Pacific).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Huene, Roland E.; Suess, E.; Emeis, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    Late in 1986, scientists on the ODP drillship JOIDES Resolution confirmed that the upper slope of the Peruvian margin consists of continental crust whereas the lower slope comprises an accretionary complex. An intricate history of horizontal and vertical movements can be detected, and the locations of ancient centers of upwelling appear to have varied, partly due to tectonic movements of the margin. In this review of Leg 112, the 3 scientific leaders on this cruise discuss their results. -from Journal Editor

  14. Application of best estimate and uncertainty safety analysis methodology to loss of flow events at Ontario's Power Generation's Darlington Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huget, R.G.; Lau, D.K.; Luxat, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Ontario Power Generation (OPG) is currently developing a new safety analysis methodology based on best estimate and uncertainty (BEAU) analysis. The framework and elements of the new safety analysis methodology are defined. The evolution of safety analysis technology at OPG has been thoroughly documented. Over the years, the use of conservative limiting assumptions in OPG safety analyses has led to gradual erosion of predicted safety margins. The main purpose of the new methodology is to provide a more realistic quantification of safety margins within a probabilistic framework, using best estimate results, with an integrated accounting of the underlying uncertainties. Another objective of the new methodology is to provide a cost-effective means for on-going safety analysis support of OPG's nuclear generating stations. Discovery issues and plant aging effects require that the safety analyses be periodically revised and, in the past, the cost of reanalysis at OPG has been significant. As OPG enters the new competitive marketplace for electricity, there is a strong need to conduct safety analysis in a less cumbersome manner. This paper presents the results of the first licensing application of the new methodology in support of planned design modifications to the shutdown systems (SDSs) at Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (NGS). The design modifications restore dual trip parameter coverage over the full range of reactor power for certain postulated loss-of-flow (LOF) events. The application of BEAU analysis to the single heat transport pump trip event provides a realistic estimation of the safety margins for the primary and backup trip parameters. These margins are significantly larger than those predicted by conventional limit of the operating envelope (LOE) analysis techniques. (author)

  15. Additional safety assessments. Report by the Nuclear Safety Authority - December 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    The first part of this voluminous report proposes an assessment of targeted audits performed in French nuclear installations (water pressurized reactors on the one hand, laboratories, factories and waste and dismantling installations on the other hand) on issues related to the Fukushima accident. The examined issues were the protection against flooding and against earthquake, and the loss of electricity supplies and of cooling sources. The second part addresses the additional safety assessments of the reactors and the European resistance tests: presentation of the French electronuclear stock, earthquake, flooding and natural hazards (installation sizing, safety margin assessment), loss of electricity supplies and cooling systems, management of severe accidents, subcontracting conditions. The third part addresses the same issues for nuclear installations other than nuclear power reactors

  16. General principles of nuclear safety management related to research reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banciu, Ortenzia; Vladescu, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    The paper contents the general principles applicable to the decommissioning of research reactors to ensure a proper nuclear safety management, during both decommissioning activities and post decommissioning period. The main objective of decommissioning is to ensure the protection of workers, population and environment against all radiological and non-radiological hazards that could result after a reactor shutdown and dismantling. In the same time, it is necessary, by some proper provisions, to limit the effect of decommissioning for the future generation, according to the new Romanian, IAEA and EU Norms and Regulations. Assurance of nuclear safety during decommissioning process involves, in the first step, to establish of some safety principles and requirements to be taken into account during whole process. In the same time, it is necessary to perform a series of analyses to ensure that the whole process is conducted in a planned and safe manner. The general principles proposed for a proper management of safety during research reactor decommissioning are as follows: - Set-up of all operations included in a Decommissioning Plan; - Set-up and qualitative evaluation of safety problems, which could appear during normal decommissioning process, both radiological and nonradiological risks for workers and public; - Set-up of accident list related to decommissioning process the events that could appear both due to some abnormal working conditions and to some on-site and off-site events like fires, explosions, flooding, earthquake, etc.); - Development and qualitative/ quantitative evaluation of scenarios for each incidents; - Development (and evaluation) of safety indicator system. The safety indicators are the most important tools used to assess the level of nuclear safety during decommissioning process, to discover the weak points and to establish safety measures. The paper contains also, a safety case evaluation (description of facility according to the decommissioning

  17. Significance of post-resection tissue shrinkage on surgical margins of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fol, Hossam Abdelkader; Noman, Samer Abduljabar; Beheiri, Mohamed Galal; Khalil, Abdalla M; Kamel, Mahmoud Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Resecting oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with an appropriate margin of uninvolved tissue is critical in preventing local recurrence and in making decisions regarding postoperative radiation therapy. This task can be difficult due to the discrepancy between margins measured intraoperatively and those measured microscopically by the pathologist after specimen processing. A total of 61 patients underwent resective surgery with curative intent for primary oral SCC were included in this study. All patients underwent resection of the tumor with a measured 1-cm margin. Specimens were then submitted for processing and reviewing, and histopathologic margins were measured. The closest histopathologic margin was compared with the in situ margin (1 cm) to determine the percentage discrepancy. The mean discrepancy between the in situ margins and the histopathological margins of all close and positive margins were 47.6% for the buccal mucosa (with a P value corresponding to 0.05 equaling 2.1), which is statistically significant, 4.8% for the floor of mouth, 9.5% for the mandibular alveolus, 4.8% for the retromolar trigon, and 33.3% for the tongue. There is a significant difference among resection margins based on tumor anatomical location. Margins shrinkage after resection and processing should be considered at the time of the initial resection. Tumors located in the buccal mucosa show significantly greater discrepancies than tumors at other sites. These findings suggest that it is critical to consider the oral site when outlining margins to ensure adequacy of resection. Buccal SCC is an aggressive disease, and should be considered as an aggressive subsite within the oral cavity, requiring a radical and aggressive resective approach. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative safety goals for the regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.; O'Donnell, L.F.

    1981-01-01

    The paper offers a brief summary of the current regulatory background in the USA, emphasizing nuclear, related to the establishment of quantitative safety goals as a way to respond to the key issue of 'how safe is safe enough'. General Atomic has taken a leading role in advocating the use of probabilistic risk assessment techniques in the regulatory process. This has led to understanding of the importance of quantitative safety goals. The approach developed by GA is discussed in the paper. It is centred around definition of quantitative safety regions. The regions were termed: design basis, safety margin or design capability and safety research. The design basis region is bounded by the frequency of 10 -4 /reactor-year and consequences of no identifiable public injury. 10 -4 /reactor-year is associated with the total projected lifetime of a commercial US nuclear power programme. Events which have a 50% chance of happening are included in the design basis region. In the safety margin region, which extends below the design basis region, protection is provided against some events whose probability of not happening during the expected course of the US nuclear power programme is within the range of 50 to 90%. Setting the lower mean frequency to this region of 10 -5 /reactor-year is equivalent to offering 90% assurance that an accident of given severity will not happen. Rare events with a mean frequency below 10 -5 can be predicted to occur. However, accidents predicted to have a probability of less than 10 -6 are 99% certain not to happen at all, and are thus not anticipated to affect public health and safety. The area between 10 -5 and 10 -6 defines the frequency portion of the safety research region. Safety goals associated with individual risk to a maximum-exposed member of public, general societal risk and property risk are proposed in the paper

  19. Passive safety optimization in liquid-sodium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Hahn, D.; Chang, W.-P.; Kwon, Y.-M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to identify and quantify the performance of innovative design features in metallic-fueled, sodium-cooled fast reactor designs. The objective of the work was to establish the reliability and safety margin enhancements provided by design innovations offering significant potential for construction, maintenance, and operating cost reductions. The project goal was accomplished with a combination of advanced model development (Task 1), analysis of innovative design and safety features (Tasks 2 and 3), and planning of key safety experiments (Task 4)

  20. Two-stream cyclotron radiative instabilities due to the marginally mirror-trapped fraction for fustion alphas in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-07-01

    It is shown here that the marginally mirror-trapped fraction of the newly-born fusion alpha particles in the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction dominated tokamak plasmas can induce a two-stream cyclotron radiative instability for the fast Alfven waves propagating near the harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c{alpha}}. This can explain both the experimentally observed time behavior and the spatially localized origin of the fusion product ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in TFTR at frequencies {omega} {approx} m{omega}{sub c{alpha}}.

  1. Two-stream cyclotron radiative instabilities due to the marginally mirror-trapped fraction for fustion alphas in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-07-01

    It is shown here that the marginally mirror-trapped fraction of the newly-born fusion alpha particles in the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction dominated tokamak plasmas can induce a two-stream cyclotron radiative instability for the fast Alfven waves propagating near the harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency ω cα . This can explain both the experimentally observed time behavior and the spatially localized origin of the fusion product ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in TFTR at frequencies ω ∼ mω cα

  2. Geomorphic response of a continental margin to tectonic and eustatic variations, the Levant margin during the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Moshe, Liran; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Enzel, Yehouda; Uri, Schattner

    2017-04-01

    During the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.97±0.01-5.33 Ma) the Mediterranean Levant margin experienced major eustatic and sedimentary cycles as well as tectonic motion along the nearby Dead Sea fault plate boundary. New structures formed along this margin with morphology responding to these changes. Our study focuses on changes in this morphology across the margin. It is based on interpretation of three 3D seismic reflection volumes from offshore Israel. Multi-attribute analysis aided the extraction of key reflectors. Morphologic analysis of these data quantified interacting eustasy, sedimentation, and tectonics. Late Messinian morphologic domains include: (a) continental shelf; (b) 'Delta' anticline, forming a ridge diagonal to the strike of the margin; (c) southward dipping 'Hadera' valley, separating between (a) and (b); (d) 'Delta Gap' - a water gap crossing perpendicular to the anticline axis, exhibiting a sinuous thalweg; (e) continental slope. Drainage across the margin developed in several stages. Remains of turbidite flows crossing the margin down-slope were spotted across the 'Delta' anticline. These flows accumulated with the MSC evaporate sequence and prior to the anticline folding. Rising of the anticline, above the then bathymetry, either blocked or diverted the turbidites. That rising also defined the Hadera valley. In-situ evaporates, covering the valley floor, are, in turn covered by a fan-delta at the distal end of the valley. The fan-delta complex contains eroded evaporites and Lago-Mare fauna. Its top is truncated by dendritic fluvial channels that drained towards the Delta Gap. The Delta Gap was carved through the Delta ridge in a morphological and structural transition zone. We propose that during the first stages of the MSC (5.97±0.01-5.59 ma) destabilization of the continental slope due to oscillating sea level produced gravity currents that flowed through the pre-existing Delta anticline. Subsequent folding of the Delta anticline

  3. ACED devices and SECAF supports for the control of structure, pipe network and equipment behaviour at seismic movements in order to enhance the safety margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serban, Viorel; Prisecaru, I.; Cretu, D.; Moldoveanu, T.

    2002-01-01

    In order to enhance the safety margin of structure, pipe networks and equipment associated to the existing NPPs, the classic consolidation solutions are very expensive and many times, impossible to be implemented. Structures, pipe networks, systems and equipment have geometries imposed by the basic construction requirements, operating and safety requirements and their modifications is not always possible. In order to enhance the strength capacity of (new or old) structures, systems and equipment mechanical devices with controlled elasticity and damping (ACED) have been designed, constructed and experimented. These devices are capable to support very large static loads over which dynamic loads (shock, vibration and seismic movements) overlap (which are damped). To increase the strength capacity of (new or existing) pipe networks and equipment connecting with pipes, SECAF supports that allow displacements from thermal expansions with low reaction force have been designed, constructed and experimented. SECAF supports are capable elastically to take permanent loads over which shocks, vibrations and seismic movements (which are damp) overlap. ACED devices and SECAF supports can be used to rehabilitate the existing NPPs with law financial costs and an increase of their strength capacity up to 100% under seismic movements, shocks and vibrations. ACED devices and SECAF supports do not require maintenance, are not affected by presence of a radiation field and their estimated service-life is similar to the NPPs

  4. The marginal costs of greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol, R.S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of the marginal costs of greenhouse gas emissions are on important input to the decision how much society would want to spend on greenhouse gas emission reduction. Marginal cost estimates in the literature range between $5 and $25 per ton of carbon. Using similar assumptions, the FUND model finds marginal costs of $9--23/tC, depending on the discount rate. If the aggregation of impacts over countries accounts for inequalities in income distribution or for risk aversion, marginal costs would rise by about a factor of 3. Marginal costs per region are an order of magnitude smaller than global marginal costs. The ratios between the marginal costs of CO 2 and those of CH 4 and N 2 O are roughly equal to the global warming potentials of these gases. The uncertainty about the marginal costs is large and right-skewed. The expected value of the marginal costs lies about 35% above the best guess, the 95-percentile about 250%

  5. Development of safety evaluation guidelines for base-isolated buildings in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the safety evaluation guidelines and the review process for non-nuclear base-isolated buildings proposed for construction in Japan. The paper discusses the guidelines application for two types of soil: hard soil and intermediate soil (soft soil was excluded.); safety evaluation items included in the level C design review; and safety margin of base isolation. Lessons learned through these design review efforts have potential applicability to design of seismic base isolation for nuclear power plants

  6. Comparing the Affordable Care Act's Financial Impact on Safety-Net Hospitals in States That Expanded Medicaid and Those That Did Not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Allen; DaVanzo, Joan E; Haught, Randy; Phap-Hoa, Luu

    2017-11-01

    Safety-net hospitals play a vital role in delivering health care to Medicaid enrollees, the uninsured, and other vulnerable patients. By reducing the number of uninsured Americans, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was also expected to lower these hospitals’ significant uncompensated care costs and shore up their financial stability. To examine how the ACA’s Medicaid expansion affected the financial status of safety-net hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid and in states that did not. Using Medicare hospital cost reports for federal fiscal years 2012 and 2015, the authors compared changes in Medicaid inpatient days as a percentage of total inpatient days, Medicaid revenues as a percentage of total net patient revenues, uncompensated care costs as a percentage of total operating costs, and hospital operating margins. Medicaid expansion had a significant, favorable financial impact on safety-net hospitals. From 2012 to 2015, safety-net hospitals in expansion states, compared to those in nonexpansion states, experienced larger increases in Medicaid inpatient days and Medicaid revenues as well as reduced uncompensated care costs. These changes improved operating margins for safety-net hospitals in expansion states. Margins for safety-net hospitals in nonexpansion states, meanwhile, declined.

  7. Core design of long life-cycle fast reactors operating without reactivity margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristova, E. N.; Baydin, D. F.; Gol'din, V. Y.; Pestryakova, G. A.; Stoynov, M. I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we consider a possibility of designing a fast reactor core that operates without reactivity margin for a long time. This study is based on the physical principle of fast reactor operating in a self-adjustable neutron-nuclear regime (SANNR-1) introduced by L.P. Feoktistov (1988-1993) and improved by V. Ya. Gol'din SANNR-2 (1995). The mathematical modeling of active zones of fast reactors in SANNR modes is held by authors since 1992. The numerical simulation is based on solving the neutron transport equation coupled with quasi-diffusion equations. The calculations have been performed using standard 26 energy groups. We use a hierarchy of spatial models of 1D, 1.5D, 2D, and 3D geometries. The spatial models of higher dimensionality are used for verification of results. The calculations showed that operation of the reactor in this mode increases its efficiency, safety and simplifies management. It is possible to achieve continuous work of the reactor in SANNR-2 during 7-10 years without fuel overloads by means of further optimization of the mode. Small reactivity margin is used only for the reactor start up. After first 10-15 days the reactor in SANNR-2 operates without reactivity margin. (authors)

  8. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Major structure response (Project IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, B.J.; Johnson, J.J.; Lo, T.Y.

    1981-08-01

    The primary task of the Major Structure Response Project within the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was to develop detailed finite element models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant's containment building and auxiliary-fuel-turbine (AFT) complex. The resulting models served as input to the seismic methodology analysis chain. The containment shell was modeled as a series of beam elements with the shear and bending characteristics of a circular cylindrical shell. Masses and rotary inertias were lumped at nodal points; thirteen modes were included in the analysis. The internal structure was modeled with three-dimensional finite elements, with masses again lumped at selected nodes; sixty modes were included in the analysis. The model of the AFT complex employed thin plate and shell elements to represent the concrete shear walls and floor diaphragms, and beam and truss elements to model the braced frames. Because of the size and complexity of the model, and the potentially large number of degrees of freedom, masses were lumped at a limited number of node points. These points were selected so as to minimize the effect of the discrete mass distribution on structural response. One hundred and thirteen modes were extracted. A second objective of Project IV was to investigate the effects of uncertainty and variability on structural response. To this end, four side studies were conducted. Three of them, briefly summarized in this volume, addressed themselves respectively to an investigation of sources of random variability in the dynamic response of nuclear power plant structures; formulation of a methodology for modeling and evaluating the effects of structural uncertainty on predicted modal characteristics of major nuclear power plant structures and substructures; and a preliminary evaluation of nonlinear responses in shear-wall structures. A fourth side study, reported in detail in this volume, quantified variations in dynamic characteristics and seismic

  9. Margin Requirements and Equity Option Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitzemann, Steffen; Hofmann, Michael; Uhrig-Homburg, Marliese

    In equity option markets, traders face margin requirements both for the options themselves and for hedging-related positions in the underlying stock market. We show that these requirements carry a significant margin premium in the cross-section of equity option returns. The sign of the margin...... premium depends on demand pressure: If end-users are on the long side of the market, option returns decrease with margins, while they increase otherwise. Our results are statistically and economically significant and robust to different margin specifications and various control variables. We explain our...... findings by a model of funding-constrained derivatives dealers that require compensation for satisfying end-users’ option demand....

  10. Margin Requirements and Equity Option Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitzemann, Steffen; Hofmann, Michael; Uhrig-Homburg, Marliese

    In equity option markets, traders face margin requirements both for the options themselves and for hedging-related positions in the underlying stock market. We show that these requirements carry a significant "margin premium" in the cross-section of equity option returns. The sign of the margin...... premium depends on demand pressure: If end-users are on the long side of the market, option returns decrease with margins, while they increase otherwise. Our results are statistically and economically significant and robust to different margin specifications and various control variables. We explain our...... findings by a model of funding-constrained derivatives dealers that require compensation for satisfying end-users’ option demand....

  11. Decoding the Margins: What Can the Fractal Geometry of Basaltic Flow Margins Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, E. I.; Hamilton, C.; Neish, C.; Beard, S. P.; Bramson, A. M.; Sori, M.; Rader, E. L.

    2016-12-01

    Studying lava flows on other planetary bodies is essential to characterizing eruption styles and constraining the bodies' thermal evolution. Although planetary basaltic flows are common, many key features are not resolvable in orbital imagery. We are thus developing a technique to characterize basaltic flow type, sub-meter roughness, and sediment mantling from these data. We will present the results from upcoming fieldwork at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve with FINESSE (August) and at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park (September). We build on earlier work that showed that basaltic flow margins are approximately fractal [Bruno et al., 1992; Gaonac'h et al., 1992] and that their fractal dimensions (D) have distinct `a`ā and pāhoehoe ranges under simple conditions [Bruno et al., 1994]. Using a differential GPS rover, we have recently shown that the margin of Iceland's 2014 Holuhraun flow exhibits near-perfect (R2=0.9998) fractality for ≥24 km across dm to km scales [Schaefer et al., 2016]. This finding suggests that a fractal-based technique has significant potential to characterize flows at sub-resolution scales. We are simultaneously seeking to understand how margin fractality can be modified. A preliminary result for an `a'ā flow in Hawaii's Ka'ū Desert suggests that although aeolian mantling obscures the original flow margin, the apparent margin (i.e., sediment-lava interface) remains fractal [Schaefer et al., 2015]. Further, the apparent margin's D is likely significantly modified from that of the original margin. Other factors that we are exploring include erosion, transitional flow types, and topographic confinement. We will also rigorously test the intriguing possibility that margin D correlates with the sub-meter Hurst exponent H of the flow surface, a common metric of roughness scaling [e.g., Shepard et al., 2001]. This hypothesis is based on geometric arguments [Turcotte, 1997] and is qualitatively consistent with all results so far.

  12. Public and Private Physical Affection Differences between Same-Sex and Different-Sex Couples: The Role of Perceived Marginalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani El-Alayli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite its connection with relationship satisfaction, research on physical affection is scarce and fails to disentangle private and public displays of affection. It is important to examine both types if marginalized couples are less comfortable displaying affection publicly. The present study examined whether same-sex couples display less public (but not private physical affection than different-sex couples due to stronger feelings of relationship marginalization. It also examined how public/private affection and marginalization relate to relationship satisfaction. Women in committed same-sex and different-sex relationships completed surveys of public affection, private affection, marginalization, and relationship satisfaction online. As predicted, women in same-sex relationships displayed less public affection than those in different-sex relationships, an effect mediated by general societal marginalization. Both private and public affection predicted higher relationship satisfaction, whereas feelings of marginalization by friends/family predicted lower relationship satisfaction. We discuss implications for relationship counseling and propose new ways of looking at marginalization.

  13. Quantifying uncertainties in the estimation of safety parameters by using bootstrapped artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, Piercesare [MOX, Department of Mathematics, Polytechnic of Milan (Italy); Zio, Enrico [Department of Energy, Polytechnic of Milan, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: enrico.zio@polimi.it; Di Maio, Francesco [Department of Energy, Polytechnic of Milan, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    For licensing purposes, safety cases of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) must be presented at the Regulatory Authority with the necessary confidence on the models used to describe the plant safety behavior. In principle, this requires the repetition of a large number of model runs to account for the uncertainties inherent in the model description of the true plant behavior. The present paper propounds the use of bootstrapped Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for performing the numerous model output calculations needed for estimating safety margins with appropriate confidence intervals. Account is given both to the uncertainties inherent in the plant model and to those introduced by the ANN regression models used for performing the repeated safety parameter evaluations. The proposed framework of analysis is first illustrated with reference to a simple analytical model and then to the estimation of the safety margin on the maximum fuel cladding temperature reached during a complete group distribution header blockage scenario in a RBMK-1500 nuclear reactor. The results are compared with those obtained by a traditional parametric approach.

  14. Occuptional Health and Safety and Employer Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Langå

    2004-01-01

    It is often argued and supported by a number of case studies that investment in human factors and occupational health and safety can pay. But any employer has a number of possible in-vestments, and many of these may have a larger marginal utility than health and safety. In addition it is often...... difficult to calculate the exact pay off for human factors and health and safety – how to calculate higher motivation for instance. The economic benefit as a possible driving force for improvement of occupational health and safety is likely to exist but it must be considered a relatively weak force. Another...... important driving force for improvements in health and safety. No employer likes to be ‘branded’ as immoral, manifested in fines by the labour inspectors or media attention to an unsafe conduct. Strategies to im-prove health and safety therefore need to focus on the legitimacy as the probably strongest...

  15. Occupational Health and Safety and Employer Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Jensen, Per Langå

    2004-01-01

    It is often argued and supported by a number of case studies that investment in human factors and occupational health and safety can pay. But any employer has a number of possible in-vestments, and many of these may have a larger marginal utility than health and safety. In addition it is often...... difficult to calculate the exact pay off for human factors and health and safety – how to calculate higher motivation for instance. The economic benefit as a possible driving force for improvement of occupational health and safety is likely to exist but it must be considered a relatively weak force. Another...... important driving force for improvements in health and safety. No employer likes to be ‘branded’ as immoral, manifested in fines by the labour inspectors or media attention to an unsafe conduct. Strategies to im-prove health and safety therefore need to focus on the legitimacy as the probably strongest...

