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Sample records for s-wave velocity layer

  1. Estimation of S-wave velocity structure of deep sedimentary layers using geophysical data and earthquake ground motion records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    The preliminary results with an outline of array observation for micro-tremor and natural earthquakes around the NIIT site were explained. Phase velocity estimated from a horizontal array of strong motion observation agrees with that from the micro-tremor survey. Estimation results are consistent with other literature, such as PS-logging data and gravity maps. Further improvement of the three-dimensional modeling by using micro-tremor surveys and horizontal array observation is planned for the future. (author)

  2. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  3. Estimation of S-wave Velocity Structures by Using Microtremor Array Measurements for Subsurface Modeling in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ridwan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jakarta is located on a thick sedimentary layer that potentially has a very high seismic wave amplification. However, the available information concerning the subsurface model and bedrock depth is insufficient for a seismic hazard analysis. In this study, a microtremor array method was applied to estimate the geometry and S-wave velocity of the sedimentary layer. The spatial autocorrelation (SPAC method was applied to estimate the dispersion curve, while the S-wave velocity was estimated using a genetic algorithm approach. The analysis of the 1D and 2D S-wave velocity profiles shows that along a north-south line, the sedimentary layer is thicker towards the north. It has a positive correlation with a geological cross section derived from a borehole down to a depth of about 300 m. The SPT data from the BMKG site were used to verify the 1D S-wave velocity profile. They show a good agreement. The microtremor analysis reached the engineering bedrock in a range from 359 to 608 m as depicted by a cross section in the north-south direction. The site class was also estimated at each site, based on the average S-wave velocity until 30 m depth. The sites UI to ISTN belong to class D (medium soil, while BMKG and ANCL belong to class E (soft soil.

  4. South Ilan Plain High-Resolution 3-D S-Wave Velocity from Ambient Noise Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Xun Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Ilan Plain in northeastern Taiwan is located at a pivotal point where the Ryukyu trench subduction zone, the northern Taiwan crustal stretching zone, and the ongoing arc-continent collision zone converge. In contrast to the North Ilan Plain, the South Ilan Plain exhibits a thin unconsolidated sedimentary layer with depths ranging from 0 - 1 km, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements relative to Penghu island. We deployed a dense network of 43 short-period vertical component Texan instruments from June to November 2013 in this study, covering most of the South Ilan Plain and its vicinity. We then used the ambient noise tomography method for simultaneous phase and group Rayleigh wave velocity measurements to invert a high-resolution 3-D S-wave for shallow structures (up to a depth of 2.5 km in the South Ilan Plain. We used the fast marching method for ray tracing to deal with ray bending in an inhomogeneous medium. The resulting rays gradually bend toward high velocity zones with increasing number of iterations. The high velocity zone results are modified by more iterations and the resolutions become higher because ray crossings are proportional to ray densities for evenly distributed stations. The final results agreed well with known sedimentary basement thickness patterns. We observed nearly EW trending fast anomalies beneath the mountainous terrain abutting to the South Ilan Plain. The Chingshui location consistently exhibited a low S-wave velocity zone to a depth of 1.5 km.

  5. Exploration of deep S-wave velocity structure using microtremor array technique to estimate long-period ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Higashi, Sadanori; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2007-01-01

    In this study, microtremor array measurements were conducted at 9 sites in the Niigata plain to explore deep S-wave velocity structures for estimation of long-period earthquake ground motion. The 1D S-wave velocity profiles in the Niigata plain are characterized by 5 layers with S-wave velocities of 0.4, 0.8, 1.5, 2.1 and 3.0 km/s, respectively. The depth to the basement layer is deeper in the Niigata port area located at the Japan sea side of the Niigata plain. In this area, the basement depth is about 4.8 km around the Seirou town and about 4.1 km around the Niigata city, respectively. These features about the basement depth in the Niigata plain are consistent with the previous surveys. In order to verify the profiles derived from microtremor array exploration, we estimate the group velocities of Love wave for four propagation paths of long-period earthquake ground motion during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake by multiple filter technique, which were compared with the theoretical ones calculated from the derived profiles. As a result, it was confirmed that the group velocities from the derived profiles were in good agreement with the ones from long-period earthquake ground motion records during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake. Furthermore, we applied the estimation method of design basis earthquake input for seismically isolated nuclear power facilities by using normal mode solution to estimate long-period earthquake ground motion during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake. As a result, it was demonstrated that the applicability of the above method for the estimation of long-period earthquake ground motion were improved by using the derived 1D S-wave velocity profile. (author)

  6. Upper-mantle P- and S- wave velocities across the Northern Tornquist Zone from traveltime tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejrani, Babak; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents P- and S-wave velocity variations for the upper mantle in southern Scandinavia and northern Germany based on teleseismic traveltime tomography. Tectonically, this region includes the entire northern part of the prominent Tornquist Zone which follows along the transition from old...... delineated between shield areas (with high seismic mantle velocity) and basins (with lower velocity). It continues northwards into southern Norway near the Oslo Graben area and further north across the Southern Scandes Mountains. This main boundary, extending to a depth of at least 300 km, is even more...

  7. S-Wave Velocity Structure beneath Southwest North America from Seismogram Comparisons of the Mexico Earthquake on 22 June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagus Jaya Santosa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates earth structure beneath the Southwest North America landmass, especially between Mexico and California. Models based on S wave velocities for this area were obtained by carrying out seismogram fitting in time domain and three Cartesian components simultaneously. The data used is from an event, coded as C052297B that occurred in the state of Guerrero, Mexico and it was fitted to synthetic data computed with the GEMINI program at TS network stations. Earth model IASPEI91 and SPREM were used as input to create the synthetic data. Real and synthetic seismograms were subjected to a low-pass filter with a frequency corner of 20 mHz.Waveform analysis results show very unsystematic and strong deviations in the waveform, arrival times, amount of oscillation and the height of the wave amplitude. Discrepancies are met on S, Love, Rayleigh and ScS waves, where the stations epicentral distances are below 300. Deviation in analysis waveform because of the usage of model 1-D of SPREM and IASPEI91, because the 1-D was a kind of average value an elastic property at one particular depth of global earth. With the method of waveform analysis we can see how sensitive waveform is to structures within the layers of the Earth.To explain the discrepancies, a correction to the earth structure is essential. The corrections account for the thickness of the crust, speed gradient of bh, the coefficient for the bh and bv in the upper mantle for surface wave fitting, a small variation of the S speed structure at a layer under the upper mantle above 771 km for S wave fitting, and a small variation at the base the mantle layers for ScS wave fitting. At some stations, a correction for S speed structure have yielded P wave fitting. Results of this research indicate that the 1-D earth model obtained through seismogram fitting at every hypocenter-observation station pair is unique. The S-wave velocity on the upper mantle has strong negative anomalies. This

  8. Temporal change in shallow subsurface P- and S-wave velocities and S-wave anisotropy inferred from coda wave interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Takeda, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent progresses in theoretical and observational researches on seismic interferometry reveal the possibility to detect subtle change in subsurface seismic structure. This high sensitivity of seismic interferometry to the medium properties may thus one of the most important ways to directly observe the time-lapse behavior of shallow crustal structure. Here, using the coda wave interferometry, we show the co-seismic and post-seismic changes in P- and S-wave velocities and S-wave anisotropy associated with the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake (M9.0). In this study, we use the acceleration data recorded at KiK-net stations operated by NIED, Japan. Each KiK-net station has a borehole whose typical depth is about 100m, and two three-component accelerometers are installed at the top and bottom of the borehole. To estimate the shallow subsurface P- and S-wave velocities and S-wave anisotropy between two sensors and their temporal change, we select about 1000 earthquakes that occurred between 2004 and 2012, and extract body waves propagating between borehole sensors by computing the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) of 3 x 3 component pairs. We use frequency bands of 2-4, 4-8, 8-16 Hz in our analysis. Each averaged CCF shows clear wave packets traveling between borehole sensors, and their travel times are almost consistent with those of P- and S-waves calculated from the borehole log data. Until the occurrence of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, the estimated travel time at each station is rather stable with time except for weak seasonal/annual variation. On the other hand, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and its aftershocks cause sudden decrease in the S-wave velocity at most of the KiK-net stations in eastern Japan. The typical value of S-wave velocity changes, which are measured by the time-stretching method, is about 5-15%. After this co-seismic change, the S-wave velocity gradually recovers with time, and the recovery continues for over one year following the

  9. Convenient method for estimating underground s-wave velocity structure utilizing horizontal and vertical components microtremor spectral ratio; Bido no suiheido/jogedo supekutoru hi wo riyoshita kan`i chika s ha sokudo kozo suiteiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H; Yoshioka, M; Saito, T [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    Studies were conducted about the method of estimating the underground S-wave velocity structure by inversion making use of the horizontal/vertical motion spectral ratio of microtremors. For this purpose, a dynamo-electric velocity type seismograph was used, capable of processing the east-west, north-south, and vertical components integratedly. For the purpose of sampling the Rayleigh wave spectral ratio, one out of all the azimuths was chosen, whose horizontal motion had a high Fourier frequency component coherency with the vertical motions. For the estimation of the underground S-wave velocity structure, parameters (P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and layer thickness) were determined from the minimum residual sum of squares involving the observed microtremor spectral ratio and the theoretical value calculated by use of a model structure. The known boring data was utilized for the study of the S-wave velocity in the top layer, and it was determined using an S-wave velocity estimation formula for the Morioka area constructed using the N-value, depth, and geological classification. It was found that the optimum S-wave velocity structure even below the top layer well reflects the S-wave velocity obtained by the estimation formula. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  10. 3D P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Tremor Locations in the Parkfield Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Shelly, D. R.; Bennington, N. L.; Cochran, E. S.; Harrington, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have assembled a new dataset to refine the 3D seismic velocity model in the Parkfield region. The S arrivals from 184 earthquakes recorded by the Parkfield Experiment to Record MIcroseismicity and Tremor array (PERMIT) during 2010-2011 were picked by a new S wave picker, which is based on machine learning. 74 blasts have been assigned to four quarries, whose locations were identified with Google Earth. About 1000 P and S wave arrivals from these blasts at permanent seismic network were also incorporated. Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurring within non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are valuable for improving the precision of NVT location and the seismic velocity model at greater depths. Based on previous work (Shelley and Hardebeck, 2010), waveforms of hundreds of LFEs in same family were stacked to improve signal qualify. In a previous study (McClement et al., 2013), stacked traces of more than 30 LFE families at the Parkfileld Array Seismic Observatory (PASO) have been picked. We expanded our work to include LFEs recorded by the PERMIT array. The time-frequency Phase Weight Stacking (tf-PWS) method was introduced to improve the stack quality, as direct stacking does not produce clear S-wave arrivals on the PERMIT stations. This technique uses the coherence of the instantaneous phase among the stacked signals to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the stack. We found that it is extremely effective for picking LFE arrivals (Thurber et al., 2014). More than 500 P and about 1000 S arrivals from 58 LFE families were picked at the PERMIT and PASO arrays. Since the depths of LFEs are much deeper than earthquakes, we are able to extend model resolution to lower crustal depths. Both P and S wave velocity structure have been obtained with the tomoDD method. The result suggests that there is a low velocity zone (LVZ) in the lower crust and the location of the LVZ is consistent with the high conductivity zone beneath the southern segment of the Rinconada fault that

  11. Upper-mantle velocities below the Scandinavian Mountains from P- and S- wave traveltime tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejrani, Babak; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2017-01-01

    More than 20000 arrival-times of teleseismic P- and S-waves were measured over a period of more than 10 years in five separate temporary and two permanent seismic networks covering the Scandinavian (Scandes) Mountains and adjacent areas of the Baltic Shield. The relative traveltime residuals were...... between Lofoten and the crest of the Northern Scandes Mountains and stays off the coast further north. Seismic velocities in the depth interval 100-300 km change across the UMVB from low relative VP and even lower relative VS on the western side to high relative VP and even higher relative VS to the east...

  12. S-wave velocity measurements along levees in New Orleans using passive surface wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Craig, M. S.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop non-invasive methods for levee inspection, geophysical investigations were carried out at four sites along levees in the New Orleans area: 17th Street Canal, London Avenue Canal, Marrero Levee, and Industrial Canal. Three of the four sites sustained damage from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and have since been rebuilt. The geophysical methods used include active and passive surface wave methods, and capacitively coupled resistivity. This paper summarizes the acquisition and analysis of the 1D and 2D passive surface wave data. Twelve wireless seismic data acquisition units with 2 Hz vertical component geophones were used to record data. Each unit includes a GPS receiver so that all units can be synchronized over any distance without cables. The 1D passive method used L shaped arrays of three different sizes with geophone spacing ranging from 5 to 340 m. Ten minutes to one hour of ambient noise was recorded with each array, and total data acquisition took approximately two hours at each site. The 2D method used a linear array with a geophone spacing of 5m. Four geophones were moved forward every 10 minutes along 400 1000 m length lines. Data acquisition took several hours for each line. Recorded ambient noise was processed using the spatial autocorrelation method and clear dispersion curves were obtained at all sites (Figure 1a). Minimum frequencies ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 Hz and maximum frequencies ranged from 10 to 30 Hz depending on the site. Non-linear inversion was performed and 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models were obtained. The 1D method penetrated to depths ranging from 200 to 500 m depending on the site (Figure 1b). The 2D method penetrated to a depth of 40 60 m and provided 400 1000 m cross sections along the levees (Figure 2). The interpretation focused on identifying zones beneath the levees or canal walls having low S-wave velocities corresponding to saturated, unconsolidated sands, or low-rigidity clays. Resultant S-wave velocity profiles

  13. Joint inversion of high resolution S-wave velocity structure underneath North China Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Li, G.; Niu, F.

    2017-12-01

    North China basin is one of earthquake prone areas in China. Many devastating earthquakes occurred in the last century and before, such as the 1937 M7.0 Heze Earthquake in Shandong province, the 1966 M7.2 Xingtai Earthquake and 1976 Tangshan Earthquake in Hebei province. Knowing the structure of the sediment cover is of great importance to predict strong ground motion caused by earthquakes. Unconsolidated sediments are loose materials, ranging from clay to sand to gravel. Earthquakes can liquefy unconsolidated sediments, thus knowing the distribution and thickness of the unconsolidated sediments has significant implication in seismic hazard analysis of the area. Quantitative estimates of the amount of extension of the North China basin is important to understand the thinning and evolution of the eastern North China craton and the underlying mechanism. In principle, the amount of lithospheric stretching can be estimated from sediment and crustal thickness. Therefore an accurate estimate of the sediment and crustal thickness of the area is also important in understanding regional tectonics. In this study, we jointly invert the Rayleigh wave phase-velocity dispersion and Z/H ratio data to construct a 3-D S-wave velocity model beneath North China area. We use 4-year ambient noise data recorded from 249 temporary stations, and 139 earthquake events to extract Rayleigh wave Z/H ratios. The Z/H ratios obtained from ambient noise data and earthquake data show a good agreement within the overlapped periods. The phase velocity dispersion curve was estimated from the same ambient noise data. The preliminary result shows a relatively low Z/H ratio and low velocity anomaly at the shallow part of sediment basins.

  14. Determination of elastic anisotropy of rocks from P- and S-wave velocities: numerical modelling and lab measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitek, Tomáš; Vavryčuk, Václav; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Petružálek, Matěj

    2014-12-01

    The most common type of waves used for probing anisotropy of rocks in laboratory is the direct P wave. Information potential of the measured P-wave velocity, however, is limited. In rocks displaying weak triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends just on 15 linear combinations of 21 elastic parameters, called the weak-anisotropy parameters. In strong triclinic anisotropy, the P-wave velocity depends on the whole set of 21 elastic parameters, but inversion for six of them is ill-conditioned and these parameters are retrieved with a low accuracy. Therefore, in order to retrieve the complete elastic tensor accurately, velocities of S waves must also be measured and inverted. For this purpose, we developed a lab facility which allows the P- and S-wave ultrasonic sounding of spherical rock samples in 132 directions distributed regularly over the sphere. The velocities are measured using a pair of P-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized along the radial direction and using two pairs of S-wave sensors with the transmitter and receiver polarized tangentially to the spherical sample in mutually perpendicular directions. We present inversion methods of phase and ray velocities for elastic parameters describing general triclinic anisotropy. We demonstrate on synthetic tests that the inversion becomes more robust and stable if the S-wave velocities are included. This applies even to the case when the velocity of the S waves is measured in a limited number of directions and with a significantly lower accuracy than that of the P wave. Finally, we analyse velocities measured on a rock sample from the Outokumpu deep drill hole, Finland. We present complete sets of elastic parameters of the sample including the error analysis for several levels of confining pressure ranging from 0.1 to 70 MPa.

  15. S-Wave's Velocities of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere System in the Caribbean Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, O'Leary; Alvarez, Jose Leonardo; Moreno, Bladimir; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2010-06-01

    An overview of the S-wave velocity (Vs) structural model of the Caribbean is presented with a resolution of 2 o x2 o . As a result of the frequency time analysis (FTAN) of more than 400 trajectories epicenter-stations in this region, new tomographic maps of Rayleigh waves group velocity dispersion at periods ranging from 10 s to 40 s have been determined. For each 2 o x2 o cell, group velocity dispersion curves were determined and extended to 150 s adding data from a larger scale tomographic study (Vdovin et al., 1999). Using, as independent a priori information, the available geological and geophysical data of the region, each dispersion curve has been mapped, by non-linear inversion, into a set of Vs vs. depth models in the depth range from 0 km to 300 km. Due to the non-uniqueness of the solutions for each cell a Local Smoothness Optimization (LSO) has been applied to the whole region to identify a tridimensional model of Vs vs. depth in cells of 2 o x2 o , thus satisfying the Occam razor concept. Through these models some main features of the lithosphere and asthenosphere are evidenced, such as: the west directed subduction zone of the eastern Caribbean region with a clear mantle wedge between the Caribbean lithosphere and the subducted slab; the complex and asymmetric behavior of the crustal and lithospheric thickness in the Cayman ridge; the diffused presence of oceanic crust in the region; the presence of continental type crust in the South America, Central America and North America plates, as well as the bottom of the upper asthenosphere that gets shallower going from west to east. (author)

  16. Lower Mantle S-wave Velocity Model under the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Grand, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    Deep mantle plumes created by thermal instabilities at the core-mantle boundary has been an explanation for intraplate volcanism since the 1970's. Recently, broad slow velocity conduits in the lower mantle underneath some hotspots have been observed (French and Romanowicz, 2015), however the direct detection of a classical thin mantle plume using seismic tomography has remained elusive. Herein, we present a seismic tomography technique designed to image a deep mantle plume under the Yellowstone Hotspot located in the western United States utilizing SKS and SKKS waves in conjunction with finite frequency tomography. Synthetic resolution tests show the technique can resolve a 235 km diameter lower mantle plume with a 1.5% Gaussian velocity perturbation even if a realistic amount of random noise is added to the data. The Yellowstone Hotspot presents a unique opportunity to image a thin plume because it is the only hotspot with a purported deep origin that has a large enough aperture and density of seismometers to accurately sample the lower mantle at the length scales required to image a plume. Previous regional tomography studies largely based on S wave data have imaged a cylindrically shaped slow anomaly extending down to 900km under the hotspot, however they could not resolve it any deeper (Schmandt et al., 2010; Obrebski et al., 2010).To test if the anomaly extends deeper, we measured and inverted over 40,000 SKS and SKKS waves' travel times in two frequency bands recorded at 2400+ stations deployed during 2006-2012. Our preliminary model shows narrow slow velocity anomalies in the lower mantle with no fast anomalies. The slow anomalies are offset from the Yellowstone hotspot and may be diapirs rising from the base of the mantle.

  17. S-Wave Velocity Structure of the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP) Site Using Microtremor Array Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Feng; Huang, Huey-Chu

    2015-10-01

    The Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP) drilled a 2-km-deep hole 2.4 km east of the surface rupture of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake ( M w 7.6), near the town of Dakeng. Geophysical well logs at the TCDP site were run over depths ranging from 500 to 1,900 m to obtain the physical properties of the fault zones and adjacent damage zones. These data provide good reference material for examining the validity of velocity structures using microtremor array measurement; therefore, we conduct array measurements for a total of four arrays at two sites near the TCDP drilling sites. The phase velocities at frequencies of 0.2-5 Hz are calculated using the frequency-wavenumber ( f- k) spectrum method. Then the S-wave velocity structures are estimated by employing surface wave inversion techniques. The S-wave velocity from the differential inversion technique gradually increases from 1.52 to 2.22 km/s at depths between 585 and 1,710 m. This result is similar to those from the velocity logs, which range from 1.4 km/s at a depth of 597 m to 2.98 km/s at a depth of 1,705 m. The stochastic inversion results are similar to those from the seismic reflection methods and the lithostratigraphy of TCDP-A borehole, comparatively. These results show that microtremor array measurement provides a good tool for estimating deep S-wave velocity structure.

  18. 2.5D S-wave velocity model of the TESZ area in northern Poland from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Receiver function (RF) locally provides the signature of sharp seismic discontinuities and information about the shear wave (S-wave) velocity distribution beneath the seismic station. The data recorded by "13 BB Star" broadband seismic stations (Grad et al., 2015) and by few PASSEQ broadband seismic stations (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2008) are analysed to investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) in northern Poland. The TESZ is one of the most prominent suture zones in Europe separating the young Palaeozoic platform from the much older Precambrian East European craton. Compilation of over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles, vertical seismic profiling in over one hundred thousand boreholes and magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods allowed for creation a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Grad et al. 2016). On the other hand the receiver function methods give an opportunity for creation the S-wave velocity model. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) are used to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. 3D P-wave velocity model are interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and synthetic back-azimuthal sections of receiver function are calculated for different Vp/Vs ratio. Densities are calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Next, the synthetic back-azimuthal sections of RF are compared with observed back-azimuthal sections of RF for "13 BB Star" and PASSEQ seismic stations to find the best 2.5D S-wave models down to 60 km depth. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  19. Gas-hydrate concentration estimated from P- and S-wave velocities at the Mallik 2L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide

    2004-05-01

    We estimate the concentration of gas hydrate at the Mallik 2L-38 research site using P- and S-wave velocities obtained from well logging and vertical seismic profiles (VSP). The theoretical velocities are obtained from a generalization of Gassmann's modulus to three phases (rock frame, gas hydrate and fluid). The dry-rock moduli are estimated from the log profiles, in sections where the rock is assumed to be fully saturated with water. We obtain hydrate concentrations up to 75%, average values of 37% and 21% from the VSP P- and S-wave velocities, respectively, and 60% and 57% from the sonic-log P- and S-wave velocities, respectively. The above averages are similar to estimations obtained from hydrate dissociation modeling and Archie methods. The estimations based on the P-wave velocities are more reliable than those based on the S-wave velocities.

  20. S-wave velocity below Europe from delay-time and waveform inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielhuis, A.

    1992-01-01

    The upper mantle of Europe has been the subject of many tomographic studies of variations in P-wave velocity (e.g., Romanowicz 1980; Hovland et al., 1981; Spakman, 1988, 1991; and Spakman et aI., in preparation). In particular the studies of Spakman (1988, 1991) and Spakman et aI. (in preparation)

  1. S-wave velocity below Europe from delay-time and waveform inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielhuis, A.

    1992-01-01

    The upper mantle of Europe has been the subject of many tomographic studies of variations in P-wave velocity (e.g., Romanowicz 1980; Hovland et al., 1981; Spakman, 1988, 1991; and Spakman et aI., in preparation). In particular the studies of Spakman (1988, 1991) and Spakman et aI. (in

  2. Wet and gassy zones in a municipal landfill from P- and S-wave velocity fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantaki, L.A.; Ghose, R.; Draganov, D.S.; Heimovaara, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the distribution of leachate and gas in a municipal landfill is of vital importance to the landfill operators performing improved landfill treatments and for environmental protection and efficient biogas extraction. We have explored the potential of using the velocity fields of

  3. Borehole P- and S-wave velocity at thirteen stations in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, James F.; Boore, David M.; Tinsley, John C.; Mueller, Charles S.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of a program to acquire seismic velocity data at locations of strong-ground motion in earthquakes (e.g., Gibbs et al., 2000), has investigated thirteen additional sites in the Southern California region. Of the thirteen sites, twelve are in the vicinity of Whittier, California, and one is located in San Bernardino, California. Several deployments of temporary seismographs were made after the Whittier Narrows, California earthquake of 1 October 1987 (Mueller et al., 1988). A deployment, between 2 October and 9 November 1987, was the motivation for selection of six of the drill sites. Temporary portable seismographs at Hoover School (HOO), Lincoln School (LIN), Corps of Engineers Station (NAR), Olive Junior High School (OLV), Santa Anita Golf Course (SAG), and Southwestern Academy (SWA) recorded significant aftershock data. These portable sites, with the exception of Santa Anita Golf Course, were co-sited with strong-motion recorders. Stations at HOO, Lincoln School Whittier (WLB), Saint Paul High School (STP), Alisos Adult School (EXC), Cerritos College Gymnasium (CGM), Cerritos College Physical Science Building (CPS), and Cerritos College Police Building (CPB) were part of an array of digital strong-motion stations deployed from "bedrock" in Whittier to near the deepest part of the Los Angeles basin in Norwalk. Although development and siting of this new array (partially installed at the time of this writing) was generally motivated by the Whittier Narrows earthquake, these new sites (with the exception of HOO) were not part of any Whittier Narrows aftershock deployments. A similar new digital strong-motion site was installed at the San Bernardino Fire Station during the same time frame. Velocity data were obtained to depths of about 90 meters at two sites, 30 meters at seven sites, and 18 to 25 meters at four sites. Lithology data from the analysis of cuttings and samples was obtained from the two 90-meter deep holes and

  4. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  5. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  6. A compendium of P- and S-wave velocities from surface-to-borehole logging; summary and reanalysis of previously published data and analysis of unpublished data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, David M.

    2003-01-01

    For over 28 years, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been acquiring seismic velocity and geologic data at a number of locations in California, many of which were chosen because strong ground motions from earthquakes were recorded at the sites. The method for all measurements involves picking first arrivals of P- and S-waves from a surface source recorded at various depths in a borehole (as opposed to noninvasive methods, such as the SASW method [e.g., Brown et al., 2002]). The results from most of the sites are contained in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports (see References). Until now, none of the results have been available as computer files, and before 1992 the interpretation of the arrival times was in terms of piecemeal interval velocities, with no attempt to derive a layered model that would fit the travel times in an overall sense (the one exception is Porcella, 1984). In this report I reanalyze all of the arrival times in terms of layered models for P- and for S-wave velocities at each site, and I provide the results as computer files. In addition to the measurements reported in the open-file reports, I also include some borehole results from other reports, as well as some results never before published. I include data for 277 boreholes (at the time of this writing; more will be added to the web site as they are obtained), all in California (I have data from boreholes in Washington and Utah, but these will be published separately). I am also in the process of interpreting travel time data obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer at hundreds of sites; these data can be interpreted in the same way of those obtained from surface-to-borehole logging. When available, the data will be added to the web site (see below for information on obtaining data from the World Wide Web (WWW)). In addition to the basic borehole data and results, I provide information concerning strong-motion stations that I judge to be close enough to the boreholes

  7. High frequency measurement of P- and S-wave velocities on crystalline rock massif surface - methodology of measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Slavík, Lubomír

    2014-05-01

    For the purpose of non-destructive monitoring of rock properties in the underground excavation it is possible to perform repeated high-accuracy P- and S-wave velocity measurements. This contribution deals with preliminary results gained during the preparation of micro-seismic long-term monitoring system. The field velocity measurements were made by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock outcrop (granite) in Bedrichov gallery (northern Bohemia). The gallery at the experimental site was excavated using TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) and it is used for drinking water supply, which is conveyed in a pipe. The stable measuring system and its automatic operation lead to the use of piezoceramic transducers both as a seismic source and as a receiver. The length of measuring base at gallery wall was from 0.5 to 3 meters. Different transducer coupling possibilities were tested namely with regard of repeatability of velocity determination. The arrangement of measuring system on the surface of the rock massif causes better sensitivity of S-transducers for P-wave measurement compared with the P-transducers. Similarly P-transducers were found more suitable for S-wave velocity determination then P-transducers. The frequency dependent attenuation of fresh rock massif results in limited frequency content of registered seismic signals. It was found that at the distance between the seismic source and receiver from 0.5 m the frequency components above 40 kHz are significantly attenuated. Therefore for the excitation of seismic wave 100 kHz transducers are most suitable. The limited frequency range should be also taken into account for the shape of electric impulse used for exciting of piezoceramic transducer. The spike pulse generates broad-band seismic signal, short in the time domain. However its energy after low-pass filtration in the rock is significantly lower than the energy of seismic signal generated by square wave pulse. Acknowledgments: This work was partially

  8. Time-lapse changes of P- and S-wave velocities and shear wave splitting in the first year after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan: shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, Kaoru; Snieder, Roel

    2013-04-01

    We detect time-lapse changes in P- and S-wave velocities (hereafter, VP and VS, respectively) and shear wave splitting parameters associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan, at depths between 0 and 504 m. We estimate not only medium parameters but also the 95 per cent confidence interval of the estimated velocity change by applying a new least squares inversion scheme to the deconvolution analysis of KiK-net vertical array records. Up to 6 per cent VS reduction is observed at more than half of the analysed KiK-net stations in northeastern Japan with over 95 per cent confidence in the first month after the main shock. There is a considerable correlation between the S-wave traveltime delay and the maximum horizontal dynamic strain (MDS) by the main shock motion when the strain exceeds 5 × 10- 4 on the ground surface. This correlation is not clearly observed for MDS at the borehole bottom. On the contrary, VP and shear wave splitting parameters do not show systematic changes after the Tohoku earthquake. These results indicate that the time-lapse change is concentrated near the ground surface, especially in loosely packed soil layers. We conclude that the behaviour of VP, VS and shear wave splitting parameters are explained by the generation of omnidirectional cracks near the ground surface and by the diffusion of water in the porous subsurface. Recovery of VS should be related to healing of the crack which is proportional to the logarithm of the lapse time after the main shock and/or to decompaction after shaking.

  9. Transdimensional inversion of scattered body waves for 1D S-wave velocity structure - Application to the Tengchong volcanic area, Southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkui; Zhang, Shuangxi; Bodin, Thomas; Lin, Xu; Wu, Tengfei

    2018-06-01

    Inversion of receiver functions is commonly used to recover the S-wave velocity structure beneath seismic stations. Traditional approaches are based on deconvolved waveforms, where the horizontal component of P-wave seismograms is deconvolved by the vertical component. Deconvolution of noisy seismograms is a numerically unstable process that needs to be stabilized by regularization parameters. This biases noise statistics, making it difficult to estimate uncertainties in observed receiver functions for Bayesian inference. This study proposes a method to directly invert observed radial waveforms and to better account for data noise in a Bayesian formulation. We illustrate its feasibility with two synthetic tests having different types of noises added to seismograms. Then, a real site application is performed to obtain the 1-D S-wave velocity structure beneath a seismic station located in the Tengchong volcanic area, Southwestern China. Surface wave dispersion measurements spanning periods from 8 to 65 s are jointly inverted with P waveforms. The results show a complex S-wave velocity structure, as two low velocity zones are observed in the crust and uppermost mantle, suggesting the existence of magma chambers, or zones of partial melt. The upper magma chambers may be the heart source that cause the thermal activity on the surface.

  10. New tomographic images of P- , S- wave velocity and Q on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo: Implication to seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Naoshi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Keiji; Kimura, Hisanor; Honda, Ryou

    2013-04-01

    The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake in the Tokyo metropolitan region will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) and Q tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. A Q tomogram show a low Q zone in PSP slab. We interpret the LVZ as a

  11. Boundary layer heights derived from velocity spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J.; Barthelmie, R.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Kaellstrand, B. [Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    It is a well-known fact that the height of the mixed layer determines the size of the largest and most energetic eddies that can be observed in the unstable boundary layer, and consequently a peak can be observed in the power spectra of the along-wind velocity component at scales comparable to the mixed layer depth. We will now show how the mixed layer depth can be derived from the u-specta and the results will be compared with direct measurements using pibal and tethersonde measurements. (au)

  12. Crustal and mantle structure of the greater Jan Mayen-East Greenland region (NE Atlantic) from combined 3D structural, S-wave velocity, and gravity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P.; Sippel, J.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Meeßen, C.; Breivik, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The study area is located between the Jan Mayen Ridge and the east coast of Greenland. It has a complex geological setting with the ultraslow Kolbeinsey and Mohn's spreading ridges, the anomalously shallow Eggvin Bank, the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMMC), and the tectonically active West Jan Mayen Fracture Zone (WJMFZ). In this study, we present the results of forward 3D structural, S-wave velocity, and gravity modeling which provide new insights into the deep crust and mantle structure and the wide-ranging influence of the Iceland Plume. The crustal parts of the presented 3D structural model are mainly constrained by local seismic refraction and reflection data. Accordingly, greatest crustal thicknesses (24 km) are observed on the northern boundary of the JMMC, while the average crustal thickness is 8.5 km and 4 km in the Kolbeinsey and Mohn's Ridge, respectively. The densities of the crustal parts are from previous studies. Additionally, the mantle density is derived from S-wave velocity data (between 50 and 250 km depth), while densities of the lithospheric mantle between the Moho and 50 km are calculated assuming isostatic equilibrium at 250 km depth. This is used as a starting density model which is further developed to obtain a reasonable fit between the calculated and measured (free-air) gravity fields. The observed S-wave tomographic data and the gravity modeling prove that the Iceland plume anomaly in the asthenosphere affects the lithospheric thickness and temperature, from the strongly influenced Middle Kolbeinsey Ridge, to the less affected North Kolbeinsey Ridge (Eggvin Bank), and to the little impacted Mohn's Ridge. Thus, the age-temperature relations of the different mid-ocean ridges of the study area are perturbed to different degrees controlled by the distance from the Iceland Plume. Furthermore, we find that the upper 50 km of lithospheric mantle are thermally affected by the plume only in the southwestern parts of the study area.

  13. Measurements of P- and S wave velocities in a rock massif and its use in estimating elastic moduli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Živor, Roman; Vilhelm, J.; Rudajev, Vladimír; Lokajíček, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2011), s. 157-167 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : seismic source * seismic waves velocity * elastic constants * geophone * piezo -electric transducer Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/abstracts/AGG/02_11/6_Zivor.pdf

  14. Measurement of Rayleigh wave Z/H ratio and joint inversion for a high-resolution S wave velocity model beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, W.; Li, G.; Niu, F.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge on the 3D sediment structure beneath the Gulf of Mexico passive margin is not only important to explore the oil and gas resources in the area, but also essential to decipher the deep crust and mantle structure beneath the margin with teleseismic data. In this study, we conduct a joint inversion of Rayleigh wave ellipticity and phase velocity at 6-40 s to construct a 3-D S wave velocity model in a rectangular area of 100°-87° west and 28°-37° north. We use ambient noise data from a total of 215 stations of the Transportable Array deployed under the Earthscope project. Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh wave Z/H (vertical to horizontal) amplitude ratio is mostly sensitive to shallow sediment structure, while the dispersion data are expected to have reasonably good resolution to uppermost mantle depths. The Z/H ratios measured from stations inside the Gulf Coastal Plain are distinctly lower in comparison with those measured from the inland stations. We also measured the phase velocity dispersion from the same ambient noise dataset. Our preliminary 3-D model is featured by strong low-velocity anomalies at shallow depth, which are spatially well correlated with Gulf Cost, East Texas, and the Lower Mississippi basins. We will discuss other features of the 3-D models once the model is finalized.

  15. Difference of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of observed earthquakes and microtremors and its application to S-wave velocity inversion based on the diffuse field concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Hiroshi; Mori, Yuta; Nagashima, Fumiaki

    2018-01-01

    We have been discussing the validity of using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVRs) as a substitute for S-wave amplifications after Nakamura first proposed the idea in 1989. So far a formula for HVRs had not been derived that fully utilized their physical characteristics until a recent proposal based on the diffuse field concept. There is another source of confusion that comes from the mixed use of HVRs from earthquake and microtremors, although their wave fields are hardly the same. In this study, we compared HVRs from observed microtremors (MHVR) and those from observed earthquake motions (EHVR) at one hundred K-NET and KiK-net stations. We found that MHVR and EHVR share similarities, especially until their first peak frequency, but have significant differences in the higher frequency range. This is because microtremors mainly consist of surface waves so that peaks associated with higher modes would not be prominent, while seismic motions mainly consist of upwardly propagating plain body waves so that higher mode resonances can be seen in high frequency. We defined here the spectral amplitude ratio between them as EMR and calculated their average. We categorize all the sites into five bins by their fundamental peak frequencies in MHVR. Once we obtained EMRs for five categories, we back-calculated EHVRs from MHVRs, which we call pseudo-EHVRs (pEHVR). We found that pEHVR is much closer to EHVR than MHVR. Then we use our inversion code to invert the one-dimensional S-wave velocity structures from EHVRs based on the diffuse field concept. We also applied the same code to pEHVRs and MHVRs for comparison. We found that pEHVRs yield velocity structures much closer to those by EHVRs than those by MHVRs. This is natural since what we have done up to here is circular except for the average operation in EMRs. Finally, we showed independent examples of data not used in the EMR calculation, where better ground structures were successfully identified from p

  16. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations

  17. Continental lithospheric subduction and intermediate-depth seismicity: Constraints from S-wave velocity structures in the Pamir and Hindu Kush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Yun; Yuan, Xiaohui; Schurr, Bernd; Mechie, James; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon; Fu, Bihong

    2018-01-01

    The Pamir has experienced more intense deformation and shortening than Tibet, although it has a similar history of terrane accretion. Subduction as a primary way to accommodate lithospheric shortening beneath the Pamir has induced the intermediate-depth seismicity, which is rare in Tibet. Here we construct a 3D S-wave velocity model of the lithosphere beneath the Pamir by surface wave tomography using data of the TIPAGE (Tien Shan-Pamir Geodynamic program) and other seismic networks in the area. We imaged a large-scale low velocity anomaly in the crust at 20-50 km depth in the Pamir overlain by a high velocity anomaly at a depth shallower than 15 km. The high velocity anomalies colocate with exposed gneiss domes, which may imply a similar history of crustal deformation, partial melting and exhumation in the hinterland, as has occurred in the Himalaya/Tibet system. At mantle depths, where the intermediate-depth earthquakes are located, a low velocity zone is clearly observed extending to about 180 km and 150 km depth in the Hindu Kush and eastern Pamir, respectively. Moreover, the geometry of the low-velocity anomaly suggests that lower crustal material has been pulled down into the mantle by the subducting Asian and Indian lithospheric mantle beneath the Pamir and Hindu Kush, respectively. Metamorphic processes in the subducting lower crust may cause the intermediate-depth seismicity down to 150-180 km depth beneath the Pamir and Hindu Kush. We inverted focal mechanisms in the seismic zone for the stress field. Differences in the stress field between the upper and lower parts of the Indian slab imply that subduction and detachment of the Indian lithosphere might cause intense seismicity associated with the thermal shear instability in the deep Hindu Kush.

  18. 3-D P- and S-wave velocity structure and low-frequency earthquake locations in the Parkfield, California region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Shelly, David R.; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Bennington, Ninfa L.; Peterson, Dana; Guo, Bin; McClement, Kara

    2016-01-01

    To refine the 3-D seismic velocity model in the greater Parkfield, California region, a new data set including regular earthquakes, shots, quarry blasts and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) was assembled. Hundreds of traces of each LFE family at two temporary arrays were stacked with time–frequency domain phase weighted stacking method to improve signal-to-noise ratio. We extend our model resolution to lower crustal depth with LFE data. Our result images not only previously identified features but also low velocity zones (LVZs) in the area around the LFEs and the lower crust beneath the southern Rinconada Fault. The former LVZ is consistent with high fluid pressure that can account for several aspects of LFE behaviour. The latter LVZ is consistent with a high conductivity zone in magnetotelluric studies. A new Vs model was developed with S picks that were obtained with a new autopicker. At shallow depth, the low Vs areas underlie the strongest shaking areas in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We relocate LFE families and analyse the location uncertainties with the NonLinLoc and tomoDD codes. The two methods yield similar results.

  19. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993

  20. S-wave velocities of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the Lesser Antilles from the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, O'Leary; Clouard, Valerie; Tait, Stephen; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2018-06-01

    We present an overview of S-wave velocities (Vs) within the crust and upper mantle of the Lesser Antilles as determined with 19 seismic broadband stations. Receiver functions (RF) have been computed from teleseismic recordings of earthquakes, and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion relations have been taken from earlier surface wave tomographic studies in the Caribbean area. Local smoothness optimization (LSO) procedure has been applied, combined with an H-K stacking method, the spatial distribution of hypocenters of local earthquakes and of the energy they released, in order to identify an optimum 1D model of Vs below each station. Several features of the Caribbean plate and its interaction with the Atlantic subducting slab are visible in the resulting models: (a) relatively thick oceanic crust below these stations ranges from 21 km to 33 km, being slight thinner in the middle of the island arc; (b) crustal low velocity zones are present below stations SABA, SEUS, SKI, SMRT, CBE, DSD, GCMP and TDBA; (c) lithospheric thickness range from 40 km to 105 km but lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary was not straightforward to correlate between stations; (d) the aseismic mantle wedge between the Caribbean seismic lithosphere and the subducted slab varies in thickness as well as Vs values which are, in general, lower below the West of Martinique than below the West of Guadeloupe; (e) the depth of the subducted slab beneath the volcanic arc, appears to be greater to the North, and relatively shallower below some stations (e.g. DLPL, SAM, BIM and FDF) than was estimated in previous studies based on the depth-distribution of seismicity; f) the WBZ is >10-15 km deeper than the top of the slab below the Central Lesser Antilles (Martinique and Dominica) where the presence of partial melt in the mantle wedge seems also to be more evident.

  1. Simultaneous inversion for hypocenters and lateral velocity variation: An iterative solution with a layered model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, B.W.; Zandt, G.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-08-10

    An iterative inversion technique has been developed that uses the direct P and S wave arrival times from local earthquakes to compute simultaneously a three-dimensional velocity structure and relocated hypocenters. Crustal structure is modeled by subdiving flat layers into rectangular blocks. An interpolation function is used to smoothly vary velocities between blocks, allowing ray trace calculations of travel times in a three-dimensional medium. Tests using synthetic data from known models show that solutions are reasonably independent of block size and spatial distribution but are sensitive to the choice of layer thicknesses. Application of the technique to observed earthquake data from north-central Utah shown the following: (1) lateral velcoity variations in the crust as large as 7% occur over 30-km distance, (2) earthquake epicenters computed with the three-dimensional velocity structure were shifted an average of 3.0 km from location determined assuming homogeneous flat layered models, and (3) the laterally varying velocity structure correlates with anomalous variations in the local gravity and aeromagnetic fields, suggesting that the new velocity information can be valuable in acquiring a better understanding of crustal structure.

  2. Pitfalls in velocity analysis for strongly contrasting, layered media - Example from the Chalk Group, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Mahboubeh; Uldall, Anette; Moreau, Julien; Nielsen, Lars

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about the velocity structure of the subsurface is critical in key seismic processing sequences, for instance, migration, depth conversion, and construction of initial P- and S-wave velocity models for full-waveform inversion. Therefore, the quality of subsurface imaging is highly dependent upon the quality of the seismic velocity analysis. Based on a case study from the Danish part of the North Sea, we show how interference caused by multiples, converted waves, and thin-layer effects may lead to incorrect velocity estimation, if such effects are not accounted for. Seismic wave propagation inside finely layered reservoir rocks dominated by chalk is described by two-dimensional finite-difference wave field simulation. The rock physical properties used for the modeling are based on an exploration well from the Halfdan field in the Danish sector of the North Sea. The modeling results are compared to seismic data from the study area. The modeling shows that interference of primaries with multiples, converted waves and thin-bed effects can give rise to strong anomalies in standard velocity analysis plots. Consequently, root-mean-square (RMS) velocity profiles may be erroneously picked. In our study area, such mis-picking can introduce errors in, for example, the thickness estimation of the layers near the base of the studied sedimentary strata by 11% to 26%. Tests show that front muting and bandpass filtering cannot significantly improve the quality of velocity analysis in our study. However, we notice that spiking deconvolution applied before velocity analysis may to some extent reduce the impact of interference and, therefore, reduce the risk of erroneous picking of the velocity function.

  3. Fine crustal and uppermost mantle S-wave velocity structure beneath the Tengchong volcanic area inferred from receiver function and surface-wave dispersion: constraints on magma chamber distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkui; Zhang, Shuangxi; Wu, Tengfei; Hua, Yujin; Zhang, Bo

    2018-03-01

    The Tengchong volcanic area is located in the southeastern margin of the collision zone between the Indian and Eurasian Plates. It is one of the youngest intraplate volcano groups in mainland China. Imaging the S-wave velocity structure of the crustal and uppermost mantle beneath the Tengchong volcanic area is an important means of improving our understanding of its volcanic activity and seismicity. In this study, we analyze teleseismic data from nine broadband seismic stations in the Tengchong Earthquake Monitoring Network. We then image the crustal and uppermost mantle S-wave velocity structure by joint analysis of receiver functions and surface-wave dispersion. The results reveal widely distributed low-velocity zones. We find four possible magma chambers in the upper-to-middle crust and one in the uppermost mantle. The chamber in the uppermost mantle locates in the depth range from 55 to 70 km. The four magma chambers in the crust occur at different depths, ranging from the depth of 7 to 25 km in general. They may be the heat sources for the high geothermal activity at the surface. Based on the fine crustal and uppermost mantle S-wave velocity structure, we propose a model for the distribution of the magma chambers.

  4. Limiting velocity of reconnection in a current layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgornyj, A.N.; Syrovatskij, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Formation of a plasma current layer from a strong perturbation wave with the Mach magnetic number Msub(a)=1 is investigated numerically within the framework of magnetic hydrodynamics. It is shown that velocity of plasma flowing into the layer is established as small one as compared with the Alfven velocity. At the current layer boundary the Mach magnetic number Msub(a, c)=0.14-0.2. A great decrease in plasma velocity to the current layer results from the counterpressure of a magnetic field, intensity of which near the layer increases due to the storage of magnetic force lines which do not yet reconnect. Calculational results demonstrate the existence of limiting velocity of magnetic reconnection constituting tenth shares of the Mach magnetic number. Influence of this phenomenon on a character of reconnection in the Earth magnetosphere is discussed

  5. Development of a new modeling technique of 3D S-wave velocity structure for strong ground motion evaluation - Integration of various geophysical and geological data using joint inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    A restricted stripe-like zone suffered major damage due to the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake, and ground motion of the south side of the Kashiwazaki NPP site was much greater than that of the north side in the 2007 Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake. One reason for these phenomena is thought to be the focusing effect due to irregularly shaped sedimentary basins (e.g., basin-edge structure, fold structure, etc.) This indicates that precise evaluation of S-wave velocity structure is important. A calculation program that was developed to make S-wave velocity models using the joint inversion method was presented. This program unifies various geophysical and geological data and can make a complex structure model for evaluating strong ground motion with high precision. (author)

  6. Velocity Spectra in the Unstable Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højstrup, Jørgen

    1982-01-01

    Models for velocity spectra of all three components in the lower half of the unstable PBL are presented. The model spectra are written as a sum of two parts, nS(n) = A(fi, z/zi)w*2 + B(f, z/zi)u*02, a mixed layer part with a stability dependence, and a surface layer part without stability...

  7. Development of S-wave portable vibrator; S ha potable vibrator shingen no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaida, Y; Matsubara, Y [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nijhof, V; Brouwer, J

    1996-05-01

    An S-wave portable vibrator to serve as a seismic source has been developed for the purpose of applying the shallow-layer reflection method to the study of the soil ground. The author, et al., who previously developed a P-wave portable vibrator has now developed an S-wave version, considering the advantage of the S-wave over the P-wave in that, for example, the S-wave velocity may be directly compared with the N-value representing ground strength and that the S-wave travels more slowly than the P-wave through sticky soil promising a higher-resolution exploration. The experimentally constructed S-wave vibrator consists of a conventional P-wave vibrator and an L-type wooden base plate combined therewith. Serving as the monitor for vibration is a conventional accelerometer without any modification. The applicability test was carried out at a location where a plank hammering test was once conducted for reflection aided exploration, and the result was compared with that of the plank hammering test. As the result, it was found that after some preliminary treatment the results of the two tests were roughly the same but that both reflected waves were a little sharper in the S-wave vibrator test than in the plank hammering test. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Constraining the depth of the time-lapse changes of P- and S-wave velocities in the first year after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, K.; Kimura, H.; Uchida, N.; Takagi, R.; Snieder, R.

    2012-12-01

    Using deconvolutions of vertical array of KiK-net (nationwide strong-motion seismograph digital network in Japan) records and applying coda wave interferometry (CWI) to Hi-net (high-sensitivity seismograph network in Japan; collocated with a borehole receiver of KiK-net) borehole records, we constrain the responsible depth of the medium changes associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (MW9.0). There is a systematic reduction in VS up to 6% in the shallow subsurface which experienced strong dynamic strain by the Tohoku earthquake. In contrast, both positive and negative changes are observed for VP, which are less than 2% for both directions. We propose that this discrepancy between the changes of VS and VP is explained by the behavior of shear and bulk moduli of a porous medium exposed to an increase of excess pore fluid pressure. At many stations, VS recovers proportional to logarithm of the lapse time after the mainshock, and mostly recovers to the reference value obtained before the mainshock in one year. However, some stations that have been exposed by additional strong motions of aftershocks and/or other earthquakes take much longer time for the recovery. The CWI technique applied to horizontal components of S-coda reveals a velocity reduction up to 0.2% widely along the coastline of northeastern Japan. For the vertical component of P-coda, however, the velocity change is mostly less than 0.1% at the same region. From single scattering model including P-S and S-P conversion scatterings, we verify that both components are sensitive to VS change around the source, but the vertical component of P-coda is sensitive to VP change around the receiver. Consequently, the difference in velocity changes revealed from the horizontal and vertical components represents the difference of VS and VP changes near the receiver. As the conclusion, VS reduction ratio in the deep lithosphere is smaller than that at the shallow ground by 1 to 2 orders.

  9. P- and S-wave velocity models incorporating the Cascadia subduction zone for 3D earthquake ground motion simulations—Update for Open-File Report 2007–1348

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William J.; Reitman, Nadine G.; Angster, Stephen J.

    2017-12-20

    In support of earthquake hazards studies and ground motion simulations in the Pacific Northwest, threedimensional (3D) P- and S-wave velocity (VP and VS , respectively) models incorporating the Cascadia subduction zone were previously developed for the region encompassed from about 40.2°N. to 50°N. latitude, and from about 122°W. to 129°W. longitude (fig. 1). This report describes updates to the Cascadia velocity property volumes of model version 1.3 ([V1.3]; Stephenson, 2007), herein called model version 1.6 (V1.6). As in model V1.3, the updated V1.6 model volume includes depths from 0 kilometers (km) (mean sea level) to 60 km, and it is intended to be a reference for researchers who have used, or are planning to use, this model in their earth science investigations. To this end, it is intended that the VP and VS property volumes of model V1.6 will be considered a template for a community velocity model of the Cascadia region as additional results become available. With the recent and ongoing development of the National Crustal Model (NCM; Boyd and Shah, 2016), we envision any future versions of this model will be directly integrated with that effort

  10. Sensitivity analysis of P-waves and S-waves to gas hydrate in the Shenhu area using OBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lei; Liu, Xueqin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Huaishan; Zhang, Jing; Li, Zizheng; Wang, Jianhua

    2018-02-01

    Compared to towed streamers, ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) obtain both S-wave data and richer wavefield information. In this paper, the induced polarization method is used to conduct wavefield separation on OBS data obtained from the Shenhu area in the South China Sea. A comparison of the changes in P- and S-waves, and a comprehensive analysis of geological factors within the area, enable analysis and description of the occurrence of natural gas hydrate in the study area. Results show an increase in P-wave velocity when natural gas hydrate exists in the formation, whereas the S-wave velocity remains almost constant, as S-waves can only propagate through the rock skeleton. Therefore, the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) response of the P-wave is better than that of the S-wave in the frequency analysis profile. In a wide-angle section, the refractive wave of the hydrate layer is evident when using P-wave components but identification is difficult with S-wave components. This velocity model illustrates the sensitivity of P- and S-wave components to gas hydrate. The use of this polarization method and results of analysis provide technical and theoretical support for research on hydrate deposits and other geological features in the Shenhu area.

  11. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lokajíček, Tomáš; Kern, H.; Svitek, Tomáš; Ivankina, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 231, June (2014), s. 1-15 ISSN 0031-9201 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13102; GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/12/0915; GA ČR GA13-13967S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : 3D-velocity calculation * measured and calculated elastic properties * neutron diffraction * seismic anisotropy * velocity measurements Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.895, year: 2014

  12. Sound field separation with a double layer velocity transducer array (L)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    of the array. The technique has been examined and compared with direct velocity based reconstruction, as well as with a technique based on the measurement of the sound pressure and particle velocity. The double layer velocity method circumvents some of the drawbacks of the pressure-velocity based...

  13. Dispersion Energy Analysis of Rayleigh and Love Waves in the Presence of Low-Velocity Layers in Near-Surface Seismic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Binbin; Xia, Jianghai; Shen, Chao; Wang, Limin

    2018-03-01

    High-frequency surface-wave analysis methods have been effectively and widely used to determine near-surface shear (S) wave velocity. To image the dispersion energy and identify different dispersive modes of surface waves accurately is one of key steps of using surface-wave methods. We analyzed the dispersion energy characteristics of Rayleigh and Love waves in near-surface layered models based on numerical simulations. It has been found that if there is a low-velocity layer (LVL) in the half-space, the dispersion energy of Rayleigh or Love waves is discontinuous and ``jumping'' appears from the fundamental mode to higher modes on dispersive images. We introduce the guided waves generated in an LVL (LVL-guided waves, a trapped wave mode) to clarify the complexity of the dispersion energy. We confirm the LVL-guided waves by analyzing the snapshots of SH and P-SV wavefield and comparing the dispersive energy with theoretical values of phase velocities. Results demonstrate that LVL-guided waves possess energy on dispersive images, which can interfere with the normal dispersion energy of Rayleigh or Love waves. Each mode of LVL-guided waves having lack of energy at the free surface in some high frequency range causes the discontinuity of dispersive energy on dispersive images, which is because shorter wavelengths (generally with lower phase velocities and higher frequencies) of LVL-guided waves cannot penetrate to the free surface. If the S wave velocity of the LVL is higher than that of the surface layer, the energy of LVL-guided waves only contaminates higher mode energy of surface waves and there is no interlacement with the fundamental mode of surface waves, while if the S wave velocity of the LVL is lower than that of the surface layer, the energy of LVL-guided waves may interlace with the fundamental mode of surface waves. Both of the interlacements with the fundamental mode or higher mode energy may cause misidentification for the dispersion curves of surface

  14. Wigner functions of s waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, J. P.; Varro, S.; Wolf, A.; Schleich, W. P.

    2007-01-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the Wigner function of wave functions in D dimensions which depend on the hyperradius--that is, of s waves. They are based either on the position or the momentum representation of the s wave. The corresponding Wigner function depends on three variables: the absolute value of the D-dimensional position and momentum vectors and the angle between them. We illustrate these expressions by calculating and discussing the Wigner functions of an elementary s wave and the energy eigenfunction of a free particle

  15. Wigner functions of s waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Varro, S.; Wolf, A.

    2007-01-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the Wigner function of wave functions in D dimensions which depend on the hyperradius-that is, of s waves. They are based either on the position or the momentum representation of the s wave. The corresponding Wigner function depends on three variables......: the absolute value of the D-dimensional position and momentum vectors and the angle between them. We illustrate these expressions by calculating and discussing the Wigner functions of an elementary s wave and the energy eigenfunction of a free particle....

