WorldWideScience

Sample records for Electronic health record Electronic patient record Occupational medicine

  1. Electronic Health Record in Occupational Medicine: Specific Aspects and Requirements of Data Structuring and Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin TRIFF

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The service of occupational medicine of a specific economic agent, as integrated part of the System of Labor Health and Safety, requires efficient, well-organized information management through standardized and computerized data processing and exploitation. Legal requirements and practical aspects of information management in occupational medicine trigger necessary operational modifications in the Electronic Health File. The goal of the paper is to present basic requirements of structuring the electronic health file and the necessary standards in recording specific data.

  2. Identification and Hierarchy of Main Electronic Health Record Components in Occupational Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin TRIFF

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the legal requirements relating to structuring of medical records in occupational medicine and international requirements regarding the certification of electronic health records we have focused on structuring and then evaluating an EHR model in occupational medicine that integrates the main functions and certification criteria required by the European and US certification bodies. The application we designed, called Medmun, structured for use in occupational medicine practices based on the model of medical file provided by the Romanian legislation, integrates both necessary components of occupational medicine practice for administration of characteristic information related to socio-economic unit, work place, health surveillance as well as components of specific EHR functionality. The application has been submitted for free evaluation by specialist physicians of five counties over a period of nine months and subsequently assessed using a questionnaire on the usefulness of specific functional components in the EHR occupational medicine practice. The model was positively evaluated after experimental employment by occupational health practitioners. They consider that absence of legislative support for EHR implementation in medical practice is the main obstacle to the use of such applications in occupational medicine practice.

  3. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  4. Are electronic health records ready for genomic medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuner, Maren T; de Vries, Han; Kim, Benjamin; Meili, Robin C; Olmstead, Sarah H; Teleki, Stephanie

    2009-07-01

    The goal of this project was to assess genetic/genomic content in electronic health records. Semistructured interviews were conducted with key informants. Questions addressed documentation, organization, display, decision support and security of family history and genetic test information, and challenges and opportunities relating to integrating genetic/genomics content in electronic health records. There were 56 participants: 10 electronic health record specialists, 18 primary care clinicians, 16 medical geneticists, and 12 genetic counselors. Few clinicians felt their electronic record met their current genetic/genomic medicine needs. Barriers to integration were mostly related to problems with family history data collection, documentation, and organization. Lack of demand for genetics content and privacy concerns were also mentioned as challenges. Data elements and functionality requirements that clinicians see include: pedigree drawing; clinical decision support for familial risk assessment and genetic testing indications; a patient portal for patient-entered data; and standards for data elements, terminology, structure, interoperability, and clinical decision support rules. Although most said that there is little impact of genetics/genomics on electronic records today, many stated genetics/genomics would be a driver of content in the next 5-10 years. Electronic health records have the potential to enable clinical integration of genetic/genomic medicine and improve delivery of personalized health care; however, structured and standardized data elements and functionality requirements are needed.

  5. Sharing electronic health records: the patient view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Powell

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of a national electronic health record system to the National Health Service (NHS has raised concerns about issues of data accuracy, security and confidentiality. The primary aim of this project was to identify the extent to which primary care patients will allow their local electronic record data to be shared on a national database. The secondary aim was to identify the extent of inaccuracies in the existing primary care records, which will be used to populate the new national Spine. Fifty consecutive attenders to one general practitioner were given a paper printout of their full primary care electronic health record. Participants were asked to highlight information which they would not want to be shared on the national electronic database of records, and information which they considered to be incorrect. There was a 62% response rate (31/50. Five of the 31 patients (16% identified information that they would not want to be shared on the national record system. The items they identified related almost entirely to matters of pregnancy, contraception, sexual health and mental health. Ten respondents (32% identified incorrect information in their records (some of these turned out to be correct on further investigation. The findings in relation to data sharing fit with the commonly held assumption that matters related to sensitive or embarrassing issues, which may affect how the patient will be treated by other individuals or institutions, are most likely to be censored by patients. Previous work on this has tended to ask hypothetical questions concerning data sharing rather than examine a real situation. A larger study of representative samples of patients in both primary and secondary care settings is needed to further investigate issues of data sharing and consent.

  6. Electronic health records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    that a centralised European health record system will become a reality even before 2020. However, the concept of a centralised supranational central server raises concern about storing electronic medical records in a central location. The privacy threat posed by a supranational network is a key concern. Cross......-border and Interoperable electronic health record systems make confidential data more easily and rapidly accessible to a wider audience and increase the risk that personal data concerning health could be accidentally exposed or easily distributed to unauthorised parties by enabling greater access to a compilation...... of the personal data concerning health, from different sources, and throughout a lifetime....

  7. Electronic health records for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Trenor

    2010-01-01

    The straight scoop on choosing and implementing an electronic health records (EHR) system Doctors, nurses, and hospital and clinic administrators are interested in learning the best ways to implement and use an electronic health records system so that they can be shared across different health care settings via a network-connected information system. This helpful, plain-English guide provides need-to-know information on how to choose the right system, assure patients of the security of their records, and implement an EHR in such a way that it causes minimal disruption to the daily demands of a

  8. Deploying Electronic Health Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOFTLINKS DIGITAL

    [11] Verisign Whitepaper (2005) Managing Application Security in Business ... health record (EHR) and Information Technology and the subsequent impact of ... advancements, said that IT must play a ... and history of medical status and other.

  9. Personal, Electronic, Secure National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Personal, Electronic, Secure: National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records ... One suggestion for saving money is to implement electronic personal health records. With this in mind, the ...

  10. Electronic health record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The European Commission wants to boost the digital economy by enabling all Europeans to have access to online medical records anywhere in Europe by 2020. With the newly enacted Directive 2011/24/EU on Patients’ Rights in cross border healthcare due for implementation by 2013, it is inevitable tha...

  11. Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... would likely trip an alarm within the hospital's computer system and start a trace on who tried to ... of what's involved in managing your own medical care . Some systems may let you interact with your health care ...

  12. Dental Electronic Health Record Evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chleborád, K.; Zvára Jr., Karel; Dostálová, T.; Zvára, Karel; Ivančáková, R.; Zvárová, Jana; Smidl, L.; Trmal, J.; Psutka, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 50-50 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI 2013 Special Topic Conference. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : dentistry * medical documentation * electronic health record Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  13. Electronic health records to facilitate clinical research

    OpenAIRE

    Cowie, Martin R.; Blomster, Juuso I.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Duclaux, Sylvie; Ford, Ian; Fritz, Fleur; Goldman, Samantha; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, J?rg; Leenay, Mark; Michel, Alexander; Ong, Seleen; Pell, Jill P.; Southworth, Mary Ross; Stough, Wendy Gattis

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide opportunities to enhance patient care, embed performance measures in clinical practice, and facilitate clinical research. Concerns have been raised about the increasing recruitment challenges in trials, burdensome and obtrusive data collection, and uncertain generalizability of the results. Leveraging electronic health records to counterbalance these trends is an area of intense interest. The initial applications of electronic health records, as the pr...

  14. Biometrics for electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Zuniga, Alejandro Enrique; Win, Khin Than; Susilo, Willy

    2010-10-01

    Securing electronic health records, in scenarios in which the provision of care services is share among multiple actors, could become a complex and costly activity. Correct identification of patients and physician, protection of privacy and confidentiality, assignment of access permissions for healthcare providers and resolutions of conflicts rise as main points of concern in the development of interconnected health information networks. Biometric technologies have been proposed as a possible technological solution for these issues due to its ability to provide a mechanism for unique verification of an individual identity. This paper presents an analysis of the benefit as well as disadvantages offered by biometric technology. A comparison between this technology and more traditional identification methods is used to determine the key benefits and flaws of the use biometric in health information systems. The comparison as been made considering the viability of the technologies for medical environments, global security needs, the contemplation of a share care environment and the costs involved in the implementation and maintenance of such technologies. This paper also discusses alternative uses for biometrics technologies in health care environments. The outcome of this analysis lays in the fact that even when biometric technologies offer several advantages over traditional method of identification, they are still in the early stages of providing a suitable solution for a health care environment.

  15. Electronic health records to facilitate clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Martin R; Blomster, Juuso I; Curtis, Lesley H; Duclaux, Sylvie; Ford, Ian; Fritz, Fleur; Goldman, Samantha; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, Jörg; Leenay, Mark; Michel, Alexander; Ong, Seleen; Pell, Jill P; Southworth, Mary Ross; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Thoenes, Martin; Zannad, Faiez; Zalewski, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide opportunities to enhance patient care, embed performance measures in clinical practice, and facilitate clinical research. Concerns have been raised about the increasing recruitment challenges in trials, burdensome and obtrusive data collection, and uncertain generalizability of the results. Leveraging electronic health records to counterbalance these trends is an area of intense interest. The initial applications of electronic health records, as the primary data source is envisioned for observational studies, embedded pragmatic or post-marketing registry-based randomized studies, or comparative effectiveness studies. Advancing this approach to randomized clinical trials, electronic health records may potentially be used to assess study feasibility, to facilitate patient recruitment, and streamline data collection at baseline and follow-up. Ensuring data security and privacy, overcoming the challenges associated with linking diverse systems and maintaining infrastructure for repeat use of high quality data, are some of the challenges associated with using electronic health records in clinical research. Collaboration between academia, industry, regulatory bodies, policy makers, patients, and electronic health record vendors is critical for the greater use of electronic health records in clinical research. This manuscript identifies the key steps required to advance the role of electronic health records in cardiovascular clinical research.

  16. The Future Is Coming: Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues The Future Is Coming: Electronic Health Records Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents For ... special conference on the cutting-edge topic of electronic health records (EHR) on May 20-21, 2009, on the ...

  17. Adoption of Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenbauer, L; Fraser, R.; McClay, J.; Woelfl, N.; Thompson, C.B.; Cambell, J.; Windle, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Less than 20% of hospitals in the US have an electronic health record (EHR). In this qualitative study, we examine the perspectives of both academic and private physicians and administrators as stakeholders, and their alignment, to explore their perspectives on the use of technology in the clinical environment. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 74 participants who were asked a series of open-ended questions. Grounded theory was used to analyze the transcribed data and build convergent themes. The relevance and importance of themes was constructed by examining frequency, convergence, and intensity. A model was proposed that represents the interactions between themes. Results Six major themes emerged, which include the impact of EHR systems on workflow, patient care, communication, research/outcomes/billing, education/learning, and institutional culture. Academic and private physicians were confident of the future benefits of EHR systems, yet cautious about the current implementations of EHR, and its impact on interactions with other members of the healthcare team and with patients, and the amount of time necessary to use EHR’s. Private physicians differed on education and were uneasy about the steep learning curve necessary for use of new systems. In contrast to physicians, university and hospital administrators are optimistic, and value the availability of data for use in reporting. Conclusion The results of our study indicate that both private and academic physicians concur on the need for features that maintain and enhance the relationship with the patient and the healthcare team. Resistance to adoption is related to insufficient functionality and its potential negative impact on patient care. Integration of data collection into clinical workflows must consider the unexpected costs of data acquisition. PMID:23616868

  18. Electronic health record in the internal medicine clinic of a Brazilian university hospital: Expectations and satisfaction of physicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jurandir Godoy; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the satisfaction and expectations of patients and physicians before and after the implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) in the outpatient clinic of a university hospital. We conducted 389 interviews with patients and 151 with physicians before and after the implementation of a commercial EHR at the internal medicine clinic of Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Brazil. The physicians were identified by their connection to the outpatient clinic and categorized by their years since graduation: residents and preceptors (with 10 years or less of graduation) or assistants (with more than 10 years of graduation). The answers to the questionnaire given by the physicians were classified as favorable or against the use of EHR, before and after the implementation of this system in this clinic, receiving 1 or 0 points, respectively. The sum of these points generated a multiple regression score to determine which factors contribute to the acceptance of EHR by physicians. We also did a third survey, after the EHR was routinely established in the outpatient clinic. The degree of patient satisfaction was the same before and after implementation, with more than 90% positive evaluations. They noted the use of the computer during the consultation and valued such use. Resident (younger) physicians had more positive expectations than assistants (older physicians) before EHR implementation. This optimism was reduced after implementation. In the third evaluation the use of EHR was higher among resident physicians. Resident physicians perceived and valued the EHR more and used it more. In 28 of the 57 questions on performance of clinical tasks, resident physicians found it easier to use EHR than assistant physicians with significant differences (pclinical setting should be preceded by careful planning to improve physician's adherence to the use of EHR. Patients do not seem to notice much difference to the

  19. The next generation of precision medicine: observational studies, electronic health records, biobanks, and continuous monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Johnson, Kipp W; Dudley, Joel T

    2018-04-12

    Precision medicine can utilize new techniques in order to more effectively translate research findings into clinical practice. In this article, we first explore the limitations of traditional study designs, which stem from (to name a few): massive cost for the assembly of large patient cohorts; non-representative patient data; and the astounding complexity of human biology. Second, we propose that harnessing electronic health records and mobile device biometrics coupled to longitudinal data may prove to be a solution to many of these problems by capturing a "real world" phenotype. We envision that future biomedical research utilizing more precise approaches to patient care will utilize continuous and longitudinal data sources.

  20. Improving Patient Safety With the Military Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Consolidated Health Informatics (CHI) project, one of the 24 electronic government ( eGov ) Internet- based technology initiatives supporting the president’s...United States Department of Defense (DoD) has transformed health care delivery in its use of information technology to automate patient data...use throughout the Federal Government . The importance of standards in EHR systems was further recognized in an IOM report, which stated, “Electronic

  1. Security Techniques for the Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Smith, Brenna; Vanderlinden, Hannah; Nealand, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    The privacy of patients and the security of their information is the most imperative barrier to entry when considering the adoption of electronic health records in the healthcare industry. Considering current legal regulations, this review seeks to analyze and discuss prominent security techniques for healthcare organizations seeking to adopt a secure electronic health records system. Additionally, the researchers sought to establish a foundation for further research for security in the healthcare industry. The researchers utilized the Texas State University Library to gain access to three online databases: PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL, and ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health Source. These sources were used to conduct searches on literature concerning security of electronic health records containing several inclusion and exclusion criteria. Researchers collected and analyzed 25 journals and reviews discussing security of electronic health records, 20 of which mentioned specific security methods and techniques. The most frequently mentioned security measures and techniques are categorized into three themes: administrative, physical, and technical safeguards. The sensitive nature of the information contained within electronic health records has prompted the need for advanced security techniques that are able to put these worries at ease. It is imperative for security techniques to cover the vast threats that are present across the three pillars of healthcare.

  2. To act or not to act: responses to electronic health record prompts by family medicine clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazove, Philip; McKee, Michael; Schleicher, Lauren; Green, Lee; Kileny, Paul; Rapai, Mary; Mulhem, Elie

    2017-03-01

    A major focus of health care today is a strong emphasis on improving the health and quality of care for entire patient populations. One common approach utilizes electronic clinical alerts to prompt clinicians when certain interventions are due for individual patients being seen. However, these alerts have not been consistently effective, particularly for less visible (though important) conditions such as hearing loss (HL) screening. We conducted hour-long cognitive task analysis interviews to explore how family medicine clinicians view, perceive, and use electronic clinical alerts, and to utilize this information to design a more effective alert using HL identification and referral as a model diagnosis. Four key direct barriers were identified that impeded alert use: poor standardization and formatting, time pressures in primary care, clinic workflow variations, and mental models of the condition being prompted (in this case, HL). One indirect barrier was identified: electronic health record and institution/government regulations. We identified that clinicians' mental model of the condition being prompted was probably the major barrier, though this was often expressed as time pressure. We discuss solutions to each of the 5 identified barriers, such as addressing physicians' mental models, by focusing on physicians' expertise rather than knowledge to improve their comfort when caring for patients with the conditions being prompted. To unleash the potential of electronic clinical alerts, electronic health record and health care institutions need to address some key barriers. We outline these barriers and propose solutions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. The effect of electronic health record software design on resident documentation and compliance with evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Torres, Yasaira; Huang, Jordan; Mihlstin, Melanie; Juzych, Mark S; Kromrei, Heidi; Hwang, Frank S

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of electronic health record software in resident education by evaluating documentation of 30 elements extracted from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Dry Eye Syndrome Preferred Practice Pattern. The Kresge Eye Institute transitioned to using electronic health record software in June 2013. We evaluated the charts of 331 patients examined in the resident ophthalmology clinic between September 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014, for an initial evaluation for dry eye syndrome. We compared documentation rates for the 30 evidence-based elements between electronic health record chart note templates among the ophthalmology residents. Overall, significant changes in documentation occurred when transitioning to a new version of the electronic health record software with average compliance ranging from 67.4% to 73.6% (p Electronic Health Record A had high compliance (>90%) in 13 elements while Electronic Health Record B had high compliance (>90%) in 11 elements. The presence of dialog boxes was responsible for significant changes in documentation of adnexa, puncta, proptosis, skin examination, contact lens wear, and smoking exposure. Significant differences in documentation were correlated with electronic health record template design rather than individual resident or residents' year in training. Our results show that electronic health record template design influences documentation across all resident years. Decreased documentation likely results from "mouse click fatigue" as residents had to access multiple dialog boxes to complete documentation. These findings highlight the importance of EHR template design to improve resident documentation and integration of evidence-based medicine into their clinical notes.

  4. The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioli, Frances E; Elliot, Diane L; Palmer, Ryan T; Graichen, Carla C; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Ashok Kumar, Kaparaboyna; Galper, Ari B; Tysinger, James W

    2017-01-01

    Because many medical students do not have access to electronic health records (EHRs) in the clinical environment, simulated EHR training is necessary. Explicitly training medical students to use EHRs appropriately during patient encounters equips them to engage patients while also attending to the accuracy of the record and contributing to a culture of information safety. Faculty developed and successfully implemented an EHR objective structured clinical examination (EHR-OSCE) for clerkship students at two institutions. The EHR-OSCE objectives include assessing EHR-related communication and data management skills. The authors collected performance data for students (n = 71) at the first institution during academic years 2011-2013 and for students (n = 211) at the second institution during academic year 2013-2014. EHR-OSCE assessment checklist scores showed that students performed well in EHR-related communication tasks, such as maintaining eye contact and stopping all computer work when the patient expresses worry. Findings indicated student EHR skill deficiencies in the areas of EHR data management including medical history review, medication reconciliation, and allergy reconciliation. Most students' EHR skills failed to improve as the year progressed, suggesting that they did not gain the EHR training and experience they need in clinics and hospitals. Cross-institutional data comparisons will help determine whether differences in curricula affect students' EHR skills. National and institutional policies and faculty development are needed to ensure that students receive adequate EHR education, including hands-on experience in the clinic as well as simulated EHR practice.

  5. Awareness and Use of Electronic Health Records in Entry-Level Occupational Therapy and Occupational Therapy Assistant Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis F. Dmytryk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE requires programs to instruct entrylevel occupational therapy (OT and occupational therapy assistant (OTA students in technology that may include electronic documentation systems, distance communication, virtual environments, and telehealth (standard B1.8. At this time, there are no publications describing if and how electronic health record (EHR instruction is implemented in entry-level OT and OTA programs. The purpose of this study is to investigate awareness and use of EHRs in entry-level OT and OTA curricula. Respondents from 76 nationally accredited entry-level programs (two OT doctoral, 24 OT masters, two OT combined bachelors/masters, and 48 OTA completed a survey. The findings showed inconsistent and incomplete EHR instruction in entry-level OT and OTA education. This study provides a baseline for investigating best practices in EHR education for entrylevel OT and OTA students

  6. Teaching Electronic Health Record Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Mary Val; Sandoval, Marie; Hart, Vicki; Drill, Clarissa

    2016-06-01

    This pilot study investigated nurse practitioner students' communication skills when utilizing the electronic health record during history taking. The nurse practitioner students (n = 16) were videotaped utilizing the electronic health record while taking health histories with standardized patients. The students were videotaped during two separate sessions during one semester. Two observers recorded the time spent (1) typing and talking, (2) typing only, and (3) looking at the computer without talking. Total history taking time, computer placement, and communication skills were also recorded. During the formative session, mean history taking time was 11.4 minutes, with 3.5 minutes engaged with the computer (30.6% of visit). During the evaluative session, mean history taking time was 12.4 minutes, with 2.95 minutes engaged with the computer (24% of visit). The percentage of time individuals spent changed over the two visits: typing and talking, -3.1% (P = .3); typing only, +12.8% (P = .038); and looking at the computer, -9.6% (P = .039). This study demonstrated that time spent engaged with the computer during a patient encounter does decrease with student practice and education. Therefore, students benefit from instruction on electronic health record-specific communication skills, and use of a simple mnemonic to reinforce this is suggested.

  7. The effect of electronic health record software design on resident documentation and compliance with evidence-based medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaira Rodriguez Torres

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the role of electronic health record software in resident education by evaluating documentation of 30 elements extracted from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Dry Eye Syndrome Preferred Practice Pattern. The Kresge Eye Institute transitioned to using electronic health record software in June 2013. We evaluated the charts of 331 patients examined in the resident ophthalmology clinic between September 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014, for an initial evaluation for dry eye syndrome. We compared documentation rates for the 30 evidence-based elements between electronic health record chart note templates among the ophthalmology residents. Overall, significant changes in documentation occurred when transitioning to a new version of the electronic health record software with average compliance ranging from 67.4% to 73.6% (p 90% in 13 elements while Electronic Health Record B had high compliance (>90% in 11 elements. The presence of dialog boxes was responsible for significant changes in documentation of adnexa, puncta, proptosis, skin examination, contact lens wear, and smoking exposure. Significant differences in documentation were correlated with electronic health record template design rather than individual resident or residents' year in training. Our results show that electronic health record template design influences documentation across all resident years. Decreased documentation likely results from "mouse click fatigue" as residents had to access multiple dialog boxes to complete documentation. These findings highlight the importance of EHR template design to improve resident documentation and integration of evidence-based medicine into their clinical notes.

  8. Using text-mining techniques in electronic patient records to identify ADRs from medicine use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, Pernille; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    This literature review included studies that use text-mining techniques in narrative documents stored in electronic patient records (EPRs) to investigate ADRs. We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts without restrictions from origin until July 2011. We...... included empirically based studies on text mining of electronic patient records (EPRs) that focused on detecting ADRs, excluding those that investigated adverse events not related to medicine use. We extracted information on study populations, EPR data sources, frequencies and types of the identified ADRs......, medicines associated with ADRs, text-mining algorithms used and their performance. Seven studies, all from the United States, were eligible for inclusion in the review. Studies were published from 2001, the majority between 2009 and 2010. Text-mining techniques varied over time from simple free text...

  9. Electronic health records access during a disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morchel, Herman; Raheem, Murad; Stevens, Lee

    2014-01-01

    As has been demonstrated previously, medical care providers that employ an electronic health records (EHR) system provide more appropriate, cost effective care. Those providers are also better positioned than those who rely on paper records to recover if their facility is damaged as a result of severe storms, fires, or other events. The events surrounding Superstorm Sandy in 2012 made it apparent that, with relatively little additional effort and investment, health care providers with EHR systems may be able to use those systems for patient care purposes even during disasters that result in damage to buildings and facilities, widespread power outages, or both.

  10. Aspects of privacy for electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sebastian; Wohlgemuth, Sven; Echizen, Isao; Sonehara, Noboru; Müller, Günter

    2011-02-01

    Patients' medical data have been originally generated and maintained by health professionals in several independent electronic health records (EHRs). Centralized electronic health records accumulate medical data of patients to improve their availability and completeness; EHRs are not tied to a single medical institution anymore. Nowadays enterprises with the capacity and knowledge to maintain this kind of databases offer the services of maintaining EHRs and adding personal health data by the patients. These enterprises get access on the patients' medical data and act as a main point for collecting and disclosing personal data to third parties, e.g. among others doctors, healthcare service providers and drug stores. Existing systems like Microsoft HealthVault and Google Health comply with data protection acts by letting the patients decide on the usage and disclosure of their data. But they fail in satisfying essential requirements to privacy. We propose a privacy-protecting information system for controlled disclosure of personal data to third parties. Firstly, patients should be able to express and enforce obligations regarding a disclosure of health data to third parties. Secondly, an organization providing EHRs should neither be able to gain access to these health data nor establish a profile about patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neonatal Nurses Experience Unintended Consequences and Risks to Patient Safety With Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudding, Katherine M; Gephart, Sheila M; Carrington, Jane M

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we examine the unintended consequences of nurses' use of electronic health records. We define these as unforeseen events, change in workflow, or an unanticipated result of implementation and use of electronic health records. Unintended consequences experienced by nurses while using electronic health records have been well researched. However, few studies have focused on neonatal nurses, and it is unclear to what extent unintended consequences threaten patient safety. A new instrument called the Carrington-Gephart Unintended Consequences of Electronic Health Record Questionnaire has been validated, and secondary analysis using the tool explored the phenomena among neonatal nurses (N = 40). The purposes of this study were to describe unintended consequences of use of electronic health records for neonatal nurses and to explore relationships between the phenomena and characteristics of the nurse and the electronic health record. The most frequent unintended consequences of electronic health record use were due to interruptions, followed by a heavier workload due to the electronic health record, changes to the workflow, and altered communication patterns. Neonatal nurses used workarounds most often with motivation to better assist patients. Teamwork was moderately related to higher unintended consequences including patient safety risks (r = 0.427, P = .007), system design (r = 0.419, P = .009), and technology barriers (r = 0.431, P = .007). Communication about patients was reduced when patient safety risks were high (r = -0.437, P = .003). By determining the frequency with which neonatal nurses experience unintended consequences of electronic health record use, future research can be targeted to improve electronic health record design through customization, integration, and refinement to support patient safety and better outcomes.

  12. Safeguarding Confidentiality in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Akhil; Appel, Jacob M

    2017-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) offer significant advantages over paper charts, such as ease of portability, facilitated communication, and a decreased risk of medical errors; however, important ethical concerns related to patient confidentiality remain. Although legal protections have been implemented, in practice, EHRs may be still prone to breaches that threaten patient privacy. Potential safeguards are essential, and have been implemented especially in sensitive areas such as mental illness, substance abuse, and sexual health. Features of one institutional model are described that may illustrate the efforts to both ensure adequate transparency and ensure patient confidentiality. Trust and the therapeutic alliance are critical to the provider-patient relationship and quality healthcare services. All of the benefits of an EHR are only possible if patients retain confidence in the security and accuracy of their medical records.

  13. -Omic and Electronic Health Records Big Data Analytics for Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Yen; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Venugopalan, Janani; Hoffman, Ryan; Wang, May D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Rapid advances of high-throughput technologies and wide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have led to fast accumulation of -omic and EHR data. These voluminous complex data contain abundant information for precision medicine, and big data analytics can extract such knowledge to improve the quality of health care. Methods In this article, we present -omic and EHR data characteristics, associated challenges, and data analytics including data pre-processing, mining, and modeling. Results To demonstrate how big data analytics enables precision medicine, we provide two case studies, including identifying disease biomarkers from multi-omic data and incorporating -omic information into EHR. Conclusion Big data analytics is able to address –omic and EHR data challenges for paradigm shift towards precision medicine. Significance Big data analytics makes sense of –omic and EHR data to improve healthcare outcome. It has long lasting societal impact. PMID:27740470

  14. Electronic Health Record Implementation: A SWOT Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Shahmoradi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Health Record (EHR is one of the most important achievements of information technology in healthcare domain, and if deployed effectively, it can yield predominant results. The aim of this study was a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis in electronic health record implementation. This is a descriptive, analytical study conducted with the participation of a 90-member work force from Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. The data were collected by using a self-structured questionnaire and analyzed by SPSS software. Based on the results, the highest priority in strength analysis was related to timely and quick access to information. However, lack of hardware and infrastructures was the most important weakness. Having the potential to share information between different sectors and access to a variety of health statistics was the significant opportunity of EHR. Finally, the most substantial threats were the lack of strategic planning in the field of electronic health records together with physicians’ and other clinical staff’s resistance in the use of electronic health records. To facilitate successful adoption of electronic health record, some organizational, technical and resource elements contribute; moreover, the consideration of these factors is essential for HER implementation.

  15. Electronic Health Record Implementation: A SWOT Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Leila; Darrudi, Alireza; Arji, Goli; Farzaneh Nejad, Ahmadreza

    2017-10-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) is one of the most important achievements of information technology in healthcare domain, and if deployed effectively, it can yield predominant results. The aim of this study was a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis in electronic health record implementation. This is a descriptive, analytical study conducted with the participation of a 90-member work force from Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). The data were collected by using a self-structured questionnaire and analyzed by SPSS software. Based on the results, the highest priority in strength analysis was related to timely and quick access to information. However, lack of hardware and infrastructures was the most important weakness. Having the potential to share information between different sectors and access to a variety of health statistics was the significant opportunity of EHR. Finally, the most substantial threats were the lack of strategic planning in the field of electronic health records together with physicians' and other clinical staff's resistance in the use of electronic health records. To facilitate successful adoption of electronic health record, some organizational, technical and resource elements contribute; moreover, the consideration of these factors is essential for HER implementation.

  16. Clinical Databases Originating in Electronic Patient Records

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2002), s. 43-60 ISSN 0208-5216 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : medical informatics * tekemedicine * electronic health record * electronic medical guidelines * decision-support systems * cardiology Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  17. Nurses' Perceptions of the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, Rocquel Devonne

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) by health care organizations has been limited. Despite the broad consensus on the potential benefits of EHRs, health care organizations have been slow to adopt the technology. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore licensed practical and registered nurses'…

  18. Towards lifetime electronic health record implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gand, Kai; Richter, Peggy; Esswein, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Integrated care concepts can help to diminish demographic challenges. Hereof, the use of eHealth, esp. overarching electronic health records, is recognized as an efficient approach. The article aims at rigorously defining the concept of lifetime electronic health records (LEHRs) and the identification of core factors that need to be fulfilled in order to implement such. A literature review was conducted. Existing definitions were identified and relevant factors were categorized. The derived assessment categories are demonstrated by a case study on Germany. Seven dimensions to differentiate types of electronic health records were found. The analysis revealed, that culture, regulation, informational self-determination, incentives, compliance, ICT infrastructure and standards are important preconditions to successfully implement LEHRs. The article paves the way for LEHR implementation and therewith for integrated care. Besides the expected benefits of LEHRs, there are a number of ethical, legal and social concerns, which need to be balanced.

  19. Web technology for emergency medicine and secure transmission of electronic patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamka, J D

    1998-01-01

    The American Heritage dictionary defines the word "web" as "something intricately contrived, especially something that ensnares or entangles." The wealth of medical resources on the World Wide Web is now so extensive, yet disorganized and unmonitored, that such a definition seems fitting. In emergency medicine, for example, a field in which accurate and complete information, including patients' records, is urgently needed, more than 5000 Web pages are available today, whereas fewer than 50 were available in December 1994. Most sites are static Web pages using the Internet to publish textbook material, but new technology is extending the scope of the Internet to include online medical education and secure exchange of clinical information. This article lists some of the best Web sites for use in emergency medicine and then describes a project in which the Web is used for transmission and protection of electronic medical records.

  20. -Omic and Electronic Health Record Big Data Analytics for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Yen; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Kaddi, Chanchala D; Venugopalan, Janani; Hoffman, Ryan; Wang, May D

    2017-02-01

    Rapid advances of high-throughput technologies and wide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have led to fast accumulation of -omic and EHR data. These voluminous complex data contain abundant information for precision medicine, and big data analytics can extract such knowledge to improve the quality of healthcare. In this paper, we present -omic and EHR data characteristics, associated challenges, and data analytics including data preprocessing, mining, and modeling. To demonstrate how big data analytics enables precision medicine, we provide two case studies, including identifying disease biomarkers from multi-omic data and incorporating -omic information into EHR. Big data analytics is able to address -omic and EHR data challenges for paradigm shift toward precision medicine. Big data analytics makes sense of -omic and EHR data to improve healthcare outcome. It has long lasting societal impact.

  1. Personal health records as portal to the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Jennifer E; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2014-03-01

    This topic review discusses the evolving clinical challenges associated with the implementation of electronic personal health records (PHR) that are fully integrated with electronic medical records (EMR). The benefits of facilitating patient access to the EMR through web-based, PHR-portals may be substantial; foremost is the potential to enhance the flow of information between patient and healthcare practitioner. The benefits of improved communication and transparency of care are presumed to be a reduction in clinical errors, increased quality of care, better patient-management of disease, and better disease and symptom comprehension. Yet PHR databases allow patients open access to newly-acquired clinical data without the benefit of concurrent expert clinical interpretation, and therefore may create the potential for greater patient distress and uncertainty. With specific attention to neuro-oncology patients, this review focuses on the developing conflicts and consequences associated with the use of a PHR that parallels data acquisition of the EMR in real-time. We conclude with a discussion of recommendations for implementing fully-integrated PHR for neuro-oncology patients.

  2. Electronic health record use, intensity of hospital care, and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecker, Saul; Goldfeld, Keith; Park, Naeun; Shine, Daniel; Austrian, Jonathan S; Braithwaite, R Scott; Radford, Martha J; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that weekend hospital care is inferior to weekday care and that this difference may be related to diminished care intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a metric for measuring intensity of hospital care based on use of the electronic health record was associated with patient-level outcomes. We performed a cohort study of hospitalizations at an academic medical center. Intensity of care was defined as the hourly number of provider accessions of the electronic health record, termed "electronic health record interactions." Hospitalizations were categorized on the basis of the mean difference in electronic health record interactions between the first Friday and the first Saturday of hospitalization. We used regression models to determine the association of these categories with patient outcomes after adjusting for covariates. Electronic health record interactions decreased from Friday to Saturday in 77% of the 9051 hospitalizations included in the study. Compared with hospitalizations with no change in Friday to Saturday electronic health record interactions, the relative lengths of stay for hospitalizations with a small, moderate, and large decrease in electronic health record interactions were 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.10), 1.11 (95% CI, 1.05-1.17), and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.15-1.35), respectively. Although a large decrease in electronic health record interactions was associated with in-hospital mortality, these findings were not significant after risk adjustment (odds ratio 1.74, 95% CI, 0.93-3.25). Intensity of inpatient care, measured by electronic health record interactions, significantly diminished from Friday to Saturday, and this decrease was associated with length of stay. Hospitals should consider monitoring and correcting temporal fluctuations in care intensity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Managing terminology assets in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Kelly; Schneider, Sue; Scichilone, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR)systems rely on standard terminologies and classification systems that require both Information Technology (IT) and Information Management (IM) skills. Convergence of perspectives is necessary for effective terminology asset management including evaluation for use, maintenance and intersection with software applications. Multiple terminologies are necessary for patient care communication and data capture within EHRs and other information management tasks. Terminology asset management encompasses workflow and operational context as well as IT specifications and software application run time requirements. This paper identifies the tasks, skills and collaboration of IM and IT approaches for terminology asset management.

  4. Problems with the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Hans-Peter; Liaschenko, Joan; Angus, Jan

    2016-01-01

    One of the most significant changes in modern healthcare delivery has been the evolution of the paper record to the electronic health record (EHR). In this paper we argue that the primary change has been a shift in the focus of documentation from monitoring individual patient progress to recording data pertinent to Institutional Priorities (IPs). The specific IPs to which we refer include: finance/reimbursement; risk management/legal considerations; quality improvement/safety initiatives; meeting regulatory and accreditation standards; and patient care delivery/evidence based practice. Following a brief history of the transition from the paper record to the EHR, the authors discuss unintended or contested consequences resulting from this change. These changes primarily reflect changes in the organization and amount of clinician work and clinician-patient relationships. The paper is not a research report but was informed by an institutional ethnography the aim of which was to understand how the EHR impacted clinicians and administrators in a large, urban hospital in the United States. The paper was also informed by other sources, including the philosophies of Jacques Ellul, Don Idhe, and Langdon Winner. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. User Interface of MUDR Electronic Health Record

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Petr; Špidlen, Josef; Heroutová, Helena; Nagy, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 74, - (2005), s. 221-227 ISSN 1386-5056 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * user interface * data entry * knowledge base Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.374, year: 2005

  6. Electronic Health Record for Forensic Dentistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana; Dostálová, T.; Hanzlíček, Petr; Teuberová, Z.; Nagy, Miroslav; Pieš, Martin; Seydlová, M.; Eliášová, H.; Šimková, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2008), s. 8-13 ISSN 0026-1270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * structured data entry * forensic dentistry Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.057, year: 2008

  7. Using text-mining techniques in electronic patient records to identify ADRs from medicine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrer, Pernille; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Juhl-Jensen, Lars; Aagaard, Lise

    2012-05-01

    This literature review included studies that use text-mining techniques in narrative documents stored in electronic patient records (EPRs) to investigate ADRs. We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts without restrictions from origin until July 2011. We included empirically based studies on text mining of electronic patient records (EPRs) that focused on detecting ADRs, excluding those that investigated adverse events not related to medicine use. We extracted information on study populations, EPR data sources, frequencies and types of the identified ADRs, medicines associated with ADRs, text-mining algorithms used and their performance. Seven studies, all from the United States, were eligible for inclusion in the review. Studies were published from 2001, the majority between 2009 and 2010. Text-mining techniques varied over time from simple free text searching of outpatient visit notes and inpatient discharge summaries to more advanced techniques involving natural language processing (NLP) of inpatient discharge summaries. Performance appeared to increase with the use of NLP, although many ADRs were still missed. Due to differences in study design and populations, various types of ADRs were identified and thus we could not make comparisons across studies. The review underscores the feasibility and potential of text mining to investigate narrative documents in EPRs for ADRs. However, more empirical studies are needed to evaluate whether text mining of EPRs can be used systematically to collect new information about ADRs. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Improving Patient Safety With the Military Electronic Health Record

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charles, Marie-Jocelyne; Harmon, Bart J; Jordan, Pamela S

    2005-01-01

    The United States Department of Defense (DoD) has transformed health care delivery in its use of information technology to automate patient data documentation, leading to improvements in patient safety...

  9. Care team identification in the electronic health record: A critical first step for patient-centered communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Anuj K; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2016-05-01

    Patient-centered communication is essential to coordinate care and safely progress patients from admission through discharge. Hospitals struggle with improving the complex and increasingly electronic conversation patterns among care team members, patients, and caregivers to achieve effective patient-centered communication across settings. Accurate and reliable identification of all care team members is a precursor to effective patient-centered communication and ideally should be facilitated by the electronic health record. However, the process of identifying care team members is challenging, and team lists in the electronic health record are typically neither accurate nor reliable. Based on the literature and on experience from 2 initiatives at our institution, we outline strategies to improve care team identification in the electronic health record and discuss potential implications for patient-centered communication. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:381-385. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  10. Electronic Health Record Meets Digital Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Betsy L.

    2000-01-01

    Linking the electronic health record to the digital library is a Web-era reformulation of the long-standing informatics goal of seamless integration of automated clinical data and relevant knowledge-based information to support informed decisions. The spread of the Internet, the development of the World Wide Web, and converging format standards for electronic health data and digital publications make effective linking increasingly feasible. Some existing systems link electronic health data and knowledge-based information in limited settings or limited ways. Yet many challenging informatics research problems remain to be solved before flexible and seamless linking becomes a reality and before systems become capable of delivering the specific piece of information needed at the time and place a decision must be made. Connecting the electronic health record to the digital library also requires positive resolution of important policy issues, including health data privacy, government envouragement of high-speed communications, electronic intellectual property rights, and standards for health data and for digital libraries. Both the research problems and the policy issues should be important priorities for the field of medical informatics. PMID:10984463

  11. Disassociation for electronic health record privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukides, Grigorios; Liagouris, John; Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Terrovitis, Manolis

    2014-08-01

    The dissemination of Electronic Health Record (EHR) data, beyond the originating healthcare institutions, can enable large-scale, low-cost medical studies that have the potential to improve public health. Thus, funding bodies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the U.S., encourage or require the dissemination of EHR data, and a growing number of innovative medical investigations are being performed using such data. However, simply disseminating EHR data, after removing identifying information, may risk privacy, as patients can still be linked with their record, based on diagnosis codes. This paper proposes the first approach that prevents this type of data linkage using disassociation, an operation that transforms records by splitting them into carefully selected subsets. Our approach preserves privacy with significantly lower data utility loss than existing methods and does not require data owners to specify diagnosis codes that may lead to identity disclosure, as these methods do. Consequently, it can be employed when data need to be shared broadly and be used in studies, beyond the intended ones. Through extensive experiments using EHR data, we demonstrate that our method can construct data that are highly useful for supporting various types of clinical case count studies and general medical analysis tasks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Macro influencers of electronic health records adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Vijay V; Chinta, Ravi; Zhirkin, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    While adoption rates for electronic health records (EHRs) have improved, the reasons for significant geographical differences in EHR adoption within the USA have remained unclear. To understand the reasons for these variations across states, we have compiled from secondary sources a profile of different states within the USA, based on macroeconomic and macro health-environment factors. Regression analyses were performed using these indicator factors on EHR adoption. The results showed that internet usage and literacy are significantly associated with certain measures of EHR adoption. Income level was not significantly associated with EHR adoption. Per capita patient days (a proxy for healthcare need intensity within a state) is negatively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Health insurance coverage is positively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Older physicians (>60 years) tend to adopt EHR systems less than their younger counterparts. These findings have policy implications on formulating regionally focused incentive programs.

  13. Is patient confidentiality compromised with the electronic health record?: a position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ilse M

    2015-02-01

    In order for electronic health records to fulfill their expected benefits, protection of privacy of patient information is key. Lack of trust in confidentiality can lead to reluctance in disclosing all relevant information, which could have grave consequences. This position paper contemplates whether patient confidentiality is compromised by electronic health records. The position that confidentiality is compromised was supported by the four bioethical principles and argued that despite laws and various safeguards to protect patients' confidentiality, numerous data breaches have occurred. The position that confidentiality is not compromised was supported by virtue ethics and a utilitarian viewpoint and argued that safeguards keep information confidential and the public feels relatively safe with the electronic health record. The article concludes with an ethically superior position that confidentiality is compromised with the electronic health record. Although organizational and governmental ways of enhancing the confidentiality of patient information within the electronic health record facilitate confidentiality, the ultimate responsibility of maintaining confidentiality rests with the individual end-users and their ethical code of conduct. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for nurses calls for nurses to be watchful with data security in electronic communications.

  14. An analysis of electronic health record-related patient safety incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palojoki, Sari; Mäkelä, Matti; Lehtonen, Lasse; Saranto, Kaija

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse electronic health record-related patient safety incidents in the patient safety incident reporting database in fully digital hospitals in Finland. We compare Finnish data to similar international data and discuss their content with regard to the literature. We analysed the types of electronic health record-related patient safety incidents that occurred at 23 hospitals during a 2-year period. A procedure of taxonomy mapping served to allow comparisons. This study represents a rare examination of patient safety risks in a fully digital environment. The proportion of electronic health record-related incidents was markedly higher in our study than in previous studies with similar data. Human-computer interaction problems were the most frequently reported. The results show the possibility of error arising from the complex interaction between clinicians and computers.

  15. Presidential Electronic Records Library

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — PERL (Presidential Electronic Records Library) used to ingest and provide internal access to the Presidential electronic Records of the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton...

  16. Integration of clinical research documentation in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broach, Debra

    2015-04-01

    Clinical trials of investigational drugs and devices are often conducted within healthcare facilities concurrently with clinical care. With implementation of electronic health records, new communication methods are required to notify nonresearch clinicians of research participation. This article reviews clinical research source documentation, the electronic health record and the medical record, areas in which the research record and electronic health record overlap, and implications for the research nurse coordinator in documentation of the care of the patient/subject. Incorporation of clinical research documentation in the electronic health record will lead to a more complete patient/subject medical record in compliance with both research and medical records regulations. A literature search provided little information about the inclusion of clinical research documentation within the electronic health record. Although regulations and guidelines define both source documentation and the medical record, integration of research documentation in the electronic health record is not clearly defined. At minimum, the signed informed consent(s), investigational drug or device usage, and research team contact information should be documented within the electronic health record. Institutional policies should define a standardized process for this integration in the absence federal guidance. Nurses coordinating clinical trials are in an ideal position to define this integration.

  17. Mandatory Use of Electronic Health Records: Overcoming Physician Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Viseeta K.

    2012-01-01

    Literature supports the idea that electronic health records hold tremendous value for the healthcare system in that it increases patient safety, improves the quality of care and provides greater efficiency. The move toward mandatory implementation of electronic health records is a growing concern in the United States health care industry. The…

  18. Leveraging electronic health records for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Sudha R; Curtis, Lesley H; Temple, Robert; Andersson, Tomas; Ezekowitz, Justin; Ford, Ian; James, Stefan; Marsolo, Keith; Mirhaji, Parsa; Rocca, Mitra; Rothman, Russell L; Sethuraman, Barathi; Stockbridge, Norman; Terry, Sharon; Wasserman, Scott M; Peterson, Eric D; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2018-04-30

    Electronic health records (EHRs) can be a major tool in the quest to decrease costs and timelines of clinical trial research, generate better evidence for clinical decision making, and advance health care. Over the past decade, EHRs have increasingly offered opportunities to speed up, streamline, and enhance clinical research. EHRs offer a wide range of possible uses in clinical trials, including assisting with prestudy feasibility assessment, patient recruitment, and data capture in care delivery. To fully appreciate these opportunities, health care stakeholders must come together to face critical challenges in leveraging EHR data, including data quality/completeness, information security, stakeholder engagement, and increasing the scale of research infrastructure and related governance. Leaders from academia, government, industry, and professional societies representing patient, provider, researcher, industry, and regulator perspectives convened the Leveraging EHR for Clinical Research Now! Think Tank in Washington, DC (February 18-19, 2016), to identify barriers to using EHRs in clinical research and to generate potential solutions. Think tank members identified a broad range of issues surrounding the use of EHRs in research and proposed a variety of solutions. Recognizing the challenges, the participants identified the urgent need to look more deeply at previous efforts to use these data, share lessons learned, and develop a multidisciplinary agenda for best practices for using EHRs in clinical research. We report the proceedings from this think tank meeting in the following paper. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility of utilizing a commercial eye tracker to assess electronic health record use during patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jeffrey Allen; Stephenson, Laurel E; Gorsuch, Adriel; Parthasarathy, Keshav; Mohan, Vishnu

    2016-09-01

    Numerous reports describe unintended consequences of electronic health record implementation. Having previously described physicians' failures to recognize patient safety issues within our electronic health record simulation environment, we now report on our use of eye and screen-tracking technology to understand factors associated with poor error recognition during an intensive care unit-based electronic health record simulation. We linked performance on the simulation to standard eye and screen-tracking readouts including number of fixations, saccades, mouse clicks and screens visited. In addition, we developed an overall Composite Eye Tracking score which measured when, where and how often each safety item was viewed. For 39 participants, the Composite Eye Tracking score correlated with performance on the simulation (p = 0.004). Overall, the improved performance was associated with a pattern of rapid scanning of data manifested by increased number of screens visited (p = 0.001), mouse clicks (p = 0.03) and saccades (p = 0.004). Eye tracking can be successfully integrated into electronic health record-based simulation and provides a surrogate measure of cognitive decision making and electronic health record usability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Patient experiences with full electronic access to health records and clinical notes through the My HealtheVet Personal Health Record Pilot: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Susan S; Schwartz, Erin; Tuepker, Anais; Press, Nancy A; Nazi, Kim M; Turvey, Carolyn L; Nichol, W Paul

    2013-03-27

    Full sharing of the electronic health record with patients has been identified as an important opportunity to engage patients in their health and health care. The My HealtheVet Pilot, the initial personal health record of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, allowed patients and their delegates to view and download content in their electronic health record, including clinical notes, laboratory tests, and imaging reports. A qualitative study with purposeful sampling sought to examine patients' views and experiences with reading their health records, including their clinical notes, online. Five focus group sessions were conducted with patients and family members who enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot at the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oregon. A total of 30 patients enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot, and 6 family members who had accessed and viewed their electronic health records participated in the sessions. Four themes characterized patient experiences with reading the full complement of their health information. Patients felt that seeing their records positively affected communication with providers and the health system, enhanced knowledge of their health and improved self-care, and allowed for greater participation in the quality of their care such as follow-up of abnormal test results or decision-making on when to seek care. While some patients felt that seeing previously undisclosed information, derogatory language, or inconsistencies in their notes caused challenges, they overwhelmingly felt that having more, rather than less, of their health record information provided benefits. Patients and their delegates had predominantly positive experiences with health record transparency and the open sharing of notes and test results. Viewing their records appears to empower patients and enhance their contributions to care, calling into question common provider concerns about the effect of full record access on patient well-being. While shared

  1. Quality and Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and use of health information technology, the electronic health record (EHR) in particular, has the potential to help improve the quality of care, increase patient safety, and reduce health care costs. Unfortunately, adoption and use of health information technology has been slow, especially when compared to the adoption and use of…

  2. Patients want granular privacy control over health information in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Kelly; Hanania, Rima

    2013-01-01

    To assess patients' desire for granular level privacy control over which personal health information should be shared, with whom, and for what purpose; and whether these preferences vary based on sensitivity of health information. A card task for matching health information with providers, questionnaire, and interview with 30 patients whose health information is stored in an electronic medical record system. Most patients' records contained sensitive health information. No patients reported that they would prefer to share all information stored in an electronic medical record (EMR) with all potential recipients. Sharing preferences varied by type of information (EMR data element) and recipient (eg, primary care provider), and overall sharing preferences varied by participant. Patients with and without sensitive records preferred less sharing of sensitive versus less-sensitive information. Patients expressed sharing preferences consistent with a desire for granular privacy control over which health information should be shared with whom and expressed differences in sharing preferences for sensitive versus less-sensitive EMR data. The pattern of results may be used by designers to generate privacy-preserving EMR systems including interfaces for patients to express privacy and sharing preferences. To maintain the level of privacy afforded by medical records and to achieve alignment with patients' preferences, patients should have granular privacy control over information contained in their EMR.