  16. Gas-cooled reactor safety and accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety and Accident Analysis was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Oak Ridge on the invitation of the Department of Energy in Washington, USA. The meeting was hosted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity to compare and discuss results of safety and accident analysis of gas-cooled reactors under development, construction or in operation, to review their lay-out, design, and their operational performance, and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting emphasized the high safety margins of gas-cooled reactors and gave particular attention to the inherent safety features of small reactor units. The meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Safety and Related Experience with Operating Gas-Cooled Reactors (4 papers); Risk and Safety Analysis (11 papers); Accident Analysis (9 papers); Miscellaneous Related Topics (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  17. Marginal integrity of resin composite restorations restored with PPD initiatorcontaining resin composite cured by QTH, monowave and polywave LED units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Betancourt, Francisco; Krejci, Ivo

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the influence of curing devices on marginal adaptation of cavities restored with self-etching adhesive containing CQ and PPD initiators and hybrid composite. Twenty-four class V (3 groups, n=8) with margins located on enamel and dentin were restored with Clearfil S3 Bond and Clearfil APX PLT, light-cured with a monowave LED, multiwave LED and halogen light-curing unit (LCU). Marginal adaptation was evaluated with SEM before/after thermo-mechanical loading (TML). On enamel, significantly lower % continuous margins (74.5±12.6) were found in group cured by multiwave LED when compared to monowave LED (87.6±9.5) and halogen LCU (94.4±9.1). The presence of enamel and composite fractures was significantly higher in the group light-cured with multiwave LED, probably due to an increased materials' friability resulted from an improved degree of cure. The clinician should aware that due to a distinct activation of both initiators, marginal quality may be influenced on the long-term.

  18. Thermal Margin Calculation of the CAREM-25 Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazufri, C.M

    2000-01-01

    During the operation in steady state and anticipated operational transient of a nuclear reactor it is necessary to avoid the damage in the fuel elements induced by thermal or hydraulic effects.To satisfy that design bases safety limits are established and calculation methodologies are defined to verify them.In the particular case of the reactor CAREM-25 reactor where the core is cooled by natural circulation, it is not adequate to use directly the same calculation methodologies from typical PWR and BWR.The low cooling flow rate and not having channels in the fuel elements (open-channel fuels) produce that most of the models and computer programs typically used must be carefully validated.As result of that process, an adequate calculation procedure for this reactor type was developed.In the present work, the thermal-hydraulic design criteria of the core and the design bases, the uncertainties factors, and the thermal margin results of the core are described.Despite that the methodology of DNBR calculation is under a validation process and considering the available calculation tools, it is possible to assure that the core fulfills the safety regulations in steady state conditions

  19. Safety of fenbendazole in common peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Sajid; Abbas, Seema; Khan, Muhammad Irfan; Nisa, Qamarun; Younus, Muhammad; Aqil, Kiran; Qayyum, Rizwan; Yaqoob, Muhammad; Ali, Asif; Yaseen, Muhammad Asif; Shah, Muhammad Ali

    2018-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to find out the safety levels of fenbendazole in common peafowl. This bird, raised on aviaries and zoos, can be severely parasitized with Ascaridia galli (enteric worms) and Syngamus trachea (gapeworm) along with other parasitic worms. Fenbendazole is a highly effective benzimidazole-class anthelmintic in animals. The objective of this work was to provide target animal safety data in young peafowl and to demonstrate reproductive safety in adult birds. During the experimental study, diets containing fenbendazole at 0, 100, 200 and 300 ppm were fed for 21 days (three times the normal treatment duration). Data for feed consumption, feed conversion rate, and body weights were recorded for each bird in each group. Drug concentrations in different tissues of birds were determined to correlate concentrations with clinical observations, clinical pathology, and histologic findings. There were no morbidities or mortalities after study day 21. Additionally, there were no statistically significant treatment-related differences among above mentioned parameters. Analysis of fenbendazole concentrations in kidney, liver, leg/thigh, and breast muscle and skin with associated fat revealed that, even at the highest dose level used and with no feed withdrawal, fenbendazole concentrations were relatively low in these tissues. These findings indicate that fenbendazole has a relatively wide margin of safety in young peafowl and that the proposed dose of 100 ppm in the feed for 7 consecutive days is well within the margin of safety. In the reproductive safety study, five breeder peafowl farms fed fendbendazole at 100ppm for 7 days and collected data on hatching percentage of peahen eggs before and after treatment. Reproductive performance in peahen was not adversely affected.

  20. Margin estimation and disturbances of irradiation field in layer-stacking carbon-ion beams for respiratory moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Shinya; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Mizukami, Tomohiro; Tsukishima, Chihiro; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2017-11-01

    Carbon-ion therapy by layer-stacking irradiation for static targets has been practised in clinical treatments. In order to apply this technique to a moving target, disturbances of carbon-ion dose distributions due to respiratory motion have been studied based on the measurement using a respiratory motion phantom, and the margin estimation given by the square root of the summation Internal margin2+Setup margin2 has been assessed. We assessed the volume in which the variation in the ratio of the dose for a target moving due to respiration relative to the dose for a static target was within 5%. The margins were insufficient for use with layer-stacking irradiation of a moving target, and an additional margin was required. The lateral movement of a target converts to the range variation, as the thickness of the range compensator changes with the movement of the target. Although the additional margin changes according to the shape of the ridge filter, dose uniformity of 5% can be achieved for a spherical target 93 mm in diameter when the upward range variation is limited to 5 mm and the additional margin of 2.5 mm is applied in case of our ridge filter. Dose uniformity in a clinical target largely depends on the shape of the mini-peak as well as on the bolus shape. We have shown the relationship between range variation and dose uniformity. In actual therapy, the upper limit of target movement should be considered by assessing the bolus shape. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  1. Links among available integral benchmarks and differential date evaluations, computational biases and uncertainties, and nuclear criticality safety biases on potential MOX production throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goluoglu, S.; Hopper, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    Through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's recently developed and applied sensitivity and uncertainty computational analysis techniques, this paper presents the relevance and importance of available and needed integral benchmarks and differential data evaluations impacting potential MOX production throughput determinations relative to low-moderated MOX fuel blending operations. The relevance and importance in the availability of or need for critical experiment benchmarks and data evaluations are presented in terms of computational biases as influenced by computational and experimental sensitivities and uncertainties relative to selected MOX production powder blending processes. Recent developments for estimating the safe margins of subcriticality for assuring nuclear criticality safety for process approval are presented. In addition, the impact of the safe margins (due to computational biases and uncertainties) on potential MOX production throughput will also be presented. (author)

  2. Passive safety design characteristics of the KALIMER-600 burner reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Cho, Chung-Ho; Ha, Ki-Seok; Kim, Sang-Ji

    2009-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has recently studied several burner core designs for a transuranics (TRU) transmutation based on the breakeven core geometry of KALIMER-600. The KALIMER-600 is a net electrical rating of 600MWe, sodium-cooled, metallic-fueled, pool-type reactor. For the burner core concept selected for the present analysis, the smearing fractions of the fuel rods in three fuel zones are changed while maintaining the cladding outer diameter and cladding thickness. The resulting fuel slug smearing fractions of the inner, middle, and outer core zones are 36%, 40%, and 48%, respectively. The TRU conversion ratio is 0.57 and the TRU enrichment of the driver fuel is set to 30.0 w/o because of the current practical limitation of the U-TRU-10%Zr metal fuel database. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety performance characteristics provided by the passive safety design features in the KALIMER-600 burner reactor by using a system-wide safety analysis code. The present scoping analysis focuses on an assessment of the enhanced safety design features that provide passive and self-regulating responses to transient conditions and an evaluation of the safety margin during unprotected overpower, unprotected loss of flow, and unprotected loss of heat sink events. The analysis results show that the KALIMER-600 burner reactor provides larger safety margins with respect to the sodium boiling, fuel rod integrity, and structural integrity. The overall inherent safety can be enhanced by accounting for the reactivity feedback mechanisms in the design process. (author)

  3. A new physics design of control safety rods for prototype fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devan, K.; Riyas, A.; Alagan, M.; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2008-01-01

    The absorber rods of 500 MWe prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR), which is under construction at Kalpakkam, have been designed to provide sufficient shutdown margin during normal and accidental conditions for ensuring the safe shut down. There are nine control and safety rods (CSR) and 3 diverse safety rods (DSR). Absorber material used is initially 65% enriched B 4 C. Based on the reported experiments in PHENIX reactor and design of absorber rods in SUPERPHENIX, the design of CSR is modified by introducing 20 cm length natural B 4 C at the top and bottom of absorber column and maintaining the remaining portion with 65% enriched B 4 C. This design ensures sufficient shutdown margin (SDM) during normal operation and also during the one stuck rod condition. For comparison of the above two designs, a CSR of 57% of enrichment was considered which gives the same worth as the revised CSR design with natural B 4 C sections in top and bottom. There is significant savings in the initial inventory of enriched B 4 C for CSR. The annual requirement of enriched boron also reduces. This new CSR can last for about 5 cycles, based on its clad life. But, it is planned to be replaced after every 3 cycles (1 cycle equals 180 efpd) of operation due to radiation damage effects in hexcan D9 steel. Use of ferritic steel for hexcan can extend the life of CSR to 5 cycles

  4. Implications of Monte Carlo Statistical Errors in Criticality Safety Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevey, Ronald E.

    2005-01-01

    Most criticality safety calculations are performed using Monte Carlo techniques because of Monte Carlo's ability to handle complex three-dimensional geometries. For Monte Carlo calculations, the more histories sampled, the lower the standard deviation of the resulting estimates. The common intuition is, therefore, that the more histories, the better; as a result, analysts tend to run Monte Carlo analyses as long as possible (or at least to a minimum acceptable uncertainty). For Monte Carlo criticality safety analyses, however, the optimization situation is complicated by the fact that procedures usually require that an extra margin of safety be added because of the statistical uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculations. This additional safety margin affects the impact of the choice of the calculational standard deviation, both on production and on safety. This paper shows that, under the assumptions of normally distributed benchmarking calculational errors and exact compliance with the upper subcritical limit (USL), the standard deviation that optimizes production is zero, but there is a non-zero value of the calculational standard deviation that minimizes the risk of inadvertently labeling a supercritical configuration as subcritical. Furthermore, this value is shown to be a simple function of the typical benchmarking step outcomes--the bias, the standard deviation of the bias, the upper subcritical limit, and the number of standard deviations added to calculated k-effectives before comparison to the USL

  5. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis.

  6. Nuclear Safety Review 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2013 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2012. The Executive Overview provides crosscutting and worldwide nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major sections covered in this report. Sections A-E of this report cover improving radiation, transport and waste safety; strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); and civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS), and activities relevant to the IAEA Safety Standards. The world nuclear community has made noteworthy progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2012, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as ''the Action Plan''). For example, an overwhelming majority of Member States with operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) have undertaken and essentially completed comprehensive safety reassessments ('stress tests') with the aim of evaluating the design and safety aspects of plant robustness to protect against extreme events, including: defence in depth, safety margins, cliff edge effects, multiple failures, and the prolonged loss of support systems. As a result, many have introduced additional safety measures including mitigation of station blackout. Moreover, the IAEA's peer review services and safety standards have been reviewed and strengthened where needed. Capacity building programmes have been built or improved, and EPR programmes have also been reviewed and improved. Furthermore, in 2012, the IAEA continued to share lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident with the nuclear community including through three international experts' meetings (IEMs) on reactor and spent fuel safety, communication in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis

  7. Miles, speed, and technology: Traffic safety under oligopolistic insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dementieva, M.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2016-01-01

    We study road safety when insurance companies have market power, and can influence drivers' behavior via insurance premiums. We obtain first- and second-best premiums for different insurance market structures. The insurance program consists of an insurance premium, and marginal dependencies of that

  8. A case of distal extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with two positive resection margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Wayne A; Ramcharan, Wesley; Harnanan, Dave; Umakanthan, Srikanth; Maharaj, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is an uncommon primary malignancy of the biliary tract that is challenging to diagnose and treat effectively due to its relatively silent and late clinical presentation. The present study reports a case of a 60-year-old male with distal extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with a 3-week history of painless obstructive jaundice symptoms and subjective weight loss. Imaging revealed an obstructing lesion in the common bile duct, just distal to the entrance of the cystic duct. Pathology revealed moderately differentiated cholangiocarcinoma with two positive proximal resection margins. The two positive resection margins presented a challenge during surgery and points to an urgent need for further studies to better illuminate diagnostic and therapeutic options for patients with similar clinicopathological presentation.

  9. Integral fast reactor safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: a pool-type primary system, and advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents

  10. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. NRC safety research in support of regulation, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    This report, the fourth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to Congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during 1988. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  12. Categorical marginal models: quite extensive package for the estimation of marginal models for categorical data

    OpenAIRE

    Wicher Bergsma; Andries van der Ark

    2015-01-01

    A package accompanying the book Marginal Models for Dependent, Clustered, and Longitudinal Categorical Data by Bergsma, Croon, & Hagenaars, 2009. It’s purpose is fitting and testing of marginal models.

  13. Audit Report The Procurement of Safety Class/Safety-Significant Items at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    the Savannah River Site. Our review disclosed that the Department had procured and installed safety-class and safety-significant SSCs that did not meet NQA-1 quality standards. Specifically, we identified multiple instances in which critical components did not meet required quality and safety standards. For example: (1) Three structural components were procured and installed by the prime contractor at Savannah River during construction of the MOX Facility that did not meet the technical specifications for items relied on for safety. These substandard items necessitated costly and time consuming remedial action to, among other things, ensure that nonconforming materials and equipment would function within safety margins; (2) In six instances, items used in the construction of TEF failed to satisfy quality standards. In one of these situations, operating procedures had to be modified to ensure that the problem item did not compromise safety; and (3) Finally, at the ISP, one component that did not meet quality standards was procured. The failure of the item could have resulted in a spill of up to 15,000 gallons of high-level radioactive waste. Based on an extensive examination of relevant internal controls and procurement practices, we concluded that these failures were attributable to inadequate attention to quality assurance at Savannah River. Simply put, Departmental controls were not adequate to prevent and/or detect quality assurance problems. For example, Federal and prime contractor officials did not expressly require that subcontractors or lower-tiered vendors comply with quality assurance requirements. Additionally, management did not effectively communicate quality assurance concerns between the several Departmental program elements operating at Savannah River. The procurement and installation of these nonconforming components resulted in cost increases. For example, as of October 2008, the MOX Facility had incurred costs of more than $680,000 due to problems

  14. Characterizing Convexity of Games using Marginal Vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, S.; Hamers, H.J.M.; Norde, H.W.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the relation between convexity of TU games and marginal vectors.We show that if specfic marginal vectors are core elements, then the game is convex.We characterize sets of marginal vectors satisfying this property, and we derive the formula for the minimum number of marginal

  15. AP1000 Containment Design and Safety Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Richard F.; Ofstun, Richard P.; Bachere, Sebastien

    2002-01-01

    The AP1000 is an up-rated version of the AP600 passive plant design that recently received final design certification from the US NRC. Like AP600, the AP1000 is a two-loop, pressurized water reactor featuring passive core cooling and passive containment safety systems. One key safety feature of the AP1000 is the passive containment cooling system which maintains containment integrity in the event of a design basis accident. This system utilizes a high strength, steel containment vessel inside a concrete shield building. In the event of a pipe break inside containment, a high pressure signal actuates valves which allow water to drain from a storage tank atop the shield building. Water is applied to the top of the containment shell, and evaporates, thereby removing heat. An air flow path is formed between the shield building and the containment to aid in the evaporation and is exhausted through a chimney at the top of the shield building. Extensive testing and analysis of this system was performed as part of the AP600 design certification process. The AP1000 containment has been designed to provide increased safety margin despite the increased reactor power. The containment volume was increased to accommodate the larger steam generators, and to provide increased margin for containment pressure response to design basis events. The containment design pressure was increased from AP600 by increasing the shell thickness and by utilizing high strength steel. The passive containment cooling system water capacity has been increased and the water application rate has been scaled to the higher decay heat level. The net result is higher margins to the containment design pressure limit than were calculated for AP600 for all design basis events. (authors)

  16. Safety and performance assessment of geologic disposal systems for nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltonen, E.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis presents a methodology for the safety and performance assesment of final disposal of nuclear wastes into crystalline bedrock. The applicability of radiation protection objectives is discussed, as well as the goals of the assessment in the various repository system development phases. Due consideration is given to the description of the pertinent analysis methods and to the comprehensive model system. The methodology has been applied to assess the acceptability of the basic disposal concepts and to study the possibilities for the optimization of protection. Furthermore, performance of different components in the multiple barrier disposal systems is estimated. The waste types dealt with are low- and intermediate-level waste as well as high-level spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear power plant. In addition, an option of high-level vitrified waste from reprocessing of spent fuel is taken into account. On the basis of the various analyses carried out it can be concluded that the disposal of different nuclear wastes in the Finnish bedrock in properly designed repositories meets the radiation protection objectives with good confidence. In addition, the studies indicate that the safety margins are considerable. This is due to the fact that the overall performance of the multiple barrier disposal systems analysed is not sensitive to possible unfavourable changes in barrier properties. From the optimization of protection point of view it can be concluded that there is no need to develop more effective repository designs than those analysed in this thesis. In fact, the results indicate that the most sophisticated designs have already gone beyond an optimal level of safety

  17. Safety goals for seismic and tsunami risks: Lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi disaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Genn, E-mail: sajig@bd5.so-net.ne.jp

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Reviewed why the Fukushima disaster was not anticipated among seismologists. • Reviewed Fukushima Daiichi's preparedness against the earthquake and tsunami. • There was a large “cliff edge” in radiological consequences from the design basis tsunami. • By including earthquakes as an “external event” resulted in insufficient “defense in depths”. • Proposes a new probabilistic seismic and tsunami safety goal be developed. - Abstract: This paper first reviews why the potential occurrence of the Tohoku-oki earthquake with momentum magnitude M{sub w} of 9.0 earthquake was not anticipated by Japanese seismologists, and to clarify our limitations in predicting rare but severe earthquakes at our current knowledge in the field of geosciences. Although there was a large volume of historical records related to earthquakes and tsunamis, generally this data infer high plate coupling in regions where earthquakes were known to have already occurred, with only partial or even no coupling from the Japan Trench to a point approximately midway between the trench and the coastline—precisely the region where the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake occurred. This phenomenon has been explained as a “silent earthquake” or a fault creep as observed at the San Andreas Faults in the US. Considering the large uncertainties in seismic events, nuclear power plants should be conservatively designed with adequate safety margins. TEPCO's preparedness against seismic and tsunami hazards were reviewed in order to clarify why the established safety margin was not sufficient during the Fukushima Daiichi. It was found that the plant incorporated the necessary safety margins against seismic oscillation however, there was a large “cliff edge” in which the radiological consequences surged by several orders of magnitude from the design basis tsunami. Since the tsunami's height was greater than the ground level of the turbine hall, a large amount of the

  18. Safety goals for seismic and tsunami risks: Lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Genn

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Reviewed why the Fukushima disaster was not anticipated among seismologists. • Reviewed Fukushima Daiichi's preparedness against the earthquake and tsunami. • There was a large “cliff edge” in radiological consequences from the design basis tsunami. • By including earthquakes as an “external event” resulted in insufficient “defense in depths”. • Proposes a new probabilistic seismic and tsunami safety goal be developed. - Abstract: This paper first reviews why the potential occurrence of the Tohoku-oki earthquake with momentum magnitude M w of 9.0 earthquake was not anticipated by Japanese seismologists, and to clarify our limitations in predicting rare but severe earthquakes at our current knowledge in the field of geosciences. Although there was a large volume of historical records related to earthquakes and tsunamis, generally this data infer high plate coupling in regions where earthquakes were known to have already occurred, with only partial or even no coupling from the Japan Trench to a point approximately midway between the trench and the coastline—precisely the region where the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake occurred. This phenomenon has been explained as a “silent earthquake” or a fault creep as observed at the San Andreas Faults in the US. Considering the large uncertainties in seismic events, nuclear power plants should be conservatively designed with adequate safety margins. TEPCO's preparedness against seismic and tsunami hazards were reviewed in order to clarify why the established safety margin was not sufficient during the Fukushima Daiichi. It was found that the plant incorporated the necessary safety margins against seismic oscillation however, there was a large “cliff edge” in which the radiological consequences surged by several orders of magnitude from the design basis tsunami. Since the tsunami's height was greater than the ground level of the turbine hall, a large amount of the tsunami

  19. 32-Phosphorus for bone pain palliation due to bone metastases, its safety and efficacy in patients with advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fettich, J.; Nair, G.; Padky, A.K.; Stare, J.; Nair, N.; Moralles, R.; Riccabona, G.; Tanumihardia, M.

    2001-01-01

    Bone pain due to bony metastases can seriously affect a patient's quality of life. External irradiation, narcotic drugs and polyphosphates may cause important side effects or are expensive, therefore in many patients radionuclide treatment using a single dose of beta emitting bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals has become widely accepted. Except 32-Phosphorus (32-P) all of them are expensive and difficult to obtain in certain countries. The aim of the study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of 32-P for palliation of bone pain due to bony metastases by comparing it to 89-Strontium (89-Sr), the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for bone pain palliation in the framework of a prospective IAEA co-ordinated multicenter study. A very strict protocol for unified patient inclusion and follow up was used. 93 cancer patients with osteoblastic bony metastases were included into the study, 48 were treated by 89-Sr (150 MBq) and 45 by 32-P (450 MBq). Pain score, analgesic consumption, quality of life, and indices of bone marrow depression were monitored 2 weeks pre- and up to 4 months post treatment. Favourable response to treatment was recorded in 75% of the patients treated with 89-Sr and in 60% of those treated with 32-P (p=0,122). There was no significant difference between the duration of favourable effect for both radiopharmaceuticals. Moderate decrease of white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts, and haemoglobin (Hb) levels was detected more often in the 32-P treated group. Although 32-P appears to be more toxic, no toxic effects requiring specific treatment were seen in either group. Due to its comparable efficacy and safety, general availability and low cost its more widespread use should be encouraged to increase quality of life and reduce cost of medical care of patients with intractable bone pain due to cancer metastases. (author)

  20. Origin of marginal basins of the NW Pacific and their plate tectonic reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junyuan; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Kelty, Tom; Yu, Ho-Shing

    2014-03-01

    Geometry of basins can indicate their tectonic origin whether they are small or large. The basins of Bohai Gulf, South China Sea, East China Sea, Japan Sea, Andaman Sea, Okhotsk Sea and Bering Sea have typical geometry of dextral pull-apart. The Java, Makassar, Celebes and Sulu Seas basins together with grabens in Borneo also comprise a local dextral, transform-margin type basin system similar to the central and southern parts of the Shanxi Basin in geometry. The overall configuration of the Philippine Sea resembles a typical sinistral transpressional "pop-up" structure. These marginal basins except the Philippine Sea basin generally have similar (or compatible) rift history in the Cenozoic, but there do be some differences in the rifting history between major basins or their sub-basins due to local differences in tectonic settings. Rifting kinematics of each of these marginal basins can be explained by dextral pull-apart or transtension. These marginal basins except the Philippine Sea basin constitute a gigantic linked, dextral pull-apart basin system.