  16. Analytical determination of low velocity layer in 4-D hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generally, Seismic reflection surveys are done in the oil sectors to determine commercially viable hydrocarbon reservoirs but in most cases reflection records are obscured by wave behaviours in weathering layer. Hence, Up-hole refraction surveys are carried out in 3-D and 4-D prospects with a view to delineating the ...

  17. Blob sizes and velocities in the Alcator C-Mod scrape-off layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kube, R.; Garcia, O.E.; LaBombard, B.

    A new blob-tracking algorithm for the GPI diagnostic installed in the outboard-midplane of Alcator C-Mod is developed. I t tracks large-amplitude fluctuations propagating through the scrape-off layer and calculates blob sizes and velocities. We compare the results of this method to a blob velocity...

  18. Direct measurements of the velocity and thickness of ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Pennycook, S.J.; Withrow, S.P.; Mashburn, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous infrared (1152 nm) and visible (633 nm) reflectivity measurements with nanosecond resolution were used to study the initial formation and subsequent motion of pulsed KrF laser-induced ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in ion implantation-amorphized silicon. The buried layer velocity decreases with depth below the surface, but increases with KrF laser energy density; a maximum velocity of about 14 m/s was observed, implying an undercooling-velocity relationship of approx. 14 K/(m/s). Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to form a direct chemical image of implanted Cu ions transported by the buried layer and showed that the final buried layer thickness was <15 nm

  19. Seismic Wave Propagation from Underground Chemical Explosions: Sensitivity to Velocity and Thickness of a Weathered Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, E. T.; Ezzedine, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recorded motions from underground chemical explosions are complicated by long duration seismic coda as well as motion in the tangential direction. The inability to distinguish the origins of these complexities as either source or path effects comprises a limitation to effective monitoring of underground chemical explosions. With numerical models, it is possible to conduct rigorous sensitivity analyses for chemical explosive sources and their resulting ground motions under the influence of many attributes, including but not limited to complex velocity structure, topography, and non-linear source characteristics. Previously we found that topography can cause significant scattering in the direct wave but leads to relatively little motion in the coda. Here, we aim to investigate the contribution from the low-velocity weathered layer that exists in the shallow subsurface apart from and in combination with surface topography. We use SW4, an anelastic anisotropic fourth order finite difference code to simulate chemical explosive source in a 1D velocity structure consisting of a single weathered layer over a half space. A range of velocity magnitudes are used for the upper weathered layer with the velocities always being lower than that of the granitic underlaying layer. We find that for lower weathered layer velocities, the wave train is highly dispersed and causes a large percentage of energy to be contained in the coda in relation to the entire time series. The percentage of energy contained in the coda grows with distance from the source but saturates at a certain distance that depends on weathered layer velocity and thickness. The saturation onset distance increases with decreasing layer thickness and increasing velocity of the upper layer. Measurements of relative coda energy and coda saturation onset distance from real recordings can provide an additional constraint on the properties of the weathered layer in remote sites as well as test sites like the Nevada

  20. One kind of atmosphere-ocean three layer model for calculating the velocity of ocean current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Z; Xi, P

    1979-10-01

    A three-layer atmosphere-ocean model is given in this paper to calcuate the velocity of ocean current, particularly the function of the vertical coordinate, taking into consideratiln (1) the atmospheric effect on the generation of ocean current, (2) a calculated coefficient of the eddy viscosity instead of an assumed one, and (3) the sea which actually varies in depth.

  1. Composition of the low seismic velocity E' layer at the top of Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Evidence for a layer (E') at the top of the outer core has been available since the '90s and while different studies suggest slightly different velocity contrasts and thicknesses, the common observation is that the layer has lower velocities than the bulk outer core (PREM). Although there are no direct measurements on the density of this layer, dynamic stability requires it to be less dense than the bulk outer core under those same pressure and temperature conditions. Using ab initio simulations on Fe-Ni-S-C-O-Si liquids we constrain the origin and composition of the low-velocity layer E' at the top of Earth's outer core. We find that increasing the concentration of any light-element always increases velocity and so a low-velocity and low-density layer (for stability) cannot be made by simply increasing light element concentration. This rules out barodiffusion or upwards sedimentation of a light phase for its origin. However, exchanging elements can—depending on the elements exchanged—produce such a layer. We evaluate three possibilities. Firstly, crystallization of a light phase from a core containing more than one light element may make such a layer, but only if the crystalizing phase is very Fe-rich, which is at odds with available phase diagrams at CMB conditions. Secondly, the E' layer may result from incomplete mixing of an early Earth core with a late impactor, depending on the light element compositions of the impactor and Earth's core, but such a primordial stratification is neither supported by dynamical models of the core nor thermodynamic models of core merger after the giant impact. The last and most plausible scenario is core-mantle chemical interaction; using thermodynamic models for metal-silicate partitioning of silicon and oxygen at CMB conditions, we show that a reaction between the core and an FeO-rich basal magma ocean can enrich the core in oxygen while depleting it in silicon, in relative amounts that produce a light and slow layer

  2. Exploration of underground basement structures in Kanto plain using the spatial autocorrelation method. 1. S-wave velocity structure along the line from Hatoyama, Saitama to Noda, Chiba; Kukan jiko sokanho ni yoru Kanto heiya no kiban kozo tansa. 1. Saitamaken Hatoyama machi - Chibaken Nodashi kan no S ha sokudo kozo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, T; Umezawa, N; Shiraishi, H [Saitama Institute of Environmental Pollution, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    The Saitama prefectural government has been conducting basement structure exploration using the spatial autocorrelation method by dividing the entire plain area into meshes, for the purpose of improving the accuracy of estimating large-scale seismic damages. This paper reports the result of explorations on meshes in the east-west direction in the central part of Saitama Prefecture. The present exploration was intended on ten meshes in the east-west direction along the north latitude 36-degree line. The number of exploration points is 13 comprising three points on the hilly area bordering on the eastern edge of the Kanto mountainous area and ten points on the plain area. The arrangement constitutes a traverse line with a total distance of about 33 km from the west edge (Hatoyama-machi in Saitama Prefecture) to the east edge (Noda City in Chiba Prefecture). The phase velocities were estimated from the result of the array microtremor observations using the spatial autocorrelation method applied with the FET. The phase velocities were used to estimate underground structures by using an inverse analysis. As a result, detailed two-dimensional S-wave velocity structures were revealed on the traverse line. The velocity cross section expresses change in the basement structures with sufficient resolution, and at the same time the information is judged highly harmonious with existing deep boring data and the result of artificial earthquake exploration. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  3. High-resolution 3-D S-wave Tomography of upper crust structures in Yilan Plain from Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai-Xun; Chen, Po-Fei; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chen, Li-Wei; Gung, YuanCheng

    2015-04-01

    The Yilan Plain (YP) in NE Taiwan locates on the western YP of the Okinawa Trough and displays high geothermal gradients with abundant hot springs, likely resulting from magmatism associated with the back-arc spreading as attested by the offshore volcanic island (Kueishantao). YP features NS distinctive characteristics that the South YP exhibits thin top sedimentary layer, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements, relative those of the northern counterpart. A dense network (~2.5 km station interval) of 89 Texan instruments was deployed in Aug. 2014, covering most of the YP and its vicinity. The ray path coverage density of each 0.015 degree cells are greater than 150 km that could provide the robustness assessment of tomographic results. We analyze ambient noise signals to invert a high-resolution 3D S-wave model for shallow velocity structures in and around YP. The aim is to investigate the velocity anomalies corresponding to geothermal resources and the NS geological distinctions aforementioned. We apply the Welch's method to generate empirical Rayleigh wave Green's functions between two stations records of continuous vertical components. The group velocities of thus derived functions are then obtained by the multiple-filter analysis technique measured at the frequency range between 0.25 and 1 Hz. Finally, we implement a wavelet-based multi-scale parameterization technique to construct 3D model of S-wave velocity. Our first month results exhibit low velocity in the plain, corresponding existing sediments, those of whole YP show low velocity offshore YP and those of high-resolution south YP reveal stark velocity contrast across the Sanshin fault. Key words: ambient seismic noises, Welch's method, S-wave, Yilan Plain

  4. Modelling Velocity Spectra in the Lower Part of the Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H.R.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    of the planetary boundary layer. Knowledge of the variation with stability of the (reduced) frequency f, for the spectral maximum is utilized in this modelling. Stable spectra may be normalized so that they adhere to one curve only, irrespective of stability, and unstable w-spectra may also be normalized to fit...... one curve. The problem of using filtered velocity variances when modelling spectra is discussed. A simplified procedure to provide a first estimate of the filter effect is given. In stable, horizontal velocity spectra, there is often a ‘gap’ at low frequencies. Using dimensional considerations...... and the spectral model previously derived, an expression for the gap frequency is found....

  5. Evaluation of interlayer interfacial stiffness and layer wave velocity of multilayered structures by ultrasonic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Biwa, Shiro

    2014-07-01

    An ultrasonic evaluation procedure for the interlayer interfacial normal stiffness and the intralayer longitudinal wave velocity of multilayered plate-like structures is proposed. Based on the characteristics of the amplitude reflection spectrum of ultrasonic wave at normal incidence to a layered structure with spring-type interlayer interfaces, it is shown that the interfacial normal stiffness and the longitudinal wave velocity in the layers can be simultaneously evaluated from the frequencies of local maxima and minima of the spectrum provided that all interfaces and layers have the same properties. The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is investigated from the perspective of the sensitivity of local extremal frequencies of the reflection spectrum. The feasibility of the proposed procedure is also investigated when the stiffness of each interface is subjected to small random fluctuations about a certain average value. The proposed procedure is applied to a 16-layered cross-ply carbon-fiber-reinforced composite laminate. The normal stiffness of resin-rich interfaces and the longitudinal wave velocity of plies in the thickness direction evaluated from the experimental reflection spectrum are shown to be consistent with simple theoretical estimations.

  6. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  7. Velocity-independent layer stripping of PP and PS reflection traveltimes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Tsvankin, I.

    The principle of the PP + PS = SS method can be used to carry out exact layer stripping for both pure and mode-converted waves in anisotropic media. The main assumptions of the algorithm intro- duced here are that the overburden is laterally homogeneous and has... horizontal and dipping interfaces in each layer H20849Alkhalifah and Tsvankin, 1995; Tsvankin, 2005H20850. This requirement, which is often difficult to satisfy in practice, is no long- er needed if the interval moveout is computed by the velocity...

  8. Time-Series Analysis of Intermittent Velocity Fluctuations in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayernouri, Mohsen; Samiee, Mehdi; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Klewicki, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Classical turbulence theory is modified under the inhomogeneities produced by the presence of a wall. In this regard, we propose a new time series model for the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the inertial sub-layer of turbulent boundary layers. The new model employs tempered fractional calculus and seamlessly extends the classical 5/3 spectral model of Kolmogorov in the inertial subrange to the whole spectrum from large to small scales. Moreover, the proposed time-series model allows the quantification of data uncertainties in the underlying stochastic cascade of turbulent kinetic energy. The model is tested using well-resolved streamwise velocity measurements up to friction Reynolds numbers of about 20,000. The physics of the energy cascade are briefly described within the context of the determined model parameters. This work was supported by the AFOSR Young Investigator Program (YIP) award (FA9550-17-1-0150) and partially by MURI/ARO (W911NF-15-1-0562).

  9. Study on of Seepage Flow Velocity in Sand Layer Profile as Affected by Water Depth and Slope Gradience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z.; Chen, X.

    2017-12-01

    BACKGROUND: The subsurface water flow velocity is of great significance in understanding the hydrodynamic characteristics of soil seepage and the influence of interaction between seepage flow and surface runoff on the soil erosion and sediment transport process. OBJECTIVE: To propose a visualized method and equipment for determining the seepage flow velocity and measuring the actual flow velocity and Darcy velocity as well as the relationship between them.METHOD: A transparent organic glass tank is used as the test soil tank, the white river sand is used as the seepage test material and the fluorescent dye is used as the indicator for tracing water flow, so as to determine the thickness and velocity of water flow in a visualized way. Water is supplied at the same flow rate (0.84 L h-1) to the three parts with an interval of 1m at the bottom of the soil tank and the pore water velocity and the thickness of each water layer are determined under four gradient conditions. The Darcy velocity of each layer is calculated according to the water supply flow and the discharge section area. The effective discharge flow pore is estimated according to the moisture content and porosity and then the relationship between Darcy velocity and the measured velocity is calculated based on the water supply flow and the water layer thickness, and finally the correctness of the calculation results is verified. RESULTS: According to the velocity calculation results, Darcy velocity increases significantly with the increase of gradient; in the sand layer profile, the flow velocity of pore water at different depths increases with the increase of gradient; under the condition of the same gradient, the lower sand layer has the maximum flow velocity of pore water. The air-filled porosity of sand layer determines the proportional relationship between Darcy velocity and pore flow velocity. CONCLUSIONS: The actual flow velocity and Darcy velocity can be measured by a visualized method and the

  10. On the wall-normal velocity of the compressible boundary-layer equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, C. David

    1991-01-01

    Numerical methods for the compressible boundary-layer equations are facilitated by transformation from the physical (x,y) plane to a computational (xi,eta) plane in which the evolution of the flow is 'slow' in the time-like xi direction. The commonly used Levy-Lees transformation results in a computationally well-behaved problem for a wide class of non-similar boundary-layer flows, but it complicates interpretation of the solution in physical space. Specifically, the transformation is inherently nonlinear, and the physical wall-normal velocity is transformed out of the problem and is not readily recovered. In light of recent research which shows mean-flow non-parallelism to significantly influence the stability of high-speed compressible flows, the contribution of the wall-normal velocity in the analysis of stability should not be routinely neglected. Conventional methods extract the wall-normal velocity in physical space from the continuity equation, using finite-difference techniques and interpolation procedures. The present spectrally-accurate method extracts the wall-normal velocity directly from the transformation itself, without interpolation, leaving the continuity equation free as a check on the quality of the solution. The present method for recovering wall-normal velocity, when used in conjunction with a highly-accurate spectral collocation method for solving the compressible boundary-layer equations, results in a discrete solution which is extraordinarily smooth and accurate, and which satisfies the continuity equation nearly to machine precision. These qualities make the method well suited to the computation of the non-parallel mean flows needed by spatial direct numerical simulations (DNS) and parabolized stability equation (PSE) approaches to the analysis of stability.

  11. Laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave anisotropy in synthetic rocks by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L.; Ostadhassan, M.; Tamimi, N.; Li, C.; Alexeyev, A.

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic rocks have been widely used to realize the models with controlled factors in rock physics and geomechanics experiments. Additive manufacturing technology, known as 3D printing, is becoming a popular method to produce the synthetic rocks as the advantages of timesaving, economics, and control. In terms of mechanical properties, the duplicability of 3D printed rock towards a natural rock has been studied whereas the seismic anisotropy still remains unknown as being the key factor in conducting rock physics experiments. This study utilized a 3D printer with gypsum as the ink to manufacture a series of synthetic rocks that have the shapes of octagonal prisms, with half of them printed from lateral and another half from the bottom. An ultrasonic investigation system was set up to measure the P- and S- wave velocities at different frequencies while samples were under dry conditions. The results show the impact of layered property on the P- and S- wave velocities. The measurement results were compared with the predicted results of Hudson model, demonstrating that the synthetic rock from 3D printing is a transverse isotropic model. The seismic anisotropy indicates that the availability of using 3D printed rocks to duplicate natural rocks for the purpose of recreating the experiments of rock physics. Future experiments will be performed on the dependence of seismic anisotropy on fracture geometry and density in 3D printed synthetic rocks.

  12. Wall-attached structures of streamwise velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-11-01

    The wall-attached structures of streamwise velocity fluctuations (u) are explored using direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer at Reτ = 1000 . We identify the structures of u, which are extended close to the wall. Their height (ly) ranges from the near-wall region to the edge of turbulent boundary layer. They are geometrically self-similar in a sense that the length and width of the structures are proportional to the distance from the wall. The population density of the attached structures shows that the tall attached structures (290 wall. The wall-attached structures of u identified in the present work are a proper candidate for Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis and these structures exist in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2017-013369) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and supported by the Supercomputing Center (KISTI).

  13. New Models for Velocity/Pressure-Gradient Correlations in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroseva, Svetlana; Murman, Scott

    2014-11-01

    To improve the performance of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, one has to improve the accuracy of models for three physical processes: turbulent diffusion, interaction of turbulent pressure and velocity fluctuation fields, and dissipative processes. The accuracy of modeling the turbulent diffusion depends on the order of a statistical closure chosen as a basis for a RANS model. When the Gram-Charlier series expansions for the velocity correlations are used to close the set of RANS equations, no assumption on Gaussian turbulence is invoked and no unknown model coefficients are introduced into the modeled equations. In such a way, this closure procedure reduces the modeling uncertainty of fourth-order RANS (FORANS) closures. Experimental and direct numerical simulation data confirmed the validity of using the Gram-Charlier series expansions in various flows including boundary layers. We will address modeling the velocity/pressure-gradient correlations. New linear models will be introduced for the second- and higher-order correlations applicable to two-dimensional incompressible wall-bounded flows. Results of models' validation with DNS data in a channel flow and in a zero-pressure gradient boundary layer over a flat plate will be demonstrated. A part of the material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AJ61A.

  14. Diurnal Dynamics of Standard Deviations of Three Wind Velocity Components in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Krasnenko, N. P.; Kapegesheva, O. F.

    2018-04-01

    Diurnal dynamics of the standard deviation (SD) of three wind velocity components measured with a minisodar in the atmospheric boundary layer is analyzed. Statistical analysis of measurement data demonstrates that the SDs for x- and y-components σx and σy lie in the range from 0.2 to 4 m/s, and σz = 0.1-1.2 m/s. The increase of σx and σy with the altitude is described sufficiently well by a power law with exponent changing from 0.22 to 1.3 depending on time of day, and σz increases by a linear law. Approximation constants are determined and errors of their application are estimated. It is found that the maximal diurnal spread of SD values is 56% for σx and σy and 94% for σz. The established physical laws and the obtained approximation constants allow the diurnal dynamics of the SDs for three wind velocity components in the atmospheric boundary layer to be determined and can be recommended for application in models of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  15. Standard deviation of vertical two-point longitudinal velocity differences in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1971-01-01

    Statistical estimates of wind shear in the planetary boundary layer are important in the design of V/STOL aircraft, and for the design of the Space Shuttle. The data analyzed in this study consist of eleven sets of longitudinal turbulent velocity fluctuation time histories digitized at 0.2 sec intervals with approximately 18,000 data points per time history. The longitudinal velocity fluctuations were calculated with horizontal wind and direction data collected at the 18-, 30-, 60-, 90-, 120-, and 150-m levels. The data obtained confirm the result that Eulerian time spectra transformed to wave-number spectra with Taylor's frozen eddy hypothesis possess inertial-like behavior at wave-numbers well out of the inertial subrange.

  16. Prediction of wall shear stresses in transitional boundary layers using near-wall mean velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Woo Pyung; Shin, Sung Ho; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2000-01-01

    The local wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer was estimated from the near-wall mean velocity data using the principle of Computational Preston tube Method(CPM). The previous DNS and experimental databases of transitional boundary layers were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and to provide the applicable range of wall unit y + . The skin friction coefficients predicted by the CPM agreed well with those from previous studies. To reexamine the applicability of the CPM, near-wall hot-wire measurements were conducted in developing transitional boundary layers on a flat plate with different freestream turbulence intensities. The intermittency profiles across the transitional boundary layers were reasonably obtained from the conditional sampling technique. An empirical correlation between the representative intermittency near the wall and the free parameter K 1 of the extended wall function of CPM has been newly proposed using the present and other experimental data. The CPM has been verified as a useful tool to measure the wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer with reasonable accuracy

  17. Simultaneous Determination of Source Wavelet and Velocity Profile Using Impulsive Point-Source Reflections from a Layered Fluid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bube, K; Lailly, P; Sacks, P; Santosa, F; Symes, W. W

    1987-01-01

    .... We show that a quasi-impulsive, isotropic point source may be recovered simultaneously with the velocity profile from reflection data over a layered fluid, in linear (perturbation) approximation...

  18. Detailed experimental investigations on flow behaviors and velocity field properties of a supersonic mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianguo; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Hao; Hou, Juwei

    2018-03-01

    The flow behaviors and mixing characteristics of a supersonic mixing layer with a convective Mach number of 0.2 have been experimentally investigated utilizing nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering and particle image velocimetry techniques. The full development and evolution process, including the formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, breakdown of large-scale structures and establishment of self-similar turbulence, is exhibited clearly in the experiments, which can give a qualitative graphically comparing for the DNS and LES results. The shocklets are first captured at this low convective Mach number, and their generation mechanisms are elaborated and analyzed. The convective velocity derived from two images with space-time correlations is well consistent with the theoretical result. The pairing and merging process of large-scale vortices in transition region is clearly revealed in the velocity vector field. The analysis of turbulent statistics indicates that in weakly compressible mixing layers, with the increase of convective Mach number, the peak values of streamwise turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stress experience a sharp decrease, while the anisotropy ratio seems to keep quasi unchanged. The normalized growth rate of the present experiments shows a well agreement with former experimental and DNS data. The validation of present experimental results is important for that in the future the present work can be a reference for assessing the accuracy of numerical data.

  19. Application of forking genetic algorithm to the estimation of an S-wave-velocity structure from Rayleigh-wave dispersion data. With special reference to an exploration method using microtremors; Rayleigh ha no bunsan data kara S ha sokudo kozo wo suiteisuru inversion mondai eno kotaigun tansaku bunkigata identeki algorithm no tekiyo. Bido tansaho ni kanrenshite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, I; Nakanishi, I [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ling, S [Nihon Nessui Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Okada, H [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Discussions were given on a genetic algorithm as a means to solve simultaneously the problems related to stability of solution and dependence on an initial model in estimating subsurface structures using the microtremor exploration method. In the study, a forking genetic algorithm (fGA) to explore solid substance groups was applied to the optimizing simulations for a velocity structure model to discuss whether the algorithm can be used practically. The simulation No. 1 was performed by making the number of layers four for both of the given velocity structure and the optimizing model. On the other hand, the simulation No. 2 was executed by making the number of layers for the given velocity structure greater than that for the optimizing model. As a result, it was verified that wide range exploration may be possible for the velocity structure model, and that a large number of candidates for the velocity structure model may be proposed. In either case, the exploration capability of the fGA exceeded that of the standard simple genetic algorithm. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. A First Layered Crustal Velocity Model for the Western Solomon Islands: Inversion of Measured Group Velocity of Surface Waves using Ambient Noise Cross-Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, C. S.; Kuo, Y. T.; Chao, W. A.; You, S. H.; Huang, B. S.; Chen, Y. G.; Taylor, F. W.; Yih-Min, W.

    2017-12-01

    Two earthquakes, MW 8.1 in 2007 and MW 7.1 in 2010, hit the Western Province of Solomon Islands and caused extensive damage, but motivated us to set up the first seismic network in this area. During the first phase, eight broadband seismic stations (BBS) were installed around the rupture zone of 2007 earthquake. With one-year seismic records, we cross-correlated the vertical component of ambient noise recorded in our BBS and calculated Rayleigh-wave group velocity dispersion curves on inter-station paths. The genetic algorithm to invert one-dimensional crustal velocity model is applied by fitting the averaged dispersion curves. The one-dimensional crustal velocity model is constituted by two layers and one half-space, representing the upper crust, lower crust, and uppermost mantle respectively. The resulted thickness values of the upper and lower crust are 6.4 and 14.2 km, respectively. Shear-wave velocities (VS) of the upper crust, lower crust, and uppermost mantle are 2.53, 3.57 and 4.23 km/s with the VP/VS ratios of 1.737, 1.742 and 1.759, respectively. This first layered crustal velocity model can be used as a preliminary reference to further study seismic sources such as earthquake activity and tectonic tremor.

  2. Electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in the proximity of the velocity shear layer in the TJ-I Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Cortes, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Hidalgo, C.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the electrostatic and magnetic turbulence changes in the proximity of the naturally velocity shear layer in the TJ-I tokamak. A decorrelation in the broad-band magnetic fluctuations and a decreasing in the density fluctuation levels have been observed in the proximity (scrape-off layer side) of the shear layer. The results are interpreted in terms of turbulence characteristics modified by sheared poloidal flows or/and magnetic configuration. (author) 8 fig. 16 ref

  3. Spanwise vorticity and wall normal velocity structure in the inertial region of turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Bautista, Juan Carlos; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; White, Christopher; Chini, Gregory; Klewicki, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress gradient is a leading order mechanism on the inertial domain of turbulent wall-flows. This quantity can be described relative to the sum of two velocity-vorticity correlations, vωz and wωy . Recent studies suggest that the first of these correlates with the step-like structure of the instantaneous streamwise velocity profile on the inertial layer. This structure is comprised of large zones of uniform momentum segregated by slender regions of concentrated vorticity. In this talk we study the contributions of the v and ωz motions to the vorticity transport (vωz) mechanism through the use of experimental data at large friction Reynolds numbers, δ+. The primary contributions to v and ωz were estimated by identifying the peak wavelengths of their streamwise spectra. The magnitudes of these peaks are of the same order, and are shown to exhibit a weak δ+ dependence. The peak wavelengths of v, however, exhibit a strong wall-distance (y) dependence, while the peak wavelengths of ωz show only a weak y dependence, and remain almost O (√{δ+}) in size throughout the inertial domain. This research was partially supported by the National Science Foundation and partially supported by the Australian Research Council.

  4. Study of cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature series in a nocturnal boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Viñas, Carmen; Viana, Samuel; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The main characteristic of the Planetary Boundary Layer is the turbulent flow that can be understood as the motions of many superimposed eddies with different scales, which are very irregular and produce mixing among the atmospheric properties. Spectral analysis is a widely used statistical tool to know the size of eddies into the flow. The Turbulent Kinetic Energy is split in fractions for each scale of eddy by mean the power spectrum of the wind velocity components. Also, the fluctuation of the other variables as temperature, humidity, gases concentrations or material particles presents in the atmosphere can be divided according to the importance of different scales in a similar way than the wind. A Cross-spectrum between two time series is used in meteorology to know their correlation in frequency space. Specially, coespectrum, or real part of cross-spectrum, amplitud and coherence give us many information about the low or high correlation between two variables in a particular frecuency or scale (Stull, 1988). In this work we have investigated cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature measured along the summer 2009 at the CIBA, Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere, located in Valladolid province (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000; Viana et al., 2009). In these experimental dataset, among other instrumentation, two sonic anemometers (20 Hz, sampling rate) at 1.5 m and 10 m height are available. Cross-spectra between variables of the two levels, specially, wind vertical component and sonic temperature, under stable stratification are studied in order to improve the knowledge of the proprieties of the momentum and heat fluxes near the ground in the PBL. Nevertheless, power spectral of horizontal components of the wind, at both levels, have been also analysed. The spectra and cross-spectra were performed by mean the Blackman-Tukey method, widely utilised in the time series studies (Blackman & Tukey, 1958) and, where it is

  5. Effect of Gas Velocity on the Dust Sediment Layer in the Coupled Field of Corona Plasma and Cyclone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Mingshan; Ma Chaochen; Li Minghua; Danish, S N

    2006-01-01

    A dust sediment layer was found on the outer tube wall when the ESCP (electrostatic centrifugal precipitator) trapped diesel particulates or ganister sand. The Compton back scatter method was used to measure the sediment thickness during the experiment. The effect of the inlet gas velocity on the dust sediment layer was investigated. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) was used to measure the velocity field between the inner barb tube wall and the outer tube wall. Experiments showed that the thickness of the sediment increased with time, and the sediment layer at the lower end was much thicker than that at the upper end. The agglomeration on the outer tube wall could be removed when the inlet gas velocity was increased to a certain value

  6. Year-Long Vertical Velocity Statistics Derived from Doppler Lidar Data for the Continental Convective Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Newsom, Rob K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Turner, David D. [Global Systems Division, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado

    2017-09-01

    One year of Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma is analyzed to provide profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis for cases of cloud-free convective boundary layers. The variance was scaled by the Deardorff convective velocity scale, which was successful when the boundary layer depth was stationary but failed in situations when the layer was changing rapidly. In this study the data are sorted according to time of day, season, wind direction, surface shear stress, degree of instability, and wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The normalized variance was found to have its peak value near a normalized height of 0.25. The magnitude of the variance changes with season, shear stress, and degree of instability, but was not impacted by wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The skewness was largest in the top half of the boundary layer (with the exception of wintertime conditions). The skewness was found to be a function of the season, shear stress, wind shear across the boundary-layer top, with larger amounts of shear leading to smaller values. Like skewness, the vertical profile of kurtosis followed a consistent pattern, with peak values near the boundary-layer top (also with the exception of wintertime data). The altitude of the peak values of kurtosis was found to be lower when there was a large amount of wind shear at the boundary-layer top.

  7. S-wave scattering of fermion revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, Anisur

    2011-01-01

    A model where a Dirac fermion is coupled to background dilaton field is considered to study s-wave scattering of fermion by a back ground dilaton black hole. It is found that an uncomfortable situation towards information loss scenario arises when one loop correction gets involved during bosonization.

  8. Three-dimensional S-wave tomography under Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillard, C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Arnulf, A. F.; Tolstoy, M.; Waldhauser, F.

    2017-12-01

    Axial Seamount is a submarine volcano located at the intersection of the Juande Fuca Ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg hotspot 500 km off the coast of thenorthwestern United States. The seamount, which rises 1 km above the seafloor, ischaracterized by a shallow caldera that is elongated in the N-S direction, measure 8km by 3 km and sits on top of a 14 km by 3 km magma reservoir. Two eruptive eventsin 1998 and 2011 motivated the deployment in 2014 of a real time cabled observatorywithin the Axial caldera, as part of the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI).Theobservatory includes a network of seven seismometers that span the southern half ofthe caldera. Five months after the observatory came on-line in November 2014, thevolcano erupted on April 24, 2015. Well over 100,000 events were located in thevicinity of the caldera, delineating an outward dipping ring fault that extends fromnear the surface to the magma body at 2 km depth and which accommodatesinflation and deflation of the volcano.The initial earthquake locations have beenobtained with a one-dimensional velocity model but the travel time residuals suggeststrong heterogeneities. A three-dimensional P-wave velocity model, obtained bycombining multichannel and ocean bottom seismometer refraction data, is being usedto refine locations but the three-dimensional S-wave structure is presently unknown.In most mid-ocean ridge settings, the distribution of earthquakes is not conducive forjoint inversions for S-wave velocity and hypocentral parameters because there are fewcrossing ray paths but at Axial the presence of a ring fault that is seismically active atall depths on both the east and west side of the caldera, provides a reasonablegeometry for such efforts. We will present the results of joint inversions that assumethe existing three-dimensional P wave velocity model and solve for VP/VS structure andhypocentral parameters using LOTOS, an algorithm that solves the forward problemusing ray bending.The resulting model

  9. S-wave tomography of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, W. B.; Allen, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    We present an S-wave tomographic model of the Pacific Northwestern United States using regional seismic arrays, including the amphibious Cascadia Initiative. Offshore, our model shows a rapid transition from slow velocities beneath the ridge to fast velocities under the central Juan de Fuca plate, as seen in previous studies of the region (c.f., Bell et al., 2016; Byrnes et al., 2017). Our model also shows an elongated low-velocity feature beneath the hinge of the Juan de Fuca slab, similar to that observed in a P-wave study (Hawley et al., 2016). The addition of offshore data also allows us to investigate along-strike variations in the structure of the subducting slab. Of particular note is a `gap' in the high velocity slab between 44N and 46N, beginning around 100km depth. There exist a number of explanations for this section of lower velocities, ranging from a change in minerology along strike, to a true tear in the subducting slab.

  10. Simultaneous sound velocity and thickness measurement by the ultrasonic pitch-catch method for corrosion-layer-forming polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Masahiro; Takizawa, Shota; Sakai, Tetsuya; Arao, Yoshihiko; Kubouchi, Masatoshi

    2018-01-01

    Since thermosetting resins have excellent resistance to chemicals, fiber reinforced plastics composed of such resins and reinforcement fibers are widely used as construction materials for equipment in chemical plants. Such equipment is usually used for several decades under severe corrosive conditions so that failure due to degradation may result. One of the degradation behaviors in thermosetting resins under chemical solutions is "corrosion-layer-forming" degradation. In this type of degradation, surface resins in contact with a solution corrode, and some of them remain asa corrosion layer on the pristine part. It is difficult to precisely measure the thickness of the pristine part of such degradation type materials by conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic testing, because the sound velocity depends on the degree of corrosion of the polymeric material. In addition, the ultrasonic reflection interface between the pristine part and the corrosion layer is obscure. Thus, we propose a pitch-catch method using a pair of normal and angle probes to measure four parameters: the thicknesses of the pristine part and the corrosion layer, and their respective sound velocities. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by measuring a two-layer sample and a sample including corroded parts. The results demonstrate that the pitch-catch method can successfully measure the four parameters and evaluate the residual thickness of the pristine part in the corrosion-layer-forming sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of small streamwise velocity distortion on the boundary layer flow over a thin flat plate with application to boundary layer stability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.; Cowley, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers show how an initially linear spanwise disturbance in the free stream velocity field is amplified by leading edge bluntness effects and ultimately leads to a small amplitude but linear spanwise motion far downstream from the edge. This spanwise motion is imposed on the boundary layer flow and ultimately causes an order-one change in its profile shape. The modified profiles are highly unstable and can support Tollmein-Schlichting wave growth well upstream of the theoretical lower branch of the neutral stability curve for a Blasius boundary layer.

  12. An assimilation test of Doppler radar reflectivity and radial velocity from different height layers in improving the WRF rainfall forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiyang; Liu, Jia; Yan, Denghua; Li, Chuanzhe; Chu, Zhigang; Yu, Fuliang

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological forecasts require high-resolution and accurate rainfall information, which is one of the most difficult variables to be captured by the mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems. Radar data assimilation is an effective method for improving rainfall forecasts by correcting the initial and lateral boundary conditions of the NWP system. The aim of this study is to explore an efficient way of utilizing the Doppler radar observations for data assimilation, which is implemented by exploring the effect of assimilating radar data from different height layers on the improvement of the NWP rainfall accuracy. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used for numerical rainfall forecast in the Zijingguan catchment located in the ;Jing-Jin-Ji; (Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei) Region of Northern China, and the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3-DVar) technique is adopted to assimilate the radar data. Radar reflectivity and radial velocity are assimilated separately and jointly. Each type of radar data is divided into seven data sets according to the height layers: (1) 2000 m, and (7) all layers. The results show that radar reflectivity assimilation leads to better results than radial velocity assimilation. The accuracy of the forecasted rainfall deteriorates with the rise of the height of the assimilated radar reflectivity. The same results can be found when assimilating radar reflectivity and radial velocity at the same time. The conclusions of this study provide a reference for efficient assimilation of the radar data in improving the NWP rainfall products.

  13. Crack wave propagation along fracture with an induced low-velocity layer; Teisokudo no chika kiretsu zone wo denpasuru kiretsuha no bunsan tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, K [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    A study has been performed on underground cracks working as a geothermy reservoir layer, with respect to characteristics of elastic waves propagating with their energy concentrated on a boundary between rocks around the cracks and fluid in the underground cracks, or `crack waves`. The study has modeled a multi-crack reservoir layer according to the three-layer structure of the fluid layer and low-velocity solid layers around the former layer, whereas crack waves propagating therein were discussed for their dispersion characteristics. As a result of discussions, a guideline to the crack wave measurement at actual fields was put together as follows: because the low-velocity layer affects the dispersion characteristics of the crack waves, the structure and characteristics of the multi-crack reservoir layer may possibly be evaluated by measuring the velocity of the crack waves; evaluating the low-velocity layers requires proper selection of frequency of the crack wave to be measured; for example, at the Higashi Hachimantai field, a crack wave of several hundred hertz must be analyzed; and thickness of the low-velocity layers around main cracks, which can be estimated from the velocity of the crack wave is two meters at the greatest. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Boundary layer and fundamental problems of hydrodynamics (compatibility of a logarithmic velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer with the experience values)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaryankin, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    The compatibility of the semiempirical turbulence theory of L. Prandtl with the actual flow pattern in a turbulent boundary layer is considered in this article, and the final calculation results of the boundary layer is analyzed based on the mentioned theory. It shows that accepted additional conditions and relationships, which integrate the differential equation of L. Prandtl, associating the turbulent stresses in the boundary layer with the transverse velocity gradient, are fulfilled only in the near-wall region where the mentioned equation loses meaning and are inconsistent with the physical meaning on the main part of integration. It is noted that an introduced concept about the presence of a laminar sublayer between the wall and the turbulent boundary layer is the way of making of a physical meaning to the logarithmic velocity profile, and can be defined as adjustment of the actual flow to the formula that is inconsistent with the actual boundary conditions. It shows that coincidence of the experimental data with the actual logarithmic profile is obtained as a result of the use of not particular physical value, as an argument, but function of this value.

  15. Sensitivity of ground motion parameters to local site effects for areas characterised by a thick buried low-velocity layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Galea, Pauline; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Paolucci, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that earthquake damage at a particular site depends on the source, the path that the waves travel through and the local geology. The latter is capable of amplifying and changing the frequency content of the incoming seismic waves. In regions of sparse or no strong ground motion records, like Malta (Central Mediterranean), ground motion simulations are used to obtain parameters for purposes of seismic design and analysis. As an input to ground motion simulations, amplification functions related to the shallow subsurface are required. Shear-wave velocity profiles of several sites on the Maltese islands were obtained using the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (H/V), the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation (ESAC) technique and the Genetic Algorithm. The sites chosen were all characterised by a layer of Blue Clay, which can be up to 75 m thick, underlying the Upper Coralline Limestone, a fossiliferous coarse grained limestone. This situation gives rise to a velocity inversion. Available borehole data generally extends down till the top of the Blue Clay layer therefore the only way to check the validity of the modelled shear-wave velocity profile is through the thickness of the topmost layer. Surface wave methods are characterised by uncertainties related to the measurements and the model used for interpretation. Moreover the inversion procedure is also highly non-unique. Such uncertainties are not commonly included in site response analysis. Yet, the propagation of uncertainties from the extracted dispersion curves to inversion solutions can lead to significant differences in the simulations (Boaga et al., 2011). In this study, a series of sensitivity analyses will be presented with the aim of better identifying those stratigraphic properties which can perturb the ground motion simulation results. The stochastic one-dimensional site response analysis algorithm, Extended Source Simulation (EXSIM; Motazedian and Atkinson, 2005), was used to perform

  16. Wavelet phase analysis of two velocity components to infer the structure of interscale transfers in a turbulent boundary-layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keylock, Christopher J [Sheffield Fluid Mechanics Group and Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Nishimura, Kouichi, E-mail: c.keylock@sheffield.ac.uk [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Scale-dependent phase analysis of velocity time series measured in a zero pressure gradient boundary layer shows that phase coupling between longitudinal and vertical velocity components is strong at both large and small scales, but minimal in the middle of the inertial regime. The same general pattern is observed at all vertical positions studied, but there is stronger phase coherence as the vertical coordinate, y, increases. The phase difference histograms evolve from a unimodal shape at small scales to the development of significant bimodality at the integral scale and above. The asymmetry in the off-diagonal couplings changes sign at the midpoint of the inertial regime, with the small scale relation consistent with intense ejections followed by a more prolonged sweep motion. These results may be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with the action of low speed streaks and hairpin vortices near the wall, with large scale motions further from the wall, the effect of which penetrates to smaller scales. Hence, a measure of phase coupling, when combined with a scale-by-scale decomposition of perpendicular velocity components, is a useful tool for investigating boundary-layer structure and inferring process from single-point measurements. (paper)

  17. Wavelet phase analysis of two velocity components to infer the structure of interscale transfers in a turbulent boundary-layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keylock, Christopher J; Nishimura, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Scale-dependent phase analysis of velocity time series measured in a zero pressure gradient boundary layer shows that phase coupling between longitudinal and vertical velocity components is strong at both large and small scales, but minimal in the middle of the inertial regime. The same general pattern is observed at all vertical positions studied, but there is stronger phase coherence as the vertical coordinate, y, increases. The phase difference histograms evolve from a unimodal shape at small scales to the development of significant bimodality at the integral scale and above. The asymmetry in the off-diagonal couplings changes sign at the midpoint of the inertial regime, with the small scale relation consistent with intense ejections followed by a more prolonged sweep motion. These results may be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with the action of low speed streaks and hairpin vortices near the wall, with large scale motions further from the wall, the effect of which penetrates to smaller scales. Hence, a measure of phase coupling, when combined with a scale-by-scale decomposition of perpendicular velocity components, is a useful tool for investigating boundary-layer structure and inferring process from single-point measurements. (paper)

  18. Length and time scales of the near-surface axial velocity in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, M.

    2006-01-01

    Reynolds number effects on relevant length and time scales in the near-wall region of a canonical turbulent boundary layer are investigated. Well resolved measurements in the atmospheric surface layer are compared with existing laboratory data to give a composite Reynolds number range spanning over three orders of magnitude. In the field experiments, a vertical rake of twenty single element hot-wires was used to measure the axial velocity, u, characteristics in the lower log layer region of the atmospheric surface layer that flows over Utah's western desert. Only data acquired under conditions of near-neutral thermal stability are analyzed. The shape of the power spectra of u as a function of distance from the wall, y, and Reynolds number is investigated, with emphasis on the appropriate scaling parameters valid across different wavenumber, k, bands. In particular, distance from the wall is found to scale the region of the u spectra around ky = 1. The presence of a k -1 slope in the spectra is also found to correlate with the Reynolds number dependence in the peak of the root mean square u profile. In addition, Reynolds number trends in the profiles of the Taylor microscales, which represent intermediate length and time scales in the boundary layer, are shown to deviate from classical scaling

  19. Geological structure analysis in Central Java using travel time tomography technique of S waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palupi, I. R.; Raharjo, W.; Nurdian, S. W.; Giamboro, W. S.; Santoso, A.

    2016-01-01

    Java is one of the islands in Indonesia that is prone to the earthquakes, in south of Java, there is the Australian Plate move to the Java island and press with perpendicular direction. This plate movement formed subduction zone and cause earthquakes. The earthquake is the release of energy due to the sudden movement of the plates. When an earthquake occurs, the energy is released and record by seismometers in the waveform. The first wave recorded is called the P waves (primary) and the next wave is called S waves (secondary). Both of these waves have different characteristics in terms of propagation and direction of movement. S wave is composed of waves of Rayleigh and Love waves, with each direction of movement of the vertical and horizontal, subsurface imaging by using S wave tomography technique can describe the type of the S wave through the medium. The variation of wave velocity under Central Java (esearch area) is ranging from -10% to 10% at the depth of 20, 30 and 40 km, the velocity decrease with the depth increase. Moho discontinuity is lies in the depth of 32 km under the crust, it is indicates there is strong heterogenity in Moho. (paper)

  20. Spectral assessment of the turbulent convection velocity in a spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer at Reynolds numbers up to Re θ = 13000

    OpenAIRE

    Renard , N.; Deck , S.; Sagaut , P.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; A method inspired by del Alamo et al. [1] is derived to assess the wavelength-dependent convection velocity in a zero pressure gradient spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer at Retheta = 13 000 for all wavelengths and all wall distances, using only estimates of the time power spectral density of the streamwise velocity and of its local spatial derivative. The resulting global convection velocity has a least-squares interpretation and is easily relate...

  1. The plane mixing layer between parallel streams of different velocities and different densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, H.E.; Lummer, M.; Nottmeyer, K.

    1990-01-01

    The problem investigated is often encountered in technical applications. For its most basic configuration, the plane turbulent mixing layer, we use the notation as sketched in fig. 1. The influence of density inhomogeneities is twofold: (a) via buoyancy effects and (b) via inertia effects. The investigation described were aimed at studying the latter, while the former -- by appropriate choice of parameters - was essentially suppressed. (authors)

  2. Rayleigh and S wave tomography constraints on subduction termination and lithospheric foundering in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengxin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steven M.; Dougherty, Sara L.; Clayton, Robert W.; Farrell, Jamie; Lin, Fan-Chi

    2018-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle structure of central California have been modified by subduction termination, growth of the San Andreas plate boundary fault system, and small-scale upper mantle convection since the early Miocene. Here we investigate the contributions of these processes to the creation of the Isabella Anomaly, which is a high seismic velocity volume in the upper mantle. There are two types of hypotheses for its origin. One is that it is the foundered mafic lower crust and mantle lithosphere of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. The alternative suggests that it is a fossil slab connected to the Monterey microplate. A dense broadband seismic transect was deployed from the coast to the western Sierra Nevada to fill in the least sampled areas above the Isabella Anomaly, and regional-scale Rayleigh and S wave tomography are used to evaluate the two hypotheses. New shear velocity (Vs) tomography images a high-velocity anomaly beneath coastal California that is sub-horizontal at depths of ∼40–80 km. East of the San Andreas Fault a continuous extension of the high-velocity anomaly dips east and is located beneath the Sierra Nevada at ∼150–200 km depth. The western position of the Isabella Anomaly in the uppermost mantle is inconsistent with earlier interpretations that the Isabella Anomaly is connected to actively foundering foothills lower crust. Based on the new Vs images, we interpret that the Isabella Anomaly is not the dense destabilized root of the Sierra Nevada, but rather a remnant of Miocene subduction termination that is translating north beneath the central San Andreas Fault. Our results support the occurrence of localized lithospheric foundering beneath the high elevation eastern Sierra Nevada, where we find a lower crustal low Vs layer consistent with a small amount of partial melt. The high elevations relative to crust thickness and lower crustal low Vs zone are consistent with geological inferences that lithospheric foundering drove

  3. Rayleigh and S wave tomography constraints on subduction termination and lithospheric foundering in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengxin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steven M.; Dougherty, Sara L.; Clayton, Robert W.; Farrell, Jamie; Lin, Fan-Chi

    2018-04-01

    The crust and upper mantle structure of central California have been modified by subduction termination, growth of the San Andreas plate boundary fault system, and small-scale upper mantle convection since the early Miocene. Here we investigate the contributions of these processes to the creation of the Isabella Anomaly, which is a high seismic velocity volume in the upper mantle. There are two types of hypotheses for its origin. One is that it is the foundered mafic lower crust and mantle lithosphere of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. The alternative suggests that it is a fossil slab connected to the Monterey microplate. A dense broadband seismic transect was deployed from the coast to the western Sierra Nevada to fill in the least sampled areas above the Isabella Anomaly, and regional-scale Rayleigh and S wave tomography are used to evaluate the two hypotheses. New shear velocity (Vs) tomography images a high-velocity anomaly beneath coastal California that is sub-horizontal at depths of ∼40-80 km. East of the San Andreas Fault a continuous extension of the high-velocity anomaly dips east and is located beneath the Sierra Nevada at ∼150-200 km depth. The western position of the Isabella Anomaly in the uppermost mantle is inconsistent with earlier interpretations that the Isabella Anomaly is connected to actively foundering foothills lower crust. Based on the new Vs images, we interpret that the Isabella Anomaly is not the dense destabilized root of the Sierra Nevada, but rather a remnant of Miocene subduction termination that is translating north beneath the central San Andreas Fault. Our results support the occurrence of localized lithospheric foundering beneath the high elevation eastern Sierra Nevada, where we find a lower crustal low Vs layer consistent with a small amount of partial melt. The high elevations relative to crust thickness and lower crustal low Vs zone are consistent with geological inferences that lithospheric foundering drove uplift

  4. Experimental Investigation of Multi-layer Insulation Effect on Damage of Stuffed Shield by High-velocity Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUAN Gong-shun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The stuffed shield with multi-layer insulation(MLI was designed by improving on Al Whipple shield, and a series of high-velocity impact tests were practiced with a two-stage light gas gun facility at vacuum environment. The damage model of the stuffed shield with different MLI location by Al-sphere projectile impacting was obtained. The effect of MLI on damage of the stuffed shield by high-velocity impact was studied. The results indicate when the MLI is located at front side of the first Al-plate, the protection performance of the stuffed shield is improved with the larger perforation diameter of the first Al-plate and more impact kinetic energy dissipation of the projectile. When MLI is arranged at back side of the first Al-plate, the expansion of the secondary debris cloud from projectile impacting the first Al-plate is restrained, it is not good to improve the protection performance of the stuffed shield. When MLI is arranged at front side of the stuffed wall, the perforation size of the stuffed wall increases; when MLI is arranged at front side of the rear wall, the distribution range of crater on the rear wall decreases.

  5. Characteristics of vertical seismic motions and qp-values in sedimentary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohdo, Masanobu; Hatori, Toshiaki; Chiba, Osamu; Takahashi, Katsuya; Takemura, Masayuki; Tanaka, Hideo.

    1995-01-01

    Using seismic records observed in 4 borehole arrays, characteristics of vertical seismic motions in sedimentary layers are investigated. The results are as follows. 1) P-waves having intensive effect to vertical component are propagating within sedimentary layers even after the S-wave onset time (S-wave part). 2) Frequency dependent Q-values for P-waves (Qp) in Tertiary sediment layers obtained from the optimal analyses to spectral ratios have the tendency to be identical with Q-values for S-waves (Qs) with the same wavelength. 3) Observed vertical motions in upper ground can be simulated by the multiple reflection theory of P-waves based on the optimized velocities and Q-values. (author)

  6. The influence of interstitial water velocity on the migration of 85Sr and 137Cs in an aerated sandy soil layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Takebe, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1983-01-01

    The influence of interstitial water velocity on the migration of Sr-85 and Cs-137 in an aerated sandy soil layer was studied at different feed water velocities and feed times. As well known, it was found that Sr-85 migrated with interstitial water, but Cs-137 little migrated with interstitial water. The apparent migration velocity for each fraction corresponding to three concentrations (2 x 10 -2 , 1 x 10 -2 and 5 x 10 -3 μCi/g) of Sr-85 was further investigated. At constant interstitial water velocity (1cm/ min), different values were given for the apparent migration velocity of three fractions, and the fraction with thin concentration migrated faster. At constant feeding time (100hr), there was a linear relationship between apparent migration velocity of three fractions and interstitial water velocity, in the range of slow water velocity ( -2 and 5 x 10 -3 μCi/g) and interstitial water velocity, in the range of fast water velocity (> 1cm/min). (author)

  7. Velocity profiles of acoustic streaming in resulting stokes layer by acoustic standing wave in a duct; Kannai kichi shindo ni okeru stokes sonai onkyoryu ryusoku bunpu no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, M; Kawahashi, M [Saitama University, Saitama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-07-25

    Acoustic streaming is generated by Reynolds stress in the sense of mean acoustic momentum flux in a sound field. In the case of an acoustic standing wave produced by an air column oscillation in a closed duct, the friction and the Reynolds stress in the resulting Stokes layer are the essentials of acoustic streaming generation in the vicinity of the duct wall. The thickness of the Stokes layer decreases with the oscillatory Reynolds number. The plane wave propagation in the duct is assumed for the case of high Reynolds number except for the thin Stokes layer adjacent to the duct wall. The velocity profiles of the streaming are estimated theoretically from the steady component of the second-order term of a perturbation expansion in which the first-order approximation is a sinusoidal oscillation of the air column with plane waves. The present paper describes theoretical analysis of the velocity profiles of the acoustic streaming in the Stokes layer by means of the matched asymptotic expansion method. The results obtained show the existence of reverse streaming in a very thin layer adjacent to the wall and the effects of thermal boundary conditions at the wall on the velocity profiles of acoustic streaming in the Stokes layer. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  8. High-velocity DC-VPS for diffusion and protecting barrier layers in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, R. H.; Franco, T.; Ruckdäschel, R.

    2006-12-01

    High-temperature fuel cells of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) type as direct converter of chemical into electrical energy show a high potential for reducing considerably the specific energy consumption in different application fields. Of particular interest are advanced lightweight planar cells for electricity supply units in cars and other mobile systems. Such cells, in one new design, consist mainly of metallic parts, for example, of ferrite steels. These cells shall operate in the temperature range of 700 to 800 °C where oxidation and diffusion processes can be of detrimental effect on cell performance for long-term operation. Problems arise in particular by diffusion of chromium species from the interconnect or the cell containment into the electrolyte/cathode interface forming insulating phases and by the mutual diffusion of substrate and anode material, for example, iron and chromium from the ferrite into the anode and nickel from the anode into the ferrite, which in both cases reduces performance and system lifetime. Additional intermediate layers of perovskite-type material, (e.g., doped LaCrO3) applied with high-velocity direct-current vacuum plasma spraying (DC-VPS) can reduce such effects considerably if they are stable and of high electronic conductivity.

  9. Site-response Estimation by 1D Heterogeneous Velocity Model using Borehole Log and its Relationship to Damping Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In the Niigata area, which suffered from several large earthquakes such as the 2007 Chuetsu-oki earthquake, geographical observation that elucidates the S-wave structure of the underground is advancing. Modeling of S-wave velocity structure in the subsurface is underway to enable simulation of long-period ground motion. The one-dimensional velocity model by inverse analysis of micro-tremors is sufficiently appropriate for long-period site response but not for short-period, which is important for ground motion evaluation at NPP sites. The high-frequency site responses may be controlled by the strength of heterogeneity of underground structure because the heterogeneity of the 1D model plays an important role in estimating high-frequency site responses and is strongly related to the damping factor of the 1D layered velocity model. (author)

  10. Statistical analysis of s-wave neutron reduced widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandita Anita; Agrawal, H.M.

    1992-01-01

    The fluctuations of the s-wave neutron reduced widths for many nuclei have been analyzed with emphasis on recent measurements by a statistical procedure which is based on the method of maximum likelihood. It is shown that the s-wave neutron reduced widths of nuclei follow single channel Porter Thomas distribution (x 2 -distribution with degree of freedom ν = 1) for most of the cases. However there are apparent deviations from ν = 1 and possible explanation and significance of this deviation is given. These considerations are likely to modify the evaluation of neutron cross section. (author)

  11. s -wave scattering length of a Gaussian potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeszenszki, Peter; Cherny, Alexander Yu.; Brand, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    We provide accurate expressions for the s -wave scattering length for a Gaussian potential well in one, two, and three spatial dimensions. The Gaussian potential is widely used as a pseudopotential in the theoretical description of ultracold-atomic gases, where the s -wave scattering length is a physically relevant parameter. We first describe a numerical procedure to compute the value of the s -wave scattering length from the parameters of the Gaussian, but find that its accuracy is limited in the vicinity of singularities that result from the formation of new bound states. We then derive simple analytical expressions that capture the correct asymptotic behavior of the s -wave scattering length near the bound states. Expressions that are increasingly accurate in wide parameter regimes are found by a hierarchy of approximations that capture an increasing number of bound states. The small number of numerical coefficients that enter these expressions is determined from accurate numerical calculations. The approximate formulas combine the advantages of the numerical and approximate expressions, yielding an accurate and simple description from the weakly to the strongly interacting limit.