  3. Electronic health records improve clinical note quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Harry B; Sessums, Laura L; Hoang, Albert; Becher, Dorothy A; Fontelo, Paul; Liu, Fang; Stephens, Mark; Pangaro, Louis N; O'Malley, Patrick G; Baxi, Nancy S; Bunt, Christopher W; Capaldi, Vincent F; Chen, Julie M; Cooper, Barbara A; Djuric, David A; Hodge, Joshua A; Kane, Shawn; Magee, Charles; Makary, Zizette R; Mallory, Renee M; Miller, Thomas; Saperstein, Adam; Servey, Jessica; Gimbel, Ronald W

    2015-01-01

    The clinical note documents the clinician's information collection, problem assessment, clinical management, and its used for administrative purposes. Electronic health records (EHRs) are being implemented in clinical practices throughout the USA yet it is not known whether they improve the quality of clinical notes. The goal in this study was to determine if EHRs improve the quality of outpatient clinical notes. A five and a half year longitudinal retrospective multicenter quantitative study comparing the quality of handwritten and electronic outpatient clinical visit notes for 100 patients with type 2 diabetes at three time points: 6 months prior to the introduction of the EHR (before-EHR), 6 months after the introduction of the EHR (after-EHR), and 5 years after the introduction of the EHR (5-year-EHR). QNOTE, a validated quantitative instrument, was used to assess the quality of outpatient clinical notes. Its scores can range from a low of 0 to a high of 100. Sixteen primary care physicians with active practices used QNOTE to determine the quality of the 300 patient notes. The before-EHR, after-EHR, and 5-year-EHR grand mean scores (SD) were 52.0 (18.4), 61.2 (16.3), and 80.4 (8.9), respectively, and the change in scores for before-EHR to after-EHR and before-EHR to 5-year-EHR were 18% (pquality scores significantly improved over the 5-year time interval. The EHR significantly improved the overall quality of the outpatient clinical note and the quality of all its elements, including the core and non-core elements. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the EHR significantly improves the quality of clinical notes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  4. Adoption of electronic health records and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataraman Palabindala

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Electronic health records (EHR are not a new idea in the U.S. medical system, but surprisingly there has been very slow adoption of fully integrated EHR systems in practice in both primary care settings and within hospitals. For those who have invested in EHR, physicians report high levels of satisfaction and confidence in the reliability of their system. There is also consensus that EHR can improve patient care, promote safe practice, and enhance communication between patients and multiple providers, reducing the risk of error. As EHR implementation continues in hospitals, administrative and physician leadership must actively investigate all of the potential risks for medical error, system failure, and legal responsibility before moving forward. Ensuring that physicians are aware of their responsibilities in relation to their charting practices and the depth of information available within an EHR system is crucial for minimizing the risk of malpractice and lawsuit. Hospitals must commit to regular system upgrading and corresponding training for all users to reduce the risk of error and adverse events.

  5. Improving patient-centered communication while using an electronic health record: Report from a curriculum evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Colleen T; Winters, Paul; Farah, Subrina

    2016-05-01

    Researchers and clinicians are concerned about the impact of electronic health record use and patient-centered communication. Training about patient-centered clinical communication skills with the electronic health record may help clinicians adapt and remain patient-centered. We developed an interactive workshop eliciting challenges and opportunities of working with the electronic health record in clinical practice, introduction of specific patient-centered behaviors and mindful practice techniques, and video demonstrating contrasts in common behavior and "better practices." One hundred thirty-nine resident physicians and faculty supervisors in five residency training programs at the University of Rochester Medical Center participated in the workshops. Participants were asked to complete an 11-item survey of behaviors related to their use of the electronic health record prior to training and after attending training. We used paired t-tests to assess changes in self-reported behavior from pre-intervention to post-intervention. We trained 139 clinicians in the workshops; 110 participants completed the baseline assessment and 39 completed both the baseline and post-intervention assessment. Data from post-curriculum respondents found a statistically significant increase in "I told the patient when turning my attention from the patient to the computer," from 60% of the time prior to the training to 70% of the time after. Data from our program evaluation demonstrated improvement in one communication behavior. Sample size limited the detection of other changes; further research should investigate effective training techniques for patient-centered communication while using the electronic health record. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Health-oriented electronic oral health record: development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsapai, Mansuang; Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Rajchagool, Sunsanee; Beach, Daryl; Kawaguchi, Sachiko

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop and evaluate a new Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record that implements the health-oriented status and intervention index. The index takes the principles of holistic oral healthcare and applies them to the design and implementation of the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record. We designed an experiment using focus groups and a consensus (Delphi process) method to develop a new health-oriented status and intervention index and graphical user interface. A comparative intervention study with qualitative and quantitative methods was used to compare an existing Electronic Oral Health Record to the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record, focusing on dentist satisfaction, accuracy, and completeness of oral health status recording. The study was conducted by the dental staff of the Inter-country Center for Oral Health collaborative hospitals in Thailand. Overall, the user satisfaction questionnaire had a positive response to the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record. The dentists found it easy to use and were generally satisfied with the impact on their work, oral health services, and surveillance. The dentists were significantly satisfied with the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record compared to the existing Electronic Oral Health Record (p health information recorded using the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record were 97.15 and 93.74 percent, respectively. This research concludes that the Health-oriented Electronic Oral Health Record satisfied many dentists, provided benefits to holistic oral healthcare, and facilitated the planning, managing, and evaluation of the healthcare delivery system.

  7. Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500 Past ... last May's Indy 500 had thousands of personal Electronic Health Records on hand for those attending—and ...

  8. Future of electronic health records: implications for decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Brian; Leonard, Joan C; Vigoda, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    The potential benefits of the electronic health record over traditional paper are many, including cost containment, reductions in errors, and improved compliance by utilizing real-time data. The highest functional level of the electronic health record (EHR) is clinical decision support (CDS) and process automation, which are expected to enhance patient health and healthcare. The authors provide an overview of the progress in using patient data more efficiently and effectively through clinical decision support to improve health care delivery, how decision support impacts anesthesia practice, and how some are leading the way using these systems to solve need-specific issues. Clinical decision support uses passive or active decision support to modify clinician behavior through recommendations of specific actions. Recommendations may reduce medication errors, which would result in considerable savings by avoiding adverse drug events. In selected studies, clinical decision support has been shown to decrease the time to follow-up actions, and prediction has proved useful in forecasting patient outcomes, avoiding costs, and correctly prompting treatment plan modifications by clinicians before engaging in decision-making. Clinical documentation accuracy and completeness is improved by an electronic health record and greater relevance of care data is delivered. Clinical decision support may increase clinician adherence to clinical guidelines, but educational workshops may be equally effective. Unintentional consequences of clinical decision support, such as alert desensitization, can decrease the effectiveness of a system. Current anesthesia clinical decision support use includes antibiotic administration timing, improved documentation, more timely billing, and postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis. Electronic health record implementation offers data-mining opportunities to improve operational, financial, and clinical processes. Using electronic health record data

  9. Risk assessment of integrated electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsson, Bjarni Thor; Sigurdardottir, Gudlaug; Stefansson, Stefan Orri

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the security concerns related to Electronic Health Records (EHR) both in registration of data and integration of systems. A description of the current state of EHR systems in Iceland is provided, along with the Ministry of Health's future vision and plans. New legislation provides the opportunity for increased integration of EHRs and further collaboration between institutions. Integration of systems, along with greater availability and access to EHR data, requires increased security awareness since additional risks are introduced. The paper describes the core principles of information security as it applies to EHR systems and data. The concepts of confidentiality, integrity, availability, accountability and traceability are introduced and described. The paper discusses the legal requirements and importance of performing risk assessment for EHR data. Risk assessment methodology according to the ISO/IEC 27001 information security standard is described with examples on how it is applied to EHR systems.

  10. Mining Electronic Health Records using Linked Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers, David J; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful Use guidelines have pushed the United States Healthcare System to adopt electronic health record systems (EHRs) at an unprecedented rate. Hospitals and medical centers are providing access to clinical data via clinical data warehouses such as i2b2, or Stanford's STRIDE database. In order to realize the potential of using these data for translational research, clinical data warehouses must be interoperable with standardized health terminologies, biomedical ontologies, and growing networks of Linked Open Data such as Bio2RDF. Applying the principles of Linked Data, we transformed a de-identified version of the STRIDE into a semantic clinical data warehouse containing visits, labs, diagnoses, prescriptions, and annotated clinical notes. We demonstrate the utility of this system though basic cohort selection, phenotypic profiling, and identification of disease genes. This work is significant in that it demonstrates the feasibility of using semantic web technologies to directly exploit existing biomedical ontologies and Linked Open Data.

  11. Privacy preservation and information security protection for patients' portable electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu-Chou; Chu, Huei-Chung; Lien, Chung-Yueh; Hsiao, Chia-Hung; Kao, Tsair

    2009-09-01

    As patients face the possibility of copying and keeping their electronic health records (EHRs) through portable storage media, they will encounter new risks to the protection of their private information. In this study, we propose a method to preserve the privacy and security of patients' portable medical records in portable storage media to avoid any inappropriate or unintentional disclosure. Following HIPAA guidelines, the method is designed to protect, recover and verify patient's identifiers in portable EHRs. The results of this study show that our methods are effective in ensuring both information security and privacy preservation for patients through portable storage medium.

  12. Enabling Patient Control of Personal Electronic Health Records Through Distributed Ledger Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, James; Ainsworth, John

    2017-01-01

    The rise of distributed ledger technology, initiated and exemplified by the Bitcoin blockchain, is having an increasing impact on information technology environments in which there is an emphasis on trust and security. Management of electronic health records, where both conformation to legislative regulations and maintenance of public trust are paramount, is an area where the impact of these new technologies may be particularly beneficial. We present a system that enables fine-grained personalized control of third-party access to patients' electronic health records, allowing individuals to specify when and how their records are accessed for research purposes. The use of the smart contract based Ethereum blockchain technology to implement this system allows it to operate in a verifiably secure, trustless, and openly auditable environment, features crucial to health information systems moving forward.

  13. Electronic Health Record for Continuous Shared Health Care

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Petr; Zvárová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2005), s. 275-280 ISSN 1335-2393. [YBERC 2005. Young Biomedical Engineers and Researchers Conference. Stará Lesná, 13.07.2005-15.07.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : information society * telemedicine * electronic health record * digital signature * personal data protection * biomedical informatics Subject RIV: FQ - Public Health Care, Social Medicine

  14. Using electronic health records to save money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Dayan, Yosefa; Saed, Halil; Boaz, Mona; Misch, Yehudith; Shahar, Talia; Husiascky, Ilan; Blumenfeld, Oren

    2013-06-01

    Health information technology, especially electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare providers. This study assessed the cost-savings of incorporating a list of preferred specialty care providers into the EHRs used by all primary care physicians (PCPs), accompanied by a comprehensive implementation plan. On January 1, 2005, all specialty clinic providers at the Israeli Defense Forces were divided into one of four financial classes based on their charges, class 1, the least expensive, being the most preferred, followed by classes 2-4. This list was incorporated into the EHRs used by all PCPs in primary care clinics. PCPs received comprehensive training. Target referral goals were determined for each class and measured for 4 years, together with the total cost of all specialist visits in the first year compared to the following years. Quality assessment (QA) scores were used as a measure of the program's effect on the quality of patient care. During 2005-2008, a marginally significant decline in referrals to class 1 was observed (r=-0.254, p=0.078), however a significant increase in referral rates to class 2 was observed (r=0.957, p=0.042), concurrent with a decrease in referral rates to classes 3 and 4 (r=-0.312, p=0.024). An inverse correlation was observed between year and total costs for all visits to specialists (2008 prices; r=-0.96, p=0.04), and between the mean cost of one specialist visit over the 4 years, indicating a significant reduction in real costs (2008 prices; r=-0.995, p=0.005). QA was not affected by these changes (r=0.94, p=0.016). From a policy perspective, our data suggest that EHR can facilitate effective utilization of healthcare providers and decrease costs.

  15. Quality of nursing documentation: Paper-based health records versus electronic-based health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhu-Zaheya, Laila; Al-Maaitah, Rowaida; Bany Hani, Salam

    2018-02-01

    To assess and compare the quality of paper-based and electronic-based health records. The comparison examined three criteria: content, documentation process and structure. Nursing documentation is a significant indicator of the quality of patient care delivery. It can be either paper-based or organised within the system known as the electronic health records. Nursing documentation must be completed at the highest standards, to ensure the safety and quality of healthcare services. However, the evidence is not clear on which one of the two forms of documentation (paper-based versus electronic health records is more qualified. A retrospective, descriptive, comparative design was used to address the study's purposes. A convenient number of patients' records, from two public hospitals, were audited using the Cat-ch-Ing audit instrument. The sample size consisted of 434 records for both paper-based health records and electronic health records from medical and surgical wards. Electronic health records were better than paper-based health records in terms of process and structure. In terms of quantity and quality content, paper-based records were better than electronic health records. The study affirmed the poor quality of nursing documentation and lack of nurses' knowledge and skills in the nursing process and its application in both paper-based and electronic-based systems. Both forms of documentation revealed drawbacks in terms of content, process and structure. This study provided important information, which can guide policymakers and administrators in identifying effective strategies aimed at enhancing the quality of nursing documentation. Policies and actions to ensure quality nursing documentation at the national level should focus on improving nursing knowledge, competencies, practice in nursing process, enhancing the work environment and nursing workload, as well as strengthening the capacity building of nursing practice to improve the quality of nursing care and

  16. The Internet in Connecting Electronics Health Record Mobile Clients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Petr; Špidlen, Josef; Zvárová, Jana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2002), s. 502-503 ISSN 0928-7329. [Mednet 2002. Qualit-e-Health. World Conference on the Internet in Medicine /7./. 04.12.2002-07.12.2002, Amsterdam] Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : distributed electronic health record * mobile health data access Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  17. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Science.gov (United States)

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  18. Overcoming barriers to implementing patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harle, Christopher A; Listhaus, Alyson; Covarrubias, Constanza M; Schmidt, Siegfried Of; Mackey, Sean; Carek, Peter J; Fillingim, Roger B; Hurley, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe the implementation of a system for collecting patient-reported outcomes and integrating results in an electronic health record. The objective was to identify lessons learned in overcoming barriers to collecting and integrating patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record. The authors analyzed qualitative data in 42 documents collected from system development meetings, written feedback from users, and clinical observations with practice staff, providers, and patients. Guided by the Unified Theory on the Adoption and Use of Information Technology, 5 emergent themes were identified. Two barriers emerged: (i) uncertain clinical benefit and (ii) time, work flow, and effort constraints. Three facilitators emerged: (iii) process automation, (iv) usable system interfaces, and (v) collecting patient-reported outcomes for the right patient at the right time. For electronic health record-integrated patient-reported outcomes to succeed as useful clinical tools, system designers must ensure the clinical relevance of the information being collected while minimizing provider, staff, and patient burden. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Managing electronic records

    CERN Document Server

    McLeod, Julie

    2005-01-01

    For records management courses, this book covers the theory and practice of managing electronic records as business and information assets. It focuses on the strategies, systems and procedures necessary to ensure that electronic records are appropriately created, captured, organized and retained over time to meet business and legal requirements.

  20. Honoring Dental Patients' Privacy Rule Right of Access in the Context of Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoni, Rachel B; Asher, Sheetal R; White, Joel M; Vaderhobli, Ram; Ogunbodede, Eyitope O; Walji, Muhammad F; Riedy, Christine; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2016-06-01

    A person's right to access his or her protected health information is a core feature of the U.S. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule. If the information is stored electronically, covered entities must be able to provide patients with some type of machine-readable, electronic copy of their data. The aim of this study was to understand how academic dental institutions execute the Privacy Rule's right of access in the context of electronic health records (EHRs). A validated electronic survey was distributed to the clinical deans of 62 U.S. dental schools during a two-month period in 2014. The response rate to the survey was 53.2% (N=33). However, three surveys were partially completed, and of the 30 completed surveys, the 24 respondents who reported using axiUm as the EHR at their dental school clinic were the ones on which the results were based (38.7% of total schools at the time). Of the responses analyzed, 86% agreed that clinical modules should be considered part of a patient's dental record, and all agreed that student teaching-related modules should not. Great variability existed among these clinical deans as to whether administrative and financial modules should be considered part of a patient record. When patients request their records, close to 50% of responding schools provide the information exclusively on paper. This study found variation among dental schools in their implementation of the Privacy Rule right of access, and although all the respondents had adopted EHRs, a large number return records in paper format.

  1. [Shared electronic health record in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimon-Suñol, Santiago; Rovira-Barberà, María; Acedo-Anta, Mateo; Nozal-Baldajos, Montserrat A; Guanyabens-Calvet, Joan

    2010-02-01

    Under the law adopted by its Parliament, the Government of Catalonia has developed an electronic medical record system for its National Health System (NHS). The model is governed by the following principles: 1) The citizen as owner of the data: direct access to his data and right to exercise his opposition's privileges; 2) Generate confidence in the system: security and confidentiality strength; 3) Shared model of information management: publishing system and access to organized and structured information, keeping in mind that the NHS of Catalonia is formally an "Integrated system of healthcare public use" (catalan acronym: SISCAT) with a wide variety of legal structures within its healthcare institutions; 4) Use of communication standards and catalogs as a need for technological and functional integration. In summary: single system of medical records shared between different actors, using interoperability tools and whose development is according to the legislation applicable in Catalonia and within its healthcare system. The result has been the establishment of a set of components and relation rules among which we highlight the following: 1) Display of information that collects sociodemographic data of the citizen, documents or reports (radiology, laboratory, therapeutic procedures, hospital release, emergency room), diagnostic health, prescription and immunization plus a summary screen with the most recent and relevant references; 2) Set of tools helping the user and direct messaging between professionals to facilitate their cooperation; 3) Model designed for supranational connections which will allow adding later, with ad hoc rules, clinical data provided by the private health sector or the proper citizen. 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Ethics and subsequent use of electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lisa M

    2017-07-01

    The digital health landscape in the United States is evolving and electronic health record data hold great promise for improving health and health equity. Like many scientific and technological advances in health and medicine, there exists an exciting narrative about what we can do with the new technology, as well as reflection about what we should do with it based on what we value. Ethical reflections about the use of EHR data for research and quality improvement have considered the important issues of privacy and informed consent for subsequent use of data. Additional ethical aspects are important in the conversation, including data validity, patient obligation to participate in the learning health system, and ethics integration into training for all personnel who interact with personal health data. Attention to these ethical issues is paramount to our realizing the benefits of electronic health data. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The patients' active role in managing a personal electronic health record: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudendistel, Ines; Winkler, Eva; Kamradt, Martina; Brophy, Sarah; Längst, Gerda; Eckrich, Felicitas; Heinze, Oliver; Bergh, Bjoern; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-09-01

    The complexity of illness and cross-sectoral health care pose challenges for patients with colorectal cancer and their families. Within a patient-centered care paradigm, it is vital to give patients the opportunity to play an active role. Prospective users' attitudes regarding the patients' role in the context of a patient-controlled electronic health record (PEPA) were explored. A qualitative study across regional health care settings and health professions was conducted. Overall, 10 focus groups were performed collecting views of 3 user groups: patients with colorectal cancer (n = 12) and representatives from patient support groups (n = 2), physicians (n = 17), and other health care professionals (HCPs) (n = 16). Data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The patients' responsibility as a gatekeeper and access manager was at the center of the focus group discussions, although HCPs addressed aspects that would limit patients taking an active role (e.g., illness related issues). Despite expressed concerns, PEPAs possibility to enhance personal responsibility was seen in all user groups. Giving patients an active role in managing a personal electronic health record is an innovative patient-centered approach, although existing restraints have to be recognized. To enhance user adoption and advance PEPAs potential, key user needs have to be addressed.

  4. Identifying patients with hypertension: a case for auditing electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Adam; Hendryx, Michael; Pollard, Cecil

    2012-01-01

    Problems in the structure, consistency, and completeness of electronic health record data are barriers to outcomes research, quality improvement, and practice redesign. This nonexperimental retrospective study examines the utility of importing de-identified electronic health record data into an external system to identify patients with and at risk for essential hypertension. We find a statistically significant increase in cases based on combined use of diagnostic and free-text coding (mean = 1,256.1, 95% CI 1,232.3-1,279.7) compared to diagnostic coding alone (mean = 1,174.5, 95% CI 1,150.5-1,198.3). While it is not surprising that significantly more patients are identified when broadening search criteria, the implications are critical for quality of care, the movement toward the National Committee for Quality Assurance's Patient-Centered Medical Home program, and meaningful use of electronic health records. Further, we find a statistically significant increase in potential cases based on the last two or more blood pressure readings greater than or equal to 140/90 mm Hg (mean = 1,353.9, 95% CI 1,329.9-1,377.9).

  5. Barriers to retrieving patient information from electronic health record data: failure analysis from the TREC Medical Records Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Tracy; Cohen, Aaron M; Bedrick, Steven; Ambert, Kyle; Hersh, William

    2012-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data relies on the ability to retrieve accurate and complete information about desired patient populations. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) 2011 Medical Records Track was a challenge evaluation allowing comparison of systems and algorithms to retrieve patients eligible for clinical studies from a corpus of de-identified medical records, grouped by patient visit. Participants retrieved cohorts of patients relevant to 35 different clinical topics, and visits were judged for relevance to each topic. This study identified the most common barriers to identifying specific clinic populations in the test collection. Using the runs from track participants and judged visits, we analyzed the five non-relevant visits most often retrieved and the five relevant visits most often overlooked. Categories were developed iteratively to group the reasons for incorrect retrieval for each of the 35 topics. Reasons fell into nine categories for non-relevant visits and five categories for relevant visits. Non-relevant visits were most often retrieved because they contained a non-relevant reference to the topic terms. Relevant visits were most often infrequently retrieved because they used a synonym for a topic term. This failure analysis provides insight into areas for future improvement in EHR-based retrieval with techniques such as more widespread and complete use of standardized terminology in retrieval and data entry systems.

  6. Moving electronic medical records upstream: incorporating social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Laura M; Tirozzi, Karen J; Manchanda, Rishi; Burns, Abby R; Sandel, Megan T

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the biological pathways and mechanisms connecting social factors with health has increased exponentially over the past 25 years, yet in most clinical settings, screening and intervention around social determinants of health are not part of standard clinical care. Electronic medical records provide new opportunities for assessing and managing social needs in clinical settings, particularly those serving vulnerable populations. To illustrate the feasibility of capturing information and promoting interventions related to social determinants of health in electronic medical records. Three case studies were examined in which electronic medical records have been used to collect data and address social determinants of health in clinical settings. From these case studies, we identified multiple functions that electronic medical records can perform to facilitate the integration of social determinants of health into clinical systems, including screening, triaging, referring, tracking, and data sharing. If barriers related to incentives, training, and privacy can be overcome, electronic medical record systems can improve the integration of social determinants of health into healthcare delivery systems. More evidence is needed to evaluate the impact of such integration on health care outcomes before widespread adoption can be recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  8. Development of archetypes of radiology for electronic health record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Tiago V.; Pires, Silvio R.; Paiva, Paulo B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a proposal to develop archetypes for electronic patient records system based the openEHR Foundation model. Archetypes were developed specifically for the areas of radiology and diagnostic imaging, as for the early implementation of an electronic health records system. The archetypes developed are related to the examinations request, their execution and report, corresponding to both the administrative as diagnostic workflow inside a diagnostic imaging sector. (author)

  9. Using OpenEHR in SICTI an electronic health record system for critical medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueira, R; Odriazola, A; Simini, F

    2007-01-01

    SICTI is a software tool for registering health records in critical medicine environments. Version 1.0 has been in use since 2003. The Biomedical Engineering Group (Nucleo de Ingenieria Biomedica), with support from the Technological Development Programme (Programa de Desarrollo Tecnologico), decided to develop a new version, to provide an aid for more critical medicine processes, based on a framework which would make the application domain change oriented. The team analyzed three alternatives: to develop an original product based on new research, to base the development on OpenEHR framework, or to use HL7 RIM as the reference model for SICTI. The team opted for OpenEHR. This work describes the use of OpenEHR, its strong and weak points, and states future work perspectives

  10. Using OpenEHR in SICTI an electronic health record system for critical medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, R.; Odriazola, A.; Simini, F.

    2007-11-01

    SICTI is a software tool for registering health records in critical medicine environments. Version 1.0 has been in use since 2003. The Biomedical Engineering Group (Núcleo de Ingeniería Biomédica), with support from the Technological Development Programme (Programa de Desarrollo Tecnológico), decided to develop a new version, to provide an aid for more critical medicine processes, based on a framework which would make the application domain change oriented. The team analyzed three alternatives: to develop an original product based on new research, to base the development on OpenEHR framework, or to use HL7 RIM as the reference model for SICTI. The team opted for OpenEHR. This work describes the use of OpenEHR, its strong and weak points, and states future work perspectives.

  11. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-05-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name “deep patient”. We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems.

  12. Identifying Patients for Clinical Studies from Electronic Health Records: TREC 2012 Medical Records Track at OHSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    report_text:infectious OR report_text:meningitis OR report_text:cefdinir OR report_text:encephalitis OR report_text:"brain abscess " OR...sertraline|zyprexa|olanza pine" 178 Patients with metastatic breast cancer ((report_text:metast* OR discharge_icd_codes_tx:196* OR...report_text:"metastatic breast cancer" 179 Patients taking atypical antipsychotics without a diagnosis schizophrenia or bipolar depression

  13. Electronic health records to support obesity-related patient care: Results from a survey of United States physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, Kayla L; Dooyema, Carrie A; Onufrak, Stephen J; Foltz, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    Obesity-related electronic health record functions increase the rates of measuring Body Mass Index, diagnosing obesity, and providing obesity services. This study describes the prevalence of obesity-related electronic health record functions in clinical practice and analyzes characteristics associated with increased obesity-related electronic health record sophistication. Data were analyzed from DocStyles, a web-based panel survey administered to 1507 primary care providers practicing in the United States in June, 2013. Physicians were asked if their electronic health record has specific obesity-related functions. Logistical regression analyses identified characteristics associated with improved obesity-related electronic health record sophistication. Of the 88% of providers with an electronic health record, 83% of electronic health records calculate Body Mass Index, 52% calculate pediatric Body Mass Index percentile, and 32% flag patients with abnormal Body Mass Index values. Only 36% provide obesity-related decision support and 17% suggest additional resources for obesity-related care. Characteristics associated with having a more sophisticated electronic health record include age ≤45years old, being a pediatrician or family practitioner, and practicing in a larger, outpatient practice. Few electronic health records optimally supported physician's obesity-related clinical care. The low rates of obesity-related electronic health record functions currently in practice highlight areas to improve the clinical health information technology in primary care practice. More work can be done to develop, implement, and promote the effective utilization of obesity-related electronic health record functions to improve obesity treatment and prevention efforts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. “Nothing About Me Without Me”: An Interpretative Review of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Ryan; Sevdalis, Nick; Mayer, Erik K; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) enable patients to access and manage personal clinical information that is made available to them by their health care providers (HCPs). It is thought that the shared management nature of medical record access improves patient outcomes and improves patient satisfaction. However, recent reviews have found that this is not the case. Furthermore, little research has focused on PAEHRs from the HCP viewpoint. HCPs include physicians, nurses, and service providers. Objective We provide a systematic review of reviews of the impact of giving patients record access from both a patient and HCP point of view. The review covers a broad range of outcome measures, including patient safety, patient satisfaction, privacy and security, self-efficacy, and health outcome. Methods A systematic search was conducted using Web of Science to identify review articles on the impact of PAEHRs. Our search was limited to English-language reviews published between January 2002 and November 2014. A total of 73 citations were retrieved from a series of Boolean search terms including “review*” with “patient access to records”. These reviews went through a novel scoring system analysis whereby we calculated how many positive outcomes were reported per every outcome measure investigated. This provided a way to quantify the impact of PAEHRs. Results Ten reviews covering chronic patients (eg, diabetes and hypertension) and primary care patients, as well as HCPs were found but eight were included for the analysis of outcome measures. We found mixed outcomes across both patient and HCP groups, with approximately half of the reviews showing positive changes with record access. Patients believe that record access increases their perception of control; however, outcome measures thought to create psychological concerns (such as patient anxiety as a result of seeing their medical record) are still unanswered. Nurses are more likely than

  15. Keeping electronic records secure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, David

    2013-10-01

    Are electronic engineering maintenance records relating to the hospital estate or a medical device as important as electronic patient records? Computer maintenance management systems (CMMS) are increasingly being used to manage all-round maintenance activities. However, the accuracy of the data held on them, and a level of security that prevents tampering with records, or other unauthorised changes to them to 'cover' poor practice, are both essential, so that, should an individual be injured or killed on hospital grounds, and a law suit follow, the estates team can be confident that it has accurate data to prove it has fulfilled its duty of care. Here David Easton MSc CEng FIHEEM MIET, director of Zener Engineering Services, and chair of IHEEM's Medical Devices Advisory Group, discusses the issues around maintenance databases, and the security and integrity of maintenance data.

  16. Impact of patients' access to medical records in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakov, A; Kabaha, N; Azuri, J; Moshe, S

    2018-04-14

    Information technologies offer new ways to engage with patients regarding their health, but no studies have been done in occupational health services (OHS). To examine the advantages and disadvantages of providing written and oral medical information to patients in OHS. In this cross-sectional study, data were retrieved from patients visiting four different OHS during 2014-15 for a fitness for work evaluation. We built a semi-quantitative satisfaction questionnaire, with responses ranging on a Likert scale of 1-5 from very dissatisfied (1) to very satisfied (5). There were 287 questionnaires available for analysis. The number of patients who received detailed oral and written information, which included an explanation of their health condition and of the occupational physician's (OP's) decision, was higher in clinics 1 and 3 compared to clinics 2 and 4 (48 and 38% compared to 21 and 31% respectively, P < 0.05). When patients were provided with detailed oral and written information, they declared having a better understanding (4.3 and 4.4 compared to 3.8 respectively, P < 0.001), a higher level of confidence in their OP (4.4 and 4.3 compared to 3.7 and 4 respectively, P < 0.001), a higher level of satisfaction (4.3 and 4.4 compared to 3.8 respectively, P < 0.001) and a higher sense of control and ability to correct the record (1.8 compared to 1.4 respectively, P < 0.01), compared to patients who received partial information. We recommend sharing detailed oral and written medical information with patients in OHS.

  17. Implementation of Electronic Health Records in US Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnadottir, Ragnhildur I; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Travers, Jasmine L; Castle, Nicholas G; Stone, Patricia W

    2017-08-01

    While electronic health records have emerged as promising tools to help improve quality of care, nursing homes have lagged behind in implementation. This study assessed electronic health records implementation, associated facility characteristics, and potential impact on quality indicators in nursing homes. Using national Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and survey data for nursing homes, a cross-sectional analysis was conducted to identify variations between nursing homes that had and had not implemented electronic health records. A difference-in-differences analysis was used to estimate the longitudinal effect of electronic health records on commonly used quality indicators. Data from 927 nursing homes were examined, 49.1% of which had implemented electronic health records. Nursing homes with electronic health records were more likely to be nonprofit/government owned (P = .04) and had a lower percentage of Medicaid residents (P = .02) and higher certified nursing assistant and registered nurse staffing levels (P = .002 and .02, respectively). Difference-in-differences analysis showed greater quality improvements after implementation for five long-stay and two short-stay quality measures (P = .001 and .01, respectively) compared with those who did not implement electronic health records. Implementation rates in nursing homes are low compared with other settings, and better-resourced facilities are more likely to have implemented electronic health records. Consistent with other settings, electronic health records implementation improves quality in nursing homes, but further research is needed to better understand the mechanism for improvement and how it can best be supported.

  18. Clinical genomics in the world of the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolo, Keith; Spooner, S Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic health records presents a number of benefits to the field of clinical genomics. They include the ability to return results to the practitioner, to use genetic findings in clinical decision support, and to have data collected in the electronic health record that serve as a source of phenotypic information for analysis purposes. Not all electronic health records are created equal, however. They differ in their features, capabilities, and ease of use. Therefore, to understand the potential of the electronic health record, it is first necessary to understand its capabilities and the impact that implementation strategy has on usability. Specifically, we focus on the following areas: (i) how the electronic health record is used to capture data in clinical practice settings; (ii) how the implementation and configuration of the electronic health record affect the quality and availability of data; (iii) the management of clinical genetic test results and the feasibility of electronic health record integration; and (iv) the challenges of implementing an electronic health record in a research-intensive environment. This is followed by a discussion of the minimum functional requirements that an electronic health record must meet to enable the satisfactory integration of genomic results as well as the open issues that remain.

  19. DETAILED CLINICAL MODELS AND THEIR RELATION WITH ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS.

    OpenAIRE

    Boscá Tomás, Diego

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Healthcare domain produces and consumes big quantities of people's health data. Although data exchange is the norm rather than the exception, being able to access to all patient data is still far from achieved. Current developments such as personal health records will introduce even more data and complexity to the Electronic Health Records (EHR). Achieving semantic interoperability is one of the biggest challenges to overcome in order to benefit from all the information contained in the ...

  20. Analysis of free text in electronic health records for identification of cancer patient trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper; Soguero-Ruiz, Cristina; Mikalsen, Karl Oyvind

    2017-01-01

    With an aging patient population and increasing complexity in patient disease trajectories, physicians are often met with complex patient histories from which clinical decisions must be made. Due to the increasing rate of adverse events and hospitals facing financial penalties for readmission......, there has never been a greater need to enforce evidence-led medical decision-making using available health care data. In the present work, we studied a cohort of 7,741 patients, of whom 4,080 were diagnosed with cancer, surgically treated at a University Hospital in the years 2004-2012. We have developed...... a methodology that allows disease trajectories of the cancer patients to be estimated from free text in electronic health records (EHRs). By using these disease trajectories, we predict 80% of patient events ahead in time. By control of confounders from 8326 quantified events, we identified 557 events...

  1. Identification of Patient Safety Risks Associated with Electronic Health Records: A Software Quality Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginio, Luiz A; Ricarte, Ivan Luiz Marques

    2015-01-01

    Although Electronic Health Records (EHR) can offer benefits to the health care process, there is a growing body of evidence that these systems can also incur risks to patient safety when developed or used improperly. This work is a literature review to identify these risks from a software quality perspective. Therefore, the risks were classified based on the ISO/IEC 25010 software quality model. The risks identified were related mainly to the characteristics of "functional suitability" (i.e., software bugs) and "usability" (i.e., interface prone to user error). This work elucidates the fact that EHR quality problems can adversely affect patient safety, resulting in errors such as incorrect patient identification, incorrect calculation of medication dosages, and lack of access to patient data. Therefore, the risks presented here provide the basis for developers and EHR regulating bodies to pay attention to the quality aspects of these systems that can result in patient harm.

  2. Can the use of Electronic Health Records in General Practice reduce hospitalizations for diabetes patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Line Planck; Mellace, Giovanni; Rose Olsen, Kim

    on Electronic Health Records (EHR) on diabetes patients total hospitalizations, diabetes related hospitalizations and hospitalizations with diabetes and cardiovascular related Ambulatory Care Sentive Conditions (ACSC). We use a rich nationwide panel dataset (2004-2013) with information of stepwise enrolment...... of GPs in the EHR program. As a control group we use GPs who never enrolled. Following the recent literature on causal inference with panel data, we use a standard propensity score matching estimator where we also match on pre-treatment outcomes. This allows controlling for all the unobservable...

  3. [Electronic patient record as the tool for better patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate again that there is a deficit in the use of electronic health records (EHR) in German hospitals. Despite good arguments in favour of their use, such as the rapid availability of data, German hospitals shy away from a wider implementation. The reason is the high cost of installing and maintaining the EHRs, for the benefit is difficult to evaluate in monetary terms for the hospital. Even if a benefit can be shown it is not necessarily evident within the hospital, but manifests itself only in the health system outside. Many hospitals only manage to partly implement EHR resulting in increased documentation requirements which reverse their positive effect.In the United States, electronic medical records are also viewed in light of their positive impact on patient safety. In particular, electronic medication systems prove the benefits they can provide in the context of patient safety. As a result, financing systems have been created to promote the digitalisation of hospitals in the United States. This has led to a large increase in the use of IT systems in the United States in recent years. The Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf (UKE) introduced electronic patient records in 2009. The benefits, in particular as regards patient safety, are numerous and there are many examples to illustrate this position. These positive results are intended to demonstrate the important role EHR play in hospitals. A financing system of the ailing IT landscape based on the American model is urgently needed to benefit-especially in terms of patient safety-from electronic medical records in the hospital.

  4. Patient preferences toward an interactive e-consent application for research using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harle, Christopher A; Golembiewski, Elizabeth H; Rahmanian, Kiarash P; Krieger, Janice L; Hagmajer, Dorothy; Mainous, Arch G; Moseley, Ray E

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to assess patient perceptions of using an interactive electronic consent (e-consent) application when deciding whether or not to grant broad consent for research use of their identifiable electronic health record (EHR) information. For this qualitative study, we conducted a series of 42 think-aloud interviews with 32 adults. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. We identified themes related to patient preferences, reservations, and mixed attitudes toward consenting electronically; low- and high-information-seeking behavior; and an emphasis on reassuring information, such as data protections and prohibitions against sharing data with pharmaceutical companies. Participants expressed interest in the types of information contained in their EHRs, safeguards protecting EHR data, and specifics on studies that might use their EHR data. This study supports the potential value of interactive e-consent applications that allow patients to customize their consent experience. This study also highlights that some people have concerns about e-consent platforms and desire more detailed information about administrative processes and safeguards that protect EHR data used in research. This study contributes new insights on how e-consent applications could be designed to ensure that patients' information needs are met when seeking consent for research use of health record information. Also, this study offers a potential electronic approach to meeting the new Common Rule requirement that consent documents contain a "concise and focused" presentation of key information followed by more details. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Do Electronic Health Records Help or Hinder Medical Education?

    OpenAIRE

    Peled, Jonathan U.; Sagher, Oren; Morrow, Jay B.; Dobbie, Alison E.

    2009-01-01

    Background to the Debate Background to the debate: Many countries worldwide are digitizing patients' medical records. In the United States, the recent economic stimulus package (?the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009?), signed into law by President Obama, includes $US17 billion in incentives for health providers to switch to electronic health records (EHRs). The package also includes $US2 billion for the development of EHR standards and best-practice guidelines. What impact will ...

  6. Automated Methods to Extract Patient New Information from Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has resulted in rapid text proliferation within clinical care. Clinicians' use of copying and pasting functions in EHR systems further compounds this by creating a large amount of redundant clinical information in clinical documents. A mixture of redundant information (especially outdated…

  7. HOSPITAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS: A STUDY OF ELECTRONIC PATIENT RECORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Cortês

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of patient records, also known as medical records, is related to different needs and objectives, as they constitute permanent documents on the health of patients. With the advancement of information technologies and systems, patient records can be stored in databases, resulting in a positive impact on patient care. Based on these considerations, a research question that arises is “what are the benefits and problems that can be seen with the use of electronic versions of medical records?” This question leads to the formulation of the following hypothesis: although problems can be identified during the process of using electronic record systems, the benefits outweigh the difficulties, thereby justifying their use. To respond to the question and test the presented hypothesis, a research study was developed with users of the same electronic record system, consisting of doctors, nurses, and administrative personnel in three hospitals located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The results show that, despite some problems in their usage, the benefits of electronic patient records outweigh possible disadvantages.

  8. The use of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marca, Guillem; Perez, Angel; Blanco-Garcia, Martin German; Miravalles, Elena; Soley, Pere; Ortiga, Berta

    The aims of this study were to describe the level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals and to identify potential barriers and facilitators to this process. We used an observational cross-sectional design. The survey was conducted between September and December 2011, using an electronic questionnaire distributed through email. We obtained a 30% response rate from the 214 hospitals contacted, all belonging to the Spanish National Health Service. The level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals was found to be high: 39.1% of hospitals surveyed had a comprehensive EHR system while a basic system was functioning in 32.8% of the cases. However, in 2011 one third of the hospitals did not have a basic electronic health record system, although some have since implemented electronic functionalities, particularly those related to clinical documentation and patient administration. Respondents cited the acquisition and implementation costs as the main barriers to implementation. Facilitators for EHR implementation were: the possibility to hire technical support, both during and post implementation; security certification warranty; and objective third-party evaluations of EHR products. In conclusion, the number of hospitals that have electronic health records is in general high, being relatively higher in medium-sized hospitals.

  9. Current patient and healthcare worker attitudes to eHealth and the personally controlled electronic health record in major hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armani, R; Mitchell, L E; Allen-Graham, J; Heriot, N R; Kotsimbos, T; Wilson, J W

    2016-06-01

    The current health system in Australia is comprised of both electronic- and paper-based medical records. The Federal Government has approved funding for the development of an individual health identifier and a universally adopted online health repository. To determine attitudes and beliefs of patients and healthcare workers regarding the use of stored medical information and the personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR) in selected major hospitals in Victoria. Qualitative survey of patients and healthcare workers (n = 600 each group) conducted during 2014 across five major hospitals in Melbourne to measure the awareness, attitudes and barriers to electronic health and the PCEHR. Of the patients, 93.3% support the concept of a shared electronic healthcare record, 33.7% were aware of the PCEHR and only 11% had registered. The majority of healthcare workers believed that the presence of a shared health record would result in an increased appropriateness of care and patient safety by reducing adverse drug events and improving the timeliness of care provided. However, only 46% of healthcare workers were aware of the PCEHR. This study provides a baseline evaluation of perceptions surrounding eHealth and PCHER in acute health services in five metropolitan centres. While there appears to be a readiness for adoption of these strategies for healthcare documentation, patients require motivation to register for the PCEHR, and healthcare workers require more information on the potential benefits to them to achieve more timely and efficient care. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Electronic Health Records: An Enhanced Security Paradigm to Preserve Patient's Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamanig, Daniel; Stingl, Christian

    In recent years, demographic change and increasing treatment costs demand the adoption of more cost efficient, highly qualitative and integrated health care processes. The rapid growth and availability of the Internet facilitate the development of eHealth services and especially of electronic health records (EHRs) which are promising solutions to meet the aforementioned requirements. Considering actual web-based EHR systems, patient-centric and patient moderated approaches are widely deployed. Besides, there is an emerging market of so called personal health record platforms, e.g. Google Health. Both concepts provide a central and web-based access to highly sensitive medical data. Additionally, the fact that these systems may be hosted by not fully trustworthy providers necessitates to thoroughly consider privacy issues. In this paper we define security and privacy objectives that play an important role in context of web-based EHRs. Furthermore, we discuss deployed solutions as well as concepts proposed in the literature with respect to this objectives and point out several weaknesses. Finally, we introduce a system which overcomes the drawbacks of existing solutions by considering an holistic approach to preserve patient's privacy and discuss the applied methods.

  11. Electronic health records: eliciting behavioral health providers' beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Nancy; Willborn, Elizabeth; Pytlikzillig, Lisa; Noel, Harmonijoie

    2012-04-01

    Interviews with 32 community behavioral health providers elicited perceived benefits and barriers of using electronic health records. Themes identified were (a) quality of care, (b) privacy and security, and (c) delivery of services. Benefits to quality of care were mentioned by 100% of the providers, and barriers by 59% of providers. Barriers involving privacy and security concerns were mentioned by 100% of providers, and benefits by 22%. Barriers to delivery of services were mentioned by 97% of providers, and benefits by 66%. Most providers (81%) expressed overall positive support for electronic behavioral health records.

  12. An analysis of electronic health record-related patient safety concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Derek W; Smith, Michael W; Taylor, Lesley; Sittig, Dean F; Scott, Jean M; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-01-01

    Objective A recent Institute of Medicine report called for attention to safety issues related to electronic health records (EHRs). We analyzed EHR-related safety concerns reported within a large, integrated healthcare system. Methods The Informatics Patient Safety Office of the Veterans Health Administration (VA) maintains a non-punitive, voluntary reporting system to collect and investigate EHR-related safety concerns (ie, adverse events, potential events, and near misses). We analyzed completed investigations using an eight-dimension sociotechnical conceptual model that accounted for both technical and non-technical dimensions of safety. Using the framework analysis approach to qualitative data, we identified emergent and recurring safety concerns common to multiple reports. Results We extracted 100 consecutive, unique, closed investigations between August 2009 and May 2013 from 344 reported incidents. Seventy-four involved unsafe technology and 25 involved unsafe use of technology. A majority (70%) involved two or more model dimensions. Most often, non-technical dimensions such as workflow, policies, and personnel interacted in a complex fashion with technical dimensions such as software/hardware, content, and user interface to produce safety concerns. Most (94%) safety concerns related to either unmet data-display needs in the EHR (ie, displayed information available to the end user failed to reduce uncertainty or led to increased potential for patient harm), software upgrades or modifications, data transmission between components of the EHR, or ‘hidden dependencies’ within the EHR. Discussion EHR-related safety concerns involving both unsafe technology and unsafe use of technology persist long after ‘go-live’ and despite the sophisticated EHR infrastructure represented in our data source. Currently, few healthcare institutions have reporting and analysis capabilities similar to the VA. Conclusions Because EHR-related safety concerns have complex

  13. Will electronic personal health records benefit providers and patients in rural America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, John S

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to educate stakeholders (e.g., providers, patients, insurers, government) in the healthcare industry about electronic personal health records (PHRs) and their potential application in rural America. Extensive research was performed on PHRs through standard literature search, product demonstrations, educational webinars, and fact finding via news releases. Various stakeholders are eager to transform the healthcare industry into the digital age like other industries (i.e., banking, retail). Despite low adoption of PHRs in 2008 (2.7% of U.S. adults), patients are interested in secure messaging and eVisits with their physicians, online appointment scheduling and reminders, and online access to their laboratory and radiology results. Federal agencies (e.g., Health and Human Services, Department of Defense, Veterans Affairs [VA]), popular information technology (IT) vendors (e.g., Google, Microsoft), and large insurers (e.g., Aetna) have energized the industry through pilot programs and new product announcements. It remains to be seen if barriers to adoption, including privacy concerns, lack of interoperability standards and funding, and provider resistance, can be overcome to enable PHRs to become a critical tool in the creation of a more efficient and less costly U.S. healthcare industry. Electronic PHRs hold great promise to enhance access and improve the quality of care provided to patients in rural America. Government, vendors, and insurers should create incentives for providers and patients to implement PHRs. Likewise, patients need to become more aware of PHRs and their ability to improve health outcomes.

  14. Evaluation of Electronic Health Record Implementation in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2017-07-01

    The effectiveness of electronic health records has not previously been widely evaluated. Thus, this national cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate electronic health records, from the perspective of nurses, by examining how they use the records, their opinions on the quality of the systems, and their overall levels of satisfaction with electronic health records. The relationship between these constructs was measured, and its predictors were investigated. A random sample of Jordanian hospitals that used electronic health records was selected, and data were gathered using a self-administered questionnaire, based on the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success model. In total, 1648 nurses from 17 different hospitals participated in the study. Results indicated that nurses were largely positive about the use and quality of the systems and were satisfied with electronic health records. Significant positive correlations were found between these constructs, and a number of demographical and situational factors were found to have an effect on nurses' perceptions. The study provides a systematic evaluation of different facets of electronic health records, which is fundamental for recognizing the motives and challenges for success and for further enhancing this success. The work proves that nurses favor the use of electronic health records and are satisfied with it and perceive its high quality, and the findings should therefore encourage their ongoing implementation.

  15. Protecting patients’ electronic health records using enhanced active bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salih, R.M.; Lilien, L.T.; Ben Othmane, L.; Arriaga, R.; Matic, A.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a solution that provides protection for patients' electronic health/medical records disseminated among different authorized healthcare information systems. The solution is known as Active Bundles using a Trusted Third Party (ABTTP). It is based on the use of trusted third parties, and the

  16. Patients' online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic interpretative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Mold, Freda; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Gronlund, Toto Anne; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Barker, Fiona; Ellis, Beverley; Koczan, Phil; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; McCarthy, Mary; Jones, Simon; Rafi, Imran

    2014-09-08

    To investigate the effect of providing patients online access to their electronic health record (EHR) and linked transactional services on the provision, quality and safety of healthcare. The objectives are also to identify and understand: barriers and facilitators for providing online access to their records and services for primary care workers; and their association with organisational/IT system issues. Primary care. A total of 143 studies were included. 17 were experimental in design and subject to risk of bias assessment, which is reported in a separate paper. Detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria have also been published elsewhere in the protocol. Our primary outcome measure was change in quality or safety as a result of implementation or utilisation of online records/transactional services. No studies reported changes in health outcomes; though eight detected medication errors and seven reported improved uptake of preventative care. Professional concerns over privacy were reported in 14 studies. 18 studies reported concern over potential increased workload; with some showing an increase workload in email or online messaging; telephone contact remaining unchanged, and face-to face contact staying the same or falling. Owing to heterogeneity in reporting overall workload change was hard to predict. 10 studies reported how online access offered convenience, primarily for more advantaged patients, who were largely highly satisfied with the process when clinician responses were prompt. Patient online access and services offer increased convenience and satisfaction. However, professionals were concerned about impact on workload and risk to privacy. Studies correcting medication errors may improve patient safety. There may need to be a redesign of the business process to engage health professionals in online access and of the EHR to make it friendlier and provide equity of access to a wider group of patients. A1 SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO

  17. Extended use of electronic health records by primary care physicians: Does the electronic health record artefact matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Louis; Paré, Guy; Marchand, Marie

    2017-04-01

    The deployment of electronic health record systems is deemed to play a decisive role in the transformations currently being implemented in primary care medical practices. This study aims to characterize electronic health record systems from the perspective of family physicians. To achieve this goal, we conducted a survey of physicians practising in private clinics located in Quebec, Canada. We used valid responses from 331 respondents who were found to be representative of the larger population. Data provided by the physicians using the top three electronic health record software products were analysed in order to obtain statistically adequate sub-sample sizes. Significant differences were observed among the three products with regard to their functional capability. The extent to which each of the electronic health record functionalities are used by physicians also varied significantly. Our results confirm that the electronic health record artefact 'does matter', its clinical functionalities explaining why certain physicians make more extended use of their system than others.

  18. A Socio-Technical Analysis of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Maria; Scandurra, Isabella

    2017-01-01

    In Sweden, and internationally, there is a movement towards increased transparency in healthcare including giving patients online access to their electronic health records (EHR). The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Swedish patient accessible EHR (PAEHR) service using a socio-technical framework, to increase the understanding of factors that influence the design, implementation, adoption and use of the service. Using the Sitting and Singh socio-technical framework as a basis for analyzing the Swedish PAEHR system and its context indicated that there are many stakeholders engaged in these types of services, with different driving forces and incentives that may influence the adoption and usefulness of PAEHR services. The analysis was useful in highlighting important areas that need to be further explored in evaluations of PAEHR services, and can act as a guide when planning evaluations of any PAEHR service.