  1. 12 CFR 220.4 - Margin account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CREDIT BY... securities. The required margin on a net long or net short commitment in a when-issued security is the margin...) Interest charged on credit maintained in the margin account; (ii) Premiums on securities borrowed in...

  2. Probabilistic safety assessment - regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanki, R.B.; Paul, U.K.; Hajra, P.; Agarwal, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been designed, constructed and operated mainly based on deterministic safety analysis philosophy. In this approach, a substantial amount of safety margin is incorporated in the design and operational requirements. Additional margin is incorporated by applying the highest quality engineering codes, standards and practices, and the concept of defence-in-depth in design and operating procedures, by including conservative assumptions and acceptance criteria in plant response analysis of postulated initiating events (PIEs). However, as the probabilistic approach has been improved and refined over the years, it is possible for the designer, operator and regulator to get a more detailed and realistic picture of the safety importance of plant design features, operating procedures and operational practices by using probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) along with the deterministic methodology. At present, many countries including USA, UK and France are using PSA insights in their decision making along with deterministic basis. India has also made substantial progress in the development of methods for carrying out PSA. However, consensus on the use of PSA in regulatory decision-making has not been achieved yet. This paper emphasises on the requirements (e.g.,level of details, key modelling assumptions, data, modelling aspects, success criteria, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis) for improving the quality and consistency in performance and use of PSA that can facilitate meaningful use of the PSA insights in the regulatory decision-making in India. This paper also provides relevant information on international scenario and various application areas of PSA along with progress made in India. The PSA perspective presented in this paper may help in achieving consensus on the use of PSA for regulatory / utility decision-making in design and operation of NPPs

  3. Conference Report: The New Discovery of Margins: Theory-Based Excursions in Marginal Social Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babette Kirchner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available At this year's spring conference of the Sociology of Knowledge Section of the German Sociological Association, a diverse range of theoretical concepts and multiple empirical insights into different marginal social fields were presented. As in everyday life, drawing a line between center and margin can be seen as an important challenge that must equally be faced in sociology. The socially constructed borderline appears to be highly variable. Therefore it has to be delineated or fixed somehow. The construction of margins is necessary for society in general and smaller social groupings alike to confirm one's own "normal" identity, or one's own membership on the fringes. The different contributions exemplify what was established at the beginning of the conference: Namely that society and its margins are defined differently according to the empirical as well as conceptual focus. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1402148

  4. Genetic Divergence and signatures of natural election in marginal populations of a Keystone, long-lived conifer, Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus) from Northern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram E. Chhatre; Om P. Rajora

    2014-01-01

    Marginal populations are expected to provide the frontiers for adaptation, evolution and range shifts of plant species under the anticipated climate change conditions. Marginal populations are predicted to show genetic divergence from central populations due to their isolation, and divergent natural selection and genetic drift operating therein. Marginal populations...

  5. Safety assessment for the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles with respect to the 37-element fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, H. C.; Lim, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    The KAERI and AECL have jointly developed an advanced CANDU fuel, called CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle. CANFLEX 43-element bundle has some improved features of increased operating margin and enhanced safety compared to the existing 37-element bundle. Since CANFLEX fuel bundle is designed to be compatible with the CANDU-6 reactor design, the behaviour in the thermalhydraulic system will be nearly identical with 37-element bundle. But due to different element design and linear element power distribution between the two bundles, it is expected that CANFLEX fuel behaviour would be different from the behaviour of the 37-element fuel. Therefore, safety assessments on the design basis accidents which result if fuel failures are performed. For all accidents selected, it is observed that the loading of CANFLEX bundle in an existing CANDU-6 reactor would not worsen the reactor safety. It is also predicted that fission product release for CANFLEX fuel bundle generally is lower than that for 37-element bundle. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  6. Margins in Swedish district heating systems; Marginaler i Fjaerrvaermesystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selinder, Patrik; Zinko, Heimo [ZW Energiteknik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2003-03-01

    It can be assumed on good reasons that the Swedish district heating nets are designed with relatively large margins concerning the transportable power. This is done historically to be able to transport the necessary power that can be called for on the coldest winter days but which occur rarely and also due to the former (until 2001) applied recommendations for the dimensioning of hot water flows. The aim of this project was to investigate the possibilities of reducing the connecting power to customers, both from a technical and from the customer point of view. The heating system of a building in Sweden is normally dimensioned according to a certain outdoor air temperature (DUT in Swedish). According to the Swedish Building Code, DUT20 is defined for a given location in such a way that if the heating system is designed for this temperature, the room temperature is allowed to decrease by 3 deg C in the average once in 20 years. That means that for economical reasons, a power deficiency is accounted for in the case of strong cold. The value of DUT is depending on the thermal inertia of the building. Buildings with high thermal inertia can have a higher DUT and vice versa. A reduced system size can in principle mean smaller size of pipes and consumer substations and more power available for additional customers to be connected. In principle, that means a more profitable district heating operation. Besides costs, another problem with oversized capacities are possible operational problems due to slow dynamic system responses, for instance at restarting occasions after a pump stop. A smaller valve size will result in a better system dynamic and may result in a more compliant system operation and increased delivery quality. By choosing just right DUT for every building and abandoning safety margins, it is shown in the report that the connecting power can be reduced in especially medium light to heavy buildings with larger time constants. However, this also means that the

  7. Guidance for the safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations for use in food and food supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilter, B; Andersson, C; Anton, R; Constable, A; Kleiner, J; O'Brien, J; Renwick, A G; Korver, O; Smit, F; Walker, R

    2003-12-01

    There is a growing interest by both consumers and industry for the development of food products with 'functional' properties, or health benefits. These products may take the form of dietary supplements or of foods. The health benefits are given by particular ingredients, and in many cases these are derived from botanicals. The variety of plants providing these functions is large, ranging from staple food sources such as cereals, fruits and vegetables, to herbals as used in traditional medicine. The food or ingredient conferring health properties may consist of the plants themselves, extracts thereof, or more purified components. The scientific literature is abundant with articles not only on the beneficial properties, but also on possible adverse health effects of plants and their components. The present report discusses the data required to determine the safe use of these types of ingredients, and provides advice on the development of risk assessment strategies consistent with due diligence under existing food regulations. Product specifications, composition and characterisation of standardised and authentic materials, documented history of use and comparison to existing products (taking into account the effect of industrial processing), description of the intended use and consequent exposure are highlighted as key background information on which to base a risk evaluation. The extent of experimental investigation required, such as in vitro, animal, and/or human studies, depends on the adequacy of this information. A decision tree is presented as an aid to determine the extent of data requirements based on product comparison. The ultimate safety in use depends on the establishment of an adequate safety margin between expected exposure and identified potential hazards. Health hazards may arise from inherent toxicities or contaminants of the plant materials, including the mechanism of the intended beneficial effect. A lower safety margin may therefore be expected

  8. The marginal band system in nymphalid butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Wataru; Kinjo, Seira; Otaki, Joji M

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns are highly complex and diverse, but they are believed to be derived from the nymphalid groundplan, which is composed of several color pattern systems. Among these pattern systems, the marginal band system, including marginal and submarginal bands, has rarely been studied. Here, we examined the color pattern diversity of the marginal band system among nymphalid butterflies. Marginal and submarginal bands are usually expressed as a pair of linear bands aligned with the wing margin. However, a submarginal band can be expressed as a broken band, an elongated oval, or a single dot. The marginal focus, usually a white dot at the middle of a wing compartment along the wing edge, corresponds to the pupal edge spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots that signify the locations of color pattern organizing centers. A marginal band can be expressed as a semicircle, an elongated oval, or a pair of eyespot-like structures, which suggest the organizing activity of the marginal focus. Physical damage at the pupal edge spot leads to distal dislocation of the submarginal band in Junonia almana and in Vanessa indica, suggesting that the marginal focus functions as an organizing center for the marginal band system. Taken together, we conclude that the marginal band system is developmentally equivalent to other symmetry systems. Additionally, the marginal band is likely a core element and the submarginal band a paracore element of the marginal band system, and both bands are primarily specified by the marginal focus organizing center.

  9. Marginal Hospital Cost of Surgery-related Hospital-acquired Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, William D; Limcangco, Rhona; Owens, Pamela L; Steiner, Claudia A

    2016-09-01

    Patients who develop hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) are more likely to die, have longer hospital stays, and are at greater risk of infections. Patients undergoing surgery are prone to developing pressure ulcers (PUs). To estimate the hospital marginal cost of a HAPU for adults patients who were hospitalized for major surgeries, adjusted for patient characteristics, comorbidities, procedures, and hospital characteristics. Data are from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases and the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System for 2011 and 2012. PU information was obtained using retrospective structured record review from trained MPMS data abstractors. Costs are derived using HCUP hospital-specific cost-to-charge ratios. Marginal cost estimates were made using Extended Estimating Equations. We estimated the marginal cost at the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of the cost distribution using Simultaneous Quantile Regression. We find that 3.5% of major surgical patients developed HAPUs and that the HAPUs added ∼$8200 to the cost of a surgical stay after adjusting for comorbidities, patient characteristics, procedures, and hospital characteristics. This is an ∼44% addition to the cost of a major surgical stay but less than half of the unadjusted cost difference. In addition, we find that for high-cost stays (75th percentile) HAPUs added ∼$12,100, whereas for low-cost stays (25th percentile) HAPUs added ∼$3900. This paper suggests that HAPUs add ∼44% to the cost of major surgical hospital stays, but the amount varies depending on the total cost of the visit.

  10. The Procedure for Determination of Special Margin Factors to Account for a Bow of the VVER-1000 Fuel Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyganov, Sergey V.; Marin, Stanislav V.; Shishkov, Lev K.

    2008-01-01

    Starting from 1980's, the problem of bow of the VVER-1000 reactor FAs and the effect of that on the operational safety is being discussed. At the initial period of time, the extension of time for dropping control rods of the control and protection system associated with this bow posed the highest threat. Later on, new more rigid structures were developed for FAs that eliminated the problems of control rods. However, bow of the VVER-1000 reactor FAs is observed up to now. The scale of this bow reduced significantly but it still effects safety. Even a minor bow available may lead to the noticeable increase of power of individual fuel pins associated with the local variation of the coolant amount. This effect must be taken into account on designing fuel loadings to eliminate the exceeding of set limitations. The introduction of additional special margins is the standard method for taking this effect into account. The present paper describes the conservative technique for the assessment of additional margins for bow of FAs of state-of-the-art designs. This technique is employed in the VVER-1000 reactor designing. The chosen conservatism degree is discussed as well as the method for its assurance and acceptable ways for its slackening. The example of the margin evaluation for the up-to-date fuel loading is given. (authors)

  11. The procedure for determination of special margin factors to account for a bow of the WWER-1000 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyganov, S. V.; Marin, S. V.; Shishkov, L. K.

    2008-01-01

    Starting from 1980s, the problem of bow of the WWER-1000 reactor fuel assemblies and the effect of that on the operational safety is being discussed. At the initial period of time, the extension of time for dropping control rods of the control and protection system associated with this bow posed the highest threat. Later on, new more rigid structures were developed for fuel assemblies that eliminated the problems of control rods. However, bow of the WWER-1000 reactor fuel assemblies is observed up to now. The scale of this bow reduced significantly but it still effects safety. Even a minor bow available may lead to the noticeable increase of power of individual fuel pins associated with the local variation of the coolant amount. This effect must be taken into account on designing fuel loadings to eliminate the exceeding of set limitations. The introduction of additional special margins is the standard method for taking this effect into account. The present paper describes the conservative technique for the assessment of additional margins for bow of fuel assemblies of state-of-the-art designs. This technique is employed in the WWER-1000 reactor designing. The chosen conservatism degree is discussed as well as the method for its assurance and acceptable ways for its slackening. The example of the margin evaluation for the up-to-date fuel loading is given. (authors)

  12. The Procedure for Determination of Special Margin Factors to Account for a Bow of the VVER-1000 Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, Sergey V.; Marin, Stanislav V.; Shishkov, Lev K. [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , 1., Kurchatov sq., 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Starting from 1980's, the problem of bow of the VVER-1000 reactor FAs and the effect of that on the operational safety is being discussed. At the initial period of time, the extension of time for dropping control rods of the control and protection system associated with this bow posed the highest threat. Later on, new more rigid structures were developed for FAs that eliminated the problems of control rods. However, bow of the VVER-1000 reactor FAs is observed up to now. The scale of this bow reduced significantly but it still effects safety. Even a minor bow available may lead to the noticeable increase of power of individual fuel pins associated with the local variation of the coolant amount. This effect must be taken into account on designing fuel loadings to eliminate the exceeding of set limitations. The introduction of additional special margins is the standard method for taking this effect into account. The present paper describes the conservative technique for the assessment of additional margins for bow of FAs of state-of-the-art designs. This technique is employed in the VVER-1000 reactor designing. The chosen conservatism degree is discussed as well as the method for its assurance and acceptable ways for its slackening. The example of the margin evaluation for the up-to-date fuel loading is given. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of the safety margins during shutdown for NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencik, V.; Sadek, S.; Bajs, T.

    2004-01-01

    In the paper the results of RELAP5/mod3.3 calculations of critical parameters during shutdown for NPP Krsko are presented. Conservative evaluations have been performed at NPP Krsko to determine the minimum configuration of systems required for the safe shutdown operation. Critical parameters in these evaluations are defined as the time to start of the boiling and the time of the core dry-out. In order to have better insight into the available margins, the best estimate code RELAP5/mod3.3 has been used to calculate the same parameters. The analyzed transient is the loss of the Residual Heat Removal (RHR) system, which is used to remove decay heat during shutdown conditions. Several configurations that include open and closed Reactor Coolant System (RCS) were considered in the evaluation. The RELAP5/mod3.3 analysis of the loss of the RHR system has been performed for the following cases: 1) RCS closed and water solid, 2) RCS closed and partially drained, 3) Pressurizer manway open, Steam Generator (SG) U tubes partially drained, 4) Pressurizer and SG manways open, SG U tubes completely drained, 5) Pressurizer manway open, SGs drained, SG nozzle dams installed and 6) SG nozzle dams installed, pressurizer manway open, 1 inch break at RHR pump discharge in the loop with pressurizer. Both RHR trains were assumed in operation prior to start of the transient. The maximum average steady state temperature for all analyzed cases was limited to 333 K. (author)

  14. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Challenges in process marginality for advanced technology nodes and tackling its contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Samy, Aravind; Schiwon, Roberto; Seltmann, Rolf; Kahlenberg, Frank; Katakamsetty, Ushasree

    2013-10-01

    Process margin is getting critical in the present node shrinkage scenario due to the physical limits reached (Rayleigh's criterion) using ArF lithography tools. K1 is used to its best for better resolution and to enhance the process margin (28nm metal patterning k1=0.31). In this paper, we would like to give an overview of various contributors in the advanced technology nodes which limit the process margins and how the challenges have been tackled in a modern foundry model. Advanced OPC algorithms are used to make the design content at the mask optimum for patterning. However, as we work at the physical limit, critical features (Hot-spots) are very susceptible to litho process variations. Furthermore, etch can have a significant impact as well. Pattern that still looks healthy at litho can fail due to etch interactions. This makes the traditional 2D contour output from ORC tools not able to predict accurately all defects and hence not able to fully correct it in the early mask tapeout phase. The above makes a huge difference in the fast ramp-up and high yield in a competitive foundry market. We will explain in this paper how the early introduction of 3D resist model based simulation of resist profiles (resist top-loss, bottom bridging, top-rounding, etc.,) helped in our prediction and correction of hot-spots in the early 28nm process development phase. The paper also discusses about the other overall process window reduction contributors due to mask 3D effects, wafer topography (focus shifts/variations) and how this has been addressed with different simulation efforts in a fast and timely manner.

  16. Segmentation of the eastern North Greenland oblique-shear margin – regional plate tectonic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Arne Døssing; Stemmerik, Lars; Dahl-Jensen, T.

    2010-01-01

    a highly complex, Paleozoic–early Cenozoic pre-opening setting. However, due to extreme ice conditions, very little is known about the offshore areas seawards of – and between – the peninsulas. Consequently, prevailing structural-tectonic models of the margin tend to be significantly oversimplified...... anticipated. In particular, we interpret strong margin segmentation along N/NE-striking fault structures. The structures are likely to have formed by Late Mesozoic–early Cenozoic strike-slip tectonics and have continued to be active during the late Cenozoic. A more than 8 km deep sedimentary basin...

  17. MARGINS: Toward a novel science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, John C.

    A science plan to study continental margins has been in the works for the past 3 years, with almost 200 Earth scientists from a wide variety of disciplines gathering at meetings and workshops. Most geological hazards and resources are found at continental margins, yet our understanding of the processes that shape the margins is meager.In formulating this MARGINS research initiative, fundamental issues concerning our understanding of basic Earth-forming processes have arisen. It is clear that a business-as-usual approach will not solve the class of problems defined by the MARGINS program; the solutions demand approaches different from those used in the past. In many cases, a different class of experiment will be required, one that is well beyond the capability of individual principle investigators to undertake on their own. In most cases, broadly based interdisciplinary studies will be needed.

  18. Reliabilityy and operating margins of LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasser, A.A.; Lindquist, K.O.

    1977-01-01

    The margins to fuel thermal operating limits under normal and accident conditions are key to plant operating flexibility and impact on availability and capacity factor. Fuel performance problems that do not result in clad breach, can reduce these margins. However, most have or can be solved with design changes. Regulatory changes have been major factors in eroding these margins. Various methods for regaining the margins are discussed

  19. Complementary assessment of the safety of French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarcat, N.; Pouget-Abadie, X.

    2011-01-01

    As an immediate consequence of the Fukushima accident the French nuclear safety Authority (ASN) asked EDF to perform a complementary safety assessment for each nuclear power plant dealing with 3 points: 1) the consequences of exceptional natural disasters, 2) the consequences of total loss of electrical power, and 3) the management of emergency situations. The safety margin has to be assessed considering 3 main points: first a review of the conformity to the initial safety requirements, secondly the resistance to events overdoing what the facility was designed to stand for, and the feasibility of any modification susceptible to improve the safety of the facility. This article details the specifications of such assessment, the methodology followed by EDF, the task organization and the time schedule. (A.C.)

  20. Changing the internal health and safety organization through organizational learning and change management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Jensen, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    Research from several countries indicates that the internal health and safety organization is marginalized in most companies, and it is difficult for the professionals to secure a proper role in health and safety on the companies' present agenda. The goal of a Danish project involving a network...... of I I companies was to search for a solution to this problem. The health and safety managers and safety representatives played the role of "change agents" for local projects aiming to develop the health and safety organization. The study showed that 3 of the 11 companies proved to be able to implement...

  1. Calculation methodology of the thermal margin in the CAREM 25 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazufri, Claudio M.

    1995-01-01

    According to the nuclear reactors characteristics, can be found different methodologies to appraise the thermal margin available in the core. In the particular case of the CAREM (25 MWe) reactor, where the core is cooled by low mass flux and there are zones with positive steam quality, such evaluation is critical. Due to these characteristics, it was necessary to develop one proper methodology. In the present work, the different steps of that development are described: the election of figures of merit for measure the thermal margin, the hypothesis to use, the election of the critical heat flux prediction model, model qualification and the specification of the core wide procedure. In each step assume criteria are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 1 tab, 1 fig

  2. Integral fast reactor safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents

  3. Aspects of nuclear safety at power plants and fuel cycle plants in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, N.I.; Efimov, E.; Dubovskij, B.G.; Dikarev, V.; Lyubchenko, V.; Kruglov, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the problems of organizing inspection monitoring of power plants including the development of some regulations and norms and the interaction between the USSR State Nuclear Safety Organization, scientific and designing organizations and power plants. The principles of computer use to work out advice for operational staff and warning signals and commands for the reactor control and protection system are discussed. Some attention is turned to the importance of using high-speed computers to calculate prompt reactivity values and to determine impurity concentrations in the coolant and margins to permissible operational limits. In particular, reactimeters are considered as signal generators in monitor and protection systems. Some problems of nuclear safety inspection, the issue and inculcation of some regulations and operational documents on nuclear safety, and instrumentation of plants reprocessing or processing fuel elements are presented. Methods of determining the critical parameters of technological units are described, together with the fundamental principles of fuel cycle plant nuclear safety, providing margin coefficients, accounting for deviations from the normal operational process and other problems, as well as methods of keeping the restrictions on nuclear safety requirements at fuel cycle plants. (author)

  4. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 4. Enhancing Safety Culture Through the Establishment of Safety Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateiwa, Kenji; Miyata, Koichi; Yahagi, Kimitoshi

    2001-01-01

    efficient management. To seek compatibility between safety culture and efficient management, and to build an agreeable common perception among the utility, regulatory body, and the public on rationalizing the safety level to the extent acceptable, two issues must be considered: (a) establishing safety goals and (b) quantifying the safety culture. As for the first issue, currently no generic safety goal for the nuclear industry is available in Japan. This causes difficulty in deciding whether or not a specific action that takes place in a plant leading to a certain amount of risk increment is acceptable. Therefore, it is important for us to have a safety goal established. By establishing the safety goal, we could utilize it for the following usage: 1. to enable prompt response in case a safety level has entered an unacceptable level; 2. to sustain and enhance the safety culture centered by risk information (sustaining safety culture and achieving rational management simultaneously); 3. to use public relations for plant activities, where condemnation for overlooking safety culture might arrive for a minor risk increasing activity. As for the second issue, we must devise a method to quantify the level of safety culture. This could be done based on the safety culture indicators listed in the appendix of IAEA INSAG-4 (Ref. 1). By quantifying the level of safety culture, a comprehensive safety level of a plant can be evaluated by integrating with the safety level based on PSA. For example, when considering on-line maintenance for specific equipment, it is important not only to assess the safety level in terms of PSA but also to assess the level of safety culture in order to have a comprehensive view of the safety level and to compare it with the safety goal. By both establishing safety goals and quantifying the level of safety culture in a nuclear power plant, the ability to assess the comprehensive safety level of a plant and acknowledge the quantitative margin from the safety

  5. Risk-informed analysis of the large break loss of coolant accident and PCT margin evaluation with the RISMC methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, T.H.; Liang, K.S.; Cheng, C.K.; Pei, B.S.; Patelli, E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • With RISMC methodology, both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties have been considered. • 14 probabilistically significant sequences have been identified and quantified. • A load spectrum for LBLOCA has been conducted with CPCT and SP of each dominant sequence. • Comparing to deterministic methodologies, the risk-informed PCT margin can be greater by 44–62 K. • The SP of the referred sequence to cover 99% in the load spectrum is only 5.07 * 10 −3 . • The occurrence probability of the deterministic licensing sequence is 5.46 * 10 −5 . - Abstract: For general design basis accidents, such as SBLOCA and LBLOCA, the traditional deterministic safety analysis methodologies are always applied to analyze events based on a so called surrogate or licensing sequence, without considering how low this sequence occurrence probability is. In the to-be-issued 10 CFR 50.46a, the LBLOCA will be categorized as accidents beyond design basis and the PCT margin shall be evaluated in a risk-informed manner. According to the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) methodology, a process has been suggested to evaluate the risk-informed PCT margin. Following the RISMC methodology, a load spectrum of PCT for LBLOCA has been generated for the Taiwan’s Maanshan Nuclear Power plant and 14 probabilistic significant sequences have been identified. It was observed in the load spectrum that the conditional PCT generally ascends with the descending sequence occurrence probability. With the load spectrum covering both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties, the risk-informed PCT margin can be evaluated by either expecting value estimation method or sequence probability coverage method. It was found that by comparing with the traditional deterministic methodology, the PCT margin evaluated by the RISMC methodology can be greater by 44–62 K. Besides, to have a cumulated occurrence probability over 99% in the load spectrum, the occurrence probability of the