  12. Relativistic effects in decay of S-wave quarkoniums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The width of S-wave quarkonium decays η c ,η b → γγ and J/ψ, Y → e + e - are calculated using the quasipotential approach. The nontrivial dependence of decay amplitude on relative quark momentum is considered. It is shown that relativistic corrections reach values of 30-50% in the processes studied

  13. S-wave π-nucleus repulsion and dirac phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, S.; Jennings, B.K.

    1993-12-01

    A relativistic π-nucleon potential is extended to m* ≠ m to investigate the possibility of generating s-wave π-nucleus repulsion. We find that relativity does indeed generate significant repulsion, the exact amount depending on the details of the calculation. In contradistinction the tp approximation gives very little repulsion. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  14. P- and S-wave models and statistical characterization of scatterers at the Solfatara Volcano using active seismic data from RICEN experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Marcello; Festa, Gaetano; Roux, Philippe; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Gresse, Marceau; Zollo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    RICEN (Repeated and InduCed Earthquakes and Noise) is an active and passive experiment organized at the Solfatara volcano, in the framework of the European project MEDSUV. It was aimed to reveal and track the variations in the elastic properties of the medium at small scale through repeated observations over time. It covered an area of 90m x 115m by a regular grid of 240 receivers and 100 shotpoints at the center of the volcano. A Vibroseis truck was used as seismic source . We cross-correlated the seismograms by the source time function to obtain the Green's functions filtered in the frequency band excited by the source. To estimate the phase and the group velocities of the Rayleigh-waves we used the coherence of the signal along the seismic sections. In subgrids of 40m x 40m we realigned the waveforms or their envelope in different frequency bands, to maximize the amplitude of the stack function, the phase or the group velocities being those speeds proving this maximum. We jointly inverted the dispersion curves to obtain a locally layered 1-D medium in term of S-waves. Finally the collection of all the models provides us with a 3-D image of the investigated area. The S-wave velocity decreases toward the "Fangaia", due to the water saturation of the medium, as confirmed by geoelectric results. Since the Solfatara is a strongly heterogeneous medium, it is not possible to localize the velocity anomalies at different scales and a description of the medium through statistical parameters, such as the mean free path (MFP) and the transport mean free path (TMFP) was provided. The MFP was recovered from the ratio between coherent and incoherent intensities of the surface waves measured in different frequency bands. It decreases with frequency from about 40m at 8.5 Hz to 10m at 21.5 Hz, this behavior being typical of volcanic areas. The TMFP was measured fitting the decay of the coda of the energy at different distances. As expected it is larger than the MFP and strongly

  15. Non-overlapped P- and S-wave Poynting vectors and its solution on Grid Method

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Yong Ming; Liu, Qiancheng

    2017-01-01

    Poynting vector represents the local directional energy flux density of seismic waves in geophysics. It is widely used in elastic reverse time migration (RTM) to analyze source illumination, suppress low-wavenumber noise, correct for image polarity and extract angle-domain common imaging gather (ADCIG). However, the P and S waves are mixed together during wavefield propagation such that the P and S energy fluxes are not clean everywhere, especially at the overlapped points. In this paper, we use a modified elastic wave equation in which the P and S vector wavefields are naturally separated. Then, we develop an efficient method to evaluate the separable P and S poynting vectors, respectively, based on the view that the group velocity and phase velocity have the same direction in isotropic elastic media. We furthermore formulate our method using an unstructured mesh based modeling method named the grid method. Finally, we verify our method using two numerical examples.

  16. Non-overlapped P- and S-wave Poynting vectors and its solution on Grid Method

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Yong Ming

    2017-12-12

    Poynting vector represents the local directional energy flux density of seismic waves in geophysics. It is widely used in elastic reverse time migration (RTM) to analyze source illumination, suppress low-wavenumber noise, correct for image polarity and extract angle-domain common imaging gather (ADCIG). However, the P and S waves are mixed together during wavefield propagation such that the P and S energy fluxes are not clean everywhere, especially at the overlapped points. In this paper, we use a modified elastic wave equation in which the P and S vector wavefields are naturally separated. Then, we develop an efficient method to evaluate the separable P and S poynting vectors, respectively, based on the view that the group velocity and phase velocity have the same direction in isotropic elastic media. We furthermore formulate our method using an unstructured mesh based modeling method named the grid method. Finally, we verify our method using two numerical examples.

  17. Non-unique turbulent boundary layer flows having a moderately large velocity defect: a rational extension of the classical asymptotic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheichl, B.; Kluwick, A.

    2013-11-01

    The classical analysis of turbulent boundary layers in the limit of large Reynolds number Re is characterised by an asymptotically small velocity defect with respect to the external irrotational flow. As an extension of the classical theory, it is shown in the present work that the defect may become moderately large and, in the most general case, independent of Re but still remain small compared to the external streamwise velocity for non-zero pressure gradient boundary layers. That wake-type flow turns out to be characterised by large values of the Rotta-Clauser parameter, serving as an appropriate measure for the defect and hence as a second perturbation parameter besides Re. Most important, it is demonstrated that also this case can be addressed by rigorous asymptotic analysis, which is essentially independent of the choice of a specific Reynolds stress closure. As a salient result of this procedure, transition from the classical small defect to a pronounced wake flow is found to be accompanied by quasi-equilibrium flow, described by a distinguished limit that involves the wall shear stress. This situation is associated with double-valued solutions of the boundary layer equations and an unconventional weak Re-dependence of the external bulk flow—a phenomenon seen to agree well with previous semi-empirical studies and early experimental observations. Numerical computations of the boundary layer flow for various values of Re reproduce these analytical findings with satisfactory agreement.

  18. Using digital holographic microscopy for simultaneous measurements of 3D near wall velocity and wall shear stress in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.

    2008-12-01

    A digital holographic microscope is used to simultaneously measure the instantaneous 3D flow structure in the inner part of a turbulent boundary layer over a smooth wall, and the spatial distribution of wall shear stresses. The measurements are performed in a fully developed turbulent channel flow within square duct, at a moderately high Reynolds number. The sample volume size is 90 × 145 × 90 wall units, and the spatial resolution of the measurements is 3 8 wall units in streamwise and spanwise directions and one wall unit in the wall-normal direction. The paper describes the data acquisition and analysis procedures, including the particle tracking method and associated method for matching of particle pairs. The uncertainty in velocity is estimated to be better than 1 mm/s, less than 0.05% of the free stream velocity, by comparing the statistics of the normalized velocity divergence to divergence obtained by randomly adding an error of 1 mm/s to the data. Spatial distributions of wall shear stresses are approximated with the least square fit of velocity measurements in the viscous sublayer. Mean flow profiles and statistics of velocity fluctuations agree very well with expectations. Joint probability density distributions of instantaneous spanwise and streamwise wall shear stresses demonstrate the significance of near-wall coherent structures. The near wall 3D flow structures are classified into three groups, the first containing a pair of counter-rotating, quasi streamwise vortices and high streak-like shear stresses; the second group is characterized by multiple streamwise vortices and little variations in wall stress; and the third group has no buffer layer structures.

  19. Drastic reduction in the surface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon passivated with catalytic chemical vapor deposited SiNx films by introducing phosphorous catalytic-doped layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    We improve the passivation property of n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivated with a catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) Si nitride (SiN x ) film by inserting a phosphorous (P)-doped layer formed by exposing c-Si surface to P radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of PH 3 molecules (Cat-doping). An extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) of 2 cm/s can be achieved for 2.5 Ω cm n-type (100) floating-zone Si wafers passivated with SiN x /P Cat-doped layers, both prepared in Cat-CVD systems. Compared with the case of only SiN x passivated layers, SRV decreases from 5 cm/s to 2 cm/s. The decrease in SRV is the result of field effect created by activated P atoms (donors) in a shallow P Cat-doped layer. Annealing process plays an important role in improving the passivation quality of SiN x films. The outstanding results obtained imply that SiN x /P Cat-doped layers can be used as promising passivation layers in high-efficiency n-type c-Si solar cells.

  20. Experiment for 3-component S-wave reflection survey. Part 3; Sanseibun S ha hanshaho no kiso jikken. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, N; Yamaguchi, K; Yokota, T; Kiguchi, T [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Anisotropy has been investigated using S-wave as a technique for detecting fractures. In this study, fundamental experiments were carried out with slightly changing the measuring conditions at a place where anisotropy was expected. This paper describes the fundamental data acquisition of anisotropy analysis using S-wave, and a part of the results. The experiments were conducted on the agricultural road in Yamadera district, Matsuyama-machi, Yamagata Prefecture. Two flat unpaved roads meeting at right angles were used as traverse lines. In this place, several reflection surfaces were certainly detected by P-wave, and anisotropy of S-wave was confirmed from the velocity of refracted wave of S-wave. Data were processed for individual traverse lines meeting at right angles. Firstly, signal sweeping, correlation, and vertical superposition were made. Six kinds of data were prepared, i.e., three-component receiving records of data at 0{degree} of generating direction and three-component receiving records of data at 90{degree} of generating direction. Records of T-component at 0{degree} and R-component at 90{degree} were used for processing of the seismic reflection method. These records would be considered to be data of SH-wave and SV-wave, respectively. 4 figs.

  1. Nonlinear attenuation of S-waves and Love waves within ambient rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Erickson, Brittany A.

    2014-04-01

    obtain scaling relationships for nonlinear attenuation of S-waves and Love waves within sedimentary basins to assist numerical modeling. These relationships constrain the past peak ground velocity (PGV) of strong 3-4 s Love waves from San Andreas events within Greater Los Angeles, as well as the maximum PGV of future waves that can propagate without strong nonlinear attenuation. During each event, the shaking episode cracks the stiff, shallow rock. Over multiple events, this repeated damage in the upper few hundred meters leads to self-organization of the shear modulus. Dynamic strain is PGV divided by phase velocity, and dynamic stress is strain times the shear modulus. The frictional yield stress is proportional to depth times the effective coefficient of friction. At the eventual quasi-steady self-organized state, the shear modulus increases linearly with depth allowing inference of past typical PGV where rock over the damaged depth range barely reaches frictional failure. Still greater future PGV would cause frictional failure throughout the damaged zone, nonlinearly attenuating the wave. Assuming self-organization has taken place, estimated maximum past PGV within Greater Los Angeles Basins is 0.4-2.6 m s-1. The upper part of this range includes regions of accumulating sediments with low S-wave velocity that may have not yet compacted, rather than having been damaged by strong shaking. Published numerical models indicate that strong Love waves from the San Andreas Fault pass through Whittier Narrows. Within this corridor, deep drawdown of the water table from its currently shallow and preindustrial levels would nearly double PGV of Love waves reaching Downtown Los Angeles.

  2. The velocity of the expanding by-products and soil layer on top of a buried landmine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snyman, I.M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses high-speed video images of the PHOTRON APX-RS high-speed camera to determine the velocity of the expanding volume of by-products of a buried landmine. The study analyses three experiments done with the Scientifically Instrumented...

  3. Horizontal structures of velocity and temperature boundary layers in two-dimensional numerical turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Quan; Sugiyama, K.; Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Xia, K.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the structures of the near-plate velocity and temperature profiles at different horizontal positions along the conducting bottom (and top) plate of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell, using two-dimensional (2D) numerical data obtained at the Rayleigh number Ra = 108 and the Prandtl

  4. Non-contact evaluation of mechanical properties of electroplated wear resistant Ni-P layer from the velocity dispersion of laser SAW; Laser reiki Rayleigh ha no sokudo bunsan wo mochiita taimamo Ni-P mekkiso tokusei no hisesshoku hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Y.; Cho, H.; Takemoto, M. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Nakayama, T. [Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1996-11-01

    We developed a new laser surface acoustic wave (SAW) system and applied this to estimate the mechanical properties of the wear-resistant Ni-P layer electroplated on a stainless steel. The velocity dispersions of Rayleigh wave of the as -plated and heat-treated Ni-P layer were obtained by the one point time domain signal processing. The Ni-P layers with excellent wear resistance produced by the heated treatment higher than 725K were found to show higher Rayleigh velocities than that of the substrate steel, while the Ni-P layer with poor wear resistance showed lower velocities. Young`s moduli of the Ni-P layer, estimated so as the computed velocity dispersion agreed with the measured one, increased with the increase of wear resistance. 10 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. The influence of the Al stabilizer layer thickness on the normal zone propagation velocity in high current superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I.; Langeslag, S.A.E.; Martins, L.P.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2015-06-19

    The stability of high-current superconductors is challenging in the design of superconducting magnets. When the stability requirements are fulfilled, the protection against a quench must still be considered. A main factor in the design of quench protection systems is the resistance growth rate in the magnet following a quench. The usual method for determining the resistance growth in impregnated coils is to calculate the longitudinal velocity with which the normal zone propagates in the conductor along the coil windings. Here, we present a 2D numerical model for predicting the normal zone propagation velocity in Al stabilized Rutherford NbTi cables with large cross section. By solving two coupled differential equations under adiabatic conditions, the model takes into account the thermal diffusion and the current redistribution process following a quench. Both the temperature and magnetic field dependencies of the superconductor and the metal cladding materials properties are included. Unlike common normal zon...

  6. A comparison of statistically optimized near field acoustic holography using single layer pressure velocity measurements and using double layer pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Chen, Xinyi; Jaud, Virginie

    2008-01-01

    recently been suggested. An alternative method uses a double layer array of pressure transducers. Both methods make it possible to distinguish between sources on the two sides of the array and thus suppress the influence of extraneous noise and reflections coming from the “wrong” side. This letter compares...

  7. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A SEPARATION/REATTACHMENT BUBBLE IN A TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER SUBJECTED TO A PRESCRIBED UPPER-BOUNDARY, VERTICAL-VELOCITY PROFILE

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2015-06-30

    We describe large-eddy simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at high Reynolds number in the presence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation/reattachment bubble. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is used in the main flow domain combined with a wall-model that is a two-dimensional extension of that developed by Chung & Pullin (2009). Flow separation and re-attachment of the incoming boundary layer is induced by prescribing wall-normal velocity distribution on the upper boundary of the flow domain that produces an adverse-favorable stream-wise pressure distribution at the wall. The LES predicts the distribution of mean shear stress along the wall including the interior of the separation bubble. Several properties of the separation/reattachment flow are discussed.

  8. Measurements of velocity-fields and temperature-fields in laminar and turbulent free convection boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1975-02-01

    This work deals with the hydrodynamics of laminar and turbulent free convection boundary layers on a vertical flat isothermal plate. Both for the laminar and turbulent region there is a good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical investigations. From these experiments one can draw important conclusions to the growth of instabilities in the transition region which lead to turbulence. (orig.) [de

  9. SPIV investigations of correlation between streamwise vorticity and velocity in the wake of a vortex generator in a boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2013-01-01

    The current work describes the experimental parametric study of streamwise vortices generated in a boundary layer by a rectangular vane (commonly named vortex generator) mounted perpendicularly to the wall and at an angle to the oncoming flow. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements ...

  10. Effect of disorder on S-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosal, Amit; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    1997-01-01

    Experiment on conventional s-wave superconducting thin films have found a strong suppression of T c , with a subsequent transition from a superconductor (SC) to an insulator (I) with increasing disorder. Anderson proposed that even in the presence of disorder the Cooper pairs can be formed by pairing the time-reversed exact eigenstates of the non interacting disordered problem. Hence he argued that T c and the thermodynamic properties should be unaffected by disorder (Anderson's theorem). This is however valid for extremely small disorder. The aim here is to calculate the properties of a superconductor at high disorder, close to the SC-I transition

  11. Planar time-resolved PIV for velocity and pressure retrieval in atmospheric boundary layer over surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Bopp, Maximilian; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling in general is important for weather, climate, fluxes. Wind wave source is crucially important for surface waves' modeling. But the wind-wave growth rate is strongly uncertain. Using direct measurements of pressure by wave-following Elliott probe [1] showed, weak and indefinite dependence of wind-wave growth rate on the wave steepness, while Grare et.al. [2] discuss the limitations of direct measurements of pressure associated with the inability to measure the pressure close to the surface by contact methods. Recently non-invasive methods for determining the pressure on the basis of technology of time-resolved PIV are actively developed [3]. Retrieving air flow velocities by 2D PIV techniques was started from Reul et al [4]. The first attempt for retrieving wind pressure field of waves in the laboratory tank from the time-resolved PIV measurements was done in [5]. The experiments were performed at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m). For 18 regimes with wind speed up to 14 m/s including presence of puddle waves, a combination of time resolved PIV technique and optical measurements of water surface form was applied to detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. Ammonium chloride smoke was used for flow visualization illuminated by two 6 Wt blue diode lasers combined into a vertical laser plane. Particle movement was captured with high-speed camera using Scheimpflug technique (up to 20 kHz frame rate with 4-frame bursts, spatial resolution about 190 μm, field of view 314x12 mm). Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave form. The resulting time resolved instantaneous velocity fields on regular grid allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from measured air velocity fluctuations. The average wind velocity patterns were

  12. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  13. Exploring AdS waves via nonminimal coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayon-Beato, Eloy; Hassaiene, Mokhtar

    2006-01-01

    We consider nonminimally coupled scalar fields to explore the Siklos spacetimes in three dimensions. Their interpretation as exact gravitational waves propagating on AdS space restrict the source to behave as a pure radiation field. We show that the related pure radiation constraints single out a unique self-interaction potential depending on one coupling constant. For a vanishing coupling constant, this potential reduces to a mass term with a mass fixed in terms of the nonminimal-coupling parameter. This mass dependence allows the existence of several free cases including massless and tachyonic sources. There even exists a particular value of the nonminimal-coupling parameter for which the corresponding mass exactly compensates the contribution generated by the negative scalar curvature, producing a genuinely massless field in this curved background. The self-interacting case is studied in detail for the conformal coupling. The resulting gravitational wave is formed by the superposition of the free and the self-interaction contributions, except for a critical value of the coupling constant where a nonperturbative effect relating the strong and weak regimes of the source appears. We establish a correspondence between the scalar source supporting an AdS wave and a pp wave by showing that their respective pure radiation constraints are conformally related, while their involved backgrounds are not. Finally, we consider the AdS waves for topologically massive gravity and its limit to conformal gravity

  14. Calibration of silicone rubber rods as passive samplers for pesticides at two different flow velocities: Modeling of sampling rates under water boundary layer and polymer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexis; Margoum, Christelle; Jolivet, Antoine; Assoumani, Azziz; El Moujahid, Bachir; Randon, Jérôme; Coquery, Marina

    2018-04-01

    There is a need to determine time-weighted average concentrations of polar contaminants such as pesticides by passive sampling in environmental waters. Calibration data for silicone rubber-based passive samplers are lacking for this class of compounds. The calibration data, sampling rate (R s ), and partition coefficient between silicone rubber and water (K sw ) were precisely determined for 23 pesticides and 13 candidate performance reference compounds (PRCs) in a laboratory calibration system over 14 d for 2 water flow velocities, 5 and 20 cm s -1 . The results showed that an in situ exposure duration of 7 d left a silicone rubber rod passive sampler configuration in the linear or curvilinear uptake period for 19 of the pesticides studied. A change in the transport mechanism from polymer control to water boundary layer control was observed for pesticides with a log K sw of approximately 3.3. The PRC candidates were not fully relevant to correct the impact of water flow velocity on R s . We therefore propose an alternative method based on an overall resistance to mass transfer model to adjust R s from laboratory experiments to in situ hydrodynamic conditions. We estimated diffusion coefficients (D s ) and thickness of water boundary layer (δ w ) as adjustable model parameters. Log D s values ranged from -12.13 to -10.07 m 2  s -1 . The estimated δ w value showed a power function correlation with water flow velocity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:1208-1218. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  15. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part I: Velocity and Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nironi, Chiara; Salizzoni, Pietro; Marro, Massimo; Mejean, Patrick; Grosjean, Nathalie; Soulhac, Lionel

    2015-09-01

    The prediction of the probability density function (PDF) of a pollutant concentration within atmospheric flows is of primary importance in estimating the hazard related to accidental releases of toxic or flammable substances and their effects on human health. This need motivates studies devoted to the characterization of concentration statistics of pollutants dispersion in the lower atmosphere, and their dependence on the parameters controlling their emissions. As is known from previous experimental results, concentration fluctuations are significantly influenced by the diameter of the source and its elevation. In this study, we aim to further investigate the dependence of the dispersion process on the source configuration, including source size, elevation and emission velocity. To that end we study experimentally the influence of these parameters on the statistics of the concentration of a passive scalar, measured at several distances downwind of the source. We analyze the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration PDFs, with a focus on the variance, its dissipation and production and its spectral density. The information provided by the dataset, completed by estimates of the intermittency factors, allow us to discuss the role of the main mechanisms controlling the scalar dispersion and their link to the form of the PDF. The latter is shown to be very well approximated by a Gamma distribution, irrespective of the emission conditions and the distance from the source. Concentration measurements are complemented by a detailed description of the velocity statistics, including direct estimates of the Eulerian integral length scales from two-point correlations, a measurement that has been rarely presented to date.

  16. Simultaneous inversion of hypocentral parameters and structure velocity of the central region of Madagascar as a premise for the mitigation of seismic hazard in Antananarivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambolamanana, G.; Panza, G.F.; Suhadole, P.

    1995-11-01

    A layered velocity model is obtained using the arrival-time data of P- and S-waves from local earthquakes for the Central Region of Madagascar. A damped least squares method is applied in the inversion of the data. The data used are 770 P-wave arrival times for 154 events which have epicenters in the region inside the Malagasy network operated by the Institut et Observatoire de Geophysique d'Antananarivo (IOGA). These data are jointly used in the inversion for the earthquake hypocenters and P- and S-wave velocity models. S-waves are not used in the first step of the inversion, since its used lead to large location errors. If the error on the phase reading for the P-wave is about 0.1 s, for S-wave this error is much bigger. The reference average model used here is a variant of the model given by RAKOTONDRAINIBE (1977). (author). 24 refs, 9 figs, 8 tabs

  17. S-wave attenuation structure beneath the northern Izu-Bonin arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    To understand temperature structure or magma distribution in the crust and uppermost mantle, it is essential to know their attenuation structure. This study estimated the 3-D S-wave attenuation structure in the crust and uppermost mantle at the northern Izu-Bonin arc, taking into account the apparent attenuation due to multiple forward scattering. In the uppermost mantle, two areas of high seismic attenuation (high Q -1) imaged beneath the volcanic front were mostly colocated with low-velocity anomalies. This coincidence suggests that these high- Q -1 areas in low-velocity zones are the most likely candidates for high-temperature regions beneath volcanoes. The distribution of random inhomogeneities indicated the presence of three anomalies beneath the volcanic front: Two were in high- Q -1 areas but the third was in a moderate- Q -1 area, indicating a low correlation between random inhomogeneities and Q -1. All three anomalies of random inhomogeneities were rich in short-wavelength spectra. The most probable interpretation of such spectra is the presence of volcanic rock, which would be related to accumulated magma intrusion during episodes of volcanic activity. Therefore, the different distributions of Q -1 and random inhomogeneities imply that the positions of hot regions in the uppermost mantle beneath this arc have changed temporally; therefore, they may provide important constraints on the evolutionary processes of arc crust and volcanoes.

  18. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  19. Comparison of a simulated velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer with measurements obtained by Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    New-Tolley, Matthew; Zhang, Yibin; Shneider, Mikhail; Miles, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Accurate velocimetry measurements of turbulent flows are essential for improving our understanding of turbulent phenomena and validating numerical approaches. Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) is an unseeded molecular tagging method for velocimetry measurements in flows which contain nitrogen. A femtosecond laser pulse is used to ionize and dissociate nitrogen molecules within its focal zone. The decaying plasma fluoresces in the visible and infrared spectrum over a period of microseconds which allows the displacement of the tagged region to be photographed to determine velocity. This study compares the experimental and numerical advection of the tagged region in a turbulent boundary layer generated by a supersonic flow over a flat plate. The tagged region in the simulation is approximated as an infinitely thin cylinder while the flow field is generated using the steady state boundary layer equations with an algebraic turbulence model. This approximation is justified by previous computational analyses, using an unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver, which indicate that the radial perturbations of the tagged region are negligible compared to its translation. This research was conducted with government support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Dr. Ivett Leyva and the Army Research Office under Dr. Matthew Munson.

  20. Power output from Tage Basse's Wave Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossen, E.A.; Mikkelsen, R.

    2000-10-01

    Tage Basse's Wave Turbine is a floating, slack moored device, placed in deep water. Via a long vertical shaft a Wells turbine is connected to a circular horizontal plate, below the turbine. The plate is in still water, preventing the device from moving up and down in the waves. At the top end of the shaft there is a float containing the power take off. The efficiency was measured to 5.1 % as an average over the year. This is measured with a rigid suspension of the turbine. If the bottom plate, in the floating version, is designed properly the result is still applicable. One reason for the large increase in efficiency shown could be that when the vertical kinetic energy in the wave is tapped by the turbine, part of the potential energy in the wave is transformed into vertical kinetic energy and is then accessible to the turbine. Turbine efficiency might increase in a full-scale device due to more favorable Reynolds number. Reynolds number in the model tests is approx. 80,000. (EHS)

  1. Short range correlations in the pion s-wave self-energy of pionic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo, L. L.; Holinde, K.; Oset, E.; Schütz, C.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluate the contribution of second order terms to the pion-nucleus s-wave optical potential of pionic atoms generated by short range nuclear correlation. The corrections are sizeable because they involve the isoscalar s-wave $\\pi N$ amplitude for half off-shell situations where the amplitude is considerably larger than the on-shell one. In addition, the s-wave optical potential is reanalyzed by looking at all the different conventional contributions together lowest order, Pauli corrected ...

  2. Modification of the mean near-wall velocity profile of a high-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer with the injection of drag-reducing polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Brian R.; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2013-08-01

    The current study explores the influence of polymer drag reduction on the near-wall velocity distribution in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) and its dependence on Reynolds number. Recent moderate Reynolds number direct numerical simulation and experimental studies presented in White et al. [Phys. Fluids 24, 021701 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3681862 have challenged the classical representation of the logarithmic dependence of the velocity profile for drag-reduced flows, especially at drag reduction levels above 40%. In the present study, high Reynolds number data from a drag reduced TBL is presented and compared to the observations of White et al. [Phys. Fluids 24, 021701 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3681862. Data presented here were acquired in the TBL flow on a 12.9-m-long flat plate at speeds to 20.3 m s-1, achieving momentum thickness based Reynolds number to 1.5 × 105, which is an order of magnitude greater than that available in the literature. Polyethylene oxide solutions with an average molecular weight of 3.9 × 106 g mol-1 were injected into the flow at various concentrations and volumetric fluxes to achieve a particular level of drag reduction. The resulting mean near-wall velocity profiles show distinctly different behavior depending on whether they fall in the low drag reduction (LDR) or the high drag reduction (HDR) regimes, which are nominally divided at 40% drag reduction. In the LDR regime, the classical view that the logarithmic slope remains constant at the Newtonian value and the intercept constant increases with increasing drag reduction appears to be valid. However, in the HDR regime the behavior is no longer universal. The intercept constant continues to increase linearly in proportion to the drag reduction level until a Reynolds-number-dependent threshold is achieved, at which point the intercept constant rapidly decreases to that predicted by the ultimate profile. The rapid decrease in the intercept constant is due to the corresponding increase in the

  3. A nonlocal potential form for s-wave α-α scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, K.; Bennett, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    Low energy s-wave α-α phase shifts that agree well with the measured set, have been extracted using a nonlocal interaction formed by folding (local real) nucleon -α particle interactions with density matrix elements of the (projectile) α particle. The resultant nonlocal s-wave α-α interaction is energy dependent and has a nonlocality range of about 2 fm

  4. GENERAL P, TYPE-I S, AND TYPE-II S WAVES IN ANELASTIC SOLIDS; INHOMOGENEOUS WAVE FIELDS IN LOW-LOSS SOLIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Wennerberg, Leif

    1985-01-01

    The physical characteristics for general plane-wave radiation fields in an arbitrary linear viscoelastic solid are derived. Expressions for the characteristics of inhomogeneous wave fields, derived in terms of those for homogeneous fields, are utilized to specify the characteristics and a set of reference curves for general P and S wave fields in arbitrary viscoelastic solids as a function of wave inhomogeneity and intrinsic material absorption. The expressions show that an increase in inhomogeneity of the wave fields cause the velocity to decrease, the fractional-energy loss (Q** minus **1) to increase, the deviation of maximum energy flow with respect to phase propagation to increase, and the elliptical particle motions for P and type-I S waves to approach circularity. Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous type-I S waves is shown to be greater than that for type-II S waves, with the deviation first increasing then decreasing with inhomogeneity. The mean energy densities (kinetic, potential, and total), the mean rate of energy dissipation, the mean energy flux, and Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous waves are shown to be greater than corresponding characteristics for homogeneous waves, with the deviations increasing as the inhomogeneity is increased for waves of fixed maximum displacement amplitude.

  5. Ultrasonic P- and S-Wave Attenuation and Petrophysical Properties of Deccan Flood Basalts, India, as Revealed by Borehole Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedanti, Nimisha; Malkoti, Ajay; Pandey, O. P.; Shrivastava, J. P.

    2018-03-01

    Petrophysical properties and ultrasonic P- and S-wave attenuation measurements on 35 Deccan basalt core specimens, recovered from Killari borehole site in western India, provide unique reference data-sets for a lesser studied Deccan Volcanic Province. These samples represent 338-m-thick basaltic column, consisting four lava flows each of Ambenali and Poladpur Formations, belonging to Wai Subgroup of the Deccan volcanic sequence. These basalt samples are found to be iron-rich (average FeOT: 13.4 wt%), but relatively poor in silica content (average SiO2: 47.8 wt%). The saturated massive basalt cores are characterized by a mean density of 2.91 g/cm3 (range 2.80-3.01 g/cm3) and mean P- and S-wave velocities of 5.89 km/s (range 5.01-6.50 km/s) and 3.43 km/s (range 2.84-3.69 km/s), respectively. In comparison, saturated vesicular basalt cores show a wide range in density (2.40-2.79 g/cm3) as well as P-wave (3.28-4.78 km/s) and S-wave (1.70-2.95 km/s) velocities. Based on the present study, the Deccan volcanic sequence can be assigned a weighted mean density of 2.74 g/cm3 and a low V p and V s of 5.00 and 3.00 km/s, respectively. Such low velocities in Deccan basalts can be attributed mainly to the presence of fine-grained glassy material, high iron contents, and hydrothermally altered secondary mineral products, besides higher porosity in vesicular samples. The measured Q values in saturated massive basalt cores vary enormously (Q p: 33-1960 and Q s: 35-506), while saturated vesicular basalt samples exhibit somewhat lesser variation in Q p (6-46) as well as Q s (5-49). In general, high-porosity rocks exhibit high attenuation, but we observed the high value of attenuation in some of the massive basalt core samples also. In such cases, energy loss is mainly due to the presence of fine-grained glassy material as well as secondary alteration products like chlorophaeite, that could contribute to intrinsic attenuation. Dominance of weekly bound secondary minerals might also be

  6. Dynamics of nanoparticules detected at 1 AU by S/WAVES onboard STEREO spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belheouane, Soraya; Issautier, Karine; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Le Chat, Gaétan; Czechowski, Andrzej; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Zouganelis, Yannis; Mann, Ingrid

    In order to interpret in detail the S/WAVES data on the interplanetary nanodust discovered by STEREO at 1 AU [Meyer-Vernet et al., 2009], we study the dynamics of nanoparticles in the inner interplanetary medium as well as the distribution of their velocities and directions of arrival, with a model based on [Czechowski and Mann, 2012]. We deduce the charges released by their impacts on the STEREO spacecraft at 1 AU and their dependence on the position of the spacecraft on their orbits. The model studies nanoparticles of size equal or smaller than about 70 nm, assumed to be created via collisional fragmentation of dust grains of larger size moving on keplerian orbits, and sublimation of dust, meteoroids and comets. The nanoparticles are released near the Sun with initial velocities close to keplerian, and mainly subjected to the Lorentz force calculated with a simple solar wind model. A part of the nanoparticles is accelerated to high speeds of the order of 300 km/s, thereby providing impact charges between 10(-14) and 10(-11) Cb [Belheouane, 2014] which enable them to be detected by S/WAVES, whereas another part is trapped within about 0.2 AU from the Sun. We discuss how the fluxes and direction of arrival at 1 AU are expected to change in function of the solar cycle. These results enable us to interpret in detail the STEREO/WAVES observations [Zaslavsky et al., 2012]; [Pantellini et al., 2013]; [Le Chat et al., 2013]. Belheouane, S. (2014). Nanoparticules dans le vent solaire, observations spatiales et theorie. PhD thesis, Pierre and Marie Curie University UPMC. Czechowski, A. and Mann, I. (2012). Nanodust Dynamics in Interplanetary Space, chapter Nanodust Dynamics in Interplanetary Space. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Le Chat, G., Zaslavsky, A., Meyer-Vernet, N., Issautier, K., Belheouane, S., Pantellini, F., Maksimovic, M., Zouganelis, I., Bale, S., and Kasper, J. (2013). Interplanetary Nanodust Detection by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/WAVES Low

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic and thermal radiation effects on the boundary-layer flow due to a moving extensible surface with the velocity slip model: A comparative study of four nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Emad H., E-mail: efarag@uj.edu.sa [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, University of Jeddah, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Sayed, Hamed M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences, Taibah University, Yanbu (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    In the current work, we investigated effects of the velocity slip for the flow and heat transfer of four nanofluids over a non-linear stretching sheet taking into account the thermal radiation and magnetic field in presence of the effective electrical conductivity. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equation using similarity transformations before being solved numerically by the Chebyshev pseudospectral differentiation matrix (ChPDM). It was found that the investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluid stream function for the whole investigated nanoparticles. In addition, velocity and skin friction profiles of the four investigated nanofluids decreases and increases, respectively, with the increase of the magnetic parameter, first-order and second-order velocity slips. Further, the flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced on applying the velocity slip model, where lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer. - Highlights: • A comparative study for four nanoparticles with MHD and thermal radiation effects was studied. • The effective electrical conductivity is mandatory; otherwise a spurious physical sight will be gained. • The investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluids' flow. • The flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced by the slip model. • Lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer.

  8. A tomographic image of upper crustal structure using P and S wave seismic refraction data in the southern granulite terrain (SGT), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra Prasad, B.; Behera, Laxmidhar; Rao, P. Koteswara

    2006-07-01

    We present a 2-D tomographic P and S wave velocity (Vp and Vs) image with Vp/Vs ratios along N-S trending 220 km long deep seismic profile acquired in 2005, which traverses across major shear and tectonically disturbed zones in southern granulite terrain (SGT), India. The 2-D velocity model constrained down to maximum 8 km depth shows velocity anomalies (>0.2 km/s) beneath major shear zones with good spatial resolution (>0.05 km/s). The presence of high Vp (6.3-6.5 km/s), Vs (3.5-3.8 km/s), Vp/Vs (>1.75) and Poisson's ratio (0.25-0.29) indicate significant compositional changes of rocks at shallow depths (0.5 to 8 km) reveal rapid crustal exhumation of mid to lower crustal rocks. This crustal exhumation could be responsible due to Pan-African tectonothermal activity during Neoproterozoic period.

  9. Constraint on the magma sources in Luzon Island Philippines by using P and S wave local seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia, N. C.; Huang, B. S.; Chen, P. F.

    2017-12-01

    The subduction of South China Sea beneath the Luzon Island has caused a complex setting of seismicity and magmatism because of the proposed ridge subduction and slab tearing. To constrain the validity of slab tearing induced by ridge subduction and their effect, we performed a P and S wave seismic tomography travel time inversion using LOTOS code. The dataset has been retrieved from International Seismological Centre from 1960 to 2008. A 1D velocity inverted by using VELEST with a Vp/Vs ratio of 1.74 is used as the starting input velocity for tomographic inversion. Total of 20905 P readings and 8126 S readings from 2355 earthquakes events were used to invert for velocity structure beneath Luzon Island. The horizontal tomographic results show low-velocity, high Vp/Vs regions at the shallow depth less than 50 km which are interpreted as the magmatic chambers of the volcanic system in Luzon. At the suspected region of slab tearing at 16oN to 18oN, two sources of magma have been indentified: slab window magma at shallow depth (< 50 km) and magma induced by mantle wedge partial melting from higher depth. This slab melting may have changed the composition of magmatic to become more silicic with high viscosity, which explains the volcanic gap in this region. At the region of 14oN to 15oN, large magma chambers under active volcanos are identified which explain the active volcanism in this region. Contrast to the region of slab tearing, in this region, the magma chambers are fed by only magma from partial melting of mantle wedge from the depth higher than 100 km. These observations are consistent with previous work on the slab tearing of South China Sea and the activities of volcanism in the Luzon Island.

  10. Determination of elastic anisotropy of rocks from P- and S-wave velocities: numerical modelling and lab measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svitek, Tomáš; Vavryčuk, Václav; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Petružálek, Matěj

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 199, č. 3 (2014), s. 1682-1697 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13102; GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/12/0915; GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/12/1491; GA ČR GA13-13967S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : geomechanics * microstructures * body waves * seismic anisotropy * wave propagation Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.724, year: 2013

  11. Evasion of HSR in S-wave charmonium decaying to P-wave light hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gang [Qufu Normal University, Department of Physics, Qufu (China); Liu, Xiao-Hai [Peking University, Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Qiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); CAS, Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Beijing (China)

    2013-09-15

    The S-wave charmonium decaying to a P-wave and S-wave light hadron pairs are supposed to be suppressed by the helicity selection rule in the perturbative QCD framework. With an effective Lagrangian method, we show that the intermediate charmed meson loops can provide a possible mechanism for the evasion of the helicity selection rule, and result in sizeable decay branching ratios in some of those channels. The theoretical predictions can be examined by the forthcoming BES-III data in the near future. (orig.)

  12. Theory of s-wave superconductor containing impurities with retarded interaction with quasiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K V Grigorishin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a perturbation theory and diagram technique for a disordered metal when scattering of quasiparticles by nonmagnetic impurities is caused with a retarded interaction. The perturbation theory generalizes a case of elastic scattering in a disordered metal. Eliashberg equations for s-wave superconductivity are generalized for such a disordered superconductor. Anderson's theorem is found to be violated in the sense that embedding of the impurities into an s-wave superconductor increases its critical temperature. We show that the amplification of superconducting properties is a result of nonelastic effects in a scattering by the impurities. (paper)

  13. S-wave kaon-nucleon phase shifts with instanton induced effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2003-01-01

    The kaon-nucleon S-wave phase shifts have been calculated, for both isospin channels I=0 and I=1, in the framework of a semirelativistic quark potential model which includes an instanton induced force. The agreement with experimental phase shifts is poor essentially because of a dominant attraction coming from instantons. The low-energy behaviour of S-wave phase shifts, for I=0 and I=1 channels, obtained in the kaon-nucleon system is characteristic of a potential which can produce one loosely bound state

  14. S-wave kaon-nucleon phase shifts with instanton induced effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, S. E-mail: lemaire@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B

    2003-09-22

    The kaon-nucleon S-wave phase shifts have been calculated, for both isospin channels I=0 and I=1, in the framework of a semirelativistic quark potential model which includes an instanton induced force. The agreement with experimental phase shifts is poor essentially because of a dominant attraction coming from instantons. The low-energy behaviour of S-wave phase shifts, for I=0 and I=1 channels, obtained in the kaon-nucleon system is characteristic of a potential which can produce one loosely bound state.

  15. Time-dependent approach to electron scattering and ionization in the s-wave model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihra, W.; Draeger, M.; Handke, G.; Friedrich, H.

    1995-01-01

    The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is integrated for continuum states of two-electron atoms in the framework of the s-wave model, in which both electrons are restricted to having vanishing individual orbital angular momenta. The method is suitable for studying the time evolution of correlations in the two-electron wave functions and yields probabilities for elastic and inelastic electron scattering and for electron-impact ionization. The spin-averaged probabilities for electron-impact ionization of hydrogen in the s-wave model reproduce the shape of the experimentally observed integrated ionization cross section remarkably well for energies near and above the maximum

  16. S-wave Qanti Qqanti q states in the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K T [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1981-06-01

    The static potential energy for an S-wave Qanti Qqanti q system is discussed in an adiabatic (Born-Oppenheimer) approximation. Both spherical bag and arbitrary bag are considered. We concentrate on those Qanti Qqanti q states in which both (Qanti Q) and (qanti q) are colour singlets. Their energy level, wave function, and possible experimental observation are studied.

  17. How to parametrize an S-wave resonance and how to identify two-hadron composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toernqvist, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    The question of how one can distinguish quark model states from two-hadron states near an S-wave threshold is discussed, and the usefulness of the running mass is emphasized as the meeting ground for experiment and theory and for defining resonance parameters

  18. In- and outbound spreading of a free-particle s-wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bialynicki-Birula, i.; Cirone, M. A.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    We show that a free quantum particle in two dimensions with zero angular momentum (s wave) in the form of a ring-shaped wave packet feels an attraction towards the center of the ring, leading first to a contraction followed by an expansion. An experiment to demonstrate this effect is also outlined....

  19. Kaon-nucleon S-wave phase shifts in a QCD-motivated quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, I.; Dosch, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    We calculate kaon-nucleon central potentials and S-wave phase shifts for I = 0 and I = 1 in an QCD-motivated quark model. In our model the K-N interaction is derived from short-range perturbative quark-quark interactions. (orig.)

  20. S/WAVES: The Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation on the STEREO Mission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bougeret, J. L.; Goetz, K.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bale, S. D.; Kellogg, P. J.; Maksimovic, M.; Monge, N.; Monson, S. J.; Astier, P. L.; Davy, S.; Dekkali, M.; Hinze, J. J.; Manning, R. E.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Bonnin, X.; Briand, C.; Cairns, I. H.; Cattell, C. A.; Cecconi, B.; Eastwood, J.; Ergun, R. E.; Fainberg, J.; Hoang, S.; Huttunen, K. E. J.; Krucker, S.; Lecacheux, A.; MacDowall, R. J.; Macher, W.; Mangeney, A.; Meetre, C. A.; Moussas, X.; Nguyen, Q. N.; Oswald, T. H.; Pulupa, M.; Reiner, M. J.; Robinson, P. A.; Rucker, H.; Salem, c.; Santolík, Ondřej; Silvis, J. M.; Ullrich, R.; Zarka, P.; Zouganelis, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 136, 1-4 (2008), s. 487-528 ISSN 0038-6308 Grant - others: NASA (US) NAS5-03076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : S/WAVES * STEREO * plasma waves * radio waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2008

  1. Anomalous Fluctuations of s-Wave Reduced Neutron Widths of 192,194Pt Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P. E.; Harvey, J. A.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Guber, K. H.

    2010-01-01

    We obtained an unprecedentedly large number of s-wave neutron widths through R-matrix analysis of neutron cross-section measurements on enriched Pt samples. Careful analysis of these data rejects the validity of the Porter-Thomas distribution with a statistical significance of at least 99.997%.

  2. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A SEPARATION/REATTACHMENT BUBBLE IN A TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER SUBJECTED TO A PRESCRIBED UPPER-BOUNDARY, VERTICAL-VELOCITY PROFILE

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    We describe large-eddy simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at high Reynolds number in the presence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation/reattachment bubble. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is used

  3. Sedimentary thickness and velocity in the northeast boundary of the Parana Basin with Andean earthquakes and local events; Espessura e velocidade das camadas sedimentares na borda nordeste da Bacia do Parana utilizando telessismos da regiao andina e sismos locais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Josimar A.; Souza, Luiz M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Geofisica; Assumpcao, Marcelo S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Deep Andean earthquakes are a suitable source of high-frequency P-waves (with good signal to noise ratio up to {approx} 10 Hz) that can be used to obtain high-resolution receiver functions at stations in intra-cratonic basins in Brazil. Receiver functions (Gaussian width 20) at five stations in the Bebedouro seismic area (NE Parana Basin) were calculated using the time domain deconvolution of Ligorria and Ammon (1999). Inter-station Rayleigh wave phase velocities were measured using local earthquakes. Joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh phase velocities provided reasonably well constrained S-wave velocity profiles. Shallow seismic refraction surveys were used to fix the velocities of the surface layers during the inversion. The area is characterized by a thin surface layer of sandstones ({approx}60 m), followed by a {approx}500 m thick basalt layer. Beneath the basalts, low-velocity layers define another sedimentary sequence. These features are consistent with the expected values based on well data at regional distances and confirm the usefulness of high-frequency receiver functions to study sedimentary basins. (author)

  4. Experiment for 3-component S-wave reflection survey. Part 3; Sanseibun S ha hanshaho no kiso jikken. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, N; Kiguchi, T; Yamaguchi, K [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Yokota, T [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-10-22

    Investigations and discussions were given by using P-S logging on anisotropy of refracted waves in the fundamental experiments conducted in the Matsuyama town, Yamagata Prefecture. In the investigations, S-wave was transmitted into two to three directions at four locations in total: one at the opening of a well with a depth of 100 m and three locations having offset of 50 m from the well opening, and anisotropy of direct waves in the depth direction was investigated. Data were recorded on the ground at the same time by using a 3-component receiver. As a result of the experiment, detection of the anisotropy by means of measurement inside the well was found more difficult than anticipated due to anomaly in the refracted waves, hence no clear velocity anisotropy has been observed. It appears that no azimuth anisotropy exists at depths shallower than at least 24 m. No anisotropy due to incident angles was made clear in the present experiment. Offset recording experienced poor S/N ratio, having made the data analysis difficult. The data for zero offset do not harmonize with the refracted wave analysis on the data derived by using the reflection method, whose cause requires further discussions. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. S -wave K π contributions to the hadronic charmonium B decays in the perturbative QCD approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Zhou; Wang, Wen-Fei

    2018-02-01

    We extend our recent works on the two-pion S -wave resonance contributions to the kaon-pion ones in the B meson hadronic charmonium decay modes based on the perturbative QCD approach. The S -wave K π timelike form factor in its distribution amplitudes is described by the LASS parametrization, which consists of the K0*(1430 ) resonant state together with an effective range nonresonant component. The predictions for the decays B →J /ψ K π in this work agree well with the experimental results from the BABAR and Belle collaborations. We also discuss theoretical uncertainties, indicating that the results of this work, which can be tested by the LHCb and Belle-II experiments, are reasonably accurate.

  6. Interplay between the energy gap and heat capacity in S-wave superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonczarek, R.; Mulak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Starting from the postulated, generalized form of the BCS gap equation, suitable for a wide class of microscopic models, the thermodynamic properties of S-wave superconductors are studied. The precise analytical formulas for the main thermodynamic quantities are given and discussed in the characteristic temperature limits. In particular the inversion of the equations defining the specific heat as a function of Δ(T), i.e. the temperature dependence of the energy gap in S-wave superconductor is presented. It makes possible a reconstruction of the energy gap as a function of temperature from the heat capacity data. As predicted, in the frame of the model, the other thermodynamic quantities from the Δ(T) function seem also to be interesting. (orig.)

  7. Estimation of shear velocity contrast for dipping or anisotropic medium from transmitted Ps amplitude variation with ray-parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Amplitude versus offset analysis of P to P reflection is often used in exploration seismology for hydrocarbon exploration. In the present work, the feasibility to estimate crustal velocity structure from transmitted P to S wave amplitude variation with ray-parameter has been investigated separately for dipping layer and anisotropy medium. First, for horizontal and isotropic medium, the approximation of P-to-s conversion is used that is expressed as a linear form in terms of slowness. Next, the intercept of the linear regression has been used to estimate the shear wave velocity contrast (δβ) across an interface. The formulation holds good for isotropic and horizontal layer medium. Application of such formula to anisotropic medium or dipping layer data may lead to erroneous estimation of δβ. In order to overcome this problem, a method has been proposed to compensate the SV-amplitude using shifted version of SH-amplitude, and subsequently transforming SV amplitudes equivalent to that from isotropic or horizontal layer medium as the case may be. Once this transformation has been done, δβ can be estimated using isotropic horizontal layer formula. The shifts required in SH for the compensation are π/2 and π/4 for dipping layer and anisotropic medium, respectively. The effectiveness of the approach has been reported using various synthetic data sets. The methodology is also tested on real data from HI-CLIMB network in Himalaya, where the presence of dipping Moho has already been reported. The result reveals that the average shear wave velocity contrast across the Moho is larger towards the Indian side compared to the higher Himalayan and Tibetan regions.

  8. Coupled channel analysis of s-wave ππ and K anti-K photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chueng-Ryong Ji; Szczepaniak, A.; Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Williams, R.

    1997-10-01

    We present a coupled channel partial wave analysis of non-diffractive S-wave π + π - and K + K - photoproduction focusing on the K anti-K threshold. Final state interactions are included. We calculate total cross sections, angular and effective mass distributions in both ππ and K anti-K channels. Our results indicate that these processes are experimentally measurable and valuable information on the f 0 (980) resonance structure can be obtained. (author)

  9. S-wave pion-nucleon phase shifts in PADE approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achuthan, P.; Chandramohan, T.; Venkatesan, K.

    1978-01-01

    The two S-wave pion nucleon pahse shifts delta( 1 ) (I = 1/2) and delta( 3 ) (I = 3/2) have been calculated in the Pade approximation using epsilon(700), rho(770), f(1260), Δ(1236) and N(938) for the energy range W = 1085 MeV - 1820 MeV in the centre of mass. Contributions from suitable resonance combinations which agree nearest with the delta( 3 ) experimental values are given. (orig.) [de

  10. Influence of a relativistic kinematics on s-wave KN phase shifts in a quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2001-01-01

    The I = 1 and I = 0 kaon-nucleon s-wave phase shifts have been calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM) and a relativistic kinematics. The spinless Salpeter equation has been solved numerically using the Fourier grid Hamiltonian method. The results have been compared to the non-relativistic ones. For each isospin channel the phase shifts obtained are not so far from the non-relativistic results. (author)

  11. S WAVE IN PULMONARY EMBOLISM, A NEW ECG SIGN TO AID THROMBOLYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas John

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a devastating disease that often leads to mortality . Previous investigators have found that thrombolysis reduces mortality in men but not significantly in women with pulmonary embolism. Many of the previous studies are with tenecteplase and alteplase. Here, we describe intra - venous thrombolysis with streptokinase in seven patients with pulmonary embolism who survived including two women. Further, we have one patient who had a new onset of S wave in lead I which subsequently disappeared after embolectomy. We also comment on the usefulness of shock sign in 2 deciding on thrombolysis .We propose a new sign for noninvasive assessment of need for thrombolysis in pulmonary embolism. New onset S wave in Lead I in pulmonary embolism can be used as a new sign for deciding the need for thrombolysis. When added to the shock sign it can be used in the emergency deparment to decide the need for thrombolysis. Further, there are no clear end points as to when to stop thrombolysis. In all 4 patients we switched to heparin when spontaneous bleeding or oozing started. In all 4 patients subsequent CT scans showed that the patient has mild to moderate resolution of the pulmonary embolism and patients remained stable and have been discharged and are under regular follow up. Hence we propose that bleeding can be used as an end point for thrombolysis in acute pulmonary embolism. We also describe a patient who had new onset S wave that disappeared after successful pulmonary embolectomy. Probably, the S wave is a marker of main pulmonary artery branch occlusions.

  12. Scaling properties of S-wave level density for heavy quarkonium from QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of a specific scheme of the QCD sum rules for S-wave of the heavy quarkonium one derives an expression, relating the energetic density of quarkonium states and universal characteristics in the heavy quarkonium physics, such as the difference between the masses of a heavy quark Q and meson and the number of heavy quarkonium levels below the threshold decay. 20 refs

  13. ESTIMA, Neutron Width Level Spacing, Neutron Strength Function of S- Wave, P-Wave Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort, E.

    1982-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ESTIMA calculates level spacing and neutron strength function of a mixed sequence of s- and p-wave resonances given a set of neutron widths as input parameters. Three algorithms are used, two of which calculate s-wave average parameters and assume that the reduced widths obey a Porter-Thomas distribution truncated by a minimum detection threshold. The third performs a maximum likelihood fit to a truncated chi-squared distribution of any specified number of degrees of freedom, i.e. it can be used for calculating s-wave or p-wave average parameters. Resonances of undeclared angular orbital momentum are divided into groups of probable s-wave and probable p-wave by a simple application of Bayes' Theorem. 2 - Method of solution: Three algorithms are used: i) GAMN method, based on simple moments properties of a Porter-Thomas distribution. ii) Missing Level Estimator, a simplified version of the algorithm used by the program BAYESZ. iii) ESTIMA, a maximum likelihood fit. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: A maximum of 400 resonances is allowed in the version available from NEADB, however this restriction can be relaxed by increasing array dimensions

  14. High-resolution S-wave reflection survey in a linear depression; Senjo kubochi ni okeru kobunkaino S ha hanshaho tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inazaki, T [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Sasaki, Y [Kyushu Regional Construction Bureau, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    An attempt was made to apply a method combining the high-resolution S-wave reflection survey with boring to a fault survey at the Kuju town, Oita Prefecture. The investigation area has a linear depression area as small as about 600 m from east to west and about 100 m from north to south surround by mountain slopes. The boundary section with mountain peaks at the north ridge of the depression area is linear, and existence of a southward falling normal fault has been indicated. The seismic investigation has employed an artificial plank hammering method, and the derived data were processed by using the processing software, Vista for Windows. The Bin interval was 25 cm, the S-wave velocity ranged from 100 to 150 m/s, and the spatial resolution was estimated at several ten centimeters or less. The resolution is thought sufficient for assessing the fault location and displacement. The acquired depth cross sections presented distinct structural discontinuity, from which the fault locations were estimated. However, for displacements in the base bed and upper beds, the reflected waves fell into disorder at the faults, having made a detailed assessment difficult. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Application of the Spatial Auto-Correlation Method for Shear-Wave Velocity Studies Using Ambient Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asten, M. W.; Hayashi, K.

    2018-05-01

    ideal regular array. We find that sparse nested triangular arrays are generally sufficient, and the use of high-density circular arrays is unlikely to be cost-effective in routine applications. We recommend that passive seismic arrays should be the method of first choice when characterizing average S-wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (V s30) and deeper, with active seismic methods such as multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) being a complementary method for use if and when conditions so require. The use of computer inversion methodology allows estimation of not only the S-wave velocity profile but also parameter uncertainties in terms of layer thickness and velocity. The coupling of SPAC methods with horizontal/vertical particle motion spectral ratio analysis generally allows use of lower frequency data, with consequent resolution of deeper layers than is possible with SPAC alone. Considering its non-invasive methodology, logistical flexibility, simplicity, applicability, and stability, the SPAC method and its various modified extensions will play an increasingly important role in site effect evaluation. The paper summarizes the fundamental theory of the SPAC method, reviews recent developments, and offers recommendations for future blind studies.

  16. What is the difference in the p-wave and s-wave photodetachment in an electric field?

    OpenAIRE

    Du, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    By applying closed-orbit theory to an existing model, a simple formula is derived for the modulation function of s-wave photo-detachment in the presence of a static electric field. We then compare the s-wave modulation function with the p-wave modulation function. We show the maximums (minimums) in the s-wave modulation function correspond to the minimums (maximums) in the p-wave modulation function because of a phase difference of $\\pi$ in their oscillations. The oscillation amplitude in the...

  17. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  18. Velocity distribution in snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Ito, Y.

    1997-12-01

    In order to investigate the detailed structure of snow avalanches, we have made snow flow experiments at the Miyanomori ski jump in Sapporo and systematic observations in the Shiai-dani, Kurobe Canyon. In the winter of 1995-1996, a new device to measure static pressures was used to estimate velocities in the snow cloud that develops above the flowing layer of avalanches. Measurements during a large avalanche in the Shiai-dani which damaged and destroyed some instruments indicate velocities increased rapidly to more than 50 m/s soon after the front. Velocities decreased gradually in the following 10 s. Velocities of the lower flowing layer were also calculated by differencing measurement of impact pressure. Both recordings in the snow cloud and in the flowing layer changed with a similar trend and suggest a close interaction between the two layers. In addition, the velocity showed a periodic change. Power spectrum analysis of the impact pressure and the static pressure depression showed a strong peak at a frequency between 4 and 6 Hz, which might imply the existence of either ordered structure or a series of surges in the flow.