  19. Ethical Implications of the Electronic Health Record: In the Service of the Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulmasy, Lois Snyder; López, Ana María; Horwitch, Carrie A

    2017-08-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide benefits for patients, physicians, and clinical teams, but also raise ethical questions. Navigating how to provide care in the digital age requires an assessment of the impact of the EHR on patient care and the patient-physician relationship. EHRs should facilitate patient care and, as an essential component of that care, support the patient-physician relationship. Billing, regulatory, research, documentation, and administrative functions determined by the operational requirements of health care systems, payers, and others have resulted in EHRs that are better able to satisfy such external functions than to ensure that patient care needs are met. The profession has a responsibility to identify and address this mismatch. This position paper by the American College of Physicians (ACP) Ethics, Professionalism and Human Rights Committee does not address EHR design, user variability, meaningful use, or coding requirements and other government and payer mandates per se; these issues are discussed in detail in ACP's Clinical Documentation policy. This paper focuses on EHRs and the patient-physician relationship and patient care; patient autonomy, privacy and confidentiality; and professionalism, clinical reasoning and training. It explores emerging ethical challenges and concerns for and raised by physicians across the professional lifespan, whose ongoing input is crucial to the development and use of information technology that truly serves patients.

  20. Patient-centered communication in the era of electronic health records: What does the evidence say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathert, Cheryl; Mittler, Jessica N; Banerjee, Sudeep; McDaniel, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Patient-physician communication is essential for patient-centered health care. Physicians are concerned that electronic health records (EHRs) negatively affect communication with patients. This study identified a framework for understanding communication functions that influence patient outcomes. We then conducted a systematic review of the literature and organized it within the framework to better understand what is known. A comprehensive search of three databases (CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO) yielded 41 articles for analysis. Results indicated that EHR use improves capture and sharing of certain biomedical information. However, it may interfere with collection of psychosocial and emotional information, and therefore may interfere with development of supportive, healing relationships. Patient access to the EHR and messaging functions may improve communication, patient empowerment, engagement, and self-management. More rigorous examination of EHR impacts on communication functions and their influences on patient outcomes is imperative for achieving patient-centered care. By focusing on the role of communication functions on patient outcomes, future EHRs can be developed to facilitate care. Training alone is likely to be insufficient to address disruptions to communication processes. Processes must be improved, and EHRs must be developed to capture useful data without interfering with physicians' and patients' abilities to effectively communicate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Forecasting the Use of Electronic Health Records, An Exp...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The authors of Forecasting the Use of Electronic Health Records, An Expert Opinion Approach, published in Volume 3, Issue 2 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  2. Modelling and implementing electronic health records in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Knut; Rasmussen, Morten Bruun; Vingtoft, Søren

    2003-01-01

    The Danish Health IT strategy points out that integration between electronic health records (EHR) systems has a high priority. This paper reporst reports new tendencies in modelling and integration platforms globally and how this is reflected in the natinal development....

  3. Identification and Progression of Heart Disease Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients from Longitudinal Electronic Health Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Jonnagaddala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, assessing the risk of its occurrence is a crucial step in predicting serious cardiac events. Identifying heart disease risk factors and tracking their progression is a preliminary step in heart disease risk assessment. A large number of studies have reported the use of risk factor data collected prospectively. Electronic health record systems are a great resource of the required risk factor data. Unfortunately, most of the valuable information on risk factor data is buried in the form of unstructured clinical notes in electronic health records. In this study, we present an information extraction system to extract related information on heart disease risk factors from unstructured clinical notes using a hybrid approach. The hybrid approach employs both machine learning and rule-based clinical text mining techniques. The developed system achieved an overall microaveraged F-score of 0.8302.

  4. Operating Room Delays: Meaningful Use in Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winkle, Rachelle A; Champagne, Mary T; Gilman-Mays, Meri; Aucoin, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Perioperative areas are the most costly to operate and account for more than 40% of expenses. The high costs prompted one organization to analyze surgical delays through a retrospective review of their new electronic health record. Electronic health records have made it easier to access and aggregate clinical data; 2123 operating room cases were analyzed. Implementing a new electronic health record system is complex; inaccurate data and poor implementation can introduce new problems. Validating the electronic health record development processes determines the ease of use and the user interface, specifically related to user compliance with the intent of the electronic health record development. The revalidation process after implementation determines if the intent of the design was fulfilled and data can be meaningfully used. In this organization, the data fields completed through automation provided quantifiable, meaningful data. However, data fields completed by staff that required subjective decision making resulted in incomplete data nearly 24% of the time. The ease of use was further complicated by 490 permutations (combinations of delay types and reasons) that were built into the electronic health record. Operating room delay themes emerged notwithstanding the significant complexity of the electronic health record build; however, improved accuracy could improve meaningful data collection and a more accurate root cause analysis of operating room delays. Accurate and meaningful use of data affords a more reliable approach in quality, safety, and cost-effective initiatives.

  5. Electronic Health Record Phenotypes for Precision Medicine: Perspectives and Caveats From Treatment of Breast Cancer at a Single Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfang; Maxwell, Kara N.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Zhang, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Precision medicine is at the forefront of biomedical research. Cancer registries provide rich perspectives and electronic health records (EHRs) are commonly utilized to gather additional clinical data elements needed for translational research. However, manual annotation is resource‐intense and not readily scalable. Informatics‐based phenotyping presents an ideal solution, but perspectives obtained can be impacted by both data source and algorithm selection. We derived breast cancer (BC) receptor status phenotypes from structured and unstructured EHR data using rule‐based algorithms, including natural language processing (NLP). Overall, the use of NLP increased BC receptor status coverage by 39.2% from 69.1% with structured medication information alone. Using all available EHR data, estrogen receptor‐positive BC cases were ascertained with high precision (P = 0.976) and recall (R = 0.987) compared with gold standard chart‐reviewed patients. However, status negation (R = 0.591) decreased 40.2% when relying on structured medications alone. Using multiple EHR data types (and thorough understanding of the perspectives offered) are necessary to derive robust EHR‐based precision medicine phenotypes. PMID:29084368

  6. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Documentation of delirium in the VA electronic health record

    OpenAIRE

    Hope, Carol; Estrada, Nicollete; Weir, Charlene; Teng, Chia-Chen; Damal, Kavitha; Sauer, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Background Delirium is a life-threatening, clinical syndrome common among the elderly and hospitalized patients. Delirium is under-recognized and misdiagnosed, complicating efforts to study the epidemiology and construct appropriate decision support to improve patient care. This study was primarily conducted to realize how providers documented confirmed cases of delirium in electronic health records as a preliminary step for using computerized methods to identify patients with delirium from e...

  8. Electronic health record standards, coding systems, frameworks, and infrastructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Pradeep K; Bendale, Prashant; Mantri, Manisha; Dande, Atreya

    2013-01-01

    Discover How Electronic Health Records Are Built to Drive the Next Generation of Healthcare Delivery The increased role of IT in the healthcare sector has led to the coining of a new phrase ""health informatics,"" which deals with the use of IT for better healthcare services. Health informatics applications often involve maintaining the health records of individuals, in digital form, which is referred to as an Electronic Health Record (EHR). Building and implementing an EHR infrastructure requires an understanding of healthcare standards, coding systems, and frameworks. This book provides an

  9. Ethical, legal, and social implications of incorporating genomic information into electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazin, Ribhi; Brothers, Kyle B; Malin, Bradley A; Koenig, Barbara A; Sanderson, Saskia C; Rothstein, Mark A; Williams, Marc S; Clayton, Ellen W; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2013-10-01

    The inclusion of genomic data in the electronic health record raises important ethical, legal, and social issues. In this article, we highlight these challenges and discuss potential solutions. We provide a brief background on the current state of electronic health records in the context of genomic medicine, discuss the importance of equitable access to genome-enabled electronic health records, and consider the potential use of electronic health records for improving genomic literacy in patients and providers. We highlight the importance of privacy, access, and security, and of determining which genomic information is included in the electronic health record. Finally, we discuss the challenges of reporting incidental findings, storing and reinterpreting genomic data, and nondocumentation and duty to warn family members at potential genetic risk.

  10. Semantic Interoperability in the Structured Electronic Health Record

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Petr; Přečková, Petra; Zvárová, Jana

    -, č. 69 (2007), s. 52-53 ISSN 0926-4981 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * terminology * classification Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  11. Chronic pain among patients with opioid use disorder: Results from electronic health records data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Mooney, Larissa J; Saxon, Andrew J; Miotto, Karen; Bell, Douglas S; Huang, David

    2017-06-01

    To examine the prevalence of comorbid chronic pain among patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) and to compare other comorbidities (substance use disorder (SUD), mental health disorders, health/disease conditions) among patients in four categories: no chronic pain (No Pain), OUD prior to pain (OUD First), OUD and pain at the same time (Same Time), or pain condition prior to OUD (Pain First). Using an electronic health record (EHR) database from 2006-2015, the study assessed 5307 adult patients with OUD in a large healthcare system; 35.6% were No Pain, 9.7% were OUD First, 14.9% were Same Time, and 39.8% were Pain First. Most OUD patients (64.4%) had chronic pain conditions, and among them 61.8% had chronic pain before their first OUD diagnosis. Other SUDs occurred more frequently among OUD First patients than among other groups in terms of alcohol (33.4% vs. 25.4% for No Pain, 20.7% for Same Time, and 20.3% for Pain First), cocaine (19.0%, vs. 13.8%, 9.4%, 7.1%), and alcohol or drug-induced disorders. OUD First patients also had the highest rates of HIV (4.7%) and hepatitis C virus (HCV; 28.2%) among the four groups. Pain First patients had the highest rates of mental disorder (81.7%), heart disease (72.0%), respiratory disease (68.4%), sleep disorder (41.8%), cancer (23.4%), and diabetes (19.3%). The alarming high rates of chronic pain conditions occurring before OUD and the associated severe mental health and physical health conditions require better models of assessment and coordinated care plans to address these complex medical conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. All together now: findings from a PCORI workshop to align patient-reported outcomes in the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Roxanne E; Snyder, Claire F; Basch, Ethan; Frank, Lori; Wu, Albert W

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, patient-reported outcomes have become increasingly collected and integrated into electronic health records. However, there are few cross-cutting recommendations and limited guidance available in this rapidly developing research area. Our goal is to report key findings from a 2013 Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute workshop on this topic and a summary of actions that followed from the workshop, and present resulting recommendations that address patient, clinical and research/quality improvement barriers to regular use. These findings provide actionable guidance across research and practice settings to promote and sustain widespread adoption of patient-reported outcomes across patient populations, healthcare settings and electronic health record systems.

  13. How bioethics principles can aid design of electronic health records to accommodate patient granular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, Eric M; Schwartz, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Ethics should guide the design of electronic health records (EHR), and recognized principles of bioethics can play an important role. This approach was recently adopted by a team of informaticists who are designing and testing a system where patients exert granular control over who views their personal health information. While this method of building ethics in from the start of the design process has significant benefits, questions remain about how useful the application of bioethics principles can be in this process, especially when principles conflict. For instance, while the ethical principle of respect for autonomy supports a robust system of granular control, the principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence counsel restraint due to the danger of patients being harmed by restrictions on provider access to data. Conflict between principles has long been recognized by ethicists and has even motivated attacks on approaches that state and apply principles. In this paper, we show how using ethical principles can help in the design of EHRs by first explaining how ethical principles can and should be used generally, and then by discussing how attention to details in specific cases can show that the tension between principles is not as bad as it initially appeared. We conclude by suggesting ways in which the application of these (and other) principles can add value to the ongoing discussion of patient involvement in their health care. This is a new approach to linking principles to informatics design that we expect will stimulate further interest.

  14. Text mining electronic health records to identify hospital adverse events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Hardahl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Manual reviews of health records to identify possible adverse events are time consuming. We are developing a method based on natural language processing to quickly search electronic health records for common triggers and adverse events. Our results agree fairly well with those obtained using manu...

  15. Learning a Health Knowledge Graph from Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotmensch, Maya; Halpern, Yoni; Tlimat, Abdulhakim; Horng, Steven; Sontag, David

    2017-07-20

    Demand for clinical decision support systems in medicine and self-diagnostic symptom checkers has substantially increased in recent years. Existing platforms rely on knowledge bases manually compiled through a labor-intensive process or automatically derived using simple pairwise statistics. This study explored an automated process to learn high quality knowledge bases linking diseases and symptoms directly from electronic medical records. Medical concepts were extracted from 273,174 de-identified patient records and maximum likelihood estimation of three probabilistic models was used to automatically construct knowledge graphs: logistic regression, naive Bayes classifier and a Bayesian network using noisy OR gates. A graph of disease-symptom relationships was elicited from the learned parameters and the constructed knowledge graphs were evaluated and validated, with permission, against Google's manually-constructed knowledge graph and against expert physician opinions. Our study shows that direct and automated construction of high quality health knowledge graphs from medical records using rudimentary concept extraction is feasible. The noisy OR model produces a high quality knowledge graph reaching precision of 0.85 for a recall of 0.6 in the clinical evaluation. Noisy OR significantly outperforms all tested models across evaluation frameworks (p < 0.01).

  16. Electronic Health Record in Continuous Shared Health Care

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Petr; Zvárová, Jana; Zvára, K.; Bureš, V.; Špidlen, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), s. 1-6 ISSN 1727-1983. [EMBEC'05. European Medical and Biomedical Conference /3./. Prague, 20.11.2005-25.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * shared health care * information technology Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  17. Electronic patient record: what makes care providers use it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel-Verkerke, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous progress that is made, many healthcare professionals still experience problems regarding patient information and patient records. For a long time the expectation is that an electronic patient record (EPR) will solve these problems. In this research the factors determining the

  18. An electronic health record for infertility clinics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ART [assisted reproductive technology] data monitoring is not a substitute for sound ... Medical history, i.e. a detailed history of the patient's past health/ illnesses .... been done in the North Shore Hospital System on Long Island in. New York[6] ...

  19. Using Electronic Health Records to Build an Ophthalmologic Data Warehouse and Visualize Patients' Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, Karsten U; Müller, Michael; Kern, Christoph; Babenko, Alexander; Mayer, Wolfgang J; Kampik, Anselm; Kreutzer, Thomas C; Priglinger, Siegfried; Hirneiss, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    To develop a near-real-time data warehouse (DW) in an academic ophthalmologic center to gain scientific use of increasing digital data from electronic medical records (EMR) and diagnostic devices. Database development. Specific macular clinic user interfaces within the institutional hospital information system were created. Orders for imaging modalities were sent by an EMR-linked picture-archiving and communications system to the respective devices. All data of 325 767 patients since 2002 were gathered in a DW running on an SQL database. A data discovery tool was developed. An exemplary search for patients with age-related macular degeneration, performed cataract surgery, and at least 10 intravitreal (excluding bevacizumab) injections was conducted. Data related to those patients (3 142 204 diagnoses [including diagnoses from other fields of medicine], 720 721 procedures [eg, surgery], and 45 416 intravitreal injections) were stored, including 81 274 optical coherence tomography measurements. A web-based browsing tool was successfully developed for data visualization and filtering data by several linked criteria, for example, minimum number of intravitreal injections of a specific drug and visual acuity interval. The exemplary search identified 450 patients with 516 eyes meeting all criteria. A DW was successfully implemented in an ophthalmologic academic environment to support and facilitate research by using increasing EMR and measurement data. The identification of eligible patients for studies was simplified. In future, software for decision support can be developed based on the DW and its structured data. The improved classification of diseases and semiautomatic validation of data via machine learning are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Ellen K; Skipenes, Eva; Hausken, Marie F; Skeie, Svein; Østbye, Truls; Iversen, Marjolein M

    2017-11-01

    Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

  1. The double-edged sword of electronic health records: implications for patient disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Castillo, Celeste; Anthony, Denise L

    2015-04-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) systems are linked to improvements in quality of care, yet also privacy and security risks. Results from research studies are mixed about whether patients withhold personal information from their providers to protect against the perceived EHR privacy and security risks. This study seeks to reconcile the mixed findings by focusing on whether accounting for patients' global ratings of care reveals a relationship between EHR provider-use and patient non-disclosure. A nationally representative sample from the 2012 Health Information National Trends Survey was analyzed using bivariate and multivariable logit regressions to examine whether global ratings of care suppress the relationship between EHR provider-use and patient non-disclosure. 13% of respondents reported having ever withheld information from a provider because of privacy/security concerns. Bivariate analysis showed that withholding information was unrelated to whether respondents' providers used an EHR. Multivariable analysis showed that accounting for respondents' global ratings of care revealed a positive relationship between having a provider who uses an EHR and withholding information. After accounting for global ratings of care, findings suggest that patients may non-disclose to providers to protect against the perceived EHR privacy and security risks. Despite evidence that EHRs inhibit patient disclosure, their advantages for promoting quality of care may outweigh the drawbacks. Clinicians should leverage the EHR's value in quality of care and discuss patients' privacy concerns during clinic visits, while policy makers should consider how to address the real and perceived privacy and security risks of EHRs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Characterizing workflow for pediatric asthma patients in emergency departments using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaynak, Mustafa; Dziadkowiec, Oliwier; Mistry, Rakesh; Callahan, Tiffany; He, Ze; Deakyne, Sara; Tham, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a workflow analysis approach and apply it in emergency departments (EDs) using data extracted from the electronic health record (EHR) system. We used data that were obtained during 2013 from the ED of a children's hospital and its four satellite EDs. Workflow-related data were extracted for all patient visits with either a primary or secondary diagnosis on discharge of asthma (ICD-9 code=493). For each patient visit, eight different a priori time-stamped events were identified. Data were also collected on mode of arrival, patient demographics, triage score (i.e. acuity level), and primary/secondary diagnosis. Comparison groups were by acuity levels 2 and 3 with 2 being more acute than 3, arrival mode (ambulance versus walk-in), and site. Data were analyzed using a visualization method and Markov Chains. To demonstrate the viability and benefit of the approach, patient care workflows were visually and quantitatively compared. The analysis of the EHR data allowed for exploration of workflow patterns and variation across groups. Results suggest that workflow was different for different arrival modes, settings and acuity levels. EHRs can be used to explore workflow with statistical and visual analytics techniques novel to the health care setting. The results generated by the proposed approach could be utilized to help institutions identify workflow issues, plan for varied workflows and ultimately improve efficiency in caring for diverse patient groups. EHR data and novel analytic techniques in health care can expand our understanding of workflow in both large and small ED units. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of electronic health record system functionalities to support the patient recruitment process in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiweis, Björn; Trinczek, Benjamin; Köpcke, Felix; Leusch, Thomas; Majeed, Raphael W; Wenk, Joachim; Bergh, Björn; Ohmann, Christian; Röhrig, Rainer; Dugas, Martin; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Reusing data from electronic health records for clinical and translational research and especially for patient recruitment has been tackled in a broader manner since about a decade. Most projects found in the literature however focus on standalone systems and proprietary implementations at one particular institution often for only one singular trial and no generic evaluation of EHR systems for their applicability to support the patient recruitment process does yet exist. Thus we sought to assess whether the current generation of EHR systems in Germany provides modules/tools, which can readily be applied for IT-supported patient recruitment scenarios. We first analysed the EHR portfolio implemented at German University Hospitals and then selected 5 sites with five different EHR implementations covering all major commercial systems applied in German University Hospitals. Further, major functionalities required for patient recruitment support have been defined and the five sample EHRs and their standard tools have been compared to the major functionalities. In our analysis of the site's hospital information system environments (with four commercial EHR systems and one self-developed system) we found that - even though no dedicated module for patient recruitment has been provided - most EHR products comprise generic tools such as workflow engines, querying capabilities, report generators and direct SQL-based database access which can be applied as query modules, screening lists and notification components for patient recruitment support. A major limitation of all current EHR products however is that they provide no dedicated data structures and functionalities for implementing and maintaining a local trial registry. At the five sites with standard EHR tools the typical functionalities of the patient recruitment process could be mostly implemented. However, no EHR component is yet directly dedicated to support research requirements such as patient recruitment. We

  4. Patient Electronic Health Records as a Means to Approach Genetic Research in Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Lieberman, David

    2015-10-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are being increasingly utilized and form a unique source of extensive data gathered during routine clinical care. Through use of codified and free text concepts identified using clinical informatics tools, disease labels can be assigned with a high degree of accuracy. Analysis linking such EHR-assigned disease labels to a biospecimen repository has demonstrated that genetic associations identified in prospective cohorts can be replicated with adequate statistical power and novel phenotypic associations identified. In addition, genetic discovery research can be performed utilizing clinical, laboratory, and procedure data obtained during care. Challenges with such research include the need to tackle variability in quality and quantity of EHR data and importance of maintaining patient privacy and data security. With appropriate safeguards, this novel and emerging field of research offers considerable promise and potential to further scientific research in gastroenterology efficiently, cost-effectively, and with engagement of patients and communities. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identifying primary care patients at risk for future diabetes and cardiovascular disease using electronic health records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrader Peter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD is possible but identification of at-risk patients for targeting interventions is a challenge in primary care. Methods We analyzed electronic health record (EHR data for 122,715 patients from 12 primary care practices. We defined patients with risk factor clustering using metabolic syndrome (MetS characteristics defined by NCEP-ATPIII criteria; if missing, we used surrogate characteristics, and validated this approach by directly measuring risk factors in a subset of 154 patients. For subjects with at least 3 of 5 MetS criteria measured at baseline (2003-2004, we defined 3 categories: No MetS (0 criteria; At-risk-for MetS (1-2 criteria; and MetS (≥ 3 criteria. We examined new diabetes and CHD incidence, and resource utilization over the subsequent 3-year period (2005-2007 using age-sex-adjusted regression models to compare outcomes by MetS category. Results After excluding patients with diabetes/CHD at baseline, 78,293 patients were eligible for analysis. EHR-defined MetS had 73% sensitivity and 91% specificity for directly measured MetS. Diabetes incidence was 1.4% in No MetS; 4.0% in At-risk-for MetS; and 11.0% in MetS (p MetS vs No MetS = 6.86 [6.06-7.76]; CHD incidence was 3.2%, 5.3%, and 6.4% respectively (p Conclusion Risk factor clustering in EHR data identifies primary care patients at increased risk for new diabetes, CHD and higher resource utilization.

  6. Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Valerie M; Connors, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration.

  7. Electronic health records and online medical records: an asset or a liability under current conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Graham, Judith; Mitchell, Lauren; Heriot, Natalie; Armani, Roksana; Langton, David; Levinson, Michele; Young, Alan; Smith, Julian A; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John W

    2018-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to audit the current use of medical records to determine completeness and concordance with other sources of medical information. Methods Medical records for 40 patients from each of five Melbourne major metropolitan hospitals were randomly selected (n=200). A quantitative audit was performed for detailed patient information and medical record keeping, as well as data collection, storage and utilisation. Using each hospital's current online clinical database, scanned files and paperwork available for each patient audited, the reviewers sourced as much relevant information as possible within a 30-min time allocation from both the record and the discharge summary. Results Of all medical records audited, 82% contained medical and surgical history, allergy information and patient demographics. All audited discharge summaries lacked at least one of the following: demographics, medication allergies, medical and surgical history, medications and adverse drug event information. Only 49% of records audited showed evidence the discharge summary was sent outside the institution. Conclusions The quality of medical data captured and information management is variable across hospitals. It is recommended that medical history documentation guidelines and standardised discharge summaries be implemented in Australian healthcare services. What is known about this topic? Australia has a complex health system, the government has approved funding to develop a universal online electronic medical record system and is currently trialling this in an opt-out style in the Napean Blue Mountains (NSW) and in Northern Queensland. The system was originally named the personally controlled electronic health record but has since been changed to MyHealth Record (2016). In Victoria, there exists a wide range of electronic health records used to varying degrees, with some hospitals still relying on paper-based records and many using scanned medical records

  8. Deploying Electronic Health Record (HER) and Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From researches and investigation on the utilization of health care based technologies, there were discoveries that certain kind of population, in the minority, was affected. Recent and evolving use of Information Technology in the healthcare sector among the population that is in the minority and ethnicity in critically ...

  9. Antidepressant medication use for primary care patients with and without medical comorbidities: a national electronic health record (EHR) network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James M; Klinkman, Michael S; Chen, Ying Xia

    2010-01-01

    Because comorbid depression can complicate medical conditions (eg, diabetes), physicians may treat depression more aggressively in patients who have these conditions. This study examined whether primary care physicians prescribe antidepressant medications more often and in higher doses for persons with medical comorbidities. This secondary data analysis of electronic health record data was conducted in the Centricity Health Care User Research Network (CHURN), a national network of ambulatory practices that use a common outpatient electronic health record. Participants included 209 family medicine and general internal medicine providers in 40 primary care CHURN offices in 17 US states. Patients included adults with a new episode of depression that had been diagnosed during the period October 2006 through July 2007 (n = 1513). Prescription of antidepressant medication and doses of antidepressant medication were compared for patients with and without 6 comorbid conditions: diabetes, coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer. 20.7% of patients had at least one medical comorbidity whereas 5.8% had multiple comorbidities. Overall, 77% of depressed patients were prescribed antidepressant medication. After controlling for age and sex, patients with multiple comorbidities were less likely to be prescribed medication (adjusted odds ratio, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.96), but there was no significant difference by individual comorbidities. Patients with cerebrovascular disease were less likely to be prescribed a full dose of medication (adjusted odds ratio, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.88), but there were no differences for other comorbidities or for multiple comorbidities, and there was no difference for any comorbidities in the prescription of minimally effective doses. Patients with new episodes of depression who present to a primary care practice are not treated more aggressively if they have medical

  10. Electronic Health Record Based Algorithm to Identify Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Lingren

    Full Text Available Cohort selection is challenging for large-scale electronic health record (EHR analyses, as International Classification of Diseases 9th edition (ICD-9 diagnostic codes are notoriously unreliable disease predictors. Our objective was to develop, evaluate, and validate an automated algorithm for determining an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD patient cohort from EHR. We demonstrate its utility via the largest investigation to date of the co-occurrence patterns of medical comorbidities in ASD.We extracted ICD-9 codes and concepts derived from the clinical notes. A gold standard patient set was labeled by clinicians at Boston Children's Hospital (BCH (N = 150 and Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center (CCHMC (N = 152. Two algorithms were created: (1 rule-based implementing the ASD criteria from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diseases 4th edition, (2 predictive classifier. The positive predictive values (PPV achieved by these algorithms were compared to an ICD-9 code baseline. We clustered the patients based on grouped ICD-9 codes and evaluated subgroups.The rule-based algorithm produced the best PPV: (a BCH: 0.885 vs. 0.273 (baseline; (b CCHMC: 0.840 vs. 0.645 (baseline; (c combined: 0.864 vs. 0.460 (baseline. A validation at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia yielded 0.848 (PPV. Clustering analyses of comorbidities on the three-site large cohort (N = 20,658 ASD patients identified psychiatric, developmental, and seizure disorder clusters.In a large cross-institutional cohort, co-occurrence patterns of comorbidities in ASDs provide further hypothetical evidence for distinct courses in ASD. The proposed automated algorithms for cohort selection open avenues for other large-scale EHR studies and individualized treatment of ASD.

  11. Open source electronic health record and patient data management system for intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaut, Jacques; Reper, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    In Intensive Care Units, the amount of data to be processed for patients care, the turn over of the patients, the necessity for reliability and for review processes indicate the use of Patient Data Management Systems (PDMS) and electronic health records (EHR). To respond to the needs of an Intensive Care Unit and not to be locked with proprietary software, we developed a PDMS and EHR based on open source software and components. The software was designed as a client-server architecture running on the Linux operating system and powered by the PostgreSQL data base system. The client software was developed in C using GTK interface library. The application offers to the users the following functions: medical notes captures, observations and treatments, nursing charts with administration of medications, scoring systems for classification, and possibilities to encode medical activities for billing processes. Since his deployment in February 2004, the PDMS was used to care more than three thousands patients with the expected software reliability and facilitated data management and review processes. Communications with other medical software were not developed from the start, and are realized by the use of the Mirth HL7 communication engine. Further upgrade of the system will include multi-platform support, use of typed language with static analysis, and configurable interface. The developed system based on open source software components was able to respond to the medical needs of the local ICU environment. The use of OSS for development allowed us to customize the software to the preexisting organization and contributed to the acceptability of the whole system.

  12. Integration services to enable regional shared electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ilídio C; Cunha, João P S

    2011-01-01

    eHealth is expected to integrate a comprehensive set of patient data sources into a coherent continuum, but implementations vary and Portugal is still lacking on electronic patient data sharing. In this work, we present a clinical information hub to aggregate multi-institution patient data and bridge the information silos. This integration platform enables a coherent object model, services-oriented applications development and a trust framework. It has been instantiated in the Rede Telemática de Saúde (www.RTSaude.org) to support a regional Electronic Health Record approach, fed dynamically from production systems at eight partner institutions, providing access to more than 11,000,000 care episodes, relating to over 350,000 citizens. The network has obtained the necessary clearance from the Portuguese data protection agency.

  13. Ethics and the electronic health record in dental school clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Robert A; Valenza, John A

    2012-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are a major development in the practice of dentistry, and dental schools and dental curricula have benefitted from this technology. Patient data entry, storage, retrieval, transmission, and archiving have been streamlined, and the potential for teledentistry and improvement in epidemiological research is beginning to be realized. However, maintaining patient health information in an electronic form has also changed the environment in dental education, setting up potential ethical dilemmas for students and faculty members. The purpose of this article is to explore some of the ethical issues related to EHRs, the advantages and concerns related to the use of computers in the dental operatory, the impact of the EHR on the doctor-patient relationship, the introduction of web-based EHRs, the link between technology and ethics, and potential solutions for the management of ethical concerns related to EHRs in dental schools.

  14. Perioperative nurses' attitudes toward the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yontz, Laura S; Zinn, Jennifer L; Schumacher, Edward J

    2015-02-01

    The adoption of an electronic health record (EHR) is mandated under current health care legislation reform. The EHR provides data that are patient centered and improves patient safety. There are limited data; however, regarding the attitudes of perioperative nurses toward the use of the EHR. The purpose of this project was to identify perioperative nurses' attitudes toward the use of the EHR. Quantitative descriptive survey was used to determine attitudes toward the electronic health record. Perioperative nurses in a southeastern health system completed an online survey to determine their attitudes toward the EHR in providing patient care. Overall, respondents felt the EHR was beneficial, did not add to the workload, improved documentation, and would not eliminate any nursing jobs. Nursing acceptance and the utilization of the EHR are necessary for the successful integration of an EHR and to support the goal of patient-centered care. Identification of attitudes and potential barriers of perioperative nurses in using the EHR will improve patient safety, communication, reduce costs, and empower those who implement an EHR. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Unsupervised ensemble ranking of terms in electronic health record notes based on their importance to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinying; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Allowing patients to access their own electronic health record (EHR) notes through online patient portals has the potential to improve patient-centered care. However, EHR notes contain abundant medical jargon that can be difficult for patients to comprehend. One way to help patients is to reduce information overload and help them focus on medical terms that matter most to them. Targeted education can then be developed to improve patient EHR comprehension and the quality of care. The aim of this work was to develop FIT (Finding Important Terms for patients), an unsupervised natural language processing (NLP) system that ranks medical terms in EHR notes based on their importance to patients. We built FIT on a new unsupervised ensemble ranking model derived from the biased random walk algorithm to combine heterogeneous information resources for ranking candidate terms from each EHR note. Specifically, FIT integrates four single views (rankers) for term importance: patient use of medical concepts, document-level term salience, word co-occurrence based term relatedness, and topic coherence. It also incorporates partial information of term importance as conveyed by terms' unfamiliarity levels and semantic types. We evaluated FIT on 90 expert-annotated EHR notes and used the four single-view rankers as baselines. In addition, we implemented three benchmark unsupervised ensemble ranking methods as strong baselines. FIT achieved 0.885 AUC-ROC for ranking candidate terms from EHR notes to identify important terms. When including term identification, the performance of FIT for identifying important terms from EHR notes was 0.813 AUC-ROC. Both performance scores significantly exceeded the corresponding scores from the four single rankers (P<0.001). FIT also outperformed the three ensemble rankers for most metrics. Its performance is relatively insensitive to its parameter. FIT can automatically identify EHR terms important to patients. It may help develop future interventions

  16. Impact of an Electronic Health Record-Integrated Personal Health Record on Patient Participation in Health Care: Development and Randomized Controlled Trial of MyHealthKeeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Borim; Kim, Nari; Heo, Eunyoung; Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Keehyuck; Hwang, Hee; Kim, Jeong-Whun; Kim, Yoojung; Lee, Joongseek; Jung, Se Young

    2017-12-07

    Personal health record (PHR)-based health care management systems can improve patient engagement and data-driven medical diagnosis in a clinical setting. The purpose of this study was (1) to demonstrate the development of an electronic health record (EHR)-tethered PHR app named MyHealthKeeper, which can retrieve data from a wearable device and deliver these data to a hospital EHR system, and (2) to study the effectiveness of a PHR data-driven clinical intervention with clinical trial results. To improve the conventional EHR-tethered PHR, we ascertained clinicians' unmet needs regarding PHR functionality and the data frequently used in the field through a cocreation workshop. We incorporated the requirements into the system design and architecture of the MyHealthKeeper PHR module. We constructed the app and validated the effectiveness of the PHR module by conducting a 4-week clinical trial. We used a commercially available activity tracker (Misfit) to collect individual physical activity data, and developed the MyHealthKeeper mobile phone app to record participants' patterns of daily food intake and activity logs. We randomly assigned 80 participants to either the PHR-based intervention group (n=51) or the control group (n=29). All of the study participants completed a paper-based survey, a laboratory test, a physical examination, and an opinion interview. During the 4-week study period, we collected health-related mobile data, and study participants visited the outpatient clinic twice and received PHR-based clinical diagnosis and recommendations. A total of 68 participants (44 in the intervention group and 24 in the control group) completed the study. The PHR intervention group showed significantly higher weight loss than the control group (mean 1.4 kg, 95% CI 0.9-1.9; Phealth tracker system and its potential to improve patient clinical profiles. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03200119; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03200119 (Archived by WebCite at http

  17. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  18. Organ Procurement Organizations and the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R J; Cochran, L D; Cornell, D L

    2015-10-01

    The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has adversely affected the ability of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to perform their federally mandated function of honoring the donation decisions of families and donors who have signed the registry. The difficulties gaining access to potential donor medical record has meant that assessment, evaluation, and management of brain dead organ donors has become much more difficult. Delays can occur that can lead to potential recipients not receiving life-saving organs. For over 40 years, OPO personnel have had ready access to paper medical records. But the widespread adoption of EHRs has greatly limited the ability of OPO coordinators to readily gain access to patient medical records and to manage brain dead donors. Proposed solutions include the following: (1) hospitals could provide limited access to OPO personnel so that they could see only the potential donor's medical record; (2) OPOs could join with other transplant organizations to inform regulators of the problem; and (3) hospital organizations could be approached to work with Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to revise the Hospital Conditions of Participation to require OPOs be given access to donor medical records. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Display methods of electronic patient record screens: patient privacy concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Yukari; Ota, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    To provide adequate care, medical professionals have to collect not only medical information but also information that may be related to private aspects of the patient's life. With patients' increasing awareness of information privacy, healthcare providers have to pay attention to the patients' right of privacy. This study aimed to clarify the requirements of the display method of electronic patient record (EPR) screens in consideration of both patients' information privacy concerns and health professionals' information needs. For this purpose, semi-structured group interviews were conducted of 78 medical professionals. They pointed out that partial concealment of information to meet patients' requests for privacy could result in challenges in (1) safety in healthcare, (2) information sharing, (3) collaboration, (4) hospital management, and (5) communication. They believed that EPRs should (1) meet the requirements of the therapeutic process, (2) have restricted access, (3) provide convenient access to necessary information, and (4) facilitate interprofessional collaboration. This study provides direction for the development of display methods that balance the sharing of vital information and protection of patient privacy.

  20. Do family physicians electronic health records support meaningful use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lars E; Blackburn, Brenna; Ivins, Douglas; Mitchell, Jason; Matson, Christine; Phillips, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Spurred by government incentives, the use of electronic health records (EHRs) in the United States has increased; however, whether these EHRs have the functionality necessary to meet meaningful use (MU) criteria remains unknown. Our objective was to characterize family physician access to MU functionality when using a MU-certified EHR. Data were obtained from a convenience survey of family physicians accessing their American Board of Family Medicine online portfolio in 2011. A brief survey queried MU functionality. We used descriptive statistics to characterize the responses and bivariate statistics to test associations between MU and patient communication functions by presence of a MU-certified EHR. Out of 3855 respondents, 60% reported having an EHR that supports MU. Physicians with MU-certified EHRs were more likely than physicians without MU-certified EHRs to report patient registry activities (49.7% vs. 32.3%, p-valuevs. 56.4%, p-valuecommunication abilities were low regardless of EHR capabilities. Family physicians with MU-certified EHRs are more likely to report MU functionality; however, a sizeable minority does not report MU functions. Many family physicians with MU-certified EHRs may not successfully meet the successively stringent MU criteria and may face significant upgrade costs to do so. Cross sectional survey. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Casebook: a virtual patient iPad application for teaching decision-making through the use of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloice, Marcus D; Simonic, Klaus-Martin; Holzinger, Andreas

    2014-08-07

    Virtual Patients are a well-known and widely used form of interactive software used to simulate aspects of patient care that students are increasingly less likely to encounter during their studies. However, to take full advantage of the benefits of using Virtual Patients, students should have access to multitudes of cases. In order to promote the creation of collections of cases, a tablet application was developed which makes use of electronic health records as material for Virtual Patient cases. Because electronic health records are abundantly available on hospital information systems, this results in much material for the basis of case creation. An iPad-based Virtual Patient interactive software system was developed entitled Casebook. The application has been designed to read specially formatted patient cases that have been created using electronic health records, in the form of X-ray images, electrocardiograms, lab reports, and physician notes, and present these to the medical student. These health records are organised into a timeline, and the student navigates the case while answering questions regarding the patient along the way. Each health record can also be annotated with meta-information by the case designer, such as insight into the thought processes and the decision-making rationale of the physician who originally worked with the patient. Students learn decision-making skills by observing and interacting with real patient cases in this simulated environment. This paper discusses our approach in detail. Our group is of the opinion that Virtual Patient cases, targeted at undergraduate students, should concern patients who exhibit prototypical symptoms of the kind students may encounter when beginning their first medical jobs. Learning theory research has shown that students learn decision-making skills best when they have access to multitudes of patient cases and it is this plurality that allows students to develop their illness scripts effectively

  2. Query Log Analysis of an Electronic Health Record Search Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zheng, Kai; Hanauer, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a longitudinal collection of query logs of a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval in electronic health records (EHR). The collection, 202,905 queries and 35,928 user sessions recorded over a course of 4 years, represents the information-seeking behavior of 533 medical professionals, including frontline practitioners, coding personnel, patient safety officers, and biomedical researchers for patient data stored in EHR systems. In this paper, we present descriptive statistics of the queries, a categorization of information needs manifested through the queries, as well as temporal patterns of the users’ information-seeking behavior. The results suggest that information needs in medical domain are substantially more sophisticated than those that general-purpose web search engines need to accommodate. Therefore, we envision there exists a significant challenge, along with significant opportunities, to provide intelligent query recommendations to facilitate information retrieval in EHR. PMID:22195150

  3. Pervasive Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    independent web service connected to database of medical records or Worldwide. Interoperability ... allows wireless monitoring and tracking of patients and first responders using sensor nodes .... All these network security threats arise mainly ...

  4. Validation of asthma recording in electronic health records: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissen F

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Francis Nissen,1 Jennifer K Quint,2 Samantha Wilkinson,1 Hana Mullerova,3 Liam Smeeth,1 Ian J Douglas1 1Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 2National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK; 3RWD & Epidemiology, GSK R&D, Uxbridge, UK Objective: To describe the methods used to validate asthma diagnoses in electronic health records and summarize the results of the validation studies. Background: Electronic health records are increasingly being used for research on asthma to inform health services and health policy. Validation of the recording of asthma diagnoses in electronic health records is essential to use these databases for credible epidemiological asthma research.Methods: We searched EMBASE and MEDLINE databases for studies that validated asthma diagnoses detected in electronic health records up to October 2016. Two reviewers independently assessed the full text against the predetermined inclusion criteria. Key data including author, year, data source, case definitions, reference standard, and validation statistics (including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value [PPV], and negative predictive value [NPV] were summarized in two tables.Results: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies demonstrated a high validity using at least one case definition (PPV >80%. Ten studies used a manual validation as the reference standard; each had at least one case definition with a PPV of at least 63%, up to 100%. We also found two studies using a second independent database to validate asthma diagnoses. The PPVs of the best performing case definitions ranged from 46% to 58%. We found one study which used a questionnaire as the reference standard to validate a database case definition; the PPV of the case definition algorithm in this study was 89%. Conclusion: Attaining high PPVs (>80% is possible using each of the discussed validation

  5. Economic outcomes of a dental electronic patient record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, James R; Walji, Muhammad F; Taylor, David; Valenza, John A

    2008-10-01

    The implementation of an electronic patient record (EPR) in many sectors of health care has been suggested to have positive relationships with both quality of care and improved pedagogy, although evaluation of actual results has been somewhat disillusioning. Evidence-based dentistry clearly suggests the need for tools and systems to improve care, and an EPR is a critical tool that has been widely proposed in recent years. In dental schools, EPR systems are increasingly being adopted, despite obstacles such as high costs, time constraints necessary for process workflow change, and overall project complexity. The increasing movement towards cost-effectiveness analyses in health and medicine suggests that the EPR should generally cover expenses, or produce total benefits greater than its combined costs, to ensure that resources are being utilized efficiently. To test the underlying economics of an EPR, we utilized a pre-post research design with a probability-based economic simulation model to analyze changes in performance and costs in one dental school. Our findings suggest that the economics are positive, but only when student fees are treated as an incremental revenue source. In addition, other performance indicators appeared to have significant changes, although most were not comprehensively measured pre-implementation, making it difficult to truly understand the performance differential-such pre-measurement of expected benefits is a key lesson learned. This article also provides recommendations for dental clinics and universities that are about to embark on this endeavor.

  6. Factors Influencing Acceptance of Electronic Health Records in Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkins, Melinda A

    2009-01-01

    The study's aim was to examine factors that may influence health information managers in the adoption of electronic health records. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) served as theoretical foundation for this quantitative study. Hospital health information managers in Arkansas were queried as to the constructs of perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and behavior intention. The study population comprised 94 health information managers with a return rate of 74.5 percent. One manager ...

  7. Electronic health records: what are the most important barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Mirani, Nader; Haghani, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The process of design and adoption of electronic health records may face a number of barriers. This study aimed to compare the importance of the main barriers from the experts' point of views in Iran. This survey study was completed in 2011. The potential participants (62 experts) included faculty members who worked in departments of health information technology and individuals who worked in the Ministry of Health in Iran and were in charge of the development and adoption of electronic health records. No sampling method was used in this study. Data were collected using a Likert-scale questionnaire ranging from 1 to 5. The validity of the questionnaire was established using content and face validity methods, and the reliability was calculated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The response rate was 51.6 percent. The participants' perspectives showed that the most important barriers in the process of design and adoption of electronic health records were technical barriers (mean = 3.84). Financial and ethical-legal barriers, with the mean value of 3.80 were other important barriers, and individual and organizational barriers, with the mean values of 3.59 and 3.50 were found to be less important than other barriers from the experts' perspectives. Strategic planning for the creation and adoption of electronic health records in the country, creating a team of experts to assess the potential barriers and develop strategies to eliminate them, and allocating financial resources can help to overcome most important barriers to the adoption of electronic health records.

  8. Exploring faculty perceptions towards electronic health records for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Y; Chan, S W C; Wang, L; Wang, W

    2014-12-01

    The use of electronic health records in nursing education is rapidly increasing worldwide. The successful implementation of electronic health records for nursing education software program relies on students as well as nursing faculty members. This study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of nursing faculty members using electronic health records for nursing education software program, and to identify the influential factors for successful implementation of this technology. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted using in-depth individual interviews at a university in Singapore. Seven faculty members participated in the study. The data were gathered and analysed at the end of the semester in the 2012/2013 academic year. The participants' perceptions of the software program were organized into three main categories: innovation, transition and integration. The participants perceived this technology as innovative, with both values and challenges for the users. In addition, using the new software program was perceived as transitional process. The integration of this technology required time from faculty members and students, as well as support from administrators. The software program had only been implemented for 2-3 months at the time of the interviews. Consequently, the participants might have lacked the necessary skill and competence and confidence to implement it successfully. In addition, the unequal exposure to the software program might have had an impact on participants' perceptions. The findings show that the integration of electronic health records into nursing education curricula is dependent on the faculty members' experiences with the new technology, as well as their perceptions of it. Hence, cultivating a positive attitude towards the use of new technologies is important. Electronic health records are significant applications of health information technology. Health informatics competency should be included as a required competency

  9. Detecting Inappropriate Access to Electronic Health Records Using Collaborative Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Aditya Krishna; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon; Vaidya, Jaideep; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-04-01

    Many healthcare facilities enforce security on their electronic health records (EHRs) through a corrective mechanism: some staff nominally have almost unrestricted access to the records, but there is a strict ex post facto audit process for inappropriate accesses, i.e., accesses that violate the facility's security and privacy policies. This process is inefficient, as each suspicious access has to be reviewed by a security expert, and is purely retrospective, as it occurs after damage may have been incurred. This motivates automated approaches based on machine learning using historical data. Previous attempts at such a system have successfully applied supervised learning models to this end, such as SVMs and logistic regression. While providing benefits over manual auditing, these approaches ignore the identity of the users and patients involved in a record access. Therefore, they cannot exploit the fact that a patient whose record was previously involved in a violation has an increased risk of being involved in a future violation. Motivated by this, in this paper, we propose a collaborative filtering inspired approach to predicting inappropriate accesses. Our solution integrates both explicit and latent features for staff and patients, the latter acting as a personalized "finger-print" based on historical access patterns. The proposed method, when applied to real EHR access data from two tertiary hospitals and a file-access dataset from Amazon, shows not only significantly improved performance compared to existing methods, but also provides insights as to what indicates an inappropriate access.

  10. Health Care Consumer's Perception of the Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A structured questionnaire was developed, validated and utilized in this quantitative research project. Quantitative data were collected ... Electronic Medical Records (EMR), as a health information technology innovation, has ... EMR will provide a highly effective, reliable, secure, and innovative information system.

  11. Voice-supported Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Nagy, Miroslav; Seydlová, M.; Hanzlíček, Petr; Kříž, P.; Šmídl, L.; Trmal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2010), s. 168-172 ISSN 0026-1270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * structured data entry * dentistry * temporomandibular joint disorder Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2010

  12. Medical Guidelines Presentation and Comparing with Electronic Health Record

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana; Peleška, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3-4 (2006), s. 240-245 ISSN 1386-5056 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : medical guidelines * electronic health record * GLIF model * reminder facility Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.726, year: 2006

  13. Implementing electronic health records in hospitals : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.; Versluis, Arie; Vos, J.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The literature on implementing Electronic Health Records (EHR) in hospitals is very diverse. The objective of this study is to create an overview of the existing literature on EHR implementation in hospitals and to identify generally applicable findings and lessons for implementers.

  14. An electronic health record for infertility clinics | Coetsee | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To design a user-friendly electronic health record system for infertility clinics (EHRIC) to capture quality data that will allow advanced audit and practice analysis, and to use the captured data for the South African Register of Assisted Reproductive Techniques (SARA) database and as a clinical research function.

  15. Documentation of delirium in the VA electronic health record

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Delirium is a life-threatening, clinical syndrome common among the elderly and hospitalized patients. Delirium is under-recognized and misdiagnosed, complicating efforts to study the epidemiology and construct appropriate decision support to improve patient care. This study was primarily conducted to realize how providers documented confirmed cases of delirium in electronic health records as a preliminary step for using computerized methods to identify patients with delirium from electronic health records. Methods The Mental Health Consult (MHC) team reported cases of delirium to the study team during a 6-month study period (December 1, 2009 - May 31, 2010). A chart extraction tool was developed to abstract documentation of diagnosis, signs and symptoms and known risk factors of delirium. A nurse practitioner, and a clinical pharmacist independently reviewed clinical notes during each patients hospital stay to determine if delirium and or sign and symptoms of delirium were documented. Results The MHC team reported 25 cases of delirium. When excluding MHC team notes, delirium was documented for 5 of the 25 patients (one reported case in a physician’s note, four in discharge summaries). Delirium was ICD-9 Coded for 7 of the 25 cases. Signs and symptoms associated with delirium were characterized in 8 physician notes, 11 discharge summaries, and 14 nursing notes, accounting for 16 of the 25 cases with identified delirium. Conclusions Documentation of delirium is highly inconsistent even with a confirmed diagnosis. Hence, efforts to use existing data to precisely estimate the prevalence of delirium or to conduct epidemiological studies based on medical records will be challenging. PMID:24708799

  16. A security analysis of the Dutch electronic patient record system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Noordende, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the security architecture of the Dutch Electronic Patient Dossier (EPD) system. Intended as a national infrastructure for exchanging medical patient records among authorized parties (particularly, physicians), the EPD has to address a number of requirements, ranging from

  17. Security in the Dutch electronic patient record system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Noordende, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the security architecture of the Dutch Electronic Patient Dossier (EPD) system. Intended as a mandatory infrastructure for exchanging medical records of most if not all patients in the Netherlands among authorized parties (particularly, physicians), the EPD has to address

  18. Socio-technical considerations in epilepsy electronic patient record implementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Quaid, Louise

    2010-05-01

    Examination of electronic patient record (EPR) implementation at the socio-technical interface. This study was based on the introduction of an anti-epileptic drug (AED) management module of an EPR in an epilepsy out-patient clinic. The objective was to introduce the module to a live clinical setting within strictly controlled conditions to evaluate its usability and usefulness.

  19. Recording of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of COPD in UK electronic health care records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothnie KJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kieran J Rothnie,1,2 Hana Müllerová,3 Sara L Thomas,2 Joht S Chandan,4 Liam Smeeth,2 John R Hurst,5 Kourtney Davis,3 Jennifer K Quint1,2 1Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 3Respiratory Epidemiology, GlaxoSmithKline R&D, Uxbridge, London; 4Medical School, 5UCL Respiratory, University College London, London, UK Background: Accurate identification of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD within electronic health care records is important for research, public health, and to inform health care utilization and service provision. We aimed to develop a strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in secondary care data and to investigate the validity of strategies to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in primary care data. Methods: We identified patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD with linked Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES data. We used discharge summaries for recent hospitalizations for AECOPD to develop a strategy to identify the recording of hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES. We then used the HES strategy as a reference standard to investigate the positive predictive value (PPV and sensitivity of strategies for identifying AECOPD using general practice CPRD data. We tested two strategies: 1 codes for hospitalization for AECOPD and 2 a code for AECOPD other than hospitalization on the same day as a code for hospitalization due to unspecified reason. Results: In total, 27,182 patients with COPD were included. Our strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES had a sensitivity of 87.5%. When compared with HES, using a code suggesting hospitalization for AECOPD in CPRD resulted in a PPV of 50.2% (95

  20. A shared electronic health record: lessons from the coalface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, Brett V; Carr, Simon J

    2009-06-01

    A shared electronic health record system has been successfully implemented in Australia by a Division of General Practice in northern Brisbane. The system grew out of coordinated care trials that showed the critical need to share summary patient information, particularly for patients with complex conditions who require the services of a wide range of multisector, multidisciplinary health care professionals. As at 30 April 2008, connected users of the system included 239 GPs from 66 general practices, two major public hospitals, three large private hospitals, 11 allied health and community-based provider organisations and 1108 registered patients. Access data showed a patient's shared record was accessed an average of 15 times over a 12-month period. The success of the Brisbane implementation relied on seven key factors: connectivity, interoperability, change management, clinical leadership, targeted patient involvement, information at the point of care, and governance. The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care is currently evaluating the system for its potential to reduce errors relating to inadequate information transfer during clinical handover.