  6. Risk-informed analysis of the large break loss of coolant accident and PCT margin evaluation with the RISMC methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, T.H. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liang, K.S., E-mail: ksliang@alum.mit.edu [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Cheng, C.K.; Pei, B.S. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Patelli, E. [Institute of Risk and Uncertainty, University of Liverpool, Room 610, Brodie Tower, L69 3GQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • With RISMC methodology, both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties have been considered. • 14 probabilistically significant sequences have been identified and quantified. • A load spectrum for LBLOCA has been conducted with CPCT and SP of each dominant sequence. • Comparing to deterministic methodologies, the risk-informed PCT margin can be greater by 44–62 K. • The SP of the referred sequence to cover 99% in the load spectrum is only 5.07 * 10{sup −3}. • The occurrence probability of the deterministic licensing sequence is 5.46 * 10{sup −5}. - Abstract: For general design basis accidents, such as SBLOCA and LBLOCA, the traditional deterministic safety analysis methodologies are always applied to analyze events based on a so called surrogate or licensing sequence, without considering how low this sequence occurrence probability is. In the to-be-issued 10 CFR 50.46a, the LBLOCA will be categorized as accidents beyond design basis and the PCT margin shall be evaluated in a risk-informed manner. According to the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) methodology, a process has been suggested to evaluate the risk-informed PCT margin. Following the RISMC methodology, a load spectrum of PCT for LBLOCA has been generated for the Taiwan’s Maanshan Nuclear Power plant and 14 probabilistic significant sequences have been identified. It was observed in the load spectrum that the conditional PCT generally ascends with the descending sequence occurrence probability. With the load spectrum covering both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties, the risk-informed PCT margin can be evaluated by either expecting value estimation method or sequence probability coverage method. It was found that by comparing with the traditional deterministic methodology, the PCT margin evaluated by the RISMC methodology can be greater by 44–62 K. Besides, to have a cumulated occurrence probability over 99% in the load spectrum, the occurrence probability

  7. PWR core safety analysis with 3-dimensional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensler, A.; Kühnel, K.; Kuch, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An overview of AREVA’s safety analysis codes their coupling is provided. • The validation base and licensing applications of these codes are summarized. • Coupled codes and methods provide improved margins and non-conservative results. • Examples for REA and inadvertent opening of the pressurizer safety valve are given. - Abstract: The main focus of safety analysis is to demonstrate the required safety level of the reactor core. Because of the demanding requirements, the quality of the safety analysis strongly affects the confidence in the operational safety of a reactor. To ensure the highest quality, it is essential that the methodology consists of appropriate analysis tools, an extensive validation base, and last but not least highly educated engineers applying the methodology. The sophisticated 3-dimensional core models applied by AREVA ensure that all physical effects relevant for safety are treated and the results are reliable and conservative. Presently AREVA employs SCIENCE, CASMO/NEMO and CASCADE-3D for pressurized water reactors. These codes are currently being consolidated into the next generation 3D code system ARCADIA®. AREVA continuously extends the validation base, including measurement campaigns in test facilities and comparisons of the predictions of steady state and transient measured data gathered from plants during many years of operation. Thus, the core models provide reliable and comprehensive results for a wide range of applications. For the application of these powerful tools, AREVA is taking benefit of its interdisciplinary know-how and international teamwork. Experienced engineers of different technical backgrounds are working together to ensure an appropriate interpretation of the calculation results, uncertainty analysis, along with continuously maintaining and enhancing the quality of the analysis methodologies. In this paper, an overview of AREVA’s broad application experience as well as the broad validation

  8. Accounting for future redesign to balance performance and development costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, D.; Haftka, R.T.; Sankar, B.V.

    2014-01-01

    Most components undergo tests after they are designed and are redesigned if necessary. Tests help designers find unsafe and overly conservative designs, and redesign can restore safety or increase performance. In general, the expected changes to the performance and reliability of the design after the test and redesign are not considered. In this paper, we explore how modeling a future test and redesign provides a company an opportunity to balance development costs versus performance by simultaneously designing the design and the post-test redesign rules during the initial design stage. Due to regulations and tradition, safety margin and safety factor based design is a common practice in industry as opposed to probabilistic design. In this paper, we show that it is possible to continue to use safety margin based design, and employ probability solely to select safety margins and redesign criteria. In this study, we find the optimum safety margins and redesign criterion for an integrated thermal protection system. These are optimized in order to find a minimum mass design with minimal redesign costs. We observed that the optimum safety margin and redesign criterion call for an initially conservative design and use the redesign process to trim excess weight rather than restore safety. This would fit well with regulatory constraints, since regulations usually impose minimum safety margins. - Highlights: • Modeling future tests and redesign allows balancing performance and development cost. • We optimize safety margins and redesign criteria for desired balance. • We design with safety margins, with probabilistic optimization to decide the margins. • Redesign also allowed the trade-off of conservativeness and performance. • In our case it paid to be conservative initially but redesign for more

  9. Safety margins of PWR irradiated vessels - The Chooz A issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedin, F; Barthelet, B [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Guilleret, J C

    1988-12-31

    In 1986, some irradiated specimen of CHOOZ A (SENA) vessel showed a significant excess of {delta} RTNDT to former previsions. The lack of data on one of the two irradiated shells, and discrepancies between dosimeters results and available previous fluence calculations whose accuracy was questionable, cause the safety authorities to require an important complementary work program before putting again the plant on the grid after 1987 fuel reloading. These works are presented and discussed. They lead to a state that a conservative to day value of the vessel RTNDT is 64 degrees Celsius and that there is no underclad defect in the vessel wall and welds. Then the plant was allowed to restart with certitude that vessel irradiation will not impair its lifetime. (author). 4 refs.

  10. Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: Relevance for human safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Patricia C., E-mail: ryanp@medimmune.com [MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Sleeman, Matthew A. [MedImmune, LLC, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Rebelatto, Marlon [MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Wang, Bing; Lu, Hong [MedImmune, LLC, Moutain View, CA (United States); Chen, Xiaomin [Novartis, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Wu, Chi-Yuan [MedImmune, LLC, Moutain View, CA (United States); Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Roskos, Lorin [MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Towers, Heidi [MedImmune, LLC, Cambridge (United Kingdom); McKeever, Kathleen; Dixit, Rakesh [MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26 weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11 weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (≥ 30 mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFRα signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress. - Highlights: • Mavrilimumab is a MAB targeting GM-CSFRα being developed for RA therapy. • Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys.

  11. Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: Relevance for human safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Patricia C.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Rebelatto, Marlon; Wang, Bing; Lu, Hong; Chen, Xiaomin; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Roskos, Lorin; Towers, Heidi; McKeever, Kathleen; Dixit, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26 weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11 weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (≥ 30 mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFRα signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress. - Highlights: • Mavrilimumab is a MAB targeting GM-CSFRα being developed for RA therapy. • Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys.

  12. NRC safety research in support of regulation--FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report, the fifth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1989. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  13. NRC safety research in support of regulation, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This report, the seventh in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1991. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  14. NRC safety research in support of regulation, FY 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This report, the sixth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1990. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  15. Failure and factors of safety in piping system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antaki, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    An important body of test and performance data on the behavior of piping systems has led to an ongoing reassessment of the code stress allowables and their safety margin. The codes stress allowables, and their factors of safety, are developed from limits on the incipient yield (for ductile materials), or incipient rupture (for brittle materials), of a test specimen loaded in simple tension. In this paper, we examine the failure theories introduced in the B31 and ASME III codes for piping and their inherent approximations compared to textbook failure theories. We summarize the evolution of factors of safety in ASME and B31 and point out that, for piping systems, it is appropriate to reconsider the concept and definition of factors of safety

  16. Safety characteristics of the US advanced liquid metal reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, P.M.; Dubberley, A.E.; Gyorey, G.L.; Lipps, A.J.; Wu, T.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) design employs innovative, passive features to provide an unprecedented level of public safety and the ability to demonstrate this safety to the public. The key features employed in the core design to produce the desired passive safety characteristics are: a small core with a tight restraint system, the use of metallic U-Pu-Zr fuel, control rod withdrawal limiters, and gas expansion modules. In addition, the reactor vessel and closure are designed to have the capability to withstand, with large margins, the maximum possible core disruptive accident without breach and radiological release. (author)

  17. A Study of Time Response for Safety-Related Operator Actions in Non-LOCA Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Seok; Lee, Sang Seob; Park, Min Soo; Lee, Gyu Cheon; Kim, Shin Whan [KEPCO E and C Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The classification of initiating events for safety analysis report (SAR) chapter 15 is categorized into moderate frequency events (MF), infrequent events (IF), and limiting faults (LF) depending on the frequency of its occurrence. For the non-LOCA safety analysis with the purpose to get construction or operation license, however, it is assumed that the operator response action to mitigate the events starts at 30 minutes after the initiation of the transient regardless of the event categorization. Such an assumption of corresponding operator response time may have over conservatism with the MF and IF events and results in a decrease in the safety margin compared to its acceptance criteria. In this paper, the plant conditions (PC) are categorized with the definitions in SAR 15 and ANS 51.1. Then, the consequence of response for safety-related operator action time is determined based on the PC in ANSI 58.8. The operator response time for safety analysis regarding PC are reviewed and suggested. The clarifying alarm response procedure would be required for the guideline to reduce the operator response time when the alarms indicate the occurrence of the transient.

  18. Time-dependent particle migration and margination in the pressure-driven channel flow of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qin M.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2018-03-01

    We present a theory to describe the time evolution of the red blood cell (RBC) and platelet concentration distributions in pressure-driven flow through a straight channel. This model is based on our previous theory for the steady-state distributions [Qi and Shaqfeh, Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 093102 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.093102] and captures the flow-induced nonuniformity of the concentrations of RBCs and platelets in the cross-flow direction. Starting with a uniform concentration, RBCs migrate away from the channel walls due to a shear-induced lift force and eventually reach steady state due to shear-induced diffusion, i.e., hydrodynamic "collisions" with other RBCs. On the other hand, platelets exit the cell-laden region due to RBC-platelet interactions and enter the cell-free layer, resulting in margination. To validate the theory, we also perform boundary integral simulations of blood flow in microchannels and directly compare various measureables between theory and simulation. The timescales associated with RBC migration and platelet margination are discussed in the context of the simulation and theory, and their importance in the function of microfluidic devices as well as the vascular network are elucidated. Due to the varying shear rate in pressure-driven flow and the wall-induced RBC lift, we report a separation of timescales for the transport in the near-wall region and in the bulk region. We also relate the transient problem to the axial variation of migration and margination, and we demonstrate how the relevant timescales can be used to predict corresponding entrance lengths. Our theory can serve as a fast and convenient alternative to large-scale simulations of these phenomena.

  19. Valuing productivity loss due to absenteeism: firm-level evidence from a Canadian linked employer-employee survey

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Huiying; Woodcock, Simon; Anis, Aslam H.

    2017-01-01

    In health economic evaluation studies, to value productivity loss due to absenteeism, existing methods use wages as a proxy value for marginal productivity. This study is the first to test the equality between wage and marginal productivity losses due to absenteeism separately for team workers and non-team workers. Our estimates are based on linked employer-employee data from Canada. Results indicate that team workers are more productive and earn higher wages than non-team workers. However, t...

  20. Research program Integrity of Components (FKS). A substantial contribution to component safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Roos, E.; Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives pursued are: (a) verify the quality of reactor pressure vessels in existing LWR-type reactors, and (b) quantify the safety margin using both specified and non-specified materials and welds. On the basis of knowledge obtained through earlier programmes, the research project was to examine in particular deviations from the specified materials properties, for more exact quantification of the safety margin before RPV failure. There are three major factors influencing the component performance until failure, which are aggregate material fatigue, flaws, loading conditions, and the research work was to focus on the materials properties. An item of main interest was to assess the impact of long service life on the materials properties, assuming particularly unfavourable boundary conditions for materials properties and operational loads. (orig./CB) [de

  1. Marginal cost application in the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twardy, L.; Rusak, H.

    1994-01-01

    Two kind of marginal costs, the short-run and the long-run, are defined. The former are applied in conditions when the load increase is not accompanied neither by the increase of the transmission capacity not the installed capacity while the latter assume new investments to expand the power system. The long-run marginal costs be used to forecast optimized development of the system. They contain two main components: the marginal costs of capacity and the marginal costs of energy. When the long-run marginal costs are calculated, each component is considered for particular voltage levels, seasons of the year, hours of the day - selected depending on the system reliability factor as well as on its load level. In the market economy countries the long-run marginal costs can be used for setting up the electric energy tariffs. (author). 7 refs, 11 figs

  2. Orogenic structural inheritance and rifted passive margin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Mora, Claudio A.; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Structural inheritance is related to mechanical weaknesses in the lithosphere due to previous tectonic events, e.g. rifting, subduction and collision. The North and South Atlantic rifted passive margins that formed during the breakup of Western Gondwana, are parallel to the older Caledonide and the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogenic belts. In the South Atlantic, 'old' mantle lithospheric fabric resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of olivine is suggested to play a role during rifted margin formation (Tommasi and Vauchez, 2001). Magnetometric and gravimetric mapping of onshore structures in the Camamu and Almada basins suggest that extensional faults are controlled by two different directions of inherited older Brasiliano structures in the upper lithosphere (Ferreira et al., 2009). In the South Atlantic Campos Basin, 3D seismic data indicate that inherited basement structures provide a first order control on basin structure (Fetter, 2009). Here we investigate the role of structural inheritance on the formation of rifted passive margins with high-resolution 2D thermo-mechanical numerical experiments. The numerical domain is 1200 km long and 600 km deep and represents the lithosphere and the sublithospheric mantle. Model experiments were carried out by creating self-consistent orogenic inheritance where a first phase of orogen formation is followed by extension. We focus in particular on the role of varying amount of orogenic shortening, crustal rheology, contrasting styles of orogen formation on rifted margin style, and the time delay between orogeny and subsequent rifted passive formation. Model results are compared to contrasting structural styles of rifted passive margin formation as observed in the South Atlantic. Ferreira, T.S., Caixeta, J.M., Lima, F.D., 2009. Basement control in Camamu and Almada rift basins. Boletim de Geociências da Petrobrás 17, 69-88. Fetter, M., 2009. The role of basement tectonic reactivation on the structural evolution

  3. Probabilistic calibration of safety coefficients for flawed components in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardillon, E.; Pitner, P.; Barthelet, B.; Remond, A.

    1996-01-01

    The rules that are currently under application to verify the acceptance of flaws in nuclear components rely on deterministic criteria supposed to ensure the safe operating of plants. The interest of having a precise and reliable method to evaluate the safety margins and the integrity of components led Electricite de France to launch an approach to link directly safety coefficients with safety levels. This paper presents a probabilistic methodology to calibrate safety coefficients in relation to reliability target values. The proposed calibration procedure applies to the case of a ferritic flawed pipe using the R6 procedure for assessing the integrity of the structure. (authors). 5 refs., 5 figs

  4. Probabilistic calibration of safety coefficients for flawed components in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardillon, E.; Pitner, P.; Barthelet, B.; Remond, A.

    1995-01-01

    The current rules applied to verify the flaws acceptance in nuclear components rely on deterministic criteria supposed to ensure the plant safe operation. The interest in have a precise and reliable method to evaluate the safety margins and the integrity of components led Electricite de France to launch an approach to link directly safety coefficients with safety levels. This paper presents a probabilistic methodology to calibrate safety coefficients in relation do reliability target values. The proposed calibration procedure applies to the case of a ferritic flawed pipe using the R 6 procedure for assessing the structure integrity. (author). 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Tectonostratigraphy of the Passive Continental Margin Offshore Indus Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, K.; Khan, M.; Liu, Y.; Farid, A.

    2017-12-01

    The tectonic evolution and structural complexities are poorly understood in the passive continental margin of the Offshore Indus of Pakistan. In the present study, an attempt has been made to interpret the structural trends and seismic stratigraphic framework in relation to the tectonics of the region. Seismic reflection data revealed tectonically controlled, distinct episodes of normal faulting representing rifting at different ages and transpression in the Late Eocene time. This transpression has resulted in the reactivation of the Pre-Cambrian basement structures. The movement of these basement structures has considerably affected the younger sedimentary succession resulting in push up structures resembling anticlines. The structural growth of the push-up structures was computed. The most remarkable tectonic setting in the region is represented by the normal faulting and by the basement uplift which divides the rifting and transpression stages. Ten mappable seismic sequences have been identified on the seismic records. A Jurassic aged paleo-shelf has also been identified on all regional seismic profiles which is indicative of Indian-African Plates separation during the Jurassic time. Furthermore, the backstripping technique was applied which has been proved to be a powerful technique to quantify subsidence/uplift history of rift-type passive continental margins. The back strip curves suggest that transition from an extensional rifted margin to transpression occurred during Eocene time (50-30 Ma). The backstripping curves show uplift had happened in the area. We infer that the uplift has occurred due to the movement of basement structures by the transpression movements of Arabian and Indian Plates. The present study suggests that the structural styles and stratigraphy of the Offshore Indus Pakistan were significantly affected by the tectonic activities during the separation of Gondwanaland in the Mesozoic and northward movement of the Indian Plate, post

  6. Workers' marginal costs of commuting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ommeren, Jos; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper applies a dynamic search model to estimate workers' marginal costs of commuting, including monetary and time costs. Using data on workers' job search activity as well as moving behaviour, for the Netherlands, we provide evidence that, on average, workers' marginal costs of one hour...

  7. Seismic Margin Assessment for Research Reactor using Fragility based Fault Tree Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwag, Shinyoung; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jong-Min; Ryu, Jeong-Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The research reactor has been often subjected to external hazards during the design lifetime. Especially, a seismic event can be one of significant threats to the failure of structure system of the research reactor. This failure is possibly extended to the direct core damage of the reactor. For this purpose, the fault tree for structural system failure leading to the core damage under an earthquake accident is developed. The failure probabilities of basic events are evaluated as fragility curves of log-normal distributions. Finally, the plant-level seismic margin is investigated by the fault tree analysis combining with fragility data and the critical path is identified. The plant-level probabilistic seismic margin assessment using the fragility based fault tree analysis was performed for quantifying the safety of research reactor to a seismic hazard. For this, the fault tree for structural system failure leading to the core damage of the reactor under a seismic accident was developed. The failure probabilities of basic events were evaluated as fragility curves of log-normal distributions.

  8. Pathology of nodal marginal zone lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileri, Stefano; Ponzoni, Maurilio

    Nodal marginal zone B cell lymphomas (NMZLs) are a rare group of lymphoid disorders part of the spectrum of marginal zone B-cell lymphomas, which encompass splenic marginal one B-cell lymphoma (SMZL) and extra nodal marginal zone of B-cell lymphoma (EMZL), often of MALT-type. Two clinicopathological forms of NMZL are recognized: adult-type and pediatric-type, respectively. NMZLs show overlapping features with other types of MZ, but distinctive features as well. In this review, we will focus on the salient distinguishing features of NMZL mostly under morphological/immunophenotypical/molecular perspectives in views of the recent acquisitions and forthcoming updated 2016 WHO classification of lymphoid malignancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety issues on advanced fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, H.; Krebs, W.D. [Siemens AG, Bereich Energieerzeugug (KWU), Erlangen (Germany). Geschaeftsgebiet Nukleare Energieerzeugung

    1998-05-01

    In the recent years a general discussion has started whether unsolved safety issues are related to advanced fuel. Advanced fuel is in this context a summary of features like high burnup, improved clad materials, low leakage loading pattern with high peaking factors etc. The design basis accidents RIA and Loca are of special interest for this discussion. From the Siemens point of view RIA is not a safety issue. There are sufficient margins between the enthalpy rise calculated by modern 3D methods and the fuel failures which occurred in RIA simulation tests when the effect of pulse width is taken into account. The evaluation of possible uncertainties for the established Loca criteria (17% equivalent corrosion, 1200 C clad temperature) for high burnup makes sense. But fuel with high burnup has significantly lower peaking factors than fuel with lower burnup. This gives sufficient margin counterbalancing possible uncertainties. In contrast to the above incomplete control rod insertion at higher burnup is potentially a real safety issue. Although Siemens fuel was not affected by the reported incidents they addressed the problem and checked that they have sufficient design margin for their fuel. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den letzten Jahren hat eine allgemeine Diskussion begonnen, ob mit fortgeschrittenen Brennelementen (BE) ungeklaerte Sicherheitsprobleme verbunden sind. Dabei ist `Fortgeschrittene Brennelemente` ein Sammelbegriff fuer hohe Abbraende, verbesserte Huellrohrmaterialien, Low-leakage-Einsatzplanungen mit hohen Heissstellenfaktoren usw. Die Auslegungsstoerfaelle RIA und Loca sind in dieser Diskussion von besonderer Bedeutung. Aus der Sicht von Siemens ist der RIA kein Sicherheitsproblem. Zwischen den mit modernen 3D-Methoden berechneten Enthalpieerhoehungen und den in RIA-Experimenten aufgetretenen Brennstabdefekten bestehen ausreichende Abstaende, wenn der Einfluss der Pulsbreite beruecksichtigt wird. Die Untersuchung eventueller Unsicherheiten bei hohen

  10. Westinghouse Advances in Passive Plant Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H. J.; Manager, General; Gerstenhaber, E.

    1993-01-01

    On June 26, 1992, Westinghouse submitted the Ap600 Standard Safety Analysis Report and comprehensive PIRA results to the U. S. NRC for review as part of the Ap600 design certification program. This major milestone was met on time on a schedule set more than 3 years before submittal and is the result of the cooperative efforts of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Requirements Program, and the Westinghouse Ap600 design team. These efforts were initiated in 1985 to develop a 600 MW advanced light water reactor plant design based on specific technical requirements established to provide the safety, simplicity, reliability, and economics necessary for the next generation of nuclear power plants. The Ap600 design achieves the ALRR safety requirements through ample design margins, simplified safety systems based on natural driving forces, and on a human-engineered man-machine interface system. Extensive Probabilistic Risk evolution, have recently shown that even if none of the active defense-in-depth safety systems are available, the passive systems alone meet safety goals. Furthermore, many tests in an extensive test program have begun or have been completed. Early tests show that passive safety perform well and meet design expectations

  11. Stigma, marginalization and psychosocial well-being of orphans in Rwanda: exploring the mediation role of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Tehetna Alemu; Pirttilä-Backman, Anna-Maija; Punamäki, Raija-Leena

    2016-01-01

    Stigma and marginalization are one of the major challenges orphans face in their daily lives, particularly in developing countries, but little is known about their impacts on mental health. This study examines how orphan-related characteristics, stigma and marginalization are associated with psychosocial well-being. It further analyses the role of social support in mediating between stigma and marginalization and mental health, indicated by emotional well-being and mental distress. The participants in this study were 430 Rwandan orphans who were 10-25 years of age, and of whom 179 were females and 251 were males. Results showed that high levels of stigma and marginalization were associated with a lower level of emotional well-being and higher levels of mental distress. A mediation analysis indicated that low level of social support due to stigma and marginalization contributed significantly to low level of emotional well-being. Once stigma, marginalization and social support were fully accounted for, AIDS orphans exhibited higher levels of mental distress than those who were orphaned by genocide or other causes. Future interventions designed to reduce stigma and marginalization for orphans and actions that facilitate social support can significantly improve emotional well-being and reduce mental distress among orphans.