  19. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10 -16 -10 -4 a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature

  20. Electron-helium scattering in the S-wave model using exterior complex scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, Daniel A.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2004-01-01

    Electron-impact excitation and ionization of helium is studied in the S-wave model. The problem is treated in full dimensionality using a time-dependent formulation of the exterior complex scaling method that does not involve the solution of large linear systems of equations. We discuss the steps that must be taken to compute stable ionization amplitudes. We present total excitation, total ionization and single differential cross sections from the ground and n=2 excited states and compare our results with those obtained by others using a frozen-core model

  1. On the imaginary part of the S-wave pion-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germond, J.F.; Lombard, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of pion absorption to the imaginary part of the S-wave pion-nucleus optical potential is calculated with Slater determinantal antisymmetrized nuclear wave funtions, taking fully into accout the spin and isospin degrees of freedom. The potential obtained has an explicit dependence on the proton and neutron nuclear densities whose coefficients are directly related to the two-nucleon absorption coupling constants. The values of these coefficients extracted from mesic atoms data are in good agreement with those deduced from exclusive pion absorption experiments in 3 He, but larger than the predictions of the pion rescattering model. (orig.)

  2. px+ipy Superfluid from s-Wave Interactions of Fermionic Cold Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanwei; Tewari, Sumanta; Lutchyn, Roman M.; Das Sarma, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional (p x +ip y ) superfluids or superconductors offer a playground for studying intriguing physics such as quantum teleportation, non-Abelian statistics, and topological quantum computation. Creating such a superfluid in cold fermionic atom optical traps using p-wave Feshbach resonance is turning out to be challenging. Here we propose a method to create a p x +ip y superfluid directly from an s-wave interaction making use of a topological Berry phase, which can be artificially generated. We discuss ways to detect the spontaneous Hall mass current, which acts as a diagnostic for the chiral p-wave superfluid

  3. The S-wave model for electron-hydrogen scattering revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartschat, K.; Bray, I.

    1996-03-01

    The R-matrix with pseudo-states (RMPS) and convergent close-coupling (CCC) methods are applied to the calculation of elastic, excitation, and total as well as single-differential ionization cross sections for the simplified S-wave model of electron-hydrogen scattering. Excellent agreement is obtained for the total cross section results obtained at electron energies between 0 and 100 eV. The two calculations also agree on the single-differential ionization cross section at 54.4 eV for the triplet spin channel, while discrepancies are evident in the singlet channel which shows remarkable structure. 18 refs., 3 figs

  4. Holographic s-wave and p-wave Josephson junction with backreaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Shuai [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University,Lanzhou 730000, People’s Republic of (China)

    2016-11-22

    In this paper, we study the holographic models of s-wave and p-wave Josephoson junction away from probe limit in (3+1)-dimensional spacetime, respectively. With the backreaction of the matter, we obtained the anisotropic black hole solution with the condensation of matter fields. We observe that the critical temperature of Josephoson junction decreases with increasing backreaction. In addition to this, the tunneling current and condenstion of Josephoson junction become smaller as backreaction grows larger, but the relationship between current and phase difference still holds for sine function. Moreover, condenstion of Josephoson junction deceases with increasing width of junction exponentially.

  5. S-wave Kπ scattering in chiral perturbation theory with resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamin, Matthias; Oller, Jose Antonio; Pich, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of S-wave Kπ scattering up to 2 GeV, making use of the resonance chiral Lagrangian predictions together with a suitable unitarisation method. Our approach incorporates known theoretical constraints at low and high energies. The present experimental status, with partly conflicting data from different experiments, is discussed. Our analysis allows to resolve some experimental ambiguities, but better data are needed in order to determine the cross-section in the higher-energy range. Our best fits are used to determine the masses and widths of the relevant scalar resonances in this energy region

  6. The number of degrees of freedom for statistical distribution of s wave reduced neutron width for several nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhixiang, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The least squares fit has been performed using chi-squared distribution function for all available evaluated data for s-wave reduced neutron width of several nuclei. The number of degrees of freedom and average value have been obtained. The missing levels of weak s-wave resonances and extra p-wave levels have been taken into account, if any. For 75 As and 103 Rh, s-wave population has been separated by Bayes' theorem before making fit. The results thus obtained are consistent with Porter-Thomas distribution, i.e., chi-squared distribution with γ=1, as one would expect. It has not been found in this work that the number of degrees of freedom for the distribution of s-wave reduced neutron width might be greater than one as reported by H.C.Sharma et al. (1976) at the international conference on interactions of neutrons with nuclei. (Auth.)

  7. Deuteron polarizability and S-wave π+d scattering at energies below 1 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupyshev, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of deuteron polarizability on the S-wave π + d-scattering in a low-energy limit is explored in the framework of the variable phase method. It is shown that the nonoscillating part of the S-wave cross section of π + d-scattering has a deep and sharp minimum in the energy region ∼ 0.4 keV

  8. Analytical assessment of some characteristic ratios for s-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczarek, Ryszard; Krzyzosiak, Mateusz; Gonczarek, Adam; Jacak, Lucjan

    2018-04-01

    We evaluate some thermodynamic quantities and characteristic ratios that describe low- and high-temperature s-wave superconducting systems. Based on a set of fundamental equations derived within the conformal transformation method, a simple model is proposed and studied analytically. After including a one-parameter class of fluctuations in the density of states, the mathematical structure of the s-wave superconducting gap, the free energy difference, and the specific heat difference is found and discussed in an analytic manner. Both the zero-temperature limit T = 0 and the subcritical temperature range T ≲ T c are discussed using the method of successive approximations. The equation for the ratio R 1, relating the zero-temperature energy gap and the critical temperature, is formulated and solved numerically for various values of the model parameter. Other thermodynamic quantities are analyzed, including a characteristic ratio R 2, quantifying the dynamics of the specific heat jump at the critical temperature. It is shown that the obtained model results coincide with experimental data for low- T c superconductors. The prospect of application of the presented model in studies of high- T c superconductors and other superconducting systems of the new generation is also discussed.

  9. S-wave elastic scattering of ${\\it o} $-Ps from $\\text {H} _2 $ at low energy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J. -Y.

    2018-03-08

    The confined variational method is applied to investigate the low-energy elastic scattering of ortho-positronium from $\\\\text{H}_2$ by first-principles quantum mechanics. Describing the correlation effect with explicitly correlated Gaussians, we obtain accurate $S$-wave phase shifts and pick-off annihilation parameters for different incident momenta. By a least-squares fit of the data to the effective-range theory, we determine the $S$-wave scattering length, $A_s=2.06a_0$, and the zero-energy value of the pick-off annihilation parameter, $^1\\\\!\\\\text{Z}_\\\\text{eff}=0.1858$. The obtained $^1\\\\!\\\\text{Z}_\\\\text{eff}$ agrees well with the precise experimental value of $0.186(1)$ (J.\\\\ Phys.\\\\ B \\\\textbf{16}, 4065 (1983)) and the obtained $A_s$ agrees well with the value of $2.1(2)a_0$ estimated from the average experimental momentum-transfer cross section for Ps energy below 0.3 eV (J.\\\\ Phys.\\\\ B \\\\textbf{36}, 4191 (2003)).

  10. Upper mantle seismic structure beneath southwest Africa from finite-frequency P- and S-wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssof, Mohammad; Yuan, Xiaohui; Tilmann, Frederik; Heit, Benjamin; Weber, Michael; Jokat, Wilfried; Geissler, Wolfram; Laske, Gabi; Eken, Tuna; Lushetile, Bufelo

    2015-04-01

    We present a 3D high-resolution seismic model of the southwestern Africa region from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S- wave data recorded by the amphibious WALPASS network. We used 40 temporary stations in southwestern Africa with records for a period of 2 years (the OBS operated for 1 year), between November 2010 and November 2012. The array covers a surface area of approximately 600 by 1200 km and is located at the intersection of the Walvis Ridge, the continental margin of northern Namibia, and extends into the Congo craton. Major questions that need to be understood are related to the impact of asthenosphere-lithosphere interaction, (plume-related features), on the continental areas and the evolution of the continent-ocean transition that followed the break-up of Gondwana. This process is supposed to leave its imprint as distinct seismic signature in the upper mantle. Utilizing 3D sensitivity kernels, we invert traveltime residuals to image velocity perturbations in the upper mantle down to 1000 km depth. To test the robustness of our tomographic image we employed various resolution tests which allow us to evaluate the extent of smearing effects and help defining the optimum inversion parameters (i.e., damping and smoothness) used during the regularization of inversion process. Resolution assessment procedure includes also a detailed investigation of the effect of the crustal corrections on the final images, which strongly influenced the resolution for the mantle structures. We present detailed tomographic images of the oceanic and continental lithosphere beneath the study area. The fast lithospheric keel of the Congo Craton reaches a depth of ~250 km. Relatively low velocity perturbations have been imaged within the orogenic Damara Belt down to a depth of ~150 km, probably related to surficial suture zones and the presence of fertile material. A shallower depth extent of the lithospheric plate of ~100 km was observed beneath the ocean

  11. The SCEC Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) Software Framework for Distributing and Querying Seismic Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maechling, P. J.; Taborda, R.; Callaghan, S.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Olsen, K. B.; Jordan, T. H.; Goulet, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal seismic velocity models and datasets play a key role in regional three-dimensional numerical earthquake ground-motion simulation, full waveform tomography, modern physics-based probabilistic earthquake hazard analysis, as well as in other related fields including geophysics, seismology, and earthquake engineering. The standard material properties provided by a seismic velocity model are P- and S-wave velocities and density for any arbitrary point within the geographic volume for which the model is defined. Many seismic velocity models and datasets are constructed by synthesizing information from multiple sources and the resulting models are delivered to users in multiple file formats, such as text files, binary files, HDF-5 files, structured and unstructured grids, and through computer applications that allow for interactive querying of material properties. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) software framework to facilitate the registration and distribution of existing and future seismic velocity models to the SCEC community. The UCVM software framework is designed to provide a standard query interface to multiple, alternative velocity models, even if the underlying velocity models are defined in different formats or use different geographic projections. The UCVM framework provides a comprehensive set of open-source tools for querying seismic velocity model properties, combining regional 3D models and 1D background models, visualizing 3D models, and generating computational models in the form of regular grids or unstructured meshes that can be used as inputs for ground-motion simulations. The UCVM framework helps researchers compare seismic velocity models and build equivalent simulation meshes from alternative velocity models. These capabilities enable researchers to evaluate the impact of alternative velocity models in ground-motion simulations and seismic hazard analysis applications

  12. Earthquake early warning using P-waves that appear after initial S-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Y.

    2017-12-01

    As measures for underprediction for large earthquakes with finite faults and overprediction for multiple simultaneous earthquakes, Hoshiba (2013), Hoshiba and Aoki (2015), and Kodera et al. (2016) proposed earthquake early warning (EEW) methods that directly predict ground motion by computing the wave propagation of observed ground motion. These methods are expected to predict ground motion with a high accuracy even for complicated scenarios because these methods do not need source parameter estimation. On the other hand, there is room for improvement in their rapidity because they predict strong motion prediction mainly based on the observation of S-waves and do not explicitly use P-wave information available before the S-waves. In this research, we propose a real-time P-wave detector to incorporate P-wave information into these wavefield-estimation approaches. P-waves within a few seconds from the P-onsets are commonly used in many existing EEW methods. In addition, we focus on P-waves that may appear in the later part of seismic waves. Kurahashi and Irikura (2013) mentioned that P-waves radiated from strong motion generation areas (SMGAs) were recognizable after S-waves of the initial rupture point in the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) (the Tohoku-oki earthquake). Detecting these P-waves would enhance the rapidity of prediction for the peak ground motion generated by SMGAs. We constructed a real-time P-wave detector that uses a polarity analysis. Using acceleration records in boreholes of KiK-net (band-pass filtered around 0.5-10 Hz with site amplification correction), the P-wave detector performed the principal component analysis with a sliding window of 4 s and calculated P-filter values (e.g. Ross and Ben-Zion, 2014). The application to the Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) showed that (1) peaks of P-filter that corresponded to SMGAs appeared in several stations located near SMGAs and (2) real-time seismic intensities (Kunugi et al

  13. Coupling of the orthorhombic distortion to the depression of the Tc's due to Zn2+ doping in the ''RE-123'' HTSC's: A (d + s)-wave picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, I.M.; Thongruang, R.; Charoenthai, N.

    1999-01-01

    The depressions of the T c 's of the 123 REBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 HTSC's due to the substitution of Zn 2+ ions into the Cu(2) layer are studied. The orthorhombic distortion which occurs in the 123 ceramics is assumed to induce a modification to the spin-fluctuation (SF) mediated pairing interaction which in turn causes the order parameters of these HTSC's to be of mixed (d + s)-wave symmetry. It is shown that part of the rapid depression of the T c 's caused by Zn 2+ substitution into the CuO 2 is due to a reduction of the SF-mediated pairing interaction. The differences in the rates of suppression of T c due to Zn 2+ doping in the different RE-123 HTSC's are shown to be due to the changes in the orthorhombicity which depend on the size of the rare earth ions

  14. Coupling of the Orthorhombic Distortion to the Depression of the Tc'S due to Zn2+ Doping in the "RE-123" Htsc's:. a (d+s)-WAVE Picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, I. M.; Charoenthai, N.; Thongruang, R.

    The depressions of the Tc's of the "123" REBa2Cu3O7 HTSC's due to the substitution of Zn2+ ions into the Cu(2) layer are studied. The orthorhombic distortion which occurs in the "123" ceramics is assumed to induce a modification to the spin-fluctuation (SF) mediated pairing interaction which inturn causes the order parameters of these HTSC's to be of mixed (d+s)-wave symmetry. It is shown that part of the rapid depression of the Tc's caused by Zn2+ substitution into the CuO2 is due to a reduction of the SF-mediated pairing interaction. The differences in the rates of suppression of Tc due to Zn2+ doping in the different "RE-123" HTSC's are shown to be due to the changes in the orthorhombicity which depend on the size of the rare earth ions.

  15. Evidence for a magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis of Taiwan from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Horng

    2016-12-23

    There are more than 7 million people living near the Tatun volcano group in northern Taiwan. For the safety of the Taipei metropolis, in particular, it has been debated for decades whether or not these volcanoes are active. Here I show evidence of a deep magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays. The reservoir is probably composed of either a thin magma layer overlay or many molten sills within thick partially molten rocks. Assuming that 40% of the reservoir is partially molten, its total volume could be approximately 350 km 3 . The exact location and geometry of the magma reservoir will be obtained after dense seismic arrays are deployed in 2017-2020.

  16. Effect of Inhomogeneity on s-wave Superconductivity in the Attractive Hubbard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryanpour, K. A. [University of California, Davis; Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL; Mayr, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institut fur Feskorperforschung, Stuttgart, Germany; Paiva, T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Pickett, W. E. [University of California, Davis; Scalettar, Richard T [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Inhomogeneous s-wave superconductivity is studied in the two-dimensional, square lattice attractive Hubbard Hamiltonian using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes BdG mean field approximation. We find that at weak coupling, and for densities mainly below half-filling, an inhomogeneous interaction in which the on-site interaction Ui takes on two values, Ui=0, 2U results in a larger zero temperature pairing amplitude, and that the superconducting Tc can also be significantly increased, relative to a uniform system with Ui=U on all sites. These effects are observed for stripe, checkerboard, and even random patterns of the attractive centers, suggesting that the pattern of inhomogeneity is unimportant. Monte Carlo calculations which reintroduce some of the fluctuations neglected within the BdG approach see the same effect, both for the attractive Hubbard model and a Hamiltonian with d-wave pairing symmetry.

  17. KN s-wave phase shifts in the non-relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre-Brac, B.; Labarsouque, J.

    1995-01-01

    The I=1 and 0 kaon-nucleon s-wave phase shifts have been calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM). The Hill-Wheeler equation has been solved numerically without any parametrization of the KN relative wave-function. The kaon and the nucleon wave-functions have been expanded as sums of several well-chosen gaussian functions, and the sensitivity of the results to the number of terms was analyzed carefully. The I=0 phase shifts are in agreement with the experimental data. In the I=1 channel too much repulsion is obtained, probably due to the lack of medium-range boson exchange type attraction. ((orig.))

  18. P and S wave Coda Calibration in Central Asia and South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Mayeda, K.; Gok, R.; Barno, J.; Roman-Nieves, J. I.

    2017-12-01

    Empirically derived coda source spectra provide unbiased, absolute moment magnitude (Mw) estimates for events that are normally too small for accurate long-period waveform modeling. In this study, we obtain coda-derived source spectra using data from Central Asia (Kyrgyzstan networks - KN and KR, and Tajikistan - TJ) and South Korea (Korea Meteorological Administration, KMA). We used a recently developed coda calibration module of Seismic WaveForm Tool (SWFT). Seismic activities during this recording period include the recent Gyeongju earthquake of Mw=5.3 and its aftershocks, two nuclear explosions from 2009 and 2013 in North Korea, and a small number of construction and mining-related explosions. For calibration, we calculated synthetic coda envelopes for both P and S waves based on a simple analytic expression that fits the observed narrowband filtered envelopes using the method outlined in Mayeda et al. (2003). To provide an absolute scale of the resulting source spectra, path and site corrections are applied using independent spectral constraints (e.g., Mw and stress drop) from three Kyrgyzstan events and the largest events of the Gyeongju sequence in Central Asia and South Korea, respectively. In spite of major tectonic differences, stable source spectra were obtained in both regions. We validated the resulting spectra by comparing the ratio of raw envelopes and source spectra from calibrated envelopes. Spectral shapes of earthquakes and explosions show different patterns in both regions. We also find (1) the source spectra derived from S-coda is more robust than that from the P-coda at low frequencies; (2) unlike earthquake events, the source spectra of explosions have a large disagreement between P and S waves; and (3) similarity is observed between 2016 Gyeongju and 2011 Virginia earthquake sequence in the eastern U.S.

  19. Neutron capture in s-wave resonances of 56Fe, 58Ni, and 60Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, F.; Kaeppeler, F.; Reffo, G.; Fabbri, F.

    1983-07-01

    The neutron capture widths of s-wave resonances in 56 Fe (27.7 keV), 58 Ni(15.4 keV) and 60 Ni (12.5 keV) have been determined using a setup completely different from previous experiments. A pulsed 3-MV Van de Graaff accelerator and a kinematically collimated neutron beam, produced via the 7 Li (p,n) reaction, was used in the experiments. Capture gamma-rays were observed by three Moxon-Rae detectors with graphite-, bismuth-graphite-, and bismuth-converters, respectively. The samples were positioned at a neutron flight path of only 8 cm. Thus events due to capture of resonance scattered neutrons in the detectors or in surrounding materials are completely discriminated by their additional time of flight. The high neutron flux at the sample position allowed the use of very thin samples (0.15 mm-0.45 mm), avoiding large multiple scattering corrections. The data obtained with the individual detectors were corrected for the efficiency of the respective converter materials. For that purpose, detailed theoretical calculations of the capture gamma-ray spectra of the measured isotopes and of gold, which was used as a standard, were performed. The final results are: GAMMAsub(γ)(27.7 keV, 56 Fe) = 1.06 +- 0.05 eV, GAMMAsub(γ)(15.4 keV, 58 Ni) = 1.53 +- 0.10 eV and GAMMAsub(γ)(12.5 keV, 60 Ni) = 2.92 +- 0.19 eV. The accuracy obtained with the present experimental method represents an improvement of a factor 3-6 compared to previous experiments. The investigated s-wave resonances contribute 10-40% to the total capture rate of the respective isotopes in a typical fast reactor. (orig.) [de

  20. Towards a new technique to construct a 3D shear-wave velocity model based on converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, G.; Colavitti, L.

    2017-12-01

    A 3D model is essential in all branches of solid Earth sciences because geological structures can be heterogeneous and change significantly in their lateral dimension. The main target of this research is to build a crustal S-wave velocity structure in 3D. The currently popular methodologies to construct 3D shear-wave velocity models are Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) and Local Earthquake Tomography (LET). Here we propose a new technique to map Earth discontinuities and velocities at depth based on the analysis of receiver functions. The 3D model is obtained by simultaneously inverting P-to-S converted waveforms recorded at a dense array. The individual velocity models corresponding to each trace are extracted from the 3D initial model along ray paths that are calculated using the shooting method, and the velocity model is updated during the inversion. We consider a spherical approximation of ray propagation using a global velocity model (iasp91, Kennett and Engdahl, 1991) for the teleseismic part, while we adopt Cartesian coordinates and a local velocity model for the crust. During the inversion process we work with a multi-layer crustal model for shear-wave velocity, with a flexible mesh for the depth of the interfaces. The RFs inversion represents a complex problem because the amplitude and the arrival time of different phases depend in a non-linear way on the depth of interfaces and the characteristics of the velocity structure. The solution we envisage to manage the inversion problem is the stochastic Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA, Sambridge, 1999), whose goal is to find an ensemble of models that sample the good data-fitting regions of a multidimensional parameter space. Depending on the studied area, this method can accommodate possible independent and complementary geophysical data (gravity, active seismics, LET, ANT, etc.), helping to reduce the non-linearity of the inversion. Our first focus of application is the Central Alps, where a 20-year long dataset of

  1. Seismic velocity structure and microearthquake source properties at The Geysers, California, geothermal area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, D.R.

    1986-12-01

    The method of progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion has been extended to incorporate S-wave arrival time data and to estimate S-wave velocities in addition to P-wave velocities. S-wave data to progressive inversion does not completely eliminate hypocenter-velocity tradeoffs, but they are substantially reduced. Results of a P and S-wave progressive hypocenter-velocity inversion at The Geysers show that the top of the steam reservoir is clearly defined by a large decrease of V/sub p//V/sub s/ at the condensation zone-production zone contact. The depth interval of maximum steam production coincides with minimum observed V/sub p//V/sub s/, and V/sub p//V/sub s/ increses below the shallow primary production zone suggesting that reservoir rock becomes more fluid saturated. The moment tensor inversion method was applied to three microearthquakes at The Geysers. Estimated principal stress orientations were comparable to those estimated using P-wave firstmotions as constraints. Well constrained principal stress orientations were obtained for one event for which the 17 P-first motions could not distinguish between normal-slip and strike-slip mechanisms. The moment tensor estimates of principal stress orientations were obtained using far fewer stations than required for first-motion focal mechanism solutions. The three focal mechanisms obtained here support the hypothesis that focal mechanisms are a function of depth at The Geysers. Progressive inversion as developed here and the moment tensor inversion method provide a complete approach for determining earthquake locations, P and S-wave velocity structure, and earthquake source mechanisms.

  2. Seismic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle along profile PANCAKE across the Carpathians between the Pannonian Basin and the East European Craton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starostenko, V.; Janik, T.; Kolomiyets, K.

    2013-01-01

    the Transcarpathian Depression and the Carpathian Foredeep; and the south-western part of the EEC, including the Trans European Suture Zone (TESZ). Seismic data support a robust model of the Vp velocity structure of the crust. In the PB, the 22-23km thick crust consists of a 2-5km thick sedimentary layer (Vp=2......Results are presented of a seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction survey along a profile between the Pannonian Basin (PB) and the East European Craton (EEC) called PANCAKE. The P- and S-wave velocity model derived can be divided into three sectors: the PB; the Carpathians, including.......4-3.7km/s), 17-20km thick upper crystalline crust (5.9-6.3km/s) and an up to 3km thick lower crustal layer (Vp=6.4km/s). In the central part of the Carpathians, a 10-24km thick uppermost part of the crust with Vp≤6.0km/s may correspond to sedimentary rocks of different ages; several high velocity bodies...

  3. Localization of s-Wave and Quantum Effective Potential of a Quasi-free Particle with Position-Dependent Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Guoxing; Xiang Yang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the s-wave for a quasi-free particle with position-dependent mass (PDM) have been discussed in details. Differed from the system with constant mass in which the localization of the s-wave for the free quantum particle around the origin only occurs in two dimensions, the quasi-free particle with PDM can experience attractive forces in D dimensions except D = 1 when its mass function satisfies some conditions. The effective mass of a particle varying with its position can induce effective interaction, which may be attractive in some cases. The analytical expressions of the eigenfunctions and the corresponding probability densities for the s-waves of the two- and three-dimensional systems with a special PDM are given, and the existences of localization around the origin for these systems are shown.

  4. A Preliminary Analysis on Empirical Attenuation of Absolute Velocity Response Spectra (1 to 10s) in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Y. P.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Aoi, S.

    2013-12-01

    (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR +∑gS +hD where Y (T) is the 5% damped peak vector response in cm/s derived from two horizontal component records for a natural period T in second; in (2) S is a dummy variable which is one if a site is located inside a sedimentary basin, otherwise zero. In (3), D is depth to the top of layer having a particular S-wave velocity. We used the deep underground S-wave velocity model available from Japan Seismic Hazard Information Station (J-SHIS). In (5), sites are classified to various sedimentary basins. Analyses show that the standard deviations decrease in the order of the models listed and the all coefficients are significant. Interestingly, coefficients g are found to be different from basin to basin at most periods, and the depth to the top of layer having S-wave velocity of 1.7km/s gives the smallest standard deviation of 0.31 at T=4.4s in (5). This study shows the possibility of describing the observed peak absolute velocity response values by using simple model parameters like site location and sedimentary depth soon after the location and magnitude of an earthquake are known.

  5. Electron attachment in F2 - Conclusive demonstration of nonresonant, s-wave coupling in the limit of zero electron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to F2 has been observed in the energy range 0-140 meV, at a resolution of 6 meV (full width at half maximum). Results show conclusively a sharp, resolution-limited threshold behavior consistent with an s-wave cross section varying as sq rt of epsilon. Two accurate theoretical calculations predict only p-wave behavior varying as the sq rt of epsilon. Several nonadiabatic coupling effects leading to s-wave behavior are outlined.

  6. Neutron capture widths of s-wave resonances in 56Fe, 5860Ni and 27Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, K.; Kaeppeler, F.; Reffo, G.; Fabbri, F.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron capture widths of s-wave resonances in 56 Fe (27.7 keV), 58 Ni (15.4 keV), 60 Ni (12.5 keV) and 27 Al (35.3 keV) have been determined, using a setup completely different from LINAC experiments. A pulsed 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator and the 7 Li(p,n) reaction served as a neutron source. The proton energy was adjusted just above the reaction threshold to obtain a kinematically collimated neutron beam. This allowed to position the samples at a flight path as short as approx. 90 mm. Capture events were detected by three Moxon-Rae detectors with graphite, bismuth-graphite and pure bismuth converter, respectively. The measurements were performed relative to a gold standard. The setup allows to discriminate capture of scattered neutrons completely by time of flight and to use very thin samples (0.15 mm) in order to reduce multiple scattering. After correction for deviations of the detector efficiency from a linear increase with gamma-ray energy, the results obtained with different detectors agree within their remaining systematic uncertainty of approx. 5%. Only preliminary results are presented

  7. Robust sky light polarization detection with an S-wave plate in a light field camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Cao, Yu; Liu, Haibo; Liu, Zejin

    2016-05-01

    The sky light polarization navigator has many advantages, such as low cost, no decrease in accuracy with continuous operation, etc. However, current celestial polarization measurement methods often suffer from low performance when the sky is covered by clouds, which reduce the accuracy of navigation. In this paper we introduce a new method and structure based on a handheld light field camera and a radial polarizer, composed of an S-wave plate and a linear polarizer, to detect the sky light polarization pattern across a wide field of view in a single snapshot. Each micro-subimage has a special intensity distribution. After extracting the texture feature of these subimages, stable distribution information of the angle of polarization under a cloudy sky can be obtained. Our experimental results match well with the predicted properties of the theory. Because the polarization pattern is obtained through image processing, rather than traditional methods based on mathematical computation, this method is less sensitive to errors of pixel gray value and thus has better anti-interference performance.

  8. Type-I and type-II topological nodal superconductors with s -wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beibing; Yang, Xiaosen; Xu, Ning; Gong, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Topological nodal superconductors with protected gapless points in momentum space are generally realized based on unconventional pairings. In this work we propose a minimal model to realize these topological nodal phases with only s -wave interaction. In our model the linear and quadratic spin-orbit couplings along the two orthogonal directions introduce anisotropic effective unconventional pairings in momentum space. This model may support different nodal superconducting phases characterized by either an integer winding number in BDI class or a Z2 index in D class at the particle-hole invariant axes. In the vicinity of the nodal points the effective Hamiltonian can be described by either type-I or type-II Dirac equations, and the Lifshitz transition from type-I nodal phases to type-II nodal phases can be driven by external in-plane magnetic fields. We show that these nodal phases are robust against weak impurities, which only slightly renormalizes the momentum-independent parameters in the impurity-averaged Hamiltonian, thus these phases are possible to be realized in experiments with real semi-Dirac materials. The smoking-gun evidences to verify these phases based on scanning tunneling spectroscopy method are also briefly discussed.

  9. Universal relations for spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas near an s -wave resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Sun, Ning

    2018-04-01

    Synthetic spin-orbit-coupled quantum gases have been widely studied both experimentally and theoretically in the past decade. As shown in previous studies, this modification of single-body dispersion will in general couple different partial waves of the two-body scattering and thus distort the wave function of few-body bound states which determines the short-distance behavior of many-body wave function. In this work, we focus on the two-component Fermi gas with one-dimensional or three-dimensional spin-orbit coupling (SOC) near an s -wave resonance. Using the method of effective field theory and the operator product expansion, we derive universal relations for both systems, including the adiabatic theorem, viral theorem, and pressure relation, and obtain the momentum distribution matrix 〈ψa†(q ) ψb(q ) 〉 at large q (a ,b are spin indices). The momentum distribution matrix shows both spin-dependent and spatial anisotropic features. And the large momentum tail is modified at the subleading order thanks to the SOC. We also discuss the experimental implication of these results depending on the realization of the SOC.

  10. Electron-helium S-wave model benchmark calculations. I. Single ionization and single excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2010-02-01

    A full four-body implementation of the propagating exterior complex scaling (PECS) method [J. Phys. B 37, L69 (2004)] is developed and applied to the electron-impact of helium in an S-wave model. Time-independent solutions to the Schrödinger equation are found numerically in coordinate space over a wide range of energies and used to evaluate total and differential cross sections for a complete set of three- and four-body processes with benchmark precision. With this model we demonstrate the suitability of the PECS method for the complete solution of the full electron-helium system. Here we detail the theoretical and computational development of the four-body PECS method and present results for three-body channels: single excitation and single ionization. Four-body cross sections are presented in the sequel to this article [Phys. Rev. A 81, 022716 (2010)]. The calculations reveal structure in the total and energy-differential single-ionization cross sections for excited-state targets that is due to interference from autoionization channels and is evident over a wide range of incident electron energies.

  11. Thorium s-wave neutron widths from 21 to 2006 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ingle, R.W.; Portney, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A 232 Th total cross section measurement in the resolved resonance region has been requested with a 2% accuracy in order to obtain resonance parameters with a 5% accuracy. These data are required for both fast and light-water breeder reactor studies. Inspection of the prior 232 Th differential data base shows several problems: the thermal cross sections seem inconsistent; the measured capture widths have large uncertanties; the two rather complete sets of measured neutron widths are systematically discrepant; and the differential data appear to give Cd capture ratios and shielded-capture resonance integrals smaller than those required by integral measurements. In order to improve the differential data base we have measured neutron transmission spectra through eight samples of 232 Th. Resonance parameters have been obtained from these data using the computer code S10B. Fits to these data up to 440 eV, which concentrated on the capture widths, have been previously reported. The results of extending these fits to 2.0 keV are reported and discussed in terms of the s-wave strength function and the dilute-capture resonance integral

  12. S wave Kπ scattering and effects of κ in J/ψ->K-bar *0(892)K+π-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, F.-K.; Ping, R.-G.; Shen, P.-N.; Chiang, H.-C.; Zou, B.-S.

    2006-01-01

    S wave scattering is studied using a chiral unitary approach (ChUT) taking into account coupled channels. With the amplitudes derived from the lowest order chiral Lagrangian as the kernel of a set of coupled channel Bathe-Salpeter equations, the I=1/2S wave Kπ scattering phase shifts below 1.2 GeV can be fitted by one parameter, a subtraction constant, and a scalar resonance corresponding to the controversial κ (K 0 *(800)) can be generated dynamically. A good description of the I=3/2S wave Kπ scattering phase shifts below 1.2 GeV can also be obtained. An artificial singularity in the cut-off method of the 2-meson loop integral of the ChUT is found. The formalism is applied to deal with the S wave Kπ final state interaction (FSI) in the decay J/ψ->K-bar * 0 (892)K + π - , and a qualitatively good fit to the data is achieved. The role of κ in the decay is discussed

  13. The 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake related to a large velocity gradient within the Pacific plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Makoto; Obara, Kazushige

    2015-04-01

    We conduct seismic tomography using arrival time data picked by the high sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). We used earthquakes off the coast outside the seismic network around the source region of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake with the centroid depth estimated from moment tensor inversion by NIED F-net (broadband seismograph network) as well as earthquakes within the seismic network determined by Hi-net. The target region, 20-48N and 120-148E, covers the Japanese Islands from Hokkaido to Okinawa. A total of manually picked 4,622,346 P-wave and 3,062,846 S-wave arrival times for 100,733 earthquakes recorded at 1,212 stations from October 2000 to August 2009 is available for use in the tomographic method. In the final iteration, we estimate the P-wave slowness at 458,234 nodes and the S-wave slowness at 347,037 nodes. The inversion reduces the root mean square of the P-wave traveltime residual from 0.455 s to 0.187 s and that of the S-wave data from 0.692 s to 0.228 s after eight iterations (Matsubara and Obara, 2011). Centroid depths are determined using a Green's function approach (Okada et al., 2004) such as in NIED F-net. For the events distant from the seismic network, the centroid depth is more reliable than that determined by NIED Hi-net, since there are no stations above the hypocenter. We determine the upper boundary of the Pacific plate based on the velocity structure and earthquake hypocentral distribution. The upper boundary of the low-velocity (low-V) oceanic crust corresponds to the plate boundary where thrust earthquakes are expected to occur. Where we do not observe low-V oceanic crust, we determine the upper boundary of the upper layer of the double seismic zone within high-V Pacific plate. We assume the depth at the Japan Trench as 7 km. We can investigate the velocity structure within the Pacific plate such as 10 km beneath the plate boundary since the

  14. Transfer function for a superficial layer. Parametric analysis and relationship with SM records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandi, H.; Stancu, O.

    2002-01-01

    The developments presented were aimed at providing an analytical and computational support for a research project intended to examine the contribution of source mechanism and of local conditions to the features of ground motion due to Vrancea earthquakes. The project referred to is being developed jointly, by the Academy of Technical Sciences of Romania, the Institute of Geodynamics, the Technical University of Civil Engineering, Bucharest, and GEOTEC, Bucharest. The modelling of the phenomenon of seismic oscillations of ground was based on assumptions of physical and geometrical linearity. The dynamic systems considered were assumed to consist of a sequence of plane = parallel homogeneous geologic layers, accepting that the relevant physical characteristics (thickness, density, low frequency S-wave velocity, rheological characteristic) are constant for a layer, but may change from one layer to another). Alternative constitutive laws were considered (the laws referred to were of Kelvin - Voigt, Poynting and Sorokin types). The transfer function of a geological package is determined as a product of transfer functions of the successive homogeneous layers. A first step of analysis corresponded to the consideration of a single homogeneous layer, for which full analytical solutions could be derived. A parametric analysis, aimed at determining the transfer function, was undertaken considering alternative (credible) values for the parameters characterizing the constitutive laws referred to. Considering alternative possible situations, it turned out that a strong amplification occurs (for any type of constitutive law) especially for the fundamental mode of the dynamic system, while the amplification is weaker for the upper normal modes. These results correlate well with the outcome of analysis of the spectral content of ground motion as obtained from the processing of strong motion records. The most striking fact is represented by the important modifications of the

  15. Joint inversion of seismic and gravity data for imaging seismic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath Utah, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Zhang, H.; Maceira, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present a method for using any combination of body wave arrival time measurements, surface wave dispersion observations, and gravity data to simultaneously invert for three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity models. The simultaneous use of disparate data types takes advantage of the differing sensitivities of each data type, resulting in a comprehensive and higher resolution three-dimensional geophysical model. In a case study for Utah, we combine body wave first arrivals mainly from the USArray Transportable Array, Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion data, and Bouguer gravity anomalies to invert for crustal and upper mantle structure of the region. Results show clear delineations, visible in both P- and S-wave velocities, between the three main tectonic provinces in the region. Without the inclusion of the surface wave and gravity constraints, these delineations are less clear, particularly for S-wave velocities. Indeed, checkerboard tests confirm that the inclusion of the additional datasets dramatically improves S-wave velocity recovery, with more subtle improvements to P-wave velocity recovery, demonstrating the strength of the method in successfully recovering seismic velocity structure from multiple types of constraints.

  16. Seismic velocity anisotropy of phyllosilicate-rich rocks: characteristics inferred from experimental and crack-model studies of biotite-rich schist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, O.; Kanagawa, K.

    2010-07-01

    Seismic velocity anisotropy of biotite schist (30 per cent-mode biotite) was measured under confining pressures up to 150 MPa. The rock shows weak orthotropy which was altered from transverse isotropy (TI) generated by biotite-preferred orientation. The orthotropy was caused by microfolding in the rock. The velocity increase under confining pressure indicates that most crack planes are aligned parallel to the cleavage planes (silicate sheet) of the oriented biotite minerals. The anisotropy of the rock is basically TI due to both the aligned biotite minerals and cracks, which have a common symmetry axis. We found that other sheet silicate-rich rocks have a similar anisotropy with the biotite schist, in which the TI-type anisotropy is characterized by the slow P- and S-wave velocities along the symmetry axis. This is caused by the preferred orientation of sheet silicate minerals and the extremely slow P- and S-wave velocities along the axis perpendicular to the silicate sheet compared to the directions along the silicate sheet. When rock contains a large percentage of highly oriented sheet silicates, the fast and slow shear waves exchange their polarities at some off-symmetry axis directions, indicating that the qS-wave (quasi-S wave) velocity exceeds the SH-wave velocity. The phase velocity distribution of qS wave shows an asymmetry with respect to the angle from the symmetry axis, which is characterized by a bulge in this distribution located near the symmetric axis. This is inherent to most sheet silicate minerals. When crack density of aligned cracks increases, the P-wave velocity along the symmetry axis decreases considerably. The qS-wave phase velocity in the off-axis directions also decreases, in accordance with the decrease of the P velocity along the symmetry axis. The asymmetry of the qS-wave phase velocity distribution increases as the P-wave velocity decreases along the symmetry axis. This relationship can be well understood by means of Berryman

  17. Evaluation of dynamic properties of soft ground using an S-wave vibrator and seismic cones. Part 2. Vs change during the vibration; S ha vibrator oyobi seismic cone wo mochiita gen`ichi jiban no doteki bussei hyoka. 2. Kashinchu no Vs no henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inazaki, T [Public Works Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    With an objective to measure a behavior of the surface ground during a strong earthquake directly on the actual ground and make evaluation thereon, a proposal was made on an original location measuring and analyzing method using an S-wave vibrator and seismic cones. This system consists of an S-wave vibrator and a static cone penetrating machine, and different types of measuring cones. A large number of measuring cones are inserted initially in the object bed of the ground, and variation in the vibration generated by the vibrator is measured. This method can derive decrease in rigidity rate of the actual ground according to dynamic strain levels, or in other words, the dynamic nonlinearity. The strain levels can be controlled with a range from 10 {sup -5} to 10 {sup -3} by varying the distance from the S-wave vibrator. Furthermore, the decrease in the rigidity rate can be derived by measuring variations in the S-wave velocity by using the plank hammering method during the vibration. Field measurement is as easy as it can be completed in about half a day including preparatory works, and the data analysis is also simple. The method is superior in mobility and workability. 9 figs.

  18. Detecting P and S-wave of Mt. Rinjani seismic based on a locally stationary autoregressive (LSAR) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhaida, Subanar, Abdurakhman, Abadi, Agus Maman

    2017-08-01

    Seismic data is usually modelled using autoregressive processes. The aim of this paper is to find the arrival times of the seismic waves of Mt. Rinjani in Indonesia. Kitagawa algorithm's is used to detect the seismic P and S-wave. Householder transformation used in the algorithm made it effectively finding the number of change points and parameters of the autoregressive models. The results show that the use of Box-Cox transformation on the variable selection level makes the algorithm works well in detecting the change points. Furthermore, when the basic span of the subinterval is set 200 seconds and the maximum AR order is 20, there are 8 change points which occur at 1601, 2001, 7401, 7601,7801, 8001, 8201 and 9601. Finally, The P and S-wave arrival times are detected at time 1671 and 2045 respectively using a precise detection algorithm.

  19. KN s-wave phase shifts in a quark model with gluon and boson exchange at the quark level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre-Brac, B.; Leandri, J.

    1997-01-01

    The kaon-nucleon s-wave phase shifts have been calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM). The interquark potential includes gluon, pion and sigma exchanges. The kaon and nucleon wave functions are expanded as a sum of Gaussian functions and the Hill-Wheeler (HW) equation is solved numerically. The I=0 phase shifts present too much attraction and in the I=1 channel too much repulsion is obtained. (orig.)

  20. Third-order non-Coulomb correction to the S-wave quarkonium wave functions at the origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beneke, M.; Kiyo, Y.; Schuller, K.

    2008-01-01

    We compute the third-order correction to the S-wave quarkonium wave functions |ψ n (0)| 2 at the origin from non-Coulomb potentials in the effective non-relativistic Lagrangian. Together with previous results on the Coulomb correction and the ultrasoft correction computed in a companion paper, this completes the third-order calculation up to a few unknown matching coefficients. Numerical estimates of the new correction for bottomonium and toponium are given

  1. Amplitude analysis for the process K-p→(π+π-)sub(s-wave)Σ0(1385)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, F.; Zalewski, K.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Hemingway, R.J.; Holmgren, S.O.; Losty, M.J.; Kluyver, J.G.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Timmermans, J.J.; Walle, R.T. van de

    1977-01-01

    Transversity amplitudes and spin density matrix elements are determined for the process K - p→(π + π - )sub(s-wave)Σ 0 (1385). Predictions of the additive quark model and of duality diagrams are tested and found consistent with the data; this is the first information about the applicability of these models to processes where a scalar object is produced at the mesonic vertex. (Auth.)

  2. Six-degree-of-freedom near-source seismic motions II: examples of real seismogram analysis and S-wave velocity retrieval

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brokešová, J.; Málek, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2015), s. 511-539 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/0925; GA MŠk LM2010008; GA ČR GAP210/12/2336; GA ČR GA15-02363S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : seismic rotation * near-source region * rotational seismometer * microearthquakes * West Bohemia/Vogtland region * Gulf of Corinth * Katla region Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.550, year: 2015

  3. A generic model for the shallow velocity structure of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Philippe; Heap, Michael J.; Kushnir, Alexandra

    2018-05-01

    The knowledge of the structure of volcanoes and of the physical properties of volcanic rocks is of paramount importance to the understanding of volcanic processes and the interpretation of monitoring observations. However, the determination of these structures by geophysical methods suffers limitations including a lack of resolution and poor precision. Laboratory experiments provide complementary information on the physical properties of volcanic materials and their behavior as a function of several parameters including pressure and temperature. Nevertheless combined studies and comparisons of field-based geophysical and laboratory-based physical approaches remain scant in the literature. Here, we present a meta-analysis which compares 44 seismic velocity models of the shallow structure of eleven volcanoes, laboratory velocity measurements on about one hundred rock samples from five volcanoes, and seismic well-logs from deep boreholes at two volcanoes. The comparison of these measurements confirms the strong variability of P- and S-wave velocities, which reflects the diversity of volcanic materials. The values obtained from laboratory experiments are systematically larger than those provided by seismic models. This discrepancy mainly results from scaling problems due to the difference between the sampled volumes. The averages of the seismic models are characterized by very low velocities at the surface and a strong velocity increase at shallow depth. By adjusting analytical functions to these averages, we define a generic model that can describe the variations in P- and S-wave velocities in the first 500 m of andesitic and basaltic volcanoes. This model can be used for volcanoes where no structural information is available. The model can also account for site time correction in hypocenter determination as well as for site and path effects that are commonly observed in volcanic structures.

  4. Separation of S-wave pseudoscalar and pseudovector amplitudes in π-p→π+π-n reaction on polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Rybicki, K.

    1996-06-01

    A new analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction π - p→π + π - n on a transversely polarized target is performed. It is based on the results obtained by CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration in the ππ energy range from 600 MeV to 1600 MeV at 17.2 GeV/c π - momentum. Energy-independent separation of the S-wave pseudoscalar amplitude (π exchange) from the pseudovector amplitude (a 1 exchange) is carried out using assumptions much weaker than those in all previous analyses. We show that, especially around 1000 MeV and around 1500 MeV, the a 1 exchange amplitude cannot be neglected. The scalar-isoscalar ππ phase shift are calculated using fairly weak assumptions. Our results are consistent both with the so called ''up'' and the well-known ''down'' solution, provided we choose those in which the S-wave phases increase slower with the effective ππ mass than the P-wave phases. Above 1420 MeV both sets of phase shifts increase with energy faster than in the experiment on an unpolarized target. This fact can be related to the presence of scalar resonance f o (1500). (author). 41 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  5. Chiral dynamics, S-wave contributions and angular analysis in D → ππl anti ν

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yu-Ji; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Shuai [Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, INPAC, Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai (China)

    2017-07-15

    We present a theoretical analysis of the D{sup -} → π{sup +}π{sup -}l anti ν and anti D{sup 0} → π{sup +}π{sup 0}l anti ν decays. We construct a general angular distribution which can include arbitrary partial waves of ππ. Retaining the S-wave and P-wave contributions we study the branching ratios, forward-backward asymmetries and a few other observables. The P-wave contribution is dominated by ρ{sup 0} resonance, and the S-wave contribution is analyzed using the unitarized chiral perturbation theory. The obtained branching fraction for D → ρlν, at the order 10{sup -3}, is consistent with the available experimental data. The S-wave contribution has a branching ratio at the order of 10{sup -4}, and this prediction can be tested by experiments like BESIII and LHCb. Future measurements can also be used to examine the π-π scattering phase shift. (orig.)

  6. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  7. The velocity of sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the velocity of sound in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to determine the velocity measurements are described. Tables are presented of reported data on the velocity of sound in lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium. A formula is given for alkali metals, in which the sound velocity is a function of shear viscosity, atomic mass and atomic volume. (U.K.)

  8. Detonation velocity in poorly mixed gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, E. S.

    2017-10-01

    The technique for computation of the average velocity of plane detonation wave front in poorly mixed mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen is proposed. Here it is assumed that along the direction of detonation propagation the chemical composition of the mixture has periodic fluctuations caused, for example, by layered stratification of gas charge. The technique is based on the analysis of functional dependence of ideal (Chapman-Jouget) detonation velocity on mole fraction (with respect to molar concentration) of the fuel. It is shown that the average velocity of detonation can be significantly (by more than 10%) less than the velocity of ideal detonation. The dependence that permits to estimate the degree of mixing of gas mixture basing on the measurements of average detonation velocity is established.

  9. Shear wave velocity structure of northern and North-Eastern Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebede, F.; Mammo, T.; Panza, G.F.; Vuan, A.; Costa, G.

    1995-10-01

    The non-linear inversion technique known as hedgehog is utilized to define the average crustal structure of North and North-Eastern Ethiopia. To accomplish the task a two dimensional frequency-time analysis is performed to obtain Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves. Six earthquakes recorded by the broad-band digital seismograph installed at the Geophysical Observatory of Addis Ababa University are utilized. The crustal structure between the Gulf of Tadjura (western Gulf of Aden) and Addis Ababa crossing southern Afar (path I) can be approximated by a total thickness of about 22 km with average S-wave velocity in the range 2.3 - 3.9 km/s. The crust-mantle transition is poorly developed at greater depths and the shear wave velocity ranges from 4.0 km/s to 4.3 km/s. If the effect of the plateau part is taken into account the average total crustal thickness is found to be less than 18 km and the average S-wave velocity varies in the range 2.4 - 3.9 km/s. The low shear wave velocity under the Afar crust is consistent with the result of other geophysical studies. For path II, which passes through the border of the Western Ethiopian plateau, the average crustal structure is found to be approximated by a thickness of about 40 km and average S-wave velocity between 3.0 km/s and 3.9 km/s. The crust overlies a lithospheric mantle with a shear wave velocity in the range 4.1-4.4 km/s. (author). 37 refs, 11 figs, 4 tabs

  10. Seismic Velocity Structure of the San Jacinto Fault Zone from Double-Difference Tomography and Expected Distribution of Head Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, A. A.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We present initial results of double-difference tomographic images for the velocity structure of the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ), and related 3D forward calculations of waves in the immediate vicinity of the SJFZ. We begin by discretizing the SJFZ region with a uniform grid spacing of 500 m, extending 140 km by 80 km and down to 25 km depth. We adopt the layered 1D model of Dreger & Helmberger (1993) as a starting model for this region, and invert for 3D distributions of VP and VS with the double-difference tomography of Zhang & Thurber (2003), which makes use of absolute event-station travel times as well as relative travel times for phases from nearby event pairs. Absolute arrival times of over 78,000 P- and S-wave phase picks generated by 1127 earthquakes and recorded at 70 stations near the SJFZ are used. Only data from events with Mw greater than 2.2 are used. Though ray coverage is limited at shallow depths, we obtain relatively high-resolution images from 4 to 13 km which show a clear contrast in velocity across the NW section of the SJFZ. To the SE, in the so-called trifurcation area, the structure is more complicated, though station coverage is poorest in this region. Using the obtained image, the current event locations, and the 3D finite-difference code of Olsen (1994), we estimate the likely distributions of fault zone head waves as a tool for future deployment of instrument. We plan to conduct further studies by including more travel time picks, including those from newly-deployed stations in the SJFZ area, in order to gain a more accurate image of the velocity structure.

  11. Charge transport in 2DEG/s-wave superconductor junction with Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We study spin-dependent charge transport in superconducting junctions. We consider ballistic two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG)/s-wave superconductor junctions with Dresselhaus-type spin-orbit coupling (DSOC). We calculate the conductance normalized by that in the normal state of superconductor in order to study the effect of DSOC in 2DEG on conductance, changing the height of insulating barrier. We find the DSOC suppresses the conductance for low insulating barrier, while it can slightly enhance the conductance for high insulating barrier. It has a reentrant dependence on DSOC for middle strength insulating barrier. The effect of DSOC is weaken as the insulating barrier becomes high

  12. Validation of the Wiedemann–Franz law in a granular s-wave superconductor in the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefvand, A; Salehi, H; Shoushtari, M Zargar

    2017-01-01

    The present study tries to evaluate the validity of the Wiedemann–Franz law in a granular s-wave superconductor in the presence of concentrated impurities. By using Green’s function method and the Kubo formula technique, three distinct contributions of the Aslamazov–Larkin, the Maki–Thompson and, the density of states are calculated for both the electrical conductivity and the thermal conductivity in a granular s-wave superconductor. It is demonstrated that these different contributions to the fluctuation conductivity depend differently on the tunneling because of their different natures. This study examines the transport in a granular superconductor system in three dimensions in the limit of large tunneling conductance, which makes it possible to ignore all localization effects and the Coulomb interaction. We find that the tunneling is efficient near the critical temperature and that there is a crossover to the characteristic behavior of a homogeneous system. When it is far from the critical temperature, the tunneling is not effective and the system behaves as an ensemble of real zero-dimensional grains. The results show that the Wiedemann–Franz law is violated in both temperature regions. (paper)

  13. Further study of the ππ S-wave isoscalar amplitude below the K(anti)K threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Rybicki, K.

    1999-01-01

    We continue the analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction π - p→π + π - n involving the data obtained by the CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration on a transversely polarized target at 17.2 GeV π - momentum. This study deals with the region below the (anti)KK threshold. In particular, we study the ''up-steep'' solution containing a narrow S-wave resonance under the ρ(770). This solution exhibits a considerable inelasticity η which does not have any physical interpretation. Assuming that this inelasticity behaviour represents an unlikely fluctuation we impose η≡1 for all data points. This leads to non-physical results in one third of the π + π - effective mass bins and in the remaining mass bins some parameters behave in a queer way. The situation is even worse for the ''down-steep'' solution. We conclude that the 17.2 GeV data cannot be described by a relatively narrow f 0 (750). The ''down-flat'' and ''up-flat'' solutions which easily pass the η≡1 constraint exhibit a slow increase of phase shifts in the ρ(770) mass range. (author)

  14. Semileptonic decays of B{sub c} meson to S-wave charmonium states in the perturbative QCD approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui, Zhou; Li, Hong; Wang, Guang-xin [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Sciences, Tangshan (China); Xiao, Ying [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Information Engineering, Tangshan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Inspired by the recent measurement of the ratio of B{sub c} branching fractions to J/ψπ{sup +} and J/ψμ{sup +}ν{sub μ} final states at the LHCb detector, we study the semileptonic decays of B{sub c} meson to the S-wave ground and radially excited 2S and 3S charmonium states with the perturbative QCD approach. After evaluating the form factors for the transitions B{sub c} → P,V, where P and V denote pseudoscalar and vector S-wave charmonia, respectively, we calculate the branching ratios for all these semileptonic decays. The theoretical uncertainty of hadronic input parameters are reduced by utilizing the light-cone wave function for the B{sub c} meson. It is found that the predicted branching ratios range from 10{sup -7} up to 10{sup -2} and could be measured by the future LHCb experiment. Our prediction for the ratio of branching fractions (BR(B{sub c}{sup +}→J/Ψπ{sup +}))/(BR(B{sub c}{sup +}→J/Ψμ{sup +}ν{sub μ})) is in good agreement with the data. For B{sub c} → Vlν{sub l} decays, the relative contributions of the longitudinal and transverse polarization are discussed in different momentum transfer squared regions. These predictions will be tested on the ongoing and forthcoming experiments. (orig.)

  15. Semileptonic decays of B_c meson to S-wave charmonium states in the perturbative QCD approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui, Zhou; Li, Hong; Wang, Guang-xin; Xiao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the recent measurement of the ratio of B_c branching fractions to J/ψπ"+ and J/ψμ"+ν_μ final states at the LHCb detector, we study the semileptonic decays of B_c meson to the S-wave ground and radially excited 2S and 3S charmonium states with the perturbative QCD approach. After evaluating the form factors for the transitions B_c → P,V, where P and V denote pseudoscalar and vector S-wave charmonia, respectively, we calculate the branching ratios for all these semileptonic decays. The theoretical uncertainty of hadronic input parameters are reduced by utilizing the light-cone wave function for the B_c meson. It is found that the predicted branching ratios range from 10"-"7 up to 10"-"2 and could be measured by the future LHCb experiment. Our prediction for the ratio of branching fractions (BR(B_c"+→J/Ψπ"+))/(BR(B_c"+→J/Ψμ"+ν_μ)) is in good agreement with the data. For B_c → Vlν_l decays, the relative contributions of the longitudinal and transverse polarization are discussed in different momentum transfer squared regions. These predictions will be tested on the ongoing and forthcoming experiments. (orig.)

  16. Further study of the $\\pi\\pi$ S-wave isoscalar amplitude below the $K\\overline{K}$ threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, R; Rybicki, K; CERN-Cracow-Munich

    2000-01-01

    We continue the analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction pi /sup -/p to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/n involving the data obtained by the CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration on a transversely polarized target at 17.2 GeV/c pi /sup $/momentum. This study deals with the region below the KK threshold. In particular, we study the "up-steep" solution containing a narrow S-wave resonance under the rho (770). This solution exhibits a considerable inelasticity eta which does not have any physical interpretation. Assuming that this inelasticity behaviour represents an unlikely fluctuation we impose eta identical to 1 for all data points. This leads to non-physical results in one third of the pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ effective mass bins and in the remaining mass bins some parameters behave in a queer way. The situation is even worse for the "down-steep" solution. We conclude that the 17.2 GeV data cannot be described by a relatively narrow f/sub 0/(750). The "down-flat" and "up-flat" solutions which easily pass the ...

  17. Water velocity meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C. W.; Smith, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive drag sphere velocity meter with a zero to 6 ft/sec range measures steady-state flow. When combined with appropriate data acquisition system, it is suited to applications where large numbers of simultaneous measurements are needed for current mapping or velocity profile determination.