  1. Electronic health records: what does your signature signify?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoroff MD Michael S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electronic health records serve multiple purposes, including clinical communication, legal documentation, financial transaction capture, research and analytics. Electronic signatures attached to entries in EHRs have different logical and legal meanings for different users. Some of these are vestiges from historic paper formats that require reconsideration. Traditionally accepted functions of signatures, such as identity verification, attestation, consent, authorization and non-repudiation can become ambiguous in the context of computer-assisted workflow processes that incorporate functions like logins, auto-fill and audit trails. This article exposes the incompatibility of expectations among typical users of electronically signed information.

  2. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  3. Patients prefer electronic medical records - fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiza, Melissa; Mostert-Phipps, Nicky; Pottasa, Dalenca

    2013-01-01

    Incomplete patient medical history compromises the quality of care provided to a patient while well-kept, adequate patient medical records are central to the provision of good quality of care. According to research, patients have the right to contribute to decision-making affecting their health. Hence, the researchers investigated their views regarding a paper-based system and an electronic medical record (EMR). An explorative approach was used in conducting a survey within selected general practices in the Nelson Mandela Metropole. The majority of participants thought that the use of a paper-based system had no negative impact on their health. Participants expressed concerns relating to the confidentiality of their medical records with both storage mediums. The majority of participants indicated they prefer their GP to computerise their consultation details. The main objective of the research on which this poster is based was to investigate the storage medium of preference for patients and the reasons for their preference. Overall, 48% of the 85 participants selected EMRs as their preferred storage medium and the reasons for their preference were also uncovered.

  4. Predicting 30-Day Pneumonia Readmissions Using Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makam, Anil N; Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Clark, Christopher; Zhang, Song; Xie, Bin; Weinreich, Mark; Mortensen, Eric M; Halm, Ethan A

    2017-04-01

    Readmissions after hospitalization for pneumonia are common, but the few risk-prediction models have poor to modest predictive ability. Data routinely collected in the electronic health record (EHR) may improve prediction. To develop pneumonia-specific readmission risk-prediction models using EHR data from the first day and from the entire hospital stay ("full stay"). Observational cohort study using stepwise-backward selection and cross-validation. Consecutive pneumonia hospitalizations from 6 diverse hospitals in north Texas from 2009-2010. All-cause nonelective 30-day readmissions, ascertained from 75 regional hospitals. Of 1463 patients, 13.6% were readmitted. The first-day pneumonia-specific model included sociodemographic factors, prior hospitalizations, thrombocytosis, and a modified pneumonia severity index; the full-stay model included disposition status, vital sign instabilities on discharge, and an updated pneumonia severity index calculated using values from the day of discharge as additional predictors. The full-stay pneumonia-specific model outperformed the first-day model (C statistic 0.731 vs 0.695; P = 0.02; net reclassification index = 0.08). Compared to a validated multi-condition readmission model, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services pneumonia model, and 2 commonly used pneumonia severity of illness scores, the full-stay pneumonia-specific model had better discrimination (C statistic range 0.604-0.681; P pneumonia. This approach outperforms a first-day pneumonia-specific model, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services pneumonia model, and 2 commonly used pneumonia severity of illness scores. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:209-216. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  5. Electronic Health Record-Driven Workflow for Diagnostic Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeslin, Matthew G; Gaskin, Cree M

    2016-01-01

    In most settings, radiologists maintain a high-throughput practice in which efficiency is crucial. The conversion from film-based to digital study interpretation and data storage launched the era of PACS-driven workflow, leading to significant gains in speed. The advent of electronic health records improved radiologists' access to patient data; however, many still find this aspect of workflow to be relatively cumbersome. Nevertheless, the ability to guide a diagnostic interpretation with clinical information, beyond that provided in the examination indication, can add significantly to the specificity of a radiologist's interpretation. Responsibilities of the radiologist include, but are not limited to, protocoling examinations, interpreting studies, chart review, peer review, writing notes, placing orders, and communicating with referring providers. Most of the aforementioned activities are not PACS-centric and require a login to one or more additional applications. Consolidation of these tasks for completion through a single interface can simplify workflow, save time, and potentially reduce the incidence of errors. Here, the authors describe diagnostic radiology workflow that leverages the electronic health record to significantly add to a radiologist's ability to be part of the health care team, provide relevant interpretations, and improve efficiency and quality. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Using Simulations to Improve Electronic Health Record Use, Clinician Training and Patient Safety: Recommendations From A Consensus Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Vishnu; Woodcock, Deborah; McGrath, Karess; Scholl, Gretchen; Pranaat, Robert; Doberne, Julie W.; Chase, Dian A.; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Ash, Joan S.

    2017-01-01

    A group of informatics experts in simulation, biomedical informatics, patient safety, medical education, and human factors gathered at Corbett, Oregon on April 30 and May 1, 2015. Their objective: to create a consensus statement on best practices for the use of electronic health record (EHR) simulations in education and training, to improve patient safety, and to outline a strategy for future EHR simulation work. A qualitative approach was utilized to analyze data from the conference and gene...

  7. Ethical questions must be considered for electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, Merle; Arnold, Michael V; Pearce, Christopher M; Fry, Craig

    2012-09-01

    National electronic health record initiatives are in progress in many countries around the world but the debate about the ethical issues and how they are to be addressed remains overshadowed by other issues. The discourse to which all others are answerable is a technical discourse, even where matters of privacy and consent are concerned. Yet a focus on technical issues and a failure to think about ethics are cited as factors in the failure of the UK health record system. In this paper, while the prime concern is the Australian Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR), the discussion is relevant to and informed by the international context. The authors draw attention to ethical and conceptual issues that have implications for the success or failure of electronic health records systems. Important ethical issues to consider as Australia moves towards a PCEHR system include: issues of equity that arise in the context of personal control, who benefits and who should pay, what are the legitimate uses of PCEHRs, and how we should implement privacy. The authors identify specific questions that need addressing.

  8. The Relationship Between Magnet Designation, Electronic Health Record Adoption, and Medicare Meaningful Use Payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippincott, Christine; Foronda, Cynthia; Zdanowicz, Martin; McCabe, Brian E; Ambrosia, Todd

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between nursing excellence and electronic health record adoption. Of 6582 US hospitals, 4939 were eligible for the Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program, and 6419 were eligible for evaluation on the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Of 399 Magnet hospitals, 330 were eligible for the Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program, and 393 were eligible for evaluation in the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Meaningful use attestation was defined as receipt of a Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program payment. The adoption electronic health record was defined as Level 6 and/or 7 on the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Logistic regression showed that Magnet-designated hospitals were more likely attest to Meaningful Use than non-Magnet hospitals (odds ratio = 3.58, P electronic health records than non-Magnet hospitals (Level 6 only: odds ratio = 3.68, P electronic health record use, which involves earning financial incentives for successful adoption. Continued investigation is needed to examine the relationships between the quality of nursing care, electronic health record usage, financial implications, and patient outcomes.

  9. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  10. Electronic health records challenges in design and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Sittig, Dean F

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the challenges in electronic health records (EHR) design and implementation along with an introduction to the best practices that have been identified over the past several years. The book examines concerns surrounding EHR use and proposes eight examples of proper EHR use. It discusses the complex strategic planning that accompanies the systemic organizational changes associated with EHR programs and highlights key lessons learned regarding health information-including technology errors and risk management concerns.

  11. Survey of patient and public perceptions of electronic health records for healthcare, policy and research: Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchenski Serena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immediate access to patients’ complete health records via electronic databases could improve healthcare and facilitate health research. However, the possible benefits of a national electronic health records (EHR system must be balanced against public concerns about data security and personal privacy. Successful development of EHR requires better understanding of the views of the public and those most affected by EHR: users of the National Health Service. This study aims to explore the correlation between personal healthcare experience (including number of healthcare contacts and number and type of longer term conditions and views relating to development of EHR for healthcare, health services planning and policy and health research. Methods/design A multi-site cross-sectional self-complete questionnaire designed and piloted for use in waiting rooms was administered to patients from randomly selected outpatients’ clinics at a university teaching hospital (431 beds and general practice surgeries from the four primary care trusts within the catchment area of the hospital. All patients entering the selected outpatients clinics and general practice surgeries were invited to take part in the survey during August-September 2011. Statistical analyses will be conducted using descriptive techniques to present respondents’ overall views about electronic health records and logistic regression to explore associations between these views and participants’ personal circumstances, experiences, sociodemographics and more specific views about electronic health records. Discussion The study design and implementation were successful, resulting in unusually high response rates and overall recruitment (85.5%, 5336 responses. Rates for face-to-face recruitment in previous work are variable, but typically lower (mean 76.7%, SD 20. We discuss details of how we collected the data to provide insight into how we obtained this unusually high

  12. Evaluating the data completeness in the Electronic Health Record after the Implementation of an Outpatient Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Mauricio; Capurro, Daniel; Catalán, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) present an opportunity for quality improvement in health organitations, particularly at the primary health level. However, EHR implementation impacts clinical workflows, and physicians frequently prefer to document in a non-structured way, which ultimately hinders the ability to measure quality indicators. We present an assessment of data completeness-a key data quality indicator-during the first 12 months after the implementation of an EHR at a teaching outpatient center in Santiago, Chile.

  13. The readmission risk flag: using the electronic health record to automatically identify patients at risk for 30-day readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Charles A; VanZandbergen, Christine; Tait, Gordon; Hanish, Asaf; Leas, Brian; French, Benjamin; Hanson, C William; Behta, Maryam; Umscheid, Craig A

    2013-12-01

    Identification of patients at high risk for readmission is a crucial step toward improving care and reducing readmissions. The adoption of electronic health records (EHR) may prove important to strategies designed to risk stratify patients and introduce targeted interventions. To develop and implement an automated prediction model integrated into our health system's EHR that identifies on admission patients at high risk for readmission within 30 days of discharge. Retrospective and prospective cohort. Healthcare system consisting of 3 hospitals. All adult patients admitted from August 2009 to September 2012. An automated readmission risk flag integrated into the EHR. Thirty-day all-cause and 7-day unplanned healthcare system readmissions. Using retrospective data, a single risk factor, ≥ 2 inpatient admissions in the past 12 months, was found to have the best balance of sensitivity (40%), positive predictive value (31%), and proportion of patients flagged (18%), with a C statistic of 0.62. Sensitivity (39%), positive predictive value (30%), proportion of patients flagged (18%), and C statistic (0.61) during the 12-month period after implementation of the risk flag were similar. There was no evidence for an effect of the intervention on 30-day all-cause and 7-day unplanned readmission rates in the 12-month period after implementation. An automated prediction model was effectively integrated into an existing EHR and identified patients on admission who were at risk for readmission within 30 days of discharge. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Electronic Personal Health Record Use Among Nurses in the Nursing Informatics Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Kyungsook; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Wilson, Marisa L

    2015-07-01

    An electronic personal health record is a patient-centric tool that enables patients to securely access, manage, and share their health information with healthcare providers. It is presumed the nursing informatics community would be early adopters of electronic personal health record, yet no studies have been identified that examine the personal adoption of electronic personal health record's for their own healthcare. For this study, we sampled nurse members of the American Medical Informatics Association and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society with 183 responding. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify those factors associated with electronic personal health record use. Overall, 72% were electronic personal health record users. Users tended to be older (aged >50 years), be more highly educated (72% master's or doctoral degrees), and hold positions as clinical informatics specialists or chief nursing informatics officers. Those whose healthcare providers used electronic health records were significantly more likely to use electronic personal health records (odds ratio, 5.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-25.61). Electronic personal health record users were significantly less concerned about privacy of health information online than nonusers (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.70) adjusted for ethnicity, race, and practice region. Informatics nurses, with their patient-centered view of technology, are in prime position to influence development of electronic personal health records. Our findings can inform policy efforts to encourage informatics and other professional nursing groups to become leaders and users of electronic personal health record; such use could help them endorse and engage patients to use electronic personal health records. Having champions with expertise in and enthusiasm for the new technology can promote the adoptionof electronic personal health records among healthcare providers as well as

  15. Patient-Controlled Attribute-Based Encryption for Secure Electronic Health Records System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jieun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Lee, Kwangsu

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, many countries have been trying to integrate electronic health data managed by each hospital to offer more efficient healthcare services. Since health data contain sensitive information of patients, there have been much research that present privacy preserving mechanisms. However, existing studies either require a patient to perform various steps to secure the data or restrict the patient to exerting control over the data. In this paper, we propose patient-controlled attribute-based encryption, which enables a patient (a data owner) to control access to the health data and reduces the operational burden for the patient, simultaneously. With our method, the patient has powerful control capability of his/her own health data in that he/she has the final say on the access with time limitation. In addition, our scheme provides emergency medical services which allow the emergency staffs to access the health data without the patient's permission only in the case of emergencies. We prove that our scheme is secure under cryptographic assumptions and analyze its efficiency from the patient's perspective.

  16. Effectiveness Of Security Controls On Electronic Health Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everleen Wanyonyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Health Record EHR systems enhance efficiency and effectiveness in handling patients information in healthcare. This study focused on the EHR security by initially establishing the nature of threats affecting the system and reviewing the implemented security safeguards. The study was done at a referral hospital level 6 government facility in Kenya. Purposive sampling was used to select a sample of 196 out of 385 staff and a questionnaire designed for qualitative data collection. Data was analyzed using SPSS software. Correlations and binary logistic regression were obtained. Binary Logistic Regression BLR was used to establish the effect of the safeguards predictors on EHR security. It was established that physical security contributes more to the security of an information system than administrative controls and technical controls in that order. BLR helped in predicting effective safeguards to control EHR security threats in limited resourced public health facilities.

  17. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-02-01

    To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC.

  18. Determinants of primary care nurses' intention to adopt an electronic health record in their clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Genevieve; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Sanderson, Duncan

    2012-09-01

    A provincial electronic health record is being developed in the Province of Quebec (and in all other provinces in Canada), and authorities hope that it will enable a safer and more efficient healthcare system for citizens. However, the expected benefits can occur only if healthcare professionals, including nurses, adopt this technology. Although attention to the use of the electronic health record by nurses is growing, better understanding of nurses' intention to use an electronic health record is needed and could help managers to better plan its implementation. This study examined the factors that influence primary care nurses' intention to adopt the provincial electronic health record, since intention influences electronic health record use and implementation success. Using a modified version of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Theory of Planned Behavior, a questionnaire was developed and pretested. Questionnaires were distributed to 199 primary care nurses. Multiple hierarchical regression indicated that the Theory of Planned Behavior variables explained 58% of the variance in nurses' intention to adopt an electronic health record. The strong intention to adopt the electronic health record is mainly determined by perceived behavioral control, normative beliefs, and attitudes. The implications of the study are that healthcare managers could facilitate adoption of an electronic health record by strengthening nurses' intention to adopt the electronic health record, which in turn can be influenced through interventions oriented toward the belief that using an electronic health record will improve the quality of patient care.

  19. On-the-job training of health professionals for electronic health record and electronic medical record use: A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina L. Younge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of electronic health records (EHRs or electronic medical records (EMRs is well documented in health informatics literature yet, very few studies focus primarily on how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained for EHR or EMR use. Purpose: To investigate how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained to prepare them for EHR or EMR use. Methods: Systematic searches were conducted in CINAHL, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed and ISI WoS and, the Arksey and O’Malley scoping methodological framework was used to collect the data and analyze the results. Results: Training was done at implementation, orientation and post-implementation. Implementation and orientation training had a broader scope while post-implementation training focused on proficiency, efficiency and improvement. The multiplicity of training methods, types and levels of training identified appear to suggest that training is more effective when a combination of training methods are used.

  20. An effective approach for choosing an electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Robert

    2009-01-01

    With government stimulus money becoming available to encourage healthcare facilities to adopt electronic health record (EHR) systems, the decision to move forward with implementing an EHR system has taken on an urgency not previously seen. The EHR landscape is evolving rapidly and the underlying technology platform is becoming increasingly interconnected. One must make sure that an EHR decision does not lock oneself into technology obsolescence. The best approach for evaluating an EHR is on the basis of:usability, interoperability, and affordability.

  1. Electronic Health Record developed by the Internet technology

    OpenAIRE

    吉原, 博幸; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    Installation of the order entry system had been done in the college hospital. However, Installation of the order entry system has just begun in middle sized hospitals. On the other hand, at the middle sized hospitals which does not equipped with the order entry system, the administrator is considering to install the electronic health record system rather than to install the order entry system, In case of small hospitals, there is no merit of installing the order entry system. So, many young d...

  2. Formalized Medical Guidelines and a Structured Electronic Health Record.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Šebesta, K.; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvára, K.; Zvárová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), s. 4652-4656 ISSN 1727-1983. [EMBEC'05. European Medical and Biomedical Conference /3./. Prague, 20.11.2005-25.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : formalization of guidelines in cardilogy * GLIF model * structure electronic health record * algorithm in cardiovascular diagnostics and treatment Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  3. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  4. Awareness of the Care Team in Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawdrey, D.K.; Wilcox, L.G.; Collins, S.; Feiner, S.; Mamykina, O.; Stein, D.M.; Bakken, S.; Fred, M.R.; Stetson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To support collaboration and clinician-targeted decision support, electronic health records (EHRs) must contain accurate information about patients’ care providers. The objective of this study was to evaluate two approaches for care provider identification employed within a commercial EHR at a large academic medical center. Methods We performed a retrospective review of EHR data for 121 patients in two cardiology wards during a four-week period. System audit logs of chart accesses were analyzed to identify the clinicians who were likely participating in the patients’ hospital care. The audit log data were compared with two functions in the EHR for documenting care team membership: 1) a vendor-supplied module called “Care Providers”, and 2) a custom “Designate Provider” order that was created primarily to improve accuracy of the attending physician of record documentation. Results For patients with a 3–5 day hospital stay, an average of 30.8 clinicians accessed the electronic chart, including 10.2 nurses, 1.4 attending physicians, 2.3 residents, and 5.4 physician assistants. The Care Providers module identified 2.7 clinicians/patient (1.8 attending physicians and 0.9 nurses). The Designate Provider order identified 2.1 clinicians/patient (1.1 attending physicians, 0.2 resident physicians, and 0.8 physician assistants). Information about other members of patients’ care teams (social workers, dietitians, pharmacists, etc.) was absent. Conclusions The two methods for specifying care team information failed to identify numerous individuals involved in patients’ care, suggesting that commercial EHRs may not provide adequate tools for care team designation. Improvements to EHR tools could foster greater collaboration among care teams and reduce communication-related risks to patient safety. PMID:22574103

  5. Electronic Health Records: Then, Now, and in the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Describe the state of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) in 1992 and their evolution by 2015 and where EHRs are expected to be in 25 years. Further to discuss the expectations for EHRs in 1992 and explore which of them were realized and what events accelerated or disrupted/derailed how EHRs evolved. Methods Literature search based on “Electronic Health Record”, “Medical Record”, and “Medical Chart” using Medline, Google, Wikipedia Medical, and Cochrane Libraries resulted in an initial review of 2,356 abstracts and other information in papers and books. Additional papers and books were identified through the review of references cited in the initial review. Results By 1992, hardware had become more affordable, powerful, and compact and the use of personal computers, local area networks, and the Internet provided faster and easier access to medical information. EHRs were initially developed and used at academic medical facilities but since most have been replaced by large vendor EHRs. While EHR use has increased and clinicians are being prepared to practice in an EHR-mediated world, technical issues have been overshadowed by procedural, professional, social, political, and especially ethical issues as well as the need for compliance with standards and information security. There have been enormous advancements that have taken place, but many of the early expectations for EHRs have not been realized and current EHRs still do not meet the needs of today’s rapidly changing healthcare environment. Conclusion The current use of EHRs initiated by new technology would have been hard to foresee. Current and new EHR technology will help to provide international standards for interoperable applications that use health, social, economic, behavioral, and environmental data to communicate, interpret, and act intelligently upon complex healthcare information to foster precision medicine and a learning health system. PMID:27199197

  6. Electronic Health Record Use a Bitter Pill for Many Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigs, Stephen L; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) adoption among office-based physician practices in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. However, the challenges of using EHRs have resulted in growing dissatisfaction with the systems among many of these physicians. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to increase understanding of physician perceptions regarding the value of using EHR technology. Important findings included the belief among physicians that EHR systems need to be more user-friendly and adaptable to individual clinic workflow preferences, physician beliefs that lack of interoperability among EHRs is a major barrier to meaningful use of the systems, and physician beliefs that EHR use does not improve the quality of care provided to patients. These findings suggest that although government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption among office-based physician practices have produced positive results, additional support may be required in the future to maintain this momentum.

  7. Developing Visual Thinking in the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Andrew D; Young, Christine D; Amatayakul, Margret; Dieter, Michael G; Pawola, Lawrence M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this vision paper is to identify how data visualization could transform healthcare. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are maturing with new technology and tools being applied. Researchers are reaping the benefits of data visualization to better access compilations of EHR data for enhanced clinical research. Data visualization, while still primarily the domain of clinical researchers, is beginning to show promise for other stakeholders. A non-exhaustive review of the literature indicates that respective to the growth and development of the EHR, the maturity of data visualization in healthcare is in its infancy. Visual analytics has been only cursorily applied to healthcare. A fundamental issue contributing to fragmentation and poor coordination of healthcare delivery is that each member of the healthcare team, including patients, has a different view. Summarizing all of this care comprehensively for any member of the healthcare team is a "wickedly hard" visual analytics and data visualization problem to solve.

  8. An architecture for a virtual electronic health record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, H.; Talmon, J.; Tange, H.; Boers, G.; Hasman, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Healthcare Domain Taskforce of the Object Management Group has specified standards for secure access and retrieval of demographic and medical data. This paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of an electronic healthcare record that implements these specifications

  9. Hospital financial position and the adoption of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Gregory O; Shen, Jay J; Moseley, Charles B

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between financial position and adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) in 2442 acute care hospitals. The study was cross-sectional and utilized a general linear mixed model with the multinomial distribution specification for data analysis. We verified the results by also running a multinomial logistic regression model. To measure our variables, we used data from (1) the 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) electronic health record implementation survey, (2) the 2006 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Cost Reports, and (3) the 2006 AHA Annual Survey containing organizational and operational data. Our dependent variable was an ordinal variable with three levels used to indicate the extent of EHR adoption by hospitals. Our independent variables were five financial ratios: (1) net days revenue in accounts receivable, (2) total margin, (3) the equity multiplier, (4) total asset turnover, and (5) the ratio of total payroll to total expenses. For control variables, we used (1) bed size, (2) ownership type, (3) teaching affiliation, (4) system membership, (5) network participation, (6) fulltime equivalent nurses per adjusted average daily census, (7) average daily census per staffed bed, (8) Medicare patients percentage, (9) Medicaid patients percentage, (10) capitation-based reimbursement, and (11) nonconcentrated market. Only liquidity was significant and positively associated with EHR adoption. Asset turnover ratio was significant but, unexpectedly, was negatively associated with EHR adoption. However, many control variables, most notably bed size, showed significant positive associations with EHR adoption. Thus, it seems that hospitals adopt EHRs as a strategic move to better align themselves with their environment.

  10. An electronic health record-enabled obesity database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of weight loss therapies is commonly measured using body mass index and other obesity-related variables. Although these data are often stored in electronic health records (EHRs and potentially very accessible, few studies on obesity and weight loss have used data derived from EHRs. We developed processes for obtaining data from the EHR in order to construct a database on patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery. Methods Clinical data obtained as part of standard of care in a bariatric surgery program at an integrated health delivery system were extracted from the EHR and deposited into a data warehouse. Data files were extracted, cleaned, and stored in research datasets. To illustrate the utility of the data, Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate length of post-operative follow-up. Results Demographic, laboratory, medication, co-morbidity, and survey data were obtained from 2028 patients who had undergone RYGB at the same institution since 2004. Pre-and post-operative diagnostic and prescribing information were available on all patients, while survey laboratory data were available on a majority of patients. The number of patients with post-operative laboratory test results varied by test. Based on Kaplan-Meier estimates, over 74% of patients had post-operative weight data available at 4 years. Conclusion A variety of EHR-derived data related to obesity can be efficiently obtained and used to study important outcomes following RYGB.

  11. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Methods Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. Results EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Discussion Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. Conclusions EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. PMID:25627278

  12. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-03-01

    Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  13. Interoperability of Electronic Health Records: A Physician-Driven Redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Johns, Lucy

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Electronic health records (EHRs), now used by hundreds of thousands of providers and encouraged by federal policy, have the potential to improve quality and decrease costs in health care. But interoperability, although technically feasible among different EHR systems, is the weak link in the chain of logic. Interoperability is inhibited by poor understanding, by suboptimal implementation, and at times by a disinclination to dilute market share or patient base on the part of vendors or providers, respectively. The intent of this project has been to develop a series of practicable recommendations that, if followed by EHR vendors and users, can promote and enhance interoperability, helping EHRs reach their potential. METHODOLOGY: A group of 11 physicians, one nurse, and one health policy consultant, practicing from California to Massachusetts, has developed a document titled "Feature and Function Recommendations To Optimize Clinician Usability of Direct Interoperability To Enhance Patient Care" that offers recommendations from the clinician point of view. This report introduces some of these recommendations and suggests their implications for policy and the "virtualization" of EHRs. CONCLUSION: Widespread adoption of even a few of these recommendations by designers and vendors would enable a major advance toward the "Triple Aim" of improving the patient experience, improving the health of populations, and reducing per capita costs.

  14. Electronic patient record and archive of records in Cardio.net system for telecardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierdziński, Janusz; Karpiński, Grzegorz

    2003-01-01

    In modern medicine the well structured patient data set, fast access to it and reporting capability become an important question. With the dynamic development of information technology (IT) such question is solved via building electronic patient record (EPR) archives. We then obtain fast access to patient data, diagnostic and treatment protocols etc. It results in more efficient, better and cheaper treatment. The aim of the work was to design a uniform Electronic Patient Record, implemented in cardio.net system for telecardiology allowing the co-operation among regional hospitals and reference centers. It includes questionnaires for demographic data and questionnaires supporting doctor's work (initial diagnosis, final diagnosis, history and physical, ECG at the discharge, applied treatment, additional tests, drugs, daily and periodical reports). The browser is implemented in EPR archive to facilitate data retrieval. Several tools for creating EPR and EPR archive were used such as: XML, PHP, Java Script and MySQL. The separate question is the security of data on WWW server. The security is ensured via Security Socket Layer (SSL) protocols and other tools. EPR in Cardio.net system is a module enabling the co-work of many physicians and the communication among different medical centers.

  15. Electronic records management in the public health sector of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngulup

    Document and Records Management System, medical records, service delivery, public ... standard operating procedures and formal methodologies for managing .... cords is the “information which is generated electronically and stored by means of a computer ..... This is because the disadvantages of one instrument are the.

  16. Unity in Diversity: Electronic Patient Record Use in Multidisciplinary Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Davidson, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine the use of electronic patient records (EPR) by clinical specialists in their development of multidisciplinary care for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. We develop a practice theory lens to investigate EPR use across multidisciplinary team practice. Our findings suggest that there are oppositional tendencies towards diversity in EPR use and unity which emerges across multidisciplinary work, and this influences the outcomes of EPR use. The value of this persp...

  17. From planning to realisation of an electronic patient record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, T; Rapp, R; Krämer, K-L

    1999-03-01

    The high complex requirements on information and information flow in todays hospitals can only be accomplished by the use of modern Information Systems (IS). In order to achieve this, the Stiftung Orthopädische Universitätsklinik has carried out first the Project "Strategic Informations System Planning" in 1993. Then realizing the neccessary infrastructure (network; client-server) from 1993 to 1997, and finally started the introduction of modern IS (SAP R/3 and IXOS-Archive) in the clinical area. One of the approved goal was the replacement of the paper medical record by an up-to-date electronical medical record. In this article the following three topics will be discussed: the difference between the up-to-date electronical medical record and the electronically archived finished cases, steps performed by our clinic to realize the up-to-date electronical medical record and the problems occured during this process.

  18. [From planning to realization of an electronic patient record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, T; Rapp, R; Krämer, K L

    1999-03-01

    The high complex requirements on information and information flow in todays hospitals can only be accomplished by the use of modern Information Systems (IS). In order to achieve this, the Stiftung Orthopädische Universitätsklinik has carried out first the Project "Strategic Informations System Planning" in 1993. Then realizing the necessary infrastructure (network; client-server) from 1993 to 1997, and finally started the introduction of modern IS (SAP R/3 and IXOS-Archive) in the clinical area. One of the approved goal was the replacement of the paper medical record by an up-to-date electronical medical record. In this article the following three topics will be discussed: the difference between the up-to-date electronical medical record and the electronically archived finished cases, steps performed by our clinic to realize the up-to-date electronical medical record and the problems occurred during this process.

  19. 76 FR 56503 - Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration... Electronic Health Records, VA Form 10- 0400. OMB Control Number: 2900-0710. Type of Review: Extension of a... power of attorney by veterans who have medical information recorded in VHA electronic health records...

  20. Taming the EHR (Electronic Health Record) - There is Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiAngi, YT; Longhurst, CA; Payne, TH

    2016-01-01

    With increasing diffusion of EHR technology over the last half decade, clinician burnout is rising. As healthcare is a complex and highly regulated field, the rapid and mass adoption of EHR technology has created disruption for highly skilled workers such as clinicians. Although, much has been written about dissatisfaction with the EHR (electronic health record), a paucity of immediate solutions exists in the literature. This article suggests three actionable steps health systems and clinicians can make to expedite gains from and mitigate the effect of the EHR on clinical practice. PMID:27830215

  1. Bidirectional RNN for Medical Event Detection in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatha, Abhyuday N; Yu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Sequence labeling for extraction of medical events and their attributes from unstructured text in Electronic Health Record (EHR) notes is a key step towards semantic understanding of EHRs. It has important applications in health informatics including pharmacovigilance and drug surveillance. The state of the art supervised machine learning models in this domain are based on Conditional Random Fields (CRFs) with features calculated from fixed context windows. In this application, we explored recurrent neural network frameworks and show that they significantly out-performed the CRF models.

  2. Developing an electronic health record (EHR) for methadone treatment recording and decision support.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Xiao, Liang

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we give an overview of methadone treatment in Ireland and outline the rationale for designing an electronic health record (EHR) with extensibility, interoperability and decision support functionality. Incorporating several international standards, a conceptual model applying a problem orientated approach in a hierarchical structure has been proposed for building the EHR.

  3. Do electronic health records affect the patient-psychiatrist relationship? A before & after study of psychiatric outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuyler Mark

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of literature shows that patients accept the use of computers in clinical care. Nonetheless, studies have shown that computers unequivocally change both verbal and non-verbal communication style and increase patients' concerns about the privacy of their records. We found no studies which evaluated the use of Electronic Health Records (EHRs specifically on psychiatric patient satisfaction, nor any that took place exclusively in a psychiatric treatment setting. Due to the special reliance on communication for psychiatric diagnosis and evaluation, and the emphasis on confidentiality of psychiatric records, the results of previous studies may not apply equally to psychiatric patients. Method We examined the association between EHR use and changes to the patient-psychiatrist relationship. A patient satisfaction survey was administered to psychiatric patient volunteers prior to and following implementation of an EHR. All subjects were adult outpatients with chronic mental illness. Results Survey responses were grouped into categories of "Overall," "Technical," "Interpersonal," "Communication & Education,," "Time," "Confidentiality," "Anxiety," and "Computer Use." Multiple, unpaired, two-tailed t-tests comparing pre- and post-implementation groups showed no significant differences (at the 0.05 level to any questionnaire category for all subjects combined or when subjects were stratified by primary diagnosis category. Conclusions While many barriers to the adoption of electronic health records do exist, concerns about disruption to the patient-psychiatrist relationship need not be a prominent focus. Attention to communication style, interpersonal manner, and computer proficiency may help maintain the quality of the patient-psychiatrist relationship following EHR implementation.

  4. Benefits and drawbacks of electronic health record systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menachemi N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nir Menachemi¹, Taleah H Collum²¹Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; ²Department of Health Services Administration, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH Act of 2009 that was signed into law as part of the "stimulus package" represents the largest US initiative to date that is designed to encourage widespread use of electronic health records (EHRs. In light of the changes anticipated from this policy initiative, the purpose of this paper is to review and summarize the literature on the benefits and drawbacks of EHR systems. Much of the literature has focused on key EHR functionalities, including clinical decision support systems, computerized order entry systems, and health information exchange. Our paper describes the potential benefits of EHRs that include clinical outcomes (eg, improved quality, reduced medical errors, organizational outcomes (eg, financial and operational benefits, and societal outcomes (eg, improved ability to conduct research, improved population health, reduced costs. Despite these benefits, studies in the literature highlight drawbacks associated with EHRs, which include the high upfront acquisition costs, ongoing maintenance costs, and disruptions to workflows that contribute to temporary losses in productivity that are the result of learning a new system. Moreover, EHRs are associated with potential perceived privacy concerns among patients, which are further addressed legislatively in the HITECH Act. Overall, experts and policymakers believe that significant benefits to patients and society can be realized when EHRs are widely adopted and used in a “meaningful” way.Keywords: EHR, health information technology, HITECH, computerized order entry, health information exchange 

  5. Electronic Health Record-Related Events in Medical Malpractice Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Mark L; Siegal, Dana; Riah, Heather; Johnston, Doug; Kenyon, Kathy

    2015-11-06

    There is widespread agreement that the full potential of health information technology (health IT) has not yet been realized and of particular concern are the examples of unintended consequences of health IT that detract from the safety of health care or from the use of health IT itself. The goal of this project was to obtain additional information on these health IT-related problems, using a mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) analysis of electronic health record-related harm in cases submitted to a large database of malpractice suits and claims. Cases submitted to the CRICO claims database and coded during 2012 and 2013 were analyzed. A total of 248 cases (<1%) involving health IT were identified and coded using a proprietary taxonomy that identifies user- and system-related sociotechnical factors. Ambulatory care accounted for most of the cases (146 cases). Cases were most typically filed as a result of an error involving medications (31%), diagnosis (28%), or a complication of treatment (31%). More than 80% of cases involved moderate or severe harm, although lethal cases were less likely in cases from ambulatory settings. Etiologic factors spanned all of the sociotechnical dimensions, and many recurring patterns of error were identified. Adverse events associated with health IT vulnerabilities can cause extensive harm and are encountered across the continuum of health care settings and sociotechnical factors. The recurring patterns provide valuable lessons that both practicing clinicians and health IT developers could use to reduce the risk of harm in the future. The likelihood of harm seems to relate more to a patient's particular situation than to any one class of error.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share thework provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used

  6. Implementation of a patient-facing genomic test report in the electronic health record using a web-application interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marc S; Kern, Melissa S; Lerch, Virginia R; Billet, Jonathan; Williams, Janet L; Moore, Gregory J

    2018-05-30

    Genomic medicine is emerging into clinical care. Communication of genetic laboratory results to patients and providers is hampered by the complex technical nature of the laboratory reports. This can lead to confusion and misinterpretation of the results resulting in inappropriate care. Patients usually do not receive a copy of the report leading to further opportunities for miscommunication. To address these problems, interpretive reports were created using input from the intended end users, patients and providers. This paper describes the technical development and deployment of the first patient-facing genomic test report (PGR) within an electronic health record (EHR) ecosystem using a locally developed standards-based web-application interface. A patient-facing genomic test report with a companion provider report was configured for implementation within the EHR using a locally developed software platform, COMPASS™. COMPASS™ is designed to manage secure data exchange, as well as patient and provider access to patient reported data capture and clinical display tools. COMPASS™ is built using a Software as a Service (SaaS) approach which exposes an API that apps can interact with. An authoring tool was developed that allowed creation of patient-specific PGRs and the accompanying provider reports. These were converted to a format that allowed them to be presented in the patient portal and EHR respectively using the existing COMPASS™ interface thus allowing patients, caregivers and providers access to individual reports designed for the intended end user. The PGR as developed was shown to enhance patient and provider communication around genomic results. It is built on current standards but is designed to support integration with other tools and be compatible with emerging opportunities such as SMART on FHIR. This approach could be used to support genomic return of results as the tool is scalable and generalizable.

  7. Using Simulations to Improve Electronic Health Record Use, Clinician Training and Patient Safety: Recommendations From A Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Vishnu; Woodcock, Deborah; McGrath, Karess; Scholl, Gretchen; Pranaat, Robert; Doberne, Julie W; Chase, Dian A; Gold, Jeffrey A; Ash, Joan S

    2016-01-01

    A group of informatics experts in simulation, biomedical informatics, patient safety, medical education, and human factors gathered at Corbett, Oregon on April 30 and May 1, 2015. Their objective: to create a consensus statement on best practices for the use of electronic health record (EHR) simulations in education and training, to improve patient safety, and to outline a strategy for future EHR simulation work. A qualitative approach was utilized to analyze data from the conference and generate recommendations in five major categories: (1) Safety, (2) Education and Training, (3) People and Organizations, (4) Usability and Design, and (5) Sociotechnical Aspects.

  8. Patients' online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic review in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Ellis, Beverley

    2015-03-01

    Online access to medical records by patients can potentially enhance provision of patient-centred care and improve satisfaction. However, online access and services may also prove to be an additional burden for the healthcare provider. To assess the impact of providing patients with access to their general practice electronic health records (EHR) and other EHR-linked online services on the provision, quality, and safety of health care. A systematic review was conducted that focused on all studies about online record access and transactional services in primary care. Data sources included MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EPOC, DARE, King's Fund, Nuffield Health, PsycINFO, OpenGrey (1999-2012). The literature was independently screened against detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria; independent dual data extraction was conducted, the risk of bias (RoB) assessed, and a narrative synthesis of the evidence conducted. A total of 176 studies were identified, 17 of which were randomised controlled trials, cohort, or cluster studies. Patients reported improved satisfaction with online access and services compared with standard provision, improved self-care, and better communication and engagement with clinicians. Safety improvements were patient-led through identifying medication errors and facilitating more use of preventive services. Provision of online record access and services resulted in a moderate increase of e-mail, no change on telephone contact, but there were variable effects on face-to-face contact. However, other tasks were necessary to sustain these services, which impacted on clinician time. There were no reports of harm or breaches in privacy. While the RoB scores suggest many of the studies were of low quality, patients using online services reported increased convenience and satisfaction. These services positively impacted on patient safety, although there were variations of record access and use by specific ethnic and socioeconomic groups

  9. Safer electronic health records safety assurance factors for EHR resilience

    CERN Document Server

    Sittig, Dean F

    2015-01-01

    This important volume provide a one-stop resource on the SAFER Guides along with the guides themselves and information on their use, development, and evaluation. The Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience (SAFER) guides, developed by the editors of this book, identify recommended practices to optimize the safety and safe use of electronic health records (EHRs). These guides are designed to help organizations self-assess the safety and effectiveness of their EHR implementations, identify specific areas of vulnerability, and change their cultures and practices to mitigate risks.This book pr

  10. Exploiting Multimodal Biometrics in E-Privacy Scheme for Electronic Health Records

    OpenAIRE

    Omotosho, Adebayo; Adegbola, Omotanwa; Adelakin, Barakat; Adelakun, Adeyemi; Emuoyibofarhe, Justice

    2015-01-01

    Existing approaches to protect the privacy of Electronic Health Records are either insufficient for existing medical laws or they are too restrictive in their usage. For example, smart card-based encryption systems require the patient to be always present to authorize access to medical records. Questionnaires were administered by 50 medical practitioners to identify and categorize different Electronic Health Records attributes. The system was implemented using multi biometrics of patients to ...

  11. A Standards-Based Architecture Proposal for Integrating Patient mHealth Apps to Electronic Health Record Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceglia, S; Fontelo, P; Rossi, E; Ackerman, M J

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health Applications (mHealth Apps) are opening the way to patients' responsible and active involvement with their own healthcare management. However, apart from Apps allowing patient's access to their electronic health records (EHRs), mHealth Apps are currently developed as dedicated "island systems". Although much work has been done on patient's access to EHRs, transfer of information from mHealth Apps to EHR systems is still low. This study proposes a standards-based architecture that can be adopted by mHealth Apps to exchange information with EHRs to support better quality of care. Following the definition of requirements for the EHR/mHealth App information exchange recently proposed, and after reviewing current standards, we designed the architecture for EHR/mHealth App integration. Then, as a case study, we modeled a system based on the proposed architecture aimed to support home monitoring for congestive heart failure patients. We simulated such process using, on the EHR side, OpenMRS, an open source longitudinal EHR and, on the mHealth App side, the iOS platform. The integration architecture was based on the bi-directional exchange of standard documents (clinical document architecture rel2 - CDA2). In the process, the clinician "prescribes" the home monitoring procedures by creating a CDA2 prescription in the EHR that is sent, encrypted and de-identified, to the mHealth App to create the monitoring calendar. At the scheduled time, the App alerts the patient to start the monitoring. After the measurements are done, the App generates a structured CDA2-compliant monitoring report and sends it to the EHR, thus avoiding local storage. The proposed architecture, even if validated only in a simulation environment, represents a step forward in the integration of personal mHealth Apps into the larger health-IT ecosystem, allowing the bi-directional data exchange between patients and healthcare professionals, supporting the patient's engagement in self

  12. Use of electronic personal health record systems to encourage HIV screening: an exploratory study of patient and provider perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McInnes D Keith

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When detected, HIV can be effectively treated with antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless in the U.S. approximately 25% of those who are HIV-infected do not know it. Much remains unknown about how to increase HIV testing rates. New Internet outreach methods have the potential to increase disease awareness and screening among patients, especially as electronic personal health records (PHRs become more widely available. In the US Department of Veterans' Affairs medical care system, 900,000 veterans have indicated an interest in receiving electronic health-related communications through the PHR. Therefore we sought to evaluate the optimal circumstances and conditions for outreach about HIV screening. In an exploratory, qualitative research study we examined patient and provider perceptions of Internet-based outreach to increase HIV screening among veterans who use the Veterans Health Administration (VHA health care system. Findings We conducted two rounds of focus groups with veterans and healthcare providers at VHA medical centers. The study's first phase elicited general perceptions of an electronic outreach program to increase screening for HIV, diabetes, and high cholesterol. Using phase 1 results, outreach message texts were drafted and then presented to participants in the second phase. Analysis followed modified grounded theory. Patients and providers indicated that electronic outreach through a PHR would provide useful information and would motivate patients to be screened for HIV. Patients believed that electronic information would be more convenient and understandable than information provided verbally. Patients saw little difference between messages about HIV versus about diabetes and cholesterol. Providers, however, felt patients would disapprove of HIV-related messages due to stigma. Providers expected increased workload from the electronic outreach, and thus suggested adding primary care resources and devising

  13. Medical guidelines presentation and comparing with Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselý, Arnost; Zvárová, Jana; Peleska, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Zdenek

    2006-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are now being developed in many places. More advanced systems provide also reminder facilities, usually based on if-then rules. In this paper we propose a method how to build the reminder facility directly upon the guideline interchange format (GLIF) model of medical guidelines. The method compares data items on the input of EHR system with medical guidelines GLIF model and is able to reveal if the input data item, that represents patient diagnosis or proposed patient treatment, contradicts with medical guidelines or not. The reminder facility can be part of EHR system itself or it can be realized by a stand-alone reminder system (SRS). The possible architecture of stand-alone reminder system is described in this paper and the advantages of stand-alone solution are discussed. The part of the EHR system could be also a browser that would present graphical GLIF model in easy to understand manner on the user screen. This browser can be data driven and focus attention of user to the relevant part of medical guidelines GLIF model.

  14. Using ISO 25040 standard for evaluating electronic health record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marília; Novaes, Magdala; Vasconcelos, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Quality of electronic health record systems (EHR-S) is one of the key points in the discussion about the safe use of this kind of system. It stimulates creation of technical standards and certifications in order to establish the minimum requirements expected for these systems. [1] In other side, EHR-S suppliers need to invest in evaluation of their products to provide systems according to these requirements. This work presents a proposal of use ISO 25040 standard, which focuses on the evaluation of software products, for define a model of evaluation of EHR-S in relation to Brazilian Certification for Electronic Health Record Systems - SBIS-CFM Certification. Proposal instantiates the process described in ISO 25040 standard using the set of requirements that is scope of the Brazilian certification. As first results, this research has produced an evaluation model and a scale for classify an EHR-S about its compliance level in relation to certification. This work in progress is part for the acquisition of the degree of master in Computer Science at the Federal University of Pernambuco.

  15. Understanding health care providers' reluctance to adopt a national electronic patient record: an empirical and legal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Ploem, M. C.; Wiesman, F. J.; Verheij, R. A.; Friele, R. D.; Gevers, J. K. M.

    2013-01-01

    Several countries are implementing a national electronic patient record (n-EPR). Despite the assumed positive effects of n-EPRs on the efficiency, continuity, safety and quality of care, their overall adoption remains low and meets resistance from involved parties. The implementation of the Dutch

  16. Understanding health care providers' reluctance to adopt a national electronic patient record : An empirical and legal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Ploem, M.C.; Wiesman, F.J.; Verheij, R.A.; Friele, R.D.; Gevers, J.K.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several countries are implementing a national electronic patient record (n-EPR). Despite the assumed positive effects of n-EPRs on the efficiency, continuity, safety and quality of care, their overall adoption remains low and meets resistance from involved parties. The implementation of

  17. Validation of asthma recording in electronic health records: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Francis; Quint, Jennifer K; Wilkinson, Samantha; Mullerova, Hana; Smeeth, Liam; Douglas, Ian J

    2017-05-29

    Asthma is a common, heterogeneous disease with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. It can be difficult to define in epidemiological studies using electronic health records as the diagnosis is based on non-specific respiratory symptoms and spirometry, neither of which are routinely registered. Electronic health records can nonetheless be valuable to study the epidemiology, management, healthcare use and control of asthma. For health databases to be useful sources of information, asthma diagnoses should ideally be validated. The primary objectives are to provide an overview of the methods used to validate asthma diagnoses in electronic health records and summarise the results of the validation studies. EMBASE and MEDLINE will be systematically searched for appropriate search terms. The searches will cover all studies in these databases up to October 2016 with no start date and will yield studies that have validated algorithms or codes for the diagnosis of asthma in electronic health records. At least one test validation measure (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value or other) is necessary for inclusion. In addition, we require the validated algorithms to be compared with an external golden standard, such as a manual review, a questionnaire or an independent second database. We will summarise key data including author, year of publication, country, time period, date, data source, population, case characteristics, clinical events, algorithms, gold standard and validation statistics in a uniform table. This study is a synthesis of previously published studies and, therefore, no ethical approval is required. The results will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. Results from this systematic review can be used to study outcome research on asthma and can be used to identify case definitions for asthma. CRD42016041798. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  18. Integrating cancer genomic data into electronic health records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy L. Warner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rise of genomically targeted therapies and immunotherapy has revolutionized the practice of oncology in the last 10–15 years. At the same time, new technologies and the electronic health record (EHR in particular have permeated the oncology clinic. Initially designed as billing and clinical documentation systems, EHR systems have not anticipated the complexity and variety of genomic information that needs to be reviewed, interpreted, and acted upon on a daily basis. Improved integration of cancer genomic data with EHR systems will help guide clinician decision making, support secondary uses, and ultimately improve patient care within oncology clinics. Some of the key factors relating to the challenge of integrating cancer genomic data into EHRs include: the bioinformatics pipelines that translate raw genomic data into meaningful, actionable results; the role of human curation in the interpretation of variant calls; and the need for consistent standards with regard to genomic and clinical data. Several emerging paradigms for integration are discussed in this review, including: non-standardized efforts between individual institutions and genomic testing laboratories; “middleware” products that portray genomic information, albeit outside of the clinical workflow; and application programming interfaces that have the potential to work within clinical workflow. The critical need for clinical-genomic knowledge bases, which can be independent or integrated into the aforementioned solutions, is also discussed.

  19. How physician electronic health record screen sharing affects patient and doctor non-verbal communication in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Onur; Young, Henry N; Chewning, Betty; Montague, Enid

    2015-03-01

    Use of electronic health records (EHRs) in primary-care exam rooms changes the dynamics of patient-physician interaction. This study examines and compares doctor-patient non-verbal communication (eye-gaze patterns) during primary care encounters for three different screen/information sharing groups: (1) active information sharing, (2) passive information sharing, and (3) technology withdrawal. Researchers video recorded 100 primary-care visits and coded the direction and duration of doctor and patient gaze. Descriptive statistics compared the length of gaze patterns as a percentage of visit length. Lag sequential analysis determined whether physician eye-gaze influenced patient eye gaze, and vice versa, and examined variations across groups. Significant differences were found in duration of gaze across groups. Lag sequential analysis found significant associations between several gaze patterns. Some, such as DGP-PGD ("doctor gaze patient" followed by "patient gaze doctor") were significant for all groups. Others, such DGT-PGU ("doctor gaze technology" followed by "patient gaze unknown") were unique to one group. Some technology use styles (active information sharing) seem to create more patient engagement, while others (passive information sharing) lead to patient disengagement. Doctors can engage patients in communication by using EHRs in the visits. EHR training and design should facilitate this. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Architecture for Semantically Interoperable Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffanello, André; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Kitajima, Adriana; Puttini, Ricardo; Aguiar, Atualpa

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing adhesion of electronic health records, the challenge of semantic interoperability remains unsolved. The fact that different parties can exchange messages does not mean they can understand the underlying clinical meaning, therefore, it cannot be assumed or treated as a requirement. This work introduces an architecture designed to achieve semantic interoperability, in a way which organizations that follow different policies may still share medical information through a common infrastructure comparable to an ecosystem, whose organisms are exemplified within the Brazilian scenario. Nonetheless, the proposed approach describes a service-oriented design with modules adaptable to different contexts. We also discuss the establishment of an enterprise service bus to mediate a health infrastructure defined on top of international standards, such as openEHR and IHE. Moreover, we argue that, in order to achieve truly semantic interoperability in a wide sense, a proper profile must be published and maintained.