  12. Potential thermal margin available from changes in the appendix K rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadek, F.F.; Gresham, J.A.; Hochreiter, L.E.; McIntyre, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Over a decade of research has been completed on light water reactor safety. This research was the result of the 1972 core cooling hearing in the United States which resulted in the Appendix K rule for evaluating safety system performance. The objectives of the research were to confirm that the Appendix K rule was conservative, determine and quantify the amount of conservatism such that the excess conservatism could be reviewed by future rule changes, and provide a basis for future rule changes. The lightwater reactor research for the large break LOCA has, in the main, been completed and the first two objectives of the research program have been achieved. Presently there are ongoing efforts in the United States to find methods of factoring into the licensing process the results of this research. This paper discusses the impact on the W safety analysis if some of the Appendix K requirements could be relaxed. Calculations are presented with revised models which have been shown, by the LWR program, to be more accurate and which have the identified excessive conservatisms removed. LOCA calculations are presented to show the increased power capability, as well as power peaking margin which can result from such changes. These calculations are also compared with best estimate calculations using more mechanistic computer codes

  13. Biodiversity and agro-ecology in field margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cauwer, B; Reheul, D; Nijs, I; Milbau, A

    2005-01-01

    This multidisciplinary study investigates agro-ecological functions (nature conservation, agriculture, environment) and implications of newly created, mown sown and unsown field margin strips installed on ex-arable land to increase biodiversity. From conservational concern, the development of species rich field margin strips was not strongly affected by the installed type of margin strip since species diversity converged over time, whether strips were sown or not. Convergence between unsown and sown margin strips occurred also in terms of species composition: unsown and sown strips became similar over time. Mowing without removal of cuttings significantly reduced species richness, yielded more grassy margin strips and delayed similarity in species composition between sown and unsown margin strips. Species richness on the longer term was not significantly affected by light regime nor by disturbance despite significant temporary effects shortly after the disturbance event. On the contrary vegetation composition in terms of importance of functional groups changed after disturbance: the share of spontaneous species within functional groups increased resulting in higher similarity between the sown and unsown vegetation. Furthermore risk of invasion was highest in the disturbed unsown community on the unshaded side of a tree lane. A positive effect of botanical diversity on insect number and diversity was found. However the effects of botanical diversity on insect number was mediated by light regime. At high light availability differences between plant communities were more pronounced compared to low light availablilty. The abundance of some insect families was dependent on the vegetation composition. Furthermore light availability significantly influenced insect diversity as well as the spatial distribution of families. From agricultural concern, installing margin strips by sowing a species mixture and a mowing regime with removal of cuttings are good practices to

  14. Regulatory practices of radiation safety of SNF transportation in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuryndina, Lidia; Kuryndin, Anton; Stroganov, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    This paper overviews current regulatory practices for the assurance of nuclear and radiation safety during railway transportation of SNF on the territory of Russian Federation from NPPs to longterm-storage of reprocessing sites. The legal and regulatory requirements (mostly compliant with IAEA ST-1), licensing procedure for NM transportation are discussed. The current procedure does not require a regulatory approval for each particular shipment if the SNF fully comply with the Rosatom's branch standard and is transported in approved casks. It has been demonstrated that SNF packages compliant with the branch standard, which is knowingly provide sufficient safety margin, will conform to the federal level regulations. The regulatory approval is required if a particular shipment does not comply with the branch standard. In this case, the shipment can be approved only after regulatory review of Applicant's documents to demonstrate that the shipment still conformant to the higher level (federal) regulations. The regulatory review frequently needs a full calculation test of the radiation safety assurance. This test can take a lot of time. That's why the special calculation tools were created in SEC NRS. These tools aimed for precision calculation of the radiation safety parameters by SNF transportation use preliminary calculated Green's functions. Such approach allows quickly simulate any source distribution and optimize spent fuel assemblies placement in cask due to the transport equation property of linearity relatively the source. The short description of calculation tools are presented. Also, the paper discusses foreseen implications related to transportation of mixed-oxide SNF. (author)

  15. Seismic safety margin research program. Program plan, Revision I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Tokarz, F.J.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Cummings, G.E.; Chou, C.K.; Vagliente, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    The overall objective of the SSMRP is to develop mathematical models that realistically predict the probability of radioactive releases from seismically induced events in nuclear power plants. These models will be used for four purposes: (1) To perform sensitivity studies to determine the weak links in seismic methodology. The weak links will then be improved by research and development. (2) To estimate the probability of release for a plant. It is believed that the major difficulty in the program will be to obtain acceptably small confidence limits on the probability of release. (3) To estimate the conservatisms in the Standard Review Plan (SRP) seismic design methodology. This will be done by comparing the results of the SRP methodology and the methodology resulting from the research and development in (1). (4) To develop an improved seismic design methodology based on probability. The Phase I objective proposed in this report is to develop mathematical models which will accomplish the purposes No. 1 and No. 2 with simplified assumptions such as linear elastic analysis, limited assessment on component fragility (considering only accident sequences leading to core melt), and simplified safety system

  16. Reactivation of precambrian faults on the southwestern continental margin of India: Evidence from gravity anomalies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, V.; Ramana, M.V.; Rao, D.G.

    con- fi~ration of the western continental margin, with various structural styles, has been considered as a single unit, even though there exists a difference of opinion about the origin and evolution of the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge complex...’tVATION OF PRECAMBRIAN FAULTS ON THE SW CON~~E~AL MARGIN OF INDIA 337 shelf break due to the steep topographic relief of shelf. Furthermore, the gradients might have played a dominant role in shaping the bathymetry when the block movement took place along the pre...

  17. Seismic margins and calibration of piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, L.C.; Tsai, N.C.; Yang, M.S.; Wong, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its objective is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant and to determine major contributors to the state-of-the-art seismic and systems analysis process and explicitly includes the uncertainties in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. In Phase I of SSMRP, the overall seismic risk assessment methodology was developed and assembled. The application of this methodology to the seismic PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant has been documented. This report documents the method deriving response factors. The response factors, which relate design calculated responses to best estimate values, were used in the seismic response determination of piping systems for a simplified seismic probablistic risk assessment. 13 references, 31 figures, 25 tables

  18. Safety assessment of green tea based beverages and dried green tea extracts as nutritional supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekant, Wolfgang; Fujii, Kenkichi; Shibata, Eiichiro; Morita, Osamu; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2017-08-05

    The safety of green tea infusions and green tea extract (GTE)-based products is reviewed regarding catechins. Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), the major catechin present in green tea, is suspected of being responsible for liver toxicity reported in humans consuming food supplements. Intake of EGCG with green tea infusions and GTE-based beverages is up to about 450mg EGCG/person/day in Europe and higher in Asia. Consumption of green tea is not associated with liver damage in humans, and green tea infusion and GTE-based beverages are considered safe in the range of historical uses. In animal studies, EGCG's potency for liver effects is highly dependent on conditions of administration. Use of NOAELs from bolus administration to derive a tolerable upper intake level applying the margin of safety concept results in acceptable EGCG-doses lower than those from one cup of green tea. NOAELs from toxicity studies applying EGCG with diet/split of the daily dose are a better point of departure for risk characterization. In clinical intervention studies, liver effects were not observed after intakes below 600mg EGCG/person/day. Thus, a tolerable upper intake level of 300mg EGCG/person/day is proposed for food supplements; this gives a twofold safety margin to clinical studies that did not report liver effects and a margin of safety of 100 to the NOAELs in animal studies with dietary administration of green tea catechins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Light Reflectance Spectroscopy to Detect Positive Surgical Margins on Prostate Cancer Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Monica S C; Lay, Aaron H; Wang, Xinlong; Kapur, Payal; Ozayar, Asim; Sayah, Maryam; Zeng, Li; Liu, Hanli; Roehrborn, Claus G; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative frozen section analysis is not routinely performed to determine positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy due to time requirements and unproven clinical usefulness. Light reflectance spectroscopy, which measures light intensity reflected or backscattered from tissues, can be applied to differentiate malignant from benign tissue. We used a novel light reflectance spectroscopy probe to evaluate positive surgical margins on ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens and correlate its findings with pathological examination. Patients with intermediate to high risk disease undergoing radical prostatectomy were enrolled. Light reflectance spectroscopy was performed on suspected malignant and benign prostate capsule immediately following organ extraction. Each light reflectance spectroscopy at 530 to 830 nm was analyzed and correlated with pathological results. A regression model and forward sequential selection algorithm were developed for optimal feature selection. Eighty percent of light reflectance spectroscopy data were selected to train a logistic regression model, which was evaluated by the remaining 20% data. This was repeated 5 times to calculate averaged sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Light reflectance spectroscopy analysis was performed on 17 ex vivo prostate specimens, on which a total of 11 histologically positive and 22 negative surgical margins were measured. Two select features from 700 to 830 nm were identified as unique to malignant tissue. Cross-validation when performing the predictive model showed that the optical probe predicted positive surgical margins with 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 86% accuracy and an AUC of 0.95. Light reflectance spectroscopy can identify positive surgical margins accurately in fresh ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens. Further study is required to determine whether such analysis may be used in real time to improve surgical decision making and decrease positive surgical margin rates

  20. Comparison of hydrothermal activity between the Adriatic and the Red Sea rift margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Philip; Incerpi, Nicolò; Birkle, Peter; Lacsamana, Elizabeth; Manatschal, Gianreto; Agar, Susan; Zhang, Shuo; Borsato, Ron

    2017-04-01

    Detailed field studies, and access to high-quality seismic reflection and refraction data have led to an improved understanding of the architecture and evolution of magma poor and magma rich margins. Associated with the spatial-temporal evolution of the rift, it is evident that there are evolving, extensive, fluid-rock interactions due to the infiltration of fluids within the sediment, basement and lithospheric mantle. Key questions therefore arise: What are the different fluid-rock reactions that can be typed to different geodynamic stages of the rift evolution? What are their compositions and how do they interact with their environment (basement, sediments, evaporites, hydrosphere, and magmatism)? What are the implications for the evolution of the margin rheology, thermal structure, depositional environments/organic matter maturity, and reservoir quality? The Adriatic paleo-rifted margin is preserved in both SE Switzerland and northern Italy. The field exposures provide a unique opportunity to study the fluid flow history of a hyperextended magma poor extensional margin. Analysis of breccias, cement veins and replacement minerals reveal that the margin records a complex, long-lasting history of dolomitization, calcification and silicification during the Jurassic rifting. The Red Sea by contrast is a young rifted margin. It differs from the paleo-Adriatic margin by several characteristics: volcanism is more evident, and syn-tectonic sediments, including evaporites (halite and anhydrite) are thicker. Several core and fluid samples are available from both onshore and offshore wells, which reveal rift-related hydrothermal alteration. In addition, we find evidence for the presence of an extreme dynamic hydraulic system with infiltration of surface water into sub-salt units during Late Pleistocene. In this study we present results from petrographic and geochemical analysis of basement and sedimentary rocks from Adriatic field-derived samples and core/subsurface fluid

  1. Cretaceous to Recent Asymetrical Subsidence of South American and West African Conjugate Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenning, J.; Mann, P.

    2017-12-01

    Two divergent interpretations have been proposed for South American rifted-passive margins: the "mirror hypothesis" proposes that the rifted margins form symmetrically from pure shear of the lithosphere while upper-plate-lower plate models propose that the rifted margins form asymmetrically by simple shear. Models based on seismic reflection and refraction imaging and comparison of conjugate, rifted margins generally invoke a hybrid stretching process involving elements of both end member processes along with the effects of mantle plumes active during the rift and passive margin phases. We use subsidence histories of 14, 1-7 km-deep exploration wells located on South American and West African conjugate pairs now separated by the South Atlantic Ocean, applying long-term subsidence to reveal the symmetry or asymmetry of the underlying, conjugate, rift processes. Conjugate pairs characterize the rifted margin over a distance of 3500 km and include: Colorado-South Orange, Punta Del Este-North Orange, South Pelotas-Lüderitz and the North Pelotas-Walvis Basins. Of the four conjugate pairs, more rapid subsidence on the South American plate is consistently observed with greater initial rift and syn-rift subsidence rates of >60m/Ma (compared to 100 m/Ma are observed offshore South Africa between approximately 120-80 Ma, compatible with onset of the post-rift thermal sag phase. During this period the majority of burial is completed and rates remain low at Argentina/Uruguay displays more gradual subsidence throughout the Cretaceous, consistently averaging a moderate 15-30m/Ma. By the end of this stage there is a subsequent increase to 25-60 m/Ma within the last 20 Ma, interpreted to reflect lithospheric loading due to increased sedimentation rates during the Cenozoic. This increase in subsidence rate is not seen in the African conjugate section where the majority of sediments bypassed the highly aggraded Cretaceous shelf. Initially greater on the Brazilian margin compared to

  2. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.A.; Springfels, D.; Schubring, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed

  3. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.A., E-mail: kjordan@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 106 UFTR Bldg., PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Springfels, D., E-mail: dspringfels@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 106 UFTR Bldg., PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Schubring, D., E-mail: dlschubring@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, PO Box 118300, Gainesville, FL 32611-8300 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed.

  4. Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, Version 2. English translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, Version 2 essentially includes the description of the Supplement Report to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, released in 1995, into the first version of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, published in 1988. The following two points are new: (1) exemplifying safety margins related to modeled dissolution and extraction processes, (2) describing evaluation methods and alarm system for criticality accidents. Revision has been made based on previous studies for the chapter that treats modeling the fuel system: e.g., the fuel grain size that the system can be regarded as homogeneous, non-uniformity effect of fuel solution, an burnup credit. This revision has solved the inconsistencies found in the first version between the evaluation of errors found in JACS code system and the criticality condition data that were calculated based on the evaluation. This report is an English translation of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook, Version 2, originally published in Japanese as JAERI 1340 in 1999. (author)

  5. Exactly marginal deformations from exceptional generalised geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, Anthony [Merton College, University of Oxford,Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JD (United Kingdom); Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford,Andrew Wiles Building, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Gabella, Maxime [Institute for Advanced Study,Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Graña, Mariana [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA/Saclay,91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Petrini, Michela [Sorbonne Université, UPMC Paris 05, UMR 7589, LPTHE,75005 Paris (France); Waldram, Daniel [Department of Physics, Imperial College London,Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-27

    We apply exceptional generalised geometry to the study of exactly marginal deformations of N=1 SCFTs that are dual to generic AdS{sub 5} flux backgrounds in type IIB or eleven-dimensional supergravity. In the gauge theory, marginal deformations are parametrised by the space of chiral primary operators of conformal dimension three, while exactly marginal deformations correspond to quotienting this space by the complexified global symmetry group. We show how the supergravity analysis gives a geometric interpretation of the gauge theory results. The marginal deformations arise from deformations of generalised structures that solve moment maps for the generalised diffeomorphism group and have the correct charge under the generalised Reeb vector, generating the R-symmetry. If this is the only symmetry of the background, all marginal deformations are exactly marginal. If the background possesses extra isometries, there are obstructions that come from fixed points of the moment maps. The exactly marginal deformations are then given by a further quotient by these extra isometries. Our analysis holds for any N=2 AdS{sub 5} flux background. Focussing on the particular case of type IIB Sasaki-Einstein backgrounds we recover the result that marginal deformations correspond to perturbing the solution by three-form flux at first order. In various explicit examples, we show that our expression for the three-form flux matches those in the literature and the obstruction conditions match the one-loop beta functions of the dual SCFT.

  6. Ameliorative design for CARR safety rod drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuewei; Luo Zhong; Zhen Jianxiao; Wang Yulin

    2014-01-01

    The problem of safety rod accident dropped during C commissioning phase for China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) was analyzed, and the reason was that the solenoid valve in safety rod drive mechanism (SRDM) driven loop was breakdown because of long-playing work. To solve this safe hidden trouble, SRDM was redesigned, and a new type of 'hydro lifting-hydro and electromagnetic holding' SRDM was presented, using Ansoft Maxwell to make a finite element analysis on new SRDM, working out electromagnetic field distribution and electromagnetic force of new SRDM. The results show that the value of electromagnetic force produced by electromagnetic force holding unit reaches 2.12 times about the weight of safety rod drive line, and it has some margins. (authors)

  7. Public and Private Physical Affection Differences between Same-Sex and Different-Sex Couples: The Role of Perceived Marginalization

    OpenAIRE

    Amani El-Alayli; Erin Kent

    2011-01-01

    Despite its connection with relationship satisfaction, research on physical affection is scarce and fails to disentangle private and public displays of affection. It is important to examine both types if marginalized couples are less comfortable displaying affection publicly. The present study examined whether same-sex couples display less public (but not private) physical affection than different-sex couples due to stronger feelings of relationship marginalization. It also examined how publ...

  8. Integral fast reactor concept inherent safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFT development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. The design features that together fulfill these goals are: 1) a liquid metal (sodium) coolant, 2) a pool-type reactor primary system configuration, 3) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and 4) an integral fuel cycle. This paper reviews the design features that contribute to the safety margins inherent to the IFR concept. Special emphasis is placed on the ability of the IFR design to accommodate anticipated transients without scram (ATWS)

  9. Integral Fast Reactor concept inherent safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. The design features that together fulfill these goals are: (1) a liquid metal (sodium) coolant, (2) a pool-type reactor primary system configuration, (3) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (4) an integral fuel cycle. This paper reviews the design features that contribute to the safety margins inherent to the IFR concept. Special emphasis is placed on the ability of the IFR design to accommodate anticipated transients without scram (ATWS)

  10. Evaluation of fission product worth margins in PWR spent nuclear fuel burnup credit calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, R.N.; Finck, P.J.; Jammes, C.; Stenberg, C.G.

    1999-01-01

    Current criticality safety calculations for the transportation of irradiated LWR fuel make the very conservative assumption that the fuel is fresh. This results in a very substantial overprediction of the actual k eff of the transportation casks; in certain cases, this decreases the amount of spent fuel which can be loaded in a cask, and increases the cost of transporting the spent fuel to the repository. Accounting for the change of reactivity due to fuel depletion is usually referred to as ''burnup credit.'' The US DOE is currently funding a program aimed at establishing an actinide only burnup credit methodology (in this case, the calculated reactivity takes into account the buildup or depletion of a limited number of actinides). This work is undergoing NRC review. While this methodology is being validated on a significant experimental basis, it implicitly relies on additional margins: in particular, the absorption of neutrons by certain actinides and by all fission products is not taken into account. This provides an important additional margin and helps guarantee that the methodology is conservative provided these neglected absorption are known with reasonable accuracy. This report establishes the accuracy of fission product absorption rate calculations: (1) the analysis of European fission product worth experiments demonstrates that fission product cross-sections available in the US provide very good predictions of fission product worth; (2) this is confirmed by a direct comparison of European and US cross section evaluations; (3) accuracy of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) fission product content predictions is established in a recent ORNL report where several SNF isotopic assays are analyzed; and (4) these data are then combined to establish in a conservative manner the fraction of the predicted total fission product absorption which can be guaranteed based on available experimental data

  11. Thermal-hydraulic transient characteristics of ship-propulsion reactor investigated through safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiki, Kazuo; Asaka, Hideaki; Ishida, Toshihisa

    1986-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic behaviors in the reactor of Nuclear Ship ''Mutsu'' were investigated through safety evaluation of operational transients by using RETRAN and COBRA-IV codes. The results were compared to the transient behaviors of typical commercial PWR and the characteristics of transient thermal-hydraulic behaviors in ship-loaded reactor were figured out. ''Mutsu'' reactor has larger thermal margin than commercial PWR because it is designed to be used as ship-propulsion power source in the load-following operation mode. This margin makes transient behavior in general milder than in commercial PWR but high opening pressure set point of main-steam safety valves leads poor heat-sink condition after reactor trip. The effects of other small-sized components are also investigated. The findings in the paper will be helpful in the design of future advanced reactor for nuclear ship. (author)

  12. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Keon Joong; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Hui Dong; Park, Chang Kyu

    1993-06-01

    To improve the nuclear safety, this project is divided into three areas which are the development of safety analysis technology, the development of severe accident analysis technology and the development of integrated safety assessment technology. 1. The development of safety analysis technology. The present research aims at the development of necessary technologies for nuclear safety analysis in Korea. Establishment of the safety analysis technologies enables to reduce the expenditure both by eliminating excessive conservatisms incorporated in nuclear reactor design and by increasing safety margins in operation. It also contributes to improving plant safety through realistic analyses of the Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP). 2. The development of severe accident analysis technology. By the computer codes (MELCOR and CONTAIN), the in-vessel and the ex-vessel severe accident phenomena are simulated. 3. The development of integrated safety assessment technology. In the development of integrated safety assessment techniques, the included research areas are the improvement of PSA computer codes, the basic study on the methodology for human reliability analysis (HRA) and common cause failure (CCF). For the development of the level 2 PSA computer code, the basic research for the interface between level 1 and 2 PSA, the methodology for the treatment of containment event tree are performed. Also the new technologies such as artificial intelligence, object-oriented programming techniques are used for the improvement of computer code and the assessment techniques

  13. Research on Safety Factor of Dam Slope of High Embankment Dam under Seismic Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the constant development of construction technology of embankment dam, the constructed embankment dam becomes higher and higher, and the embankment dam with its height over 200m will always adopt the current design criteria of embankment dam only suitable for the construction of embankment dam lower than 200m in height. So the design criteria of high embankment dam shall be improved. We shall calculate the stability and safety factors of dam slope of high embankment dam under different dam height, slope ratio and different seismic intensity based on ratio of safety margin, and clarify the change rules of stability and safety factors of dam slope of high embankment dam with its height over 200m. We calculate the ratio of safety margin of traditional and reliable method by taking the stable, allowable and reliability index 4.2 of dam slope of high embankment dam with its height over 200m as the standard value, and conduct linear regression for both. As a result, the conditions, where 1.3 is considered as the stability and safety factors of dam slope of high embankment dam with its height over 200m under seismic condition and 4.2 as the allowable and reliability index, are under the same risk control level.