  18. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  19. Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocities During Partial Melting of a Mantle Peridotite KLB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Donald J.; Li, Li; Whitaker, Matthew L.; Triplett, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge of the elastic properties of partially molten rocks is crucial for understanding low-velocity regions in the interior of the Earth. Models of fluid and solid mixtures have demonstrated that significant decreases in seismic velocity are possible with small amounts of melt, but there is very little available data for testing these models, particularly with both P and S waves for mantle compositions. We report ultrasonic measurements of P and S velocities on a partially molten KLB-1 sample at mantle conditions using a multi-anvil device at a synchrotron facility. The P, S, and bulk sound velocities decrease as melting occurs. We find that the quantity, ∂lnVS/∂lnVB (where VB is the bulk sound velocity) is lower than mechanical models estimate. Instead, our data, as well as previous data in the literature, are consistent with a dynamic melting model in which melting and solidification interact with the stress field of the acoustic wave.

  20. Apparent splitting of S waves propagating through an isotropic lowermost mantle

    KAUST Repository

    Parisi, Laura

    2018-03-24

    Observations of shear‐wave anisotropy are key for understanding the mineralogical structure and flow in the mantle. Several researchers have reported the presence of seismic anisotropy in the lowermost 150–250 km of the mantle (i.e., D” layer), based on differences in the arrival times of vertically (SV) and horizontally (SH) polarized shear waves. By computing waveforms at period > 6 s for a wide range of 1‐D and 3‐D Earth structures we illustrate that a time shift (i.e., apparent splitting) between SV and SH may appear in purely isotropic simulations. This may be misinterpreted as shear wave anisotropy. For near‐surface earthquakes, apparent shear wave splitting can result from the interference of S with the surface reflection sS. For deep earthquakes, apparent splitting can be due to the S‐wave triplication in D”, reflections off discontinuities in the upper mantle and 3‐D heterogeneity. The wave effects due to anomalous isotropic structure may not be easily distinguished from purely anisotropic effects if the analysis does not involve full waveform simulations.

  1. Apparent splitting of S waves propagating through an isotropic lowermost mantle

    KAUST Repository

    Parisi, Laura; Ferreira, Ana M. G.; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    Observations of shear‐wave anisotropy are key for understanding the mineralogical structure and flow in the mantle. Several researchers have reported the presence of seismic anisotropy in the lowermost 150–250 km of the mantle (i.e., D” layer), based on differences in the arrival times of vertically (SV) and horizontally (SH) polarized shear waves. By computing waveforms at period > 6 s for a wide range of 1‐D and 3‐D Earth structures we illustrate that a time shift (i.e., apparent splitting) between SV and SH may appear in purely isotropic simulations. This may be misinterpreted as shear wave anisotropy. For near‐surface earthquakes, apparent shear wave splitting can result from the interference of S with the surface reflection sS. For deep earthquakes, apparent splitting can be due to the S‐wave triplication in D”, reflections off discontinuities in the upper mantle and 3‐D heterogeneity. The wave effects due to anomalous isotropic structure may not be easily distinguished from purely anisotropic effects if the analysis does not involve full waveform simulations.

  2. One-dimensional velocity model of the Middle Kura Depresion from local earthquakes data of Azerbaijan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetirmishli, G. C.; Kazimova, S. E.; Kazimov, I. E.

    2011-09-01

    We present the method for determining the velocity model of the Earth's crust and the parameters of earthquakes in the Middle Kura Depression from the data of network telemetry in Azerbaijan. Application of this method allowed us to recalculate the main parameters of the hypocenters of the earthquake, to compute the corrections to the arrival times of P and S waves at the observation station, and to significantly improve the accuracy in determining the coordinates of the earthquakes. The model was constructed using the VELEST program, which calculates one-dimensional minimal velocity models from the travel times of seismic waves.

  3. Upper-mantle velocity structure and its relation to topography across the Caledonides in Greenland and Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejrani, Babak; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the upper-mantle P- and S-wave velocity structure as well as structure in the VP/VS ratio across the high topography areas of north Atlantic Caledonides, integrating data from a new East Greenland Caledonide Central Fjord Array (EGCFA) with results of recent studies...... strong upper-mantle velocity boundary under the East Greenland Caledonides. However, the contrast in the VP/VS ratio is not as clear at this location. A correlation study of topography versus upper-mantle velocity revealed positive correlation in southern Norway but negative or absent correlation...

  4. Velocity Feedback Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient response such as ringing in a control system can be reduced or removed by velocity feedback. It is a useful control technique that should be covered in the relevant engineering laboratory courses. We developed velocity feedback experiments using two different low cost technologies, viz., operational amplifiers and microcontrollers. These experiments can be easily integrated into laboratory courses on feedback control systems or microcontroller applications. The intent of developing these experiments was to illustrate the ringing problem and to offer effective, low cost solutions for removing such problem. In this paper the pedagogical approach for these velocity feedback experiments was described. The advantages and disadvantages of the two different implementation of velocity feedback were discussed also.

  5. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  6. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  7. s-wave scattering for deep potentials with attractive tails falling off faster than -1/r2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Tim-Oliver; Kaiser, Alexander; Friedrich, Harald

    2011-01-01

    For potentials with attractive tails, as occur in typical atomic interactions, we present a simple formula for the s-wave phase shift δ 0 . It exposes a universal dependence of δ 0 (E) on the potential tail and the influence of effects specific to a given potential, which enter via the scattering length a, or equivalently, the noninteger part Δ th of the threshold quantum number n th . The formula accurately reproduces δ 0 (E) from threshold up to the semiclassical regime, far beyond the validity of the effective-range expansion. We derive the tail functions occurring in the formula for δ 0 (E) and demonstrate the validity of the formula for attractive potential tails proportional to 1/r 6 or to 1/r 4 , and also for a mixed potential tail consisting of a 1/r 4 term together with a non-negligible 1/r 6 contribution.

  8. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    This report presents met - ocean data and wave energy characteristics at three U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites . Its purpose is to enable the compari son of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the select io n of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives . It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment and op eration s and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the (draft) International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Specification (IEC 62600 - 101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of oc currence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services .

  9. Electron-helium S-wave model benchmark calculations. II. Double ionization, single ionization with excitation, and double excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Stelbovics, Andris T.

    2010-02-01

    The propagating exterior complex scaling (PECS) method is extended to all four-body processes in electron impact on helium in an S-wave model. Total and energy-differential cross sections are presented with benchmark accuracy for double ionization, single ionization with excitation, and double excitation (to autoionizing states) for incident-electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. While the PECS three-body cross sections for this model given in the preceding article [Phys. Rev. A 81, 022715 (2010)] are in good agreement with other methods, there are considerable discrepancies for these four-body processes. With this model we demonstrate the suitability of the PECS method for the complete solution of the electron-helium system.

  10. Upper mantle seismic structure beneath southwest Africa from finite-frequency P- and S-wave tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Yuan, Xiaohui; Tilmann, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    We present a 3D high-resolution seismic model of the southwestern Africa region from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S- wave data recorded by the amphibious WALPASS network. We used 40 temporary stations in southwestern Africa with records for a period of 2 years (the OBS operated...... for 1 year), between November 2010 and November 2012. The array covers a surface area of approximately 600 by 1200 km and is located at the intersection of the Walvis Ridge, the continental margin of northern Namibia, and extends into the Congo craton. Major questions that need to be understood......, probably related to surficial suture zones and the presence of fertile material. A shallower depth extent of the lithospheric plate of ∼100 km was observed beneath the ocean, consistent with plate-cooling models. In addition to tomographic images, the seismic anisotropy measurements within the upper mantle...

  11. Determination of the S-wave scattering shape parameter P from the zero-energy wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermode, M.W.; van Dijk, W.

    1990-01-01

    We show that for S-wave scattering at an energy k 2 by a local potential which supports no more than one bound state, the shape parameter P and coefficients of higher powers of k 2 in the effective range expansion function cotδ=-1/a+1/2 r 0 k 2 -Pr 0 3 k 3 +Qr 0 5 k 6 +..., where δ is the phase shift, may be obtained from the zero-energy wave function, u 0 (r). Thus δ itself may be determined from u 0 . We show that Pr 0 3 =∫ 0 R [β(r)u 0 2 (r)-bar β(r)bar u 0 2 (r)]dr, where r 0 is the effective range, β(r) is determined from an integral involving the wave function, and bar β(r) is a simple function of r which involves the scattering length and effective range

  12. Manipulatable Andreev reflection due to the interplay between the DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Qi; Yi, Guang-Yu; Han, Yu; Jiang, Cui; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2018-07-01

    We construct one mesoscopic circuit in which one quantum dot couples to one DIII-class topological superconductor and one s-wave superconductor, in addition to its connection with the metallic lead. And then, the Andreev reflection current in the metallic lead is evaluated. It is found that the two kinds of superconductors drive the Andreev reflection in the constructive manner. Next as finite superconducting phase difference is taken into account, the Andreev reflection oscillates in period π/2, and it can be suppressed in the low-energy region if the superconducting phase difference is (n + 1/2) π/2 (n ∈ Integer). Such a result is almost independent of the increase of the intradot Coulomb interaction. Therefore, this structure can assist to realize the manipulation of the Andreev reflection. Also, the result in this work provides useful information for understanding the property of the DIII-class topological superconductor.

  13. Multi-component pre-stack time-imaging and migration-based velocity analysis in transversely isotropic media; Imagerie sismique multicomposante et analyse de vitesse de migration en milieu transverse isotrope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerea, C.V.

    2001-06-01

    Complementary to the recording of compressional (P-) waves, the observation of P-S converted waves has recently been receiving specific attention. This is mainly due to their tremendous potential as a tool for fracture and lithology characterization, imaging sediments in gas saturated rocks, and imaging shallow sediments with higher resolution than conventional P-P data. In a conventional marine seismic survey, we cannot record P-to-S converted-wave energy since the fluids cannot support shear-wave strain. Thus, to capture the converted-wave energy, we need to record it at the water-bottom casing an ocean-bottom cable (OBC). The S-waves recorded at the seabed are mainly converted from P to S (i.e., PS-waves or C-waves) at the subsurface reflectors. The most accurate way to image seismic data is pre-stack depth migration. In this thesis, I develop a numerically efficient 2.5-D true-amplitude elastic Kirchhoff pre-stack migration algorithm designed to handle OBC data gathered along a single line. All the kinematic and dynamic elastic Green's functions required in the computation of true-amplitude weight term of Kirchhoff summation, are based on the non-hyperbolic explicit approximations of P- and SV-wave travel-times in layered transversely isotropic (VTI) media. Hence, this elastic imaging algorithm is very well-suited for migration-based velocity analysis techniques, for which fast, robust and iterative pre-stack migration is desired. In this thesis, I approach also the topic of anisotropic velocity model building for elastic pre-stack time-imaging. and propose an original methodology for joint PP-PS migration-based velocity analysis (MVA) in layered VTI anisotropic media. Tests on elastic synthetic and real OBC seismic data ascertain the validity of the pre-stack migration algorithm and velocity analysis methodology. (author)

  14. Metastable structure formation during high velocity grinding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarin, A.N.; Klyuev, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Metastable structures in surface layers of samples are; investigated during force high-velocity abrasive grinding. Samples of martensitic (40Kh13), austenitic (12Kh18N10T), ferritic (05Kh23Yu5) steels and some alloys, in particular KhN77TYuR (EhI437B), were grinded for one pass at treatment depth from 0.17 up to 2.6 mm. It is established that processes of homogenizing, recrystallization and coagulation are; developed during force high-velocity grinding along with polymorphic transformations in the zone of thermomechanical effect, that leads to changes of physical and mechanical properties of the surface

  15. Evolution of microstructure and elastic wave velocities in dehydrated gypsum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike

    2012-12-01

    We report on changes in P and S-wave velocities and rock microstructure induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air, at ambient pressure, and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Dehydration did not proceed homogeneously but via a reaction front moving sample inwards separating an outer highly porous rim from the remaining gypsum which, above approximately 393 (±5) K, concurrently decomposed into hemihydrate. Overall porosity was observed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% for fully hydrated samples to 30% for completely dehydrated ones. Concurrently, P and S-wave velocities linearly decreased with porosity from 5.2 and 2.7 km/s to 1.0 and 0.7 km/s, respectively. It is concluded that a linearized empirical Raymer-type model extended by a critical porosity term and based on the respective time dependent mineral and pore volumes reasonably replicates the P and S-wave data in relation to reaction progress and porosity.

  16. Estimating the Wet-Rock P-Wave Velocity from the Dry-Rock P-Wave Velocity for Pyroclastic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Sair; Fener, Mustafa; Kilic, Cumhur Ozcan

    2017-07-01

    Seismic methods are widely used for the geotechnical investigations in volcanic areas or for the determination of the engineering properties of pyroclastic rocks in laboratory. Therefore, developing a relation between the wet- and dry-rock P-wave velocities will be helpful for engineers when evaluating the formation characteristics of pyroclastic rocks. To investigate the predictability of the wet-rock P-wave velocity from the dry-rock P-wave velocity for pyroclastic rocks P-wave velocity measurements were conducted on 27 different pyroclastic rocks. In addition, dry-rock S-wave velocity measurements were conducted. The test results were modeled using Gassmann's and Wood's theories and it was seen that estimates for saturated P-wave velocity from the theories fit well measured data. For samples having values of less and greater than 20%, practical equations were derived for reliably estimating wet-rock P-wave velocity as function of dry-rock P-wave velocity.

  17. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  18. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  19. Group velocity tomography and regionalization in Italy and bordering areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontevivo, A.; Panza, G.F.

    2001-10-01

    More than one hundred group velocity dispersion curves of the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves have been processed to obtain tomographic maps, in the period range from 10 s to 35 s, for the Italian peninsula and bordering areas. We compute average dispersion relations over a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid, and, since the lateral resolving power of our data set is about 200 km, we group the cells of the grid accordingly to their dispersion curves. In this way and without a priori geological constraints, we define seven different regions, each characterised by a distinctive mean group velocity dispersion curve. The resulting regionalization can be easily correlated with the main tectonic features of the study area and mimics a recently proposed structural sketch. Average models of the shear wave velocity in the crust and in the upper mantle for a few selected regions are presented. The very low S-wave velocity values found in the uppermost upper mantle of the Southern Tyrrhenian basin are consistent with a large percentage of partial melting, well in agreement with the presence of the Vavilov-Magnaghi and Marsili huge volcanic bodies. (author)

  20. Modified circular velocity law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghloul, Nazim

    2018-05-01

    A modified circular velocity law is presented for a test body orbiting around a spherically symmetric mass. This law exhibits a distance scale parameter and allows to recover both usual Newtonian behaviour for lower distances and a constant velocity limit at large scale. Application to the Galaxy predicts the known behaviour and also leads to a galactic mass in accordance with the measured visible stellar mass so that additional dark matter inside the Galaxy can be avoided. It is also shown that this circular velocity law can be embedded in a geometrical description of spacetime within the standard general relativity framework upon relaxing the usual asymptotic flatness condition. This formulation allows to redefine the introduced Newtonian scale limit in term of the central mass exclusively. Moreover, a satisfactory answer to the galactic escape speed problem can be provided indicating the possibility that one can also get rid of dark matter halo outside the Galaxy.

  1. Variational multi-valued velocity field estimation for transparent sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez-Manzanares, Alonso; Rivera, Mariano; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Motion estimation in sequences with transparencies is an important problem in robotics and medical imaging applications. In this work we propose a variational approach for estimating multi-valued velocity fields in transparent sequences. Starting from existing local motion estimators, we derive...... a variational model for integrating in space and time such a local information in order to obtain a robust estimation of the multi-valued velocity field. With this approach, we can indeed estimate multi-valued velocity fields which are not necessarily piecewise constant on a layer –each layer can evolve...

  2. Excited waves in shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  3. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  4. Multidisc neutron velocity selector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosta, L.; Zsigmond, Gy.; Farago, B.; Mezei, F.; Ban, K.; Perendi, J.

    1987-12-01

    The prototype of a velocity selector for neutron monochromatization in the 4-20 A wavelength range is presented. The theoretical background of the multidisc rotor system is given together with a description of the mechanical construction and electronic driving system. The first tests and neutron measurements prove easy handling and excellent parameters. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  5. Electric and magnetic dipole transitions from broad s-wave neutron resonance in even-even sd-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, H.; Igashira, M.; Shimizu, M.; Muto, K.; Oda, T.; Achiha, Y.; Lee, Y.; Mukai, N.

    1992-01-01

    Observations have been performed for electromagnetic transitions from the broad s-wave neutron resonances at 658 keV in 24 Mg, at 180 keV in 28 Si, and at 103 keV in 32 S. Capture gamma rays were measured with an anti-Compton NaI(Tl) detector, using a neutron time-of-flight technique. E1 and M1 transitions from those resonances to low-lying states with a strong single-particle character were found. The deduced partial radiative widths for E1 transition are in excellent agreement with the Lane-Mughabghab valence-capture model calculations taking the neutron effective charge, -Ze/A. Moreover, it is shown that essential features of the observed E1 and M1 transitions can be well explained by assuming a configuration-mixing wave function, Ψ i (1/2 + )=a(0 + direct-product 1/2 + )+b(1 + direct-product 1/2 + )+c(1 + direct-product 3/2 + ), for each resonance. The M1 transition strengths are compared also with more detailed shell model calculations in the model space of full (sd) n configurations, using the Wildenthal effective interaction

  6. Attenuation of S-waves in the lithosphere of the Sea of Crete according to OBS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, S. A.; Kuzin, I. P.; Shoda, O. Yu.; Soloviev, S. L.

    1991-11-01

    Five OBS were installed in the Sea of Crete in 1987. During a period of nine days 430 local earthquakes were recorded. Hypocentres were determined for 85 microearthquakes. A correlation between magnitude ML and duration of seismic events on the records of the ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) was found from data of 14 shocks recorded simultaneously by OBS and some land-based Greek stations. A magnitude-frequency relationship for earthquakes recorded by OBS was obtained in the magnitude range ML = 2-4. Amplitude curves describing the attenuation of body waves in the lithosphere of the Sea of Crete were compiled. Assessment of quality factor Qs was made by comparison of empirical and theoretical amplitude curves. The values of Qs for the lithosphere of the Sea of Crete were calculated and found equal to 200-300. Low values of Qs and consequently strong attenuation of S-waves in the lithosphere of the Sea of Crete could be explained by extension of the lithosphere accompanied by its partial contamination with melted magma.

  7. A microscopic description of the S-wave πN-scattering lengths and the (pπ-)-atom lifetime in the quark confinement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.; Ivanov, M.A.; Rusetskij, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The S-wave πN-scattering lengths and the (pπ - )-atom lifetime are in the quark confinement model. Nucleon is treated as a quark-diquark system. The fulfillment of the Weinberg-Tomozawa relations is checked. The agreement is achieved with the experiment and with the results obtained within other approaches. 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  8. Measurements of the S-wave fraction in B-0 -> K+ pi(-) mu(+) mu(-) decays and the B-0 -> K*(892)(0) mu(+) mu(-) differential branching fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Dufour, L.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the differential branching fraction of the decay B-0 -> K* (892)(0) mu(+)mu(-) is presented together with a determination of the S-wave fraction of the K+ pi(-) system in the decay B-0 -> K+ pi-mu(+)mu(-). The analysis is based on pp-collision data corresponding to an integrated

  9. Poisson's ratio model derived from P- and S-wave reflection seismic data at the CO2CRC Otway Project pilot site, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilecke, Thies; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Tanner, David C.; Ziesch, Jennifer; Research Group Protect

    2014-05-01

    Compressional wave (P-wave) reflection seismic field measurements are a standard tool for subsurface exploration. 2-D seismic measurements are often used for overview measurements, but also as near-surface supplement to fill gaps that often exist in 3-D seismic data sets. Such supplementing 2-D measurements are typically simple with respect to field layout. This is an opportunity for the use of shear waves (S-waves). Within the last years, S-waves have become more and more important. One reason is that P- and S-waves are differently sensitive to fluids and pore fill so that the additional S-wave information can be used to enhance lithological studies. Another reason is that S-waves have the advantage of higher spatial resolution. Within the same signal bandwidth they typically have about half the wavelength of P-waves. In near-surface unconsolidated sediments they can even enhance the structural resolution by one order of magnitude. We make use of these capabilities within the PROTECT project. In addition to already existing 2-D P-wave data, we carried out a near surface 2-D S-wave field survey at the CO2CRC Otway Project pilot site, close to Warrnambool, Australia in November 2013. The combined analysis of P-wave and S-wave data is used to construct a Poisson's Ratio 2-D model down to roughly 600 m depth. The Poisson's ratio values along a 1 km long profile at the site are surprisingly high, ranging from 0.47 in the carbonate-dominated near surface to 0.4 at depth. In the literature, average lab measurements of 0.22 for unfissured carbonates and 0.37 for fissured examples have been reported. The high values that we found may indicate areas of rather unconsolidated or fractured material, or enhanced fluid contents, and will be subject of further studies. This work is integrated in a larger workflow towards prediction of CO2 leakage and monitoring strategies for subsurface storage in general. Acknowledgement: This work was sponsored in part by the Australian

  10. Surface wave velocity tracking by bisection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, T.

    2005-01-01

    Calculation of surface wave velocity is a classic problem dating back to the well-known Haskell's transfer matrix method, which contributes to solutions of elastic wave propagation, global subsurface structure evaluation by simulating observed earthquake group velocities, and on-site evaluation of subsurface structure by simulating phase velocity dispersion curves and/or H/V spectra obtained by micro-tremor observation. Recently inversion analysis on micro-tremor observation requires efficient method of generating many model candidates and also stable, accurate, and fast computation of dispersion curves and Raleigh wave trajectory. The original Haskell's transfer matrix method has been improved in terms of its divergence tendency mainly by the generalized transmission and reflection matrix method with formulation available for surface wave velocity; however, root finding algorithm has not been fully discussed except for the one by setting threshold to the absolute value of complex characteristic functions. Since surface wave number (reciprocal to the surface wave velocity multiplied by frequency) is a root of complex valued characteristic function, it is intractable to use general root finding algorithm. We will examine characteristic function in phase plane to construct two dimensional bisection algorithm with consideration on a layer to be evaluated and algorithm for tracking roots down along frequency axis. (author)

  11. Thermal Cracking in Westerly Granite Monitored Using Direct Wave Velocity, Coda Wave Interferometry, and Acoustic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, L.; Lengliné, O.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Schmittbuhl, J.

    2018-03-01

    To monitor both the permanent (thermal microcracking) and the nonpermanent (thermo-elastic) effects of temperature on Westerly Granite, we combine acoustic emission monitoring and ultrasonic velocity measurements at ambient pressure during three heating and cooling cycles to a maximum temperature of 450°C. For the velocity measurements we use both P wave direct traveltime and coda wave interferometry techniques, the latter being more sensitive to changes in S wave velocity. During the first cycle, we observe a high acoustic emission rate and large—and mostly permanent—apparent reductions in velocity with temperature (P wave velocity is reduced by 50% of the initial value at 450°C, and 40% upon cooling). Our measurements are indicative of extensive thermal microcracking during the first cycle, predominantly during the heating phase. During the second cycle we observe further—but reduced—microcracking, and less still during the third cycle, where the apparent decrease in velocity with temperature is near reversible (at 450°C, the P wave velocity is decreased by roughly 10% of the initial velocity). Our results, relevant for thermally dynamic environments such as geothermal reservoirs, highlight the value of performing measurements of rock properties under in situ temperature conditions.

  12. Microseismic Velocity Imaging of the Fracturing Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of low permeability reservoirs can induce microseismic events during fracture development. For this reason, microseismic monitoring using sensors on surface or in borehole have been widely used to delineate fracture spatial distribution and to understand fracturing mechanisms. It is often the case that the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) is determined solely based on microseismic locations. However, it is known that for some fracture development stage, long period long duration events, instead of microseismic events may be associated. In addition, because microseismic events are essentially weak and there exist different sources of noise during monitoring, some microseismic events could not be detected and thus located. Therefore the estimation of the SRV is biased if it is solely determined by microseismic locations. With the existence of fluids and fractures, the seismic velocity of reservoir layers will be decreased. Based on this fact, we have developed a near real time seismic velocity tomography method to characterize velocity changes associated with fracturing process. The method is based on double-difference seismic tomography algorithm to image the fracturing zone where microseismic events occur by using differential arrival times from microseismic event pairs. To take into account varying data distribution for different fracking stages, the method solves the velocity model in the wavelet domain so that different scales of model features can be obtained according to different data distribution. We have applied this real time tomography method to both acoustic emission data from lab experiment and microseismic data from a downhole microseismic monitoring project for shale gas hydraulic fracturing treatment. The tomography results from lab data clearly show the velocity changes associated with different rock fracturing stages. For the field data application, it shows that microseismic events are located in low velocity anomalies. By

  13. Deriving micro- to macro-scale seismic velocities from ice-core c axis orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerch, Johanna; Diez, Anja; Weikusat, Ilka; Eisen, Olaf

    2018-05-01

    One of the great challenges in glaciology is the ability to estimate the bulk ice anisotropy in ice sheets and glaciers, which is needed to improve our understanding of ice-sheet dynamics. We investigate the effect of crystal anisotropy on seismic velocities in glacier ice and revisit the framework which is based on fabric eigenvalues to derive approximate seismic velocities by exploiting the assumed symmetry. In contrast to previous studies, we calculate the seismic velocities using the exact c axis angles describing the orientations of the crystal ensemble in an ice-core sample. We apply this approach to fabric data sets from an alpine and a polar ice core. Our results provide a quantitative evaluation of the earlier approximative eigenvalue framework. For near-vertical incidence our results differ by up to 135 m s-1 for P-wave and 200 m s-1 for S-wave velocity compared to the earlier framework (estimated 1 % difference in average P-wave velocity at the bedrock for the short alpine ice core). We quantify the influence of shear-wave splitting at the bedrock as 45 m s-1 for the alpine ice core and 59 m s-1 for the polar ice core. At non-vertical incidence we obtain differences of up to 185 m s-1 for P-wave and 280 m s-1 for S-wave velocities. Additionally, our findings highlight the variation in seismic velocity at non-vertical incidence as a function of the horizontal azimuth of the seismic plane, which can be significant for non-symmetric orientation distributions and results in a strong azimuth-dependent shear-wave splitting of max. 281 m s-1 at some depths. For a given incidence angle and depth we estimated changes in phase velocity of almost 200 m s-1 for P wave and more than 200 m s-1 for S wave and shear-wave splitting under a rotating seismic plane. We assess for the first time the change in seismic anisotropy that can be expected on a short spatial (vertical) scale in a glacier due to strong variability in crystal-orientation fabric (±50 m s-1 per 10 cm

  14. Instantaneous fluctuation velocity and skewness distributions upstream of transition onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernon, D.; Walsh, E.J.; McEligot, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    The development of streamwise orientated disturbances through the boundary layer thickness prior to transition onset for zero-pressure gradient boundary layer flow under the influence %Tu = 4.2 is presented. The analysis concentrates on the development of the maximum positive and negative of the fluctuation velocity in order to gain further insight into the transition process. The average location of the peak negative fluctuation velocity over a range of Reynolds numbers was measured in the upper portion of the boundary layer at y/δ ∼ 0.6, whereas the location of the peak positive value was measured at y/δ ∼ 0.3. The disturbance magnitude of the negative fluctuation velocity increased beyond that of the positive as transition onset approached. The distribution and disturbance magnitude of the maximum positive and negative fluctuation velocities indicate that the initiation of transition may occur on the low-speed components of the flow that are lifted up to the upper region of the boundary layer. This is in qualitative agreement with recent direct numerical simulations on the breakdown of the flow on the lifted low-speed streaks near the boundary layer edge. The results presented in this investigation also demonstrate the increased physical insight gained by examining the distributions of the maximum positive and negative of the streamwise fluctuation velocity component associated with the low- and high-speed streaks, compared to time-averaged values, in determining what structures cause the breakdown to turbulence

  15. Self-similar magnetohydrodynamic boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel; Lastra, Alberto, E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.e [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The boundary layer created by parallel flow in a magnetized fluid of high conductivity is considered in this paper. Under appropriate boundary conditions, self-similar solutions analogous to the ones studied by Blasius for the hydrodynamic problem may be found. It is proved that for these to be stable, the size of the Alfven velocity at the outer flow must be smaller than the flow velocity, a fact that has a ready physical explanation. The process by which the transverse velocity and the thickness of the layer grow with the size of the Alfven velocity is detailed.

  16. Self-similar magnetohydrodynamic boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, Manuel; Lastra, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The boundary layer created by parallel flow in a magnetized fluid of high conductivity is considered in this paper. Under appropriate boundary conditions, self-similar solutions analogous to the ones studied by Blasius for the hydrodynamic problem may be found. It is proved that for these to be stable, the size of the Alfven velocity at the outer flow must be smaller than the flow velocity, a fact that has a ready physical explanation. The process by which the transverse velocity and the thickness of the layer grow with the size of the Alfven velocity is detailed.

  17. Velocity and stress distributions of deep seismic zone under Izu-Bonin, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoming; Zhang, Guibin; Jia, Zhengyuan

    2017-04-01

    Deep earthquakes can provide the deep information of the Earth directly. We have collected the waveform data from 77 deep earthquakes with depth greater than 300 km under Izu-Bonin in Japan. To obtain the velocity structures of P- and S-wave, we have inversed the double-differences of travel times from deep event-pairs. These velocity anomalies can further yield the Poisson's ratio and the porosity. Our results show that the average P-wave velocity anomaly is lower 6%, however the S-wave anomaly is higher 2% than the iasp91 model. The corresponding Poisson's ratio and porosity anomaly are -24% and -4%, respectively, which suggest that the possibility of water in the deep seismic zone is very few and the porosity might be richer. To obtain the stress distribution, we have used the ISOLA method to analyse the non-double-couple components of moment tensors of 77 deep earthquakes. The focal mechanism results show that almost half of all earthquakes have larger double-couple (DC) components, but others have clear isotropic (ISO) or compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) components. The non-double-couple components (ISO and CLVD) seem to represent the volume around a deep earthquake changes as it occurs, which could be explained the metastable olivine phase transition. All results indicate that the metastable olivine wedge (MOW) might exist in the Pacific slab under the Izu-Bonin region and the deep earthquakes might be induced by the phase change of metastable olivine.

  18. Sn-wave velocity structure of the uppermost mantle beneath the Australian continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhi; Kennett, Brian L. N.; Sun, Weijia

    2018-06-01

    We have extracted a data set of more than 5000 Sn traveltimes for source-station pairs within continental Australia, with 3-D source relocation using Pn arrivals to improve data consistency. We conduct tomographic inversion for S-wave-speed structure down to 100 km using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) method for the whole Australian continent. We obtain a 3-D model with potential resolution of 3.0° × 3.0°. The new S-wave-speed model provides strong constraints on structure in a zone that was previously poorly characterized. The S velocities in the uppermost mantle are rather fast, with patterns of variation generally corresponding to those for Pn. We find strong heterogeneities of Swave speed in the uppermost mantle across the entire continent of Australia with a close relation to crustal geological features. For instance, the cratons in the western Australia usually have high S velocities (>4.70 km s-1), while the volcanic regions on the eastern margin of Australia are characterized by low S velocities (<4.40 km s-1). Exploiting an equivalent Pn inversion, we also determine the Vp/Vs ratios across the whole continent. We find that most of the uppermost mantle has Vp/Vs between 1.65 and 1.85, but with patches in central Australia and in the east with much higher Vp/Vs ratios. Distinctive local anomalies on the eastern margin may indicate the positions of remnants of mantle plumes.

  19. Seismic Wave Velocity in Earth's Shallow Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Eaton, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of the outer core indicate that it is composed of liquid Fe and Ni alloyed with a ~10% fraction of light elements such as O, S or Si. Recently, unusual features, such as sediment accumulation, immiscible fluid layers or stagnant convection, have been predicted in the shallow core region. Secular cooling and compositional buoyancy drive vigorous convection that sustains the geodynamo, although critical details of light-element composition and thermal regime remain uncertain. Seismic velocity models can provide important constraints on the light element composition, however global reference models, such as Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM), IASP91 and AK135 vary significantly in the 200 km below the core-mantle boundary. Past studies of the outermost core velocity structure have been hampered by traveltime uncertainties due to lowermost mantle heterogeneities. The recently published Empirical Transfer Function (ETF) method has been shown to reduce the uncertainty using a waveform stacking approach to improve global observations of SmKS teleseismic waves. Here, we apply the ETF method to achieve a precise top-of-core velocity measurement of 8.05 ± 0.03 km/s. This new model accords well with PREM. Since PREM is based on the adiabatic form of the Adams-Williamson equation, it assumes a well mixed (i.e. homogeneous) composition. This result suggests a lack of heterogeneity in the outermost core due to layering or stagnant convection.

  20. A comparison of seismic velocity inversion methods for layered acoustics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, T.; Mulder, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    In seismic imaging, one tries to infer the medium properties of the subsurface from seismic reflection data. These data are the result of an active source experiment, where an explosive source and an array of receivers are placed at the surface. Due to the absence of low frequencies in the data, the

  1. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  2. Teleseismic P and S wave attenuation constraints on temperature and melt of the upper mantle in the Alaska Subduction Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Castaneda, R. A.; Abers, G. A.; Eilon, Z.; Christensen, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Recent broadband deployments in Alaska provide an excellent opportunity to advance our understanding of the Alaska-Aleutians subduction system, with implications for subduction processes worldwide. Seismic attenuation, measured from teleseismic body waves, provides a strong constraint on thermal structure as well as an indirect indication of ground shaking expected from large intermediate-depth earthquakes. We measure P and S wave attenuation from pairwise amplitude and phase spectral ratios for teleseisms recorded at 204 Transportable Array, Alaska Regional, and Alaska Volcano Observatory, SALMON (Southern Alaska Lithosphere & Mantle Observation Network) and WVLF (Wrangell Volcanics & subducting Lithosphere Fate) stations in central Alaska. The spectral ratios are inverted in a least squares sense for differential t* (path-averaged attenuation operator) and travel time anomalies at every station. Our preliminary results indicate a zone of low attenuation across the forearc and strong attenuation beneath arc and backarc in the Cook Inlet-Kenai region where the Aleutian-Yakutat slab subducts, similar to other subduction zones. This attenuation differential is observed in both the volcanic Cook Inlet segment and amagmatic Denali segments of the Aleutian subduction zone. By comparison, preliminary results for the Wrangell-St. Elias region past the eastern edge of the Aleutian slab show strong attenuation beneath the Wrangell Volcanic Field, as well as much further south than in the Cook Inlet-Kenai region. This pattern of attenuation seems to indicate a short slab fragment in the east of the subduction zone, though the picture is complex. Results also suggest the slab may focus or transmit energy with minimal attenuation, adding to the complexity. To image the critical transition between the Alaska-Aleutian slab and the region to its east, we plan to incorporate new broadband data from the WVLF array, an ongoing deployment of 37 PASSCAL instruments installed in 2016

  3. Lithospheric structure of the Arabian Shield and Platform from complete regional waveform modelling and surface wave group velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Arthur J.; Walter, William R.; Mellors, Robert J.; Al-Amri, Abdullah M. S.; Zhang, Yu-Shen

    1999-09-01

    Regional seismic waveforms reveal significant differences in the structure of the Arabian Shield and the Arabian Platform. We estimate lithospheric velocity structure by modelling regional waveforms recorded by the 1995-1997 Saudi Arabian Temporary Broadband Deployment using a grid search scheme. We employ a new method whereby we narrow the waveform modelling grid search by first fitting the fundamental mode Love and Rayleigh wave group velocities. The group velocities constrain the average crustal thickness and velocities as well as the crustal velocity gradients. Because the group velocity fitting is computationally much faster than the synthetic seismogram calculation this method allows us to determine good average starting models quickly. Waveform fits of the Pn and Sn body wave arrivals constrain the mantle velocities. The resulting lithospheric structures indicate that the Arabian Platform has an average crustal thickness of 40 km, with relatively low crustal velocities (average crustal P- and S-wave velocities of 6.07 and 3.50 km s^-1 , respectively) without a strong velocity gradient. The Moho is shallower (36 km) and crustal velocities are 6 per cent higher (with a velocity increase with depth) for the Arabian Shield. Fast crustal velocities of the Arabian Shield result from a predominantly mafic composition in the lower crust. Lower velocities in the Arabian Platform crust indicate a bulk felsic composition, consistent with orogenesis of this former active margin. P- and S-wave velocities immediately below the Moho are slower in the Arabian Shield than in the Arabian Platform (7.9 and 4.30 km s^-1 , and 8.10 and 4.55 km s^-1 , respectively). This indicates that the Poisson's ratios for the uppermost mantle of the Arabian Shield and Platform are 0.29 and 0.27, respectively. The lower mantle velocities and higher Poisson's ratio beneath the Arabian Shield probably arise from a partially molten mantle associated with Red Sea spreading and continental

  4. Experimental Observation of Non-'S-Wave' Superconducting Behavior in Bulk Superconducting Tunneling Junctions of Yba2Cu3O7-δ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Jose Guerra

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of non-s-wave superconductivity from normal tunneling experiments in bulk tunneling junctions of YBa2Cu3O7-δ is presented. The I-V and dI/dV characteristics of bulk superconducting tunneling junctions of YBa2Cu3O7-δ have been measured at 77.0K and clear deviation from s-wave superconducting behavior has been observed. The result agrees with d-wave symmetry, and interpreting the data in this way, the magnitude of the superconducting energy gap, 2Δ, is found to be (0.038 ± 0.002 eV. Comparing this energy gap with Tc (2Δ/kB Tc = 5.735, indicates that these high-Tc superconductors are strongly correlated materials, which in contrast with BCS-superconductors are believed to be weakly correlated.

  5. Locating S-wave sources for the SPE-5 explosion using time reversal methods and a close-in, 1000 sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S. C.; Pitarka, A.; Mellors, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is producing new data to study the generation of seismic waves from explosive sources. Preliminary results show that far-field S-waves are generated both within the non-elastic volume surrounding explosive sources and by P- to S-wave scattering. The relative contribution of non-elastic phenomenology and elastic-wave scattering to far-field S-waves has been debated for decades, and numerical simulations based on the SPE experiments are addressing this question. The match between observed and simulated data degrades with event-station distance and with increasing time in each seismogram. This suggests that a more accurate model of subsurface elastic properties could result in better agreement between observed and simulated seismograms. A detailed model of subsurface structure has been developed using geologic maps and the extensive database of borehole logs, but uncertainty in structural details remains high. The large N instrument deployment during the SPE-5 experiment offers an opportunity to use time-reversal techniques to back project the wave field into the subsurface to locate significant sources of scattered energy. The large N deployment was nominally 1000, 5 Hz sensors (500 Z and 500 3C geophones) deployed in a roughly rectangular array to the south and east of the SPE-5 shot. Sensor spacing was nominally 50 meters in the interior portion of the array and 100 meters in the outer region, with two dense lines at 25 m spacing. The array covers the major geologic boundary between the Yucca Flat basin and the granitic Climax Stock in which the SPE experiments have been conducted. Improved mapping of subsurface scatterers is expected to result in better agreement between simulated and observed seismograms and aid in our understanding of S-wave generation from explosions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Amplitude analysis for the process K/sup -/p to ( pi /sup +/ pi /sup - /)/sub s-wave/ Sigma /sup 0/(1385)

    CERN Document Server

    Barreiro, F; Hemingway, R J; Holmgren, S O; Kluyver, J G; Losty, Michael J; Massaro, G G G; Timmermans, J; Van de Walle, R T; Zalewski, K

    1977-01-01

    Transversity amplitudes and spin density matrix elements are determined for the process K/sup -/p to ( pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/) Sigma /sup 0/(1385)/sub s-wave/. Predictions of the additive quark model and of duality diagrams are tested and found consistent with the data; this is the first information about the applicability of these models to processes where a scalar object is produced at the mesonic vertex. (5 refs).

  7. Automatic detection of P- and S-wave arrival times: new strategies based on the modified fractal method and basic matching pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Durán, R. K.; Comte, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Silva, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, new strategies for automatic identification of P- and S-wave arrival times from digital recorded local seismograms are proposed and analyzed. The database of arrival times previously identified by a human reader was compared with automatic identification techniques based on the Fourier transformation in reduced time (spectrograms), fractal analysis, and the basic matching pursuit algorithm. The first two techniques were used to identify the P-wave arrival times, while the third was used for the identification of the S-wave. For validation, the results were compared with the short-time average over long-time average (STA/LTA) of Rietbrock et al., Geophys Res Lett 39(8), (2012) for the database of aftershocks of the 2010 Maule Mw = 8.8 earthquake. The identifiers proposed in this work exhibit good results that outperform the STA/LTA identifier in many scenarios. The average difference from the reference picks (times obtained by the human reader) in P- and S-wave arrival times is 1 s.

  8. Separation of S-wave pseudoscalar and pseudovector amplitudes in {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n reaction on polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Rybicki, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-06-01

    A new analysis of S-wave production amplitudes for the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n on a transversely polarized target is performed. It is based on the results obtained by CERN-Cracow-Munich collaboration in the {pi}{pi} energy range from 600 MeV to 1600 MeV at 17.2 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} momentum. Energy-independent separation of the S-wave pseudoscalar amplitude ({pi} exchange) from the pseudovector amplitude (a{sub 1} exchange) is carried out using assumptions much weaker than those in all previous analyses. We show that, especially around 1000 MeV and around 1500 MeV, the a{sub 1} exchange amplitude cannot be neglected. The scalar-isoscalar {pi}{pi} phase shift are calculated using fairly weak assumptions. Our results are consistent both with the so called ``up`` and the well-known ``down`` solution, provided we choose those in which the S-wave phases increase slower with the effective {pi}{pi} mass than the P-wave phases. Above 1420 MeV both sets of phase shifts increase with energy faster than in the experiment on an unpolarized target. This fact can be related to the presence of scalar resonance f{sub o}(1500). (author). 41 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab.

  9. Protonium spectrosopy and identification of P-wave and S-wave initial states of p-p annihilations at rest with the ASTERIX experiment at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldi, U.; Ahmad, S.; Amsler, C.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses an experiment designed to study the general features of p - p interactions at rest, to extend work done in the spectroscopy of light mesons produced in p - p annihilations at rest, and to search with high sensitivity for gluonium, qq - qq baryonium structures and NN states bound by strong interactions. The effect of using a gas target and a large acceptance X-ray detector is examined. The rate and the signature of antiprotons stopping in the gas target are investigated. Topics covered include the protonium cascade and spectroscopy; a comparison of S-wave and P-wave p - p annihilations at rest; - p stop and the formation of p - p atoms; the x-ray detector (projection chamber, electronics, tests); and examples of estimations of signal and background (protonium spectroscopy, search of resonances in P-wave annihilations, search of resonances in S-wave annihilations). The distinctive features of the ASTERIX experiment are the use of a gaseous H 2 target instead of a conventional liquid H 2 one; an X-ray detector of large overall detection efficiency, low energy threshold and low background rate that enables identification of P-wave and S-wave annihilation events from 2P and 1S levels of protonium; a detection system for the products of p - p annihilations; and a trigger system that enables filtration of the acquisition of events by means of two independent chains of processors working in parallel

  10. In-situ testing of the liquefaction potential of soft ground using an s-wave vibrator and seismic cones. Part 1. System, concept and preliminary test result; S ha vibrator oyobi seismic cone wo mochiita gen`ichi jiban ekijoka potential no hyoka. 1. System kosei oyobi genchi yosatsu keisoku kekka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inazaki, T [Public Works Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    For the purpose of evaluating liquefaction in situ, it was proposed that an S-wave vibrator designed to serve as a source in a reflection exploration method be utilized as a strong vibration generating source, and measurement was conducted in this connection. Equipment used in this test included an S-wave vibrator, static cone penetration machine, and various measuring cones. A multiplicity of measuring cones had been inserted beforehand into the target layers and comparison layers, and changes upon vibrator activation were measured. On a dry bed of the Tonegawa river, a 40m{sup 2} field was set up, and 41 cone penetration tests were conducted, with the cones positioned zigzag at 5m intervals. In this way, the ground structure was disclosed from the surface to the 10m-deep level. For the measurement, 3-component cones and seismic cones were placed at prescribed depths, and fluctuations and waveforms presented by pore water pressure at each level were determined with the vibration source changing its place. It was found that the changes in the pore water pressure exposed to vibration assume characteristic patterns corresponding to the conditions of vibration application. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Elastic Wave Velocity Measurements on Mantle Peridotite at High Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistler, G. W.; Ishikawa, M.; Li, B.

    2002-12-01

    With the success of conducting ultrasonic measurements at high pressure and high temperature in large volume high pressure apparatus with in-situ measurement of the sample length by X-ray imaging, it is now possible to measure elastic wave velocities on aggregate samples with candidate compositions of the mantle to the conditions of the Earth's transition zone in the laboratory. These data can be directly compared with seismic data to distinguish the compositional models in debate. In this work, we carried out velocity measurements on natural peridotite KLB-1 at the conditions of the Earth's upper mantle. Fine powered sample of natural KLB-1 was used as starting material. Specimens for ultrasonic measurements were hot-pressed and equilibrated at various pressure and temperature conditions along geotherm up to the transition zone. The recovered samples were characterized with density measurement, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. Bench top P and S wave velocities of KLB-1 sample sintered at 3-4 GPa and 1400 degree centigrade showed a very good agreement with the VRH average of pyrolite. High pressure and high temperature measurements was conducted up to 7 GPa and 800 degree centigrade using ultrasonic interferometric method in a DIA-type high pressure apparatus in conjunction with X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging. The utilization of X-ray imaging technique provides direct measurements of sample lengths at high pressure and high temperature, ensuring a precise determination of velocities. The results of P and S wave velocities at high pressure and high temperature as well as their comparison with calculated pyrolite model will be presented.

  12. Crustal and mantle velocity models of southern Tibet from finite frequency tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaofeng; Shen, Yang; Chen, Yongshun John; Ren, Yong

    2011-02-01

    Using traveltimes of teleseismic body waves recorded by several temporary local seismic arrays, we carried out finite-frequency tomographic inversions to image the three-dimensional velocity structure beneath southern Tibet to examine the roles of the upper mantle in the formation of the Tibetan Plateau. The results reveal a region of relatively high P and S wave velocity anomalies extending from the uppermost mantle to at least 200 km depth beneath the Higher Himalaya. We interpret this high-velocity anomaly as the underthrusting Indian mantle lithosphere. There is a strong low P and S wave velocity anomaly that extends from the lower crust to at least 200 km depth beneath the Yadong-Gulu rift, suggesting that rifting in southern Tibet is probably a process that involves the entire lithosphere. Intermediate-depth earthquakes in southern Tibet are located at the top of an anomalous feature in the mantle with a low Vp, a high Vs, and a low Vp/Vs ratio. One possible explanation for this unusual velocity anomaly is the ongoing granulite-eclogite transformation. Together with the compressional stress from the collision, eclogitization and the associated negative buoyancy force offer a plausible mechanism that causes the subduction of the Indian mantle lithosphere beneath the Higher Himalaya. Our tomographic model and the observation of north-dipping lineations in the upper mantle suggest that the Indian mantle lithosphere has been broken laterally in the direction perpendicular to the convergence beneath the north-south trending rifts and subducted in a progressive, piecewise and subparallel fashion with the current one beneath the Higher Himalaya.

  13. Spatially-resolved velocities of thermally-produced spray droplets using a velocity-divided Abel inversion of photographed streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-10-01

    Droplet velocities of thermal spray are known to have profound effects on important coating qualities, such as adhesive strength, porosity, and hardness, for various applications. For obtaining the droplet velocities, therefore, the TOF (time-of-flight) technique has been widely used, which relies on observations of emitted radiation from the droplets, where all droplets along the line-of-sight contribute to signals. Because droplets at and near the flow axis mostly contribute coating layers, it has been hoped to get spatially resolved velocities. For this purpose, a velocity-divided Abel inversion was devised from CMOS photographic data. From this result, it has turned out that the central velocity is about 25% higher than that obtained from the TOF technique for the case studied (at the position 150 mm downstream of the plasma spray gun, where substrates for spray coatings are usually placed). Further implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  14. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  15. Sound velocities of the 23 Å phase at high pressure and implications for seismic velocities in subducted slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, N.; Chen, T.; Qi, X.; Inoue, T.; Li, B.

    2017-12-01

    Dense hydrous phases are believed to play an important role in transporting water back into the deep interior of the Earth. Recently, a new Al-bearing hydrous Mg-silicate, named the 23 Å phase (ideal composition Mg12Al2Si4O16(OH)14), was reported (Cai et al., 2015), which could be a very important hydrous phase in subducting slabs. Here for the first time we report the measurements of the compressional and shear wave velocities of the 23 Å phase under applied pressures up to 14 GPa and room temperature, using a bulk sample with a grain size of less than 20 μm and density of 2.947 g/cm3. The acoustic measurements were conducted in a 1000-ton uniaxial split-cylinder multi-anvil apparatus using ultrasonic interferometry techniques (Li et al., 1996). The pressures were determined in situ by using an alumina buffer rod as the pressure marker (Wang et al., 2015). A dual-mode piezoelectric transducer enabled us to measure P and S wave travel times simultaneously, which in turn allowed a precise determination of the sound velocities and elastic bulk and shear moduli at high pressures. A fit to the acoustic data using finite strain analysis combined with a Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) bounds calculation yields: Ks0 = 113.3 GPa, G0 = 42.8 GPa, and K' = 3.8, G' = 1.9 for the bulk and shear moduli and their pressure derivatives. The velocities (especially for S wave) of this 23 Å phase (ambient Vp = 7.53 km/s, Vs = 3.72 km/s) are lower than those of phase A, olivine, pyrope, etc., while the Vp/Vs ratio (from 2.02 to 1.94, decreasing with increasing pressure) is quite high. These results suggest that a hydrous assemblage containing 23 Å phase should be distinguishable from a dry one at high pressure and temperature conditions relevant to Al-bearing subducted slabs.

  16. Symmetry of order-parameters in high-Tc layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopal, A.K.; Jha, Sudhanshu S.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the anisotropy and wave-vector dependence of the energy-gap function determine many important properties of a superconductor which are relevant for device applications. Apart from a weak dependence on the wave-vector k - > in the direction perpendicular to the reciprocal layer-plane of a high-T c layered superconductor, it is shown that anisotropic superconducting order parameters for intra-layer pairing in the class of such materials with orthorhombic crystal structures, can have either pure s-wave like symmetry or mixed d-wave and anisotropic extended s-wave like symmetries in the reciprocal layer-plane. However, in such materials with tetragonal crystal structures, it is possible to have a pure s-wave like symmetry, which may be either isotropic or anisotropic in the layer k - >-space, or a pure d-wave like symmetry, as far the k - >-dependence in the reciprocal layer plane is concerned. In view of this, some suggestions for analysing experimental data will also be presented. (author)

  17. Dense velocity reconstruction from tomographic PTV with material derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct the instantaneous velocity field from time-resolved volumetric particle tracking velocimetry (PTV, e.g., 3D-PTV, tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box), employing both the instantaneous velocity and the velocity material derivative of the sparse tracer particles. The constraint to the measured temporal derivative of the PTV particle tracks improves the consistency of the reconstructed velocity field. The method is christened as pouring time into space, as it leverages temporal information to increase the spatial resolution of volumetric PTV measurements. This approach becomes relevant in cases where the spatial resolution is limited by the seeding concentration. The method solves an optimization problem to find the vorticity and velocity fields that minimize a cost function, which includes next to instantaneous velocity, also the velocity material derivative. The velocity and its material derivative are related through the vorticity transport equation, and the cost function is minimized using the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. The procedure is assessed numerically with a simulated PTV experiment in a turbulent boundary layer from a direct numerical simulation (DNS). The experimental validation considers a tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment in a similar turbulent boundary layer and the additional case of a jet flow. The proposed technique (`vortex-in-cell plus', VIC+) is compared to tomographic PIV analysis (3D iterative cross-correlation), PTV interpolation methods (linear and adaptive Gaussian windowing) and to vortex-in-cell (VIC) interpolation without the material derivative. A visible increase in resolved details in the turbulent structures is obtained with the VIC+ approach, both in numerical simulations and experiments. This results in a more accurate determination of the turbulent stresses distribution in turbulent boundary layer investigations. Data from a jet

  18. Estimation of seismic velocity in the subducting crust of the Pacific slab beneath Hokkaido, northern Japan by using guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, T.; Nakajima, J.; Toyokuni, G.; Kita, S.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    A subducting crust contains a large amount of water as a form of hydrous minerals (e.g., Hacker et al., 2003), and the crust plays important roles for water transportation and seismogenesis in subduction zones at intermediate depths (e.g., Kirby et al., 1996; Iwamori, 2007). Therefore, the investigation of seismic structure in the crust is important to understand ongoing physical processes with subduction of oceanic lithosphere. A guided wave which propagates in the subducting crust is recorded in seismograms at Hokkaido, northern Japan (Shiina et al., 2014). Here, we estimated P- and S-wave velocity in the crust with guided waves, and obtained P-wave velocity of 6.6-7.3 km/s and S-wave velocity of 3.6-4.2 km/s at depths of 50-90 km. Moreover, Vp/Vs ratio in the crust is calculated to be 1.80-1.85 in that depth range. The obtained P-wave velocity about 6.6km/s at depths of 50-70 km is consistent with those estimated in Tohoku, northeast Japan (Shiina et al., 2013), and this the P-wave velocity is lower than those expected from models of subducting crustal compositions, such as metamorphosed MORB model (Hacker et al., 2003). In contrast, at greater depths (>80 km), the P-wave velocity marks higher velocity than the case of NE Japan and the velocity is roughly comparable to those of the MORB model. The obtained S-wave velocity distribution also shows characteristics similar to P waves. This regional variation may be caused by a small variation in thermal regime of the Pacific slab beneath the two regions as a result of the normal subduction in Tohoku and oblique subduction in Hokkaido. In addition, the effect of seismic anisotropy in the subducting crust would not be ruled out because rays used in the analysis in Hokkaido propagate mostly in the trench-parallel direction, while those in Tohoku are sufficiently criss-crossed.

  19. Leading edge effect in laminar boundary layer excitation by sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leehey, P.; Shapiro, P.

    1980-01-01

    Essentially plane pure tone sound waves were directed downstream over a heavily damped smooth flat plate installed in a low turbulence (0.04%) subsonic wind tunnel. Laminar boundary layer disturbance growth rates were measured with and without sound excitation and compared with numerical results from spatial stability theory. The data indicate that the sound field and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves coexist with comparable amplitudes when the latter are damped; moreover, the response is linear. Higher early growth rates occur for excitation by sound than by stream turbulence. Theoretical considerations indicate that the boundary layer is receptive to sound excitation primarily at the test plate leading edge. (orig.)

  20. Control rod velocity limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Carruth, J.C.; Dixon, R.C.; Spencer, S.S.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a velocity control arrangement for a reciprocable, vertically oriented control rod for use in a nuclear reactor in a fluid medium, the control rod including a drive hub secured to and extending from one end therefrom. The control device comprises: a toroidally shaped control member spaced from and coaxially positioned around the hub and secured thereto by a plurality of spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the toroidal member spaced therefrom in coaxial position. The side of the control member toward the control rod has a smooth generally conical surface. The side of the control member away from the control rod is formed with a concave surface constituting a single annular groove. The device also comprises inner and outer annular vanes radially spaced from one another and spaced from the side of the control member away from the control rod and positioned coaxially around and spaced from the hub and secured thereto by spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the vanes. The vanes are angled toward the control member, the outer edge of the inner vane being closer to the control member and the inner edge of the outer vane being closer to the control member. When the control rod moves in the fluid in the direction toward the drive hub the vanes direct a flow of fluid turbulence which provides greater resistance to movement of the control rod in the direction toward the drive hub than in the other direction

  1. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-01-01

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (σ*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  2. On linear relationship between shock velocity and particle velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandache, H.