  1. Ethical issues in electronic health records: A general overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzia F Ozair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic health record (EHR is increasingly being implemented in many developing countries. It is the need of the hour because it improves the quality of health care and is also cost-effective. Technologies can introduce some hazards hence safety of information in the system is a real challenge. Recent news of security breaches has put a question mark on this system. Despite its increased usefulness, and increasing enthusiasm in its adoption, not much attention is being paid to the ethical issues that might arise. Securing EHR with an encrypted password is a probable option. The purpose of this article is to discuss the various ethical issues arising in the use of the EHRs and their possible solutions.

  2. Barriers Against Adoption of Electronic Health Record in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bonacina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to expose the barriers which work against the satisfactory adoption and utilization of Electronic Health Records (EHRs in Italy. Experts from six operating areas were involved where barriers associated with practical daily use of EHRs might arise. Experts disclosed different barriers in their operating areas: the low interoperability of healthcare system infrastructures in diagnostic services; the lack of systems able to represent complex processes characterized by uncertainties in hospital wards; the unsatisfactory information exchange between heterogeneous healthcare providers in territorial healthcare; the lack of models and guidelines for administration process management; the lack of Health Information engineers who are recognized as professionals in Italian hospitals; the lack of domain vocabularies and ontologies for conceptual integration in clinical communication. Our findings suggest how future solutions must be designed considering the environment of specific areas.

  3. DANBIO-powerful research database and electronic patient record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund

    2011-01-01

    an overview of the research outcome and presents the cohorts of RA patients. The registry, which is approved as a national quality registry, includes patients with RA, PsA and AS, who are followed longitudinally. Data are captured electronically from the source (patients and health personnel). The IT platform...... as an electronic patient 'chronicle' in routine care, and at the same time provides a powerful research database....

  4. Developing an Interface to Order and Document Health Education Videos in the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Transitioning to electronic health records (EHRs) provides an opportunity for health care systems to integrate educational content available on interactive patient systems (IPS) with the medical documentation system. This column discusses how one hospital simplified providers' workflow by making it easier to order educational videos and ensure that completed education is documented within the medical record. Integrating the EHR and IPS streamlined the provision of patient education, improved documentation, and supported the organization in meeting core requirements for Meaningful Use.

  5. Patient and public attitudes towards informed consent models and levels of awareness of Electronic Health Records in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Fiona; Papoutsi, Chrysanthi; Reed, Julie E.; Marston, Cicely; Bell, Derek; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) forms an integral part of the information strategy for the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, with the aim of facilitating health information exchange for patient care and secondary use, including research and healthcare planning. Implementing EHR systems requires an understanding of patient expectations for consent mechanisms and consideration of public awareness towards information sharing as might be made possible through integrated EHRs across primary and secondary health providers. Objectives To explore levels of public awareness about EHRs and to examine attitudes towards different consent models with respect to sharing identifiable and de-identified records for healthcare provision, research and planning. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to adult patients and members of the public in primary and secondary care clinics in West London, UK in 2011. In total, 5331 individuals participated in the survey, and 3157 were included in the final analysis. Results The majority (91%) of respondents expected to be explicitly asked for consent for their identifiable records to be accessed for health provision, research or planning. Half the respondents (49%) did not expect to be asked for consent before their de-identified records were accessed. Compared with White British respondents, those from all other ethnic groups were more likely to anticipate their permission would be obtained before their de-identified records were used. Of the study population, 59% reported already being aware of EHRs before the survey. Older respondents and individuals with complex patterns of interaction with healthcare services were more likely to report prior awareness of EHRs. Individuals self-identifying as belonging to ethnic groups other than White British, and those with lower educational qualifications were less likely to report being aware of EHRs than White British respondents and

  6. 76 FR 40454 - Proposed Information Collection (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration... Access to VHA Electronic Health Records, VA Form 10- 0400. OMB Control Number: 2900-0710. Type of Review... were granted power of attorney by veterans who have medical information recorded in VHA electronic...

  7. 77 FR 23193 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program-Stage 2; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ..., 413, and 495 [CMS-0044-CN] RIN 0938-AQ84 Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record... proposed rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program--Stage... (77 FR 13698), the proposed rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record...

  8. Stakeholder engagement: a key component of integrating genomic information into electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Andrea; McCarty, Catherine A; Rasmussen, Luke V; Williams, Marc S; Brilliant, Murray; Bowton, Erica A; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Faucett, William A; Ferryman, Kadija; Field, Julie R; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Horowitz, Carol R; Koenig, Barbara A; McCormick, Jennifer B; Ralston, James D; Sanderson, Saskia C; Smith, Maureen E; Trinidad, Susan Brown

    2013-10-01

    Integrating genomic information into clinical care and the electronic health record can facilitate personalized medicine through genetically guided clinical decision support. Stakeholder involvement is critical to the success of these implementation efforts. Prior work on implementation of clinical information systems provides broad guidance to inform effective engagement strategies. We add to this evidence-based recommendations that are specific to issues at the intersection of genomics and the electronic health record. We describe stakeholder engagement strategies employed by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, a national consortium of US research institutions funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute to develop, disseminate, and apply approaches that combine genomic and electronic health record data. Through select examples drawn from sites of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, we illustrate a continuum of engagement strategies to inform genomic integration into commercial and homegrown electronic health records across a range of health-care settings. We frame engagement as activities to consult, involve, and partner with key stakeholder groups throughout specific phases of health information technology implementation. Our aim is to provide insights into engagement strategies to guide genomic integration based on our unique network experiences and lessons learned within the broader context of implementation research in biomedical informatics. On the basis of our collective experience, we describe key stakeholder practices, challenges, and considerations for successful genomic integration to support personalized medicine.

  9. Electronic Medical Record Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This service provides web services used to obtain clinical data for patients. There are three service methods that allow write functionality signNote, writeNote and...

  10. Health Care Personnel Perception of the Privacy of Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kenji; Shofer, Frances S; Saberi, Poune; Green-McKenzie, Judith

    2017-06-01

    : Health care facilities are increasingly converting paper medical records to electronic health records. This study investigates the perception of privacy health care personnel have of electronic health records. A pilot tested, anonymous survey was administered to a convenience sample of health care personnel. Standard summary statistics and Chi-square analysis were used to assess differences in perception. Of the 93% (96/103) who responded, 65% were female and 43% white. The mean age was 44.3 years. Most (94%) felt that Medical Record privacy was important and one-third reported they would not seek care at their workplace if Electronic Health Records were used. Efforts to assure and communicate the integrity of electronic health records are essential toward reducing deterrents for health care personnel to access geographically convenient and timely health care.

  11. Adoption of Electronic Health Records: A Roadmap for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sunil Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study was to create a roadmap for the adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) in India based an analysis of the strategies of other countries and national scenarios of ICT use in India. The strategies for adoption of EHR in other countries were analyzed to find the crucial steps taken. Apart from reports collected from stakeholders in the country, the study relied on the experience of the author in handling several e-health projects. It was found that there are four major areas where the countries considered have made substantial efforts: ICT infrastructure, Policy & regulations, Standards & interoperability, and Research, development & education. A set of crucial activities were identified in each area. Based on the analysis, a roadmap is suggested. It includes the creation of a secure health network; health information exchange; and the use of open-source software, a national health policy, privacy laws, an agency for health IT standards, R&D, human resource development, etc. Although some steps have been initiated, several new steps need to be taken up for the successful adoption of EHR. It requires a coordinated effort from all the stakeholders.

  12. Adoption of Electronic Health Records: A Roadmap for India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the study was to create a roadmap for the adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) in India based an analysis of the strategies of other countries and national scenarios of ICT use in India. Methods The strategies for adoption of EHR in other countries were analyzed to find the crucial steps taken. Apart from reports collected from stakeholders in the country, the study relied on the experience of the author in handling several e-health projects. Results It was found that there are four major areas where the countries considered have made substantial efforts: ICT infrastructure, Policy & regulations, Standards & interoperability, and Research, development & education. A set of crucial activities were identified in each area. Based on the analysis, a roadmap is suggested. It includes the creation of a secure health network; health information exchange; and the use of open-source software, a national health policy, privacy laws, an agency for health IT standards, R&D, human resource development, etc. Conclusions Although some steps have been initiated, several new steps need to be taken up for the successful adoption of EHR. It requires a coordinated effort from all the stakeholders. PMID:27895957

  13. Designing a system for patients controlling providers' access to their electronic health records: organizational and technical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Jeremy C; Cummins, Jonathan A; Schwartz, Peter H; Martin, Douglas K; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are proliferating, and financial incentives encourage their use. Applying Fair Information Practice principles to EHRs necessitates balancing patients' rights to control their personal information with providers' data needs to deliver safe, high-quality care. We describe the technical and organizational challenges faced in capturing patients' preferences for patient-controlled EHR access and applying those preferences to an existing EHR. We established an online system for capturing patients' preferences for who could view their EHRs (listing all participating clinic providers individually and categorically-physicians, nurses, other staff) and what data to redact (none, all, or by specific categories of sensitive data or patient age). We then modified existing data-viewing software serving a state-wide health information exchange and a large urban health system and its primary care clinics to allow patients' preferences to guide data displays to providers. Patients could allow or restrict data displays to all clinicians and staff in a demonstration primary care clinic, categories of providers (physicians, nurses, others), or individual providers. They could also restrict access to all EHR data or any or all of five categories of sensitive data (mental and reproductive health, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, and substance abuse) and for specific patient ages. The EHR viewer displayed data via reports, data flowsheets, and coded and free text data displayed by Google-like searches. Unless patients recorded restrictions, by default all requested data were displayed to all providers. Data patients wanted restricted were not displayed, with no indication they were redacted. Technical barriers prevented redacting restricted information in free textnotes. The program allowed providers to hit a "Break the Glass" button to override patients' restrictions, recording the date, time, and next screen viewed. Establishing patient

  14. Medical devices, electronic health records and assuring patient safety : Future challenges?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, Cor J.

    2015-01-01

    The patient safety movement was triggered by publications showing that modern health care is more unsafe than road travel and that more patients are killed annually by avoidable adverse events than by breast cancer [1]. As a result, an urgent need to improve patient safety has dominated

  15. Implementing Electronic Health Record Default Settings to Reduce Opioid Overprescribing: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivin, Kara; White, Jessica O; Chao, Sandra; Christensen, Anna L; Horner, Luke; Petersen, Dana M; Hobbs, Morgan R; Capreol, Grace; Halbritter, Kevin A; Jones, Christopher M

    2018-01-09

    To pilot test the effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of instituting a 15-pill quantity default in the electronic health record for new Schedule II opioid prescriptions. A mixed-methods pilot study in two health systems, including pre-post analysis of prescribed opioid quantity and focus groups or interviews with prescribers and health system administrators. We implemented a 15-pill electronic health record default for new Schedule II opioids and assessed opioid quantity before and after implementation using electronic health record data on 6,390 opioid prescriptions from 448 prescribers. We then analyzed themes from focus groups and interviews with four staff members and six prescribers. The proportion of opioid prescriptions for 15 pills increased at both sites after adding an electronic health record default, with one reaching statistical significance (from 4.1% to 7.2% at CHC, P = 0.280, and 15.9% to 37.2% at WVU, P default, although ease of implementation varied by electronic health record vendor. Most prescribers were not aware of the default change and stated that they made prescribing decisions based on patient clinical characteristics rather than defaults. This pilot provides initial evidence that changing default settings can increase the number of prescriptions at the default level. This low-cost and relatively simple intervention could have an impact on opioid overprescribing. However, default settings should be selected carefully to avoid unintended consequences. © 2018 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Empirical advances with text mining of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delespierre, T; Denormandie, P; Bar-Hen, A; Josseran, L

    2017-08-22

    Korian is a private group specializing in medical accommodations for elderly and dependent people. A professional data warehouse (DWH) established in 2010 hosts all of the residents' data. Inside this information system (IS), clinical narratives (CNs) were used only by medical staff as a residents' care linking tool. The objective of this study was to show that, through qualitative and quantitative textual analysis of a relatively small physiotherapy and well-defined CN sample, it was possible to build a physiotherapy corpus and, through this process, generate a new body of knowledge by adding relevant information to describe the residents' care and lives. Meaningful words were extracted through Standard Query Language (SQL) with the LIKE function and wildcards to perform pattern matching, followed by text mining and a word cloud using R® packages. Another step involved principal components and multiple correspondence analyses, plus clustering on the same residents' sample as well as on other health data using a health model measuring the residents' care level needs. By combining these techniques, physiotherapy treatments could be characterized by a list of constructed keywords, and the residents' health characteristics were built. Feeding defects or health outlier groups could be detected, physiotherapy residents' data and their health data were matched, and differences in health situations showed qualitative and quantitative differences in physiotherapy narratives. This textual experiment using a textual process in two stages showed that text mining and data mining techniques provide convenient tools to improve residents' health and quality of care by adding new, simple, useable data to the electronic health record (EHR). When used with a normalized physiotherapy problem list, text mining through information extraction (IE), named entity recognition (NER) and data mining (DM) can provide a real advantage to describe health care, adding new medical material and

  17. Developing an electronic health record (EHR) for methadone treatment recording and decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In this paper, we give an overview of methadone treatment in Ireland and outline the rationale for designing an electronic health record (EHR) with extensibility, interoperability and decision support functionality. Incorporating several international standards, a conceptual model applying a problem orientated approach in a hierarchical structure has been proposed for building the EHR. Methods A set of archetypes has been designed in line with the current best practice and clinical guidelines which guide the information-gathering process. A web-based data entry system has been implemented, incorporating elements of the paper-based prescription form, while at the same time facilitating the decision support function. Results The use of archetypes was found to capture the ever changing requirements in the healthcare domain and externalises them in constrained data structures. The solution is extensible enabling the EHR to cover medicine management in general as per the programme of the HRB Centre for Primary Care Research. Conclusions The data collected via this Irish system can be aggregated into a larger dataset, if necessary, for analysis and evidence-gathering, since we adopted the openEHR standard. It will be later extended to include the functionalities of prescribing drugs other than methadone along with the research agenda at the HRB Centre for Primary Care Research in Ireland. PMID:21284849

  18. Developing an electronic health record (EHR) for methadone treatment recording and decision support

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Xiao, Liang

    2011-02-01

    Abstract Background In this paper, we give an overview of methadone treatment in Ireland and outline the rationale for designing an electronic health record (EHR) with extensibility, interoperability and decision support functionality. Incorporating several international standards, a conceptual model applying a problem orientated approach in a hierarchical structure has been proposed for building the EHR. Methods A set of archetypes has been designed in line with the current best practice and clinical guidelines which guide the information-gathering process. A web-based data entry system has been implemented, incorporating elements of the paper-based prescription form, while at the same time facilitating the decision support function. Results The use of archetypes was found to capture the ever changing requirements in the healthcare domain and externalises them in constrained data structures. The solution is extensible enabling the EHR to cover medicine management in general as per the programme of the HRB Centre for Primary Care Research. Conclusions The data collected via this Irish system can be aggregated into a larger dataset, if necessary, for analysis and evidence-gathering, since we adopted the openEHR standard. It will be later extended to include the functionalities of prescribing drugs other than methadone along with the research agenda at the HRB Centre for Primary Care Research in Ireland.

  19. Using data from ambient assisted living and smart homes in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, P; Schöpe, L

    2014-01-01

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Using Data from Ambient Assisted Living and Smart Homes in Electronic Health Records". To increase efficiency in the health care of the future, data from innovative technology like it is used for ambient assisted living (AAL) or smart homes should be available for individual health decisions. Integrating and aggregating data from different medical devices and health records enables a comprehensive view on health data. The objective of this paper is to present examples of the state of the art in research on information management that leads to a sustainable use and long-term storage of health data provided by innovative assistive technologies in daily living. Current research deals with the perceived usefulness of sensor data, the participatory design of visual displays for presenting monitoring data, and communication architectures for integrating sensor data from home health care environments with health care providers either via a regional health record bank or via a telemedical center. Integrating data from AAL systems and smart homes with data from electronic patient or health records is still in an early stage. Several projects are in an advanced conceptual phase, some of them exploring feasibility with the help of prototypes. General comprehensive solutions are hardly available and should become a major issue of medical informatics research in the near future.

  20. Participation, Power, Critique: Constructing a Standard for Electronic Patient Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus

    2006-01-01

      The scope of participatory design is discussed through the case of a national standard for electronic patient records (EPR) in Denmark. Currently within participatory design, the relationship between participatory methods and techniques on the one hand and critical and emancipatory aims...... on the other hand is discussed. Some argue that participation in itself entails a strive towards democracy, others argue that the tendency to focus upon tools, techniques and the arena of single projects should be supplemented with emancipatory aims, such as technology assessment and critique of dominance....... These issues are discussed through the controversies around the test in late 2004 of a prototype application based on BEHR, a standard developed from 1999 to 2005 for EPRs. I argue that participation is valuable, but that the scope of participatory design should also include critical conceptualizations...

  1. Technology as friend or foe? Do electronic health records increase burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Wanderer, Jonathan P

    2018-06-01

    To summarize recent relevant studies regarding the use of electronic health records and physician burnout. Recently acquired knowledge regarding the relationship between electronic health record use, professional satisfaction, burnout, and desire to leave clinical practice are discussed. Adoption of electronic health records has increased across the United States and worldwide. Although electronic health records have many benefits, there is growing concern about the adverse consequences of their use on physician satisfaction and burnout. Poor usability, incongruent workflows, and the addition of clerical tasks to physician documentation requirements have been previously highlighted as ongoing concerns with electronic health record adoption. In multiple recent studies, electronic health records have been shown to decrease professional satisfaction, increase burnout, and the likelihood that a physician will reduce or leave clinical practice. One interventional study demonstrated a positive effect of a dedicated electronic health record entry clerk on physicians working in an outpatient practice.

  2. Fine-Grained Access Control for Electronic Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Pham Thi Bach; Wohlgemuth, Sven; Echizen, Isao; Thuy, Dong Thi Bich; Thuc, Nguyen Dinh

    There needs to be a strategy for securing the privacy of patients when exchanging health records between various entities over the Internet. Despite the fact that health care providers such as Google Health and Microsoft Corp.'s Health Vault comply with the U.S Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the privacy of patients is still at risk. Several encryption schemes and access control mechanisms have been suggested to protect the disclosure of a patient's health record especially from unauthorized entities. However, by implementing these approaches, data owners are not capable of controlling and protecting the disclosure of the individual sensitive attributes of their health records. This raises the need to adopt a secure mechanism to protect personal information against unauthorized disclosure. Therefore, we propose a new Fine-grained Access Control (FGAC) mechanism that is based on subkeys, which would allow a data owner to further control the access to his data at the column-level. We also propose a new mechanism to efficiently reduce the number of keys maintained by a data owner in cases when the users have different access privileges to different columns of the data being shared.

  3. Barriers to Electronic Health Record Adoption: a Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Kristof, Caitlin; Jones, Beau; Mitchell, Erica; Martinez, Angelica

    2016-12-01

    Federal efforts and local initiatives to increase adoption and use of electronic health records (EHRs) continue, particularly since the enactment of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Roughly one in four hospitals not adopted even a basic EHR system. A review of the barriers may help in understanding the factors deterring certain healthcare organizations from implementation. We wanted to assemble an updated and comprehensive list of adoption barriers of EHR systems in the United States. Authors searched CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and accepted only articles relevant to our primary objective. Reviewers independently assessed the works highlighted by our search and selected several for review. Through multiple consensus meetings, authors tapered articles to a final selection most germane to the topic (n = 27). Each article was thoroughly examined by multiple authors in order to achieve greater validity. Authors identified 39 barriers to EHR adoption within the literature selected for the review. These barriers appeared 125 times in the literature; the most frequently mentioned barriers were regarding cost, technical concerns, technical support, and resistance to change. Despite federal and local incentives, the initial cost of adopting an EHR is a common existing barrier. The other most commonly mentioned barriers include technical support, technical concerns, and maintenance/ongoing costs. Policy makers should consider incentives that continue to reduce implementation cost, possibly aimed more directly at organizations that are known to have lower adoption rates, such as small hospitals in rural areas.

  4. Nurses' Perceptions of Nursing Care Documentation in the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tracey A.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) will soon become the standard for documenting nursing care. The EHR holds the promise of rapid access to complete records of a patient's encounter with the healthcare system. It is the expectation that healthcare providers input essential data that communicates important patient information to support quality…

  5. Dynamic modeling of patient and physician eye gaze to understand the effects of electronic health records on doctor-patient communication and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Enid; Asan, Onur

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine eye gaze patterns between patients and physicians while electronic health records were used to support patient care. Eye gaze provides an indication of physician attention to patient, patient/physician interaction, and physician behaviors such as searching for information and documenting information. A field study was conducted where 100 patient visits were observed and video recorded in a primary care clinic. Videos were then coded for gaze behaviors where patients' and physicians' gaze at each other and artifacts such as electronic health records were coded using a pre-established objective coding scheme. Gaze data were then analyzed using lag sequential methods. Results showed that there are several eye gaze patterns significantly dependent to each other. All doctor-initiated gaze patterns were followed by patient gaze patterns. Some patient-initiated gaze patterns were also followed by doctor gaze patterns significantly unlike the findings in previous studies. Health information technology appears to contribute to some of the new significant patterns that have emerged. Differences were also found in gaze patterns related to technology that differ from patterns identified in studies with paper charts. Several sequences related to patient-doctor-technology were also significant. Electronic health records affect the patient-physician eye contact dynamic differently than paper charts. This study identified several patterns of patient-physician interaction with electronic health record systems. Consistent with previous studies, physician initiated gaze is an important driver of the interactions between patient and physician and patient and technology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. On standardization of basic datasets of electronic medical records in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Ni, Wandong; Li, Jing; Jiang, Youlin; Liu, Kunjing; Ma, Zhaohui

    2017-12-24

    Standardization of electronic medical record, so as to enable resource-sharing and information exchange among medical institutions has become inevitable in view of the ever increasing medical information. The current research is an effort towards the standardization of basic dataset of electronic medical records in traditional Chinese medicine. In this work, an outpatient clinical information model and an inpatient clinical information model are created to adequately depict the diagnosis processes and treatment procedures of traditional Chinese medicine. To be backward compatible with the existing dataset standard created for western medicine, the new standard shall be a superset of the existing standard. Thus, the two models are checked against the existing standard in conjunction with 170,000 medical record cases. If a case cannot be covered by the existing standard due to the particularity of Chinese medicine, then either an existing data element is expanded with some Chinese medicine contents or a new data element is created. Some dataset subsets are also created to group and record Chinese medicine special diagnoses and treatments such as acupuncture. The outcome of this research is a proposal of standardized traditional Chinese medicine medical records datasets. The proposal has been verified successfully in three medical institutions with hundreds of thousands of medical records. A new dataset standard for traditional Chinese medicine is proposed in this paper. The proposed standard, covering traditional Chinese medicine as well as western medicine, is expected to be soon approved by the authority. A widespread adoption of this proposal will enable traditional Chinese medicine hospitals and institutions to easily exchange information and share resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Assessing the value of Western Cape Provincial Government health administrative data and electronic pharmacy records in ascertaining medicine use during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Mehta

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. In African settings, where there is a high disease burden, there is a need to improve the science of documenting and analysing accurate information regarding medicine exposures in women immediately before and during pregnancy to assess the extent of use and safety in pregnant women and their unborn children.Objectives. To compare evidence of medicine use during pregnancy, as documented in paper-based clinical records (maternity case records (MCRs against electronic health information resources (Provincial Health Data Centre (PHDC and assess the level of concordance between the two as part of baseline investigations before piloting a provincial pregnancy exposure registry and birth defect surveillance system. The PHDC consolidates electronic clinical and pharmacy data.Methods. A folder review of completed pregnancies between November 2013 and January 2016 was conducted on randomly selected MCRs from midwife-run obstetric units and a secondary maternity hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Medication exposures in the MCR were captured and compared with a customised PHDC data extract. The type and timing of drug exposures were compared. Total exposures were compiled from all data sources.Results. Two hundred and six MCRs from three facilities were sampled: 83 women had documented antiretroviral therapy (ART exposure; all but 1 (1% had been recorded in the PHDC extract. There was no evidence of ART use in the MCRs of 4 (5% cases, despite evidence in the PHDC. There were imprecise drug names in the MCRs of 14 (17% ART patients, discordant dates of onset between the MCRs and PHDC extracts in 10/83 (12% and inaccurate medicine names and incorrect dates in 1 (1% case each. Nine of 10 (90% women who were administered antituberculosis medication were recorded in the PHDC extract. Ten of 21 (48% isoniazid preventive therapy treatments appeared in the MCRs and PHDC; 9 (42% in the PHDC only and 2 (10% in the MCRs only. Half (n=18/36 of all

  8. Assessing electronic health record systems in emergency departments: Using a decision analytic Bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    In the last decade, health providers have implemented information systems to improve accuracy in medical diagnosis and decision-making. This article evaluates the impact of an electronic health record on emergency department physicians' diagnosis and admission decisions. A decision analytic approach using a decision tree was constructed to model the admission decision process to assess the added value of medical information retrieved from the electronic health record. Using a Bayesian statistical model, this method was evaluated on two coronary artery disease scenarios. The results show that the cases of coronary artery disease were better diagnosed when the electronic health record was consulted and led to more informed admission decisions. Furthermore, the value of medical information required for a specific admission decision in emergency departments could be quantified. The findings support the notion that physicians and patient healthcare can benefit from implementing electronic health record systems in emergency departments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Supplementing electronic health records through sample collection and patient diaries: A study set within a primary care research database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rebecca M; Soames, Jamie; Wright, Mark; Sultana, Kirin; van Staa, Tjeerd P; Dixon, William G

    2018-02-01

    To describe a novel observational study that supplemented primary care electronic health record (EHR) data with sample collection and patient diaries. The study was set in primary care in England. A list of 3974 potentially eligible patients was compiled using data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Interested general practices opted into the study then confirmed patient suitability and sent out postal invitations. Participants completed a drug-use diary and provided saliva samples to the research team to combine with EHR data. Of 252 practices contacted to participate, 66 (26%) mailed invitations to patients. Of the 3974 potentially eligible patients, 859 (22%) were at participating practices, and 526 (13%) were sent invitations. Of those invited, 117 (22%) consented to participate of whom 86 (74%) completed the study. We have confirmed the feasibility of supplementing EHR with data collected directly from patients. Although the present study successfully collected essential data from patients, it also underlined the requirement for improved engagement with both patients and general practitioners to support similar studies. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Computer-assisted expert case definition in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexander M; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Weiss, Lisa S; Shen, Rongjun; Sobel, Rachel E; Bate, Andrew; Reynolds, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    To describe how computer-assisted presentation of case data can lead experts to infer machine-implementable rules for case definition in electronic health records. As an illustration the technique has been applied to obtain a definition of acute liver dysfunction (ALD) in persons with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The technique consists of repeatedly sampling new batches of case candidates from an enriched pool of persons meeting presumed minimal inclusion criteria, classifying the candidates by a machine-implementable candidate rule and by a human expert, and then updating the rule so that it captures new distinctions introduced by the expert. Iteration continues until an update results in an acceptably small number of changes to form a final case definition. The technique was applied to structured data and terms derived by natural language processing from text records in 29,336 adults with IBD. Over three rounds the technique led to rules with increasing predictive value, as the experts identified exceptions, and increasing sensitivity, as the experts identified missing inclusion criteria. In the final rule inclusion and exclusion terms were often keyed to an ALD onset date. When compared against clinical review in an independent test round, the derived final case definition had a sensitivity of 92% and a positive predictive value of 79%. An iterative technique of machine-supported expert review can yield a case definition that accommodates available data, incorporates pre-existing medical knowledge, is transparent and is open to continuous improvement. The expert updates to rules may be informative in themselves. In this limited setting, the final case definition for ALD performed better than previous, published attempts using expert definitions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Federated learning of predictive models from federated Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisimi, Theodora S; Chen, Ruidi; Mela, Theofanie; Olshevsky, Alex; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch; Shi, Wei

    2018-04-01

    In an era of "big data," computationally efficient and privacy-aware solutions for large-scale machine learning problems become crucial, especially in the healthcare domain, where large amounts of data are stored in different locations and owned by different entities. Past research has been focused on centralized algorithms, which assume the existence of a central data repository (database) which stores and can process the data from all participants. Such an architecture, however, can be impractical when data are not centrally located, it does not scale well to very large datasets, and introduces single-point of failure risks which could compromise the integrity and privacy of the data. Given scores of data widely spread across hospitals/individuals, a decentralized computationally scalable methodology is very much in need. We aim at solving a binary supervised classification problem to predict hospitalizations for cardiac events using a distributed algorithm. We seek to develop a general decentralized optimization framework enabling multiple data holders to collaborate and converge to a common predictive model, without explicitly exchanging raw data. We focus on the soft-margin l 1 -regularized sparse Support Vector Machine (sSVM) classifier. We develop an iterative cluster Primal Dual Splitting (cPDS) algorithm for solving the large-scale sSVM problem in a decentralized fashion. Such a distributed learning scheme is relevant for multi-institutional collaborations or peer-to-peer applications, allowing the data holders to collaborate, while keeping every participant's data private. We test cPDS on the problem of predicting hospitalizations due to heart diseases within a calendar year based on information in the patients Electronic Health Records prior to that year. cPDS converges faster than centralized methods at the cost of some communication between agents. It also converges faster and with less communication overhead compared to an alternative distributed

  12. Improving Patient Safety: Avoiding Unread Imaging Exams in the National VA Enterprise Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastawrous, Sarah; Carney, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    In the current digital and filmless age of radiology, rates of unread radiology exams remain low, however, may still exist in unique environments. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care systems may experience higher rates of unread exams due to coexistence of Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture (VistA) imaging and commercial picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). The purpose of this patient safety initiative was to identify any unread exams and causes leading to unread exams. Following approval by departmental quality assurance committee, a comprehensive review was performed of all radiology exams within VistA imaging from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2014 to identify unread radiology exams. Over the 5-year period, the total unread exam rate was calculated to be 0.17%, with the highest yearly unread exam rate of 0.25%. The leading majority of unread exam type was plain radiographs. Analysis revealed unfinished dictations, unassociated accession numbers, technologist errors, and inefficient radiologist work lists as top contributors to unread exams. Once unread radiology exams were discovered and the causes identified, valuable process changes were implemented within our department to ensure simultaneous tracking of all unread exams in VistA imaging as well as the commercial PACS.

  13. Tissue Banking, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Medical Records: The Front-End Requirements for Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, K. Stephen; Sarojini, Sreeja; Youssif, Maher; Nalley, Kip; Milinovikj, Natasha; Elloumi, Fathi; Russell, Steven; Pecora, Andrew; Schecter, Elyssa; Goy, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored treatments that enhance patient care and decrease overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics and “-omics” data obtained from patient biospecimens and records to guide therapy choices that generate good clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records (EMRs). The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks. For cancer, high-quality biospecimens collected at diagnosis, first relapse, and various treatment stages provide crucial resources for study designs. To enlarge biospecimen collections, patient education regarding the value of specimen donation is vital. One approach for increasing consent is to offer publically available illustrations and game-like engagements demonstrating how wider sample availability facilitates development of novel therapies. The critical value of tissue bank samples, bioinformatics, and EMR in the early stages of the biomarker discovery process for personalized medicine is often overlooked. The data obtained also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. PMID:23818899

  14. Seniors' views on the use of electronic health records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Morin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Mauricie and Centre-du-Qu_bec region of the province of Quebec, Canada, an integrated services network has been implemented for frail seniors. It combines three of the best practices in the field of integrated services, namely: single-entry point, case management and personalised care plan. A shared interdisciplinary electronic health record (EHR system was set up in 1998. A consensus on the relevance of using EHRs is growing in Quebec, in Canada and around the world. However, technology has outpaced interest in the notions of confidentiality, informed consent and the impact perceived by the clientele. This study specifically examines how frail seniors perceive these issues related to an EHR. The conceptual framework is inspired by the DeLone and McLean model whose main attributes are: system quality, information quality, utilisation modes and the impact on organisations and individuals. This last attribute is the focus of this study, which is a descriptive with quantitative and qualitative component. Thirty seniors were surveyed. Positive information they provided falls under three headings: (i being better informed; (ii trust and consideration for professionals; and (iii appreciation of innovation. The opinions of the seniors are generally favourable regarding the use of computers and the EHR in their presence. Improvements in EHR systems for seniors can be encouraged.

  15. Measuring Nursing Value from the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    We report the findings of a big data nursing value expert group made up of 14 members of the nursing informatics, leadership, academic and research communities within the United States tasked with 1. Defining nursing value, 2. Developing a common data model and metrics for nursing care value, and 3. Developing nursing business intelligence tools using the nursing value data set. This work is a component of the Big Data and Nursing Knowledge Development conference series sponsored by the University Of Minnesota School Of Nursing. The panel met by conference calls for fourteen 1.5 hour sessions for a total of 21 total hours of interaction from August 2014 through May 2015. Primary deliverables from the bit data expert group were: development and publication of definitions and metrics for nursing value; construction of a common data model to extract key data from electronic health records; and measures of nursing costs and finance to provide a basis for developing nursing business intelligence and analysis systems.

  16. Electronic Health Record Portal Adoption: a cross country analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Jorge; Oliveira, Tiago

    2017-07-05

    This study's goal is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt Electronic Health Record (EHR) portals and to estimate if there are differences between countries with different healthcare models. We applied a new adoption model using as a starting point the extended Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2) by incorporating the Concern for Information Privacy (CFIP) framework. To evaluate the research model we used the partial least squares (PLS) - structural equation modelling (SEM) approach. An online questionnaire was administrated in the United States (US) and Europe (Portugal). We collected 597 valid responses. The statistically significant factors of behavioural intention are performance expectancy ([Formula: see text] total  = 0.285; P expectancy ([Formula: see text] total  = 0.160; P value ([Formula: see text] total  = 0.152; P value are only predictors in the US group. The model explained 53% of the variance in behavioural intention and 36% of the variance in use behaviour. Our study identified critical factors for the adoption of EHR portals and significant differences between the countries. Confidentiality issues do not seem to influence acceptance. The EHR portals usage patterns are significantly higher in US compared to Portugal.

  17. Cloud Based Electronic Health Record Applications are Essential to Expeditionary Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Processing Theory Approach,” International Journal of Logistics Management, Vol. 23(2), 2012. Columbus, L. “83% of Healthcare Organizations are Using... International Journal of Cloud Computing and Services Science, Vol.2,No.4, August 2014. 35 Wilson, E. & Lankton, N. “Interdisciplinary Research ...transitions from an EMEDS HRT to a larger EMEDS by adding more laptops and printers to emergency medicine, medical ward, dental clinic , critical care

  18. Market effects on electronic health record adoption by physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Menachemi, Nir; Shewchuk, Richard M; Ginter, Peter M; Duncan, W Jack; Brooks, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    Despite the advantages of electronic health record (EHR) systems, the adoption of these systems has been slow among community-based physicians. Current studies have examined organizational and personal barriers to adoption; however, the influence of market characteristics has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of market characteristics on EHR adoption by physicians. Generalized hierarchal linear modeling was used to analyze EHR survey data from Florida which were combined with data from the Area Resource File and the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation. The main outcome variable was self-reported use of EHR by physicians. A total of 2,926 physicians from practice sizes of 20 or less were included in the sample. Twenty-one percent (n = 613) indicated that they personally and routinely use an EHR system in their practice. Physicians located in counties with higher physician concentration were found to be more likely to adopt EHRs. For every one-unit increase in nonfederal physicians per 10,000 in the county, there was a 2.0% increase in likelihood of EHR adoption by physicians (odds ratio = 1.02, confidence interval = 1.00-1.03). Health maintenance organization penetration rate and poverty level were not found to be significantly related to EHR adoption. However, practice size, years in practice, Medicare payer mix, and measures of technology readiness were found to independently influence physician adoption. Market factors play an important role in the diffusion of EHRs in small medical practices. Policy makers interested in furthering the adoption of EHRs must consider strategies that would enhance the confidence of users as well as provide financial support in areas with the highest concentration of small medical practices and Medicare beneficiaries. Health care leaders should be cognizant of the market forces that enable or constrain the adoption of EHR among their practices and those of their competitors.

  19. Medical narratives and patient analogs: the ethical implications of electronic patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, E H

    1999-12-01

    An electronic patient record consists of electronically stored data about a specific patient. It therefore constitutes a data-space. The data may be combined into a patient profile which is relative to a particular specialty as well as phenomenologically unique to the specific professional who constructs the profile. Further, a diagnosis may be interpreted as a path taken by a health care professional with a certain specialty through the data-space relative to the patient profile constructed by that professional. This way of looking at electronic patient records entails certain ethical implications about privacy and accessibility. However, it also permits the construction of artificial intelligence and competence algorithms for health care professionals relative to their specialties.

  20. Electronic Health Records: PHR Opportunities for Public Health – Part 2

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Ken Mandl discusses electronic health records and personally-controlled health records. Dr. Mandl leads the IndivoHealth personally-controlled health record project, the original reference model for the Microsoft, Google, and Dossia personal health records (PHRs or PCHRs). He has successfully used PHRs for immunization and influenza, leads efforts in real-time surveillance systems, and is currently adapting personal health records for longitudinal and genomic research. The lecture was given at CDC on June 19, 2009.

  1. Electronic Health Records: PHR Opportunities for Public Health – Part 1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Ken Mandl discusses electronic health records and personally-controlled health records. Dr. Mandl leads the IndivoHealth personally-controlled health record project, the original reference model for the Microsoft, Google, and Dossia personal health records (PHRs or PCHRs). He has successfully used PHRs for immunization and influenza, leads efforts in real-time surveillance systems, and is currently adapting personal health records for longitudinal and genomic research. The lecture was given at CDC on June 19, 2009.

  2. Electronic Health Record Systems and Intent to Apply for Meaningful Use Incentives among Office-based Physician ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Electronic Health Record Systems and Intent to Apply for ... In 2011, 57% of office-based physicians used electronic medical record/electronic health record (EMR/EHR) systems, ...

  3. Positive beliefs and privacy concerns shape the future for the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnbom, E C; Douglas, H E; Makeham, M A B

    2016-01-01

    The uptake of the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) has been slowly building momentum in Australia. The purpose of the PCEHR is to collect clinically important information from multiple healthcare providers to provide a secure electronic record to patients and their authorised healthcare providers that will ultimately enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare delivery. Reasons for the slow uptake of the PCEHR and future directions to improve its usefulness is discussed later. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Nurse's use of power to standardise nursing terminology in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Samira; Sieloff, Christina L

    2017-07-01

    To describe nurses' use of power to influence the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. Little is known about nurses' potential use of power to influence the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. The theory of group power within organisations informed the design of the descriptive, cross-sectional study used a survey method to assess nurses' use of power to influence the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. The Sieloff-King Assessment of Group Power within Organizations © and Nursing Power Scale was used. A total of 232 nurses responded to the survey. The mean power capability score was moderately high at 134.22 (SD 18.49), suggesting that nurses could use power to achieve the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. The nurses' power capacity was significantly correlated with their power capability (r = 0.96, P power to achieve their goals, such as the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. Nurse administrators may use their power to influence the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. If nurses lack power, this could decrease nurses' ability to achieve their goals and contribute to the achievement of effective patient outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Changes to Workflow and Process Measures in the PICU During Transition From Semi to Full Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salib, Mina; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Dasgupta, Mahua; Zimmerman, Haydee; Hanson, Sheila

    2015-10-01

    Studies showing the changes in workflow during transition from semi to full electronic medical records are lacking. This objective study is to identify the changes in workflow in the PICU during transition from semi to full electronic health record. Prospective observational study. Children's Hospital of Wisconsin Institutional Review Board waived the need for approval so this study was institutional review board exempt. This study measured clinical workflow variables at a 72-bed PICU during different phases of transition to a full electronic health record, which occurred on November 4, 2012. Phases of electronic health record transition were defined as follows: pre-electronic health record (baseline data prior to transition to full electronic health record), transition phase (3 wk after electronic health record), and stabilization (6 mo after electronic health record). Data were analyzed for the three phases using Mann-Whitney U test with a two-sided p value of less than 0.05 considered significant. Seventy-two bed PICU. All patients in the PICU were included during the study periods. Five hundred and sixty-four patients with 2,355 patient days were evaluated in the three phases. Duration of rounds decreased from a median of 9 minutes per patient pre--electronic health record to 7 minutes per patient post electronic health record. Time to final note decreased from 2.06 days pre--electronic health record to 0.5 days post electronic health record. Time to first medication administration after admission also decreased from 33 minutes pre--electronic health record and 7 minutes post electronic health record. Time to Time to medication reconciliation was significantly higher pre-electronic health record than post electronic health record and percent of medication reconciliation completion was significantly lower pre--electronic health record than post electronic health record and percent of medication reconciliation completion was significantly higher pre--electronic

  6. Negation scope and spelling variation for text-mining of Danish electronic patient records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Cecilia Engel; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Electronic patient records are a potentially rich data source for knowledge extraction in biomedical research. Here we present a method based on the ICD10 system for text-mining of Danish health records. We have evaluated how adding functionalities to a baseline text-mining tool affected...

  7. Provider interaction with the electronic health record: the effects on patient-centered communication in medical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Richard L; Liu, Lin; Farber, Neil J; Chen, Yunan; Calvitti, Alan; Zuest, Danielle; Gabuzda, Mark T; Bell, Kristin; Gray, Barbara; Rick, Steven; Ashfaq, Shazia; Agha, Zia

    2014-09-01

    The computer with the electronic health record (EHR) is an additional 'interactant' in the medical consultation, as clinicians must simultaneously or in alternation engage patient and computer to provide medical care. Few studies have examined how clinicians' EHR workflow (e.g., gaze, keyboard activity, and silence) influences the quality of their communication, the patient's involvement in the encounter, and conversational control of the visit. Twenty-three primary care providers (PCPs) from USA Veterans Administration (VA) primary care clinics participated in the study. Up to 6 patients per PCP were recruited. The proportion of time PCPs spent gazing at the computer was captured in real time via video-recording. Mouse click/scrolling activity was captured through Morae, a usability software that logs mouse clicks and scrolling activity. Conversational silence was coded as the proportion of time in the visit when PCP and patient were not talking. After the visit, patients completed patient satisfaction measures. Trained coders independently viewed videos of the interactions and rated the degree to which PCPs were patient-centered (informative, supportive, partnering) and patients were involved in the consultation. Conversational control was measured as the proportion of time the PCP held the floor compared to the patient. The final sample included 125 consultations. PCPs who spent more time in the consultation gazing at the computer and whose visits had more conversational silence were rated lower in patient-centeredness. PCPs controlled more of the talk time in the visits that also had longer periods of mutual silence. PCPs were rated as having less effective communication when they spent more time looking at the computer and when there was more periods of silence in the consultation. Because PCPs increasingly are using the EHR in their consultations, more research is needed to determine effective ways that they can verbally engage patients while simultaneously

  8. Electronic health record usability: analysis of the user-centered design processes of eleven electronic health record vendors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratwani, Raj M; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Hettinger, A Zachary; Benda, Natalie C

    2015-11-01

    The usability of electronic health records (EHRs) continues to be a point of dissatisfaction for providers, despite certification requirements from the Office of the National Coordinator that require EHR vendors to employ a user-centered design (UCD) process. To better understand factors that contribute to poor usability, a research team visited 11 different EHR vendors in order to analyze their UCD processes and discover the specific challenges that vendors faced as they sought to integrate UCD with their EHR development. Our analysis demonstrates a diverse range of vendors' UCD practices that fall into 3 categories: well-developed UCD, basic UCD, and misconceptions of UCD. Specific challenges to practicing UCD include conducting contextually rich studies of clinical workflow, recruiting participants for usability studies, and having support from leadership within the vendor organization. The results of the study provide novel insights for how to improve usability practices of EHR vendors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Electronic records management in the public health sector of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngulup

    records) ... cally related administrative decision-making and problem-solving. ... This implies that a successful e-health system needs maximum support from proper ...... disaster backup for recovery in case it is affected by disaster like fire and water.

  10. A First Standardized Swiss Electronic Maternity Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murbach, Michel; Martin, Sabine; Denecke, Kerstin; Nüssli, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    During the nine months of pregnancy, women have to regularly visit several physicians for continuous monitoring of the health and development of the fetus and mother. Comprehensive examination results of different types are generated in this process; documentation and data transmission standards are still unavailable or not in use. Relevant information is collected in a paper-based maternity record carried by the pregnant women. To improve availability and transmission of data, we aim at developing a first prototype for an electronic maternity record for Switzerland. By analyzing the documentation workflow during pregnancy, we determined a maternity record data set. Further, we collected requirements towards a digital maternity record. As data exchange format, the Swiss specific exchange format SMEEX (swiss medical data exchange) was exploited. Feedback from 27 potential users was collected to identify further improvements. The relevant data is extracted from the primary care information system as SMEEX file, stored in a database and made available in a web and a mobile application, developed as prototypes of an electronic maternity record. The user confirmed the usefulness of the system and provided multiple suggestions for an extension. An electronical maternity record as developed in this work could be in future linked to the electronic patient record.

  11. Controlled dissemination of Electronic Medical Records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Noordende, G.

    2011-01-01

    Building upon a security analysis of the Dutch electronic patient record system, this paper describes an approach to construct a fully decentralized patient record system, using controlled disclosure of references to medical records. This paper identifies several paths that can be used to disclose

  12. Introduction of a national electronic patient record in The Netherlands: some legal issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploem, Corrette; Gevers, Sjef

    2011-01-01

    The electronic patient record (EPR) is a major technological development within the healthcare sector. Many hospitals across Europe already use institution-based electronic patient records, which allow not only for electronic exchange of patient data within the hospital, but potentially also for

  13. Making electronic health records support quality management: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillou, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Since the 1990s many hospitals in the OECD countries have introduced electronic health record (EHR) systems. A number of studies have examined the factors impinging on EHR implementation. Others have studied the clinical efficacy of EHR. However, only few studies have explored the (intermediary) factors that make EHR systems conducive to quality management (QM). Undertake a narrative review of existing studies in order to identify and discuss the factors conducive to making EHR support three dimensions of QM: clinical outcomes, managerial monitoring and cost-effectiveness. A narrative review of Web of Science, Cochrane, EBSCO, ProQuest, Scopus and three Nordic research databases. most studies do not specify the type of EHR examined. 39 studies were identified for analysis. 10 factors were found to be conducive to make EHR support QM. However, the contribution of EHR to the three specific dimensions of QM varied substantially. Most studies (29) included clinical outcomes. However, only half of these reported EHR to have a positive impact. Almost all the studies (36) dealt with the ability of EHR to enhance managerial monitoring of clinical activities, the far majority of which showed a positive relationship. Finally, only five dealt with cost-effectiveness of which two found positive effects. The findings resonates well with previous reviews, though two factors making EHR support QM seem new, namely: political goals and strategies, and integration of guidelines for clinical conduct. Lacking EHR type specification and diversity in study method imply that there is a strong need for further research on the factors that may make EHR may support QM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hersh WR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available William R Hersh,1 Paul N Gorman,1 Frances E Biagioli,2 Vishnu Mohan,1 Jeffrey A Gold,3 George C Mejicano4 1Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Family Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, 4School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. Keywords: curriculum transformation, clinical decision support, patient safety, health care quality, patient engagement

  15. DANBIO-powerful research database and electronic patient record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund

    2011-01-01

    is based on open-source software. Via a unique personal identification code, linkage with various national registers is possible for research purposes. Since the year 2000, more than 10,000 patients have been included. The main focus of research has been on treatment efficacy and drug survival. Compared...... an overview of the research outcome and presents the cohorts of RA patients. The registry, which is approved as a national quality registry, includes patients with RA, PsA and AS, who are followed longitudinally. Data are captured electronically from the source (patients and health personnel). The IT platform...... with RA patients, who were on conventional treatment with DMARDs, the patients who started biological treatment were younger, had longer disease duration, higher disease activity, tried more DMARDs and received more prednisolone. Also, more patients on biological therapy were seropositive and had erosive...

  16. Finding Important Terms for Patients in Their Electronic Health Records: A Learning-to-Rank Approach Using Expert Annotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiaping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Many health organizations allow patients to access their own electronic health record (EHR) notes through online patient portals as a way to enhance patient-centered care. However, EHR notes are typically long and contain abundant medical jargon that can be difficult for patients to understand. In addition, many medical terms in patients’ notes are not directly related to their health care needs. One way to help patients better comprehend their own notes is to reduce information overload and help them focus on medical terms that matter most to them. Interventions can then be developed by giving them targeted education to improve their EHR comprehension and the quality of care. Objective We aimed to develop a supervised natural language processing (NLP) system called Finding impOrtant medical Concepts most Useful to patientS (FOCUS) that automatically identifies and ranks medical terms in EHR notes based on their importance to the patients. Methods First, we built an expert-annotated corpus. For each EHR note, 2 physicians independently identified medical terms important to the patient. Using the physicians’ agreement as the gold standard, we developed and evaluated FOCUS. FOCUS first identifies candidate terms from each EHR note using MetaMap and then ranks the terms using a support vector machine-based learn-to-rank algorithm. We explored rich learning features, including distributed word representation, Unified Medical Language System semantic type, topic features, and features derived from consumer health vocabulary. We compared FOCUS with 2 strong baseline NLP systems. Results Physicians annotated 90 EHR notes and identified a mean of 9 (SD 5) important terms per note. The Cohen’s kappa annotation agreement was .51. The 10-fold cross-validation results show that FOCUS achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) of 0.940 for ranking candidate terms from EHR notes to identify important terms. When including term

  17. Can Social Cognitive Theories Help Us Understand Nurses' Use of Electronic Health Records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Gillian; Booth, Richard; Mistry, Kartini

    2016-04-01

    Electronic health record implementations have accelerated in clinical settings around the world in an effort to improve patient safety and enhance efficiencies related to care delivery. As the largest group of healthcare professionals globally, nurses play an important role in the use of these records and ensuring their benefits are realized. Social cognitive theories such as the Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned Behaviour, and the Technology Acceptance Model have been developed to explain behavior. Given that variation in nurses' electronic health record utilization may influence the degree to which benefits are realized, the aim of this article is to explore how the use of these social cognitive theories may assist organizations implementing electronic health records to facilitate deeper-level adoption of this type of clinical technology.