  14. Alternate approaches to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    For the US nuclear power industry to expand, a greatly increased portion of the public must come to share the industry's confidence in reactor safety. Major obstacles to establishing this confidence are frequent incidents with potential safety implications and a lack of incontrovertible proof that the risk of a major accident is very low. The most important step toward overcoming these obstacles would be for each utility to operate, maintain, and evaluate its reactors according to far higher standards. With improvements in reliability and safety margins, existing plants would be a stimulus for building new ones rather than an impediment. If changes to the operation of existing plants and improvements to the design of future ones were inadequate, the only hope for a revival of the nuclear industry would be an alternative reactor so obviously safe that risk would no longer be an issue. Three possible concepts are the modular high-temperature gas reactor, the process inherent ultimate safety reactor, and the liquid-metal fast reactor. All three have inherent safety features that should make a meltdown essentially impossible. They cannot know just how great the advantage of these alternate reactors would be, but the benefits of developing one or more of the concepts appear great

  15. Professional Commitment and Professional Marginalism in Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalashnikov A.I.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews teachers' attitudes towards the teaching profession which can be expressed both in professional commitment and in professional marginalism. The dominance of professional marginalism could affect destructively the students as well as the teacher’s personality, hence the issues related to the content of personal position of a marginal and the rate of marginalism among teachers. It was suggested that marginalism could be revealed in the study of professional commitment. The study involved 81 teachers of Sverdlovsk secondary schools aged 21—60 years with work experience ranging from 1 month to 39 years. The Professional Commitment Questionnaire was used as the study technique. The results showed that negative emotional attitude towards the profession and reluctance to leave the profession were grouped as a separate factor. The dispersion factor was 12,5%. The factor loadings ranged from 0.42 to 0.84. The study proved that professional marginalism in teachers includes dissatisfaction with work, feelings of resentment against profession and an unwillingness to leave the profession.

  16. A quantitative analysis of transtensional margin width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2018-06-01

    Continental rifted margins show variations between a few hundred to almost a thousand kilometres in their conjugated widths from the relatively undisturbed continent to the oceanic crust. Analogue and numerical modelling results suggest that the conjugated width of rifted margins may have a relationship to their obliquity of divergence, with narrower margins occurring for higher obliquity. We here test this prediction by analysing the obliquity and rift width for 26 segments of transtensional conjugate rifted margins in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. We use the plate reconstruction software GPlates (http://www.gplates.org) for different plate rotation models to estimate the direction and magnitude of rifting from the initial phases of continental rifting until breakup. Our rift width corresponds to the distance between the onshore maximum topography and the last identified continental crust. We find a weak positive correlation between the obliquity of rifting and rift width. Highly oblique margins are narrower than orthogonal margins, as expected from analogue and numerical models. We find no relationships between rift obliquities and rift duration nor the presence or absence of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs).

  17. A Study on the Optimization Method of the Main Steam Safety Valve Characteristics for Overpressure Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Ryun; Kim, Ung Soo; Pakr, Min Soo; Lee, Gyu Cheon; Kim, Shin Whan [KEPCO EnC Company Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The safety analysis on Loss of Condenser Vacuum (LOCV) event should be performed in accordance with Standard Review Plan (SRP) for pressurized water reactor. SRP is prepared for the guidance of staff reviewers in the office of nuclear reactor regulation in performing safety reviews of applications to operate nuclear power plants. The recent SRP requires that peak pressure in the primary and secondary system be evaluated separately since initial conditions are different for the primary and secondary systems. This paper presents an evaluation of the effect of the MSSVs characteristics with the analysis of LOCV event in order to have the sufficient safety margin of RCS and secondary system. This study has been conducted with the sensitivity analysis on the design parameters of MSSV which are the opening logic, set-point pressure and discharging capacity to the atmosphere. In this work, the effect of optimization method for the MSSV is evaluated from the viewpoints of opening logic change, discharge capacity increase and opening set-point decrease to mitigate the RCS and secondary system peak pressure resulting in additional safety margin. From the results, the optimization method is identified to be effective in reducing system peak pressure, especially for the secondary system. The opening logic which has increased number of MSSVs in the 1''st MSSV bank remarkably decreases the pressure of the secondary system. In the cases of 1/1/3, 2/1/2, the peak pressure of the main steam system is limited to the set-point of the 3''rd bank of MSSVs, and in the case of 3/1/1 it is limited to the set- point of the 2''nd bank of MSSVs. Consequently, the opening logic of the MSSVs is very important parameter to have the safety margin of the secondary system. The capacity and set-point of MSSVs do not involve increasing the peak pressure of RCS. It is recommended that the new design method of MSSVs as shown in this study be adopted to have the sufficient

  18. A systematic approach for safety evidence collection in the safety-critical domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, H.; Wu, Ji; Yuan, C.; Luo, Y.; Brand, van den M.G.J.; Engelen, L.J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In order to show that the required safety objectives are met, it is necessary to collect safety evidence in the form of consistent and complete data. However, manual safety evidence collection is usually tedious and time-consuming, due to a large number of artifacts and implicit relations between

  19. On the evaluation of marginal expected shortfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In the analysis of systemic risk, Marginal Expected Shortfall may be considered to evaluate the marginal impact of a single stock on the market Expected Shortfall. These quantities are generally computed using log-returns, in particular when there is also a focus on returns conditional distribution....... In this case, the market log-return is only approximately equal to the weighed sum of equities log-returns. We show that the approximation error is large during turbulent market phases, with a subsequent impact on Marginal Expected Shortfall. We then suggest how to improve the evaluation of Marginal Expected...

  20. [Resection margins in conservative breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Fernández, Francisco Javier; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Lombardo Galera, María Sagrario; Rioja Torres, Pilar; Bascuñana Estudillo, Guillermo; Rufián Peña, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Conservative breast cancer surgery is facing a new problem: the potential tumour involvement of resection margins. This eventuality has been closely and negatively associated with disease-free survival. Various factors may influence the likelihood of margins being affected, mostly related to the characteristics of the tumour, patient or surgical technique. In the last decade, many studies have attempted to find predictive factors for margin involvement. However, it is currently the new techniques used in the study of margins and tumour localisation that are significantly reducing reoperations in conservative breast cancer surgery. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Elastic thickness estimates at northeast passive margin of North America and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R. T. Ratheesh; Maji, Tanmay K.; Kandpal, Suresh Ch; Sengupta, D.; Nair, Rajesh R.

    2011-06-01

    Global estimates of the elastic thickness (Te) of the structure of passive continental margins show wide and varying results owing to the use of different methodologies. Earlier estimates of the elastic thickness of the North Atlantic passive continental margins that used flexural modelling yielded a Te value of ~20-100 km. Here, we compare these estimates with the Te value obtained using orthonormalized Hermite multitaper recovered isostatic coherence functions. We discuss how Te is correlated with heat flow distribution and depth of necking. The E-W segment in the southern study region comprising Nova Scotia and the Southern Grand Banks show low Te values, while the zones comprising the NE-SW zones, viz., Western Greenland, Labrador, Orphan Basin and the Northern Grand Bank show comparatively high Te values. As expected, Te broadly reflects the depth of the 200-400°C isotherm below the weak surface sediment layer at the time of loading, and at the margins most of the loading occurred during rifting. We infer that these low Te measurements indicate Te frozen into the lithosphere. This could be due to the passive nature of the margin when the loads were emplaced during the continental break-up process at high temperature gradients.

  2. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir

  3. Methylation patterns in marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Alberto J; Bertoni, Francesco

    Promoter DNA methylation is a major regulator of gene expression and transcription. The identification of methylation changes is important for understanding disease pathogenesis, for identifying prognostic markers and can drive novel therapeutic approaches. In this review we summarize the current knowledge regarding DNA methylation in MALT lymphoma, splenic marginal zone lymphoma, nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Despite important differences in the study design for different publications and the existence of a sole large and genome-wide methylation study for splenic marginal zone lymphoma, it is clear that DNA methylation plays an important role in marginal zone lymphomas, in which it contributes to the inactivation of tumor suppressors but also to the expression of genes sustaining tumor cell survival and proliferation. Existing preclinical data provide the rationale to target the methylation machinery in these disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Limitations of ''margin'' in qualification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.L.; Gillen, K.T.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out investigations of polymer radiation degradation behaviors which have brought to light a number of reasons why this concept of margin can break down. First of all, we have found that dose-rate effects vary greatly in magnitude. Thus, based on high dose-rate testing, poor materials with large dose-rate effects may be selected over better materials with small effects. Also, in certain cases, material properties have been found to level out (as with PVC) or reverse trend (as with buna-n) at high doses, so that ''margin'' may be ineffective, misleading, or counterproductive. For Viton, the material properties were found to change in opposite directions at high and low dose rates, making ''margin'' inappropriate. The underlying problem with the concept of ''margin'' is that differences in aging conditions can lead to fundamental differences in degradation mechanisms

  5. Silenced, Silence, Silent: Motherhood in the Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Lorelei; Austin, Helena

    2007-01-01

    This project explores the experiences of women who mother children with ADHD. The authors use the metaphor of the text and the margin. The text is the "motherhood myth" that describes a particular sort of "good" mothering. The margin is the space beyond that text. This marginal space is inhabited by some or all of the mothers they spoke with, some…

  6. Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) / Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS Evaluation of Risk-Informed Margins Management Strategies for a Representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) toolkit and methodology are proposed for investigating nuclear power plant core, fuels design and safety analysis, including postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. This toolkit, under an integrated evaluation model framework, is name LOCA toolkit for the US (LOTUS). This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermal hydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results.

  7. Continental transform margins : state of art and future milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    Transform faults were defined 45 years ago as ‘a new class of fault' (Wilson, 1965), and transform margins were consequently individualized as a new class of continental margins. While transform margins represent 20 to 25 % of the total length of continent-ocean transitions, they were poorly studied, especially when compared with the amount of data, interpretations, models and conceptual progress accumulated on divergent or convergent continental margins. The best studied examples of transform margins are located in the northern part of Norway, south of South Africa, in the gulf of California and on both sides of the Equatorial Atlantic. Here is located the Côte d'Ivoire - Ghana margin, where the more complete data set was acquired, based on numerous geological and geophysical cruises, including ODP Leg 159. The first models that encompassed the structure and evolution of transform margins were mainly driven by plate kinematic reconstructions, and evidenced the diachronic end of tectonic activity and the non-cylindrical character of these margins, with a decreasing strike-slip deformation from the convex to the concave divergent-transform intersections. Further thermo-mechanical models were more specifically designed to explain the vertical displacements along transform margins, and especially the occurrence of high-standing marginal ridges. These thermo-mechanical models involved either heat transfer from oceanic to continental lithospheres across the transform faults or tectonically- or gravity-driven mass transfer in the upper crust. These models were far from fully fit observations, and were frequently dedicated to specific example, and not easily generalizable. Future work on transform continental margins may be expected to fill some scientific gaps, and the definition of working directions can benefit from the studies dedicated to other types of margins. At regional scale the structural and sedimentological variability of transform continental margins has

  8. A gene signature in histologically normal surgical margins is predictive of oral carcinoma recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Patricia P; Simpson, Colleen; Goldstein, David; Brown, Dale; Gilbert, Ralph; Gullane, Patrick; Irish, Jonathan; Jurisica, Igor; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Waldron, Levi; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Pintilie, Melania; Galloni, Natalie Naranjo; Xuan, Yali; Cervigne, Nilva K; Warner, Giles C; Makitie, Antti A

    2011-01-01

    Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is a major cause of cancer death worldwide, which is mainly due to recurrence leading to treatment failure and patient death. Histological status of surgical margins is a currently available assessment for recurrence risk in OSCC; however histological status does not predict recurrence, even in patients with histologically negative margins. Therefore, molecular analysis of histologically normal resection margins and the corresponding OSCC may aid in identifying a gene signature predictive of recurrence. We used a meta-analysis of 199 samples (OSCCs and normal oral tissues) from five public microarray datasets, in addition to our microarray analysis of 96 OSCCs and histologically normal margins from 24 patients, to train a gene signature for recurrence. Validation was performed by quantitative real-time PCR using 136 samples from an independent cohort of 30 patients. We identified 138 significantly over-expressed genes (> 2-fold, false discovery rate of 0.01) in OSCC. By penalized likelihood Cox regression, we identified a 4-gene signature with prognostic value for recurrence in our training set. This signature comprised the invasion-related genes MMP1, COL4A1, P4HA2, and THBS2. Over-expression of this 4-gene signature in histologically normal margins was associated with recurrence in our training cohort (p = 0.0003, logrank test) and in our independent validation cohort (p = 0.04, HR = 6.8, logrank test). Gene expression alterations occur in histologically normal margins in OSCC. Over-expression of the 4-gene signature in histologically normal surgical margins was validated and highly predictive of recurrence in an independent patient cohort. Our findings may be applied to develop a molecular test, which would be clinically useful to help predict which patients are at a higher risk of local recurrence

  9. Aspects of marginal expenditures in energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojchev, D.; Kynev, K.

    1994-01-01

    Technical and economical problems of marginal analysis methodology, its application procedure in energy sector and marginal expenditures determination are outlined. A comparative characteristics of the application is made for different periods of time. The differences in calculation of the marginal expenditures and prices are discussed. The operational costs, investments and inflation are analyzed. The mechanism of application of this approach in different planing horizon is outlined. The role of the change in the costs in time, the time unit, volume, the scope of application, etc. are determined. The areas of transition from one to other form of marginal expenditures are shown. 4 refs. (orig.)

  10. Characterizing entanglement with global and marginal entropic measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio; De Siena, Silvio

    2003-01-01

    We qualify the entanglement of arbitrary mixed states of bipartite quantum systems by comparing global and marginal mixednesses quantified by different entropic measures. For systems of two qubits we discriminate the class of maximally entangled states with fixed marginal mixednesses, and determine an analytical upper bound relating the entanglement of formation to the marginal linear entropies. This result partially generalizes to mixed states the quantification of entanglement with marginal mixednesses holding for pure states. We identify a class of entangled states that, for fixed marginals, are globally more mixed than product states when measured by the linear entropy. Such states cannot be discriminated by the majorization criterion

  11. Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2005-09-01

    The Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis (PDF 347 KB) identifies opportunities for developing advanced technologies and estimates both the necessary funding and the potential payoff. This analysis determines what portion of the energy bandwidth can be captured through the adoption of state-of-the-art technology and practices. R&D opportunities for addressing the remainder of the bandwidth are characterized and plotted on a marginal opportunity curve.

  12. Steep microbial boundstone-dominated plaform margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenter, J.A.M.; Harris, P.M.; Della Porta, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Seaward progradation of several kilometers has been documented mostly for leeward margin low-angle carbonate slope systems with a dominant platform top sediment source. However, steep and high-relief margins fronting deep basins can also prograde and as such are somewhat perplexing. Characteristics

  13. Savannah River Site TRU Drum Waste Criticality Safety Margin Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.; Hammer, K.

    1998-01-01

    The text of the paper will include an overview of the methodology used to determine the credible scenarios, summary of the analysis of the results, challenges overcome during compliance and implementation, and cost savings due to reduced operational expanses

  14. Core size effects on safety performances of LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Hahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An oxide fuel small size core (1200 MWt) was analyzed in comparison with a large size core (3600 MWt) in order to evaluate the size effects on transient safety performances of liquid-metal reactors (LMRs). In the first part of the study, main static safety parameters (i.e., Doppler coefficient, sodium void effect, etc.) of the two cores were characterized, and the second part of the study was focused on the dynamic behavior of the cores in two representative transient events: the unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) and the unprotected transient overpower (UTOP). Margins to fuel melting and sodium boiling have been evaluated for these representative transients. Results show that the small core has a generally better or equivalent level of safety performances during these events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  15. Core size effects on safety performances of LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Hahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    An oxide fuel small size core (1200 MWt) was analyzed in comparison with a large size core (3600 MWt) in order to evaluate the size effects on transient safety performances of liquid-metal reactors (LMRs). In the first part of the study, main static safety parameters (i.e., Doppler coefficient, sodium void effect, etc.) of the two cores were characterized, and the second part of the study was focused on the dynamic behavior of the cores in two representative transient events: the unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) and the unprotected transient overpower (UTOP). Margins to fuel melting and sodium boiling have been evaluated for these representative transients. Results show that the small core has a generally better or equivalent level of safety performances during these events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  16. Temporal variation in population size of European bird species: effects of latitude and marginality of distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J Cuervo

    Full Text Available In the Northern Hemisphere, global warming has been shown to affect animal populations in different ways, with southern populations in general suffering more from increased temperatures than northern populations of the same species. However, southern populations are also often marginal populations relative to the entire breeding range, and marginality may also have negative effects on populations. To disentangle the effects of latitude (possibly due to global warming and marginality on temporal variation in population size, we investigated European breeding bird species across a latitudinal gradient. Population size estimates were regressed on years, and from these regressions we obtained the slope (a proxy for population trend and the standard error of the estimate (SEE (a proxy for population fluctuations. The possible relationships between marginality or latitude on one hand and slopes or SEE on the other were tested among populations within species. Potentially confounding factors such as census method, sampling effort, density-dependence, habitat fragmentation and number of sampling years were controlled statistically. Population latitude was positively related to regression slopes independent of marginality, with more positive slopes (i.e., trends in northern than in southern populations. The degree of marginality was positively related to SEE independent of latitude, with marginal populations showing larger SEE (i.e., fluctuations than central ones. Regression slopes were also significantly related to our estimate of density-dependence and SEE was significantly affected by the census method. These results are consistent with a scenario in which southern and northern populations of European bird species are negatively affected by marginality, with southern populations benefitting less from global warming than northern populations, thus potentially making southern populations more vulnerable to extinction.

  17. Study of Cost Effective Large Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors that Employ Passive Safety Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, J.W.; Corletti, M.M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A report of DOE sponsored portions of AP1000 Design Certification effort. On December 16, 1999, The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Design Certification of the AP600 standard nuclear reactor design. This culminated an 8-year review of the AP600 design, safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment. The AP600 is a 600 MWe reactor that utilizes passive safety features that, once actuated, depend only on natural forces such as gravity and natural circulation to perform all required safety functions. These passive safety systems result in increased plant safety and have also significantly simplified plant systems and equipment, resulting in simplified plant operation and maintenance. The AP600 meets NRC deterministic safety criteria and probabilistic risk criteria with large margins. A summary comparison of key passive safety system design features is provided in Table 1. These key features are discussed due to their importance in affecting the key thermal-hydraulic phenomenon exhibited by the passive safety systems in critical areas. The scope of some of the design changes to the AP600 is described. These changes are the ones that are important in evaluating the passive plant design features embodied in the certified AP600 standard plant design. These design changes are incorporated into the AP1000 standard plant design that Westinghouse is certifying under 10 CFR Part 52. In conclusion, this report describes the results of the representative design certification activities that were partially supported by the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. These activities are unique to AP1000, but are representative of research activities that must be driven to conclusion to realize successful licensing of the next generation of nuclear power plants in the United States

  18. Consumer and farmer safety evaluation of application of botanical pesticides in black pepper crop protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Moreno, David; Soffers, Ans E M F; Wiratno; Falke, Hein E; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a consumer and farmer safety evaluation on the use of four botanical pesticides in pepper berry crop protection. The pesticides evaluated include preparations from clove, tuba root, sweet flag and pyrethrum. Their safety evaluation was based on their active ingredients being eugenol, rotenone, β-asarone and pyrethrins, respectively. Botanical pesticides from Acorus calamus are of possible concern because of the genotoxic and carcinogenic ingredient β-asarone although estimated margins of exposure (MOE) for consumers indicate a low priority for risk management. For the other three botanical pesticides the margin of safety (MOS) between established acute reference doses and/or acceptable daily intake values and intake estimates for the consumer, resulting from their use as a botanical pesticide are not of safety concern, with the exception for levels of rotenone upon use of tuba root extracts on stored berries. Used levels of clove and pyrethrum as botanical pesticides in pepper berry crop production is not of safety concern for consumers or farmers, whereas for use of tuba root and sweet flag some risk factors were defined requiring further evaluation and/or risk management. It seems prudent to look for alternatives for use of sweet flag extracts containing β-asarone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Crystallization Firing on Marginal Gap of CAD/CAM Fabricated Lithium Disilicate Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Steven A; Ferracane, Jack L; da Costa, Juliana

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the marginal gaps of CAD/CAM (CEREC 3) produced crowns made from leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) blocks (LG), and lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max CAD) blocks before (LD-B), and after (LD-A) crystallization firing. A human molar tooth (#19) was mounted with adjacent teeth on a typodont and prepared for a full-coverage ceramic crown. The typodont was assembled in the mannequin head to simulate clinical conditions. After tooth preparation 15 individual optical impressions were taken by the same operator using titanium dioxide powder and a CEREC 3 camera per manufacturer's instructions. One operator designed and machined the crowns in leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic blocks (n = 5) and lithium-disilicate blocks (n = 10) using the CEREC 3 system. The crowns were rigidly seated on the prepared tooth, and marginal gaps (μm) were measured with an optical microscope (500×) at 12 points, 3 on each of the M, B, D, and L surfaces of the leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns and the lithium-disilicate crowns before and after crystallization firing. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α = 0.05). The overall mean marginal gaps (μm) for the crowns evaluated were: LG = 49.2 ± 5.5, LD-B = 42.9 ± 12.2, and LD-A = 57.2 ± 16.0. The marginal gaps for LG and LD-B were not significantly different, but both were significantly less than for LD-A. The type of ceramic material did not affect the marginal gap of CAD/CAM crowns. The crystallization firing process required for lithium-disilicate crowns resulted in a significant increase in marginal gap size, likely due to shrinkage of the ceramic during the crystallization process. The marginal gap of CAD/CAM-fabricated lithium disilicate crowns increases following crystallization firing. The marginal gap still remains within clinically acceptable parameters. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. 78 FR 12065 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for Independent Data Safety Monitoring, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety... Safety Monitoring, Inc. due to its failure to correct a deficiency. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act) authorizes the listing of PSOs, which are entities or component...

  1. Conference Report: The New Discovery of Margins: Theory-Based Excursions in Marginal Social Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchner, Babette; Lorenzen, Jule-Marie; Striffler, Christine

    2014-01-01

    At this year's spring conference of the Sociology of Knowledge Section of the German Sociological Association, a diverse range of theoretical concepts and multiple empirical insights into different marginal social fields were presented. As in everyday life, drawing a line between center and margin can be seen as an important challenge that must equally be faced in sociology. The socially constructed borderline appears to be highly variable. Therefore it has to be delineated or fixed somehow. ...

  2. Evaluating the marginal utility principle for long-term hydropower scheduling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Zhao, Jianshi; Liu, Pan; Lei, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of one-, two- and multi-period hydropower scheduling. • Derivation of marginal cost and marginal return of carry-over storage. • Evaluation of the marginal utility principle in a case study of the Three Gorges Reservoir. - Abstract: The conversion of the potential energy of dammed water into hydropower depends on both reservoir storage and release, which are the major difficulties in hydropower reservoir operation. This study evaluates the marginal utility principle, which determines the optimal carry-over storage between periods, for long-term hydropower scheduling. Increasing marginal cost and decreasing marginal return are two important characteristics that determine the marginal utility principle in water supply. However, the notion of decreasing marginal return is inapplicable in hydropower scheduling. Instead, the carry-over storage from one period has an increasing marginal contribution to the power generation in the next period. Although carry-over storage incurs an increasing marginal cost to the power generation in the current period, the marginal return is higher than the marginal cost. The marginal return from the carry-over storage further increases in the multi-period case. These findings suggest saving as much carry-over storage as possible, which is bounded by the operational constraints of storage capacity, environmental flow, and installed capacity in actual hydropower scheduling. The marginal utility principle is evaluated for a case study of the Three Gorges Reservoir, and the effects of the constraints are discussed. Results confirm the theoretical findings and show that the marginal return from carry-over storage is larger than the marginal cost. The operational constraints help determine the optimal carry-over storage.