    1986-11-01

    We attempt to derive the linear relationship between shock velocity U s and particle velocity U p from thermodynamic considerations, taking into account an ideal gas equation of state and a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state for solids. 23 refs

  3. Transport velocity transformation - A convenient method for performance analysis of multilayer solar cell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that in the case of low-level injection, space-charge quasi-neutrality, and spatially constant material parameters (including an electrostatic field), the individual layer can be treated analytically and the basic solar cell performance parameters can be evaluated from three equations. The first equation represents the transformation of the transport velocity across the layer from the other layer boundary. The second establishes the light-generated current output from the layer interface, under the influence of the transport velocities and minority-carrier density at both layer boundaries and of bulk recombination. The third equation describes the flow of these carriers across other layers. The power of the approach is considered to lie in its facility for analysis of the solar cell's performance layer by layer, giving a clear picture of the individual layer's influence on cell efficiency.

  4. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  5. The thickness of the HI gas layer in spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicking, Floris Jan

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, in two inclined spiral galaxies, NGC 3198 and NGC 2403, the HI random velocity dispersion and layer thickness will be measured simultaneously. This will be done from the HI velocity dispersion field (the distribution on the sky of the observed HI line of sight velocity

  6. Poloidal rotation velocity measurement in toroidal plasmas via microwave reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlichenko, O.S.; Skibenko, A.I.; Fomin, I.P.; Pinos, I.B.; Ocheretenko, V.L.; Berezhniy, V.L.

    2001-01-01

    Results of experiment modeling backscattering of microwaves from rotating plasma layer perturbed by fluctuations are presented. It was shown that auto- and crosscorrelation of reflected power have a periodicity equal to rotation period. Such periodicity was observed by microwave reflectometry in experiments on RF plasma production on U-3M torsatron and was used for measurement of plasma poloidal rotation velocity. (author)

  7. S-wave attenuation in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, near the faults that ruptured during the earthquake of 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Escobar, Gina P; Castro, Raúl R

    2014-01-01

    We used a new data set of relocated earthquakes recorded by the Seismic Network of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (RESNES) to characterize the attenuation of S-waves in the fault zone of the 1887 Sonora earthquake (M w 7.5). We determined spectral attenuation functions for hypocentral distances (r) between 10 and 140 km using a nonparametric approach and found that in this fault zone the spectral amplitudes decay slower with distance at low frequencies (f < 4 Hz) compared to those reported in previous studies in the region using more distant recordings. The attenuation functions obtained for 23 frequencies (0.4 ≤ f ≤ 63.1 Hz) permit us estimating the average quality factor Q S  = (141 ± 1.1 )f ((0.74 ± 0.04)) and a geometrical spreading term G(r) = 1/r (0.21). The values of Q estimated for S-wave paths traveling along the fault system that rupture during the 1887 event, in the north-south direction, are considerably lower than the average Q estimated using source-station paths from multiple stations and directions. These results indicate that near the fault zone S waves attenuate considerably more than at regional scale, particularly at low frequencies. This may be the result of strong scattering near the faults due to the fractured upper crust and higher intrinsic attenuation due to stress concentration near the faults.

  8. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making ...

  9. A robust absorbing layer method for anisotropic seismic wave modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Métivier, L., E-mail: ludovic.metivier@ujf-grenoble.fr [LJK, CNRS, Université de Grenoble, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); ISTerre, Université de Grenoble I, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Brossier, R. [ISTerre, Université de Grenoble I, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Labbé, S. [LJK, CNRS, Université de Grenoble, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Operto, S. [Géoazur, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, IRD, OCA, Villefranche-sur-Mer (France); Virieux, J. [ISTerre, Université de Grenoble I, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2014-12-15

    When applied to wave propagation modeling in anisotropic media, Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) exhibit instabilities. Incoming waves are amplified instead of being absorbed. Overcoming this difficulty is crucial as in many seismic imaging applications, accounting accurately for the subsurface anisotropy is mandatory. In this study, we present the SMART layer method as an alternative to PML approach. This method is based on the decomposition of the wavefield into components propagating inward and outward the domain of interest. Only outgoing components are damped. We show that for elastic and acoustic wave propagation in Transverse Isotropic media, the SMART layer is unconditionally dissipative: no amplification of the wavefield is possible. The SMART layers are not perfectly matched, therefore less accurate than conventional PML. However, a reasonable increase of the layer size yields an accuracy similar to PML. Finally, we illustrate that the selective damping strategy on which is based the SMART method can prevent the generation of spurious S-waves by embedding the source in a small zone where only S-waves are damped.

  10. A robust absorbing layer method for anisotropic seismic wave modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Labbé, S.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2014-01-01

    When applied to wave propagation modeling in anisotropic media, Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) exhibit instabilities. Incoming waves are amplified instead of being absorbed. Overcoming this difficulty is crucial as in many seismic imaging applications, accounting accurately for the subsurface anisotropy is mandatory. In this study, we present the SMART layer method as an alternative to PML approach. This method is based on the decomposition of the wavefield into components propagating inward and outward the domain of interest. Only outgoing components are damped. We show that for elastic and acoustic wave propagation in Transverse Isotropic media, the SMART layer is unconditionally dissipative: no amplification of the wavefield is possible. The SMART layers are not perfectly matched, therefore less accurate than conventional PML. However, a reasonable increase of the layer size yields an accuracy similar to PML. Finally, we illustrate that the selective damping strategy on which is based the SMART method can prevent the generation of spurious S-waves by embedding the source in a small zone where only S-waves are damped

  11. Numerical analysis of resonances induced by s wave neutrons in transmission time-of-flight experiments with a computer IBM 7094 II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corge, Ch.

    1969-01-01

    Numerical analysis of transmission resonances induced by s wave neutrons in time-of-flight experiments can be achieved in a fairly automatic way on an IBM 7094/II computer. The involved computations are carried out following a four step scheme: 1 - experimental raw data are processed to obtain the resonant transmissions, 2 - values of experimental quantities for each resonance are derived from the above transmissions, 3 - resonance parameters are determined using a least square method to solve the over determined system obtained by equalling theoretical functions to the correspondent experimental values. Four analysis methods are gathered in the same code, 4 - graphical control of the results is performed. (author) [fr

  12. Turbulent current layer equilibrium and current layer of the Earth magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, E.E.; Ovchinnikov, I.L.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of distribution of plasma and magnetic field concentration in the unidimensional current layer under the condition of equality of the current inflowing into the layer and the counter diffusion current by various dependences of the regular velocity and the turbulent diffusion coefficient on the magnetic field. Corresponding two-dimensional solutions are obtained in the tail approximation. Comparison of the model turbulent current layer with characteristics of the plasma layer of the Earth magnetosphere tail is carried out. 16 refs., 3 figs

  13. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  14. Fracturing process and effect of fracturing degree on wave velocity of a crystalline rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Saroglou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the effect of fracturing degree on P- and S-wave velocities in rock. The deformation of intact brittle rocks under loading conditions is characterized by a microcracking procedure, which occurs due to flaws in their microscopic structure and propagates through the intact rock, leading to shear fracture. This fracturing process is of fundamental significance as it affects the mechanical properties of the rock and hence the wave velocities. In order to determine the fracture mechanism and the effect of fracturing degree, samples were loaded at certain percentages of peak strength and ultrasonic wave velocity was recorded after every test. The fracturing degree was recorded on the outer surface of the sample and quantified by the use of the indices P10 (traces of joints/m, P20 (traces of joints/m2 and P21 (length of fractures/m2. It was concluded that the wave velocity decreases exponentially with increasing fracturing degree. Additionally, the fracturing degree is described adequately with the proposed indices. Finally, other parameters concerning the fracture characteristics, rock type and scale influence were found to contribute to the velocity decay and need to be investigated further.

  15. 3D velocity structure of upper crust beneath NW Bohemia/Vogtland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javad Fallahi, Mohammad; Mousavi, Sima; Korn, Michael; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Bauer, Klaus; Rößler, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    The 3D structure of the upper crust beneath west Bohemia/Vogtland region, analyzed with travel time tomography and ambient noise surface wave tomography using existing data. This region is characterized by a series of phenomena like occurrence of repeated earthquake swarms, surface exhalation, CO2 enriched fluids, mofettes, mineral springs and enhanced heat flow, and has been proposed as an excellent location for an ICDP drilling project targeted to a better understanding of the crust in an active magmatic environment. We performed a 3D tomography using P-and S-wave travel times of local earthquakes and explosions. The data set were taken from permanent and temporary seismic networks in Germany and Czech Republic from 2000 to 2010, as well as active seismic experiments like Celebration 2000 and quarry blasts. After picking P and S wave arrival times, 399 events which were recorded by 9 or more stations and azimuthal gap<160° were selected for inversion. A simultaneous inversion of P and S wave 1D velocity models together with relocations of hypocenters and station corrections was performed. The obtained minimum 1D velocity model was used as starting model for the 3D Vp and Vp/Vs velocity models. P and S wave travel time tomography employs damped least-square method and ray tracing by pseudo-bending algorithm. For model parametrization different cell node spacings have been tested to evaluate the resolution in each node. Synthetic checkerboard tests have been done to check the structural resolution. Then Vp and Vp/Vs in the preferred 3D grid model have been determined. Earthquakes locations in iteration process change till the hypocenter adjustments and travel time residuals become smaller than the defined threshold criteria. Finally the analysis of the resolution depicts the well resolved features for interpretation. We observed lower Vp/Vs ratio in depth of 5-10 km close to the foci of earthquake swarms and higher Vp/Vs ratio is observed in Saxoturingian zone and

  16. Radial velocity asymmetries from jets with variable velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Velazquez, P. F.; Raga, A. C.; De Colle, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have computed a set of 3-D numerical simulations of radiatively cooling jets including variabilities in both the ejection direction (precession) and the jet velocity (intermittence), using the Yguazu-a code. In order to investigate the effects of jet rotation on the shape of the line profiles, we also introduce an initial toroidal rotation velocity profile. Since the Yguazu-a code includes an atomic/ionic network, we are able to compute the emission coefficients for several emission lines, and we generate line profiles for the Hα, [O I]λ6300, [S II]λ6716 and [N II]λ6548 lines. Using initial parameters that are suitable for the DG Tau microjet, we show that the computed radial velocity shift for the medium-velocity component of the line profile as a function of distance from the jet axis is strikingly similar for rotating and non-rotating jet models

  17. Measurements in a synthetic turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, J. H.; Coles, D. E.

    Some measurements in a synthetic turbulent boundary layer (SBL) are reported. The main diagnostic tool is an X-wire probe. The velocity of the large eddies is determined to be 0.842 times the freestream velocity. The mean properties of the SBL are reasonably close to those of a natural turbulent boundary layer. The large eddy in the SBL appears to be a pair of counterrotating eddies in the stream direction, inclined at a shallow angle and occupying much of the boundary-layer thickness.

  18. Insights into the structure and tectonic history of the southern South Island, New Zealand, from the 3-D distribution of P- and S-wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Donna; Reyners, Martin; Upton, Phaedra; Gubbins, David

    2018-05-01

    The Pacific-Australian plate boundary in the South Island of New Zealand is a transpressive boundary through continental lithosphere consisting of multiple terranes which were amalgamated during previous periods of subduction and plate reorganization. The style and locus of deformation within the present-day plate boundary is controlled by the mechanical behavior and distribution of these different lithospheric blocks. Geological studies are limited when it comes to illuminating lithospheric structure and rheology at depth. Imaging the 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation (1/Q), with distributed local earthquakes, helps unravel regional structure and variations in strength, fractures and fluids. We determine the 3-D distribution of Qp and Qs, which show much more variation than seismic velocity (Vp), underlining the utility of Q (1/attenuation). The Haast schist belt, previously shown as c. 25-km thick dry unit with moderate Vp and low Vp/Vs, is imaged with high Qs, and the highest Qs areas correlate with zones of higher grade schist. Below 25-km depth, the distribution of high Qp and Qs is markedly different from that of the overlying geological terranes. Both the strike and dip of the high Q regions indicate that they represent the subducted Hikurangi Plateau and its adjacent Cretaceous oceanic crust. The thickest part of the plateau, previously identified by Vp > 8.5 km/s from seismic tomography and P-wave precursors and associated with an eclogite layer at the base of the plateau, also has the highest Q. This confirms that the strong plateau extends southwestward as a narrow salient to the northern Fiordland subduction zone, where moderate-Q Eocene oceanic crust on the Australian plate is being subducted and bent to vertical. In the ductile crust, Q results suggest fluid saturation and elevated temperature conditions in the crustal root of the Southern Alps, and confirm that the shape of this crustal root is influenced by both the orientation and depth of the

  19. Uncertainty assessment of 3D instantaneous velocity model from stack velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele Maesano, Francesco; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    3D modelling is a powerful tool that is experiencing increasing applications in data analysis and dissemination. At the same time the need of quantitative uncertainty evaluation is strongly requested in many aspects of the geological sciences and by the stakeholders. In many cases the starting point for 3D model building is the interpretation of seismic profiles that provide indirect information about the geology of the subsurface in the domain of time. The most problematic step in the 3D modelling construction is the conversion of the horizons and faults interpreted in time domain to the depth domain. In this step the dominant variable that could lead to significantly different results is the velocity. The knowledge of the subsurface velocities is related mainly to punctual data (sonic logs) that are often sparsely distributed in the areas covered by the seismic interpretation. The extrapolation of velocity information to wide extended horizons is thus a critical step to obtain a 3D model in depth that can be used for predictive purpose. In the EU-funded GeoMol Project, the availability of a dense network of seismic lines (confidentially provided by ENI S.p.A.) in the Central Po Plain, is paired with the presence of 136 well logs, but few of them have sonic logs and in some portion of the area the wells are very widely spaced. The depth conversion of the 3D model in time domain has been performed testing different strategies for the use and the interpolation of velocity data. The final model has been obtained using a 4 layer cake 3D instantaneous velocity model that considers both the initial velocity (v0) in every reference horizon and the gradient of velocity variation with depth (k). Using this method it is possible to consider the geological constraint given by the geometries of the horizons and the geo-statistical approach to the interpolation of velocities and gradient. Here we present an experiment based on the use of set of pseudo-wells obtained from the

  20. Fractals control in particle's velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongping; Liu Shutang; Shen Shulan

    2009-01-01

    Julia set, a fractal set of the literature of nonlinear physics, has significance for the engineering applications. For example, the fractal structure characteristics of the generalized M-J set could visually reflect the change rule of particle's velocity. According to the real world requirement, the system need show various particle's velocity in some cases. Thus, the control of the nonlinear behavior, i.e., Julia set, has attracted broad attention. In this work, an auxiliary feedback control is introduced to effectively control the Julia set that visually reflects the change rule of particle's velocity. It satisfies the performance requirement of the real world problems.

  1. Southern high-velocity stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augensen, H.J.; Buscombe, W.

    1978-01-01

    Using the model of the Galaxy presented by Eggen, Lynden-Bell and Sandage (1962), plane galactic orbits have been calculated for 800 southern high-velocity stars which possess parallax, proper motion, and radial velocity data. The stars with trigonometric parallaxes were selected from Buscombe and Morris (1958), supplemented by more recent spectroscopic data. Photometric parallaxes from infrared color indices were used for bright red giants studied by Eggen (1970), and for red dwarfs for which Rodgers and Eggen (1974) determined radial velocities. A color-color diagram based on published values of (U-B) and (B-V) for most of these stars is shown. (Auth.)

  2. Estimation of sand dune thickness using a vertical velocity profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous field and mathematical studies have shown that sand dunes may have vertical velocity profiles (i.e. continuous increase of velocity with depth). Therefore, computing the dunes thickness using conventional seismic refraction methods that assume a vertically homogeneous layer will likely produce some errors. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of the vertical velocity profile in a sand dune on the process of thickness estimation using seismic refraction data. First, the time distance (T-X) data of the direct wave in the dune is calculated using a vertical velocity profile, V (z), derived from Hertz-Mindlin contact theory. Then the thickness is estimated from the calculated T-X data, intercept time and velocity of the refractor at the dune's base assuming a constant velocity in the dune. The error in the estimated thickness due to the constant-velocity assumption increases with increasing thickness and decreasing porosity of the dune. For sand dunes with porosities greater than 0.2 and thickness less than 200 meter, the error is less than 15%. (author)

  3. EVOLUTION OF ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES OF A-TYPE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wuming; Bi Shaolan; Tian Zhijia; Meng Xiangcun

    2013-01-01

    The equatorial velocity of A-type stars undergoes an acceleration in the first third of the main sequence (MS) stage, but the velocity decreases as if the stars were not undergoing any redistribution of angular momentum in the external layers in the last stage of the MS phase. Our calculations show that the acceleration and the decrease of the equatorial velocity can be reproduced by the evolution of the differential rotation zero-age MS model with the angular momentum transport caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the MS stage. The acceleration results from the fact that the angular momentum stored in the interiors of the stars is transported outward. In the last stage, the core and the radiative envelope are uncoupling, and the rotation of the envelope is a quasi-solid rotation; the uncoupling and the expansion of the envelope indicate that the decrease of the equatorial velocity approximately follows the slope for the change in the equatorial velocity of the model without any redistribution of angular momentum. When the fractional age 0.3 ∼ MS ∼< 0.5, the equatorial velocity remains almost constant for stars whose central density increases with age in the early stage of the MS phase, while the velocity decreases with age for stars whose central density decreases with age in the early stage of the MS phase.

  4. Sound Velocity in Soap Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gong-Tao; Lü Yong-Jun; Liu Peng-Fei; Li Yi-Ning; Shi Qing-Fan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity of sound in soap foams at high gas volume fractions is experimentally studied by using the time difference method. It is found that the sound velocities increase with increasing bubble diameter, and asymptotically approach to the value in air when the diameter is larger than 12.5 mm. We propose a simple theoretical model for the sound propagation in a disordered foam. In this model, the attenuation of a sound wave due to the scattering of the bubble wall is equivalently described as the effect of an additional length. This simplicity reasonably reproduces the sound velocity in foams and the predicted results are in good agreement with the experiments. Further measurements indicate that the increase of frequency markedly slows down the sound velocity, whereas the latter does not display a strong dependence on the solution concentration

  5. Settling velocities in batch sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, A.M.; Thompson, B.E.

    1982-10-01

    The sedimentation of mixtures containing one and two sizes of spherical particles (44 and 62 μm in diameter) was studied. Radioactive tracing with 57 Co was used to measure the settling velocities. The ratio of the settling velocity U of uniformly sized particles to the velocity predicted to Stokes' law U 0 was correlated to an expression of the form U/U 0 = epsilon/sup α/, where epsilon is the liquid volume fraction and α is an empirical constant, determined experimentally to be 4.85. No effect of viscosity on the ratio U/U 0 was observed as the viscosity of the liquid medium was varied from 1x10 -3 to 5x10 -3 Pa.s. The settling velocities of particles in a bimodal mixture were fit by the same correlation; the ratio U/U 0 was independent of the concentrations of different-sized particles

  6. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transition of unsteady velocity profiles with reverse flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debopam; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    1998-11-01

    This paper deals with the stability and transition to turbulence of wall-bounded unsteady velocity profiles with reverse flow. Such flows occur, for example, during unsteady boundary layer separation and in oscillating pipe flow. The main focus is on results from experiments in time-developing flow in a long pipe, which is decelerated rapidly. The flow is generated by the controlled motion of a piston. We obtain analytical solutions for laminar flow in the pipe and in a two-dimensional channel for arbitrary piston motions. By changing the piston speed and the length of piston travel we cover a range of values of Reynolds number and boundary layer thickness. The velocity profiles during the decay of the flow are unsteady with reverse flow near the wall, and are highly unstable due to their inflectional nature. In the pipe, we observe from flow visualization that the flow becomes unstable with the formation of what appears to be a helical vortex. The wavelength of the instability [simeq R: similar, equals]3[delta] where [delta] is the average boundary layer thickness, the average being taken over the time the flow is unstable. The time of formation of the vortices scales with the average convective time scale and is [simeq R: similar, equals]39/([Delta]u/[delta]), where [Delta]u=(umax[minus sign]umin) and umax, umin and [delta] are the maximum velocity, minimum velocity and boundary layer thickness respectively at each instant of time. The time to transition to turbulence is [simeq R: similar, equals]33/([Delta]u/[delta]). Quasi-steady linear stability analysis of the velocity profiles brings out two important results. First that the stability characteristics of velocity profiles with reverse flow near the wall collapse when scaled with the above variables. Second that the wavenumber corresponding to maximum growth does not change much during the instability even though the velocity profile does change substantially. Using the results from the experiments and the

  8. Propagation velocity analysis of a single blob in the SOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Satoru; Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear simulation of plasma blob propagation in the tokamak scrape-off layer is reported. Three types of model equations are introduced and the simulation results are compared. It is found that in the parameter regime where the intercharge instability appears during the propagation process, the theoretical model of propagation velocity determined by the initial blob size provides a good approximation of the simulation results. In the regime where the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability appears, however, the blob velocity saturates at a lower value. (author)

  9. Tracking silica in Earth's upper mantle using new sound velocity data for coesite to 5.8 GPa and 1073 K: Tracking Silica in Earth's Upper Mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ting [Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Liebermann, Robert C. [Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Zou, Yongtao [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun China; Li, Ying [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Key Laboratory of Earthquake Prediction, Institute of Earthquake Science, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing China; Qi, Xintong [Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Li, Baosheng [Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA

    2017-08-12

    The compressional and shear wave velocities for coesite have been measured simultaneously up to 5.8 GPa and 1073 K by ultrasonic interferometry for the first time. The shear wave velocity decreases with pressure along all isotherms. The resulting contrasts between coesite and stishovite reach ~34% and ~45% for P and S wave velocities, respectively, and ~64% and ~75% for their impedance at mantle conditions. The large velocity and impedance contrasts across coesite-stishovite transition imply that to generate the velocity and impedance contrasts observed at the X-discontinuity, only a small amount of silica would be required. The velocity jump dependences on silica, d(lnVP)/d(SiO2) = 0.38 (wt %)-1 and d(lnVS)/d(SiO2) = 0.52 (wt %)-1, are utilized to place constraints on the amount of silica in the upper mantle and provide a geophysical approach to track mantle eclogite materials and ancient subducted oceanic slabs.

  10. Exploring the magnetospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hapgood, M.A.; Bryant, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    We show how, for most crossings of the boundary layer, one can construct a 'transition parameter', based on electron density and temperature, which orders independent plasma measurements into well-defined patterns which are consistent from case to case. We conclude that there is a gradual change in the balance of processes which determine the structure of the layer and suggest that there is no advantage in dividing the layer into different regions. We further conclude that the mixing processes in layer act in an organised way to give the consistent patterns revealed by the transition parameter. More active processes must sometimes take to give the extreme values (e.g. in velocity) which are seen in some crossings

  11. Two S-wave gap symmetry for single crystals of the superconductor BaFe1.8Co0.2As2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ki-Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Choi, Changho; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Wang, X.F.; Chen, X.H.; Noh, Jae Dong; Lee, Sung-IK

    2010-01-01

    To clarify the gap structure of the iron-pnictide superconductors, we synthesized optimally doped single crystals of BaFe 1.8 Co 0.2 As 2 , which had a critical temperature, T c , of 23.6 K. The initial M-H curve was used to find the lower critical field, H c1 . The full range of the temperature dependence of H c1 was explained by using a two S-wave gap symmetry. We estimate the two gap as Δ 1 (0) = 1.64 ± 0.2 meV for the small gap and Δ 2 (0) = 6.20 ± 0.2 meV for the large gap.

  12. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data, 2nd Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallman, Ann R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Water Power Technologies; Neary, Vincent S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Water Power Technologies

    2015-09-01

    This report presents met-ocean data and wave energy characteristics at eight U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites. Its purpose is to enable the comparison of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the selection of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives. It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment, and operations and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Speci cation (IEC 62600-101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of occurrence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services.

  13. s-wave threshold in electron attachment - Results in 2-C4F6 and CFCl3 at ultra-low electron energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.; Ajello, J. M.; Orient, O. J.

    1984-01-01

    Electron attachment lineshapes and cross sections are reported for the processes 2-C4F6(-)/2-C4F6 and Cl(-)/CFCl3 at electron energies of 0-120 and 0-140 meV, and at resolutions of 6 and 7 meV (FWHM), respectively. As in previous measurements in CCl4 and SF6, the results show resolution-limited narrow structure in the cross section at electron energies below 15 meV. This structure arises from the divergence of the s-wave cross section in the limit of zero electron energy. Comparisons are given with swarm-measured results, and with collisional ionization (high-Rydberg attachment) data in this energy range.

  14. Deeply Bound 1s and 2p Pionic States in 205Pb and Determination of the s-Wave Part of the Pion-Nucleus Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, H.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.; Hayano, R. S.; Hirenzaki, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Münch, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Schott, W.; Suzuki, K.; Tomono, D.; Weick, H.; Yamazaki, T.; Yoneyama, T.

    2002-03-01

    We observed well-separated 1s and 2p π- states in 205Pb in the 206Pb(d,3He) reaction at Td = 604.3 MeV. The binding energies and the widths determined are B1s = 6.762+/-0.061 MeV, Γ1s = 0.764+0.171-0.154 MeV, B2p = 5.110+/-0.045 MeV, and Γ2p = 0.321+0.060-0.062 MeV. They are used to deduce the real and imaginary strengths of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction, which translates into a positive mass shift of π- in 205Pb.

  15. Velocity Estimate Following Air Data System Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McLaren, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    .... A velocity estimator (VEST) algorithm was developed to combine the inertial and wind velocities to provide an estimate of the aircraft's current true velocity to be used for command path gain scheduling and for display in the cockpit...

  16. Monitoring Seismic Velocity Change to Explore the Earthquake Seismogenic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C. F.; Wen, S.; Chen, C.

    2017-12-01

    Studying spatial-temporal variations of subsurface velocity structures is still a challenge work, but it can provide important information not only on geometry of a fault, but also the rheology change induced from the strong earthquake. In 1999, a disastrous Chi-Chi earthquake (Mw7.6; Chi-Chi EQ) occurred in central Taiwan and caused great impacts on Taiwan's society. Therefore, the major objective of this research is to investigate whether the rheology change of fault can be associated with seismogenic process before strong earthquake. In addition, after the strike of the Chi-Chi EQ, whether the subsurface velocity structure resumes to its steady state is another issue in this study. Therefore, for the above purpose, we have applied a 3D tomographic technique to obtain P- and S-wave velocity structures in central Taiwan using travel time data provided by the Central Weather Bureau (CWB). One major advantage of this method is that we can include out-of-network data to improve the resolution of velocity structures at deeper depths in our study area. The results show that the temporal variations of Vp are less significant than Vs (or Vp/Vs ratio), and Vp is not prominent perturbed before and after the occurrence of the Chi-Chi EQ. However, the Vs (or Vp/Vs ratio) structure in the source area demonstrates significant spatial-temporal difference before and after the mainshock. From the results, before the mainshock, Vs began to decrease (Vp/Vs ratio was increased as well) at the hanging wall of Chelungpu fault, which may be induced by the increasing density of microcracks and fluid. But in the vicinities of Chi-Chi Earthquake's source area, Vs was increasing (Vp/Vs ratio was also decreased). This phenomenon may be owing to the closing of cracks or migration of fluid. Due to the different physical characteristics around the source area, strong earthquake may be easily nucleated at the junctional zone. Our findings suggest that continuously monitoring the Vp and Vs (or

  17. Compressive and Shear Wave Velocity Profiles using Seismic Refraction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziman, M; Hazreek, Z A M; Azhar, A T S; Haimi, D S

    2016-01-01

    Seismic refraction measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine soil profile. Meanwhile, the borehole technique is an established way to identify the changes of soil layer based on number of blows penetrating the soil. Both techniques are commonly adopted for subsurface investigation. The seismic refraction test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment compared to borehole technique. The soil velocities of compressive wave and shear wave derived from the seismic refraction measurements can be directly utilised to calculate soil parameters such as soil modulus and Poisson’s ratio. This study investigates the seismic refraction techniques to obtain compressive and shear wave velocity profile. Using the vertical and horizontal geophones as well as vertical and horizontal strike directions of the transient seismic source, the propagation of compressive wave and shear wave can be examined, respectively. The study was conducted at Sejagung Sri Medan. The seismic velocity profile was obtained at a depth of 20 m. The velocity of the shear wave is about half of the velocity of the compression wave. The soil profiles of compressive and shear wave velocities were verified using the borehole data and showed good agreement with the borehole data. (paper)

  18. Layered granule chute flow near the angle of repose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; Walton, O.R.

    1985-01-01

    A natural, two-layered gravity flow of sand can be obtained on chutes inclined at angles slightly above the angle of repose of the sand. The top-surface layer is free-flowing, is thin, and moves rapidly at supercritical velocity. The velocity depends mainly on the character of the sand and the chute inclination angle. The bottom layer is thick and moves more slowly, with the flow controlled by adjustable weirs at the chute exit. The velocity profile in the thick bottom layer is curved; as much as an order of magnitude higher velocity occurs in the upper portion of the layer than occurs along the bottom wall of the chute. This study has applications to the cascade inertial fusion concept

  19. Cosmic string induced peculiar velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dalen, A.; Schramm, D.N.

    1987-02-01

    We calculate analytically the probability distribution for peculiar velocities on scales from 10h -1 to 60h -1 Mpc with cosmic string loops as the dominant source of primordial gravitational perturbations. We consider a range of parameters βGμ appropriate for both hot (HDM) and cold (CDM) dark matter scenarios. An Ω = 1 CDM Universe is assumed with the loops randomly placed on a smooth background. It is shown how the effects can be estimated of loops breaking up and being born with a spectrum of sizes. It is found that to obtain large scale streaming velocities of at least 400 km/s it is necessary that either a large value for βGμ or the effect of loop fissioning and production details be considerable. Specifically, for optimal CDM string parameters Gμ = 10 -6 , β = 9, h = .5, and scales of 60h -1 Mpc, the parent size spectrum must be 36 times larger than the evolved daughter spectrum to achieve peculiar velocities of at least 400 km/s with a probability of 63%. With this scenario the microwave background dipole will be less than 800 km/s with only a 10% probability. The string induced velocity spectrum is relatively flat out to scales of about 2t/sub eq//a/sub eq/ and then drops off rather quickly. The flatness is a signature of string models of galaxy formation. With HDM a larger value of βGμ is necessary for galaxy formation since accretion on small scales starts later. Hence, with HDM, the peculiar velocity spectrum will be larger on large scales and the flat region will extend to larger scales. If large scale peculiar velocities greater than 400 km/s are real then it is concluded that strings plus CDM have difficulties. The advantages of strings plus HDM in this regard will be explored in greater detail in a later paper. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  1. Three dimensional reflection velocity analysis based on velocity model scan; Model scan ni yoru sanjigen hanshaha sokudo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minegishi, M; Tsuru, T [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, T [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Introduced herein is a reflection wave velocity analysis method using model scanning as a method for velocity estimation across a section, the estimation being useful in the construction of a velocity structure model in seismic exploration. In this method, a stripping type analysis is carried out, wherein optimum structure parameters are determined for reflection waves one after the other beginning with those from shallower parts. During this process, the velocity structures previously determined for the shallower parts are fixed and only the lowest of the layers undergoing analysis at the time is subjected to model scanning. To consider the bending of ray paths at each velocity boundaries involving shallower parts, the ray path tracing method is utilized for the calculation of the reflection travel time curve for the reflection surface being analyzed. Out of the reflection wave travel time curves calculated using various velocity structure models, one that suits best the actual reflection travel time is detected. The degree of matching between the calculated result and actual result is measured by use of data semblance in a time window provided centering about the calculated reflective wave travel time. The structure parameter is estimated on the basis of conditions for the maximum semblance. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  2. About probabilistic integration of ill-posed geophysical tomography and logging data: A knowledge discovery approach versus petrophysical transfer function concepts illustrated using cross-borehole radar-, P- and S-wave traveltime tomography in combination with cone penetration and dielectric logging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasche, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    Site characterization requires detailed and ideally spatially continuous information about the subsurface. Geophysical tomographic experiments allow for spatially continuous imaging of physical parameter variations, e.g., seismic wave propagation velocities. Such physical parameters are often related to typical geotechnical or hydrological target parameters, e.g. as achieved from 1D direct push or borehole logging. Here, the probabilistic inference of 2D tip resistance, sleeve friction, and relative dielectric permittivity distributions in near-surface sediments is constrained by ill-posed cross-borehole seismic P- and S-wave and radar wave traveltime tomography. In doing so, we follow a discovery science strategy employing a fully data-driven approach capable of accounting for tomographic ambiguity and differences in spatial resolution between the geophysical tomograms and the geotechnical logging data used for calibration. We compare the outcome to results achieved employing classical hypothesis-driven approaches, i.e., deterministic transfer functions derived empirically for the inference of 2D sleeve friction from S-wave velocity tomograms and theoretically for the inference of 2D dielectric permittivity from radar wave velocity tomograms. The data-driven approach offers maximal flexibility in combination with very relaxed considerations about the character of the expected links. This makes it a versatile tool applicable to almost any combination of data sets. However, error propagation may be critical and justify thinking about a hypothesis-driven pre-selection of an optimal database going along with the risk of excluding relevant information from the analyses. Results achieved by transfer function rely on information about the nature of the link and optimal calibration settings drawn as retrospective hypothesis by other authors. Applying such transfer functions at other sites turns them into a priori valid hypothesis, which can, particularly for empirically

  3. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  4. Modeling delamination of FRP laminates under low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Wen, H. M.; Ren, S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Fiber reinforced plastic laminates (FRP) have been increasingly used in various engineering such as aeronautics, astronautics, transportation, naval architecture and their impact response and failure are a major concern in academic community. A new numerical model is suggested for fiber reinforced plastic composites. The model considers that FRP laminates has been constituted by unidirectional laminated plates with adhesive layers. A modified adhesive layer damage model that considering strain rate effects is incorporated into the ABAQUS / EXPLICIT finite element program by the user-defined material subroutine VUMAT. It transpires that the present model predicted delamination is in good agreement with the experimental results for low velocity impact.

  5. Sound field separation with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclère, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    separation techniques make it possible to distinguish between outgoing and incoming waves from the two sides, and thus NAH can be applied. In this paper, a separation method based on the measurement of the particle velocity in two layers and another method based on the measurement of the pressure...... and the velocity in a single layer are proposed. The two methods use an equivalent source formulation with separate transfer matrices for the outgoing and incoming waves, so that the sound from the two sides of the array can be modeled independently. A weighting scheme is proposed to account for the distance......In conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH) it is not possible to distinguish between sound from the two sides of the array, thus, it is a requirement that all the sources are confined to only one side and radiate into a free field. When this requirement cannot be fulfilled, sound field...

  6. Velocity-pressure correlation measurements in complex free shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naka, Yoshitsugu; Obi, Shinnosuke

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of fluctuating velocity and pressure were performed in various turbulent free shear flows including a turbulent mixing layer and the wing-tip vortex trailing from a NACA0012 half-wing. Two different methods for fluctuating static pressure measurement were considered: a direct method using a miniature Pitot tube and an indirect method where static pressure was calculated from total pressure. The pressure obtained by either of these methods was correlated with the velocity measured by an X-type hot-wire probe. The results from these two techniques agreed with each other in the turbulent mixing layer. In the wing-tip vortex case, however, some discrepancies were found, although overall characteristics of the pressure-related statistics were adequately captured by both methods.

  7. Dispersion of acoustic surface waves by velocity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, S. D.; Kim, H. C.

    1987-10-01

    The perturbation theory of Auld [Acoustic Fields and Waves in Solids (Wiley, New York, 1973), Vol. II, p. 294], which describes the effect of a subsurface gradient on the velocity dispersion of surface waves, has been modified to a simpler form by an approximation using a newly defined velocity gradient for the case of isotropic materials. The modified theory is applied to nitrogen implantation in AISI 4140 steel with a velocity gradient of Gaussian profile, and compared with dispersion data obtained by the ultrasonic right-angle technique in the frequency range from 2.4 to 14.8 MHz. The good agreement between experiments and our theory suggests that the compound layer in the subsurface region plays a dominant role in causing the dispersion of acoustic surface waves.

  8. ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES FOR M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Ramsey, L. W.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barnes, J. R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Gallardo, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic rotation velocities (v sin i) for 56 M dwarf stars using high-resolution Hobby-Eberly Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph red spectroscopy. In addition, we have also determined photometric effective temperatures, masses, and metallicities ([Fe/H]) for some stars observed here and in the literature where we could acquire accurate parallax measurements and relevant photometry. We have increased the number of known v sin i values for mid M stars by around 80% and can confirm a weakly increasing rotation velocity with decreasing effective temperature. Our sample of v sin is peak at low velocities (∼3 km s -1 ). We find a change in the rotational velocity distribution between early M and late M stars, which is likely due to the changing field topology between partially and fully convective stars. There is also a possible further change in the rotational distribution toward the late M dwarfs where dust begins to play a role in the stellar atmospheres. We also link v sin i to age and show how it can be used to provide mid-M star age limits. When all literature velocities for M dwarfs are added to our sample, there are 198 with v sin i ≤ 10 km s -1 and 124 in the mid-to-late M star regime (M3.0-M9.5) where measuring precision optical radial velocities is difficult. In addition, we also search the spectra for any significant Hα emission or absorption. Forty three percent were found to exhibit such emission and could represent young, active objects with high levels of radial-velocity noise. We acquired two epochs of spectra for the star GJ1253 spread by almost one month and the Hα profile changed from showing no clear signs of emission, to exhibiting a clear emission peak. Four stars in our sample appear to be low-mass binaries (GJ1080, GJ3129, Gl802, and LHS3080), with both GJ3129 and Gl802 exhibiting double Hα emission features. The tables presented here will aid any future M star planet search target selection to extract stars with low v

  9. Measurement of pressure distributions and velocity fields of water jet intake flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Eun Ho; Yoon, Sang Youl; Kwon, Seong Hoon; Chun, Ho Hwan; Kim, Mun Chan; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2002-01-01

    Waterjet propulsion system can avoid cavitation problem which is being arised conventional propeller propulsion system. The main issue of designing waterjet system is the boundary layer separation at ramp and lib of water inlet. The flow characteristics are highly depended on Jet to Velocity Ratio(JVR) as well as the intake geometry. The present study is conducted in a wind tunnel to provide accurate pressure destribution at the inlet wall and velocity field of the inlet and exit planes. Particle image velocimetry technique is used to obtain detail velocity fields. Pressure distributions and velocity field are discussed with accelerating and deaccelerating flow zones and the effect of JVR

  10. Comparative sound velocity measurements between porous rock and fully-dense material under crustal condition: The cases of Darley Dale sandstone and copper block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, J.; Chien, Y. V.; Wu, W.; Dong, J.; Chang, Y.; Tsai, C.; Yang, M.; Wang, K.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies showed that the voids and their geometry in the sedimentary rocks have great influence on the compressibility of rock, which reflects on its elastic velocities. Some models were developed to discuss the relations among velocity, porosity and void geometry. Therefore, the information of porosity, and void geometry and its distribution in rock is essential for understanding how the elastic properties of porous rocks affected by their poregeometry. In this study, we revisited a well-studied porous rock, Darley Dale sandstone, which has been studied by different groups with different purposes. Most of them are the deformation experiments. Different from previous studies, we measured the sound velocity of Darley dale sandstone under hydrostatic conditions. Also, we employed different techniques to investigate the pore geometry and porosity of Darley Dale sandstone to gain the insight of velocity changing behavior under the crustal conditions. Here, we measured a fully-dense copper block for a comparison. We performed X-ray CT scanning (XCT) to image the pore space of sandstone to construct the 3-D image of pore geometry, distribution and the pore size. The CT image data are allowed us to estimate the porosity of sandstone, too. One the other hand, the porosity of sample was measured using imbibitions method at ambient conditions and helium porosimeter at high pressure (up to 150 MPa). A set of specimens were cored from Darley Dale sandstone block. P and S wave velocities of specimens were measured at ambient conditions. We also performed high pressure velocity measurements on a selected rock specimen and a copper block up to 150 MPa under dry condition. Porosity of a set of rock specimens measured by imbibitions method was spanned from 6% to 15%, largely distributed within a range of 8%-11%. Compared the porosity obtained from three different techniques, imbibitions method, helium porosimeter and XCT, values from those measurements are in good agreement

  11. Boundary-layer effects in droplet splashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2017-11-01

    A drop falling onto a solid substrate will disintegrate into smaller parts when its impact velocity exceeds the so called critical velocity for splashing. Under these circumstances, the very thin liquid sheet ejected tangentially to the solid after the drop touches the substrate, lifts off as a consequence of the aerodynamic forces exerted on it and finally breaks into smaller droplets, violently ejected radially outwards, provoking the splash. Here, the tangential deceleration experienced by the fluid entering the thin liquid sheet is investigated making use of boundary layer theory. The velocity component tangent to the solid, computed using potential flow theory provides the far field boundary condition as well as the pressure gradient for the boundary layer equations. The structure of the flow permits to find a self similar solution of the boundary layer equations. This solution is then used to calculate the boundary layer thickness at the root of the lamella as well as the shear stress at the wall. The splash model presented in, which is slightly modified to account for the results obtained from the boundary layer analysis, provides a very good agreement between the measurements and the predicted values of the critical velocity for the splash.

  12. Ballistic studies on layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, P.K.; Ramanjeneyulu, K.; Siva Kumar, K.; Balakrishna Bhat, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the ballistic behavior and penetration mechanism of metal-metal and metal-fabric layered structures against 7.62 armour piercing projectiles at a velocity of 840 ± 15 m/s at 30 o angle of impact and compares the ballistic results with that of homogeneous metallic steel armour. This study also describes the effect of keeping a gap between the target layers. Experimental results showed that among the investigated materials, the best ballistic performance was attained with metal-fabric layered structures. The improvements in ballistic performance were analyzed in terms of mode of failure and fracture mechanisms of the samples by using optical and electron microscope, X-ray radiography and hardness measurement equipments.

  13. Influence of foundation layering on soil-structure system motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with effects on structural motion due to layering of the foundation. Impedance functions for foundations which consist of a layer resting on a viscoelastic half-space are used on a simple 3-dof SSI system and transfer functions are generated. It is shown that the layering of the foundation effects the motion of the SSI system. These effects are more pronounced for shallow layers with large difference in shear wave velocity from the underlying half-space. (orig.)

  14. Mixing in straight shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasso, P. S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed in a liquid plane mixing layer to extract the probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction of a passive scalar across the layer. Three Reynolds number (Re) cases were studied, 10,000, 33,000 and 90,000, with Re based on velocity difference and visual thickness. The results show that a non-marching pdf (central hump invariant from edge to edge of the layer) exists for Re = 10,000 but that a marching type pdf characterizes the Re = 33,000 and Re = 90,000 cases. For all cases, a broad range of mixture fraction values is found at each location across the layer. Streamwise and spanwise ramps across the layer, and structure-to-structure variation were observed and are believed to be responsible for the above behavior of the composition field. Tripping the boundary layer on the high-speed side of the splitter plate for each of the above three cases resulted in increased three-dimensionality and a change in the composition field. Average and average mixed fluid compositions are reported for all cases.

  15. Internal equilibrium layer growth over forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, E.; Jensen, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    the magnitude of the scatter. Different theoretical friction velocity profiles for the Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) are tested against the forest data. The results yield information on the Internal Equilibrium Layer (IEL) growth and an equation for the IEL height fur neutral conditions is derived. For stable...... conditions the results indicate that very long fetches are required in order to measure parameters in equilibrium with the actual surface....

  16. A variable K - planetary boundary layer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, P.K.

    1976-07-01

    The steady-state, homogeneous and barotropic equations of motion within the planetary boundary layer are solved with the assumption that the coefficient of eddy viscosity varies as K(Z) = K 0 (1-Z/h)sup(p), where h is the height of the boundary layer and p a parameter which depends on the atmospheric stability. The solutions are compared with the observed velocity profiles based on the Wangara data. They compare favourably. (author)

  17. Numerical calculation of velocity distribution near a vertical flat plate immersed in bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Horihata, Hideyuki; Hiraoka, Setsuro; Aragaki, Tsutomu; Yamada, Ikuho; Isoda, Shinji.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid and gas velocity distributions for bubble flow near a vertical flat plate were calculated numerically by using the SIMPLER method, where the flow was assumed to be laminar, two-dimensional, and at steady state. The two-fluid flow model was used in the numerical analysis. To calculate the drag force on a small bubble, Stokes' law for a rigid sphere is applicable. The dimensionless velocity distributions which were arranged with characteristic boundary layer thickness and maximum liquid velocity were adjusted with a single line and their forms were similar to that for single-phase wall-jet flow. The average wall shear stress derived from the velocity gradient at the plate wall was strongly affected by bubble diameter but not by inlet liquid velocity. The present dimensionless velocity distributions obtained numerically agreed well with previous experimental results, and the proposed numerical algorithm was validated. (author)

  18. Experimental evidence for s-wave pairing symmetry in superconducting Cu(x)Bi2Se3 single crystals using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Niv; Zhang, Tong; Ha, Jeonghoon; Sharifi, Fred; Talin, A Alec; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2013-03-15

    Topological superconductors represent a newly predicted phase of matter that is topologically distinct from conventional superconducting condensates of Cooper pairs. As a manifestation of their topological character, topological superconductors support solid-state realizations of Majorana fermions at their boundaries. The recently discovered superconductor Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) has been theoretically proposed as an odd-parity superconductor in the time-reversal-invariant topological superconductor class, and point-contact spectroscopy measurements have reported the observation of zero-bias conductance peaks corresponding to Majorana states in this material. Here we report scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the superconducting energy gap in Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) as a function of spatial position and applied magnetic field. The tunneling spectrum shows that the density of states at the Fermi level is fully gapped without any in-gap states. The spectrum is well described by the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory with a momentum independent order parameter, which suggests that Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) is a classical s-wave superconductor contrary to previous expectations and measurements.

  19. Structural analysis of S-wave seismics around an urban sinkhole: evidence of enhanced dissolution in a strike-slip fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Tanner, David C.; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-12-01

    In November 2010, a large sinkhole opened up in the urban area of Schmalkalden, Germany. To determine the key factors which benefited the development of this collapse structure and therefore the dissolution, we carried out several shear-wave reflection-seismic profiles around the sinkhole. In the seismic sections we see evidence of the Mesozoic tectonic movement in the form of a NW-SE striking, dextral strike-slip fault, known as the Heßleser Fault, which faulted and fractured the subsurface below the town. The strike-slip faulting created a zone of small blocks ( sinkholes and dissolution-induced depressions. Since the processes are still ongoing, the occurrence of a new sinkhole cannot be ruled out. This case study demonstrates how S-wave seismics can characterize a sinkhole and, together with geological information, can be used to study the processes that result in sinkhole formation, such as a near-surface fault zone located in soluble rocks. The more complex the fault geometry and interaction between faults, the more prone an area is to sinkhole occurrence.

  20. Determination of the S-wave $\\pi \\pi$ scattering lengths from a study of $K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J R; Kalmus, G; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Slater, M W; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Bocquet, G; Cabibbo, N; Ceccucci, A; Cundy, D; Falaleev, V; Fidecaro, Maria; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Kubischta, W; Norton, A; Maier, A; Patel, M; Peters, A; Balev, S; Frabetti, P L; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D T; Marinova, E; Molokanova, N; Polenkevich, I; Potrebenikov, Yu; Stoynev, S; Zinchenko, A; Monnier, E; Swallow, E; Winston, R; Rubin, P; Walker, A; Baldini, W; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Fiorini, M; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Wahl, H; Calvetti, M; Iacopini, E; Ruggiero, G; Bizzeti, A; Lenti, M; Veltri, M; Behler, M; Eppard, K; Kleinknecht, K; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Renk, B; Wache, M; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Coward, D; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Shieh, M; Szleper, M; Velasco, M; Wood, M D; Anzivino, G; Imbergamo, E; Nappi, A; Piccini, M; Raggi, M; Valdata-Nappi, M; Cenci, P; Pepé, M; Pettrucci, M C; Cerri, C; Fantechi, R; Collazuol, G; Di Lella, L; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Michetti, A; Costantini, F; Doble, N; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Pierazzini, G; Sozzi, M; Venditti, S; Bloch-Devaux, B; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Derré, J; Marel, G; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Bifani, S; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Marchetto, F; Bifani, S; Clemencic, M; Goy-Lopez, S; Dibon, H; Jeitler, M; Markytan, M; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Widhalm, L

    2009-01-01

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of $~6.031 x 10^{7} K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the $\\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ invariant mass (M_00) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around $M_{00} = 2m_{+}$, where m_{+} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-} \\to \\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ in $K^{\\pm} \\to \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decay. Fits to the M_{00} distribution using two different theoretical models provide the presently most precise determination of $a_{0}-a_{2}$, the difference between the pi pi S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order pi pi rescattering terms, included in the two models, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a_2.

  1. Deeply bound 1s and 2p pionic states in 205Pb and determination of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissel, H.; Gilg, H.; Gillitzer, A.

    2001-06-01

    We observed well separated 1s and 2p π - states in 205 Pb in the 206 Pb(d, 3 He) reaction at T d = 604.3 MeV. The binding energies and the widths determined are: B 1s = 6.768 ± 0.044 (stat) ± 0.041 (syst) MeV, Γ 1s = 0.778 -0.130 +0.150 (stat) ± 0.055 (syst) MeV, B 2p = 5.110 ± 0.015 (stat) ± 0.042 (syst) MeV, and Γ 2p = 0.371 ± 0.037 (stat) ± 0.048 (syst) MeV. They are used to deduce the real and imaginary strengths of the s-wave part of the pion-nucleus interaction, yielding 26.1 -1.5 +1.7 MeV as a pion mass shift in the center of 205 Pb. (orig.)

  2. Generation of net sediment transport by velocity skewness in oscillatory sheet flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Li, Yong; Chen, Genfa; Wang, Fujun; Tang, Xuelin

    2018-01-01

    This study utilizes a qualitative approach and a two-phase numerical model to investigate net sediment transport caused by velocity skewness beneath oscillatory sheet flow and current. The qualitative approach is derived based on the pseudo-laminar approximation of boundary layer velocity and exponential approximation of concentration. The two-phase model can obtain well the instantaneous erosion depth, sediment flux, boundary layer thickness, and sediment transport rate. It can especially illustrate the difference between positive and negative flow stages caused by velocity skewness, which is considerably important in determining the net boundary layer flow and sediment transport direction. The two-phase model also explains the effect of sediment diameter and phase-lag to sediment transport by comparing the instantaneous-type formulas to better illustrate velocity skewness effect. In previous studies about sheet flow transport in pure velocity-skewed flows, net sediment transport is only attributed to the phase-lag effect. In the present study with the qualitative approach and two-phase model, phase-lag effect is shown important but not sufficient for the net sediment transport beneath pure velocity-skewed flow and current, while the asymmetric wave boundary layer development between positive and negative flow stages also contributes to the sediment transport.

  3. Seismic velocity variation along the Izu-Bonin arc estaimated from traveltime tomography using OBS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obana, K.; Tamura, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kodaira, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) arc is an intra-oceanic island arc along the convergent plate boundary between the subducting Pacific and overriding Philippine Sea plates. Recent active seismic studies in the Izu-Bonin arc reveal significant along-arc variations in crustal structure [Kodaira et al., 2007]. The thickness of the arc crust shows a remarkable change between thicker Izu (~30 km) and thinner Bonin (~10 km) arcs. In addition to this, several geological and geophysical contrasts, such as seafloor topography and chemical composition of volcanic rocks, between Izu and Bonin arc have been reported [e.g., Yuasa 1992]. We have conducted earthquake observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) to reveal seismic velocity structure of the crust and mantle wedge in the Izu-Bonin arc and to investigate origin of the along-arc structure variations. We deployed 40 short-period OBSs in Izu and Bonin area in 2006 and 2009, respectively. The OBS data were processed with seismic data recorded at routine seismic stations on Hachijo-jima, Aoga-shima, and Chichi-jima operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). More than 5000 earthquakes were observed during about three-months observation period in each experiment. We conducted three-dimensional seismic tomography using manually picked P- and S-wave arrival time data. The obtained image shows a different seismic velocity structures in the mantle beneath the volcanic front between Izu and Bonin arcs. Low P-wave velocity anomalies in the mantle beneath the volcanic front in the Izu arc are limited at depths deeper than those in the Bonin arc. On the other hand, P-wave velocity in the low velocity anomalies beneath volcanic front in the Bonin arc is slower than that in the Izu arc. These large-scale along-arc structure variations in the mantle could relate to the geological and geophysical contrasts between Izu and Bonin arcs.

  4. Velocity distribution of fragments of catastrophic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasuhiko; Kato, Manabu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional velocities of fragments produced by laboratory impact experiments were measured for basalts and pyrophyllites. The velocity distribution of fragments obtained shows that the velocity range of the major fragments is rather narrow, at most within a factor of 3 and that no clear dependence of velocity on the fragment mass is observed. The NonDimensional Impact Stress (NDIS) defined by Mizutani et al. (1990) is found to be an appropriate scaling parameter to describe the overall fragment velocity as well as the antipodal velocity.

  5. Influence of Core Permeability on Accropode Armour Layer Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Christensen, M.; Jensen, T.

    1998-01-01

    Hedar and van der Meer studied the influence of core permeability on the stability of two layer rock armour. In both cases a significant influence was found. However, it is to be expected that for single layer armour there will be an even larger influence on the core permeability. This is because...... the dissipation of wave energy in single layer armour will e smaller than in double layer armour, thus giving room for larger flow velocities in and over armour layer On this background a laboratory stud of single layer Accropode stability was undertaken at Aalborg University in 1995. The test results as well...

  6. Electron velocity and momentum density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A null 4-vector eta + sigma/sub μ/based on Dirac's relativistic electron equation, is shown explicitly for a plane wave and various Coulomb states. This 4-vector constitutes a mechanical ''model'' for the electron in those staes, and expresses the important spinor quantities represented conventionally by n, f, g, m, j, kappa, l, and s. The model for a plane wave agrees precisely with the relation between velocity and phase gradient customarily used in quantum theory, but the models for Coulomb states contradict that relation

  7. Three-dimensional distribution of random velocity inhomogeneities at the Nankai trough seismogenic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.; Obana, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Nakanishi, A.; Kaiho, Y.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Nankai trough in southwestern Japan is a convergent margin where the Philippine sea plate is subducted beneath the Eurasian plate. There are major faults segments of huge earthquakes that are called Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes. According to the earthquake occurrence history over the past hundreds years, we must expect various rupture patters such as simultaneous or nearly continuous ruptures of plural fault segments. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) conducted seismic surveys at Nankai trough in order to clarify mutual relations between seismic structures and fault segments, as a part of "Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes" funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. This study evaluated the spatial distribution of random velocity inhomogeneities from Hyuga-nada to Kii-channel by using velocity seismograms of small and moderate sized earthquakes. Random velocity inhomogeneities are estimated by the peak delay time analysis of S-wave envelopes (e.g., Takahashi et al. 2009). Peak delay time is defined as the time lag from the S-wave onset to its maximal amplitude arrival. This quantity mainly reflects the accumulated multiple forward scattering effect due to random inhomogeneities, and is quite insensitive to the inelastic attenuation. Peak delay times are measured from the rms envelopes of horizontal components at 4-8Hz, 8-16Hz and 16-32Hz. This study used the velocity seismograms that are recorded by 495 ocean bottom seismographs and 378 onshore seismic stations. Onshore stations are composed of the F-net and Hi-net stations that are maintained by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) of Japan. It is assumed that the random inhomogeneities are represented by the von Karman type PSDF. Preliminary result of inversion analysis shows that spectral gradient of PSDF (i.e., scale dependence of

  8. Experimental formation of a fractional vortex in a superconducting bi-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y.; Yamamori, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Nishio, T.; Arisawa, S.