  18. Electronic health record tools' support of nurses' clinical judgment and team communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossman, Susan P; Bonney, Leigh Ann; Kim, Myoung Jin

    2013-11-01

    Nurses need to quickly process information to form clinical judgments, communicate with the healthcare team, and guide optimal patient care. Electronic health records not only offer potential for enhanced care but also introduce unintended consequences through changes in workflow, clinical judgment, and communication. We investigated nurses' use of improvised (self-made) and electronic health record-generated cognitive artifacts on clinical judgment and team communication. Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model provided a framework and basis for questions in an online survey and focus group interviews. Findings indicated that (1) nurses rated self-made work lists and medication administration records highest for both clinical judgment and communication, (2) tools aided different dimensions of clinical judgment, and (3) interdisciplinary tools enhance team communication. Implications are that electronic health record tool redesign could better support nursing work.

  19. Time Spent on Dedicated Patient Care and Documentation Tasks Before and After the Introduction of a Structured and Standardized Electronic Health Record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joukes, Erik; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Cornet, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2018-01-01

    Physicians spend around 35% of their time documenting patient data. They are concerned that adopting a structured and standardized electronic health record (EHR) will lead to more time documenting and less time for patient care, especially during consultations.  This study measures the effect of the

  20. Defining and incorporating basic nursing care actions into the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebright, Jane; Aldrich, Kelly; Taylor, Cathy R

    2014-01-01

    To develop a definition of basic nursing care for the hospitalized adult patient and drive uptake of that definition through the implementation of an electronic health record. A team of direct care nurses, assisted by subject matter experts, analyzed nursing theory and regulatory requirements related to basic nursing care. The resulting list of activities was coded using the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system and incorporated into the electronic health record system of a 170-bed community hospital. Nine basic nursing care activities were identified as a result of analyzing nursing theory and regulatory requirements in the framework of a hypothetical "well" patient. One additional basic nursing care activity was identified following the pilot implementation in the electronic health record. The pilot hospital has successfully passed a post-implementation regulatory review with no recommendations related to the documentation of basic patient care. This project demonstrated that it is possible to define the concept of basic nursing care and to distinguish it from the interdisciplinary, problem-focused plan of care. The use of the electronic health record can help clarify, document, and communicate basic care elements and improve uptake among nurses. This project to define basic nursing care activities and incorporate into the electronic health record represents a first step in capturing meaningful data elements. When fully implemented, these data could be translated into knowledge for improving care outcomes and collaborative processes. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Innovative uses of electronic health records and social media for public health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Emma M; Weitzman, Elissa R

    2014-03-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) and social media have the potential to enrich public health surveillance of diabetes. Clinical and patient-facing data sources for diabetes surveillance are needed given its profound public health impact, opportunity for primary and secondary prevention, persistent disparities, and requirement for self-management. Initiatives to employ data from EHRs and social media for diabetes surveillance are in their infancy. With their transformative potential come practical limitations and ethical considerations. We explore applications of EHR and social media for diabetes surveillance, limitations to approaches, and steps for moving forward in this partnership between patients, health systems, and public health.

  2. Electronic Health Record-Related Safety Concerns: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Electronic Health Record Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajunen, Tuuli; Saranto, Kaija; Lehtonen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Background The rapid expansion in the use of electronic health records (EHR) has increased the number of medical errors originating in health information systems (HIS). The sociotechnical approach helps in understanding risks in the development, implementation, and use of EHR and health information technology (HIT) while accounting for complex interactions of technology within the health care system. Objective This study addresses two important questions: (1) “which of the common EHR error types are associated with perceived high- and extreme-risk severity ratings among EHR users?”, and (2) “which variables are associated with high- and extreme-risk severity ratings?” Methods This study was a quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive study of EHR users. We conducted a cross-sectional web-based questionnaire study at the largest hospital district in Finland. Statistical tests included the reliability of the summative scales tested with Cronbach’s alpha. Logistic regression served to assess the association of the independent variables to each of the eight risk factors examined. Results A total of 2864 eligible respondents provided the final data. Almost half of the respondents reported a high level of risk related to the error type “extended EHR unavailability”. The lowest overall risk level was associated with “selecting incorrectly from a list of items”. In multivariate analyses, profession and clinical unit proved to be the strongest predictors for high perceived risk. Physicians perceived risk levels to be the highest (Prisk levels (PeLearning courses on EHR-use was associated with lower risk for some of the risk factors. Conclusions Based on a large number of Finnish EHR users in hospitals, this study indicates that HIT safety hazards should be taken very seriously, particularly in operating rooms, procedure units, emergency departments, and intensive care units/critical care units. Health care organizations should use proactive and

  3. Electronic health records: a valuable tool for dental school strategic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filker, Phyllis J; Cook, Nicole; Kodish-Stav, Jodi

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if electronic patient records have utility in dental school strategic planning. Electronic health records (EHRs) have been used by all predoctoral students and faculty members at Nova Southeastern University's College of Dental Medicine (NSU-CDM) since 2006. The study analyzed patient demographic and caries risk assessment data from October 2006 to May 2011 extracted from the axiUm EHR database. The purpose was to determine if there was a relationship between high oral health care needs and patient demographics, including gender, age, and median income of the zip code where they reside in order to support dental school strategic planning including the locations of future satellite clinics. The results showed that about 51 percent of patients serviced by the Broward County-based NSU-CDM oral health care facilities have high oral health care needs and that about 60 percent of this population resides in zip codes where the average income is below the median income for the county ($41,691). The results suggest that EHR data can be used adjunctively by dental schools when proposing potential sites for satellite clinics and planning for future oral health care programming.

  4. Norwegians GPs' use of electronic patient record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Tom; Faxvaag, Arild; Loerum, Hallvard; Grimsmo, Anders

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate GPs use of three major electronic patient record systems with emphasis on the ability of the systems to support important clinical tasks and to compare the findings with results from a study of the three major hospital-wide systems. A national, cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in Norwegian primary care. 247 (73%) of 338 GPs responded. Proportions of the respondents who reported to use the EPR system to conduct 23 central clinical tasks, differences in the proportions of users of different EPR systems and user satisfaction and perceived usefulness of the EPR system were measured. The GPs reported extensive use of their EPR systems to support clinical tasks. There were no significant differences in functionality between the systems, but there were differences in reported software and hardware dysfunction and user satisfaction. The respondents reported high scores in computer literacy and there was no correlation between computer usage and respondent age or gender. A comparison with hospital physicians' use of three hospital-wide EPR systems revealed that GPs had higher usage than the hospital-based MDs. Primary care EPR systems support clinical tasks far better than hospital systems with better overall user satisfaction and reported impact on the overall quality of the work. EPR systems in Norwegian primary care that have been developed in accordance with the principles of user-centered design have achieved widespread adoption and highly integrated use. The quality and efficiency of the clinical work has increased in contrast to the situation of their hospital colleagues, who report more modest use and benefits of EPR systems.

  5. A pilot study to evaluate the magnitude of association of the use of electronic personal health records with patient activation and empowerment in HIV-infected veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Cédric B. Crouch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The HITECH Act signed into law in 2009 requires hospitals to provide patients with electronic access to their health information through an electronic personal health record (ePHR in order to receive Medicare/Medicaid incentive payments. Little is known about who uses these systems or the impact these systems will have on patient outcomes in HIV care. The health care empowerment model provides rationale for the hypothesis that knowledge from an electronic personal health record can lead to greater patient empowerment resulting in improved outcomes. The objective was to determine the patient characteristics and patient activation, empowerment, satisfaction, knowledge of their CD4, Viral Loads, and antiretroviral medication, and medication adherence outcomes associated with electronic personal health record use in Veterans living with HIV at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. The participants included HIV-Infected Veterans receiving care in a low volume HIV-clinic at the San Francisco VA Medical Center, divided into two groups of users and non-users of electronic personal health records. The research was conducted using in-person surveys either online or on paper and data abstraction from medical records for current anti-retroviral therapy (ART, CD4 count, and plasma HIV-1 viral load. The measures included the Patient Activation Measure, Health Care Empowerment Inventory, ART adherence, provider satisfaction, current CD4 count, current plasma viral load, knowledge of current ART, knowledge of CD4 counts, and knowledge of viral load. In all, 40 participants were recruited. The use of electronic personal health records was associated with significantly higher levels of patient activation and levels of patient satisfaction for getting timely appointments, care, and information. ePHR was also associated with greater proportions of undetectable plasma HIV-1 viral loads, of knowledge of current CD4 count, and of knowledge of current viral load. The

  6. Electronic health records and cardiac implantable electronic devices: new paradigms and efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotwiner, David J

    2016-10-01

    The anticipated advantages of electronic health records (EHRs)-improved efficiency and the ability to share information across the healthcare enterprise-have so far failed to materialize. There is growing recognition that interoperability holds the key to unlocking the greatest value of EHRs. Health information technology (HIT) systems including EHRs must be able to share data and be able to interpret the shared data. This requires a controlled vocabulary with explicit definitions (data elements) as well as protocols to communicate the context in which each data element is being used (syntactic structure). Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide a clear example of the challenges faced by clinicians when data is not interoperable. The proprietary data formats created by each CIED manufacturer, as well as the multiple sources of data generated by CIEDs (hospital, office, remote monitoring, acute care setting), make it challenging to aggregate even a single patient's data into an EHR. The Heart Rhythm Society and CIED manufacturers have collaborated to develop and implement international standard-based specifications for interoperability that provide an end-to-end solution, enabling structured data to be communicated from CIED to a report generation system, EHR, research database, referring physician, registry, patient portal, and beyond. EHR and other health information technology vendors have been slow to implement these tools, in large part, because there have been no financial incentives for them to do so. It is incumbent upon us, as clinicians, to insist that the tools of interoperability be a prerequisite for the purchase of any and all health information technology systems.

  7. Empowering Nurses by Making Electronic Health Records Collaboratively Available

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    focused on the nurses’ use of a large shared EHR display during highly collaborative situations. An ethnographic analysis of emergent changes to the nurses’ work reveals (a) a change from oral presentation to collective reading of patient records, (b) initiation of collective investigations of patient...... records, and (c) that nurses’ observations became a prominent part of the shared agenda during interdisciplinary team conferences (attended by all clinicians). The presentation will present video excerpts and audio transcripts from the observations and demonstrate (1) the empowerment experienced...... by the nurses during the experiment, and (2) the implications with regard to design...

  8. Patient Perspectives on Gender Identity Data Collection in Electronic Health Records: An Analysis of Disclosure, Privacy, and Access to Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hale M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ruled that health organizations comply with additional requirements for electronic health records (EHRs), known as "Meaningful Use," and develop the capacity to collect gender identity data. Research has established effectiveness of a two-step gender identity question to collect these data. This study examines transgender patient perspectives on the use of a two-step question and experiences with privacy and sensitive disclosures in EHRs and healthcare settings. Methods: Four focus groups ( N =30) were conducted in Chicago, Illinois in 2014-2015. Participants were asked to compare two intake forms-one with a two-step question and one with a single question-and discuss experiences with gender identity disclosure, privacy, and access to care. Narratives were transcribed verbatim to identify patterns and themes; the extended case method was used and grounded the data analysis process in the concept of intersectionality. Results: Participants expressed appreciation for improved reliability and competencies that the two-part question may afford. Narratives reveal concerns related to patient privacy, safety, and access because of the contexts in which these data are collected and transmitted. Virtually all participants described situations whereby sensitive gender identity information had been involuntarily disclosed, misinterpreted, or abused, and safety and care were compromised. Conclusion: Participants recognized the potential of the two-part question as a measurement and competency tool, but anticipated new privacy violations and involuntary disclosures. Narratives indicate that effects of sensitive disclosures may vary intersectionally, whereby white participants experienced lesser harms than their immigrant, HIV-positive, and black trans feminine counterparts. Discrimination and privacy violations may occur regardless of a two-part or one-part gender identity question, but increasing these sensitive

  9. The impact of an electronic health record on nurse sensitive patient outcomes: an interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn W; Turley, Marianne; Garrido, Terhilda

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of electronic health record (EHR) implementation on nursing care processes and outcomes. Interrupted time series analysis, 2003-2009. A large US not-for-profit integrated health care organization. 29 hospitals in Northern and Southern California. An integrated EHR including computerized physician order entry, nursing documentation, risk assessment tools, and documentation tools. Percentage of patients with completed risk assessments for hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) and falls (process measures) and rates of HAPU and falls (outcome measures). EHR implementation was significantly associated with an increase in documentation rates for HAPU risk (coefficient 2.21, 95% CI 0.67 to 3.75); the increase for fall risk was not statistically significant (0.36; -3.58 to 4.30). EHR implementation was associated with a 13% decrease in HAPU rates (coefficient -0.76, 95% CI -1.37 to -0.16) but no decrease in fall rates (-0.091; -0.29 to 0.11). Irrespective of EHR implementation, HAPU rates decreased significantly over time (-0.16; -0.20 to -0.13), while fall rates did not (0.0052; -0.01 to 0.02). Hospital region was a significant predictor of variation for both HAPU (0.72; 0.30 to 1.14) and fall rates (0.57; 0.41 to 0.72). The introduction of an integrated EHR was associated with a reduction in the number of HAPUs but not in patient fall rates. Other factors, such as changes over time and hospital region, were also associated with variation in outcomes. The findings suggest that EHR impact on nursing care processes and outcomes is dependent on a number of factors that should be further explored.

  10. Using the Electronic Medical Record to Enhance Physician-Nurse Communication Regarding Patients' Discharge Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Molly; Gurka, David

    2015-01-01

    The fast-paced environment of hospitals contributes to communication failures between health care providers while impacting patient care and patient flow. An effective mechanism for sharing patients' discharge information with health care team members is required to improve patient throughput. The communication of a patient's discharge plan was identified as crucial in alleviating patient flow delays at a tertiary care, academic medical center. By identifying the patients who were expected to be discharged the following day, the health care team could initiate discharge preparations in advance to improve patient care and patient flow. The patients' electronic medical record served to convey dynamic information regarding the patients' discharge status to the health care team via conditional discharge orders. Two neurosciences units piloted a conditional discharge order initiative. Conditional discharge orders were designed in the electronic medical record so that the conditions for discharge were listed in a dropdown menu. The health care team was trained on the conditional discharge order protocol, including when to write them, how to find them in the patients' electronic medical record, and what actions should be prompted by these orders. On average, 24% of the patients discharged had conditional discharge orders written the day before discharge. The average discharge time for patients with conditional discharge orders decreased by 83 minutes (0.06 day) from baseline. Qualitatively, the health care team reported improved workflows with conditional orders. The conditional discharge orders allowed physicians to communicate pending discharges electronically to the multidisciplinary team. The initiative positively impacted patient discharge times and workflows.

  11. Perceptions of electronic health record implementation: a statewide survey of physicians in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Matthew C; Baier, Rosa R; Gardner, Rebekah L

    2014-10-01

    Although electronic health record use improves healthcare delivery, adoption into clinical practice is incomplete. We sought to identify the extent of adoption in Rhode Island and the characteristics of physicians and electronic health records associated with positive experience. We performed a cross-sectional study of data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Health for the Health Information Technology Survey 2009 to 2013. Survey questions included provider and practice demographics, health record information, and Likert-type scaled questions regarding how electronic health record use affected clinical practice. The survey response rate ranged from 50% to 65%, with 62% in 2013. Increasing numbers of physicians in Rhode Island use an electronic health record. In 2013, 81% of physicians used one, and adoption varied by clinical subspecialty. Most providers think that electronic health record use improves billing and quality improvement but has not improved job satisfaction. Physicians with longer and more sophisticated electronic health record use report positive effects of introduction on all aspects of practice examined (P electronic health record introduction (P electronic health record vendors most frequently used in Rhode Island, 5 were associated with improved job satisfaction. We report the largest statewide study of electronic health record adoption to date. We found increasing physician use in Rhode Island, and the extent of adoption varies by subspecialty. Although older physicians are less likely to be positive about electronic health record adoption, longer and more sophisticated use are associated with more positive opinions, suggesting acceptance will grow over time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid progress or lengthy process? electronic personal health records in mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Mike

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A major objective of many healthcare providers is to increase patients' participation in their own care. The introduction of electronic personal health records (ePHRs may help to achieve this. An ePHR is an electronic database of an individual's health information, accessible to and maintained by the patient. ePHRs are very much in vogue, with an increasing number of studies reporting their potential utility as well as cost. However, the vast majority of these studies focus on general healthcare. Little attempt has been made to document the specific problems which might occur throughout the implementation of ePHRs in mental health. This review identifies such concerns through an electronic search of the literature. Several potential difficulties are highlighted and addressed, including access to information technology, identifying relevant populations and the handling of sensitive information. Special attention is paid to the concept of 'empowerment' and what this means in relation to ePHRs.

  13. Hospital Electronic Health Record Adoption and Its Influence on Postoperative Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Naleef

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems could make healthcare delivery safer by providing benefits such as timely access to accurate and complete patient information, advances in diagnosis and coordination of care, and enhancements for monitoring patient vitals. This study explored the nature of EHR adoption in U.S. hospitals and their patient…

  14. The Role of Electronic Health Records in Structuring Nursing Handoff Communication and Maintaining Situation Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghenaimi, Said

    2012-01-01

    In healthcare institutions, work must continue 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. A team of nurses is needed to provide around-the-clock patient care, and this process requires transfer of patient care responsibilities, a process known as a "handoff." The present study explored the role of electronic health records in structuring handoff…

  15. Locating relevant patient information in electronic health record data using representations of clinical concepts and database structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuequn; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and clinical researchers often seek information in electronic health records (EHRs) that are relevant to some concept of interest, such as a disease or finding. The heterogeneous nature of EHRs can complicate retrieval, risking incomplete results. We frame this problem as the presence of two gaps: 1) a gap between clinical concepts and their representations in EHR data and 2) a gap between data representations and their locations within EHR data structures. We bridge these gaps with a knowledge structure that comprises relationships among clinical concepts (including concepts of interest and concepts that may be instantiated in EHR data) and relationships between clinical concepts and the database structures. We make use of available knowledge resources to develop a reproducible, scalable process for creating a knowledge base that can support automated query expansion from a clinical concept to all relevant EHR data.

  16. Development of electronic medical record charting for hospital-based transfusion and apheresis medicine services: Early adoption perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Levy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electronic medical records (EMRs provide universal access to health care information across multidisciplinary lines. In pathology departments, transfusion and apheresis medicine services (TAMS involved in direct patient care activities produce data and documentation that typically do not enter the EMR. Taking advantage of our institution′s initiative for implementation of a paperless medical record, our TAMS division set out to develop an electronic charting (e-charting strategy within the EMR. Methods: A focus group of our hospital′s transfusion committee consisting of transfusion medicine specialists, pathologists, residents, nurses, hemapheresis specialists, and information technologists was constituted and charged with the project. The group met periodically to implement e-charting TAMS workflow and produced electronic documents within the EMR (Cerner Millenium for various service line functions. Results: The interdisciplinary working group developed and implemented electronic versions of various paper-based clinical documentation used by these services. All electronic notes collectively gather and reside within a unique Transfusion Medicine Folder tab in the EMR, available to staff with access to patient charts. E-charting eliminated illegible handwritten notes, resulted in more consistent clinical documentation among staff, and provided greater real-time review/access of hemotherapy practices. No major impediments to workflow or inefficiencies have been encountered. However, minor updates and corrections to documents as well as select work re-designs were required for optimal use of e-charting by these services. Conclusion: Documentation of pathology subspecialty activities such as TAMS can be successfully incorporated into the EMR. E-charting by staff enhances communication and helps promote standardized documentation of patient care within and across service lines. Well-constructed electronic documents in the EMR may also

  17. Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS) is part of the Clinical Information Support System (CISS) portal framework and the initial CISS partner system. OHRS...

  18. Use of Electronic Health Records and Administrative Data for Public Health Surveillance of Eye Health and Vision-Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amanda; Davidson, Arthur; Lum, Flora; Chiang, Michael; Saaddine, Jinan B; Zhang, Xinzhi; Crews, John E.; Chou, Chiu-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To discuss the current trend toward greater use of electronic health records and how these records could enhance public health surveillance of eye health and vision-related conditions. Methods We describe three currently available sources of electronic health data (Kaiser Permanente, the Veterans Health Administration, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) and how these sources can contribute to a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system. Results Each of the three sources of electronic health data can contribute meaningfully to a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system, but none currently provide all the information required. The use of electronic health records for vision and eye health surveillance has both advantages and disadvantages. Conclusions Electronic health records may provide additional information needed to create a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system. Recommendations for incorporating electronic health records into such a system are presented. PMID:23158225

  19. A qualitative study of how patients with type 2 diabetes use an electronic stand-alone personal health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Kevin T; Abbott, Amy A; Galt, Kimberly A

    2015-04-01

    Patient use of personal health records (PHRs) to manage their health information has been proposed to enhance patient knowledge and empower patients to make changes in their self-care behaviors. However, there remains a gap in understanding about patients' actual PHR use behaviors. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how patients with type 2 diabetes used a PHR to manage their diabetes-related health information for self-care. Fifty-nine patients with type 2 diabetes were interviewed 3-6 months after receiving initial training on a free-of-charge, Web-based PHR. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an iterative process of in vivo coding, categorization, and theme development. Nine themes emerged, three of which expressed positive experiences: complete and accessible record; increased awareness; and behavioral changes. The remaining six themes expressed negative experiences: out of sight, out of mind; I would have used it if I were sicker; economic, infrastructure, and computer literacy barriers; lack of patient-provider engagement; double tracking; and privacy and security concerns. Despite some potential positive benefits resulting from PHR use, several barriers inhibited sustained and effective use over time. Provider and patient education about the benefits of PHR use and about the potential for filling in information gaps in the provider-based record is key to engage patients and stimulate PHR adoption and use.

  20. Using the Electronic Health Record in Nursing Research: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joanne G; McGrath, Robert J; Fetzer, Susan J; Mittal, Prashant; Bourgoine, Derek

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the patient record from the paper to the electronic health record format present challenges and opportunities for the nurse researcher. Current use of data from the electronic health record is in a state of flux. Novel data analytic techniques and massive data sets provide new opportunities for nursing science. Realization of a strong electronic data output future relies on meeting challenges of system use and operability, data presentation, and privacy. Nurse researchers need to rethink aspects of proposal development. Joining ongoing national efforts aimed at creating usable data output is encouraged as a means to affect system design. Working to address challenges and embrace opportunities will help grow the science in a way that answers important patient care questions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Electronic health record-based patient identification and individualized mailed outreach for primary cardiovascular disease prevention: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persell, Stephen D; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Friesema, Elisha M; Cooper, Andrew J; Baker, David W

    2013-04-01

    Many individuals at higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) do not receive recommended treatments. Prior interventions using personalized risk information to promote prevention did not test clinic-wide effectiveness. To perform a 9-month cluster-randomized trial, comparing a strategy of electronic health record-based identification of patients with increased CVD risk and individualized mailed outreach to usual care. Patients of participating physicians with a Framingham Risk Score of at least 5 %, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol level above guideline threshold for drug treatment, and not prescribed a lipid-lowering medication were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Patients of physicians randomized to the intervention group were mailed individualized CVD risk messages that described benefits of using a statin (and controlling hypertension or quitting smoking when relevant). The primary outcome was occurrence of a LDL-cholesterol level, repeated in routine practice, that was at least 30 mg/dl lower than prior. A secondary outcome was lipid-lowering drug prescribing. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01286311. Fourteen physicians with 218 patients were randomized to intervention, and 15 physicians with 217 patients to control. The mean patient age was 60.7 years and 77% were male. There was no difference in the primary outcome (11.0 % vs. 11.1 %, OR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.56-1.74, P = 0.96), but intervention group patients were twice as likely to receive a prescription for lipid-lowering medication (11.9 %, vs. 6.0 %, OR 2.13, 95 % CI 1.05-4.32, p = 0.038). In post hoc analysis with extended follow-up to 18 months, the primary outcome occurred more often in the intervention group (22.5 % vs. 16.1 %, OR 1.59, 95 % CI 1.05-2.41, P = 0.029). In this effectiveness trial, individualized mailed CVD risk messages increased the frequency of new lipid-lowering drug prescriptions, but we observed no difference in proportions lowering LDL

  2. Use of a Nationwide Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record by Healthcare Professionals and Patients: A Case Study with the French DMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroussi, Brigitte; Bouaud, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    If the wide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is necessary to address health information sharing and care coordination issues, it is not sufficient. In order to address health information sharing, some countries, among which, France, have implemented a centralized framework with "new" nationwide care records. The French DMP is a centralized, nationally shared, electronic medical record, created according to the opt-in model. More than five years after the launching of the DMP project, DMPs have been created for 1.5% of the target population, which demonstrates the poor adoption of the tool by healthcare professionals. Among the 583,997 existing DMPs in June 2016, 41% were empty, and 24% of non-empty DMPs were actually accessed. If these "active" DMPs were equally accessed by both healthcare professionals and patients, patients accessed DMP documents four times more than healthcare professionals.

  3. Abstracting ICU Nursing Care Quality Data From the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Jennifer B; Evans, Anna C; Sciulli, Andrea M; Barnato, Amber E; Sereika, Susan M; Happ, Mary Beth

    2017-09-01

    The electronic health record is a potentially rich source of data for clinical research in the intensive care unit setting. We describe the iterative, multi-step process used to develop and test a data abstraction tool, used for collection of nursing care quality indicators from the electronic health record, for a pragmatic trial. We computed Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) to assess interrater agreement or reliability of data abstracted using preliminary and finalized tools. In assessing the reliability of study data ( n = 1,440 cases) using the finalized tool, 108 randomly selected cases (10% of first half sample; 5% of last half sample) were independently abstracted by a second rater. We demonstrated mean κ values ranging from 0.61 to 0.99 for all indicators. Nursing care quality data can be accurately and reliably abstracted from the electronic health records of intensive care unit patients using a well-developed data collection tool and detailed training.

  4. Views on health information sharing and privacy from primary care practices using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Gihan; Holbrook, Anne; Thabane, Lehana; Foster, Gary; Willison, Donald J

    2011-02-01

    To determine how patients and physicians balance the perceived benefits and harms of sharing electronic health data for patient care and for secondary purposes. Before-after survey of patients and providers in practices using electronic medical records (EMRs) enrolled in a clinical trial in Ontario, Canada. Outcomes were measured using the Health Information Privacy Questionnaire (HIPQ) at baseline and end of study. Thirteen questions in 4 general domains investigated attitudes towards the privacy of EMRs, outsider's use of patient's health information, the sharing of patient's information within the health care system, and the overall perception of benefits versus harms of computerization in health care. 511 patients (mean age 60.3 years, 49.6% female) and 46 physicians (mean age 47.2 years, 37.0% female) participated. Most (>90%) supported the computerized sharing of the patient's health records among their health care professionals and to provide clinical advice. Fewer agreed that the patient's de-identified information should be shared outside of the health care circle (records can be keep more private than paper records (38-50%). Overall, a majority (58% patients, 70% physicians) believed that the benefits of computerization were greater than the risks of confidentiality loss. This was especially true for patients who were frequent computer users. While these primary care physicians and their patients valued the clinical features of EMRs, a substantial minority have concerns about the secondary use of de-identified information. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementation of the Agitated Behavior Scale in the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Helen John; Dasgupta, Kritis; Michael, Kathleen

    The purpose of the study was to implement an Agitated Behavior Scale through an electronic health record and to evaluate the usability of the scale in a brain injury unit at a rehabilitation hospital. A quality improvement project was conducted in the brain injury unit at a large rehabilitation hospital with registered nurses as participants using convenience sampling. The project consisted of three phases and included education, implementation of the scale in the electronic health record, and administration of the survey questionnaire, which utilized the system usability scale. The Agitated Behavior Scale was found to be usable, and there was 92.2% compliance with the use of the electronic Electronic Agitated Behavior Scale. The Agitated Behavior Scale was effectively implemented in the electronic health record and was found to be usable in the assessment of agitation. Utilization of the scale through the electronic health record on a daily basis will allow for an early identification of agitation in patients with traumatic brain injury and enable prompt interventions to manage agitation.

  6. Worldwide telemedicine services based on distributed multimedia electronic patient records by using the second generation Web server hyperwave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, G; Novotny, J; Burde, B; May, F; Beck, L E; Goldschmidt, A

    1999-01-01

    A distributed multimedia electronic patient record (EPR) is a central component of a medicine-telematics application that supports physicians working in rural areas of South America, and offers medical services to scientists in Antarctica. A Hyperwave server is used to maintain the patient record. As opposed to common web servers--and as a second generation web server--Hyperwave provides the capability of holding documents in a distributed web space without the problem of broken links. This enables physicians to browse through a patient's record by using a standard browser even if the patient's record is distributed over several servers. The patient record is basically implemented on the "Good European Health Record" (GEHR) architecture.

  7. Improving Service Coordination and Reducing Mental Health Disparities Through Adoption of Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Brian; Mack, Dominic; Wrenn, Glenda; Shim, Ruth S; Holden, Kisha; Satcher, David

    2015-09-01

    Despite widespread support for removing barriers to the use of electronic health records (EHRs) in behavioral health care, adoption of EHRs in behavioral health settings lags behind adoption in other areas of health care. The authors discuss barriers to use of EHRs among behavioral health care practitioners, suggest solutions to overcome these barriers, and describe the potential benefits of EHRs to reduce behavioral health care disparities. Thoughtful and comprehensive strategies will be needed to design EHR systems that address concerns about policy, practice, costs, and stigma and that protect patients' privacy and confidentiality. However, these goals must not detract from continuing to challenge the notion that behavioral health and general medical health should be treated as separate and distinct. Ultimately, utilization of EHRs among behavioral health care providers will improve the coordination of services and overall patient care, which is essential to reducing mental health disparities.

  8. Possibilities and Implications of Using the ICF and Other Vocabulary Standards in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeman, Daniel J; Richoz, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    There is now widespread recognition of the powerful potential of electronic health record (EHR) systems to improve the health-care delivery system. The benefits of EHRs grow even larger when the health data within their purview are seamlessly shared, aggregated and processed across different providers, settings and institutions. Yet, the plethora of idiosyncratic conventions for identifying the same clinical content in different information systems is a fundamental barrier to fully leveraging the potential of EHRs. Only by adopting vocabulary standards that provide the lingua franca across these local dialects can computers efficiently move, aggregate and use health data for decision support, outcomes management, quality reporting, research and many other purposes. In this regard, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) is an important standard for physiotherapists because it provides a framework and standard language for describing health and health-related states. However, physiotherapists and other health-care professionals capture a wide range of data such as patient histories, clinical findings, tests and measurements, procedures, and so on, for which other vocabulary standards such as Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes and Systematized Nomenclature Of Medicine Clinical Terms are crucial for interoperable communication between different electronic systems. In this paper, we describe how the ICF and other internationally accepted vocabulary standards could advance physiotherapy practise and research by enabling data sharing and reuse by EHRs. We highlight how these different vocabulary standards fit together within a comprehensive record system, and how EHRs can make use of them, with a particular focus on enhancing decision-making. By incorporating the ICF and other internationally accepted vocabulary standards into our clinical information systems, physiotherapists will be able to leverage the potent

  9. Terminological Shadows: a Framework to Integrate Electronic Health Records with Clinical Terminologies

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare processes across the world have migrated from an approach where healthcare is provided in generalist centres of care to one where the patient is referred between specialists who engage in shared care. The developers of recent Electronic Health Record (EHR) standards such as CEN EN13606 and HL7 version 3 aim to enable healthcare professionals in a shared care setting to deliver high quality health data and share patient health information. A key innovation of these standards is a p...

  10. Towards the Adoption of Open Source and Open Access Electronic Health Record Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Maglogiannis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As the Electronic Health Record (EHR systems constantly expand to support more clinical activities and their implementations in healthcare organizations become more widespread, several communities have been working intensively for several years to develop open access and open source EHR software, aiming at reducing the costs of EHR deployment and maintenance. In this paper, we describe and evaluate the most popular open source electronic medical records such as openEMR, openMRS and patientOS, providing their technical features and potentials. These systems are considered quite important due to their prevalence. The article presents the key features of each system and outlines the advantages and problems of Open Source Software (OSS Systems through a review of the literature, in order to demonstrate the possibility of their adoption in modern electronic healthcare systems. Also discussed are the future trends of OS EHRs in the context of the Personal Health Records and mobile computing paradigm.

  11. Nurses' Experiences of an Initial and Reimplemented Electronic Health Record Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Ping; Lee, Ting-Ting; Liu, Chia-Hui; Mills, Mary Etta

    2016-04-01

    The electronic health record is a key component of healthcare information systems. Currently, numerous hospitals have adopted electronic health records to replace paper-based records to document care processes and improve care quality. Integrating healthcare information system into traditional nursing daily operations requires time and effort for nurses to become familiarized with this new technology. In the stages of electronic health record implementation, smooth adoption can streamline clinical nursing activities. In order to explore the adoption process, a descriptive qualitative study design and focus group interviews were conducted 3 months after and 2 years after electronic health record system implementation (system aborted 1 year in between) in one hospital located in southern Taiwan. Content analysis was performed to analyze the interview data, and six main themes were derived, in the first stage: (1) liability, work stress, and anticipation for electronic health record; (2) slow network speed, user-unfriendly design for learning process; (3) insufficient information technology/organization support; on the second stage: (4) getting used to electronic health record and further system requirements, (5) benefits of electronic health record in time saving and documentation, (6) unrealistic information technology competence expectation and future use. It concluded that user-friendly design and support by informatics technology and manpower backup would facilitate this adoption process as well.

  12. Electronic Health Records: PHR Opportunities for Public Health – Part 2

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-10

    In this podcast, Dr. Ken Mandl discusses electronic health records and personally-controlled health records. Dr. Mandl leads the IndivoHealth personally-controlled health record project, the original reference model for the Microsoft, Google, and Dossia personal health records (PHRs or PCHRs). He has successfully used PHRs for immunization and influenza, leads efforts in real-time surveillance systems, and is currently adapting personal health records for longitudinal and genomic research. The lecture was given at CDC on June 19, 2009.  Created: 9/10/2009 by Coordinating Center for Health Information Service (CCHIS), Healthy Healthcare Settings Goal Team, Office of Strategy and Innovation.   Date Released: 6/3/2010.

  13. Electronic Health Records: PHR Opportunities for Public Health – Part 1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-10

    In this podcast, Dr. Ken Mandl discusses electronic health records and personally-controlled health records. Dr. Mandl leads the IndivoHealth personally-controlled health record project, the original reference model for the Microsoft, Google, and Dossia personal health records (PHRs or PCHRs). He has successfully used PHRs for immunization and influenza, leads efforts in real-time surveillance systems, and is currently adapting personal health records for longitudinal and genomic research. The lecture was given at CDC on June 19, 2009.  Created: 9/10/2009 by Coordinating Center for Health Information Service (CCHIS), Healthy Healthcare Settings Goal Team, Office of Strategy and Innovation.   Date Released: 6/3/2010.

  14. Behavioral Health Providers and Electronic Health Records: An Exploratory Beliefs Elicitation and Segmentation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is a public policy strategy to improve healthcare quality and reduce accelerating health care costs. Much research has focused on medical providers' perceptions of EHRs, but little is known about those of behavioral health providers. This research was informed by the theory of reasoned…

  15. Electronic Health Records: Overcoming Obstacles to Improve Acceptance and Utilization for Mental Health Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics and progress of the integration of the electronic health record (EHR) into health-care disciplines have been described and examined using theories related to technology adoption. Previous studies have examined health-care clinician resistance to the EHR in primary care, hospital, and urgent care medical settings, but few studies have…

  16. Electronic Health Record Impacts on Family Medicine Teachers: Survey of Third-Year Medical Student Clerkship Preceptors at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Elizabeth; Oser, Tamara K; Oser, Sean M

    2017-10-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) use in clinical practice has accelerated in recent years. While several aspects of EHR use have been extensively studied, there is little data on EHR impacts on medical student educators, especially those involved in outpatient family medicine. This study evaluated perceived impacts of EHR use on clinician teachers of outpatient family medicine. The study used a mixed methods survey of clinicians who teach third-year medical students during the required family and community medicine outpatient clerkship at a Mid-Atlantic medical school. Among 50 completed surveys, most respondents reported that the EHR had impacted their teaching (70% reported at least one negative effect; 84% reported at least one positive effect). Positive impacts included more easily viewing information, more effectively teaching evidence-based medicine, and teaching about EHR use itself. Negative impacts included less time teaching or interacting with students, and a perception that EHR use impedes development of students' critical thinking and clinical integration skills. Providers who have taught medical students both with and without EHR in place (>P=.024), those over 50 years old (>P=.019), and those with at least 5 years teaching experience (>P=.006) were more likely to report negative impacts. Most preceptors reported that EHR use had both positive and negative impacts on their teaching of medical students, though the negative effects were perceived by respondents as more substantial, consistent with a theme of decreased enthusiasm for teaching due to EHR use. These findings can be used to help inform faculty development and education initiatives.

  17. The development and deployment of electronic personal health records records: a strategic positioning perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark; Baxter, Ryan; Pouder, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of strategic position on the ability of an entrepreneurial firm to successfully develop and deploy electronic personal health records technology within the US healthcare industry. This study uses an in-depth longitudinal case study methodology. The study contributes by juxtaposing a longitudinal view of how the focal firm proposed and acted on different strategic positions in an attempt to achieve development and deployment success. In doing so, the study also elaborates on Porter's recognition that firms need to make trade-offs when choosing a strategic position, as the purposeful limitation of service offerings can protect against the degradation of existing value creating activities. The authors' study highlights the enormous challenge of facilitating the adoption and diffusion of technology enabled interventions in the US healthcare ecosystem. Future research that combines both interdisciplinary and multi-level investigation and analysis is sorely needed to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the phenomenon and to encourage the development and deployment of useful technology enabled interventions within the US healthcare industry. While the fragmented nature of the healthcare industry provides opportunities for entrepreneurial firms, such complexity within the ecosystem should not be underestimated as a reason for concern for small firms. Total economic burden due to chronic diseases and other healthcare-related expenses is massive for the USA. Consequently, prevention and early detection of future disease states has become a core component of the current healthcare reform debate. EPHRs are considered one core component of a broader healthcare strategy to improve health outcomes and lower costs. By deepening our understanding of how best to develop and deploy such interventions, society will surely benefit. The longitudinal nature of the authors' study provides a unique opportunity to understand the

  18. 32 CFR 701.21 - Electronic record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electronic record. 701.21 Section 701.21... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.21 Electronic record. Records (including e-mail) which are created, stored, and retrieved by electronic means. ...

  19. Permanent record. Electronic records aid in the aftermath of Joplin tornado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    When a tornado struck St. John's Regional Medical Center in May 2011, its patient records were stored in a newly launched electronic health record system, helping prevent a bad situation from being worse.

  20. Julius – a template based supplementary electronic health record system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Gunnar O

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EHR systems are widely used in hospitals and primary care centres but it is usually difficult to share information and to collect patient data for clinical research. This is partly due to the different proprietary information models and inconsistent data quality. Our objective was to provide a more flexible solution enabling the clinicians to define which data to be recorded and shared for both routine documentation and clinical studies. The data should be possible to reuse through a common set of variable definitions providing a consistent nomenclature and validation of data. Another objective was that the templates used for the data entry and presentation should be possible to use in combination with the existing EHR systems. Methods We have designed and developed a template based system (called Julius that was integrated with existing EHR systems. The system is driven by the medical domain knowledge defined by clinicians in the form of templates and variable definitions stored in a common data repository. The system architecture consists of three layers. The presentation layer is purely web-based, which facilitates integration with existing EHR products. The domain layer consists of the template design system, a variable/clinical concept definition system, the transformation and validation logic all implemented in Java. The data source layer utilizes an object relational mapping tool and a relational database. Results The Julius system has been implemented, tested and deployed to three health care units in Stockholm, Sweden. The initial responses from the pilot users were positive. The template system facilitates patient data collection in many ways. The experience of using the template system suggests that enabling the clinicians to be in control of the system, is a good way to add supplementary functionality to the present EHR systems. Conclusion The approach of the template system in combination with various local EHR

  1. The need for academic electronic health record systems in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joohyun; Cho, Insook

    2017-07-01

    The nursing profession has been slow to incorporate information technology into formal nurse education and practice. The aim of this study was to identify the use of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education and to determine student and faculty perceptions of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education. A quantitative research design with supportive qualitative research was used to gather information on nursing students' perceptions and nursing faculty's perceptions of academic electronic health record systems in nurse education. Eighty-three participants (21 nursing faculty and 62 students), from 5 nursing schools, participated in the study. A purposive sample of 9 nursing faculty was recruited from one university in the Midwestern United States to provide qualitative data for the study. The researcher-designed surveys (completed by faculty and students) were used for quantitative data collection. Qualitative data was taken from interviews, which were transcribed verbatim for analysis. Students and faculty agreed that academic electronic health record systems could be useful for teaching students to think critically about nursing documentation. Quantitative and qualitative findings revealed that academic electronic health record systems regarding nursing documentation could help prepare students for the future of health information technology. Meaningful adoption of academic electronic health record systems will help in building the undergraduate nursing students' competence in nursing documentation with electronic health record systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Beneficial Effects of Two Types of Personal Health Record Services Connected With Electronic Medical Records Within the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisan; Kim, James G Boram; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Kiwhan; Kim, Byungjun; Kim, Sukwha; Kim, Jeongeun

    2017-11-01

    Healthcare consumers must be able to make decisions based on accurate health information. To assist with this, we designed and developed an integrated system connected with electronic medical records in hospitals to ensure delivery of accurate health information. The system-called the Consumer-centered Open Personal Health Record platform-is composed of two services: a portal for users with any disease and a mobile application for users with cleft lip/palate. To assess the benefits of these services, we used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, assigning participants to the portal (n = 50) and application (n = 52) groups. Both groups showed significantly increased knowledge, both objective (actual knowledge of health information) and subjective (perceived knowledge of health information), after the intervention. Furthermore, while both groups showed higher information needs satisfaction after the intervention, the application group was significantly more satisfied. Knowledge changes were more affected by participant characteristics in the application group. Our results may be due to the application's provision of specific disease information and a personalized treatment plan based on the participant and other users' data. We recommend that services connected with electronic medical records target specific diseases to provide personalized health management to patients in a hospital setting.

  3. Using Electronic Patient Records to Discover Disease Correlations and Stratify Patient Cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roque, Francisco S.; Jensen, Peter B.; Schmock, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracting...... phenotype information from the free-text in such records we demonstrate that we can extend the information contained in the structured record data, and use it for producing fine-grained patient stratification and disease co-occurrence statistics. The approach uses a dictionary based on the International...

  4. [Electronic versus paper-based patient records: a cost-benefit analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, A S; Priglinger, S; Ehrt, O

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the costs and benefits of electronic, paperless patient records with the conventional paper-based charts. Costs and benefits of planned electronic patient records are calculated for a University eye hospital with 140 beds. Benefit is determined by direct costs saved by electronic records. In the example shown, the additional benefits of electronic patient records, as far as they can be quantified total 192,000 DM per year. The costs of the necessary investments are 234,000 DM per year when using a linear depreciation over 4 years. In total, there are additional annual costs for electronic patient records of 42,000 DM. Different scenarios were analyzed. By increasing the time of depreciation to 6 years, the cost deficit reduces to only approximately 9,000 DM. Increased wages reduce the deficit further while the deficit increases with a loss of functions of the electronic patient record. However, several benefits of electronic records regarding research, teaching, quality control and better data access cannot be easily quantified and would greatly increase the benefit to cost ratio. Only part of the advantages of electronic patient records can easily be quantified in terms of directly saved costs. The small cost deficit calculated in this example is overcompensated by several benefits, which can only be enumerated qualitatively due to problems in quantification.

  5. The Challenges of Electronic Health Records and Diabetes Electronic Prescribing: Implications for Safety Net Care for Diverse Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Ratanawongsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Widespread electronic health record (EHR implementation creates new challenges in the diabetes care of complex and diverse populations, including safe medication prescribing for patients with limited health literacy and limited English proficiency. This review highlights how the EHR electronic prescribing transformation has affected diabetes care for vulnerable patients and offers recommendations for improving patient safety through EHR electronic prescribing design, implementation, policy, and research. Specifically, we present evidence for (1 the adoption of RxNorm; (2 standardized naming and picklist options for high alert medications such as insulin; (3 the widespread implementation of universal medication schedule and language-concordant labels, with the expansion of electronic prescription 140-character limit; (4 enhanced bidirectional communication with pharmacy partners; and (5 informatics and implementation research in safety net healthcare systems to examine how EHR tools and practices affect diverse vulnerable populations.

  6. An Enterprise Architecture Perspective to Electronic Health Record Based Care Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoc, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an Enterprise Architecture viewpoint of Electronic Health Record (EHR) based care governance. The improvements expected are derived from the collaboration framework and the clinical health model proposed as foundation for the concept of EHR.

  7. Attitudes of nursing staff towards electronic patient records: a questionnaire survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Francke, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of health care organizations are implementing a system of electronic patient records (EPR). This implies a change in work routines for nursing staff, but it could also be regarded as an opportunity to improve the quality of care. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is

  8. 22 CFR 503.9 - Electronic records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Electronic records. 503.9 Section 503.9 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REGULATION § 503.9 Electronic records... electronic format. Documentation not previously subject to the FOIA when maintained in a non-electronic...

  9. Workarounds Emerging From Electronic Health Record System Usage: Consequences for Patient Safety, Effectiveness of Care, and Efficiency of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blijleven, Vincent; Koelemeijer, Kitty; Wetzels, Marijntje; Jaspers, Monique

    2017-10-05

    Health care providers resort to informal temporary practices known as workarounds for handling exceptions to normal workflow unintendedly imposed by electronic health record systems (EHRs). Although workarounds may seem favorable at first sight, they are generally suboptimal and may jeopardize patient safety, effectiveness of care, and efficiency of care. Research into the scope and impact of EHR workarounds on patient care processes is scarce. This paper provides insight into the effects of EHR workarounds on organizational workflows and outcomes of care services by identifying EHR workarounds and determining their rationales, scope, and impact on health care providers' workflows, patient safety, effectiveness of care, and efficiency of care. Knowing the rationale of a workaround provides valuable clues about the source of origin of each workaround and how each workaround could most effectively be resolved. Knowing the scope and impact a workaround has on EHR-related safety, effectiveness, and efficiency provides insight into how to address related concerns. Direct observations and follow-up semistructured interviews with 31 physicians, 13 nurses, and 3 clerks and qualitative bottom-up coding techniques was used to identify, analyze, and classify EHR workarounds. The research was conducted within 3 specialties and settings at a large university hospital. Rationales were associated with work system components (persons, technology and tools, tasks, organization, and physical environment) of the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) framework to reveal their source of origin as well as to determine the scope and the impact of each EHR workaround from a structure-process-outcome perspective. A total of 15 rationales for EHR workarounds were identified of which 5 were associated with persons, 4 with technology and tools, 4 with the organization, and 2 with the tasks. Three of these 15 rationales for EHR workarounds have not been identified in prior

  10. Attitudes toward inter-hospital electronic patient record exchange: discrepancies among physicians, medical record staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Ho, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Jen-De; Chai, Sinkuo; Tai, Chih-Jaan; Chen, Yung-Fu

    2015-07-12

    In this era of ubiquitous information, patient record exchange among hospitals still has technological and individual barriers including resistance to information sharing. Most research on user attitudes has been limited to one type of user or aspect. Because few analyses of attitudes toward electronic patient records (EPRs) have been conducted, understanding the attitudes among different users in multiple aspects is crucial to user acceptance. This proof-of-concept study investigated the attitudes of users toward the inter-hospital EPR exchange system implemented nationwide and focused on discrepant behavioral intentions among three user groups. The system was designed by combining a Health Level 7-based protocol, object-relational mapping, and other medical informatics techniques to ensure interoperability in realizing patient-centered practices. After implementation, three user-specific questionnaires for physicians, medical record staff, and patients were administered, with a 70 % response rate. The instrument showed favorable convergent construct validity and internal consistency reliability. Two dependent variables were applied: the attitudes toward privacy and support. Independent variables comprised personal characteristics, work characteristics, human aspects, and technology aspects. Major statistical methods included exploratory factor analysis and general linear model. The results from 379 respondents indicated that the patients highly agreed with privacy protection by their consent and support for EPRs, whereas the physicians remained conservative toward both. Medical record staff was ranked in the middle among the three groups. The three user groups demonstrated discrepant intentions toward privacy protection and support. Experience of computer use, level of concerns, usefulness of functions, and specifically, reason to use electronic medical records and number of outpatient visits were significantly associated with the perceptions. Overall, four

  11. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Healthcare Professional's Beliefs and Attitudes toward Face to Face Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickles, Kenneth Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The impact of electronic health records on healthcare professional's beliefs and attitudes toward face to face communication during patient and provider interactions was examined. Quantitative survey research assessed user attitudes towards an electronic health record system and revealed that healthcare professionals from a wide range of…

  12. Protection of electronic health records (EHRs) in cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulatif, Abdulatif; Khalil, Ibrahim; Mai, Vu

    2013-01-01

    EHR technology has come into widespread use and has attracted attention in healthcare institutions as well as in research. Cloud services are used to build efficient EHR systems and obtain the greatest benefits of EHR implementation. Many issues relating to building an ideal EHR system in the cloud, especially the tradeoff between flexibility and security, have recently surfaced. The privacy of patient records in cloud platforms is still a point of contention. In this research, we are going to improve the management of access control by restricting participants' access through the use of distinct encrypted parameters for each participant in the cloud-based database. Also, we implement and improve an existing secure index search algorithm to enhance the efficiency of information control and flow through a cloud-based EHR system. At the final stage, we contribute to the design of reliable, flexible and secure access control, enabling quick access to EHR information.

  13. Childrens Hospital Integrated Patient Electronic Record System Continuation (CHIPERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric  ICU  with  severe  sepsis/shock...traumatic  brain  injury  and  pulmonary  embolus   and  in  both  adult  and   pediatric  patients.  CDS  can  be  a...record,   pediatric  critical  care,  neonatal  intensive  care,  severe  sepsis,  septic  shock   16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  14. Electronic health records (EHRs): supporting ASCO's vision of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter; Artz, David; Warner, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    ASCO's vision for cancer care in 2030 is built on the expanding importance of panomics and big data, and envisions enabling better health for patients with cancer by the rapid transformation of systems biology knowledge into cancer care advances. This vision will be heavily dependent on the use of health information technology for computational biology and clinical decision support systems (CDSS). Computational biology will allow us to construct models of cancer biology that encompass the complexity of cancer panomics data and provide us with better understanding of the mechanisms governing cancer behavior. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality promotes CDSS based on clinical practice guidelines, which are knowledge bases that grow too slowly to match the rate of panomic-derived knowledge. CDSS that are based on systems biology models will be more easily adaptable to rapid advancements and translational medicine. We describe the characteristics of health data representation, a model for representing molecular data that supports data extraction and use for panomic-based clinical research, and argue for CDSS that are based on systems biology and are algorithm-based.