  3. Three-Phase AC Optimal Power Flow Based Distribution Locational Marginal Price: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui; Zhang, Yingchen

    2017-05-17

    Designing market mechanisms for electricity distribution systems has been a hot topic due to the increased presence of smart loads and distributed energy resources (DERs) in distribution systems. The distribution locational marginal pricing (DLMP) methodology is one of the real-time pricing methods to enable such market mechanisms and provide economic incentives to active market participants. Determining the DLMP is challenging due to high power losses, the voltage volatility, and the phase imbalance in distribution systems. Existing DC Optimal Power Flow (OPF) approaches are unable to model power losses and the reactive power, while single-phase AC OPF methods cannot capture the phase imbalance. To address these challenges, in this paper, a three-phase AC OPF based approach is developed to define and calculate DLMP accurately. The DLMP is modeled as the marginal cost to serve an incremental unit of demand at a specific phase at a certain bus, and is calculated using the Lagrange multipliers in the three-phase AC OPF formulation. Extensive case studies have been conducted to understand the impact of system losses and the phase imbalance on DLMPs as well as the potential benefits of flexible resources.

  4. Seismic evidence of Messinian salt in opposite margins of West Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocnik, Arianna; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Del Ben, Anna; Geletti, Riccardo; Wardell, Nigel; Zgur, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    The post drift Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) affected the whole Mediterranean basin, with deposition of evaporitic sequences in the deep basins, in the lower continental slopes, and in several shallower marginal basins; usually, in the continental margins, the MSC originated noticeable erosional truncations that locally cause important hiatuses in the pre-Messinian sequences, covered by the Plio-Quaternary sediments. In this work we focus on the MSC seismic signature of two new seismic datasets acquired in 2010 (West Sardinia offshore) and in 2012 (within the Eurofleet project SALTFLU in the South Balearic continental margin and the northern Algero abyssal plain). The "Messinian trilogy" recognized in the West-Mediterranean abyssal plain, is characterized by different seismic facies: the Lower evaporite Unit (LU), the salt Mobile Unit (MU) and the Upper evaporite mainly gypsiferous Unit (UU). Both seismic datasets show the presence of the Messinian trilogy also if the LU is not always clearly interpretable due to the strong seismic signal absorption by the halite layers; the salt thickness of the MU is similar in both the basins as also the thickness and stratigraphy of the UU. The Upper Unit (UU) is made up of a well reflecting package of about 10 reflectors, partially deformed by salt tectonic and characterized by a thin transparent layer that we interpreted as salt sequence inner the shallower part of the UU. Below the stratified UU, the MU exhibits a transparent layer in the deep basin and also on the foot of the slope, where a negative reflector, related to the high interval velocity of salt, marks its base. The halokinetic processes are not homogeneously distributed in the region, forming a great number of diapirs on the foot of the slope (due to the pression of the slided sediments) and giant domes toward the deep basin (due to the higher thickness of the Plio-quaternary sediments). This distribution seems to be related to the amount of salt and of the

  5. Sci—Thur PM: Planning and Delivery — 04: Respiratory margin derivation and verification in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, S; Conroy, L; Smith, WL

    2014-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) following breast-conserving surgery is emerging as an effective means to achieve local control and reduce irradiated breast volume. Patients are planned on a static CT image; however, treatment is delivered while the patient is free-breathing. Respiratory motion can degrade plan quality by reducing target coverage and/or dose homogeneity. A variety of methods can be used to determine the required margin for respiratory motion in PBI. We derive geometric and dosimetric respiratory 1D margin. We also verify the adequacy of the typical 5 mm respiratory margin in 3D by evaluating plan quality for increasing respiratory amplitudes (2–20 mm). Ten PBI plans were used for dosimetric evaluation. A database of volunteer respiratory data, with similar characteristics to breast cancer patients, was used for this study. We derived a geometric 95%-margin of 3 mm from the population respiratory data. We derived a dosimetric 95%-margin of 2 mm by convolving 1D dose profiles with respiratory probability density functions. The 5 mm respiratory margin is possibly too large when 1D coverage is assessed and could lead to unnecessary normal tissue irradiation. Assessing margins only for coverage may be insufficient; 3D dosimetric assessment revealed degradation in dose homogeneity is the limiting factor, not target coverage. Hotspots increased even for the smallest respiratory amplitudes, while target coverage only degraded at amplitudes greater than 10 mm. The 5 mm respiratory margin is adequate for coverage, but due to plan quality degradation, respiratory management is recommended for patients with respiratory amplitudes greater than 10 mm

  6. KHNP special safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Bang-Jin; Lee, Soung-Hee; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2009-01-01

    Commemorating the 30 year anniversary of commercial nuclear power plant operation in KOREA, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has conducted a Special Safety Review (SSR) of its 20 operating units to understand their safety performance and to identify any areas that need improvement. The SSR reviewed all 20 operating units for 2 weeks per site. Areas that were reviewed are Safety Margins, Plant Performance, Employee Safety, Employee Performance and Performance Improvement Process. Each review team consisted of international and domestic members. The international reviewers were from IAEA, WANO and INPO. The domestic reviewers consisted of professors, Engineering Company, Research Institute and KHNP experts. The review confirmed safe and reliable operations of the 20 nuclear units. The common understanding resulted from the SSR is as follows. Firstly, KHNP corporate and its plants confirmed and shared mutual understanding on recurring areas for improvements, especially in the areas of Organizational Effectiveness, Industrial Safety, Human Performance, Configuration Management, Operations, Equipment Performance and Material Condition. Secondly, KHNP understood that plant and department level performances are directly related to the leadership and competency of the management team including supervisors. Thirdly, the strengths of individual stations that consistently have produced good results need to be shared with the other KHNP stations. Finally, KHNP learned that strong corporate leadership and support are needed to resolve most of the areas for improvement since they are common to all KHNP stations. (author)

  7. Phenix plant - Complementary safety assessment of the Phenix plant (INB 71) in the light of the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This CSA (Complementary Safety Assessment) analyses the robustness of the Phenix reactor to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident and proposes a series of improvements. The Phenix reactor stands on the Marcoule site of CEA and was stopped definitely in 2009 for electricity production. Robustness is the ability for the facility to withstand events beyond the level for which the facility was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accident sequence (cliff edge effect). Safety is not only a matter of design or of engineered systems, it is also a matter of organization. So issues like crisis organization and work organization via subcontracting are also taken into consideration. This report is divided into 9 main chapters: 1) main features of the Phenix facility, 2) identification of cliff edge risks as well as structures and equipment essential to safety, 3) earthquake risk, 4) flood risk, 5) risks due to other extreme natural disasters, 6) the loss of electrical power supplies and of cooling systems, 7) management of severe accidents, 8) subcontracting policy, 9) synthesis. This study shows that it is necessary to take some measures to reinforce the robustness of the plant concerning flood risks. (A.C.)

  8. Enhancing the diversity of breeding invertebrates within field margins of intensively managed grassland: Effects of alternative management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritch, Rochelle A; Sheridan, Helen; Finn, John A; McCormack, Stephen; Ó hUallacháin, Daire

    2017-11-01

    Severe declines in biodiversity have been well documented for many taxonomic groups due to intensification of agricultural practices. Establishment and appropriate management of arable field margins can improve the diversity and abundance of invertebrate groups; however, there is much less research on field margins within grassland systems. Three grassland field margin treatments (fencing off the existing vegetation "fenced"; fencing with rotavation and natural regeneration "rotavated" and; fencing with rotavation and seeding "seeded") were compared to a grazed control in the adjacent intensively managed pasture. Invertebrates were sampled using emergence traps to investigate species breeding and overwintering within the margins. Using a manipulation experiment, we tested whether the removal of grazing pressure and nutrient inputs would increase the abundance and richness of breeding invertebrates within grassland field margins. We also tested whether field margin establishment treatments, with their different vegetation communities, would change the abundance and richness of breeding invertebrates in the field margins. Exclusion of grazing and nutrient inputs led to increased abundance and richness in nearly all invertebrate groups that we sampled. However, there were more complex effects of field margin establishment treatment on the abundance and richness of invertebrate taxa. Each of the three establishment treatments supported a distinct invertebrate community. The removal of grazing from grassland field margins provided a greater range of overwintering/breeding habitat for invertebrates. We demonstrate the capacity of field margin establishment to increase the abundance and richness in nearly all invertebrate groups in study plots that were located on previously more depauperate areas of intensively managed grassland. These results from grassland field margins provide evidence to support practical actions that can inform Greening (Pillar 1) and agri

  9. The availability and economic analyses of using marginal land for bioenergy production in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuqi, Chen; Xudong, Guo; Chunyan, Lv

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, China has witnessed rapid increase in the dependence of foreign oil import. In 2015, the primary energy consumption of China is 543 million tons, of which 328 million tons was imported. The total amount of imported foreign oil increased from 49.8% in 2008 to 60.41% in 2016. To address the national energy security and GHG emission reduction, China has made considerable progress in expanding renewable energy portfolio, especially liquid biofuels. However, under the pressure of high population and vulnerable food security, China's National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) ruled that bioenergy is only allowed to be produced using non-cereal feedstock. In addition, the energy crops can only be planted on marginal land, which is the land not suitable for growing field crops due to edaphic and/or climatic limitations, and other environmental risks. Although there have been a number of studies about estimating the marginal land for energy plants' cultivation in China, as to the different definition of marginal land and land use data, the results are quite different. Furthermore, even if there is enough marginal land suitable for energy plants' cultivation, economic viability of cultivating energy plants on marginal land is critical. In order to analyze the availability and economic analyses of the marginal land for bioenergy production strategy, firstly, by using of the latest and most authoritative land use data, this study focused on the assessment of marginal land resources and bioenergy potential by planting five species of energy plants including Cassava, Jatropha curcas, Helianthus tuberous L, Pistacia chinensis, Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge. The results indicate that there are 289.71 million ha marginal land can be used for these five energy plants' cultivation, which can produce 24.45 million tons bioethanol and 8.77 million tons of biodiesel. Secondly, based on field survey data and literature reviews, we found that, from the farmers

  10. From Borders to Margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Noel

    2009-01-01

    of entities that are ever open to identity shifts.  The concept of the margin possesses a much wider reach than borders, and focuses continual attention on the meetings and interactions between a range of indeterminate entities whose interactions may determine both themselves and the types of entity...... upon Deleuze's philosophy to set out an ontology in which the continual reformulation of entities in play in ‘post-international' society can be grasped.  This entails a strategic shift from speaking about the ‘borders' between sovereign states to referring instead to the ‘margins' between a plethora...

  11. Safety during sea transport of radioactive materials. Probabilistic safety analysis of package fro sea surface fire accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Obara, Isonori; Akutsu, Yukio; Aritomi, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    The ships carrying irradiated nuclear fuel, plutonium and high level radioactive wastes(INF materials) are designed to keep integrity of packaging based on the various safety and fireproof measures, even if the ship encounters a maritime fire accident. However, granted that the frequency is very low, realistic severe accidents should be evaluated. In this paper, probabilistic safety assessment method is applied to evaluate safety margin for severe sea fire accidents using event tree analysis. Based on our separate studies, the severest scenario was estimated as follows; an INF transport ship collides with oil tanker and induces a sea surface fire. Probability data such as ship's collision, oil leakage, ignition, escape from fire region, operations of cask cooling system and water flooding systems were also introduced from above mentioned studies. The results indicate that the probability of which packages cannot keep their integrity during the sea surface fire accident is very low and sea transport of INF materials is carried out very safely. (author)

  12. Quantification of margins and uncertainties: Alternative representations of epistemic uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, Jon C.; Johnson, Jay D.

    2011-01-01

    In 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy in conjunction with the national security laboratories (i.e., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories) initiated development of a process designated Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) for the use of risk assessment methodologies in the certification of the reliability and safety of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. A previous presentation, 'Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties: Conceptual and Computational Basis,' describes the basic ideas that underlie QMU and illustrates these ideas with two notional examples that employ probability for the representation of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty. The current presentation introduces and illustrates the use of interval analysis, possibility theory and evidence theory as alternatives to the use of probability theory for the representation of epistemic uncertainty in QMU-type analyses. The following topics are considered: the mathematical structure of alternative representations of uncertainty, alternative representations of epistemic uncertainty in QMU analyses involving only epistemic uncertainty, and alternative representations of epistemic uncertainty in QMU analyses involving a separation of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty. Analyses involving interval analysis, possibility theory and evidence theory are illustrated with the same two notional examples used in the presentation indicated above to illustrate the use of probability to represent aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in QMU analyses.

  13. Mental Depreciation and Marginal Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath; Fennema

    1996-11-01

    We propose that individuals practice "mental depreciation," that is, they implicitly spread the fixed costs of their expenses over time or use. Two studies explore how people spread fixed costs on durable goods. A third study shows that depreciation can lead to two distinct errors in marginal decisions: First, people sometimes invest too much effort to get their money's worth from an expense (e.g., they may use a product a lot to spread the fixed expense across more uses). Second, people sometimes invest too little effort to get their money's worth: When people add a portion of the fixed cost to the current costs, their perceived marginal (i.e., incremental) costs exceed their true marginal costs. In response, they may stop investing because their perceived costs surpass the marginal benefits they are receiving. The latter effect is supported by two field studies that explore real board plan decisions by university students.

  14. Marginal and Interaction Effects in Ordered Response Models

    OpenAIRE

    Debdulal Mallick

    2009-01-01

    In discrete choice models the marginal effect of a variable of interest that is interacted with another variable differs from the marginal effect of a variable that is not interacted with any variable. The magnitude of the interaction effect is also not equal to the marginal effect of the interaction term. I present consistent estimators of both marginal and interaction effects in ordered response models. This procedure is general and can easily be extended to other discrete choice models. I ...

  15. Safety research program of NUCEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Y.

    1996-01-01

    To contribute the safety and establishment of advanced technologies in the area of nuclear fuel cycle, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has constructed a new research facility NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility) as the center for the research and development, particularly on the reprocessing technology and transuranium (TRU) waste management. NUCEF consist of three buildings, administration building, experiment building A and B. Building A has two experiment facilities STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) and TRACY (Transient Experiment Critical Facility). The experiment building B is referred to as BECKY (Back-end Fuel Cycle Key Elements Research Facility). Researches on the reprocessing and the waste management are carried out with spent fuels, high-level liquid waste, TRU etc. in the α γ cell and glove boxes. NUCEF was constructed with the following aims. Using STACY and TRACY, are aimed, (1) research on advanced technology for criticality safety control, (2) reconfirmation of criticality safety margin of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. Using BECKY, are aimed, (1) research on advanced technology of reprocessing process, (2) contribution to develop the scenario for TRU waste disposal, (3) development of new technology for TRU partitioning and volume reduction of radioactive waste. To realize the above aims, following 5 research subjects are settled in NUCEF, (1) Criticality safety research, (2) Research on safety and advanced technology of fuel reprocessing, (3) Research on TRU waste management, (4) Fundamental research on TRU chemistry, (5) Key technology development for TRU processing. (author)

  16. CRBRP structural and thermal margin beyond the design base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strawbridge, L.E.

    1979-01-01

    Prudent margins beyond the design base have been included in the design of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant to further reduce the risk to the public from highly improbable occurrences. These margins include Structural Margin Beyond the Design Base to address the energetics aspects and Thermal Margin Beyond the Design Base to address the longer term thermal and radiological consequences. The assessments that led to the specification of these margins are described, along with the experimental support for those assessments. 8 refs

  17. Complementary safety assessments - Report by the French Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    As an immediate consequence of the Fukushima accident, the French Authority of Nuclear Safety (ASN) launched a campaign of on-site inspections and asked operators (mainly EDF, AREVA and CEA) to make complementary assessments of the safety of the nuclear facilities they manage. The approach defined by ASN for the complementary safety assessments (CSA) is to study the behaviour of nuclear facilities in severe accidents situations caused by an off-site natural hazard according to accident scenarios exceeding the current baseline safety requirements. This approach can be broken into 2 phases: first conformity to current design and secondly an approach to the beyond design-basis scenarios built around the principle of defence in depth. 38 inspections were performed on issues linked to the causes of the Fukushima crisis. It appears that some sites have to reinforce the robustness of the heat sink. The CSA confirmed that the processes put into place at EDF to detect non-conformities were satisfactory. The complementary safety assessments demonstrated that the current seismic margins on the EDF nuclear reactors are satisfactory. With regard to flooding, the complementary safety assessments show that the complete reassessment carried out following the flooding of the Le Blayais nuclear power plant in 1999 offers the installations a high level of protection against the risk of flooding. Concerning the loss of electrical power supplies and the loss of cooling systems, the analysis of EDF's CSA reports showed that certain heat sink and electrical power supply loss scenarios can, if nothing is done, lead to core melt in just a few hours in the most unfavourable circumstances. As for nuclear facilities that are not power or experimental reactors, some difficulties have appeared to implement the CSA approach that was initially devised for reactors. Generally speaking, ASN considers that the safety of nuclear facilities must be made more robust to improbable risks which are not

  18. Positive Surgical Margins in Favorable-Stage Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Catherine E; Drew, Peter A; Morris, Christopher G; Dziegielewski, Peter T; Mendenhall, William M; Amdur, Robert J

    2018-04-16

    The significance of positive margin in favorable-stage well-differentiated thyroid cancer is controversial. We report outcomes of positive-margin patients with a matched-pair comparison to a negative-margin group. A total of 25 patients with classic-histology papillary or follicular carcinoma, total thyroidectomy +/- node dissection, stage T1-3N0-1bM0, positive surgical margin at primary site, adjuvant radioactive iodine (I-131), and age older than 18 years were treated between 2003 and 2013. Endpoints were clinical and biochemical (thyroglobulin-only) recurrence-free survival. Matched-pair analysis involved a 1:1 match with negative-margin cases matched for overall stage and I-131 dose. Recurrence-free survival in positive-margin patients was 71% at 10 years. No patient was successfully salvaged with additional treatment. Only 1 patient died of thyroid cancer. Recurrence-free survival at 10 years was worse with a positive (71%) versus negative (90%) margin (P=0.140). Cure with a microscopically positive margin was suboptimal (71%) despite patients having classic-histology papillary and follicular carcinoma, favorable stage, and moderate-dose I-131 therapy.

  19. Learning Convex Inference of Marginals

    OpenAIRE

    Domke, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Graphical models trained using maximum likelihood are a common tool for probabilistic inference of marginal distributions. However, this approach suffers difficulties when either the inference process or the model is approximate. In this paper, the inference process is first defined to be the minimization of a convex function, inspired by free energy approximations. Learning is then done directly in terms of the performance of the inference process at univariate marginal prediction. The main ...

  20. On elastic limit margins for earthquake design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchhardt, F.; Matthees, W.; Magiera, G.

    1987-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany KTA rule 2201 being the basis for the design of nuclear power plants against seismic events is now under discussion for revisions. One of the main demands to modify KTA rule 2201 consists in cancelling the existing design philosophy, i.e. design against an operating basis earthquake (AEB) as well as against a safe shutdown earthquake (SEB). When using the present rule the 'lower' earthquake (AEB) can become design-predominant, since for AEB and SEB different types of load cases are to be superimposed with different safety factors. The scope of this study is to quantify by parametric analyses so-called 'elastic bearing capacity limit margins' for seismic events; hereby different seismic input criteria - conventional as well as recently proposed are taken into account to investigate the influence of eventual modifications in seismic design philosophy. This way a relation between AEB and SEB has to be defined so that SEB is just still predominant for the design while AEB still will yield to elastic behaviour. The study covers all German site conditions

  1. Spectrum estimation method based on marginal spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianhua; Hu Weiwen; Wang Xianchun

    2011-01-01

    FFT method can not meet the basic requirements of power spectrum for non-stationary signal and short signal. A new spectrum estimation method based on marginal spectrum from Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) was proposed. The procession of obtaining marginal spectrum in HHT method was given and the linear property of marginal spectrum was demonstrated. Compared with the FFT method, the physical meaning and the frequency resolution of marginal spectrum were further analyzed. Then the Hilbert spectrum estimation algorithm was discussed in detail, and the simulation results were given at last. The theory and simulation shows that under the condition of short data signal and non-stationary signal, the frequency resolution and estimation precision of HHT method is better than that of FFT method. (authors)

  2. Development of safety factors to be used for evaluation of cracked nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M.