    2018-05-01

    We report the experimental formation of a fractional vortex generated by using a thin superconducting bi-layer in the form of a niobium bi-layer, observed as a magnetic flux distribution image taken by a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope. Thus, we demonstrated that multi-component superconductivity can be realized by an s-wave conventional superconductor, because, in these superconductors, the magnetic flux is no longer quantized as it is destroyed by the existence of an inter-component phase soliton (i-soliton).

  9. Elastic wave velocities, chemistry and modal mineralogy of crustal rocks sampled by the Outokumpu scientific drill hole: Evidence from lab measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, H.; Mengel, K.; Strauss, K. W.; Ivankina, T. I.; Nikitin, A. N.; Kukkonen, I. T.

    2009-07-01

    The Outokumpu scientific deep drill hole intersects a 2500 m deep Precambrian crustal section comprising a 1300 m thick biotite-gneiss series (mica schists) at top, followed by a 200 m thick meta-ophiolite sequence, underlain again by biotite gneisses (mica schists) (500 m thick) with intercalations of amphibolite and meta-pegmatoids (pegmatitic granite). From 2000 m downward the dominating rock types are meta-pegmatoids (pegmatitic granite). Average isotropic intrinsic P- and S-wave velocities and densities of rocks were calculated on the basis of the volume fraction of the constituent minerals and their single crystal properties for 29 core samples covering the depth range 198-2491 m. The modal composition of the rocks is obtained from bulk rock (XRF) and mineral chemistry (microprobe), using least squares fitting. Laboratory seismic measurements on 13 selected samples representing the main lithologies revealed strong anisotropy of P- and S-wave velocities and shear wave splitting. Seismic anisotropy is strongly related to foliation and is, in particular, an important property of the biotite gneisses, which dominate the upper and lower gneiss series. At in situ conditions, velocity anisotropy is largely caused by oriented microcracks, which are not completely closed at the pressures corresponding to the relatively shallow depth drilled by the borehole, in addition to crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of the phyllosilicates. The contribution of CPO to bulk anisotropy is confirmed by 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction texture measurements. For vertical incidence of the wave train, the in situ velocities derived from the lab measurements are significantly lower than the measured and calculated intrinsic velocities. The experimental results give evidence that the strong reflective nature of the ophiolite-derived rock assemblages is largely affected by oriented microcracks and preferred crystallographic orientation of major minerals, in

  10. Amount of gas hydrate estimated from compressional- and shear-wave velocities at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The amount of in situ gas hydrate concentrated in the sediment pore space at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well was estimated by using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) downhole log measurements. A weighted equation developed for relating the amount of gas hydrate concentrated in the pore space of unconsolidated sediments to the increase of seismic velocities was applied to the acoustic logs with porosities derived from the formation density log. A weight of 1.56 (W=1.56) and the exponent of 1 (n=1) provided consistent estimates of gas hydrate concentration from the S-wave and the P-wave logs. Gas hydrate concentration is as much as 80% in the pore spaces, and the average gas hydrate concentration within the gas-hydrate-bearing section from 897 m to 1110 m (excluding zones where there is no gas hydrate) was calculated at 39.0% when using P-wave data and 37.8% when using S-wave data.

  11. Seismic Wave Propagation in Layered Viscoelastic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R. D.

    2008-12-01

    Advances in the general theory of wave propagation in layered viscoelastic media reveal new insights regarding seismic waves in the Earth. For example, the theory predicts: 1) P and S waves are predominantly inhomogeneous in a layered anelastic Earth with seismic travel times, particle-motion orbits, energy speeds, Q, and amplitude characteristics that vary with angle of incidence and hence, travel path through the layers, 2) two types of shear waves exist, one with linear and the other with elliptical particle motions each with different absorption coefficients, and 3) surface waves with amplitude and particle motion characteristics not predicted by elasticity, such as Rayleigh-Type waves with tilted elliptical particle motion orbits and Love-Type waves with superimposed sinusoidal amplitude dependencies that decay exponentially with depth. The general theory provides closed-form analytic solutions for body waves, reflection-refraction problems, response of multiple layers, and surface wave problems valid for any material with a viscoelastic response, including the infinite number of models, derivable from various configurations of springs and dashpots, such as elastic, Voight, Maxwell, and Standard Linear. The theory provides solutions independent of the amount of intrinsic absorption and explicit analytic expressions for physical characteristics of body waves in low-loss media such as the deep Earth. The results explain laboratory and seismic observations, such as travel-time and wide-angle reflection amplitude anomalies, not explained by elasticity or one dimensional Q models. They have important implications for some forward modeling and inverse problems. Theoretical advances and corresponding numerical results as recently compiled (Borcherdt, 2008, Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media, Cambridge University Press) will be reviewed.

  12. Instrument for measuring flow velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffo, J.

    1977-01-01

    The design described here means to produce a 'more satisfying instrument with less cost' than comparable instruments known up to now. Instead of one single turbine rotor, two similar ones but with opposite blade inclination and sense of rotation are to be used. A cylindrical measuring body is carrying in its axis two bearing blocks whose shape is offering little flow resistance. On the shaft, supported by them, the two rotors run in opposite direction a relatively small axial distance apart. The speed of each rotor is picked up as pulse recurrence frequency by a transmitter and fed to an electronic measuring unit. Measuring errors as they are caused for single rotors by turbulent flow, profile distortion of the velocity, or viscous flow are to be eliminated by means of the contrarotating turbines and the subsequently added electronic unit, because in these cases the adulterating increase of the angular velocity of one rotor is compensated by a corresponding deceleration of the other rotor. The mean value then indicated by the electronic unit has high accurancy of measurement. (RW) [de

  13. Longitudinal vortices in a transitioning boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, J.B.; Backwelder, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    Naturally occurring spanwise variations of the streamwise velocity component, characteristic of longitudinal vortices embedded in a transitioning boundary layer were explored using hot-wire anemometers. A vibrating ribbon introduced stable or unstable Tollmien-Schlichting waves into the laminar boundary layer. These damped or growing disturbances always developed a strong three-dimensional pattern even though no spanwise perturbations were artificially induced. Changing the radius of the leading edge and other modifications to the flat plate, wind tunnel and boundary layer did not alter the spanwise wavelength of the vortices. (orig.)

  14. Structural analysis of S-wave seismics around an urban sinkhole: evidence of enhanced dissolution in a strike-slip fault zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Wadas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In November 2010, a large sinkhole opened up in the urban area of Schmalkalden, Germany. To determine the key factors which benefited the development of this collapse structure and therefore the dissolution, we carried out several shear-wave reflection-seismic profiles around the sinkhole. In the seismic sections we see evidence of the Mesozoic tectonic movement in the form of a NW–SE striking, dextral strike-slip fault, known as the Heßleser Fault, which faulted and fractured the subsurface below the town. The strike-slip faulting created a zone of small blocks ( < 100 m in size, around which steep-dipping normal faults, reverse faults and a dense fracture network serve as fluid pathways for the artesian-confined groundwater. The faults also acted as barriers for horizontal groundwater flow perpendicular to the fault planes. Instead groundwater flows along the faults which serve as conduits and forms cavities in the Permian deposits below ca. 60 m depth. Mass movements and the resulting cavities lead to the formation of sinkholes and dissolution-induced depressions. Since the processes are still ongoing, the occurrence of a new sinkhole cannot be ruled out. This case study demonstrates how S-wave seismics can characterize a sinkhole and, together with geological information, can be used to study the processes that result in sinkhole formation, such as a near-surface fault zone located in soluble rocks. The more complex the fault geometry and interaction between faults, the more prone an area is to sinkhole occurrence.

  15. The S-wave resonance contributions in the B{sup 0}{sub s} decays into ψ(2S,3S) plus pion pair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui, Zhou [North China University of Science and Technology, College of Sciences, Tangshan (China); Li, Ya [Nanjing Normal University, Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Wen-Fei [Shanxi University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2017-03-15

    The three-body decays B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(2S,3S)π{sup +}π{sup -} are studied based on the perturbative QCD approach. With the help of the nonperturbative two-pion distribution amplitudes, the analysis is simplified into the quasi-two-body processes. Besides the traditional factorizable and nonfactorizable diagrams at the leading order, the next-to-leading order vertex corrections are also included to cancel the scale dependence. The f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1500) resonance contributions as well as the nonresonant contributions are taken into account using the presently known ππ time-like scalar form factor for the s anti s component. It is found that the predicted B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(2S)π{sup +}π{sup -} decay spectra in the pion pair invariant mass shows a similar behavior as the experiment. The calculated S-wave contributions to the branching ratio of B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(2S)π{sup +}π{sup -} is 6.0 x 10{sup -5}, which is in agreement with the LHCb data B(B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(2S)π{sup +}π{sup -}) = (7.2±1.2) x 10{sup -5} within errors. The estimate of B(B{sup 0}{sub s} → ψ(3S)π{sup +}π{sup -}) can reach the order of 10{sup -5}, pending the corresponding measurements. (orig.)

  16. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  17. Questions Students Ask: About Terminal Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Earl R.; Nelson, Jim

    1984-01-01

    If a ball were given an initial velocity in excess of its terminal velocity, would the upward force of air resistance (a function of velocity) be greater than the downward force of gravity and thus push the ball back upwards? An answer to this question is provided. (JN)

  18. Balance velocities of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Ekholm, Simon

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetery data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail......, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning....

  19. Properties of Love waves in a piezoelectric layered structure with a viscoelastic guiding layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Lijun; Lu, Yanyan; He, Shitang

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical method is developed for analyzing Love waves in a structure with a viscoelastic guiding layer bounded on a piezoelectric substrate. The dispersion equation previously derived for piezoelectric Love waves propagating in the layered structure with an elastic layer is adopted for analyzing a structure with a viscoelastic layer. A Maxwell–Weichert model is introduced to describe the shear stiffness of a polymeric material. Newton’s method is employed for the numerical calculation. The dispersion equation for piezoelectric–elastic Love waves is proved suitable for solving a structure with a viscoelastic layer on a piezoelectric substrate. The theoretical results indicate that the propagation velocity of the Love wave is mainly decided by the shear stiffness of the guiding layer, whereas the propagation loss is approximately proportional to its viscosity. A detailed experimental study was conducted on a Love wave delay line fabricated on an ST-90° X quartz substrate and overlaid with various thicknesses of SU-8 guiding layers. A tail-raising caused by the viscosity of the guiding layer existed in both the calculated and the measured propagation velocities. The calculated insertion loss of the Love wave delay lines was in good agreement with the measured results. The method and the results presented in this paper are beneficial to the design of Love wave sensors with a viscoelastic guiding layer. (paper)

  20. Optimization of multi-layered metallic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Dor, G.; Dubinsky, A.; Elperin, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We investigated the problem of optimization of a multi-layered metallic shield. → The maximum ballistic limit velocity is a criterion of optimization. → The sequence of materials and the thicknesses of layers in the shield are varied. → The general problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming. → Analytical solutions are obtained for two- and three-layered shields. - Abstract: We investigate the problem of optimization of multi-layered metallic shield whereby the goal is to determine the sequence of materials and the thicknesses of the layers that provide the maximum ballistic limit velocity of the shield. Optimization is performed under the following constraints: fixed areal density of the shield, the upper bound on the total thickness of the shield and the bounds on the thicknesses of the plates manufactured from every material. The problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming which can be solved numerically using known methods. For the most interesting in practice cases of two-layered and three-layered shields the solution is obtained in the explicit analytical form.

  1. Measurements of phoretic velocities of aerosol particles in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodi, F.; Santachiara, G.; Travaini, S.; Vedernikov, A.; Dubois, F.; Minetti, C.; Legros, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of thermo- and diffusio-phoretic velocities of aerosol particles (carnauba wax, paraffin and sodium chloride) were performed in microgravity conditions (Drop Tower facility, in Bremen, and Parabolic Flights, in Bordeaux). In the case of thermophoresis, a temperature gradient was obtained by heating the upper plate of the cell, while the lower one was maintained at environmental temperature. For diffusiophoresis, the water vapour gradient was obtained with sintered plates imbued with a water solution of MgCl 2 and distilled water, at the top and at the bottom of the cell, respectively. Aerosol particles were observed through a digital holographic velocimeter, a device allowing the determination of 3-D coordinates of particles from the observed volume. Particle trajectories and consequently particle velocities were reconstructed through the analysis of the sequence of particle positions. The experimental values of reduced thermophoretic velocities are between the theoretical values of Yamamoto and Ishihara [Yamamoto, K., Ishihara, Y., 1988. Thermophoresis of a spherical particle in a rarefied gas of a transition regime. Phys. Fluids. 31, 3618-3624] and Talbot et al. [Talbot, L., Cheng, R.K., Schefer, R.W., Willis, D.R., 1980. Thermophoresis of particles in a heated boundary layer. J. Fluid Mech. 101, 737-758], and do not show a clear dependence on the thermal conductivity of the aerosol. The existence of negative thermophoresis is not confirmed in our experiments. Concerning diffusiophoretic experiments, the results obtained show a small increase of reduced diffusiophoretic velocity with the Knudsen number.

  2. Critical velocities in He II for independently varied superfluid and normal fluid velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the critical velocity in pure superflow and compare to the theoretical prediction; to measure the first critical velocity for independently varied superfluid and normal fluid velocities; and to investigate the propagation of the second critical velocity from the thermal counterflow line through the V/sub n/,-V/sub s/ quadrant. The experimental apparatus employed a thermal counterflow heater to adjust the normal fluid velocity, a fountain pump to vary the superfluid velocity, and a level sensing capacitor to measure the superfluid velocity. The results of the pure superfluid critical velocity measurements indicate that this velocity is temperature independent contrary to Schwarz's theory. It was found that the first critical velocity for independently varied V/sub n/ and V/sub s/ could be described by a linear function of V/sub n/ and was otherwise temperature independent. It was found that the second critical velocity could only be distinguished near the thermal counterflow line

  3. Wind-induced flow velocity effects on nutrient concentrations at Eastern Bay of Lake Taihu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Abdul; Li, Yiping; Du, Wei; Wang, Jianwei; Gao, Xiaomeng; Wang, Wencai; Acharya, Kumud

    2017-07-01

    Shallow lakes are highly sensitive to respond internal nutrient loading due to wind-induced flow velocity effects. Wind-induced flow velocity effects on nutrient suspension were investigated at a long narrow bay of large shallow Lake Taihu, the third largest freshwater lake in China. Wind-induced reverse/compensation flow and consistent flow field probabilities at vertical column of the water were measured. The probabilities between the wind field and the flow velocities provided a strong correlation at the surface (80.6%) and the bottom (65.1%) layers of water profile. Vertical flow velocity profile analysis provided the evidence of delay response time to wind field at the bottom layer of lake water. Strong wind field generated by the west (W) and west-north-west (WNW) winds produced displaced water movements in opposite directions to the prevailing flow field. An exponential correlation was observed between the current velocities of the surface and the bottom layers while considering wind speed as a control factor. A linear model was developed to correlate the wind field-induced flow velocity impacts on nutrient concentration at the surface and bottom layers. Results showed that dominant wind directions (ENE, E, and ESE) had a maximum nutrient resuspension contribution (nutrient resuspension potential) of 34.7 and 43.6% at the surface and the bottom profile layers, respectively. Total suspended solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) average concentrations were 6.38, 1.5, and 0.03 mg/L during our field experiment at Eastern Bay of Lake Taihu. Overall, wind-induced low-to-moderate hydrodynamic disturbances contributed more in nutrient resuspension at Eastern Bay of Lake Taihu. The present study can be used to understand the linkage between wind-induced flow velocities and nutrient concentrations for shallow lakes (with uniform morphology and deep margins) water quality management and to develop further models.

  4. Determining the Velocity Fine Structure by a Laser Anemometer with Fixed Orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Kirkegaard, Peter; Mikkelsen, Torben

    We have studied the velocity structure functions and spectra which can be determined by a CW-laser anemometer and a (pulsed) lidar anemometer. We have found useful theoretical expressions for both types of anemometers and compared their filtering of the alongbeam turbulent velocity. The purpose h...... been to establish a basis for remote determining of turbulence fine-structure in terms of the rate of dissipation of specific kinetic energy in the atmospheric boundary layer....

  5. Determining the velocity fine structure by a laser anemometer with fixed orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, Leif; Kirkegaard, P.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    2011-02-15

    We have studied the velocity structure functions and spectra which can be determined by a CW-laser anemometer and a (pulsed) lidar anemometer. We have found useful theoretical expressions for both types of anemometers and compared their filtering of the along-beam turbulent velocity. The purpose has been to establish a basis for remote determining of turbulence fine-structure in terms of the rate of dissipation of specific kinetic energy in the atmospheric boundary layer. (Author)

  6. Anomalous Skin Effect for Anisotropic Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Gennady Shvets

    2004-01-01

    The anomalous skin effect in a plasma with a highly anisotropic electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) is very different from skin effect in a plasma with the isotropic EVDF. An analytical solution was derived for the electric field penetrated into plasma with the EVDF described as a Maxwellian with two temperatures Tx >> Tz, where x is the direction along the plasma boundary and z is the direction perpendicular to the plasma boundary. The skin layer was found to consist of two distinctive regions of width of order nTx/w and nTz/w, where nTx,z/w = (Tx,z/m)1/2 is the thermal electron velocity and w is the incident wave frequency

  7. Calculation of afterbody flows with a composite velocity formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rubin, S. G.; Khosla, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    A recently developed technique for numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for subsonic, laminar flows is investigated. It is extended here to allow for the computation of transonic and turbulent flows. The basic approach involves a multiplicative composite of the appropriate velocity representations for the inviscid and viscous flow regions. The resulting equations are structured so that far from the surface of the body the momentum equations lead to the Bernoulli equation for the pressure, while the continuity equation reduces to the familiar potential equation. Close to the body surface, the governing equations and solution techniques are characteristic of those describing interacting boundary layers. The velocity components are computed with a coupled strongly implicity procedure. For transonic flows the artificial compressibility method is used to treat supersonic regions. Calculations are made for both laminar and turbulent flows over axisymmetric afterbody configurations. Present results compare favorably with other numerical solutions and/or experimental data.

  8. Experimental investigation of separated shear layer from a leading ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shear layer development over a thick flat plate with a semi-circular leading edge is investigated for a range of angles of attack under different pressure gradients for a Reynolds number of 2.44×105 (based on chord and free-stream velocity). The characteristics of the separated shear layer are very well documented through ...

  9. Instability limits for spontaneous double layer formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J. Jr.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; VanDervort, R. W.; Magee, R. M.; Reynolds, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present time-resolved measurements that demonstrate that large amplitude electrostatic instabilities appear in pulsed, expanding helicon plasmas at the same time as particularly strong double layers appear in the expansion region. A significant cross-correlation between the electrostatic fluctuations and fluctuations in the number of ions accelerated by the double layer electric field is observed. No correlation is observed between the electrostatic fluctuations and ions that have not passed through the double layer. These measurements confirm that the simultaneous appearance of the electrostatic fluctuations and the double layer is not simple coincidence. In fact, the accelerated ion population is responsible for the growth of the instability. The double layer strength, and therefore, the velocity of the accelerated ions, is limited by the appearance of the electrostatic instability

  10. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  11. Implication of Broadband Dispersion Measurements in Constraining Upper Mantle Velocity Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuponiyi, A.; Kao, H.; Cassidy, J. F.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Dosso, S. E.; Gosselin, J. M.; Spence, G.

    2017-12-01

    Dispersion measurements from earthquake (EQ) data are traditionally inverted to obtain 1-D shear-wave velocity models, which provide information on deep earth structures. However, in many cases, EQ-derived dispersion measurements lack short-period information, which theoretically should provide details of shallow structures. We show that in at least some cases short-period information, such as can be obtained from ambient seismic noise (ASN) processing, must be combined with EQ dispersion measurements to properly constrain deeper (e.g. upper-mantle) structures. To verify this, synthetic dispersion data are generated using hypothetical velocity models under four scenarios: EQ only (with and without deep low-velocity layers) and combined EQ and ASN data (with and without deep low-velocity layers). The now "broadband" dispersion data are inverted using a trans-dimensional Bayesian framework with the aim of recovering the initial velocity models and assessing uncertainties. Our results show that the deep low-velocity layer could only be recovered from the inversion of the combined ASN-EQ dispersion measurements. Given this result, we proceed to describe a method for obtaining reliable broadband dispersion measurements from both ASN and EQ and show examples for real data. The implication of this study in the characterization of lithospheric and upper mantle structures, such as the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB), is also discussed.

  12. Experimental observation of both negative and positive phase velocities in a two-dimensional sonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ming-Hui; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Chen, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Yong-Yuan; Mao, Yi-Wei; Zi, Jian

    2007-01-01

    Both negative and positive phase velocities for acoustic waves have been experimentally established in a two-dimensional triangular sonic crystal (SC) consisting of steel cylinders embedded in air at first. With the increase of the SCs thickness layer by layer in the experiments, phase shifts decrease in the second band but increase in the first band, showing the negative and the positive phase velocities, respectively. Moreover, the dispersion relation of the SC is constructed by the phase information, which is consistent well with the theoretical results. These abundant characteristics of acoustic wave propagation in the SC might be useful for the device applications

  13. Effects of Velocity-Slip and Viscosity Variation in Squeeze Film Lubrication of Two Circular Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Rao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A generalized form of Reynolds equation for two symmetrical surfaces is taken by considering velocity-slip at the bearing surfaces. This equation is applied to study the effects of velocity-slip and viscosity variation for the lubrication of squeeze films between two circular plates. Expressions for the load capacity and squeezing time obtained are also studied theoretically for various parameters. The load capacity and squeezing time decreases due to slip. They increase due to the presence of high viscous layer near the surface and decrease due to low viscous layer.

  14. A California statewide three-dimensional seismic velocity model from both absolute and differential times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, G.; Thurber, C.H.; Zhang, H.; Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.M.; Waldhauser, F.; Brocher, T.M.; Hardebeck, J.

    2010-01-01

    We obtain a seismic velocity model of the California crust and uppermost mantle using a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm. We begin by using absolute arrival-time picks to solve for a coarse three-dimensional (3D) P velocity (VP) model with a uniform 30 km horizontal node spacing, which we then use as the starting model for a finer-scale inversion using double-difference tomography applied to absolute and differential pick times. For computational reasons, we split the state into 5 subregions with a grid spacing of 10 to 20 km and assemble our final statewide VP model by stitching together these local models. We also solve for a statewide S-wave model using S picks from both the Southern California Seismic Network and USArray, assuming a starting model based on the VP results and a VP=VS ratio of 1.732. Our new model has improved areal coverage compared with previous models, extending 570 km in the SW-NE directionand 1320 km in the NW-SE direction. It also extends to greater depth due to the inclusion of substantial data at large epicentral distances. Our VP model generally agrees with previous separate regional models for northern and southern California, but we also observe some new features, such as high-velocity anomalies at shallow depths in the Klamath Mountains and Mount Shasta area, somewhat slow velocities in the northern Coast Ranges, and slow anomalies beneath the Sierra Nevada at midcrustal and greater depths. This model can be applied to a variety of regional-scale studies in California, such as developing a unified statewide earthquake location catalog and performing regional waveform modeling.

  15. Theory and experiment on electromagnetic-wave-propagation velocities in stacked superconducting tunnel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakai, S.; Ustinov, A. V.; Kohlstedt, H.

    1994-01-01

    Characteristic velocities of the electromagnetic waves propagating in vertically stacked Josephson transmission are theoretically discussed. An equation for solving n velocities of the waves in an n Josephson-junction stack is derived. The solutions of two- and threefold stacks are especially...... focused on. Furthermore, under the assumption that all parameters of the layers are equal, analytic solutions for a generic N-fold stack are presented. The velocities of the waves in two- and three-junction stacks by Nb-Al-AlOx-Nb systems are experimentally obtained by measuring the cavity resonance...

  16. S-velocity structure in Cimandiri fault zone derived from neighbourhood inversion of teleseismic receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syuhada; Anggono, T.; Febriani, F.; Ramdhan, M.

    2018-03-01

    The availability information about realistic velocity earth model in the fault zone is crucial in order to quantify seismic hazard analysis, such as ground motion modelling, determination of earthquake locations and focal mechanism. In this report, we use teleseismic receiver function to invert the S-velocity model beneath a seismic station located in the Cimandiri fault zone using neighbourhood algorithm inversion method. The result suggests the crustal thickness beneath the station is about 32-38 km. Furthermore, low velocity layers with high Vp/Vs exists in the lower crust, which may indicate the presence of hot material ascending from the subducted slab.

  17. Near-field acoustic holography with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren

    of the particle velocity has notable potential in NAH, and furthermore, combined measurement of sound pressure and particle velocity opens a new range of possibilities that are examined in this study. On this basis, sound field separation methods have been studied, and a new measurement principle based on double...... layer measurements of the particle velocity has been proposed. Also, the relation between near-field and far-field radiation from sound sources has been examined using the concept of the supersonic intensity. The calculation of this quantity has been extended to other holographic methods, and studied...

  18. Shear wave propagation in piezoelectric-piezoelectric composite layered structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Mli Gaur

    Full Text Available The propagation behavior of shear wave in piezoelectric composite structure is investigated by two layer model presented in this approach. The composite structure comprises of piezoelectric layers of two different materials bonded alternatively. Dispersion equations are derived for propagation along the direction normal to the layering and in direction of layering. It has been revealed that thickness and elastic constants have significant influence on propagation behavior of shear wave. The phase velocity and wave number is numerically calculated for alternative layer of Polyvinylidene Difluoride (PVDF and Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT-5H in composite layered structure. The analysis carried out in this paper evaluates the effect of volume fraction on the phase velocity of shear wave.

  19. Determination of Focal Mechanisms of Non-Volcanic Tremors Based on S-Wave Polarization Data Corrected for the Effects of Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanishi, K.; Uchide, T.; Takeda, N.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method to determine focal mechanisms of non-volcanic tremors (NVTs) based on S-wave polarization angles. The successful retrieval of polarization angles in low S/N tremor signals owes much to the observation that NVTs propagate slowly and therefore they do not change their location immediately. This feature of NVTs enables us to use a longer window to compute a polarization angle (e.g., one minute or longer), resulting in a stack of particle motions. Following Zhang and Schwartz (1994), we first correct for the splitting effect to recover the source polarization angle (anisotropy-corrected angle). This is a key step, because shear-wave splitting distorts the particle motion excited by a seismic source. We then determine the best double-couple solution using anisotropy-corrected angles of multiple stations. The present method was applied to a tremor sequence at Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan, which occurred at the beginning of April 2013. A standard splitting and polarization analysis were subject to a one-minute-long moving window to determine the splitting parameters as well as anisotropy-corrected angles. A grid search approach was performed at each hour to determine the best double-couple solution satisfying one-hour average polarization angles. Most solutions show NW-dipping low-angle planes consistent with the plate boundary or SE-dipping high-angle planes. Because of 180 degrees ambiguity in polarization angles, the present method alone cannot distinguish compressional quadrant from dilatational one. Together with the observation of very low-frequency earthquakes near the present study area (Ito et al., 2007), it is reasonable to consider that they represent shear slip on low-angle thrust faults. It is also noted that some of solutions contain strike-slip component. Acknowledgements: Seismograph stations used in this study include permanent stations operated by NIED (Hi-net), JMA, Earthquake Research Institute, together with Geological Survey of

  20. S-wave triggering of tremor beneath the Parkfield, California, section of the San Andreas fault by the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake: observations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Peng, Zhigang; Shelly, David R.; Aiken, Chastity

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic stresses that are associated with the energetic seismic waves generated by the Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake off the northeast coast of Japan triggered bursts of tectonic tremor beneath the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault (SAF) at an epicentral distance of ∼8200  km. The onset of tremor begins midway through the ∼100‐s‐period S‐wave arrival, with a minor burst coinciding with the SHSH arrival, as recorded on the nearby broadband seismic station PKD. A more pronounced burst coincides with the Love arrival, followed by a series of impulsive tremor bursts apparently modulated by the 20‐ to 30‐s‐period Rayleigh wave. The triggered tremor was located at depths between 20 and 30 km beneath the surface trace of the fault, with the burst coincident with the S wave centered beneath the fault 30 km northwest of Parkfield. Most of the subsequent activity, including the tremor coincident with the SHSH arrival, was concentrated beneath a stretch of the fault extending from 10 to 40 km southeast of Parkfield. The seismic waves from the Tohoku epicenter form a horizontal incidence angle of ∼14°, with respect to the local strike of the SAF. Computed peak dynamic Coulomb stresses on the fault at tremor depths are in the 0.7–10 kPa range. The apparent modulation of tremor bursts by the small, strike‐parallel Rayleigh‐wave stresses (∼0.7  kPa) is likely enabled by pore pressure variations driven by the Rayleigh‐wave dilatational stress. These results are consistent with the strike‐parallel dynamic stresses (δτs) associated with the S, SHSH, and surface‐wave phases triggering small increments of dextral slip on the fault with a low friction (μ∼0.2). The vertical dynamic stresses δτd do not trigger tremor with vertical or oblique slip under this simple Coulomb failure model.

  1. Transition of unsteady velocity profiles with reverse flow

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Debopam; Arakeri, Jaywant H

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the stability and transition to turbulence of wall-bounded unsteady velocity profiles with reverse flow. Such flows occur, for example, during unsteady boundary layer separation and in oscillating pipe flow. The main focus is on results from experiments in time-developing flow in a long pipe, which is decelerated rapidly. The flow is generated by the controlled motion of a piston. We obtain analytical solutions for laminar flow in the pipe and in a two-dimensional channe...

  2. Layering and Ordering in Electrochemical Double Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yihua [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Kawaguchi, Tomoya [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Pierce, Michael S. [Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, New York 14623, United States; Komanicky, Vladimir [Faculty of Science, Safarik University, 041 54 Kosice, Slovakia; You, Hoydoo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2018-02-26

    Electrochemical double layers (EDL) form at electrified interfaces. While Gouy-Chapman model describes moderately charged EDL, formation of Stern layers was predicted for highly charged EDL. Our results provide structural evidence for a Stern layer of cations, at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in alkali fluoride and chloride electrolytes. Layering was observed by x-ray crystal truncation rods and atomic-scale recoil responses of Pt(111) surface layers. Ordering in the layer is confirmed by glancing-incidence in-plane diffraction measurements.

  3. Determination of velocity correction factors for real-time air velocity monitoring in underground mines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lihong; Yuan, Liming; Thomas, Rick; Iannacchione, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    When there are installations of air velocity sensors in the mining industry for real-time airflow monitoring, a problem exists with how the monitored air velocity at a fixed location corresponds to the average air velocity, which is used to determine the volume flow rate of air in an entry with the cross-sectional area. Correction factors have been practically employed to convert a measured centerline air velocity to the average air velocity. However, studies on the recommended correction fac...

  4. Permeability and seismic velocity anisotropy across a ductile-brittle fault zone in crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenning, Quinn C.; Madonna, Claudio; de Haller, Antoine; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2018-05-01

    This study characterizes the elastic and fluid flow properties systematically across a ductile-brittle fault zone in crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site underground research laboratory. Anisotropic seismic velocities and permeability measured every 0.1 m in the 0.7 m across the transition zone from the host Grimsel granodiorite to the mylonitic core show that foliation-parallel P- and S-wave velocities systematically increase from the host rock towards the mylonitic core, while permeability is reduced nearest to the mylonitic core. The results suggest that although brittle deformation has persisted in the recent evolution, antecedent ductile fabric continues to control the matrix elastic and fluid flow properties outside the mylonitic core. The juxtaposition of the ductile strain zone next to the brittle zone, which is bounded inside the two mylonitic cores, causes a significant elastic, mechanical, and fluid flow heterogeneity, which has important implications for crustal deformation and fluid flow and for the exploitation and use of geothermal energy and geologic waste storage. The results illustrate how physical characteristics of faults in crystalline rocks change in fault zones during the ductile to brittle transitions.

  5. Coupled s-wave and d-wave states in the heavy-fermion superconductor U/sub 1-//sub x/Th/sub x/Be/sub 13/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, A.; Sahu, D.; George, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    In the heavy-fermion superconductor U/sub 1-//sub x/Th/sub x/Be/sub 13/, superconducting states coexist for thorium concentrations 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.06. Assuming s-wave and d-wave symmetries for these states, we derive a Ginzburg-Landau free-energy expression which couples s- and d-wave states and is rotationally invariant, in contrast to the free-energy expression proposed by P. Kumar and P. Woelfle [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1954 (1987)]. We discuss in detail the consequences that follow from our free-energy relation. In particular, we predict that in the above system there are two eigenfrequencies associated with the dynamics of phase oscillations (internal Josephson effect) which are characteristic of the s-wave and d-wave states

  6. Characteristic wave velocities in spherical electromagnetic cloaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaghjian, A D; Maci, S; Martini, E

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the characteristic wave velocities in spherical electromagnetic cloaks, namely, phase, ray, group and energy-transport velocities. After deriving explicit expressions for the phase and ray velocities (the latter defined as the phase velocity along the direction of the Poynting vector), special attention is given to the determination of group and energy-transport velocities, because a cursory application of conventional formulae for local group and energy-transport velocities can lead to a discrepancy between these velocities if the permittivity and permeability dyadics are not equal over a frequency range about the center frequency. In contrast, a general theorem can be proven from Maxwell's equations that the local group and energy-transport velocities are equal in linear, lossless, frequency dispersive, source-free bianisotropic material. This apparent paradox is explained by showing that the local fields of the spherical cloak uncouple into an E wave and an H wave, each with its own group and energy-transport velocities, and that the group and energy-transport velocities of either the E wave or the H wave are equal and thus satisfy the general theorem.

  7. INCOMPRESSIBLE LAMINAR BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL BY BLOWING AND SUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    AZZEDINE NAHOUI; LAKHDAR BAHI

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional incompressible laminar boundary layer and its control using blowing and suction over a flat plate and around the NACA 0012 and 661012 profiles, is studied numerically. The study is based on the Prandtl boundary layer model using the finite differences method and the Crank-Nicolson scheme. The velocity distribution, the boundary layer thickness and the friction coefficient, are determined and presented with and without control. The application of the control technique, has de...

  8. Geotail observations of FTE velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Korotova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the plasma velocity signatures expected in association with flux transfer events (FTEs. Events moving faster than or opposite the ambient media should generate bipolar inward/outward (outward/inward flow perturbations normal to the nominal magnetopause in the magnetosphere (magnetosheath. Flow perturbations directly upstream and downstream from the events should be in the direction of event motion. Flows on the flanks should be in the direction opposite the motion of events moving at subsonic and subAlfvénic speeds relative to the ambient plasma. Events moving with the ambient flow should generate no flow perturbations in the ambient plasma. Alfvén waves propagating parallel (antiparallel to the axial magnetic field of FTEs may generate anticorrelated (correlated magnetic field and flow perturbations within the core region of FTEs. We present case studies illustrating many of these signatures. In the examples considered, Alfvén waves propagate along event axes away from the inferred reconnection site. A statistical study of FTEs observed by Geotail over a 3.5-year period reveals that FTEs within the magnetosphere invariably move faster than the ambient flow, while those in the magnetosheath move both faster and slower than the ambient flow.

  9. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  10. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  11. Group Velocity for Leaky Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeznik, Andrew; Chumakova, Lyubov; Rosales, Rodolfo

    2017-11-01

    In many linear dispersive/conservative wave problems one considers solutions in an infinite medium which is uniform everywhere except for a bounded region. In general, localized inhomogeneities of the medium cause partial internal reflection, and some waves leak out of the domain. Often one only desires the solution in the inhomogeneous region, with the exterior accounted for by radiation boundary conditions. Formulating such conditions requires definition of the direction of energy propagation for leaky waves in multiple dimensions. In uniform media such waves have the form exp (d . x + st) where d and s are complex and related by a dispersion relation. A complex s is required since these waves decay via radiation to infinity, even though the medium is conservative. We present a modified form of Whitham's Averaged Lagrangian Theory along with modulation theory to extend the classical idea of group velocity to leaky waves. This allows for solving on the bounded region by representing the waves as a linear combination of leaky modes, each exponentially decaying in time. This presentation is part of a joint project, and applications of these results to example GFD problems will be presented by L. Chumakova in the talk ``Leaky GFD Problems''. This work is partially supported by NSF Grants DMS-1614043, DMS-1719637, and 1122374, and by the Hertz Foundation.

  12. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  13. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  14. A baseline for upper crustal velocity variations along the East Pacific Rise at 13 deg N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Mary E.; Harding, Alistair J.; Orcutt, John A.

    1995-04-01

    A wide aperture profile of the East Pacific Rise at 13 deg N provides data necessary to make a high-resolution seismic velocity profile of the uppermost crust along a 52-km segment of ridge crest. Automated and objective processing steps, including r-p analysis and waveform inversion, allow the construction of models in a consistent way so that comparisons are meaningful. A continuous profile is synthesized from 70 independent one-dimensional models spaced at 750-km intervals along the ridge. The resulting seismic velocity structure of the top 500 m of crust is remarkable in its lack of variability. The main features are a thin low-velocity layer 2A at the top with a steep gradient to layer 2B. The seafloor velocity is nearly constant at 2.45 km/s +/- 3% along the entire ridge. The velocity at the top of layer 2B is 5.0 km/s +/- 10%. The depth to the 4 km/s isovelocity contour within layer 2A is 130 +/- 20 m from 13 deg to 13 deg 20 min N, north of which it increases to 180 m. The increase in thickness is coincident with a deviation from axial linearity (DEVAL) noted by both a slight change in axis depth and orientation and in geochemistry. The waveform inversion, providing more details plus velocity gradient information, shows a layer 2A with about 80 m of constant-velocity material underlain by 150 m of high velocity gradient material, putting the base of layer 2A at approximately 230 m depth south of 13 deg 20 min N and about 50 m thicker north of the DEVAL. The overall lack of variability, combined with other recent measurements of layer 2A thickness along and near the axis, indicates that the thickness of volcanic extrusives is controlled not by levels of volcanic productivity, but the dynamics of emplacement. The homogeneity along axis also provides a baseline of inherent variability in crustal structure of about 10% against which other observed variations in similar regimes can be compared.

  15. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... in the ultrasound field to find the transverse velocity. In-vivo examples from the carotid artery are shown, where complex turbulent flow is found in certain parts of the cardiac cycle. The second approach uses directional beam forming along the flow direction to estimate the velocity magnitude. Using a correlation...... search can also yield the direction, and the full velocity vector is thereby found. An examples from a flow rig is shown....

  16. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schemes...... have been developed for performing the estimation, and the various approaches are described. The current systems only display the velocity along the ultrasound beam direction and a velocity transverse to the beam is not detected. This is a major problem in these systems, since most blood vessels...... are parallel to the skin surface. Angling the transducer will often disturb the flow, and new techniques for finding transverse velocities are needed. The various approaches for determining transverse velocities will be explained. This includes techniques using two-dimensional correlation (speckle tracking...

  17. On the role of acoustic feedback in boundary-layer instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuesong

    2014-07-28

    In this paper, the classical triple-deck formalism is employed to investigate two instability problems in which an acoustic feedback loop plays an essential role. The first concerns a subsonic boundary layer over a flat plate on which two well-separated roughness elements are present. A spatially amplifying Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) wave between the roughness elements is scattered by the downstream roughness to emit a sound wave that propagates upstream and impinges on the upstream roughness to regenerate the T-S wave, thereby forming a closed feedback loop in the streamwise direction. Numerical calculations suggest that, at high Reynolds numbers and for moderate roughness heights, the long-range acoustic coupling may lead to absolute instability, which is characterized by self-sustained oscillations at discrete frequencies. The dominant peak frequency may jump from one value to another as the Reynolds number, or the distance between the roughness elements, is varied gradually. The second problem concerns the supersonic 'twin boundary layers' that develop along two well-separated parallel flat plates. The two boundary layers are in mutual interaction through the impinging and reflected acoustic waves. It is found that the interaction leads to a new instability that is absent in the unconfined boundary layer. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Remote determination of the velocity index and mean streamwise velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. D.; Cowen, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    When determining volumetric discharge from surface measurements of currents in a river or open channel, the velocity index is typically used to convert surface velocities to depth-averaged velocities. The velocity index is given by, k=Ub/Usurf, where Ub is the depth-averaged velocity and Usurf is the local surface velocity. The USGS (United States Geological Survey) standard value for this coefficient, k = 0.85, was determined from a series of laboratory experiments and has been widely used in the field and in laboratory measurements of volumetric discharge despite evidence that the velocity index is site-specific. Numerous studies have documented that the velocity index varies with Reynolds number, flow depth, and relative bed roughness and with the presence of secondary flows. A remote method of determining depth-averaged velocity and hence the velocity index is developed here. The technique leverages the findings of Johnson and Cowen (2017) and permits remote determination of the velocity power-law exponent thereby, enabling remote prediction of the vertical structure of the mean streamwise velocity, the depth-averaged velocity, and the velocity index.

  19. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  20. Demonstration of a Vector Velocity Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa......With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner...

  1. On whistler-mode group velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazhin, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical of the group velocity of whistler-mode waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field in a hot anisotropic plasma is presented. Some simple approximate formulae, which can be used for the magnetospheric applications, are derived. These formulae can predict some properties of this group velocity which were not previously recognized or were obtained by numerical methods. In particular, it is pointed out that the anisotropy tends to compensate for the influence of the electron temperature on the value of the group velocity when the wave frequency is well below the electron gyrofrequency. It is predicted, that under conditions at frequencies near the electron gyrofrequency, this velocity tends towards zero

  2. Velocity measurement of conductor using electromagnetic induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gu Hwa; Kim, Ho Young; Park, Joon Po; Jeong, Hee Tae; Lee, Eui Wan

    2002-01-01

    A basic technology was investigated to measure the speed of conductor by non-contact electromagnetic method. The principle of the velocity sensor was electromagnetic induction. To design electromagnet for velocity sensor, 2D electromagnetic analysis was performed using FEM software. The sensor output was analyzed according to the parameters of velocity sensor, such as the type of magnetizing currents and the lift-off. Output of magnetic sensor was linearly depended on the conductor speed and magnetizing current. To compensate the lift-off changes during measurement of velocity, the other magnetic sensor was put at the pole of electromagnet.

  3. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  4. Tomography of core-mantle boundary and lowermost mantle coupled by geodynamics: joint models of shear and compressional velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Soldati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We conduct joint tomographic inversions of P and S travel time observations to obtain models of delta v_P  and delta v_S in the entire mantle. We adopt a recently published method which takes into account the geodynamic coupling between mantle heterogeneity and core-mantle boundary (CMB topography by viscous flow, where sensitivity of the seismic travel times to the CMB is accounted for implicitly in the inversion (i.e. the CMB topography is not explicitly inverted for. The seismic maps of the Earth's mantle and CMB topography that we derive can explain the inverted seismic data while being physically consistent with each other. The approach involved scaling P-wave velocity (more sensitive to the CMB to density anomalies, in the assumption that mantle heterogeneity has a purely thermal origin, so that velocity and density heterogeneity are proportional to one another. On the other hand, it has sometimes been suggested that S-wave velocity might be more directly sensitive to temperature, while P heterogeneity is more strongly influenced by chemical composition. In the present study, we use only S-, and not P-velocity, to estimate density heterogeneity through linear scaling, and hence the sensitivity of core-reflected P phases to mantle structure. Regardless of whether density is more closely related to P- or S-velocity, we think it is worthwhile to explore both scaling approaches in our efforts to explain seismic data. The similarity of the results presented in this study to those obtained by scaling P-velocity to density suggests that compositional anomaly has a limited impact on viscous flow in the deep mantle.

  5. Generation of mesoscale F layer structure and electric fields by the combined Perkins and Es layer instabilities, in simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Cosgrove

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The generic equilibrium configuration of the nighttime midlatitude ionosphere consists of an F layer held up against gravity by winds and/or electric fields, and a sporadic E (Es layer located by a sheared wind field, which experiences the same electric fields as the F layer. This configuration is subject to two large-scale (e.g. >10 km "layer instabilities": one of the F layer known as the Perkins instability, and another of the Es layer which has been called the Es layer instability. Electric fields on scales larger than (about 10 km map very efficiently between the Es and F layers, and the two instabilities have a similar geometry, allowing them to interact with one another. As shown through a linear growth rate analysis, the two most important parameters governing the interaction are the relative horizontal velocity between the Es and F layers, and the integrated conductivity ratio ΣH/ΣPF, where ΣH and ΣPF are the field line integrated Hall conductivity of the Es layer, and the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity of the F layer, respectively. For both large and small relative velocities the growth rate was found to be more than double that of the Perkins instability alone, when ΣHΣPF=1.8. However, the characteristic eigenmode varies considerably with relative velocity, and different nonlinear behavior is expected in these two cases. As a follow up to the linear growth rate analysis, we explore in this article the nonlinear evolution of the unstable coupled system subject to a 200 km wavelength initial perturbation of the F layer, using a two-dimensional numerical solution of the two-fluid equations, as a function of relative horizontal velocity and ΣHΣPF. We find that when ΣHΣPF⪝0.5 the Perkins instability is able to control the dynamics and modulate the F layer altitude in 2 to 3 h time. However, the electric fields remain small until the altitude modulation is extremely large, and even then they are not large enough to

  6. Inversion of Love wave phase velocity using smoothness-constrained least-squares technique; Heikatsuka seiyakutsuki saisho jijoho ni yoru love ha iso sokudo no inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, S [Nippon Geophysical Prospecting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Smoothness-constrained least-squares technique with ABIC minimization was applied to the inversion of phase velocity of surface waves during geophysical exploration, to confirm its usefulness. Since this study aimed mainly at the applicability of the technique, Love wave was used which is easier to treat theoretically than Rayleigh wave. Stable successive approximation solutions could be obtained by the repeated improvement of velocity model of S-wave, and an objective model with high reliability could be determined. While, for the inversion with simple minimization of the residuals squares sum, stable solutions could be obtained by the repeated improvement, but the judgment of convergence was very hard due to the smoothness-constraint, which might make the obtained model in a state of over-fitting. In this study, Love wave was used to examine the applicability of the smoothness-constrained least-squares technique with ABIC minimization. Applicability of this to Rayleigh wave will be investigated. 8 refs.

  7. Moveout analysis of wide-azimuth data in the presence of lateral velocity variation

    KAUST Repository

    Takanashi, Mamoru

    2012-05-01

    Moveout analysis of wide-azimuth reflection data seldom takes into account lateral velocity variations on the scale of spreadlength. However, velocity lenses (such as channels and reefs) in the overburden can cause significant, laterally varying errors in the moveout parameters and distortions in data interpretation. Here, we present an analytic expression for the normal-moveout (NMO) ellipse in stratified media with lateral velocity variation. The contribution of lateral heterogeneity (LH) is controlled by the second derivatives of the interval vertical traveltime with respect to the horizontal coordinates, along with the depth and thickness of the LH layer. This equation provides a quick estimate of the influence of velocity lenses and can be used to substantially mitigate the lens-induced distortions in the effective and interval NMO ellipses. To account for velocity lenses in nonhyperbolic moveout inversion of wide-azimuth data, we propose a prestack correction algorithm that involves computation of the lens-induced traveltime distortion for each recorded trace. The overburden is assumed to be composed of horizontal layers (one of which contains the lens), but the target interval can be laterally heterogeneous with dipping or curved interfaces. Synthetic tests for horizontally layered models confirm that our algorithm accurately removes lens-related azimuthally varying traveltime shifts and errors in the moveout parameters. The developed methods should increase the robustness of seismic processing of wide-azimuth surveys, especially those acquired for fracture-characterization purposes. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  8. Moveout analysis of wide-azimuth data in the presence of lateral velocity variation

    KAUST Repository

    Takanashi, Mamoru; Tsvankin, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    Moveout analysis of wide-azimuth reflection data seldom takes into account lateral velocity variations on the scale of spreadlength. However, velocity lenses (such as channels and reefs) in the overburden can cause significant, laterally varying errors in the moveout parameters and distortions in data interpretation. Here, we present an analytic expression for the normal-moveout (NMO) ellipse in stratified media with lateral velocity variation. The contribution of lateral heterogeneity (LH) is controlled by the second derivatives of the interval vertical traveltime with respect to the horizontal coordinates, along with the depth and thickness of the LH layer. This equation provides a quick estimate of the influence of velocity lenses and can be used to substantially mitigate the lens-induced distortions in the effective and interval NMO ellipses. To account for velocity lenses in nonhyperbolic moveout inversion of wide-azimuth data, we propose a prestack correction algorithm that involves computation of the lens-induced traveltime distortion for each recorded trace. The overburden is assumed to be composed of horizontal layers (one of which contains the lens), but the target interval can be laterally heterogeneous with dipping or curved interfaces. Synthetic tests for horizontally layered models confirm that our algorithm accurately removes lens-related azimuthally varying traveltime shifts and errors in the moveout parameters. The developed methods should increase the robustness of seismic processing of wide-azimuth surveys, especially those acquired for fracture-characterization purposes. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Measurement uncertainty budget of an interferometric flow velocity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermuske, Mike; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Flow rate measurements are a common topic for process monitoring in chemical engineering and food industry. To achieve the requested low uncertainties of 0:1% for flow rate measurements, a precise measurement of the shear layers of such flows is necessary. The Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) is an established method for measuring local flow velocities. For exact estimation of the flow rate, the flow profile in the shear layer is of importance. For standard LDV the axial resolution and therefore the number of measurement points in the shear layer is defined by the length of the measurement volume. A decrease of this length is accompanied by a larger fringe distance variation along the measurement axis which results in a rise of the measurement uncertainty for the flow velocity (uncertainty relation between spatial resolution and velocity uncertainty). As a unique advantage, the laser Doppler profile sensor (LDV-PS) overcomes this problem by using two fan-like fringe systems to obtain the position of the measured particles along the measurement axis and therefore achieve a high spatial resolution while it still offers a low velocity uncertainty. With this technique, the flow rate can be estimated with one order of magnitude lower uncertainty, down to 0:05% statistical uncertainty.1 And flow profiles especially in film flows can be measured more accurately. The problem for this technique is, in contrast to laboratory setups where the system is quite stable, that for industrial applications the sensor needs a reliable and robust traceability to the SI units, meter and second. Small deviations in the calibration can, because of the highly position depending calibration function, cause large systematic errors in the measurement result. Therefore, a simple, stable and accurate tool is needed, that can easily be used in industrial surroundings to check or recalibrate the sensor. In this work, different calibration methods are presented and their influences to the

  10. A new approach for modeling dry deposition velocity of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M.; Buffa, P.

    2018-05-01

    The dry deposition process is recognized as an important pathway among the various removal processes of pollutants in the atmosphere. In this field, there are several models reported in the literature useful to predict the dry deposition velocity of particles of different diameters but many of them are not capable of representing dry deposition phenomena for several categories of pollutants and deposition surfaces. Moreover, their applications is valid for specific conditions and if the data in that application meet all of the assumptions required of the data used to define the model. In this paper a new dry deposition velocity model based on an electrical analogy schema is proposed to overcome the above issues. The dry deposition velocity is evaluated by assuming that the resistances that affect the particle flux in the Quasi-Laminar Sub-layers can be combined to take into account local features of the mutual influence of inertial impact processes and the turbulent one. Comparisons with the experimental data from literature indicate that the proposed model allows to capture with good agreement the main dry deposition phenomena for the examined environmental conditions and deposition surfaces to be determined. The proposed approach could be easily implemented within atmospheric dispersion modeling codes and efficiently addressing different deposition surfaces for several particle pollution.

  11. A parabolic velocity-decomposition method for wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Anshul; Briley, W. Roger; Sreenivas, Kidambi; Taylor, Lafayette K.

    2017-02-01

    An economical parabolized Navier-Stokes approximation for steady incompressible flow is combined with a compatible wind turbine model to simulate wind turbine flows, both upstream of the turbine and in downstream wake regions. The inviscid parabolizing approximation is based on a Helmholtz decomposition of the secondary velocity vector and physical order-of-magnitude estimates, rather than an axial pressure gradient approximation. The wind turbine is modeled by distributed source-term forces incorporating time-averaged aerodynamic forces generated by a blade-element momentum turbine model. A solution algorithm is given whose dependent variables are streamwise velocity, streamwise vorticity, and pressure, with secondary velocity determined by two-dimensional scalar and vector potentials. In addition to laminar and turbulent boundary-layer test cases, solutions for a streamwise vortex-convection test problem are assessed by mesh refinement and comparison with Navier-Stokes solutions using the same grid. Computed results for a single turbine and a three-turbine array are presented using the NREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine. These are also compared with an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solution computed with full rotor resolution. On balance, the agreement in turbine wake predictions for these test cases is very encouraging given the substantial differences in physical modeling fidelity and computer resources required.

  12. Drag and power-loss in rowing due to velocity fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greidanus, A.J.; Delfos, R.; Westerweel, J.; Jansen, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The flow motions in the turbulent boundary layer between water and a rowing boat initiate a turbulent skin friction. Reducing this skin friction results in better rowing performances. A Taylor-Couette (TC) facility was used to verify the power losses due to velocity fluctuations PV′ in

  13. Waveform tomography images of velocity and inelastic attenuation from the Mallik 2002 crosshole seismic surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, R.G.; Hou, F. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada); Bauer, K.; Weber, M. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    A time-lapse crosshole seismic survey was conducted at the Mallik field in Canada's Northwest Territories as part of the 2002 Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program. The acquired data provided information on the distribution of the compressional-velocity and compressional-attenuation properties of the sediments. Waveform tomography extracted that information and provided subwavelength high-resolution quantitative images of the seismic velocity and attenuation from the first repeat survey, using frequencies between 100 Hz and 1000 Hz. A preprocessing flow was applied to the waveform data that includes tube-wave suppression, low-pass filtering, spatial subsampling, time-windowing, and amplitude equalization. Travel times by anisotropic velocity tomography was used to obtain the starting model for the waveform tomography. The gas-hydrate-bearing sediments were seen as laterally, continuous, high-velocity anomalies and were characterized by an increase in attenuation. The velocity images resolved individual layers as thin as a few metres. These layers could be followed across the area of interest. Slight lateral changes in velocity and in the attenuation factor were observed.

  14. Velocity spectrum for the Iranian plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastami, Morteza; Soghrat, M. R.

    2018-01-01

    Peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration values have been proposed in most building codes/guidelines, unlike spectral velocity (SV) and peak ground velocity (PGV). Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of spectral velocity and peak ground velocity in the design of long period structures (e.g., pipelines, tunnels, tanks, and high-rise buildings) and evaluation of seismic vulnerability in underground structures. The current study was undertaken to develop a velocity spectrum and for estimation of PGV. In order to determine these parameters, 398 three-component accelerograms recorded by the Building and Housing Research Center (BHRC) were used. The moment magnitude (Mw) in the selected database was 4.1 to 7.3, and the events occurred after 1977. In the database, the average shear-wave velocity at 0 to 30 m in depth (Vs30) was available for only 217 records; thus, the site class for the remaining was estimated using empirical methods. Because of the importance of the velocity spectrum at low frequencies, the signal-to-noise ratio of 2 was chosen for determination of the low and high frequency to include a wider range of frequency content. This value can produce conservative results. After estimation of the shape of the velocity design spectrum, the PGV was also estimated for the region under study by finding the correlation between PGV and spectral acceleration at the period of 1 s.

  15. Analyses of hydraulic performance of velocity caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Degn Eskesen, Mark Chr.; Buhrkall, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic performance of a velocity cap has been investigated. Velocity caps are often used in connection with offshore intakes. CFD (computational fluid dynamics) examined the flow through the cap openings and further down into the intake pipes. This was combined with dimension analyses...