  15. Machine Learning Methods to Extract Documentation of Breast Cancer Symptoms From Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Alexander W; Barzilay, Regina; Hughes, Kevin S; Lui, Dickson; Lorenz, Karl A; Enzinger, Andrea; Tulsky, James A; Lindvall, Charlotta

    2018-02-27

    Clinicians document cancer patients' symptoms in free-text format within electronic health record visit notes. Although symptoms are critically important to quality of life and often herald clinical status changes, computational methods to assess the trajectory of symptoms over time are woefully underdeveloped. To create machine learning algorithms capable of extracting patient-reported symptoms from free-text electronic health record notes. The data set included 103,564 sentences obtained from the electronic clinical notes of 2695 breast cancer patients receiving paclitaxel-containing chemotherapy at two academic cancer centers between May 1996 and May 2015. We manually annotated 10,000 sentences and trained a conditional random field model to predict words indicating an active symptom (positive label), absence of a symptom (negative label), or no symptom at all (neutral label). Sentences labeled by human coder were divided into training, validation, and test data sets. Final model performance was determined on 20% test data unused in model development or tuning. The final model achieved precision of 0.82, 0.86, and 0.99 and recall of 0.56, 0.69, and 1.00 for positive, negative, and neutral symptom labels, respectively. The most common positive symptoms were pain, fatigue, and nausea. Machine-based labeling of 103,564 sentences took two minutes. We demonstrate the potential of machine learning to gather, track, and analyze symptoms experienced by cancer patients during chemotherapy. Although our initial model requires further optimization to improve the performance, further model building may yield machine learning methods suitable to be deployed in routine clinical care, quality improvement, and research applications. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and implementation of a 'Mental Health Finder' software tool within an electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, D; Hannigan, A; Higgins, S; McDonnell, R; Meagher, D; Cullen, W

    2017-02-01

    In Ireland, as in many other healthcare systems, mental health service provision is being reconfigured with a move toward more care in the community, and particularly primary care. Recording and surveillance systems for mental health information and activities in primary care are needed for service planning and quality improvement. We describe the development and initial implementation of a software tool ('mental health finder') within a widely used primary care electronic medical record system (EMR) in Ireland to enable large-scale data collection on the epidemiology and management of mental health and substance use problems among patients attending general practice. In collaboration with the Irish Primary Care Research Network (IPCRN), we developed the 'Mental Health Finder' as a software plug-in to a commonly used primary care EMR system to facilitate data collection on mental health diagnoses and pharmacological treatments among patients. The finder searches for and identifies patients based on diagnostic coding and/or prescribed medicines. It was initially implemented among a convenience sample of six GP practices. Prevalence of mental health and substance use problems across the six practices, as identified by the finder, was 9.4% (range 6.9-12.7%). 61.9% of identified patients were female; 25.8% were private patients. One-third (33.4%) of identified patients were prescribed more than one class of psychotropic medication. Of the patients identified by the finder, 89.9% were identifiable via prescribing data, 23.7% via diagnostic coding. The finder is a feasible and promising methodology for large-scale data collection on mental health problems in primary care.

  17. An efficacy trial of an electronic health record-based strategy to inform patients on safe medication use: The role of written and spoken communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Laura M; Mullen, Rebecca J; Russell, Allison; Fata, Aimee; Bailey, Stacy C; Makoul, Gregory; Wolf, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    We tested the feasibility and efficacy of an electronic health record (EHR) strategy that automated the delivery of print medication information at the time of prescribing. Patients (N=141) receiving a new prescription at one internal medicine clinic were recruited into a 2-arm physician-randomized study. We leveraged an EHR platform to automatically deliver 1-page educational 'MedSheets' to patients after medical encounters. We also assessed if physicians counseled patients via patient self-report immediately following visits. Patients' understanding was objectively measured via phone interview. 122 patients completed the trial. Most intervention patients (70%) reported receiving MedSheets. Patients reported physicians frequently counseled on indication and directions for use, but less often for risks. In multivariable analysis, written information (OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.10-7.04) and physician counseling (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.26-6.91) were independently associated with patient understanding of risk information. Receiving both was most beneficial; 87% of those receiving counseling and MedSheets correctly recalled medication risks compared to 40% receiving neither. An EHR can be a reliable means to deliver tangible, print medication education to patients, but cannot replace the salience of physician-patient communication. Offering both written and spoken modalities produced a synergistic effect for informing patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Experiences of Healthcare Professionals to the Introduction in Sweden of a Public eHealth Service: Patients' Online Access to their Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ålander, Ture; Scandurra, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Patients' increasing demands for medical information, the digitization of health records and the fast spread of Internet access form a basis of introducing new eHealth services. An international trend is to provide access for patients to health information of various kind. In Sweden, access by patients to their proper electronic health record (EHR) has been provided in a pilot county since November 2012. This eHealth service is controversial and criticism has arised from the clinical professions, mainly physicians. Two web surveys were conducted to discover whether the opinions of healthcare professionals differ; between staff that have had experience with patients accessing their own EHR and those who have no such expericence. Experienced nurses found the EHR more important for the patients and a better reform, compared to unexperienced nurses in the rest of the country. Similarly, physicians with their own experience had a more positive attitude compared to non-experienced physicians. The conclusion of this study is that healthcare professionals must be involved in the implementation of public eHealth services such as EHRs and that real experiences of the professionals should be better disseminated to their inexperienced peers.

  19. Privacy, confidentiality, and electronic medical records.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrows, R C; Clayton, P D

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced availability of health information in an electronic format is strategic for industry-wide efforts to improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care, yet it brings a concomitant concern of greater risk for loss of privacy among health care participants. The authors review the conflicting goals of accessibility and security for electronic medical records and discuss nontechnical and technical aspects that constitute a reasonable security solution. It is argued that with gui...

  20. Distribution of Problems, Medications and Lab Results in Electronic Health Records: The Pareto Principle at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many natural phenomena demonstrate power-law distributions, where very common items predominate. Problems, medications and lab results represent some of the most important data elements in medicine, but their overall distribution has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: Our objective is to determine whether problems, medications and lab results demonstrate a power law distribution. METHODS: Retrospective review of electronic medical record data for 100,000 randomly selected patients seen at least twice in 2006 and 2007 at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and its affiliated medical practices. RESULTS: All three data types exhibited a power law distribution. The 12.5% most frequently used problems account for 80% of all patient problems, the top 11.8% of medications account for 80% of all medication orders and the top 4.5% of lab result types account for all lab results. CONCLUSION: These three data elements exhibited power law distributions with a small number of common items representing a substantial proportion of all orders and observations, which has implications for electronic health record design.

  1. Advancing cognitive engineering methods to support user interface design for electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyvalikakath, Thankam P; Dziabiak, Michael P; Johnson, Raymond; Torres-Urquidy, Miguel Humberto; Acharya, Amit; Yabes, Jonathan; Schleyer, Titus K

    2014-04-01

    Despite many decades of research on the effective development of clinical systems in medicine, the adoption of health information technology to improve patient care continues to be slow, especially in ambulatory settings. This applies to dentistry as well, a primary care discipline with approximately 137,000 practitioners in the United States. A critical reason for slow adoption is the poor usability of clinical systems, which makes it difficult for providers to navigate through the information and obtain an integrated view of patient data. In this study, we documented the cognitive processes and information management strategies used by dentists during a typical patient examination. The results will inform the design of a novel electronic dental record interface. We conducted a cognitive task analysis (CTA) study to observe ten general dentists (five general dentists and five general dental faculty members, each with more than two years of clinical experience) examining three simulated patient cases using a think-aloud protocol. Dentists first reviewed the patient's demographics, chief complaint, medical history and dental history to determine the general status of the patient. Subsequently, they proceeded to examine the patient's intraoral status using radiographs, intraoral images, hard tissue and periodontal tissue information. The results also identified dentists' patterns of navigation through patient's information and additional information needs during a typical clinician-patient encounter. This study reinforced the significance of applying cognitive engineering methods to inform the design of a clinical system. Second, applying CTA to a scenario closely simulating an actual patient encounter helped with capturing participants' knowledge states and decision-making when diagnosing and treating a patient. The resultant knowledge of dentists' patterns of information retrieval and review will significantly contribute to designing flexible and task

  2. Mining Electronic Health Records Data: Domestic Violence and Adverse Health Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakurt, Gunnur; Patel, Vishal; Whiting, Kathleen; Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) often culminates in acute physical injury, sexual assault, and mental health issues. It is crucial to understand the healthcare habits of victims to develop interventions that can drastically improve a victim's quality of life and prevent future abuse. The objective of this study is to mine de-identified and aggregated Electronic Health Record data to identify women's health issues that are potentially associated with IPV. In this study we compared health issues of female domestic abuse victims to female non-domestic abuse victims. The Domestic abuse population contained 5870 patients, while the Non-Domestic Abuse population contained 14,315,140 patients. Explorys provides National Big Data from the entire USA. Statistical analysis identified 2429 terms as significantly more prevalent among victims of domestic abuse, compared to the general population. These terms were classified into broad categories, including acute injury, chronic conditions, substance abuse, mental health, disorders, gynecological and pregnancy related problems.

  3. Evaluating the adoption of an Electronic Patient Medicine module in health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Andersen, Povl Erik Rostgård

    , and care of patients. One of the modules of the EHR system is the Electronic Patient Medicine (EPM) module which is considered an important means for reducing medical errors. In the literature, focus is primarily on those medical errors that are reduced when introducing EPM modules, whereas there is scarce......Introduction: In recent years, there has been an increased demand to exploit the possibilities of Information Technology (IT) in health care. In many hospitals, focus is on Electronic Health care Records (EHRs) which are depicted as central technologies in supporting the examination, treatment...

  4. Point-of-care cluster randomized trial in stroke secondary prevention using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; van Staa, Tjeerd P; McDermott, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Ashworth, Mark; Charlton, Judith; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony; Yardley, Lucy; Gulliford, Martin C; Trial Steering Committee

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the remote introduction of electronic decision support tools into family practices improves risk factor control after first stroke. This study also aimed to develop methods to implement cluster randomized trials in stroke using electronic health records. Family practices were recruited from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and allocated to intervention and control trial arms by minimization. Remotely installed, electronic decision support tools promoted intensified secondary prevention for 12 months with last measure of systolic blood pressure as the primary outcome. Outcome data from electronic health records were analyzed using marginal models. There were 106 Clinical Practice Research Datalink family practices allocated (intervention, 53; control, 53), with 11 391 (control, 5516; intervention, 5875) participants with acute stroke ever diagnosed. Participants at trial practices had similar characteristics as 47,887 patients with stroke at nontrial practices. During the intervention period, blood pressure values were recorded in the electronic health records for 90% and cholesterol values for 84% of participants. After intervention, the latest mean systolic blood pressure was 131.7 (SD, 16.8) mm Hg in the control trial arm and 131.4 (16.7) mm Hg in the intervention trial arm, and adjusted mean difference was -0.56 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -1.38 to 0.26; P=0.183). The financial cost of the trial was approximately US $22 per participant, or US $2400 per family practice allocated. Large pragmatic intervention studies may be implemented at low cost by using electronic health records. The intervention used in this trial was not found to be effective, and further research is needed to develop more effective intervention strategies. http://www.controlled-trials.com. Current Controlled Trials identifier: ISRCTN35701810. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Electronic health records and patient safety: co-occurrence of early EHR implementation with patient safety practices in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, C; Gans, D; White, J; Nath, R; Pohl, J

    2015-01-01

    The role of electronic health records (EHR) in enhancing patient safety, while substantiated in many studies, is still debated. This paper examines early EHR adopters in primary care to understand the extent to which EHR implementation is associated with the workflows, policies and practices that promote patient safety, as compared to practices with paper records. Early adoption is defined as those who were using EHR prior to implementation of the Meaningful Use program. We utilized the Physician Practice Patient Safety Assessment (PPPSA) to compare primary care practices with fully implemented EHR to those utilizing paper records. The PPPSA measures the extent of adoption of patient safety practices in the domains: medication management, handoffs and transition, personnel qualifications and competencies, practice management and culture, and patient communication. Data from 209 primary care practices responding between 2006-2010 were included in the analysis: 117 practices used paper medical records and 92 used an EHR. Results showed that, within all domains, EHR settings showed significantly higher rates of having workflows, policies and practices that promote patient safety than paper record settings. While these results were expected in the area of medication management, EHR use was also associated with adoption of patient safety practices in areas in which the researchers had no a priori expectations of association. Sociotechnical models of EHR use point to complex interactions between technology and other aspects of the environment related to human resources, workflow, policy, culture, among others. This study identifies that among primary care practices in the national PPPSA database, having an EHR was strongly empirically associated with the workflow, policy, communication and cultural practices recommended for safe patient care in ambulatory settings.

  6. Management of laboratory data and information exchange in the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Myra L; Henricks, Walter H; Castellani, William J; Whitsitt, Mark S; Sinard, John H

    2015-03-01

    In the era of the electronic health record, the success of laboratories and pathologists will depend on effective presentation and management of laboratory information, including test orders and results, and effective exchange of data between the laboratory information system and the electronic health record. In this third paper of a series that explores empowerment of pathology in the era of the electronic health record, we review key elements of managing laboratory information within the electronic health record and examine functional issues pertinent to pathologists and laboratories in the exchange of laboratory information between electronic health records and both anatomic and clinical pathology laboratory information systems. Issues with electronic order-entry and results-reporting interfaces are described, and considerations for setting up these interfaces are detailed in tables. The role of the laboratory medical director as mandated by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 and the impacts of discordance between laboratory results and their display in the electronic health record are also discussed.

  7. Electronic records management in the public health sector of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngulup

    cally related administrative decision-making and problem-solving. This implies that records ... ment for proper future accountability and also to meet legal, financial and administrative re- quirements. This implies ..... several challenges such as system offline and lack of system usage skills as stated by 100% respondents and ...

  8. Radiology Reporting System Data Exchange With the Electronic Health Record System: A Case Study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Bashiri, Azadeh

    2015-03-18

    In order to better designing of electronic health record system in Iran, integration of health information systems based on a common language must be done to interpret and exchange this information with this system is required. This study provides a conceptual model of radiology reporting system using unified modeling language. The proposed model can solve the problem of integration this information system with the electronic health record system. By using this model and design its service based, easily connect to electronic health record in Iran and facilitate transfer radiology report data. This is a cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2013. The study population was 22 experts that working at the Imaging Center in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran and the sample was accorded with the community. Research tool was a questionnaire that prepared by the researcher to determine the information requirements. Content validity and test-retest method was used to measure validity and reliability of questioner respectively. Data analyzed with average index, using SPSS. Also Visual Paradigm software was used to design a conceptual model. Based on the requirements assessment of experts and related texts, administrative, demographic and clinical data and radiological examination results and if the anesthesia procedure performed, anesthesia data suggested as minimum data set for radiology report and based it class diagram designed. Also by identifying radiology reporting system process, use case was drawn. According to the application of radiology reports in electronic health record system for diagnosing and managing of clinical problem of the patient, with providing the conceptual Model for radiology reporting system; in order to systematically design it, the problem of data sharing between these systems and electronic health records system would eliminate.

  9. Electronic Health Records Data and Metadata: Challenges for Big Data in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Lauren E; Moulaison, Heather Lea

    2013-12-01

    This article, written by researchers studying metadata and standards, represents a fresh perspective on the challenges of electronic health records (EHRs) and serves as a primer for big data researchers new to health-related issues. Primarily, we argue for the importance of the systematic adoption of standards in EHR data and metadata as a way of promoting big data research and benefiting patients. EHRs have the potential to include a vast amount of longitudinal health data, and metadata provides the formal structures to govern that data. In the United States, electronic medical records (EMRs) are part of the larger EHR. EHR data is submitted by a variety of clinical data providers and potentially by the patients themselves. Because data input practices are not necessarily standardized, and because of the multiplicity of current standards, basic interoperability in EHRs is hindered. Some of the issues with EHR interoperability stem from the complexities of the data they include, which can be both structured and unstructured. A number of controlled vocabularies are available to data providers. The continuity of care document standard will provide interoperability in the United States between the EMR and the larger EHR, potentially making data input by providers directly available to other providers. The data involved is nonetheless messy. In particular, the use of competing vocabularies such as the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms, MEDCIN, and locally created vocabularies inhibits large-scale interoperability for structured portions of the records, and unstructured portions, although potentially not machine readable, remain essential. Once EMRs for patients are brought together as EHRs, the EHRs must be managed and stored. Adequate documentation should be created and maintained to assure the secure and accurate use of EHR data. There are currently a few notable international standards initiatives for EHRs. Organizations such as Health Level Seven

  10. Use and Characteristics of Electronic Health Record Systems among Office-Based Physician Practices: United States, ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Technical Information Service NCHS Use and Characteristics of Electronic Health Record Systems Among Office-based ... physicians that collects information on physician and practice characteristics, including the adoption and use of EHR systems. ...

  11. Technical Limitations of Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers: Implications on Ambulatory Care Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Christopher E.

    2010-01-01

    Research objectives: This dissertation examines the state of development of each of the eight core electronic health record (EHR) functionalities as described by the IOM and describes how the current state of these functionalities limit quality improvement efforts in ambulatory care settings. There is a great deal of literature describing both the…

  12. The use of electronic patient records for medical research: conflicts and contradictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Fiona

    2015-03-29

    The use of electronic patient records for medical research is extremely topical. The Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CRPD), the English NHS observational data and interventional research service, was launched in April 2012. The CPRD has access to, and facilities to link, many healthcare related datasets. The CPRD is partially based on learning from the Health Research Support Service (HRSS), which was used to test the technical and practical aspects of downloading and linking electronic patient records for research. Questions around the feasibility and acceptability of implementing and integrating the processes necessary to enable electronic patient records to be used for the purposes of research remain. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with a total of 50 patients and 7 staff from the two English GP practices involved in piloting the HRSS, supplemented with 11 interviews with key stakeholders. Emergent themes were mapped on to the constructs of normalization process theory (NPT) to consider the ways in which sense was made of the work of implementing and integrating the HRSS. The NPT analysis demonstrated a lack of commitment to, and engagement with, the HRSS on the part of patients, whilst the commitment of doctors and practice staff was to some extent mitigated by concerns about issues of governance and consent, particularly in relation to downloading electronic patient records with associated identifiers. Although the CPRD is presented as a benign, bureaucratic process, perceptions by patients and staff of inherent contradictions with centrally held values of information governance and consent in downloading and linking electronic patient records for research remains a barrier to implementation. It is likely that conclusions reached about the problems of balancing the contradictions inherent in sharing what can be perceived as a private resource for the public good are globally transferrable.

  13. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  14. Security of electronic mental health communication and record-keeping in the digital age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhai, Jon D; Frueh, B Christopher

    2016-02-01

    The mental health field has seen a trend in recent years of the increased use of information technology, including mobile phones, tablets, and laptop computers, to facilitate clinical treatment delivery to individual patients and for record keeping. However, little attention has been paid to ensuring that electronic communication with patients is private and secure. This is despite potentially deleterious consequences of a data breach, which are reported in the news media very frequently in modern times. In this article, we present typical security concerns associated with using technology in clinical services or research. We also discuss enhancing the privacy and security of electronic communication with clinical patients and research participants. We offer practical, easy-to-use software application solutions for clinicians and researchers to secure patient communication and records. We discuss such issues as using encrypted wireless networks, secure e-mail, encrypted messaging and videoconferencing, privacy on social networks, and others. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  15. A taxonomy for contextual information in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Charlene R; Staggers, Nancy; Doing-Harris, Kristina; Dunlea, Robert; McCormick, Teresa; Barrus, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    Contextual information is functional, social and financial information about patients and is central to many health-care decisions, including end-of-life care, living arrangements, and the aggressiveness of treatment. It is the language of patients when talking about their health and frequently the focus of nursing interventions. In this study, we report the results of a qualitative analysis of interviews of 17 clinicians focusing on their use of contextual information during the process of care, decision-making and documentation. We identified seven characteristics of contextual information relevant to its use in a clinical setting. Implications for Natural Language Processing and Ontology construction are discussed.

  16. Attitude Towards Health Information Privacy and Electronic Health Records Among Urban Sri Lankan Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissera, Shaluni R; Silva, S N

    2016-01-01

    Sri Lanka is planning to move towards an Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. This research argues that the public preparedness should be considered in order to implement a functioning and an effective EHR system in a country. When asked about how concerned the participants were about the security of their health records, 40.5% stated they were concerned and 38.8% were very concerned. They were asked to rate the 'level of trust' they have on health institutes in Sri Lanka on a scale from 1 to 10 (1 lowest level of trust and 10 highest), 66.1% rated at level 5 or less.

  17. Blockchain Technology: A new secured Electronic Health Record System

    OpenAIRE

    Tamazirt , Lotfi; Alilat , Farid; Agoulmine , Nazim

    2018-01-01

    International audience; Nowadays, health systems are looking for effective ways to manage more patients in a shorter time, and to increase the quality of care through better coordination to provide quick, accurate and non-invasive diagnostics to patients. This paper aims to solve the dependence on trusted third parties by proposing a new management strategy, storage and security in a decentralized network through Blockchain technology. The proposed system also aims to offer a solution to help...

  18. Accuracy of Laboratory Data Communication on ICU Daily Rounds Using an Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artis, Kathryn A; Dyer, Edward; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A

    2017-02-01

    Accurately communicating patient data during daily ICU rounds is critically important since data provide the basis for clinical decision making. Despite its importance, high fidelity data communication during interprofessional ICU rounds is assumed, yet unproven. We created a robust but simple methodology to measure the prevalence of inaccurately communicated (misrepresented) data and to characterize data communication failures by type. We also assessed how commonly the rounding team detected data misrepresentation and whether data communication was impacted by environmental, human, and workflow factors. Direct observation of verbalized laboratory data during daily ICU rounds compared with data within the electronic health record and on presenters' paper prerounding notes. Twenty-six-bed academic medical ICU with a well-established electronic health record. ICU rounds presenter (medical student or resident physician), interprofessional rounding team. None. During 301 observed patient presentations including 4,945 audited laboratory results, presenters used a paper prerounding tool for 94.3% of presentations but tools contained only 78% of available electronic health record laboratory data. Ninty-six percent of patient presentations included at least one laboratory misrepresentation (mean, 6.3 per patient) and 38.9% of all audited laboratory data were inaccurately communicated. Most misrepresentation events were omissions. Only 7.8% of all laboratory misrepresentations were detected. Despite a structured interprofessional rounding script and a well-established electronic health record, clinician laboratory data retrieval and communication during ICU rounds at our institution was poor, prone to omissions and inaccuracies, yet largely unrecognized by the rounding team. This highlights an important patient safety issue that is likely widely prevalent, yet underrecognized.

  19. Using electronic patient records to discover disease correlations and stratify patient cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco S Roque

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracting phenotype information from the free-text in such records we demonstrate that we can extend the information contained in the structured record data, and use it for producing fine-grained patient stratification and disease co-occurrence statistics. The approach uses a dictionary based on the International Classification of Disease ontology and is therefore in principle language independent. As a use case we show how records from a Danish psychiatric hospital lead to the identification of disease correlations, which subsequently can be mapped to systems biology frameworks.

  20. [ELGA--the electronic health record in the light of data protection and data security].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströher, Alexander; Honekamp, Wilfried

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of an electronic health record (ELGA) is a subject discussed for a long time in Austria. Another big step toward ELGA is made at the end of 2010 on the pilot project e-medication in three model regions; other projects should follow. In addition, projects of the ELGA structure are sped up on the part of the ELGA GmbH to install the base of a functioning electronic health record. Unfortunately, many of these initiatives take place, so to speak, secretly, so that in the consciousness of the general public - and that includes not only patients but also physicians and other healthcare providers - always concerns about protection and security of such a storage of health data arouse. In this article the bases of the planned act are discussed taking into account the data protection and data security.

  1. Implementation of an Electronic Medical Records System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fletcher, Chadwick B

    2008-01-01

    .... Substantial benefits are realized through routine use of electronic medical records include improved quality, safety, and efficiency, along with the increased ability to conduct education and research...

  2. The provision and impact of online patient access to their electronic health records (EHR) and transactional services on the quality and safety of health care: systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Freda; Ellis, Beverley; de Lusignan, Simon; Sheikh, Aziz; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Cavill, Mary; Michalakidis, Georgios; Barker, Fiona; Majeed, Azeem; Quinn, Tom; Koczan, Phil; Avanitis, Theo; Gronlund, Toto Anne; Franco, Christina; McCarthy, Mary; Renton, Zoë; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Jones, Simon; Rafi, Imran

    2012-01-01

    Innovators have piloted improvements in communication, changed patterns of practice and patient empowerment from online access to electronic health records (EHR). International studies of online services, such as prescription ordering, online appointment booking and secure communications with primary care, show good uptake of email consultations, accessing test results and booking appointments; when technologies and business process are in place. Online access and transactional services are due to be rolled out across England by 2015; this review seeks to explore the impact of online access to health records and other online services on the quality and safety of primary health care. To assess the factors that may affect the provision of online patient access to their EHR and transactional services, and the impact of such access on the quality and safety of health care. Two reviewers independently searched 11 international databases during the period 1999-2012. A range of papers including descriptive studies using qualitative or quantitative methods, hypothesis-testing studies and systematic reviews were included. A detailed eligibility criterion will be used to shape study inclusion. A team of experts will review these papers for eligibility, extract data using a customised extraction form and use the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) instrument to determine the quality of the evidence and the strengths of any recommendation. Data will then be descriptively summarised and thematically synthesised. Where feasible, we will perform a quantitative meta-analysis. Prospero (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews) registration number: crd42012003091.

  3. The organization of information in electronic patient record under the perspective of usability recommendations: proposition of organization of information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Tissa Kawakami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the various areas of studies, health information is highlighted in this study. More specifically, the patient's electronic medical records and issues related to it’s informational organization and usability. Objectives: suggest Usability recommendations applicable to the Electronic Patient Record. More specifically, identify, according to the specialized literature, recommendations of Usability, as well as to develop a checklist with recommendations of Usability for the Electronic Patient Record. Methodology: the study’s basic purpose is the theoretical nature. The deductive method of documental delimitation was chosen. Results: elaboration of checklist with recommendations of Usability for Electronic Patient Records. Conclusion: Usability recommendations can be used to improve electronic patient records. However, it should be noted that knowledge in the scope of Information Science should be considered and summed up, since a great deal of content related to Usability refers to operational and visual aspects of the interface, not clearly or directly contemplating the issues related to information.

  4. Electronic Health Records in the Cloud: Improving Primary Health Care Delivery in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Liezel; Wright, Graham

    2017-01-01

    In South Africa, the recording of health data is done manually in a paper-based file, while attempts to digitize healthcare records have had limited success. In many countries, Electronic Health Records (EHRs) has developed in silos, with little or no integration between different operational systems. Literature has provided evidence that the cloud can be used to 'leapfrog' some of these implementation issues, but the adoption of this technology in the public health care sector has been very limited. This paper aims to identify the major reasons why the cloud has not been used to implement EHRs for the South African public health care system, and to provide recommendations of how to overcome these challenges. From the literature, it is clear that there are technology, environmental and organisational challenges affecting the implementation of EHRs in the cloud. Four recommendations are provided that can be used by the National Department of Health to implement EHRs making use of the cloud.

  5. Using Technology to Improve Cancer Care: Social Media, Wearables, and Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Michael J; Chung, Arlene E; Accordino, Melissa K

    2016-01-01

    Digital engagement has become pervasive in the delivery of cancer care. Internet- and cellular phone-based tools and systems are allowing large groups of people to engage with each other and share information. Health systems and individual health professionals are adapting to this revolution in consumer and patient behavior by developing ways to incorporate the benefits of technology for the purpose of improving the quality of medical care. One example is the use of social media platforms by oncologists to foster interaction with each other and to participate with the lay public in dialogue about science, medicine, and cancer care. In addition, consumer devices and sensors (wearables) have provided a new, growing dimension of digital engagement and another layer of patient-generated health data to foster better care and research. Finally, electronic health records have become the new standard for oncology care delivery, bringing new opportunities to measure quality in real time and follow practice patterns, as well as new challenges as providers and patients seek ways to integrate this technology along with other forms of digital engagement to produce more satisfaction in the process of care along with measurably better outcomes.

  6. Electronic health record training in undergraduate medical education: bridging theory to practice with curricula for empowering patient- and relationship-centered care in the computerized setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Hedy S; George, Paul; Reis, Shmuel P; Taylor, Julie Scott

    2014-03-01

    While electronic health record (EHR) use is becoming state-of-the-art, deliberate teaching of health care information technology (HCIT) competencies is not keeping pace with burgeoning use. Medical students require training to become skilled users of HCIT, but formal pedagogy within undergraduate medical education (UME) is sparse. How can medical educators best meet the needs of learners while integrating EHRs into medical education and practice? How can they help learners preserve and foster effective communication skills within the computerized setting? In general, how can UME curricula be devised for skilled use of EHRs to enhance rather than hinder provision of effective, humanistic health care?Within this Perspective, the authors build on recent publications that "set the stage" for next steps: EHR curricula innovation and implementation as concrete embodiments of theoretical underpinnings. They elaborate on previous calls for maximizing benefits and minimizing risks of EHR use with sufficient focus on physician-patient communication skills and for developing core competencies within medical education. The authors describe bridging theory into practice with systematic longitudinal curriculum development for EHR training in UME at their institution, informed by Kern and colleagues' curriculum development framework, narrative medicine, and reflective practice. They consider this innovation within a broader perspective-the overarching goal of empowering undergraduate medical students' patient- and relationship-centered skills while effectively demonstrating HCIT-related skills.

  7. Optimizing the electronic health record to standardize administration and documentation of nutritional supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citty, Sandra W; Kamel, Amir; Garvan, Cynthia; Marlowe, Lee; Westhoff, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition in hospitalized patients is a major cause for hospital re-admission, pressure ulcers and increased hospital costs. Methods to improve the administration and documentation of nutritional supplements for hospitalized patients are needed to improve patient care, outcomes and resource utilization. Staff at a medium-sized academic health science center hospital in the southeastern United States noted that nutritional supplements ordered for patients at high risk for malnutrition were not offered or administered to patients in a standardized manner and/or not documented clearly in the electronic health record as per prescription. This paper reports on a process improvement project that redesigned the ordering, administration and documentation process of oral nutritional supplements in the electronic health record. By adding nutritional products to the medication order sets and adding an electronic nutrition administration record (ENAR) tab, the multidisciplinary team sought to standardize nutritional supplement ordering, documentation and administration at prescribed intervals. This process improvement project used a triangulated approach to evaluating pre- and post-process change including: medical record reviews, patient interviews, and nutrition formula room log reports. Staff education and training was carried out prior to initiation of the system changes. This process change resulted in an average decrease in the return of unused nutritional formula from 76% returned at baseline to 54% post-process change. The process change resulted in 100% of nutritional supplement orders having documentation about nutritional medication administration and/or reason for non-administration. Documentation in the ENAR showed that 41% of ONS orders were given and 59% were not given. Significantly more patients reported being offered the ONS product (p=0.0001) after process redesign and more patients (5% before ENAR and 86% after ENAR reported being offered the correct

  8. Positive effects of electronic patient records on three clinical activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    records prior to the trial period. The data comprise measurements from 11 team conferences, 7 ward rounds, and 10 nursing handovers. Results: During team conferences the clinicians experienced a reduction on five of six subscales of mental workload, and the physicians experienced an overall reduction...... in mental workload. The physician in charge also experienced increased clarity about the importance of and responsibilities for work tasks, and reduced mental workload during ward rounds. During nursing handovers the nurses experienced fewer missing pieces of information and fewer messages to pass on after...

  9. Measuring up: Implementing a dental quality measure in the electronic health record context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Aarti; Ramoni, Rachel; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Neumann, Ana; Hebballi, Nutan B; White, Joel M; McClellan, Lyle; Walji, Muhammad F

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement requires using quality measures that can be implemented in a valid manner. Using guidelines set forth by the Meaningful Use portion of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, the authors assessed the feasibility and performance of an automated electronic Meaningful Use dental clinical quality measure to determine the percentage of children who received fluoride varnish. The authors defined how to implement the automated measure queries in a dental electronic health record. Within records identified through automated query, the authors manually reviewed a subsample to assess the performance of the query. The automated query results revealed that 71.0% of patients had fluoride varnish compared with the manual chart review results that indicated 77.6% of patients had fluoride varnish. The automated quality measure performance results indicated 90.5% sensitivity, 90.8% specificity, 96.9% positive predictive value, and 75.2% negative predictive value. The authors' findings support the feasibility of using automated dental quality measure queries in the context of sufficient structured data. Information noted only in free text rather than in structured data would require using natural language processing approaches to effectively query electronic health records. To participate in self-directed quality improvement, dental clinicians must embrace the accountability era. Commitment to quality will require enhanced documentation to support near-term automated calculation of quality measures. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Healthcare technology innovation adoption electronic health records and other emerging health information technology innovations

    CERN Document Server

    Daim, Tugrul U; Basoglu, Nuri; Kök, Orhun M; Hogaboam, Liliya

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to study the factors affecting the adoption and diffusion of Health Information Technology (HIT) innovation. It analyzes the adoption processes of various tools and applications, particularly Electronic Health Records (EHR), highlighting the impact on various sectors of the healthcare system, such as physicians, administration,  and patient care, while also identifying the various pitfalls and gaps in the literature. With the various challenges currently facing the United States healthcare system, the study, adoption and diffusion of healthcare technology innovation, particularly HIT, is imperative to achieving national goals. This book is organized into three sections. Section one reviews theories and applications for the diffusion of Health Care Technologies. Section two evaluates EHR technology, including the barriers and enables in adoption and alternative technologies. Finally, section three examines the factors impacting the adoption of EHR systems. This book will be a key source for stu...

  11. Towards the Application of Open Source Software in Developing National Electronic Health Record-Narrative Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminpour, Farzaneh; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Ahmadi, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a repository of patient health information shared among multiple authorized users. As a modern method of storing and processing health information, it is a solution for improving quality, safety and efficiency of patient care and health system. However, establishment of EHR requires a significant investment of time and money. While many of healthcare providers have very limited capital, application of open source software would be considered as a solution in developing national electronic health record especially in countries with low income. The evidence showed that financial limitation is one of the obstacles to implement electronic health records in developing countries. Therefore, establishment of an open source EHR system capable of modifications according to the national requirements seems to be inevitable in Iran. The present study identifies the impact of application of open source software in developing national electronic health record in Iran.

  12. A global travelers' electronic health record template standard for personal health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chuan; Detmer, Don E; Shabbir, Syed-Abdul; Nguyen, Phung Anh; Jian, Wen-Shan; Mihalas, George I; Shortliffe, Edward H; Tang, Paul; Haux, Reinhold; Kimura, Michio

    2012-01-01

    Tourism as well as international business travel creates health risks for individuals and populations both in host societies and home countries. One strategy to reduce health-related risks to travelers is to provide travelers and relevant caregivers timely, ongoing access to their own health information. Many websites offer health advice for travelers. For example, the WHO and US Department of State offer up-to-date health information about countries relevant to travel. However, little has been done to assure travelers that their medical information is available at the right place and time when the need might arise. Applications of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) utilizing mobile phones for health management are promising tools both for the delivery of healthcare services and the promotion of personal health. This paper describes the project developed by international informaticians under the umbrella of the International Medical Informatics Association. A template capable of becoming an international standard is proposed. This application is available free to anyone who is interested. Furthermore, its source code is made open.

  13. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses.

  14. Montreal Accord on Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROs) use series - Paper 8: patient-reported outcomes in electronic health records can inform clinical and policy decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sara; Ware, Patrick; Gardner, William; Witter, James; Bingham, Clifton O; Kairy, Dahlia; Bartlett, Susan J

    2017-09-01

    Given that the goal of health care systems is to improve and maintain the health of the populations they serve, the indicators of performance must include outcomes that are meaningful to patients. The growth of health technologies provides an unprecedented opportunity to integrate the patient voice into clinical care by linking electronic health records (EHRs) to patient-reported outcome (PRO) data collection. However, PRO data must be relevant, meaningful, and actionable for those who will have to invest the time and effort to collect it. In this study, we highlight opportunities to integrate PRO data collection into EHRs. We consider how stakeholder perspectives should influence the selection of PROs and ways to enhance engagement in and commitment to PRO implementation. We propose a research and policy agenda to address unanswered questions and facilitate the widespread adoption of PRO data collection into EHRs. Building a learning health care system that gathers PRO data in ways that can inform individual patient care, quality improvement, and comparative effectiveness research has the potential to accelerate the application of new evidence and knowledge to patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Integrating phenotypic data from electronic patient records with molecular level systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracti...... Classification of Disease ontology and is therefore in principle language independent. As a use case we show how records from a Danish psychiatric hospital lead to the identification of disease correlations, which subsequently are mapped to systems biology frameworks....

  16. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Ambulatory Costs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Our nation is in the midst of an unprecedented investment in IT to support healthcare delivery. The centerpiece of the 2009 Health Information Technology for...

  17. Knowledge and attitudes of nurses in community health centres about electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don O'Mahony

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in primary healthcare record data for the monitoring and evaluation of diseases and services. Information and communications technology (ICT can improve quality in healthcare by providing quality medical records. However, worldwide, the majority of health ICT projects have failed. Individual user acceptance is a crucial factor in successful ICT implementation. Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding ICT so as to inform the future implementation of electronic medical record (EMR systems. Methods: A qualitative design was used. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with nurses at three community health centres (CHCs in the King Sabata Dalyindyebo Local Municipality. The interview guide was informed by the literature on user acceptance of ICT. Interviews were recorded and analysed using content analysis. Results: Many nurses knew about health ICT and articulated clearly the potential benefits of an EMR such as fewer errors, more complete records, easier reporting and access to information. They thought that an EMR system would solve the challenges they identified with the current paper-based record system, including duplication of data, misfiling, lack of a chronological patient record, excessive time in recording and reduced time for patient care. For personal ICT needs, approximately half used cellphone Internet-based services and computers. Conclusions: In this study, nurses identified many challenges with the current recording methods. They thought that an EMR should be installed at CHCs. Their knowledge about EMR, positive attitudes to ICT and personal use of ICT devices increase the likelihood of successful EMR implementation at CHCs.

  18. Knowledge and attitudes of nurses in community health centres about electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don O’Mahony

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in primary healthcare record data for the monitoring and evaluation of diseases and services. Information and communications technology (ICT can improve quality in healthcare by providing quality medical records. However, worldwide, the majority of health ICT projects have failed. Individual user acceptance is a crucial factor in successful ICT implementation. Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding ICT so as to inform the future implementation of electronic medical record (EMR systems. Methods: A qualitative design was used. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with nurses at three community health centres (CHCs in the King Sabata Dalyindyebo Local Municipality. The interview guide was informed by the literature on user acceptance of ICT. Interviews were recorded and analysed using content analysis. Results: Many nurses knew about health ICT and articulated clearly the potential benefits of an EMR such as fewer errors, more complete records, easier reporting and access to information. They thought that an EMR system would solve the challenges they identified with the current paper-based record system, including duplication of data, misfiling, lack of a chronological patient record, excessive time in recording and reduced time for patient care. For personal ICT needs, approximately half used cellphone Internet-based services and computers. Conclusions: In this study, nurses identified many challenges with the current recording methods. They thought that an EMR should be installed at CHCs. Their knowledge about EMR, positive attitudes to ICT and personal use of ICT devices increase the likelihood of successful EMR implementation at CHCs.

  19. Progress along developmental tracks for electronic health records implementation in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollar David W

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and implementation of electronic health records (EHR have occurred slowly in the United States. To date, these approaches have, for the most part, followed four developmental tracks: (a Enhancement of immunization registries and linkage with other health records to produce Child Health Profiles (CHP, (b Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO demonstration projects to link together patient medical records, (c Insurance company projects linked to ICD-9 codes and patient records for cost-benefit assessments, and (d Consortia of EHR developers collaborating to model systems requirements and standards for data linkage. Until recently, these separate efforts have been conducted in the very silos that they had intended to eliminate, and there is still considerable debate concerning health professionals access to as well as commitment to using EHR if these systems are provided. This paper will describe these four developmental tracks, patient rights and the legal environment for EHR, international comparisons, and future projections for EHR expansion across health networks in the United States.

  20. Privacy, security, and the public health researcher in the era of electronic health record research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Neal D; Sarwate, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Health data derived from electronic health records are increasingly utilized in large-scale population health analyses. Going hand in hand with this increase in data is an increasing number of data breaches. Ensuring privacy and security of these data is a shared responsibility between the public health researcher, collaborators, and their institutions. In this article, we review the requirements of data privacy and security and discuss epidemiologic implications of emerging technologies from the computer science community that can be used for health data. In order to ensure that our needs as researchers are captured in these technologies, we must engage in the dialogue surrounding the development of these tools.

  1. The adolescence of electronic health records: Status and perspectives for large scale implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Drauschke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Health informatics started to evolve decades ago with the intention to support healthcare using computers. Since then Electronic health records (EHRs and personal health records (PHRs have become available but widespread adoption was limited by lack of interoperability and security issues. This paper discusses the feasibility of interoperable standards based EHRs and PHRs drawing on experience from implementation projects. It outlines challenges and goals in education and implementation for the next years.

  2. A knowledge-based taxonomy of critical factors for adopting electronic health record systems by physicians: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Víctor H; Martínez-García, Ana I; Pulido, J R G

    2010-10-15

    -based systems, to assist the adoption process of electronic health records in an automatic fashion. From our review, six critical adoption factors have been identified: user attitude towards information systems, workflow impact, interoperability, technical support, communication among users, and expert support. The main limitation of the taxonomy is the different impact of the adoption factors of electronic health records reported by some studies depending on the type of practice, setting, or attention level; however, these features are a determinant aspect with regard to the adoption rate for the latter rather than the presence of a specific critical adoption factor. The critical adoption factors established here provide a sound theoretical basis for research to understand, support, and facilitate the adoption of electronic health records to physicians in benefit of patients.

  3. A knowledge-based taxonomy of critical factors for adopting electronic health record systems by physicians: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-García Ana I

    2010-10-01

    framework for supporting the design of knowledge-based systems, to assist the adoption process of electronic health records in an automatic fashion. From our review, six critical adoption factors have been identified: user attitude towards information systems, workflow impact, interoperability, technical support, communication among users, and expert support. The main limitation of the taxonomy is the different impact of the adoption factors of electronic health records reported by some studies depending on the type of practice, setting, or attention level; however, these features are a determinant aspect with regard to the adoption rate for the latter rather than the presence of a specific critical adoption factor. Conclusions The critical adoption factors established here provide a sound theoretical basis for research to understand, support, and facilitate the adoption of electronic health records to physicians in benefit of patients.

  4. Electronic Versus Manual Data Processing: Evaluating the Use of Electronic Health Records in Out-of-Hospital Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgard, Craig D.; Zive, Dana; Jui, Jonathan; Weathers, Cody; Daya, Mohamud

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To compare case ascertainment, agreement, validity, and missing values for clinical research data obtained, processed, and linked electronically from electronic health records (EHR), compared to “manual” data processing and record abstraction in a cohort of out-ofhospital trauma patients. Methods This was a secondary analysis of two sets of data collected for a prospective, population-based, out-of-hospital trauma cohort evaluated by 10 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies transporting to 16 hospitals, from January 1, 2006 through October 2, 2007. Eighteen clinical, operational, procedural, and outcome variables were collected and processed separately and independently using two parallel data processing strategies, by personnel blinded to patients in the other group. The electronic approach included electronic health record data exports from EMS agencies, reformatting and probabilistic linkage to outcomes from local trauma registries and state discharge databases. The manual data processing approach included chart matching, data abstraction, and data entry by a trained abstractor. Descriptive statistics, measures of agreement, and validity were used to compare the two approaches to data processing. Results During the 21-month period, 418 patients underwent both data processing methods and formed the primary cohort. Agreement was good to excellent (kappa 0.76 to 0.97; intraclass correlation coefficient 0.49 to 0.97), with exact agreement in 67% to 99% of cases, and a median difference of zero for all continuous and ordinal variables. The proportions of missing out-of-hospital values were similar between the two approaches, although electronic processing generated more missing outcomes (87 out of 418, 21%, 95% CI = 17% to 25%) than the manual approach (11 out of 418, 3%, 95% CI = 1% to 5%). Case ascertainment of eligible injured patients was greater using electronic methods (n = 3,008) compared to manual methods (n = 629). Conclusions In this

  5. Evaluation of a Pilot Asthma Care Program for Electronic Communication between School Health and a Healthcare System's Electronic Medical Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Kelly W; Taylor, Yhenneko; Tapp, Hazel; Ludden, Thomas; Shade, Lindsay E; Burton, Beth; Courtlandt, Cheryl; Dulin, Michael

    2016-10-19

    Asthma is a common childhood chronic lung disease affecting greater than 10% of children in the United States. School nurses are in a unique position to close gaps in care. Indeed, effective asthma management is more likely to result when providers, family, and schools work together to optimize the patient's treatment plan. Currently, effective communication between schools and healthcare systems through electronic medical record (EMR) systems remains a challenge. The goal of this feasibility pilot was to link the school-based care team with primary care providers in the healthcare system network via electronic communication through the EMR, on behalf of pediatric asthma patients who had been hospitalized for an asthma exacerbation. The implementation process and the potential impact of the communication with providers on the reoccurrence of asthma exacerbations with the linked patients were evaluated. By engaging stakeholders from the school system and the healthcare system, we were able to collaboratively design a communication process and implement a pilot which demonstrated the feasibility of electronic communication between school nurses and primary care providers. Outcomes data was collected from the electronic medical record to examine the frequency of asthma exacerbations among patients with a message from their school nurse. The percent of exacerbations in the 12 months before and after electronic communication was compared using McNemar's test. The pilot system successfully established communication between the school nurse and primary care provider for 33 students who had been hospitalized for asthma and a decrease in hospital admissions was observed with students whose school nurse communicated through the EMR with the primary care provider. Findings suggest a collaborative model of care that is enhanced through electronic communication via the EMR could positively impact the health of children with asthma or other chronic illnesses.

  6. Smart Card Based Integrated Electronic Health Record System For Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    N. Anju Latha; B. Rama Murthy; U. Sunitha

    2012-01-01

    Smart cards are used in information technologies as portable integrated devices with data storage and data processing capabilities. As in other fields, smart card use in health systems became popular due to their increased capacity and performance. Smart cards are used as a Electronic Health Record (EHR) Their efficient use with easy and fast data access facilities leads to implementation particularly widespread in hospitals. In this paper, a smart card based Integrated Electronic health Reco...

  7. The Effect of Electronic Health Record Use and Patient-Centered Communication on Cancer Screening Behavior: An Analysis of the Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzkay, Daniel; Silk, Kami J; Sheff, Sarah E

    2017-07-01

    The present study used the 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey (N = 3185) to examine the effects of patient-centered communication (PCC) and the use of electronic health records (EHRs) on the likelihood of patients receiving a recommended screening for cancer (i.e., mammogram, PSA test). Self-determination theory, a framework of self-initiated extrinsic behaviors, was applied to test mediation models of PCC and EHR use, respectively, through patient activation. The results demonstrated that PCC and EHR use predicted cancer screening (mediated through patient activation), but only for women recommended for biannual mammograms. The aforementioned relationship was not found for men who are recommended for prostate cancer screening. PCC and EHRs do appear to facilitate a patient's ability to take care of their own health, but only under certain circumstances. It was additionally found that men were more likely to report higher degrees of physician PCC when their physicians maintained an EHR, whereas women reported no difference. Future research should examine more nuanced personality factors that affect the perception of PCC in the presence of EHRs and the relationship between men's activation and likelihood of receiving a cancer screen.