    1996-10-01

    A modified concept for safety evaluation is introduced which separately accounts for the failure mechanisms fracture and plastic collapse. For application on nuclear components a set of safety factors are also proposed that retain the safety margins expressed in ASME, section III and XI. By performing comparative studies of the acceptance levels for surface cracks in pipes and a pressure vessel, it is shown that some of the anomalies connected with the old safety procedures are removed. It is the authors belief that the outlined safety evaluation procedure has the capability of treating cracks in a consistent way and that the procedure together with the proposed safety factors fulfill the basic safety requirements for nuclear components. Hopefully, it is possible in the near future to develop a probabilistic safety assessment procedure in Sweden, which enables a systematic treatment of uncertainties in the involved data. 14 refs

  3. Regulation of Aging Power Plants: Ensuring Safety in a Changing Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    In her keynote address to the Plim and Plex 1997 Conference, Dr. Jackson, President of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, dealt with four problem areas: (i) the development and application of safety margins; (ii) aging mechanisms and the use of inspection and testing methods; (iii) the U. S. licence renewal process; and (iv) risk-informed, performance-based regulation. Aging effects can further complicate existing interactions between 'explicit' and 'implicit' safety margins. Attempting to satisfy these combined margins can have a significant technical and financial impact on the plant operator. Aging degradation affects a broad range of plant systems, structures and components. Inspection and testing methods are improved continually, but development of methods for direct measuring of material properties on a more microscopic level together with elaboration of more precise predictive models of aging is still needed. In the U. S., the decision on whether to seek licence renewal rests with the licensee. The NRC task is to establish a reasonable process and clear safety standards. License renewal (extension of a NPP 40-years operating licence for additional 20 years) is explicitly allowed in NRS regulations in 10 CFR Part 54. In the U. S. nuclear power industry, there is considerable interest in licence renewal. A 'risk informed' approach to regulation means that, in the decision-making, the risk information is considered along with other factors. Performance-based regulation is, by definition, results focused; its essential component is the feedback of operating experience into subsequent evaluation. When the results focus is linked to risk analysis and ranking, the result is risk-informed, performance-based regulation. The NRS applies this combined approach in all its activities and, also, in its collaborative programs with the nuclear power industry. At the threshold of the 21st century, the nuclear power industry faces an array of challenges and opportunities

  4. Convolution method and CTV-to-PTV margins for finite fractions and small systematic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J J; Siebers, J V

    2007-01-01

    The van Herk margin formula (VHMF) relies on the accuracy of the convolution method (CM) to determine clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins. This work (1) evaluates the accuracy of the CM and VHMF as a function of the number of fractions N and other parameters, and (2) proposes an alternative margin algorithm which ensures target coverage for a wider range of parameter values. Dose coverage was evaluated for a spherical target with uniform margin, using the same simplified dose model and CTV coverage criterion as were used in development of the VHMF. Systematic and random setup errors were assumed to be normally distributed with standard deviations Σ and σ. For clinically relevant combinations of σ, Σ and N, margins were determined by requiring that 90% of treatment course simulations have a CTV minimum dose greater than or equal to the static PTV minimum dose. Simulation results were compared with the VHMF and the alternative margin algorithm. The CM and VHMF were found to be accurate for parameter values satisfying the approximate criterion: σ[1 - γN/25] 0.2, because they failed to account for the non-negligible dose variability associated with random setup errors. These criteria are applicable when σ ∼> σ P , where σ P = 0.32 cm is the standard deviation of the normal dose penumbra. (Qualitative behaviour of the CM and VHMF will remain the same, though the criteria might vary if σ P takes values other than 0.32 cm.) When σ P , dose variability due to random setup errors becomes negligible, and the CM and VHMF are valid regardless of the values of Σ and N. When σ ∼> σ P , consistent with the above criteria, it was found that the VHMF can underestimate margins for large σ, small Σ and small N. A potential consequence of this underestimate is that the CTV minimum dose can fall below its planned value in more than the prescribed 10% of treatments. The proposed alternative margin algorithm provides better margin

  5. A feasibility study on the extended cycle from the point of view of Non-LOCA safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul Sin; Kim, Hee Chul; Kim, Jeong Jin; Baek, Seung Su; Lee, Byung Il; Jeon, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jeong Chan

    1996-06-01

    Extended cycle operation has many advantages as compared with standard cycle operation (12 months) from the viewpoint of operators' exposure to radiation dose, man-power for maintenance and the production of nuclear waste. And it is more economic than the standard cycle operation. If the extended cycle operation is adopted in the CE type nuclear plant, the effective management and enhancement of operation capability could be expected. A feasibility study on the extended cycle operation should be performed. The purpose of this technical report is to perform safety analysis using the design data for Yonggwang Nuclear Plant (YGN) 3 and 4 extended cycle operation and to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the safety related design basis events to verify the satisfaction of the safety criteria. Boron dilution and steam line break accidents were found to be most influenced by the change of physics data due to the adaptation of the extended cycle operation. For boron dilution accident, source range monitor ratio of 3.07 for YGN 3 cycle 2 was decreased to 2.92. The 3D reactivity feedback effect due to the local heatup in the vicinity of stuck CEA was credited in the analysis of steam line break. No return-to-power occurred for the steam line break with offsite power available and return-to-power occurred for the steam line break with loss of offsite power. For the steam line break with loss of offsite power, the safety margin was preserved with respect to fuel performance (DNB and LHGR) despite the return-to-power. 6 tabs., 10 figs., 5 refs. (Author) .new

  6. Reconstructing Rodinia by Fitting Neoproterozoic Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstructions of Phanerozoic tectonic plates can be closely constrained by lithologic correlations across conjugate margins by paleontologic information, by correlation of orogenic belts, by paleomagnetic location of continents, and by ocean floor magmatic stripes. In contrast, Proterozoic reconstructions are hindered by the lack of some of these tools or the lack of their precision. To overcome some of these difficulties, this report focuses on a different method of reconstruction, namely the use of the shape of continents to assemble the supercontinent of Rodinia, much like a jigsaw puzzle. Compared to the vast amount of information available for Phanerozoic systems, such a limited approach for Proterozoic rocks, may seem suspect. However, using the assembly of the southern continents (South America, Africa, India, Arabia, Antarctica, and Australia) as an example, a very tight fit of the continents is apparent and illustrates the power of the jigsaw puzzle method. This report focuses on Neoproterozoic rocks, which are shown on two new detailed geologic maps that constitute the backbone of the study. The report also describes the Neoproterozoic, but younger or older rocks are not discussed or not discussed in detail. The Neoproterozoic continents and continental margins are identified based on the distribution of continental-margin sedimentary and magmatic rocks that define the break-up margins of Rodinia. These Neoproterozoic continental exposures, as well as critical Neo- and Meso-Neoproterozoic tectonic features shown on the two new map compilations, are used to reconstruct the Mesoproterozoic supercontinent of Rodinia. This approach differs from the common approach of using fold belts to define structural features deemed important in the Rodinian reconstruction. Fold belts are difficult to date, and many are significantly younger than the time frame considered here (1,200 to 850 Ma). Identifying Neoproterozoic continental margins, which are primarily

  7. Rents in the European power sector due to carbon trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Jan Horst; Cruciani, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) has imposed a price on the allowances for CO 2 emissions of electricity companies. Integrating this allowance price into the price of electricity earns a rent for companies who have received these allowances for free. During Phase I, 2005-2007, rents corresponding to the aggregate value of allocated allowances amounted to roughly EUR 13 billion per year. However, due to the specific price-setting mechanism in electricity markets true rents were considerably higher. This is due to the fact that companies also that have not received any allowances gain additional infra-marginal rents to the extent that their variable costs are below the new market price after inclusion of the allowance price. Producers with low carbon emissions and low marginal costs thus also benefit substantially from carbon pricing. This paper develops a methodology to determine the specific interaction of the imposition of such a CO 2 constraint and the price-setting mechanism in the electricity sector under the assumption of marginal cost pricing in a liberalized European electricity market. The article thus provides an empirical estimate of the true total rents of power producers during Phase I of the EU-ETS (2005-2007). The EU ETS generated in Phase I additional rents in excess of EUR 19 billion per year for electricity producers. These transfers are distributed very unevenly between different electricity producers. In a second step, the paper assesses the impact of switching from free allocation to an auctioning of allowances in 2013. We show that such a switch to auctioning will continue to create additional infra-marginal rents for certain producers and will leave the electricity sector as a whole better off than before the introduction of the EU ETS. (author)

  8. Margins for treatment planning of proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Simon J

    2006-01-01

    For protons and other charged particles, the effect of set-up errors on the position of isodoses is considerably less in the direction of the incident beam than it is laterally. Therefore, the margins required between the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) can be less in the direction of the incident beam than laterally. Margins have been calculated for a typical head plan and a typical prostate plan, for a single field, a parallel opposed and a four-field arrangement of protons, and compared with margins calculated for photons, assuming identical geometrical uncertainties for each modality. In the head plan, where internal motion was assumed negligible, the CTV-PTV margin reduced from approximately 10 mm to 3 mm in the axial direction for the single field and parallel opposed plans. For a prostate plan, where internal motion cannot be ignored, the corresponding reduction in margin was from 11 mm to 7 mm. The planning organ at risk (PRV) margin in the axial direction reduced from 6 mm to 2 mm for the head plan, and from 7 mm to 4 mm for the prostate plan. No reduction was seen on the other axes, or for any axis of the four-field plans. Owing to the shape of proton dose distributions, there are many clinical cases in which good dose distributions can be obtained with one or two fields. When this is done, it is possible to use smaller PTV and PRV margins. This has the potential to convert untreatable cases, in which the PTV and PRV overlap, into cases with a gap between PTV and PRV of adequate size for treatment planning

  9. Prototype application of best estimate and uncertainty safety analysis methodology to large LOCA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxat, J.C.; Huget, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    Development of a methodology to perform best estimate and uncertainty nuclear safety analysis has been underway at Ontario Power Generation for the past two and one half years. A key driver for the methodology development, and one of the major challenges faced, is the need to re-establish demonstrated safety margins that have progressively been undermined through excessive and compounding conservatism in deterministic analyses. The major focus of the prototyping applications was to quantify the safety margins that exist at the probable range of high power operating conditions, rather than the highly improbable operating states associated with Limit of the Envelope (LOE) assumptions. In LOE, all parameters of significance to the consequences of a postulated accident are assumed to simultaneously deviate to their limiting values. Another equally important objective of the prototyping was to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting safety analysis as an incremental analysis activity, as opposed to a major re-analysis activity. The prototype analysis solely employed prior analyses of Bruce B large break LOCA events - no new computer simulations were undertaken. This is a significant and novel feature of the prototyping work. This methodology framework has been applied to a postulated large break LOCA in a Bruce generating unit on a prototype basis. This paper presents results of the application. (author)

  10. Margin Evaluation in the Presence of Deformation, Rotation, and Translation in Prostate and Entire Seminal Vesicle Irradiation With Daily Marker-Based Setup Corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutanga, Theodore F.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Incrocci, Luca; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for margin evaluation accounting for all measured displacements during treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients treated with stereographic targeting marker-based online translation corrections, dose distributions with varying margins and gradients were created. Sets of possible cumulative delivered dose distributions were simulated by moving voxels and accumulating dose per voxel. Voxel motion was simulated consistent with measured distributions of systematic and random displacements due to stereographic targeting inaccuracies, deformation, rotation, and intrafraction motion. The method of simulation maintained measured correlation of voxel motions due to organ deformation. Results: For the clinical target volume including prostate and seminal vesicles (SV), the probability that some part receives <95% of the prescribed dose, the changes in minimum dose, and volume receiving 95% of prescription dose compared with planning were 80.5% ± 19.2%, 9.0 ± 6.8 Gy, and 3.0% ± 3.7%, respectively, for the smallest studied margins (3 mm prostate, 5 mm SV) and steepest dose gradients. Corresponding values for largest margins (5 mm prostate, 8 mm SV) with a clinical intensity-modulated radiotherapy dose distribution were 46.5% ± 34.7%, 6.7 ± 5.8 Gy, and 1.6% ± 2.3%. For prostate-only clinical target volume, the values were 51.8% ± 17.7%, 3.3 ± 1.6 Gy, and 0.6% ± 0.5% with the smallest margins and 5.2% ± 7.4%, 1.8 ± 0.9 Gy, and 0.1% ± 0.1% for the largest margins. Addition of three-dimensional rotation corrections only improved these values slightly. All rectal planning constraints were met in the actual reconstructed doses for all studied margins. Conclusion: We developed a system for margin validation in the presence of deformations. In our population, a 5-mm margin provided sufficient dosimetric coverage for the prostate. In contrast, an 8-mm SV margin was still insufficient owing to deformations. Addition of

  11. The Continental Margin of East Asia: a collage of multiple plates formed by convergence and extension from multiple directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Wang, T.; Ludington, S.; Qiu, Z.; Li, Z.

    2017-12-01

    East Asia is one of the most complex regions in the world. Its margin was divided into 4 parts: Northeast Asia, North China, South China and Southeast Asia. During the Phanerozoic, continental plates of East Asia have interacted successively with a) the Paleo Tethyan Ocean, b) the Tethyan and Paleo Pacific Oceans and c) the Pacific and Indian. In the Early Mesozoic, the Indosinian orogeny is characterized by the convergence and extension within multiple continental plates, whereas the Late Mesozoic Yanshanian orogeny is characterized by both convergence and compression due to oceanic subduction and by widespread extension. We propose this combination as "East Asia Continental Margin type." Except in Northeast Asia, where Jurassic and Cretaeous accretionary complexes are common, most magmatic rocks are the result of reworking of ancient margins of small continental plates; and oceanic island arc basalts and continental margin arc andesites are largely absent. Because South China is adjacent to the western margin of the Pacific Plate, some effects of its westward subduction must be unavoidable, but juvenile arc-related crust has not been identified. The East Asian Continental Margin is characterized by magmatic rocks that are the result of post-convergent tectonics, which differs markedly from the active continental margins of both South and North America. In summary, the chief characteristics of the East Asian Continental Margin are: 1) In Mesozoic, the periphery of multiple blocks experienced magmatism caused by lithospheric delamination and thinning in response to extension punctuated by shorter periods of convergence. 2) The main mechanism of magma generation was the partial melting of crustal rocks, due to underplating by upwelling mafic magma associated with the collapse of orogenic belts and both extension and compression between small continental blocks. 3) During orogeny, mostly high Sr/Y arc-related granitoids formed, whereas during post-orogenic times, A

  12. Margins in breast conserving surgery: The financial cost & potential savings associated with the new margin guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Lauren; Brown, Eric; Lanni, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we compare the indications for re-excision, the findings of additional tumor in the re-excision specimen as they relate to margin status, and costs associated with re-excision based on recent new consensus statements. A retrospective analysis was performed on 462 patients with invasive breast carcinoma who underwent at least one lumpectomy between January 2011 and December 2013. Postoperative data was analyzed based on where additional disease was found, as it relates to the margin status of the initial lumpectomy and the additional direct costs associated with additional procedures. Of the 462 patients sampled, 149 underwent a re-excision surgery (32.2%). Four patients underwent mastectomy as their second operation. In the 40 patients with additional disease found on re-excision, 36 (90.0%) of them had a positive margin on their initial lumpectomy. None of the four mastectomy patients had residual disease. The mean cost of the initial lumpectomy for all 462 patients was $2118.01 plus an additional $1801.92 for those who underwent re-excision. A positive margin was most predictive of finding residual tumor on re-excision as would be expected. Using old criteria only 0.07% (4/61) of patients who had undergone re-excision with a 'clear' margin, had additional tumor found, at a total cost of $106,354.11. Thus, the new consensus guidelines will lead to less overall cost, at no clinical risk to patients while reducing a patient's surgical risk and essentially eliminating delays in adjuvant care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasticity margin recovery during annealing after cold deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogatov, A.A.; Smirnov, S.V.; Kolmogorov, V.L.

    1978-01-01

    Restoration of the plasticity margin in steel 20 after cold deformation and annealing at 550 - 750 C and soaking for 5 - 300 min was investigated. The conditions of cold deformation under which the metal acquires microdefects unhealed by subsequent annealing were determined. It was established that if the degree of utilization of the plasticity margin is psi < 0.5, the plasticity margin in steel 20 can be completely restored by annealing. A mathematical model of restoration of the plasticity margin by annealing after cold deformation was constructed. A statistical analysis showed good agreement between model and experiment

  14. Adequacy of Current Equivalent Margins Analysis (EMA) Guidance, Data and Methodologies for 60+ Years of Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.; Hardin, T.; Cipolla, R.; Hall, B.

    2015-01-01

    In order to assure the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs), the fracture toughness of the ferritic steels used to fabricate the RPV must be shown to be adequate during their entire operating life, including extended license life. The Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact test has been used in the nuclear industry since it uses a small test specimen that can be irradiated in surveillance programs and provides an indirect way of assessing the fracture toughness of RPV steels. The effects of embrittlement typically are characterized by changes to the average Charpy curves measured before and after irradiation: shift of the 30 ft-lb (41 J) index temperature, and decrease in the CVN upper shelf energy (USE). Requirements in the USA for the USE of RPV belt-line materials are codified in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50 (10 CFR 50), Appendix G. Before irradiation, USE in the transverse (T-L) orientation for base materials and crack extension in the welding direction for weld materials must be greater than or equal to 75 ft-lb (102 J), and it is not to become less than 50 ft-lb (68 J) due to radiation embrittlement throughout the license of the RPV. If the projected USE of any RPV belt-line steel falls below 50 ft-lb (68 J), the projected value must be demonstrated to provide a margin of safety against ductile fracture equivalent to that required by Appendix G of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The analytical evaluation method used is called an equivalent margin analysis (EMA). This paper reviews the current status of EMAs and recommends improvements and clarifications that can be made to meet the needs of extended license life to 80 years. Focus is placed on analytical methodology, material property needs and proper implementation. (authors)

  15. Estimation of marginal costs at existing waste treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Hulgaard, Tore; Hindsgaul, Claus; Riber, Christian; Kamuk, Bettina; Astrup, Thomas F

    2016-04-01

    This investigation aims at providing an improved basis for assessing economic consequences of alternative Solid Waste Management (SWM) strategies for existing waste facilities. A bottom-up methodology was developed to determine marginal costs in existing facilities due to changes in the SWM system, based on the determination of average costs in such waste facilities as function of key facility and waste compositional parameters. The applicability of the method was demonstrated through a case study including two existing Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facilities, one with co-generation of heat and power (CHP) and another with only power generation (Power), affected by diversion strategies of five waste fractions (fibres, plastic, metals, organics and glass), named "target fractions". The study assumed three possible responses to waste diversion in the WtE facilities: (i) biomass was added to maintain a constant thermal load, (ii) Refused-Derived-Fuel (RDF) was included to maintain a constant thermal load, or (iii) no reaction occurred resulting in a reduced waste throughput without full utilization of the facility capacity. Results demonstrated that marginal costs of diversion from WtE were up to eleven times larger than average costs and dependent on the response in the WtE plant. Marginal cost of diversion were between 39 and 287 € Mg(-1) target fraction when biomass was added in a CHP (from 34 to 303 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case), between -2 and 300 € Mg(-1) target fraction when RDF was added in a CHP (from -2 to 294 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case) and between 40 and 303 € Mg(-1) target fraction when no reaction happened in a CHP (from 35 to 296 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case). Although average costs at WtE facilities were highly influenced by energy selling prices, marginal costs were not (provided a response was initiated at the WtE to keep constant the utilized thermal capacity). Failing to systematically

  16. LWR safety research at EPRI: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.; Kalra, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    The philosophy, objectives, approach, and updated status of the Electric Power Research Institute's Light-Water-Reactor Safety Research Program are presented. In light of current industry needs, the major research and development emphases are described. The program focuses on providing enhanced capability via large-scale test projects, for understanding and predicting the behavior of nuclear power plants. This leads to a realistic quantification of the safety margins and to ways of improving reliability, availability, and productivity and thus to significant economic benefits for the nuclear industry. The major accomplishments resulting from various projects in the program categories of risk assessment, code development and validation, and analysis and testing are presented with the goal of technology transfer to the nuclear industry

  17. Safety assessment of novel foods and strategies to determine their safety in use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    Safety assessment of novel foods requires a different approach to that traditionally used for the assessment of food chemicals. A case-by-case approach is needed which must be adapted to take account of the characteristics of the individual novel food. A thorough appraisal is required of the origin, production, compositional analysis, nutritional characteristics, any previous human exposure and the anticipated use of the food. The information should be compared with a traditional counterpart of the food if this is available. In some cases, a conclusion about the safety of the food may be reached on the basis of this information alone, whereas in other cases, it will help to identify any nutritional or toxicological testing that may be required to further investigate the safety of the food. The importance of nutritional evaluation cannot be over-emphasised. This is essential for the conduct of toxicological studies in order to avoid dietary imbalances, etc., that might lead to interpretation difficulties, but also in the context of its use as food and to assess the potential impact of the novel food on the human diet. The traditional approach used for chemicals, whereby an acceptable daily intake (ADI) is established with a large safety margin relative to the expected exposure, cannot be applied to foods. The assessment of safety in use should be based upon a thorough knowledge of the composition of the food, evidence from nutritional, toxicological and human studies, expected use of the food and its expected consumption. Safety equates to a reasonable certainty that no harm will result from intended uses under the anticipated conditions of consumption

  18. Firn thickness variations across the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream margins indicating nonlinear densification rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riverman, K. L.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Alley, R. B.; Peters, L. E.; Christianson, K. A.; Muto, A.

    2013-12-01

    Northeast Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS) is the largest ice stream in Greenland, draining approximately 8.4% of the ice sheet's area. The flow pattern and stability mechanism of this ice stream are unique to others in Greenland and Antarctica, and merit further study to ascertain the sensitivity of this ice stream to future climate change. Geophysical methods are valuable tools for this application, but their results are sensitive to the structure of the firn and any spatial variations in firn properties across a given study region. Here we present firn data from a 40-km-long seismic profile across the upper reaches of NEGIS, collected in the summer of 2012 as part of an integrated ground-based geophysical survey. We find considerable variations in firn thickness that are coincident with the ice stream shear margins, where a thinner firn layer is present within the margins, and a thicker, more uniform firn layer is present elsewhere in our study region. Higher accumulation rates in the marginal surface troughs due to drift-snow trapping can account for some of this increased densification; however, our seismic results also highlight enhanced anisotropy within the firn and upper ice column that is confined to narrow bands within the shear margins. We thus interpret these large firn thickness variations and abrupt changes in anisotropy as indicators of firn densification dependent on the effective stress state as well as the overburden pressure, suggesting that the strain rate increases nonlinearly with stress across the shear margins. A GPS strain grid maintained for three weeks across both margins observed strong side shearing, with rapid stretching and then compression along particle paths, indicating large deviatoric stresses in the margins. This work demonstrates the importance of developing a high-resolution firn densification model when conducting geophysical field work in regions possessing a complex ice flow history; it also motivates the need for a more

  19. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  20. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  1. Reinforcing marginality? Maternal health interventions in rural Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvernflaten, Birgit

    2017-06-23

    To achieve Millennium Development Goal 5 on maternal health, many countries have focused on marginalized women who lack access to care. Promoting facility-based deliveries to ensure skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care has become a main measure for preventing maternal deaths, so women who opt for home births are often considered 'marginal' and in need of targeted intervention. Drawing upon ethnographic data from Nicaragua, this paper critically examines the concept of marginality in the context of official efforts to increase institutional delivery amongst the rural poor, and discusses lack of access to health services among women living in peripheral areas as a process of marginalization. The promotion of facility birth as the new norm, in turn, generates a process of 're-marginalization', whereby public health officials morally disapprove of women who give birth at home, viewing them as non-compliers and a problem to the system. In rural Nicaragua, there is a discrepancy between the public health norm and women's own preferences and desires for home birth. These women live at the margins also in spatial and societal terms, and must relate to a health system they find incapable of providing good, appropriate care. Strong public pressure for institutional delivery makes them feel distressed and pressured. Paradoxically then, the aim of including marginal groups in maternal health programmes engenders resistance to facility birth.

  2. A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Intravenous Iclaprim Vs Vancomycin for the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections Suspected or Confirmed to be Due to Gram-Positive Pathogens: REVIVE-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, David B; O'Riordan, William; Overcash, J Scott; Heller, Barry; Amin, Faisal; File, Thomas M; Wilcox, Mark H; Torres, Antoni; Dryden, Matthew; Holland, Thomas L; McLeroth, Patrick; Shukla, Rajesh; Corey, G Ralph

    2018-04-03

    Our objective in this study was to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of iclaprim compared with vancomycin for the treatment of patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). REVIVE-1 was a phase 3, 600-patient, double-blinded, randomized (1:1), active-controlled trial among patients with ABSSSI that compared the safety and efficacy of iclaprim 80 mg fixed dose with vancomycin 15 mg/kg, both administered intravenously every 12 hours for 5-14 days. The primary endpoint of this study was a ≥20% reduction in lesion size (early clinical response [ECR]) compared with baseline among patients randomized to iclaprim or vancomycin at the early time point (ETP), 48 to 72 hours after the start of administration of study drug in the intent-to-treat population. ECR among patients who received iclaprim and vancomycin at the ETP was 80.9% (241 of 298) of patients receiving iclaprim compared with 81.0% (243 of 300) of those receiving vancomycin (treatment difference, -0.13%; 95% confidence interval, -6.42%-6.17%). Iclaprim was well tolerated in the study, with most adverse events categorized as mild. Iclaprim achieved noninferiority (10% margin) at ETP compared with vancomycin and was well tolerated in this phase 3 clinical trial for the treatment of ABSSSI. Based on these results, iclaprim appears to be an efficacious and safe treatment for ABSSSI suspected or confirmed to be due to gram-positive pathogens. NCT02600611.

  3. Enhancing the Safety Climate and Reducing Violence Against Staff in Closed Hospital Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Valerie; Vashdi, Dana;