  16. Photoelectric Radial Velocities, Paper XIX Additional Spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ian velocity curve that does justice to the measurements, but it cannot be expected to have much predictive power. Key words. Stars: late-type—stars: radial velocities—spectroscopic binaries—orbits. 0. Preamble. The 'Redman K stars' are a lot of seventh-magnitude K stars whose radial velocities were first observed by ...

  17. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, V.; Rabinovitch, A.; Bahat, D.

    2006-01-01

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality

  18. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, V. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: vfrid@bgu.ac.il; Rabinovitch, A. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Bahat, D. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2006-07-31

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality.

  19. Estimation of blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    imaging, and, finally, some of the more recent experimental techniques. The authors shows that the Doppler shift, usually considered the way velocity is detected, actually, plays a minor role in pulsed systems. Rather, it is the shift of position of signals between pulses that is used in velocity...

  20. Peculiar velocity measurement in a clumpy universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Farhang; Baghram, Shant; Tavasoli, Saeed

    Aims: In this work, we address the issue of peculiar velocity measurement in a perturbed Friedmann universe using the deviations from measured luminosity distances of standard candles from background FRW universe. We want to show and quantify the statement that in intermediate redshifts (0.5 deviations from the background FRW model are not uniquely governed by peculiar velocities. Luminosity distances are modified by gravitational lensing. We also want to indicate the importance of relativistic calculations for peculiar velocity measurement at all redshifts. Methods: For this task, we discuss the relativistic correction on luminosity distance and redshift measurement and show the contribution of each of the corrections as lensing term, peculiar velocity of the source and Sachs-Wolfe effect. Then, we use the SNe Ia sample of Union 2, to investigate the relativistic effects, we consider. Results: We show that, using the conventional peculiar velocity method, that ignores the lensing effect, will result in an overestimate of the measured peculiar velocities at intermediate redshifts. Here, we quantify this effect. We show that at low redshifts the lensing effect is negligible compare to the effect of peculiar velocity. From the observational point of view, we show that the uncertainties on luminosity of the present SNe Ia data prevent us from precise measuring the peculiar velocities even at low redshifts (z < 0.2).

  1. Radial velocities of RR Lyrae stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, S.L.; Barnes, T.G. III

    1985-01-01

    283 spectra of 57 RR Lyrae stars have been obtained using the 2.1-m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Radial velocities were determined using a software cross-correlation technique. New mean radial velocities were determined for 46 of the stars. 11 references

  2. The measurement of low air flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghaei, A.; Mao, X.G.; Zanden, van der A.J.J.; Schaik, W.H.J.; Hendriks, N.A.

    2005-01-01

    Air flow velocity is measured with an acoustic sensor, which can be used especially for measuring low air flow velocities as well as the temperature of the air simultaneously. Two opposite transducers send a sound pulse towards each other. From the difference of the transit times, the air flow

  3. Critical Landau Velocity in Helium Nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, N.B.; Smolarek, S.; Loginov, E.; Mateo, D.; Hernando, A.; Pi, M.; Barranco, M.; Buma, W.J.; Drabbels, M.

    2013-01-01

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective

  4. Observation of E×B Flow Velocity Profile Change Using Doppler Reflectometry in HL-2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Wei-Wen; ZOU Xiao-Lan; DING Xuan-Tong; DONG Jia-Qi; LIU Ze-Tian; SONG Shao-Dong; GAO Ya-Dong; YAO Liang-Hua; FENG Bei-Bin; SONG Xian-Ming; CHEN Cheng-Yuan; SUN Hong-Juan; LI Yong-Gao; YANG Qing-Wei; YAN Long-Wen; LIU Yi; DUAN Xu-Ru; PAN Chuan-Hong; LIU Yong

    2009-01-01

    A broadband,O-mode sweeping Doppler reflectometry designed for measuring plasma E×B flow velocity profiles is operated in HL-2A.The main feature of the Doppler reflectometry is its capability to be tuned to any selected frequency in total waveband from 26-40 GHz.This property enables us to probe several plasma layers within a short time interval during a discharge,permitting the characterization of the radial distribution of plasma fluctuations.The system allows us to extract important information about the velocity change layer,namely its spatial localization.In purely Ohmic discharge a change of the E×B flow velocity profiles has been observed in the region for 28 < r < 30cm if only the line average density exceeds 2.2×1019 m-3.The density gradient change is measured in the same region,too.

  5. Propagation characteristics of SH wave in an mm2 piezoelectric layer on an elastic substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Kong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the propagation characteristics of shear horizontal (SH waves in a structure consisting of an elastic substrate and an mm2 piezoelectric layer with different cut orientations. The dispersion equations are derived for electrically open and shorted conditions on the free surface of the piezoelectric layer. The phase velocity and electromechanical coupling coefficient are calculated for a layered structure with a KNbO3 layer perfectly bonded to a diamond substrate. The dispersion curves for the electrically shorted boundary condition indicate that for a given cut orientation, the phase velocity of the first mode approaches the B-G wave velocity of the KNbO3 layer, while the phase velocities of the higher modes tend towards the limit velocity of the KNbO3 layer. For the electrically open boundary condition, the asymptotic phase velocities of all modes are the limit velocity of the KNbO3 layer. In addition, it is found that the electromechanical coupling coefficient strongly depends on the cut orientation of the KNbO3 crystal. The obtained results are useful in device applications.

  6. Comparison of high group velocity accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is well known that waveguides with no perturbations have phase velocities greater than the velocity of light c. If the waveguide dimensions are chosen so that the phase velocity is only moderately greater than c, only small perturbations are required to reduce the phase velocity to be synchronous with a high energy particle bunch. Such a lightly loaded accelerator structure will have smaller longitudinal and transverse wake potentials and hence will lead to lower emittance growth in an accelerated beam. Since these structures are lightly loaded, their group velocities are only slightly less than c and not in the order of 0.01c, as is the case for the standard disk-loaded structures. To ascertain that the peak and average power requirements for these structures are not prohibitive, we examine the elastance and the Q for several traveling wave structures: phase slip structures, bellows-like structures, and lightly loaded disk-loaded structures

  7. A glance at velocity structure of Izmir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özer, Çağlar, E-mail: caglar.ozer@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Engineering, Geophysical Engineering Department, Izmir (Turkey); Dokuz Eylul University, The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Geophysical Engineering, Izmir (Turkey); Polat, Orhan, E-mail: orhan.polat@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Engineering, Geophysical Engineering Department, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    In this study; we investigated velocity structure of Izmir and surroundings. We used local earthquake data which was recorded by different type of instruments and obtained high resolution 3D sections. We selected more than 400 earthquakes which were occurred between 2010 and 2013. Examined tomographic sections especially in Izmir along coastal areas (Mavisehir-Inciraltı); revealed the low speed zone. Along this low-speed zone; it is consistent with the results obtained from the stratigraphic section and surface geology. While; low velocity zones are associated with faults and water content; high velocity is related to magmatic rocks or compact rocks. Along Karsıyaka, Seferihisar, Orhanlı, Izmir fault zones; low P velocity was observed. When examined higher elevations of the topography; which are composed of soured magmatic material is dominated by high P velocity. In all horizontal sections; resolution decreasing with increasing depth. The reason for this; the reduction of earthquakes causes ray tracing problems.

  8. Finite-Source Inversion for the 2004 Parkfield Earthquake using 3D Velocity Model Green's Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A.; Dreger, D.; Larsen, S.

    2008-12-01

    We determine finite fault models of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake using 3D Green's functions. Because of the dense station coverage and detailed 3D velocity structure model in this region, this earthquake provides an excellent opportunity to examine how the 3D velocity structure affects the finite fault inverse solutions. Various studies (e.g. Michaels and Eberhart-Phillips, 1991; Thurber et al., 2006) indicate that there is a pronounced velocity contrast across the San Andreas Fault along the Parkfield segment. Also the fault zone at Parkfield is wide as evidenced by mapped surface faults and where surface slip and creep occurred in the 1966 and the 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. For high resolution images of the rupture process"Ait is necessary to include the accurate 3D velocity structure for the finite source inversion. Liu and Aurchuleta (2004) performed finite fault inversions using both 1D and 3D Green's functions for 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake using the same source paramerization and data but different Green's functions and found that the models were quite different. This indicates that the choice of the velocity model significantly affects the waveform modeling at near-fault stations. In this study, we used the P-wave velocity model developed by Thurber et al (2006) to construct the 3D Green's functions. P-wave speeds are converted to S-wave speeds and density using by the empirical relationships of Brocher (2005). Using a finite difference method, E3D (Larsen and Schultz, 1995), we computed the 3D Green's functions numerically by inserting body forces at each station. Using reciprocity, these Green's functions are recombined to represent the ground motion at each station due to the slip on the fault plane. First we modeled the waveforms of small earthquakes to validate the 3D velocity model and the reciprocity of the Green"fs function. In the numerical tests we found that the 3D velocity model predicted the individual phases well at frequencies lower than 0

  9. Combined estimation of kappa and shear-wave velocity profile of the Japanese rock reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Valerio; Edwards, Benjamin; Fäh, Donat

    2013-04-01

    The definition of a common soil or rock reference is a key issue in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), microzonation studies, local site-response analysis and, more generally, when predicted or observed ground motion is compared for sites of different characteristics. A scaling procedure, which accounts for a common reference, is then necessary to avoid bias induced by the differences in the local geology. Nowadays methods requiring the definition of a reference condition generally prescribe the characteristic of a rock reference, calibrated using indirect estimation methods based on geology or on surface proxies. In most cases, a unique average shear-wave velocity value is prescribed (e.g. Vs30 = 800m/s as for class A of the EUROCODE8). Some attempts at defining the whole shape of a reference rock velocity profile have been described, often without a clear physical justification of how such a selection was performed. Moreover, in spite of its relevance in affecting the high-frequency part of the spectrum, the definition of the associated reference attenuation is in most cases missing or, when present, still remains quite uncertain. In this study we propose an approach that is based on the comparison between empirical anelastic amplification functions from spectral modeling of earthquakes and average S-wave velocities computed using the quarter-wavelength approach. The method is an extension of the approach originally proposed by Poggi et al. (2011) for Switzerland, and is here applied to Japan. For the analysis we make use of a selection of 36 stiff-soil and rock sites from the Japanese KiK-net network, for which a measured velocity profile is available. With respect to the previous study, however, we now analyze separately the elastic and anelastic contributions of the estimated empirical amplification. In a first step - which is consistent with the original work - only the elastic part of the amplification spectrum is considered. This procedure allows

  10. Shear layer characteristics of supersonic free and impinging jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. B.; Kumar, R.

    2015-09-01

    The initial shear layer characteristics of a jet play an important role in the initiation and development of instabilities and hence radiated noise. Particle image velocimetry has been utilized to study the initial shear layer development of supersonic free and impinging jets. Microjet control employed to reduce flow unsteadiness and jet noise appears to affect the development of the shear layer, particularly near the nozzle exit. Velocity field measurements near the nozzle exit show that the initially thin, uncontrolled shear layer develops at a constant rate while microjet control is characterized by a rapid nonlinear thickening that asymptotes downstream. The shear layer linear growth rate with microjet control, in both the free and the impinging jet, is diminished. In addition, the thickened shear layer with control leads to a reduction in azimuthal vorticity for both free and impinging jets. Linear stability theory is used to compute unstable growth rates and convection velocities of the resultant velocity profiles. The results show that while the convection velocity is largely unaffected, the unstable growth rates are significantly reduced over all frequencies with microjet injection. For the case of the impinging jet, microjet control leads to near elimination of the impingement tones and an appreciable reduction in broadband levels. Similarly, for the free jet, significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels in the peak radiation direction is observed.

  11. Rational Rock Physics for Improved Velocity Prediction and Reservoir Properties Estimation for Granite Wash (Tight Sands in Anadarko Basin, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Z. A. Durrani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complex nature, deriving elastic properties from seismic data for the prolific Granite Wash reservoir (Pennsylvanian age in the western Anadarko Basin Wheeler County (Texas is quite a challenge. In this paper, we used rock physics tool to describe the diagenesis and accurate estimation of seismic velocities of P and S waves in Granite Wash reservoir. Hertz-Mindlin and Cementation (Dvorkin’s theories are applied to analyze the nature of the reservoir rocks (uncemented and cemented. In the implementation of rock physics diagnostics, three classical rock physics (empirical relations, Kuster-Toksöz, and Berryman models are comparatively analyzed for velocity prediction taking into account the pore shape geometry. An empirical (VP-VS relationship is also generated calibrated with core data for shear wave velocity prediction. Finally, we discussed the advantages of each rock physics model in detail. In addition, cross-plots of unconventional attributes help us in the clear separation of anomalous zone and lithologic properties of sand and shale facies over conventional attributes.

  12. Terminal velocity of liquids and granular materials dispersed by a high explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, J.; Pontalier, Q.; Milne, A. M.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.

    2018-04-01

    The explosive dispersal of a layer of solid particles or a layer of liquid surrounding a spherical high-explosive charge generates a turbulent, multiphase flow. Shock compression of the material layer during the initial acceleration may partially consolidate the material, leading to the formation of jet-like structures when the layer fragments and sheds particles upon release. Similarly, release of a shock-compressed liquid shell causes the nucleation of cavitation sites, leading to the radial breakup of the shell and the formation of jets upon expansion. In the current study, a wide variety of granular materials and liquids were explosively dispersed. The maximum terminal jet tip or shell velocity was measured using high-speed videography. Charges were constructed using thin-walled glass bulbs of various diameters and contained a central C-4 charge surrounded by the material to be dispersed. This permitted variation of the ratio of material mass to charge mass (M/C) from 4 to 300. Results indicated that material velocity broadly correlates with predictions of the Gurney model. For liquids, the terminal velocity was accurately predicted by the Gurney model. For granular materials, Gurney over-predicted the terminal velocity by 25-60%, depending on the M/C ratio, with larger M/C values exhibiting larger deficits. These deficits are explained by energy dissipation during the collapse of voids in the granular material bed. Velocity deficits were insensitive to the degree of jetting and granular material properties. Empirical corrections to the Gurney model are presented with improved agreement with the dry powder experimental velocities.

  13. Terminal velocity of liquids and granular materials dispersed by a high explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, J.; Pontalier, Q.; Milne, A. M.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.

    2018-05-01

    The explosive dispersal of a layer of solid particles or a layer of liquid surrounding a spherical high-explosive charge generates a turbulent, multiphase flow. Shock compression of the material layer during the initial acceleration may partially consolidate the material, leading to the formation of jet-like structures when the layer fragments and sheds particles upon release. Similarly, release of a shock-compressed liquid shell causes the nucleation of cavitation sites, leading to the radial breakup of the shell and the formation of jets upon expansion. In the current study, a wide variety of granular materials and liquids were explosively dispersed. The maximum terminal jet tip or shell velocity was measured using high-speed videography. Charges were constructed using thin-walled glass bulbs of various diameters and contained a central C-4 charge surrounded by the material to be dispersed. This permitted variation of the ratio of material mass to charge mass ( M/ C) from 4 to 300. Results indicated that material velocity broadly correlates with predictions of the Gurney model. For liquids, the terminal velocity was accurately predicted by the Gurney model. For granular materials, Gurney over-predicted the terminal velocity by 25-60%, depending on the M/ C ratio, with larger M/ C values exhibiting larger deficits. These deficits are explained by energy dissipation during the collapse of voids in the granular material bed. Velocity deficits were insensitive to the degree of jetting and granular material properties. Empirical corrections to the Gurney model are presented with improved agreement with the dry powder experimental velocities.

  14. Flow structure in a downward branch pipe with a closed end. Characteristics of flow velocity in the branch pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Koji; Nakamura, Akira; Takenaka, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Many pipes branch off from a main pipe in industrial plants. The penetration of hot water into the branch pipe causes thermal stratification. The thermal stratification layer fluctuates and causes thermal fatigue. The characteristics of velocity distributions in the branch pipe for inner diameters from D_b=21 mm to 43 mm were investigated by laser Doppler velocimetry in this paper. As for the flow in the branch pipe at L=4D_b, the mean velocity of the spiral flow was a simple forced vortex which indicated a straight velocity distribution. The maximum circumferential velocity U_θ _m_a_x and minimum axial velocity U_z _m_i_n at L=4D_b were expressed with D_b and main flow velocity. Empirical formulas were proposed for estimating the distributions of U_θ _m_a_x and U_z _m_i_n in the axial direction. (author)

  15. Homogenization and implementation of a 3D regional velocity model in Mexico for its application in moment tensor inversion of intermediate-magnitude earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Cardozo, Félix; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Caló, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Moment tensor inversions for intermediate and small earthquakes (M. < 4.5) are challenging as they principally excite relatively short period seismic waves that interact strongly with local heterogeneities. Incorporating detailed regional 3D velocity models permits obtaining realistic synthetic seismograms and recover the seismic source parameters these smaller events. Two 3D regional velocity models have recently been developed for Mexico, using surface waves and seismic noise tomography (Spica et al., 2016; Gaite et al., 2015), which could be used to model the waveforms of intermediate magnitud earthquakes in this region. Such models are parameterized as layered velocity profiles and for some of the profiles, the velocity difference between two layers are considerable. The "jump" in velocities between two layers is inconvenient for some methods and algorithms that calculate synthetic waveforms, in particular for the method that we are using, the spectral element method (SPECFEM3D GLOBE, Komatitsch y Tromp, 2000), when the mesh does not follow the layer boundaries. In order to make the velocity models more easily implementec in SPECFEM3D GLOBE it is neccesary to apply a homogenization algorithm (Capdeville et al., 2015) such that the (now anisotropic) layer velocities are smoothly varying with depth. In this work, we apply a homogenization algorithm to the regional velocity models in México for implementing them in SPECFEM3D GLOBE, calculate synthetic waveforms for intermediate-magnitude earthquakes in México and invert them for the seismic moment tensor.

  16. Influence of lateral slab edge distance on plate velocity, trench velocity, and subduction partitioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Stegman, D. R.; Farrington, R. J.; Moresi, L.

    2011-01-01

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere occurs through both trenchward subducting plate motion and trench retreat. We investigate how subducting plate velocity, trench velocity and the partitioning of these two velocity components vary for individual subduction zone segments as a function of proximity to

  17. Mean Velocity vs. Mean Propulsive Velocity vs. Peak Velocity: Which Variable Determines Bench Press Relative Load With Higher Reliability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Pestaña-Melero, Francisco L; Pérez-Castilla, Alejandro; Rojas, Francisco J; Gregory Haff, G

    2018-05-01

    García-Ramos, A, Pestaña-Melero, FL, Pérez-Castilla, A, Rojas, FJ, and Haff, GG. Mean velocity vs. mean propulsive velocity vs. peak velocity: which variable determines bench press relative load with higher reliability? J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1273-1279, 2018-This study aimed to compare between 3 velocity variables (mean velocity [MV], mean propulsive velocity [MPV], and peak velocity [PV]): (a) the linearity of the load-velocity relationship, (b) the accuracy of general regression equations to predict relative load (%1RM), and (c) the between-session reliability of the velocity attained at each percentage of the 1-repetition maximum (%1RM). The full load-velocity relationship of 30 men was evaluated by means of linear regression models in the concentric-only and eccentric-concentric bench press throw (BPT) variants performed with a Smith machine. The 2 sessions of each BPT variant were performed within the same week separated by 48-72 hours. The main findings were as follows: (a) the MV showed the strongest linearity of the load-velocity relationship (median r = 0.989 for concentric-only BPT and 0.993 for eccentric-concentric BPT), followed by MPV (median r = 0.983 for concentric-only BPT and 0.980 for eccentric-concentric BPT), and finally PV (median r = 0.974 for concentric-only BPT and 0.969 for eccentric-concentric BPT); (b) the accuracy of the general regression equations to predict relative load (%1RM) from movement velocity was higher for MV (SEE = 3.80-4.76%1RM) than for MPV (SEE = 4.91-5.56%1RM) and PV (SEE = 5.36-5.77%1RM); and (c) the PV showed the lowest within-subjects coefficient of variation (3.50%-3.87%), followed by MV (4.05%-4.93%), and finally MPV (5.11%-6.03%). Taken together, these results suggest that the MV could be the most appropriate variable for monitoring the relative load (%1RM) in the BPT exercise performed in a Smith machine.

  18. Anomalous density and elastic properties of basalt at high pressure: Reevaluating of the effect of melt fraction on seismic velocity in the Earth's crust and upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alisha N.; Lesher, Charles E.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Wang, Yanbin

    2016-06-01

    Independent measurements of the volumetric and elastic properties of Columbia River basalt glass were made up to 5.5 GPa by high-pressure X-ray microtomography and GHz-ultrasonic interferometry, respectively. The Columbia River basalt displays P and S wave velocity minima at 4.5 and 5 GPa, respectively, violating Birch's law. These data constrain the pressure dependence of the density and elastic moduli at high pressure, which cannot be modeled through usual equations of state nor determined by stepwise integrating the bulk sound velocity as is common practice. We propose a systematic variation in compression behavior of silicate glasses that is dependent on the degree of polymerization and arises from the flexibility of the aluminosilicate network. This behavior likely persists into the liquid state for basaltic melts resulting in weak pressure dependence for P wave velocities perhaps to depths of the transition zone. Modeling the effect of partial melt on P wave velocity reductions suggests that melt fraction determined by seismic velocity variations may be significantly overestimated in the crust and upper mantle.

  19. Spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations in jet mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. G.; Adrian, R. J.; Nithianandan, C. K.; Planchon, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral similarity laws are derived for the power spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations by application of dimensional analysis in the limit of large turbulent Reynolds number. The theory predicts that pressure spectra are generated by three distinct types of interaction in the velocity fields: a fourth order interaction between fluctuating velocities, an interaction between the first order mean shear and the third order velocity fluctuations, and an interaction between the second order mean shear rate and the second order fluctuating velocity. Measurements of one-dimensional power spectra of the turbulent static pressure fluctuations in the driven mixing layer of a subsonic, circular jet are presented, and the spectra are examined for evidence of spectral similarity. Spectral similarity is found for the low wavenumber range when the large scale flow on the centerline of the mixing layer is self-preserving. The data are also consistent with the existence of universal inertial subranges for the spectra of each interaction mode.

  20. Statistically optimized near field acoustic holography using an array of pressure-velocity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Jaud, Virginie

    2007-01-01

    of a measurement aperture that extends well beyond the source can be relaxed. Both NAH and SONAH are based on the assumption that all sources are on one side of the measurement plane whereas the other side is source free. An extension of the SONAH procedure based on measurement with a double layer array...... of pressure microphones has been suggested. The double layer technique makes it possible to distinguish between sources on the two sides of the array and thus suppress the influence of extraneous noise coming from the “wrong” side. It has also recently been demonstrated that there are significant advantages...... in NAH based on an array of acoustic particle velocity transducers (in a single layer) compared with NAH based on an array of pressure microphones. This investigation combines the two ideas and examines SONAH based on an array of pressure-velocity intensity probes through computer simulations as well...

  1. Analysis of photosynthate translocation velocity and measurement of weighted average velocity in transporting pathway of crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Cailin; Luo Shishi; Gong Jian; Zhang Hao; Ma Fei

    1996-08-01

    The translocation profile pattern of 14 C-photosynthate along the transporting pathway in crops were monitored by pulse-labelling a mature leaf with 14 CO 2 . The progressive spreading of translocation profile pattern along the sheath or stem indicates that the translocation of photosynthate along the sheath or stem proceed with a range of velocities rather than with just a single velocity. The method for measuring the weighted average velocity of photosynthate translocation along the sheath or stem was established in living crops. The weighted average velocity and the maximum velocity of photosynthate translocation along the sheath in rice and maize were measured actually. (4 figs., 3 tabs.)

  2. Elastic wave velocity and acoustic emission monitoring during Gypsum dehydration under triaxial stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantut, N.; David, E. C.; Héripré, E.; Schubnel, A. J.; Zimmerman, R. W.; Gueguen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Dehydration experiments were performed on natural Gypsum polycrystal samples coming from Volterra, Italy in order to study contemporaneously the evolution of P and S elastic wave velocities and acoustic emission (AE) triggering. During these experiments, temperature was slowly raised at 0.15 degrees C per minute under constant stress conditions. Two experiments were realized under quasi-hydrostatic stress (15 and 55 MPa respectively). The third experiment was realized under constant triaxial stress (σ3=45MPa, σ1=75MPa). All three were drained (10MPa constant pore pressure). In each experiments, both P and S wave velocities reduced drastically (as much as approx. 50% in the low confining pressure case) at the onset of dehydration. Importantly, the Vp/Vs ratio also decreased. Shortly after the onset of decrease in P and S wave velocities, the dehydration reaction was also accompanied by bursts of AEs. Time serie locations of the AEs show that they initiated from the pore pressure port, ie from where the pore fluid could easily be drained, and then slowly migrated within the sample. In each experiments, the AE rate could be positively correlated to the reaction rate, inferred from pore volumetry. In such a way, the AE rate reached a peak when the reaction was the fastest. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed they had a large volumetric component in compaction, confirming that AEs were indeed related to pore closure and/or collapse. In addition, the AE rate also increased with confinement, ie when a larger amount of compaction was observed. Interestingly, when under differential stress conditions, AE focal mechanisms were mainly in shear. Additional dehydration experiments performed within an environmental scanning electron microscope under low vacuum highlight that, in drained conditions at least, the reaction seems to take place in two phases. First, cracks are being opened along cleavage planes within a single gypsum crystal, which allows for the

  3. Performance of a vector velocity estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    tracking can be found in the literature, but no method with a satisfactory performance has been found that can be used in a commercial implementation. A method for estimation of the velocity vector is presented. Here an oscillation transverse to the ultrasound beam is generated, so that a transverse motion...... in an autocorrelation approach that yields both the axial and the lateral velocity, and thus the velocity vector. The method has the advantage that a standard array transducer and a modified digital beamformer, like those used in modern ultrasound scanners, is sufficient to obtain the information needed. The signal...

  4. Balance Velocities of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joughin, Ian; Fahnestock, Mark; Ekholm, Simon; Kwok, Ron

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetry data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail the location of an ice stream in northeastern Greenland, which was only recently discovered using satellite imagery. Enhanced flow associated with all of the major outlets is clearly visible, although small errors in the source data result in less accurate estimates of the absolute flow speeds. Nevertheless, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning.

  5. Superhilac real-time velocity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Meaney, D.; Thatcher, R.; Timossi, C.

    1987-03-01

    Phase probes have been placed in several external beam lines at the LBL heavy ion linear accelerator (SuperHILAC) to provide non-destructive velocity measurements independent of the ion being accelerated. The existing system has been improved to provide the following features: a display refresh rate better than twice per second, a sensitive pseudo-correlation technique to pick out the signal from the noise, simultaneous measurements of up to four ion velocities when more than one beam is being accelerated, and a touch-screen operator interface. These improvements allow the system to be used as a routine tuning aid and beam velocity monitor

  6. Sound velocity in potassium hydroxide aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapuryan, Kh.D.; Aleksandrov, A.A.; Kochetkov, A.I.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of ultrasonic velocities in potassium hydroxide aqueous solutions are carried out within the frames of studies on improvement of water chemistry in NPP cooling systems. Method of echo pulses superposition with acoustic path length of 41.447 mm is used for measurements. The measurements are performed at 2.6 MHz frequency. Complex temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is determined. Ultrasonic velocity dependence on pressure is close to linear one. The formula for calculation of thermodynamic properties of the studied solutions on the basis of experimental data obtained is proposed

  7. Neutron stars velocities and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paret, Daryel Manreza; Martinez, A. Perez; Ayala, Alejandro.; Piccinelli, G.; Sanchez, A.

    2018-01-01

    We study a model that explain neutron stars velocities due to the anisotropic emission of neutrinos. Strong magnetic fields present in neutron stars are the source of the anisotropy in the system. To compute the velocity of the neutron star we model its core as composed by strange quark matter and analice the properties of a magnetized quark gas at finite temperature and density. Specifically we have obtained the electron polarization and the specific heat of magnetized fermions as a functions of the temperature, chemical potential and magnetic field which allow us to study the velocity of the neutron star as a function of these parameters.

  8. Shuttlecock Velocity of a Badminton Drop Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampharin Ongvises

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a badminton ‘drop shot’, the shuttlecock is struck by a non-rotating racquet at low speed. In this investigation, a shuttlecock was hit by a badminton racquet in a linear collision, simulating a drop shot. The collision was recorded with high-speed video and the velocities of the racquet and shuttlecock determined. The relationship between the impact velocity of the racquet and the velocity of the shuttlecock as it leaves the badminton racquet after collision was found to be proportional over the range tested.

  9. Shuttlecock Velocity of a Badminton Drop Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampharin Ongvises

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a badminton ‘drop shot’, the shuttlecock is struck by a non-rotating racquet at low speed. In this investigation, a shuttlecock was hit by a badminton racquet in a linear collision, simulating a drop shot. The collision was recorded with high-speed video and the velocities of the racquet and shuttlecock determined. The relationship between the impact velocity of the racquet and the velocity of the shuttlecock as it leaves the badminton racquet after collision was found to be proportional over the range tested.

  10. Velocity Segregation and Systematic Biases In Velocity Dispersion Estimates with the SPT-GMOS Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Matthew. B.; Zengo, Kyle; Ruel, Jonathan; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Bulbul, Esra; Brodwin, Mark; Capasso, Raffaella; Chiu, I.-non; McDonald, Michael; Rapetti, David; Saro, Alex; Stalder, Brian; Stark, Antony A.; Strazzullo, Veronica; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2017-03-01

    The velocity distribution of galaxies in clusters is not universal; rather, galaxies are segregated according to their spectral type and relative luminosity. We examine the velocity distributions of different populations of galaxies within 89 Sunyaev Zel’dovich (SZ) selected galaxy clusters spanning 0.28GMOS spectroscopic survey, supplemented by additional published spectroscopy, resulting in a final spectroscopic sample of 4148 galaxy spectra—2868 cluster members. The velocity dispersion of star-forming cluster galaxies is 17 ± 4% greater than that of passive cluster galaxies, and the velocity dispersion of bright (m< {m}* -0.5) cluster galaxies is 11 ± 4% lower than the velocity dispersion of our total member population. We find good agreement with simulations regarding the shape of the relationship between the measured velocity dispersion and the fraction of passive versus star-forming galaxies used to measure it, but we find a small offset between this relationship as measured in data and simulations, which suggests that our dispersions are systematically low by as much as 3% relative to simulations. We argue that this offset could be interpreted as a measurement of the effective velocity bias that describes the ratio of our observed velocity dispersions and the intrinsic velocity dispersion of dark matter particles in a published simulation result. Measuring velocity bias in this way suggests that large spectroscopic surveys can improve dispersion-based mass-observable scaling relations for cosmology even in the face of velocity biases, by quantifying and ultimately calibrating them out.

  11. Determination of the filtration velocities and mean velocity in ground waters using radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran P, Oscar; Diaz V, Francisco; Heresi M, Nelida

    1994-01-01

    An experimental method to determine filtration, or, Darcy velocity and mean velocity in underground waters using radiotracers, is described. After selecting the most appropriate tracers, from 6 chemical compounds, to measure water velocity, a method to measure filtration velocity was developed. By fully labelling the water column with 2 radioisotopes, Br and tritium, almost identical values were obtained for the aquifer filtration velocity in the sounding S1. This value was 0.04 m/d. Field porosity was calculated at 11% and mean velocity at 0.37 m.d. With the filtration velocity value and knowing the hydraulic variation between the soundings S1 and S2 placed at 10 meters, field permeability was estimated at 2.4 x 10 m/s. (author)

  12. Crustal composition in the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt estimated from seismic velocity by laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Toyoshima, T.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the dynamics of the lithosphere in subduction systems, the knowledge of rock composition is significant. However, rock composition of the overriding plate is still poorly understood. To estimate rock composition of the lithosphere, it is an effective method to compare the elastic wave velocities measured under the high pressure and temperature condition with the seismic velocities obtained by active source experiment and earthquake observation. Due to an arc-arc collision in central Hokkaido, middle to lower crust is exposed along the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt (HMB), providing exceptional opportunities to study crust composition of an island arc. Across the HMB, P-wave velocity model has been constructed by refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic profiling (Iwasaki et al., 2004). Furthermore, because of the interpretation of the crustal structure (Ito, 2000), we can follow a continuous pass from the surface to the middle-lower crust. We corrected representative rock samples from HMB and measured ultrasonic P-wave (Vp) and S-wave velocities (Vs) under the pressure up to 1.0 GPa in a temperature range from 25 to 400 °C. For example, the Vp values measured at 25 °C and 0.5 GPa are 5.88 km/s for the granite (74.29 wt.% SiO2), 6.02-6.34 km/s for the tonalites (66.31-68.92 wt.% SiO2), 6.34 km/s for the gneiss (64.69 wt.% SiO2), 6.41-7.05 km/s for the amphibolites (50.06-51.13 wt.% SiO2), and 7.42 km/s for the mafic granulite (50.94 wt.% SiO2). And, Vp of tonalites showed a correlation with SiO2 (wt.%). Comparing with the velocity profiles across the HMB (Iwasaki et al., 2004), we estimate that the lower to middle crust consists of amphibolite and tonalite, and the estimated acoustic impedance contrast between them suggests an existence of a clear reflective boundary, which accords well to the obtained seismic reflection profile (Iwasaki et al., 2014). And, we can obtain the same tendency from comparing measured Vp/Vs ratio and Vp/Vs ratio structure model

  13. Exact solution of nonsteady thermal boundary layer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorfman, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    There are only a few exact solutions of the thermal boundary layer equation. Most of them are derived for a specific surface temperature distribution. The first exact solution of the steady-state boundary layer equation was given for a plate with constant surface temperature and free-stream velocity. The same problem for a plate with polynomial surface temperature distribution was solved by Chapmen and Rubesin. Levy gave the exact solution for the case of a power law distribution of both surface temperature and free-stream velocity. The exact solution of the steady-state boundary layer equation for an arbitrary surface temperature and a power law free-stream velocity distribution was given by the author in two forms: of series and of the integral with an influence function of unheated zone. A similar solution of the nonsteady thermal boundary layer equation for an arbitrary surface temperature and a power law free-stream velocity distribution is presented here. In this case, the coefficients of series depend on time, and in the limit t → ∞ they become the constant coefficients of a similar solution published before. This solution, unlike the one presented here, does not satisfy the initial conditions at t = 0, and, hence, can be used only in time after the beginning of the process. The solution in the form of a series becomes a closed-form exact solution for polynomial surface temperature and a power law free-stream velocity distribution. 7 refs., 2 figs

  14. Low-velocity superconducting accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper reviews the status of RF superconductivity as applied to low-velocity accelerating properties. Heavy-ion accelerators must accelerate efficiently particles which travel at a velocity much smaller than that of light particles, whose velocity changes along accelerator, and also different particles which have different velocity profiles. Heavy-ion superconducting accelerators operate at frequencies which are lower than high-energy superconducting accelerators. The present paper first discusses the basic features of heavy-ion superconducting structures and linacs. Design choices are then addressed focusing on structure geometry, materials, frequency, phase control, and focusing. The report also gives an outline of the status of superconducting booster projects currently under way at the Argonne National Laboratory, SUNY Stony Brook, Weizmann Institute, University of Washington, Florida State, Saclay, Kansas State, Daresbury, Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute, Legnaro, Bombay, Sao Paulo, ANU (Canberra), and Munich. Recent developments and future prospects are also described. (N.K.) 68 refs

  15. Wave Velocity Estimation in Heterogeneous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, modulating functions-based method is proposed for estimating space-time dependent unknown velocity in the wave equation. The proposed method simplifies the identification problem into a system of linear algebraic equations. Numerical

  16. Ultrasonic velocity measurements in expanded liquid mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Inutake, M.; Fujiwaka, S.

    1977-10-01

    In this paper we present the first results of the sound velocity measurements in expanded liquid mercury. The measurements were made at temperatures up to 1600 0 C and pressures up to 1700 kg/cm 2 by means of an ultrasonic pulse transmission/echo technique which was newly developed for such high temperature/pressure condition. When the density is larger than 9 g/cm 3 , the observed sound velocity decreases linearly with decreasing density. At densities smaller than 9 g/cm 3 , the linear dependence on the density is no longer observed. The observed sound velocity approaches a minimum near the liquid-gas critical point (rho sub(cr) asymptotically equals 5.5 g/cm 3 ). The existing theories for sound velocity in liquid metals fail to explain the observed results. (auth.)

  17. Spectator-velocity pions from heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Ridout, J.; Murphy, D.; Radi, H.M.A.

    1982-11-01

    The discussion centers on pions in the velocity regions of target and projectile, where strong spectral features appear. The topics covered include stopped-pion studies, and convoy pions in the projectile frame

  18. Imaging chemical reactions - 3D velocity mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichinin, A. I.; Gericke, K.-H.; Kauczok, S.; Maul, C.

    Visualising a collision between an atom or a molecule or a photodissociation (half-collision) of a molecule on a single particle and single quantum level is like watching the collision of billiard balls on a pool table: Molecular beams or monoenergetic photodissociation products provide the colliding reactants at controlled velocity before the reaction products velocity is imaged directly with an elaborate camera system, where one should keep in mind that velocity is, in general, a three-dimensional (3D) vectorial property which combines scattering angles and speed. If the processes under study have no cylindrical symmetry, then only this 3D product velocity vector contains the full information of the elementary process under study.

  19. Spectral Velocity Estimation in the Transverse Direction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    A method for estimating the velocity spectrum for a fully transverse flow at a beam-to-flow angle of 90is described. The approach is based on the transverse oscillation (TO) method, where an oscillation across the ultrasound beam is made during receive processing. A fourth-order estimator based...... on the correlation of the received signal is derived. A Fourier transform of the correlation signal yields the velocity spectrum. Performing the estimation for short data segments gives the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, and it also works for a beam-to-flow angle of 90...... estimation scheme can reliably find the spectrum at 90, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with the SARUS experimental scanner and a BK 8820e convex array transducer (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark). A CompuFlow 1000 (Shelley Automation, Inc, Toronto, Canada...

  20. The critical ionization velocity - a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.; Brenning, N.; Raadu, M.A.

    1982-12-01

    A list of all relevant contributions, known to the authors, concerning the critical ionization velocity phenomena is presented. The contributions are classified and described in a few sentences. (Authors)

  1. The species velocity of trees in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, B. D.; Napier, J.; de Lafontaine, G.; Heath, K.; Li, B.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has motivated interest in the paleo record to enhance our knowledge about past vegetation responses to climate change and help understand potential responses in the future. Additionally, polar regions currently experience the most rapid rates of climate change globally, prompting concern over changes in the ecological composition of high latitude ecosystems. Recent analyses have attempted to construct methods to estimate a species' ability to track climate change by computing climate velocity; a measure of the rate of climate displacement across a landscape which may indicate the speed an organism must migrate to keep pace with climate change. However, a challenge to using climate velocity in understanding range shifts is a lack of species-specificity in the velocity calculations: climate velocity does not actually use any species data in its analysis. To solve the shortcomings of climate velocity in estimating species displacement rates, we computed the "species velocity" of white spruce, green and grey alder populations across the state of Alaska from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to today. Species velocity represents the rate and direction a species is required to migrate to keep pace with a changing climate following the LGM. We used a species distribution model to determine past and present white spruce and alder distributions using statistically downscaled climate data at 60m. Species velocity was then derived from the change in species distribution per year by the change in distribution over Alaska (km/yr). High velocities indicate locations where the species environmental envelope is changing drastically and must disperse rapidly to survive climate change. As a result, high velocity regions are more vulnerable to distribution shifts and higher risk of local extinction. Conversely, low species velocities indicate locations where the local climate envelope is shifting relatively slowly, reducing the stress to disperse quickly

  2. Experimental demonstration of the Rayleigh acoustic viscous boundary layer theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón-Pita, J R; Castrejón-Pita, A A; Huelsz, G; Tovar, R

    2006-03-01

    Amplitude and phase velocity measurements on the laminar oscillatory viscous boundary layer produced by acoustic waves are presented. The measurements were carried out in acoustic standing waves in air with frequencies of 68.5 and 114.5 Hz using laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry. The results obtained by these two techniques are in good agreement with the predictions made by the Rayleigh viscous boundary layer theory and confirm the existence of a local maximum of the velocity amplitude and its expected location.

  3. Experimental investigation of ultrasonic velocity anisotropy in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/077/02/0345-0355. Keywords. Magnetic fluids; ultrasonic wave; sound velocity; anisotropy. Abstract. Magnetic field-induced dispersion of ultrasonic velocity in a Mn0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 fluid (applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the ultrasonic propagation vector) is ...

  4. Jovian cloud structure and velocity fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.L.; Terrile, R.J.; Collins, S.A.; Smith, B.A.; Muller, J.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Hunt, G.E.; Beebe, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    A regional comparison of the cloud structures and velocity fields (meridional as well as zonal velocities) in the jovian atmosphere (scales > 200 km) as observed by the Voyager 1 imaging system is given. It is shown that although both hemispheres of Jupiter show similar patterns of diminishing and alternating eastward and westward jets as one progresses polewards, there is a pronounced asymmetry in the structural appearance of the two hemispheres. (UK)

  5. On the velocity of the Vela pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that if the shell of the Vela supernova remnant is responsible for nearly all the scattering of the Vela pulsar, then the scintillation and proper motion velocities of the pulsar can only be reconciled with each other in the case of nonzero transverse velocity of the scattering material. A possible origin of large-scale transverse motions in the shell of the Vela supernova remnant is discussed.

  6. On the velocity of the Vela pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V.

    2001-04-01

    It is shown that if the shell of the Vela supernova remnant is responsible for nearly all the scattering of the Vela pulsar, then the scintillation and proper motion velocities of the pulsar can only be reconciled with each other in the case of nonzero transverse velocity of the scattering material. A possible origin of large-scale transverse motions in the shell of the Vela supernova remnant is discussed.

  7. Velocity Memory Effect for polarized gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.-M.; Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2018-05-01

    Circularly polarized gravitational sandwich waves exhibit, as do their linearly polarized counterparts, the Velocity Memory Effect: freely falling test particles in the flat after-zone fly apart along straight lines with constant velocity. In the inside zone their trajectories combine oscillatory and rotational motions in a complicated way. For circularly polarized periodic gravitational waves some trajectories remain bounded, while others spiral outward. These waves admit an additional "screw" isometry beyond the usual five. The consequences of this extra symmetry are explored.

  8. Velocity navigator for motion compensated thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Florian; Krafft, Axel J; Yung, Joshua P; Stafford, R Jason; Elliott, Andrew; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Proton resonance frequency shift thermometry is sensitive to breathing motion that leads to incorrect phase differences. In this work, a novel velocity-sensitive navigator technique for triggering MR thermometry image acquisition is presented. A segmented echo planar imaging pulse sequence was modified for velocity-triggered temperature mapping. Trigger events were generated when the estimated velocity value was less than 0.2 cm/s during the slowdown phase in parallel to the velocity-encoding direction. To remove remaining high-frequency spikes from pulsation in real time, a Kalman filter was applied to the velocity navigator data. A phantom experiment with heating and an initial volunteer experiment without heating were performed to show the applicability of this technique. Additionally, a breath-hold experiment was conducted for comparison. A temperature rise of ΔT = +37.3°C was seen in the phantom experiment, and a root mean square error (RMSE) outside the heated region of 2.3°C could be obtained for periodic motion. In the volunteer experiment, a RMSE of 2.7°C/2.9°C (triggered vs. breath hold) was measured. A novel velocity navigator with Kalman filter postprocessing in real time significantly improves the temperature accuracy over non-triggered acquisitions and suggests being comparable to a breath-held acquisition. The proposed technique might be clinically applied for monitoring of thermal ablations in abdominal organs.

  9. High-velocity frictional properties of gabbro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Akito; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    High-velocity friction experiments have been performed on a pair of hollow-cylindrical specimens of gabbro initially at room temperature, at slip rates from 7.5 mm/s to 1.8 m/s, with total circumferential displacements of 125 to 174 m, and at normal stresses to 5 MPa, using a rotary-shear high-speed friction testing machine. Steady-state friction increases slightly with increasing slip rate at slip rates to about 100 mm/s (velocity strengthening) and it decreases markedly with increasing slip rate at higher velocities (velocity weakening). Steady-state friction in the velocity weakening regime is lower for the non-melting case than the frictional melting case, due perhaps to severe thermal fracturing. A very large peak friction is always recognized upon the initiation of visible frictional melting, presumably owing to the welding of fault surfaces upon the solidification of melt patches. Frictional properties thus change dramatically with increasing displacement at high velocities, and such a non-linear effect must be incorporated into the analysis of earthquake initiation processes.

  10. Consideration of some difficulties in migration velocity analysis; Migration velocity analysis no shomondai ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akama, K [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center; Matsuoka, T [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Concerning migration velocity analysis in the seismic exploration method, two typical techniques, out of velocity analysis techniques using residual moveout in the CIP gather, are verified. Deregowski`s method uses pre-stacking deep-level migration records for velocity analysis to obtain velocities free of spatial inconsistency and not dependent on the velocity structure. This method is very like the conventional DMO velocity analysis method and is easy to understand intuitively. In this method, however, error is apt to be aggravated in the process of obtaining the depth-sector velocity from the time-RMS velocity. Al-Yahya`s method formulates the moveout residual in the CIP gather. This assumes horizontal stratification and a small residual velocity, however, and fails to guarantee convergence in the case of a steep structure or a grave model error. In the updating of the velocity model, in addition, it has to maintain required accuracy and, at the same time, incorporate smoothing to ensure not to deteriorate high convergence. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Lunar near-surface shear wave velocities at the Apollo landing sites as inferred from spectral amplitude ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, P.; Latham, G. V.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    The horizontal-to-vertical amplitude ratios of the long-period seismograms are reexamined to determine the shear wave velocity distributions at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 lunar landing sites. Average spectral ratios, computed from a number of impact signals, were compared with spectral ratios calculated for the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves in media consisting of homogeneous, isotropic, horizontal layers. The shear velocities of the best fitting models at the different sites resemble each other and differ from the average for all sites by not more than 20% except for the bottom layer at station 14. The shear velocities increase from 40 m/s at the surface to about 400 m/s at depths between 95 and 160 m at the various sites. Within this depth range the velocity-depth functions are well represented by two piecewise linear segments, although the presence of first-order discontinuities cannot be ruled out.

  12. The structure of a jet in cross flow at low velocity ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, Shridhar; Abraham, Bruce M.; Katz, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines in detail the flow structure and associated wall pressure fluctuations caused by the injection of a round, turbulent jet into a turbulent boundary layer. The velocity ratio, r, ratio of mean jet velocity to the mean cross flow, varies from 0.5 to 2.5 and the Reynolds number based on the cross flow speed and jet diameter is 1.9x10 4 . Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the flow and flush mounted pressure sensors installed at several locations used to determine the wall pressure. The results consist of sample instantaneous flow structures, distributions of mean velocity, vorticity and turbulence intensity, as well as wall pressure spectra. The flow structure depends strongly on the velocity ratio and there are two distinctly different regions. At low velocity ratios, namely r 2, the near-wall flow behind the jet resembles a Karman vortex street and the wall-normal vortical structures contain cross flow boundary layer vorticity. Autospectra of the pressure signals show that the effect of the jet is mainly in the 15-100 Hz range. At r 2, the wall pressure levels reach a plateau demonstrating the diminishing effect of the jet on the near-wall flow. Consistent with the flow structure, the highest wall pressure fluctuations occur off the jet centerline for r 2. Also, the advection speed of near-wall vortical structures increase with r at r 2 it is a constant

  13. Ultrasonic Evaluation of the Pull-Off Adhesion between Added Repair Layer and a Concrete Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Slawomir

    2017-10-01

    This paper concerns the evaluation of the pull-off adhesion between a concrete added repair layer with variable thickness and a concrete substrate, based on parameters assessed using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) method. In construction practice, the experimental determination of pull-off adhesion f b, between added repair layer and a concrete substrate is necessary to assess the quality of repair. This is usually carried out with the use of pull-off method which results in local damage of the added concrete layer in all the testing areas. Bearing this in mind, it is important to describe the method without these disadvantages. The prediction of the pull-off adhesion of the two-layer concrete elements with variable thickness of each layer might be provided by means of UPV method with two-sided access to the investigated element. For this purpose, two-layered cylindrical specimens were obtained by drilling the borehole from a large size specially prepared concrete element. Those two-layer elements were made out of concrete substrate layer and Polymer Cement Concrete (PCC) mortar as an added repair layer. The values of pull-off adhesion f b of the elements were determined before obtaining the samples by using the semi-destructive pull-off method. The ultrasonic wave velocity was determined in samples with variable thickness of each layer and was then compared to theoretical ultrasonic wave velocity predicted for those specimens. The regression curve for the dependence of velocity and pull-off adhesion, determined by the pulloff method, was made. It has been proved that together with an increase of ratio of investigated ultrasonic wave velocity divided by theoretical ultrasonic wave velocity, the pull-off adhesion value f b between added repair layer with variable thickness and a substrate layer also increases.

  14. Velocity Model Analysis Based on Integrated Well and Seismic Data of East Java Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubin, Fathul; Widya, Aviandy; Eka Nurcahya, Budi; Nurul Mahmudah, Erma; Purwaman, Indro; Radityo, Aryo; Shirly, Agung; Nurwani, Citra

    2018-03-01

    Time to depth conversion is an important processof seismic interpretationtoidentify hydrocarbonprospectivity. Main objectives of this research are to minimize the risk of error in geometry and time to depth conversion. Since it’s using a large amount of data and had been doing in the large scale of research areas, this research can be classified as a regional scale research. The research was focused on three horizons time interpretation: Top Kujung I, Top Ngimbang and Basement which located in the offshore and onshore areas of east Java basin. These three horizons was selected because they were assumed to be equivalent to the rock formation, which is it has always been the main objective of oil and gas exploration in the East Java Basin. As additional value, there was no previous works on velocity modeling for regional scale using geological parameters in East Java basin. Lithology and interval thickness were identified as geological factors that effected the velocity distribution in East Java Basin. Therefore, a three layer geological model was generated, which was defined by the type of lithology; carbonate (layer 1: Top Kujung I), shale (layer 2: Top Ngimbang) and Basement. A statistical method using three horizons is able to predict the velocity distribution on sparse well data in a regional scale. The average velocity range for Top Kujung I is 400 m/s - 6000 m/s, Top Ngimbang is 500 m/s - 8200 m/s and Basement is 600 m/s - 8000 m/s. Some velocity anomalies found in Madura sub-basin area, caused by geological factor which identified as thick shale deposit and high density values on shale. Result of velocity and depth modeling analysis can be used to define the volume range deterministically and to make geological models to prospect generation in details by geological concept.

  15. 3-D Velocity Model of the Coachella Valley, Southern California Based on Explosive Shots from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, P.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Hole, J. A.; Goldman, M.; Scheirer, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    We have analyzed explosive shot data from the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) across a 2-D seismic array and 5 profiles in the Coachella Valley to produce a 3-D P-wave velocity model that will be used in calculations of strong ground shaking. Accurate maps of seismicity and active faults rely both on detailed geological field mapping and a suitable velocity model to accurately locate earthquakes. Adjoint tomography of an older version of the SCEC 3-D velocity model shows that crustal heterogeneities strongly influence seismic wave propagation from moderate earthquakes (Tape et al., 2010). These authors improve the crustal model and subsequently simulate the details of ground motion at periods of 2 s and longer for hundreds of ray paths. Even with improvements such as the above, the current SCEC velocity model for the Salton Trough does not provide a match of the timing or waveforms of the horizontal S-wave motions, which Wei et al. (2013) interpret as caused by inaccuracies in the shallow velocity structure. They effectively demonstrate that the inclusion of shallow basin structure improves the fit in both travel times and waveforms. Our velocity model benefits from the inclusion of known location and times of a subset of 126 shots detonated over a 3-week period during the SSIP. This results in an improved velocity model particularly in the shallow crust. In addition, one of the main challenges in developing 3-D velocity models is an uneven stations-source distribution. To better overcome this challenge, we also include the first arrival times of the SSIP shots at the more widely spaced Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) in our inversion, since the layout of the SSIP is complementary to the SCSN. References: Tape, C., et al., 2010, Seismic tomography of the Southern California crust based on spectral-element and adjoint methods: Geophysical Journal International, v. 180, no. 1, p. 433-462. Wei, S., et al., 2013, Complementary slip distributions

  16. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance.

  17. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  18. Measurements of the S-wave fraction in $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decays and the $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{\\ast}(892)^{0}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ differential branching fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-11-08

    A measurement of the differential branching fraction of the decay ${B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{\\ast}(892)^{0}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}}$ is presented together with a determination of the S-wave fraction of the $K^+\\pi^-$ system in the decay $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$. The analysis is based on $pp$-collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3\\,fb$^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb experiment. The measurements are made in bins of the invariant mass squared of the dimuon system, $q^2$. Precise theoretical predictions for the differential branching fraction of $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{\\ast}(892)^{0}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decays are available for the $q^2$ region $1.1S-wave fraction of the $K^+\\pi^-$ system in $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decays is found to be \\begin{equation*} F_{\\rm S} = 0.101\\pm0.017({\\rm stat})\\pm0.009 ({\\rm syst}), \\end{equation*}...

  19. Martian Mixed Layer during Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G. M.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.

    2008-09-01

    In situ measurements of the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (MPBL) encompass only the sur- face layer. Therefore, in order to fully address the MPBL, it becomes necessary to simulate somehow the behaviour of the martian mixed layer. The small-scale processes that happen in the MPBL cause GCM's ([1], [2]) to describe only partially the turbulent statistics, height, convective scales, etc, of the surface layer and the mixed layer. For this reason, 2D and 3D martian mesoscale models ([4], [5]), and large eddy simulations ([4], [6], [7], [8]) have been designed in the last years. Although they are expected to simulate more accurately the MPBL, they take an extremely expensive compu- tational time. Alternatively, we have derived the main turbu- lent characteristics of the martian mixed layer by using surface layer and mixed layer similarity ([9], [10]). From in situ temperature and wind speed measurements, together with quality-tested simu- lated ground temperature [11], we have character- ized the martian mixed layer during the convective hours of Pathfinder mission Sol 25. Mean mixed layer turbulent statistics like tem- perature variance , horizontal wind speed variance , vertical wind speed variance , viscous dissipation rate , and turbu- lent kinetic energy have been calculated, as well as the mixed layer height zi, and the convective scales of wind w? and temperature θ?. Our values, obtained with negligible time cost, match quite well with some previously obtained results via LES's ([4] and [8]). A comparisson between the above obtained mar- tian values and the typical Earth values are shown in Table 1. Convective velocity scale w doubles its counterpart terrestrial typical value, as it does the mean wind speed variances and . On the other hand, the temperature scale θ? and the mean temperature variance are virtually around one order higher on Mars. The limitations of these results concern the va- lidity of the convective mixed layer similarity. This theory

  20. Modification of the quantum mechanical flux formula for electron-hydrogen ionization through Bohm's velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, J. M.; Ancarani, L. U.

    2015-12-01

    For the single differential cross section (SDCS) for hydrogen ionization by electron impact (e -H problem), we propose a correction to the flux formula given by R. Peterkop [Theory of Ionization of Atoms by Electron Impact (Colorado Associated University Press, Boulder, 1977)]. The modification is based on an alternative way of defining the kinetic energy fraction, using Bohm's definition of velocities instead of the usual asymptotic kinematical, or geometrical, approximation. It turns out that the solution-dependent, modified energy fraction is equally related to the components of the probability flux. Compared to what is usually observed, the correction yields a finite and well-behaved SDCS value in the asymmetrical situation where one of the continuum electrons carries all the energy while the other has zero energy. We also discuss, within the S -wave model of the e -H ionization process, the continuity of the SDCS derivative at the equal energy sharing point, a property not so clearly observed in published benchmark results obtained with integral and S -matrix formulas with unequal final states.