  8. Understanding Productivity and Technostress for Oncology Nurses Using an Electronic Health Record (EHR) to Increase Safety, Quality, and Effectiveness of Care for Patients with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Elizabeth M. Wertz

    2013-01-01

    Health information technology has become more prevalent in hospitals, physician offices, clinics, and other areas of medical treatment, especially since the federal government passed legislation to offer incentive payments for the meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs). Previous research demonstrated a decrease in medical errors as…

  9. Implementing an Open Source Electronic Health Record System in Kenyan Health Care Facilities: Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muinga, Naomi; Magare, Steve; Monda, Jonathan; Kamau, Onesmus; Houston, Stuart; Fraser, Hamish; Powell, John; English, Mike; Paton, Chris

    2018-04-18

    The Kenyan government, working with international partners and local organizations, has developed an eHealth strategy, specified standards, and guidelines for electronic health record adoption in public hospitals and implemented two major health information technology projects: District Health Information Software Version 2, for collating national health care indicators and a rollout of the KenyaEMR and International Quality Care Health Management Information Systems, for managing 600 HIV clinics across the country. Following these projects, a modified version of the Open Medical Record System electronic health record was specified and developed to fulfill the clinical and administrative requirements of health care facilities operated by devolved counties in Kenya and to automate the process of collating health care indicators and entering them into the District Health Information Software Version 2 system. We aimed to present a descriptive case study of the implementation of an open source electronic health record system in public health care facilities in Kenya. We conducted a landscape review of existing literature concerning eHealth policies and electronic health record development in Kenya. Following initial discussions with the Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization, and implementing partners, we conducted a series of visits to implementing sites to conduct semistructured individual interviews and group discussions with stakeholders to produce a historical case study of the implementation. This case study describes how consultants based in Kenya, working with developers in India and project stakeholders, implemented the new system into several public hospitals in a county in rural Kenya. The implementation process included upgrading the hospital information technology infrastructure, training users, and attempting to garner administrative and clinical buy-in for adoption of the system. The initial deployment was ultimately scaled back due to a

  10. Adoption of Electronic Personal Health Records in Canada: Perceptions of Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre Gagnon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare stakeholders have a great interest in the adoption and use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs because of the potential benefits associated with them. Little is known, however, about the level of adoption of ePHRs in Canada and there is limited evidence concerning their benefits and implications for the healthcare system. This study aimed to describe the current situation of ePHRs in Canada and explore stakeholder perceptions regarding barriers and facilitators to their adoption. Methods: Using a qualitative descriptive study design, we conducted semi-structured phone interviews between October 2013 and February 2014 with 35 individuals from seven Canadian provinces. The participants represented six stakeholder groups (patients, ePHR administrators, healthcare professionals, organizations interested in health technology development, government agencies, and researchers. A detailed summary of each interview was created and thematic analysis was conducted. Results: We observed that there was no consensual definition of ePHR in Canada. Factors that could influence ePHR adoption were related to knowledge (confusion with other electronic medical records [EMRs] and lack of awareness, system design (usability and relevance, user capacities and attitudes (patient health literacy, education and interest, support for professionals, environmental factors (government commitment, targeted populations and legal and ethical issues (information control and custody, confidentiality, privacy and security. Conclusion: ePHRs are slowly entering the Canadian healthcare landscape but provinces do not seem wellprepared for the implementation of this type of record. Guidance is needed on critical issues regarding ePHRs, such as ePHR definition, data ownership, access to information and interoperability with other electronic health records (EHRs. Better guidance on these issues would provide a greater awareness of ePHRs and inform

  11. Adoption of Electronic Personal Health Records in Canada: Perceptions of Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Breton, Erik; Fortin, Jean-Paul; Khoury, Lara; Dolovich, Lisa; Price, David; Wiljer, David; Bartlett, Gillian; Archer, Norman

    2016-04-06

    Healthcare stakeholders have a great interest in the adoption and use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) because of the potential benefits associated with them. Little is known, however, about the level of adoption of ePHRs in Canada and there is limited evidence concerning their benefits and implications for the healthcare system. This study aimed to describe the current situation of ePHRs in Canada and explore stakeholder perceptions regarding barriers and facilitators to their adoption. Using a qualitative descriptive study design, we conducted semi-structured phone interviews between October 2013 and February 2014 with 35 individuals from seven Canadian provinces. The participants represented six stakeholder groups (patients, ePHR administrators, healthcare professionals, organizations interested in health technology development, government agencies, and researchers). A detailed summary of each interview was created and thematic analysis was conducted. We observed that there was no consensual definition of ePHR in Canada. Factors that could influence ePHR adoption were related to knowledge (confusion with other electronic medical records [EMRs] and lack of awareness), system design (usability and relevance), user capacities and attitudes (patient health literacy, education and interest, support for professionals), environmental factors (government commitment, targeted populations) and legal and ethical issues (information control and custody, confidentiality, privacy and security). ePHRs are slowly entering the Canadian healthcare landscape but provinces do not seem well-prepared for the implementation of this type of record. Guidance is needed on critical issues regarding ePHRs, such as ePHR definition, data ownership, access to information and interoperability with other electronic health records (EHRs). Better guidance on these issues would provide a greater awareness of ePHRs and inform stakeholders including clinicians, decision-makers, patients

  12. Patient perceptions of electronic medical records use and ratings of care quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finney Rutten LJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lila J Finney Rutten,1 Sana N Vieux,2 Jennifer L St Sauver,1 Neeraj K Arora,2 Richard P Moser,2 Ellen Burke Beckjord,3 Bradford W Hesse2 1Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Healthcare Delivery, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Biobehavioral Medicine in Oncology Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Purpose: Despite considerable potential for improving health care quality, adoption of new technologies, such as electronic medical records (EMRs, requires prudence, to ensure that such tools are designed, implemented, and used meaningfully to facilitate patient-centered communication and care processes, and better health outcomes. The association between patients’ perceptions of health care provider use of EMRs and health care quality ratings was assessed. Method: Data from two iterations of the Health Information National Trends Survey, fielded in 2011 and 2012, were pooled for these analyses. The data were collected via mailed questionnaire, using a nationally representative listing of home addresses as the sampling frame (n=7,390. All data were weighted to provide representative estimates of quality of care ratings and physician use of EMR, in the adult US population. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Results: EMR use was reported significantly more frequently by females, younger age groups, non-Hispanic whites, and those with higher education, higher incomes, health insurance, and a usual source of health care. Respondents who reported physician use of EMRs had significantly higher ratings of care quality (Beta=4.83, standard error [SE]=1.7, P<0.01, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, usual source of health care, and health insurance status. Conclusion: Nationally representative

  13. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients.

  14. Impact of Electronic Health Records on Nurses' Information Seeking and Discriminating Skills for Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Adria S.

    2013-01-01

    In February 2009, the United States government passed into law the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) providing incentive money for hospitals and care providers to implement a certified electronic health record (EHR) in order to promote the adoption and…

  15. Acceptance and Usage of Electronic Health Record Systems in Small Medical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannan, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the U.S. government has been the development of a nationwide health information infrastructure, including adoption and use of an electronic health records (EHR) system. However, a 2008 survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics indicated a 41.5% usage of the EHR system by physicians in office-based…

  16. Savana: Re-using Electronic Health Records with Artificial Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Hernández Medrano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Health information grows exponentially (doubling every 5 years, thus generating a sort of inflation of science, i.e. the generation of more knowledge than we can leverage. In an unprecedented data-driven shift, today doctors have no longer time to keep updated. This fact explains why only one in every five medical decisions is based strictly on evidence, which inevitably leads to variability. A good solution lies on clinical decision support systems, based on big data analysis. As the processing of large amounts of information gains relevance, automatic approaches become increasingly capable to see and correlate information further and better than the human mind can. In this context, healthcare professionals are increasingly counting on a new set of tools in order to deal with the growing information that becomes available to them on a daily basis. By allowing the grouping of collective knowledge and prioritizing “mindlines” against “guidelines”, these support systems are among the most promising applications of big data in health. In this demo paper we introduce Savana, an AI-enabled system based on Natural Language Processing (NLP and Neural Networks, capable of, for instance, the automatic expansion of medical terminologies, thus enabling the re-use of information expressed in natural language in clinical reports. This automatized and precise digital extraction allows the generation of a real time information engine, which is currently being deployed in healthcare institutions, as well as clinical research and management.

  17. Accounting and Co-constructing: The Development of a Standard for Electronic Health Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    care services, cooperation between staff and make patient records immediately and accessible to distributed actors. Investments also have the aims of making health care services more accountable, integrated and increase quality and efficiency. This paper analyses a Danish national standard...... for electronic health records on the basis of an application prototype test build on that standard. The analysis shows that inscribed in the standard is an ambition to make staff and health care services more accountable at the cost of more work, loss of overview and fragmentation of patient cases. Significantly......, despite the standard having been conceived and developed in a process of co-construction with clinicians, clinicians did not find it adequate for their work. The analysis argues this was the result of the model of work embedded in the standard coming from a stance from without practice. Subsequently...

  18. The Glory and Misery of Electronic Health Records

    KAUST Repository

    Smith, Barry

    2016-01-27

    While bioinformatics has witnessed enormous technological advances since the turn of the millennium, progress in the EHR field has been stymied by outdated approaches entrenched through ill-conceived government mandates. In the US, especially, the dominant EHR systems are expensive, difficult to use, fail to ensure even a minimal level of interoperability, and detract from patient care. I will outline the reasons for some of these failures, and sketch an evolutionary path towards the sort of EHR landscape that will be needed in the future, in which consistency with biomedical ontologies will play a central role.

  19. Big data from electronic health records for early and late translational cardiovascular research: challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Harry; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Danesh, John; Dobson, Richard; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Maggioni, Aldo; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M; Cronin, Maureen; Brobert, Gunnar; Vardas, Panos; Anker, Stefan D; Grobbee, Diederick E; Denaxas, Spiros

    2018-04-21

    Cohorts of millions of people's health records, whole genome sequencing, imaging, sensor, societal and publicly available data present a rapidly expanding digital trace of health. We aimed to critically review, for the first time, the challenges and potential of big data across early and late stages of translational cardiovascular disease research. We sought exemplars based on literature reviews and expertise across the BigData@Heart Consortium. We identified formidable challenges including: data quality, knowing what data exist, the legal and ethical framework for their use, data sharing, building and maintaining public trust, developing standards for defining disease, developing tools for scalable, replicable science and equipping the clinical and scientific work force with new inter-disciplinary skills. Opportunities claimed for big health record data include: richer profiles of health and disease from birth to death and from the molecular to the societal scale; accelerated understanding of disease causation and progression, discovery of new mechanisms and treatment-relevant disease sub-phenotypes, understanding health and diseases in whole populations and whole health systems and returning actionable feedback loops to improve (and potentially disrupt) existing models of research and care, with greater efficiency. In early translational research we identified exemplars including: discovery of fundamental biological processes e.g. linking exome sequences to lifelong electronic health records (EHR) (e.g. human knockout experiments); drug development: genomic approaches to drug target validation; precision medicine: e.g. DNA integrated into hospital EHR for pre-emptive pharmacogenomics. In late translational research we identified exemplars including: learning health systems with outcome trials integrated into clinical care; citizen driven health with 24/7 multi-parameter patient monitoring to improve outcomes and population-based linkages of multiple EHR sources

  20. Implementation of an Electronic Medical Records System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-07

    Hartman, MAJ Roddex Barlow , CPT Christopher Besser and Capt Michael Emerson...thank you I am truly honored to call each of you my friends. Electronic... abnormal findings are addressed. 18 Electronic Medical Record Implementation Barriers of the Electronic Medical Records System There are several...examination findings • Psychological and social assessment findings N. The system provides a flexible mechanism for retrieval of encounter

  1. Usability Testing of a National Substance Use Screening Tool Embedded in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Anne; DeStio, Catherine; McCullagh, Lauren; Kapoor, Sandeep; Morley, Jeanne; Conigliaro, Joseph

    2016-07-08

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is currently being implemented into health systems nationally via paper and electronic methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the integration of an electronic SBIRT tool into an existing paper-based SBIRT clinical workflow in a patient-centered medical home. Usability testing was conducted in an academic ambulatory clinic. Two rounds of usability testing were done with medical office assistants (MOAs) using a paper and electronic version of the SBIRT tool, with two and four participants, respectively. Qualitative and quantitative data was analyzed to determine the impact of both tools on clinical workflow. A second round of usability testing was done with the revised electronic version and compared with the first version. Personal workflow barriers cited in the first round of testing were that the electronic health record (EHR) tool was disruptive to patient's visits. In Round 2 of testing, MOAs reported favoring the electronic version due to improved layout and the inclusion of an alert system embedded in the EHR. For example, using the system usability scale (SUS), MOAs reported a grade "1" for the statement, "I would like to use this system frequently" during the first round of testing but a "5" during the second round of analysis. The importance of testing usability of various mediums of tools used in health care screening is highlighted by the findings of this study. In the first round of testing, the electronic tool was reported as less user friendly, being difficult to navigate, and time consuming. Many issues faced in the first generation of the tool were improved in the second generation after usability was evaluated. This study demonstrates how usability testing of an electronic SBRIT tool can help to identify challenges that can impact clinical workflow. However, a limitation of this study was the small sample size of MOAs that participated. The results may have been biased to

  2. Integration of the enterprise electronic health record and anesthesia information management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springman, Scott R

    2011-09-01

    Fewer than 5% of anesthesia departments use an electronic medical record (EMR) that is anesthesia specific. Many anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been developed with a focus only on the unique needs of anesthesia providers, without being fully integrated into other electronic health record components of the entire enterprise medical system. To understand why anesthesia providers should embrace health information technology (HIT) on a health system-wide basis, this article reviews recent HIT history and reviews HIT concepts. The author explores current developments in efforts to expand enterprise HIT, and the pros and cons of full enterprise integration with an AIMS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: Implications for Biobanking and Electronic Health Record Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodyn Platt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon’s MTurk system (n = 447. We found that seeing one’s primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public’s trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making.

  4. Childrens Hospital Integrated Patient Electronic Record System Continuation (CHIPERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    child might...lytes  and  glucose.     **  Time  zero  is  the  first  point  at  which  anyone  considers  that  a   child ...culture  of  their  hospital,  namely  the  hierarchy  of  medicine  and  a   stigma  for  nurses  calling  

  5. A student-centred electronic health record system for clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kristine; Judd, Terry; McColl, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are an increasingly important feature of the national healthcare system [1]. However, little research has investigated the impact this will have on medical students' learning. As part of an innovative technology platform for a new masters level program in medicine, we are developing a student-centred EHR system for clinical education. A prototype was trialed with medical students over several weeks during 2010. This paper reports on the findings of the trial, which had the overall aim of assisting our understanding of how trainee doctors might use an EHR system for learning and communication in a clinical setting. In primary care and hospital settings, EHR systems offer potential benefits to medical students' learning: Longitudinal tracking of clinical progress towards established learning objectives [2]; Capacity to search across a substantial body of records [3]; Integration with online medical databases [3]; Development of expertise in creating, accessing and managing high quality EHRs [4]. While concerns have been raised that EHR systems may alter the interaction between teachers and students [3], and may negatively influence physician-patient communication [6], there is general consensus that the EHR is changing the current practice environment and teaching practice needs to respond. Final year medical students on clinical placement at a large university teaching hospital were recruited for the trial. Following a four-week period of use, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 participants. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and data analysed for emerging themes. Study participants were also surveyed about the importance of EHR systems in general, their familiarity with them, and general perceptions of sharing patient records. Medical students in this pilot study identified a number of educational, practical and administrative advantages that the student-centred EHR system offered over their existing ad

  6. Privacy, consent, and the electronic mental health record: The Person vs. the System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A

    2012-01-01

    As electronic health record systems become widely adopted and proposals are advanced to integrate mental health with general health systems, there is mounting pressure to include mental health information on the same basis as general health information without any requirement for active, individual patient consent to do so. A prime example is the current effort to change the Mental Health Information Act of the District of Columbia, which has, up till now, stood as a model for protection of the privacy of patients with mental illness, the requirement of informed consent for disclosure of health information, and delimitation of minimum necessary disclosure. Mental health information is exceptionally sensitive and potentially damaging if privacy is breached, which makes patients reluctant to seek treatment if they cannot be assured of confidentiality. In addition, there have been spectacular breaches of the security of large electronic health record databases. A subtle but more likely threat is the possibility that mental health information in networks could be fully accessible to all of the patient's providers in a network, not just those for whom it would be necessary to the patient's care. In the 1996 Supreme Court decision in Jaffee v. Redmond, the high court recognized that confidentiality is essential for patients to engage in effective psychotherapy, and HIPAA maintains that special status in the protection of psychotherapy notes as well as explicitly stating that it defers to state laws that are more protective of confidentiality than is HIPAA itself. Highly sensitive information also exists in mental health records aside from psychotherapy notes. Any change in the laws that govern informed consent for disclosure of mental health information must take these factors into account. Specifically, the author opposes any change that would assume tacit consent to release mental health information through an electronic health information exchange in the absence of a

  7. Electronic dental records: start taking the steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergoff, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Converting paper patient records charts into their electronic counterparts (EDRs) not only has many advantages, but also could become a legal requirement in the future. Several steps key to a successful transition includes assessing the needs of the dental team and what they require as a part of the implementation Existing software and hardware must be evaluated for continued use and expansion. Proper protocols for information transfer must be established to ensure complete records while maintaining HIPAA regulations regarding patient privacy. Reduce anxiety by setting realistic dead-lines and using trusted back-up methods.

  8. Pan-Canadian Respiratory Standards Initiative for Electronic Health Records (PRESTINE: 2011 National Forum Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Diane Lougheed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a novel knowledge translation initiative, the Government of Ontario’s Asthma Plan of Action funded the development of an Asthma Care Map to enable adherence with the Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines developed under the auspices of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS. Following its successful evaluation within the Primary Care Asthma Pilot Project, respiratory clinicians from the Asthma Research Unit, Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario are leading an initiative to incorporate standardized Asthma Care Map data elements into electronic health records in primary care in Ontario. Acknowledging that the issue of data standards affects all respiratory conditions, and all provinces and territories, the Government of Ontario approached the CTS Respiratory Guidelines Committee. At its meeting in September 2010, the CTS Respiratory Guidelines Committee agreed that developing and standardizing respiratory data elements for electronic health records are strategically important. In follow-up to that commitment, representatives from the CTS, the Lung Association, the Government of Ontario, the National Lung Health Framework and Canada Health Infoway came together to form a planning committee. The planning committee proposed a phased approach to inform stakeholders about the issue, and engage them in the development, implementation and evaluation of a standardized dataset. An environmental scan was completed in July 2011, which identified data definitions and standards currently available for clinical variables that are likely to be included in electronic medical records in primary care for diagnosis, management and patient education related to asthma and COPD. The scan, sponsored by the Government of Ontario, includes compliance with clinical nomenclatures such as SNOMED-CT® and LOINC®. To help launch and create momentum for this initiative, a national forum was convened on October 2 and 3, 2011, in Toronto, Ontario. The forum was designed to

  9. The provision and impact of online patient access to their electronic health records (EHR and transactional services on the quality and safety of health care: systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freda Mold

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Innovators have piloted improvements in communication, changed patterns of practice and patient empowerment from online access to electronic health records (EHR. International studies of online services, such as prescription ordering, online appointment booking and secure communications with primary care, show good uptake of email consultations, accessing test results and booking appointments; when technologies and business process are in place. Online access and transactional services are due to be rolled out across England by 2015; this review seeks to explore the impact of online access to health records and other online services on the quality and safety of primary health care.Objective To assess the factors that may affect the provision of online patient access to their EHR and transactional services, and the impact of such access on the quality and safety of health care.Method Two reviewers independently searched 11 international databases during the period 1999–2012. A range of papers including descriptive studies using qualitative or quantitative methods, hypothesis-testing studies and systematic reviews were included. A detailed eligibility criterion will be used to shape study inclusion .A team of experts will review these papers for eligibility, extract data using a customised extraction form and use the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE instrument to determine the quality of the evidence and the strengths of any recommendation. Data will then be descriptively summarised and thematically synthesised. Where feasible, we will perform a quantitative meta-analysis.Prospero (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews registration number: crd42012003091.

  10. Testing the Electronic Personal Health Record Acceptance Model by Nurses for Managing Their Own Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkoff, A.M.; Storr, C.L.; Wilson, M.L.; Gurses, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To our knowledge, no evidence is available on health care professionals’ use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) for their health management. We therefore focused on nurses’ personal use of ePHRs using a modified technology acceptance model. Objectives To examine (1) the psychometric properties of the ePHR acceptance model, (2) the associations of perceived usefulness, ease of use, data privacy and security protection, and perception of self as health-promoting role models to nurses’ own ePHR use, and (3) the moderating influences of age, chronic illness and medication use, and providers’ use of electronic health record (EHRs) on the associations between the ePHR acceptance constructs and ePHR use. Methods A convenience sample of registered nurses, those working in one of 12 hospitals in the Maryland and Washington, DC areas and members of the nursing informatics community (AMIA and HIMSS), were invited to respond to an anonymous online survey; 847 responded. Multiple logistic regression identified associations between the model constructs and ePHR use, and the moderating effect. Results Overall, ePHRs were used by 47%. Sufficient reliability for all scales was found. Three constructs were significantly related to nurses’ own ePHR use after adjusting for covariates: usefulness, data privacy and security protection, and health-promoting role model. Nurses with providers that used EHRs who perceived a higher level of data privacy and security protection had greater odds of ePHR use than those whose providers did not use EHRs. Older nurses with a higher self-perception as health-promoting role models had greater odds of ePHR use than younger nurses. Conclusions Nurses who use ePHRs for their personal health might promote adoption by the general public by serving as health-promoting role models. They can contribute to improvements in patient education and ePHR design, and serve as crucial resources when working with their

  11. National electronic health records and the digital disruption of moral orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrety, Karin; McLoughlin, Ian; Wilson, Rob; Zelle, Gregor; Martin, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The digitalisation of patient health data to provide national electronic health record systems (NEHRS) is a major objective of many governments. Proponents claim that NEHRS will streamline care, reduce mistakes and cut costs. However, building these systems has proved highly problematic. Using recent developments in Australia as an example, we argue that a hitherto unexamined source of difficulty concerns the way NEHRS disrupt the moral orders governing the production, ownership, use of and responsibility for health records. Policies that pursue digitalisation as a self-evident 'solution' to problems in healthcare without due regard to these disruptions risk alienating key stakeholders. We propose a more emergent approach to the development and implementation of NEHRS that supports moral re-ordering around rights and responsibilities appropriate to the intentions of those involved in healthcare relationships. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electronic health records approaches and challenges: a comparison between Malaysia and four East Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Ghani, Mohd Khanapi; Bali, Rajeev K; Naguib, Raouf N G; Marshall, Ian M

    2008-01-01

    An integrated Lifetime Health Record (LHR) is fundamental for achieving seamless and continuous access to patient medical information and for the continuum of care. However, the aim has not yet been fully realised. The efforts are actively progressing around the globe. Every stage of the development of the LHR initiatives had presented peculiar challenges. The best lessons in life are those of someone else's experiences. This paper presents an overview of the development approaches undertaken by four East Asian countries in implementing a national Electronic Health Record (EHR) in the public health system. The major challenges elicited from the review including integration efforts, process reengineering, funding, people, and law and regulation will be presented, compared, discussed and used as lessons learned for the further development of the Malaysian integrated LHR.

  13. Designing of Electronic Health Record Software in the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Azizi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: much effort was conducted to support the use of electronic record systems in nursing process. Some of the most important reasons for its application are efficiency, security and the quality of the patients’ data registration. The purpose of this study is to present electronic registration software of patients, health assessment and to determine the attitude of nurses towards it. Methods: this is a R&D leading to construction of the patient’s health assessment software. In the beginning, Gordon Model and the daily charts of the patients were prepared to paper. During the next 8 months these charts were converted into the software programs. The databases were implemented using “the SQL server” and “C#Net” programming language. Results: the software used in this study included 4 parts; the first one contained information of Gordon health assessment model in 11 items, the second contained charts of the study, the third part consisted of Lund-Browder table and dummy data table for 4 age groups, and the fourth one was image infor-mation storage part for burn wounds pictures. Conclusion: despite barriers, electronic systems could lead to confidential information, increase the quality of nursing records, and also reduce the amount of expenses.

  14. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  15. Personalized Hypertension Management Using Patient-Generated Health Data Integrated With Electronic Health Records (EMPOWER-H): Six-Month Pre-Post Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Nan; Xiao, Lan; Simmons, Martha L; Rosas, Lisa G; Chan, Albert; Entwistle, Martin

    2017-09-19

    EMPOWER-H (Engaging and Motivating Patients Online With Enhanced Resources-Hypertension) is a personalized-care model facilitating engagement in hypertension self-management utilizing an interactive Web-based disease management system integrated with the electronic health record. The model is designed to support timely patient-provider interaction by incorporating decision support technology to individualize care and provide personalized feedback for patients with chronic disease. Central to this process were patient-generated health data, including blood pressure (BP), weight, and lifestyle behaviors, which were uploaded using a smartphone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the program among patients within primary care already under management for hypertension and with uncontrolled BP. Using a 6-month pre-post design, outcome measures included office-measured and home-monitored BP, office-measured weight, intervention contacts, diet, physical activity, smoking, knowledge, and health-related quality of life. At 6 months, 55.9% of participants (N=149) achieved office BP goals (total intervention, behavioral, pharmaceutical contacts had significantly lower odds of achieving home BP goals but higher improvements in office BP (all Pmanagement. The experience gained in this study provides support for the feasibility and value of using carefully managed patient-generated health data in the day-to-day clinical management of patients with chronic conditions. A large-scale, real-world study to evaluate sustained effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and scalability is warranted. ©Nan Lv, Lan Xiao, Martha L Simmons, Lisa G Rosas, Albert Chan, Martin Entwistle. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 19.09.2017.

  16. Examining the Relationship between Electronic Health Record Interoperability and Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Bernice M.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of interoperability impairs data quality among health care providers' electronic health record (EHR) systems. The problem is whether the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9000 principles relate to the problem of interoperability in implementation of EHR systems. The purpose of the nonexperimental quantitative research…

  17. The Successful Implementation of Electronic Health Records at Small Rural Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have been in use since the 1960s. U.S. rural hospital leaders and administrators face significant pressure to implement health information technology because of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. However, some leaders and managers of small rural hospital lack strategies to develop and implement…

  18. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  19. Exploring Workarounds Related to Electronic Health Record System Usage: A Study Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijleven, Vincent; Koelemeijer, Kitty; Jaspers, Monique

    2017-01-01

    Health care providers resort to informal temporary practices known as workarounds for handling exceptions to normal workflow that are unintentionally imposed by electronic health record (EHR) systems. Although workarounds may seem favorable at first sight, they are generally suboptimal and may

  20. Electronic Health Record for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders – Support in Therapeutic Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hippmann, R.; Nagy, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Zvárová, Jana; Seydlová, M.; Feltlová, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 27-32 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * automatic speech recognition * dental cross * temporomandibular joint * temporomandibular joint disorders * structured data entry * dentistry * data model * text-to-speech system * Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/25-en- electronic - health - record -for-temporomandibular-joint-disorders-support-in-therapeutic-process.html

  1. Design and implementation of a privacy preserving electronic health record linkage tool in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Abel N; Cashy, John P; Jackson, Kathryn L; Pah, Adam R; Goel, Satyender; Boehnke, Jörn; Humphries, John Eric; Kominers, Scott Duke; Hota, Bala N; Sims, Shannon A; Malin, Bradley A; French, Dustin D; Walunas, Theresa L; Meltzer, David O; Kaleba, Erin O; Jones, Roderick C; Galanter, William L

    2015-09-01

    To design and implement a tool that creates a secure, privacy preserving linkage of electronic health record (EHR) data across multiple sites in a large metropolitan area in the United States (Chicago, IL), for use in clinical research. The authors developed and distributed a software application that performs standardized data cleaning, preprocessing, and hashing of patient identifiers to remove all protected health information. The application creates seeded hash code combinations of patient identifiers using a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant SHA-512 algorithm that minimizes re-identification risk. The authors subsequently linked individual records using a central honest broker with an algorithm that assigns weights to hash combinations in order to generate high specificity matches. The software application successfully linked and de-duplicated 7 million records across 6 institutions, resulting in a cohort of 5 million unique records. Using a manually reconciled set of 11 292 patients as a gold standard, the software achieved a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 100%, with a majority of the missed matches accounted for by patients with both a missing social security number and last name change. Using 3 disease examples, it is demonstrated that the software can reduce duplication of patient records across sites by as much as 28%. Software that standardizes the assignment of a unique seeded hash identifier merged through an agreed upon third-party honest broker can enable large-scale secure linkage of EHR data for epidemiologic and public health research. The software algorithm can improve future epidemiologic research by providing more comprehensive data given that patients may make use of multiple healthcare systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Process mining routinely collected electronic health records to define real-life clinical pathways during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karl; Dunwoodie, Elaine; Jones, Richard G; Newsham, Alex; Johnson, Owen; Price, Christopher P; Wolstenholme, Jane; Leal, Jose; McGinley, Patrick; Twelves, Chris; Hall, Geoff

    2017-07-01

    There is growing interest in the use of routinely collected electronic health records to enhance service delivery and facilitate clinical research. It should be possible to detect and measure patterns of care and use the data to monitor improvements but there are methodological and data quality challenges. Driven by the desire to model the impact of a patient self-test blood count monitoring service in patients on chemotherapy, we aimed to (i) establish reproducible methods of process-mining electronic health records, (ii) use the outputs derived to define and quantify patient pathways during chemotherapy, and (iii) to gather robust data which is structured to be able to inform a cost-effectiveness decision model of home monitoring of neutropenic status during chemotherapy. Electronic Health Records at a UK oncology centre were included if they had (i) a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer and received adjuvant epirubicin and cyclosphosphamide chemotherapy or (ii) colorectal cancer and received palliative oxaliplatin and infusional 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy, and (iii) were first diagnosed with cancer between January 2004 and February 2013. Software and a Markov model were developed, producing a schematic of patient pathways during chemotherapy. Significant variance from the assumed care pathway was evident from the data. Of the 535 patients with breast cancer and 420 with colorectal cancer there were 474 and 329 pathway variants respectively. Only 27 (5%) and 26 (6%) completed the planned six cycles of chemotherapy without having unplanned hospital contact. Over the six cycles, 169 (31.6%) patients with breast cancer and 190 (45.2%) patients with colorectal cancer were admitted to hospital. The pathways of patients on chemotherapy are complex. An iterative approach to addressing semantic and data quality issues enabled the effective use of routinely collected patient records to produce accurate models of the real-life experiences of chemotherapy patients and

  3. Design and implementation of a web-based patient portal linked to an electronic health record designed to improve medication safety: the Patient Gateway medications module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Schnipper

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we describe the background, design, and preliminary results of a medications module within Patient Gateway (PG, a patient portal linked to an electronic health record (EHR. The medications module is designed to improve the accuracy of medication lists within the EHR, reduce adverse drug events and improve patient_provider communication regarding medications and allergies in several primary care practices within a large integrated healthcare delivery network. This module allows patients to view and modify the list of medications and allergies from the EHR, report nonadherence, side effects and other medication-related problems and easily communicate this information to providers, who can verify the information and update the EHR as needed. Usage and satisfaction data indicate that patients found the module easy to use, felt that it led to their providers having more accurate information about them and enabled them to feel more prepared for their forthcoming visits. Further analyses will determine the effects of this module on important medication-related outcomes and identify further enhancements needed to improve on this approach.

  4. Electronic medical record systems are associated with appropriate placement of HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in rural health facilities in Kenya: a retrospective pre-post study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oluoch, Tom; Katana, Abraham; Ssempijja, Victor; Kwaro, Daniel; Langat, Patrick; Kimanga, Davies; Okeyo, Nicky; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; de Keizer, Nicolette

    2014-01-01

    There is little evidence that electronic medical record (EMR) use is associated with better compliance with clinical guidelines on initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among ART-eligible HIV patients. We assessed the effect of transitioning from paper-based to an EMR-based system on

  5. Health information technology: integration of clinical workflow into meaningful use of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowens, Felicia M; Frye, Patricia A; Jones, Warren A

    2010-10-01

    This article examines the role that clinical workflow plays in successful implementation and meaningful use of electronic health record (EHR) technology in ambulatory care. The benefits and barriers of implementing EHRs in ambulatory care settings are discussed. The researchers conclude that widespread adoption and meaningful use of EHR technology rely on the successful integration of health information technology (HIT) into clinical workflow. Without successful integration of HIT into clinical workflow, clinicians in today's ambulatory care settings will continue to resist adoption and implementation of EHR technology.

  6. Utilizing Dental Electronic Health Records Data to Predict Risk for Periodontal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyvalikakath, Thankam P; Padman, Rema; Vyawahare, Karnali; Darade, Pratiksha; Paranjape, Rhucha

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a major cause for tooth loss and adversely affects individuals' oral health and quality of life. Research shows its potential association with systemic diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and social habits such as smoking. This study explores mining potential risk factors from dental electronic health records to predict and display patients' contextualized risk for periodontal disease. We retrieved relevant risk factors from structured and unstructured data on 2,370 patients who underwent comprehensive oral examinations at the Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Predicting overall risk and displaying relationships between risk factors and their influence on the patient's oral and general health can be a powerful educational and disease management tool for patients and clinicians at the point of care.

  7. A Primer on Endoscopic Electronic Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and co...

  8. How to integrate the electronic health record and patient-centered communication into the medical visit: a skills-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Pamela; Frankel, Richard M; Reis, Shmuel

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of the electronic health record (EHR) has changed the dynamics of doctor-patient communication. Physicians train to use EHRs from a technical standpoint, giving only minimal attention to integrating the human dimensions of the doctor-patient relationship into the computer-accompanied medical visit. This article reviews the literature and proposes a model to help clinicians, residents, and students improve physician-patient communication while using the EHR. We conducted a literature search on use of communication skills when interfacing with the EHR. We observed an instructional gap and developed a model using evidence-based communication skills. This model integrates patient-centered interview skills and aims to empower physicians to remain patient centered while effectively using EHRs. It may also serve as a template for future educational and practice interventions for use of the EHR in the examination room.

  9. Maternity patients' access to their electronic medical records: use and perspectives of a patient portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megan Forster, Megan; Dennison, Kerrie; Callen, Joanne; Andrew, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    Patients have been able to access clinical information from their paper-based health records for a number of years. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) access to this information can now be achieved online using a secure electronic patient portal. The purpose of this study was to investigate maternity patients' use and perceptions of a patient portal developed at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. A web-based patient portal, one of the first developed and deployed in Australia, was introduced on 26 June 2012. The portal was designed for maternity patients booked at Mater Mothers' Hospital, as an alternative to the paper-based Pregnancy Health Record. Through the portal, maternity patients are able to complete their hospital registration form online and obtain current health information about their pregnancy (via their EMR), as well as access a variety of support tools to use during their pregnancy such as tailored public health advice. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was employed. Usage statistics were extracted from the system for a one year period (1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013). Patients' perceptions of the portal were obtained using an online survey, accessible by maternity patients for two weeks in February 2013 (n=80). Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 10,892 maternity patients were offered a patient portal account and access to their EMR. Of those 6,518 created one (60%; 6,518/10,892) and 3,104 went on to request access to their EMR (48%; 3,104/6,518). Of these, 1,751 had their access application granted by 30 June 2013. The majority of maternity patients submitted registration forms online via the patient portal (56.7%). Patients could view their EMR multiple times: there were 671 views of the EMR, 2,781 views of appointment schedules and 135 birth preferences submitted via the EMR. Eighty survey responses were received from EMR account holders, (response

  10. Delivering a lifelong integrated electronic health record based on a service oriented architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katehakis, Dimitrios G; Sfakianakis, Stelios G; Kavlentakis, Georgios; Anthoulakis, Dimitrios N; Tsiknakis, Manolis

    2007-11-01

    Efficient access to a citizen's Integrated Electronic Health Record (I-EHR) is considered to be the cornerstone for the support of continuity of care, the reduction of avoidable mistakes, and the provision of tools and methods to support evidence-based medicine. For the past several years, a number of applications and services (including a lifelong I-EHR) have been installed, and enterprise and regional infrastructure has been developed, in HYGEIAnet, the Regional Health Information Network (RHIN) of the island of Crete, Greece. Through this paper, the technological effort toward the delivery of a lifelong I-EHR by means of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) technologies, on top of a service-oriented architecture that reuses already existing middleware components is presented and critical issues are discussed. Certain design and development decisions are exposed and explained, laying this way the ground for coordinated, dynamic navigation to personalized healthcare delivery.

  11. Examining Evidence-Based Content Related to Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Paper and Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaekel, Camilla M.

    2012-01-01

    Although there have been great advancements in the Electronic Health Record (EHR), there is a dearth of rigorous research that examines the relationship between the use of electronic documentation to capture nursing process components and the impact of consistent documentation on patient outcomes (Daly, Buckwalter & Maas, 2002; Gugerty, 2006;…

  12. Development of an electronic claim system based on an integrated electronic health record platform to guarantee interoperability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwa Sun; Cho, Hune; Lee, In Keun

    2011-06-01

    We design and develop an electronic claim system based on an integrated electronic health record (EHR) platform. This system is designed to be used for ambulatory care by office-based physicians in the United States. This is achieved by integrating various medical standard technologies for interoperability between heterogeneous information systems. The developed system serves as a simple clinical data repository, it automatically fills out the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)-1500 form based on information regarding the patients and physicians' clinical activities. It supports electronic insurance claims by creating reimbursement charges. It also contains an HL7 interface engine to exchange clinical messages between heterogeneous devices. The system partially prevents physician malpractice by suggesting proper treatments according to patient diagnoses and supports physicians by easily preparing documents for reimbursement and submitting claim documents to insurance organizations electronically, without additional effort by the user. To show the usability of the developed system, we performed an experiment that compares the time spent filling out the CMS-1500 form directly and time required create electronic claim data using the developed system. From the experimental results, we conclude that the system could save considerable time for physicians in making claim documents. The developed system might be particularly useful for those who need a reimbursement-specialized EHR system, even though the proposed system does not completely satisfy all criteria requested by the CMS and Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). This is because the criteria are not sufficient but necessary condition for the implementation of EHR systems. The system will be upgraded continuously to implement the criteria and to offer more stable and transparent transmission of electronic claim data.

  13. Leveraging electronic health records for predictive modeling of post-surgical complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Grant B; Lovely, Jenna; Larson, David W; Earnshaw, Berton A; Huebner, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Hospital-specific electronic health record systems are used to inform clinical practice about best practices and quality improvements. Many surgical centers have developed deterministic clinical decision rules to discover adverse events (e.g. postoperative complications) using electronic health record data. However, these data provide opportunities to use probabilistic methods for early prediction of adverse health events, which may be more informative than deterministic algorithms. Electronic health record data from a set of 9598 colorectal surgery cases from 2010 to 2014 were used to predict the occurrence of selected complications including surgical site infection, ileus, and bleeding. Consistent with previous studies, we find a high rate of missing values for both covariates and complication information (4-90%). Several machine learning classification methods are trained on an 80% random sample of cases and tested on a remaining holdout set. Predictive performance varies by complication, although an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve as high as 0.86 on testing data was achieved for bleeding complications, and accuracy for all complications compares favorably to existing clinical decision rules. Our results confirm that electronic health records provide opportunities for improved risk prediction of surgical complications; however, consideration of data quality and consistency standards is an important step in predictive modeling with such data.

  14. Health care quality measures for children and adolescents in Foster Care: feasibility testing in electronic records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Katherine J; Minneci, Peter C; Nacion, Kristine M; Leonhart, Karen; Cooper, Jennifer N; Scholle, Sarah Hudson; Kelleher, Kelly J

    2018-02-22

    Preventive quality measures for the foster care population are largely untested. The objective of the study is to identify healthcare quality measures for young children and adolescents in foster care and to test whether the data required to calculate these measures can be feasibly extracted and interpreted within an electronic health records or within the Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System. The AAP Recommendations for Preventive Pediatric Health Care served as the guideline for determining quality measures. Quality measures related to well child visits, developmental screenings, immunizations, trauma-related care, BMI measurements, sexually transmitted infections and depression were defined. Retrospective chart reviews were performed on a cohort of children in foster care from a single large pediatric institution and related county. Data available in the Ohio Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System was compared to the same population studied in the electronic health record review. Quality measures were calculated as observed (received) to expected (recommended) ratios (O/E ratios) to describe the actual quantity of recommended health care that was received by individual children. Electronic health records and the Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System data frequently lacked important information on foster care youth essential for calculating the measures. Although electronic health records were rich in encounter specific clinical data, they often lacked custodial information such as the dates of entry into and exit from foster care. In contrast, Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System included robust data on custodial arrangements, but lacked detailed medical information. Despite these limitations, several quality measures were devised that attempted to accommodate these limitations. In this feasibility testing, neither the electronic health records at a single institution nor the county level Statewide

  15. [Views of health system administrators, professionals, and users concerning the electronic health record and facilitators and obstacles to its implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jose Felipe Riani; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo

    2018-02-05

    The design and deployment of complex technologies like the electronic health record (EHR) involve technical, personal, social, and organizational issues. The Brazilian public and private scenario includes different local and regional initiatives for implementation of the electronic health record. The Brazilian Ministry of Health also has a proposal to develop a national EHR. The current study aimed to provide a comprehensive view of perceptions by health system administrators, professionals, and users concerning their experiences with the electronic health record and their opinions of the possibility of developing a national EHR. This qualitative study involved 28 semi-structured interviews. The results revealed both the diversity of factors that can influence the implementation of an electronic health record and the existence of convergences and aspects that tend to be valued differently according to the different points of view. Key aspects include discussions on the electronic health record's attributes and it impact on healthcare, especially in the case of local electronic health records, concerns over costs and confidentiality and privacy pertaining to electronic health records in general, and the possible implications of centralized versus decentralized data storage in the case of a national EHR. The interviews clearly showed the need to establish more effective communication among the various stakeholders, and that the different perspectives should be considered when drafting and deploying an EHR at the local, regional, and national levels.

  16. Development of archetypes of radiology for electronic health record; Desenvolvimento de arquetipos de radiologia para registro eletronico de saude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Tiago V.; Pires, Silvio R.; Paiva, Paulo B., E-mail: tiago.veloso@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Informatica em Saude

    2013-08-15

    This paper presents a proposal to develop archetypes for electronic patient records system based the openEHR Foundation model. Archetypes were developed specifically for the areas of radiology and diagnostic imaging, as for the early implementation of an electronic health records system. The archetypes developed are related to the examinations request, their execution and report, corresponding to both the administrative as diagnostic workflow inside a diagnostic imaging sector. (author)

  17. Clinical and Para Clinical Information Needs of Infertility Electronic Health Records in Iran: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Jeddi, Fateme Rangraz; Gilasi, Hamid Reza; Shirzadi, Diana

    2017-09-01

    infertility is referred to the person's inability to conceive pregnancy after one year of intercourse without using protection. This study paves the ground for creating a complete, united, and coherent source of patients' medical information. this is an applied research of descriptive-cross sectional type which has been carried out through qualitative - quantitative methods. The sample of the present study was 50 specialists in the field of infertility which has been chosen based on purposive sampling method. Designing the questionnaire was done based on library studies and Gathering experts' views was done based on Delphi technique. 261 items from clinical and Para clinical information of infertile patients' electronic health records were subjected to an opinion poll by experts. During this process 223 items were accepted and 38 items have been rejected after two sessions of surveys by infertility experts. Para clinical information section consisted of 57 items that all of them have been accepted by the experts. Also, clinical information section consisted of 242 items from which 204 items were accepted and 38 items were rejected by the experts. existence of a structured electronic record system of infertile patients' information leads to the integration of patients' information, improvement of health care services and a decrease in treatment costs: all working to increase information safety. Furthermore, only essential and relevant information would be provided for the specialists and it will facilitate and direct the future infertility related studies due to the coherence, unity and relevance of the information.

  18. Electronic Health Records and US Public Health: Current Realities and Future Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, R. Gibson; Ross, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) could contribute to improving population health in the United States. Realizing this potential will require understanding what EHRs can realistically offer to efforts to improve population health, the requirements for obtaining useful information from EHRs, and a plan for addressing these requirements. Potential contributions of EHRs to improving population health include better understanding of the level and distribution of disease, function, and well-being within populations. Requirements are improved population coverage of EHRs, standardized EHR content and reporting methods, and adequate legal authority for using EHRs, particularly for population health. A collaborative national effort to address the most pressing prerequisites for and barriers to the use of EHRs for improving population health is needed to realize the EHR’s potential. PMID:23865646

  19. Possible Sources of Bias in Primary Care Electronic Health Record Data Use and Reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Robert A; Curcin, Vasa; Delaney, Brendan C; McGilchrist, Mark M

    2018-05-29

    Enormous amounts of data are recorded routinely in health care as part of the care process, primarily for managing individual patient care. There are significant opportunities to use these data for other purposes, many of which would contribute to establishing a learning health system. This is particularly true for data recorded in primary care settings, as in many countries, these are the first place patients turn to for most health problems. In this paper, we discuss whether data that are recorded routinely as part of the health care process in primary care are actually fit to use for other purposes such as research and quality of health care indicators, how the original purpose may affect the extent to which the data are fit for another purpose, and the mechanisms behind these effects. In doing so, we want to identify possible sources of bias that are relevant for the use and reuse of these type of data. This paper is based on the authors' experience as users of electronic health records data, as general practitioners, health informatics experts, and health services researchers. It is a product of the discussions they had during the Translational Research and Patient Safety in Europe (TRANSFoRm) project, which was funded by the European Commission and sought to develop, pilot, and evaluate a core information architecture for the learning health system in Europe, based on primary care electronic health records. We first describe the different stages in the processing of electronic health record data, as well as the different purposes for which these data are used. Given the different data processing steps and purposes, we then discuss the possible mechanisms for each individual data processing step that can generate biased outcomes. We identified 13 possible sources of bias. Four of them are related to the organization of a health care system, whereas some are of a more technical nature. There are a substantial number of possible sources of bias; very little is

  20. Use of large electronic health record databases for environmental epidemiology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Electronic health records (EHRs) are a ubiquitous component of the United States healthcare system and capture nearly all data collected in a clinic or hospital setting. EHR databases are attractive for secondary data analysis as they may contain detailed clinical rec...

  1. Understanding Clinician Information Demands and Synthesis of Clinical Documents in Electronic Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farri, Oladimeji Feyisetan

    2012-01-01

    Large quantities of redundant clinical data are usually transferred from one clinical document to another, making the review of such documents cognitively burdensome and potentially error-prone. Inadequate designs of electronic health record (EHR) clinical document user interfaces probably contribute to the difficulties clinicians experience while…

  2. A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arshia A.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

  3. The Cradle Coast Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record evaluation research plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Cheek, Colleen; Van Der Ploeg, Winifred

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 the Federal Government announced funding over two years to create a Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) for Australians. One of the wave 2 implementation sites is the Cradle Coast in Tasmania. A PCEHR Program Benefits and Evaluation Partner (BEP) has been appointed to u...

  4. Implementation of an Electronic Health Records System in a Small Clinic: The Viewpoint of Clinic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Smith, Paul; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Kuruchittham, Vipat; Li, Qian

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the implementation of an electronic health records (EHR) system in a small family practice clinic. We used three data collection instruments to evaluate user experience, work pattern changes, and organisational changes related to the implementation and use of the EHR system: (1) an EHR user survey, (2) interviews with…

  5.   Representations at Work: A national Standard for Electronic Health Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus

    2006-01-01

      Representations are at work in IT technology. As plans of and for work, they enable cooperation, coordination, accountability and control, which have to be balanced off against each other. The article describes a standard developed for electronic health records (EHR) and the results of a test...

  6. Nurse Educators' Consensus Opinion on Using an Academic Electronic Health Record: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Darlene S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the opinions of nurse educators in the state of North Dakota (ND) who were using the academic Electronic Health Record (EHR) known as SimChart. In this dissertation research study, factors that either hindered or facilitated the introduction of SimChart in nursing programs in ND were examined.…

  7. "Teaching Case": ComprehensiveCare and the Failed Implementation of an Electronic Health Records System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomillion, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Administrator Jennifer Stanton attempts to adopt an Electronic Health Records system at ComprehensiveCare, a multispecialty healthcare practice. Consultants from the vendor provide guidance to the organization, but do not provide that guidance in a way that the non-technical administrator understands. The project experiences escalation of…

  8. Electronic Health Record Adoption as a Function of Success: Implications for Meaningful Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Riyad J.

    2012-01-01

    Successful electronic health records (EHR) implementation has the potential to transform the entire care delivery process across the enterprise. However, the rate of EHR implementation and use among physicians has been slow. Different factors have been reported in the literature that may hinder adoption of EHR. Identifying and managing these…

  9. 77 FR 53967 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program-Stage 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... Provider Order Entry CQM Clinical Quality Measure CY Calendar Year EHR Electronic Health Record EP Eligible... Measures b. Reporting on Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs) c. Payment Adjustments and Exceptions d... Multiple Practices/Locations (3) Discussion of the Reporting Requirements of the Measures Associated with...

  10. "It's like texting at the dinner table": A qualitative analysis of the impact of electronic health records on patient-physician interaction in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelland, Kimberly D; Baier, Rosa R; Gardner, Rebekah L

    2017-06-30

    nBACKGROUND: Electronic health records (EHRs) may reduce medical errors and improve care, but can complicate clinical encounters. To describe hospital-based physicians' perceptions of the impact of EHRs on patient-physician interactions and contrast these findings against office-based physicians' perceptionsMethods: We performed a qualitative analysis of comments submitted in response to the 2014 Rhode Island Health Information Technology Survey. Office- and hospital-based physicians licensed in Rhode Island, in active practice, and located in Rhode Island or neighboring states completed the survey about their Electronic Health Record use. The survey's response rate was 68.3% and 2,236 (87.1%) respondents had EHRs. Among survey respondents, 27.3% of hospital-based and 37.8% of office-based physicians with EHRs responded to the question about patient interaction. Five main themes emerged for hospital-based physicians, with respondents generally perceiving EHRs as negatively altering patient interactions. We noted the same five themes among office-based physicians, but the rank-order of the top two responses differed by setting: hospital-based physicians commented most frequently that they spend less time with patients because they have to spend more time on computers; office-based physicians commented most frequently on EHRs worsening the quality of their interactions and relationships with patients. In our analysis of a large sample of physicians, hospital-based physicians generally perceived EHRs as negatively altering patient interactions, although they emphasized different reasons than their office-based counterparts. These findings add to the prior literature, which focuses on outpatient physicians, and can shape interventions to improve how EHRs are used in inpatient settings.

  11. “It’s like texting at the dinner table”: A qualitative analysis of the impact of electronic health records on patient-physician interaction in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D Pelland

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electronic health records (EHRs may reduce medical errors and improve care, but can complicate clinical encounters. Objective: To describe hospital-based physicians’ perceptions of the impact of EHRs on patient-physician interactions and contrast these findings against office-based physicians’ perceptions Methods: We performed a qualitative analysis of comments submitted in response to the 2014 Rhode Island Health Information Technology Survey. Office- and hospital-based physicians licensed in Rhode Island, in active practice, and located in Rhode Island or neighboring states completed the survey about their Electronic Health Record use. Results: The survey’s response rate was 68.3% and 2,236 (87.1% respondents had EHRs. Among survey respondents, 27.3% of hospital-based and 37.8% of office-based physicians with EHRs responded to the question about patient interaction. Five main themes emerged for hospital-based physicians, with respondents generally perceiving EHRs as negatively altering patient interactions. We noted the same five themes among office-based physicians, but the rank-order of the top two responses differed by setting: hospital-based physicians commented most frequently that they spend less time with patients because they have to spend more time on computers; office-based physicians commented most frequently on EHRs worsening the quality of their interactions and relationships with patients. Conclusion: In our analysis of a large sample of physicians, hospital-based physicians generally perceived EHRs as negatively altering patient interactions, although they emphasized different reasons than their office-based counterparts. These findings add to the prior literature, which focuses on outpatient physicians, and can shape interventions to improve how EHRs are used in inpatient settings.

  12. Educating Health Professionals about the Electronic Health Record (EHR: Removing the Barriers to Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Bellwood

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the healthcare industry we have had a significant rise in the use of electronic health records (EHRs in health care settings (e.g. hospital, clinic, physician office and home. There are three main barriers that have arisen to the adoption of these technologies: (1 a shortage of health professional faculty who are familiar with EHRs and related technologies, (2 a shortage of health informatics specialists who can implement these technologies, and (3 poor access to differing types of EHR software. In this paper we outline a novel solution to these barriers: the development of a web portal that provides facility and health professional students with access to multiple differing types of EHRs over the WWW. The authors describe how the EHR is currently being used in educational curricula and how it has overcome many of these barriers. The authors also briefly describe the strengths and limitations of the approach.

  13. Electronic Health Record Tools to Care for At-Risk Older Drivers: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Colleen M; Salinas, Katherine; Eckstrom, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    Evaluating driving safety of older adults is an important health topic, but primary care providers (PCP) face multiple barriers in addressing this issue. The study's objectives were to develop an electronic health record (EHR)-based Driving Clinical Support Tool, train PCPs to perform driving assessments utilizing the tool, an