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Sample records for ryanodine sensitive ion

  1. Functionally heterogenous ryanodine receptors in avian cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierralta, J; Fill, M; Suárez-Isla, B A

    1996-07-19

    The functional heterogeneity of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels in avian cerebellum was defined. Heavy endoplasmic reticulum microsomes had significant levels of ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binding. Scatchard analysis and kinetic studies indicated the existence of at least two distinct ryanodine binding sites. Ryanodine binding was calcium-dependent but was not significantly enhanced by caffeine. Incorporation of microsomes into planar lipid bilayers revealed ion channels with pharmacological features (calcium, magnesium, ATP, and caffeine sensitivity) similar to the RyR channels found in mammalian striated muscle. Despite a wide range of unitary conductances (220-500 picosiemens, symmetrical cesium methanesulfonate), ryanodine locked both channels into a characteristic slow gating subconductance state, positively identifying them as RyR channels. Two populations of avian RyR channels were functionally distinguished by single channel calcium sensitivity. One population was defined by a bell-shaped calcium sensitivity analogous to the skeletal muscle RyR isoform (type I). The calcium sensitivity of the second RyR population was sigmoidal and analogous to the cardiac muscle RyR isoform (type II). These data show that there are at least two functionally distinct RyR channel populations in avian cerebellum. This leads to the possibility that these functionally distinct RyR channels are involved in different intracellular calcium signaling pathways.

  2. Membrane depolarization increases ryanodine sensitivity to Ca2+ release to the cytosol in L6 skeletal muscle cells: Implications for excitation-contraction coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitake, Saumitra; Ochs, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor in the plasma membrane and the ryanodine receptor in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are known to physically interact in the process of excitation-contraction coupling. However, the mechanism for subsequent Ca(2+) release through the ryanodine receptor is unknown. Our lab has previously presented evidence that the dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor combine as a channel for the entry of Ca(2+) under resting conditions, known as store operated calcium entry. Here, we provide evidence that depolarization during excitation-contraction coupling causes the dihydropyridine receptor to disengage from the ryanodine receptor. The newly freed ryanodine receptor can then transport Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol. Experimentally, this should more greatly expose the ryanodine receptor to exogenous ryanodine. To examine this hypothesis, we titrated L6 skeletal muscle cells with ryanodine in resting and excited (depolarized) states. When L6 muscle cells were depolarized with high potassium or exposed to the dihydropyridine receptor agonist BAYK-8644, known to induce dihydropyridine receptor movement within the membrane, ryanodine sensitivity was enhanced. However, ryanodine sensitivity was unaffected when Ca(2+) was elevated without depolarization by the ryanodine receptor agonist chloromethylcresol, or by increasing Ca(2+) concentration in the media. Ca(2+) entry currents (from the extracellular space) during excitation were strongly inhibited by ryanodine, but Ca(2+) entry currents in the resting state were not. We conclude that excitation releases the ryanodine receptor from occlusion by the dihydropyridine receptor, enabling Ca(2+) release from the ryanodine receptor to the cytosol. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  3. [3H]PN200-110 and [3H]ryanodine binding and reconstitution of ion channel activity with skeletal muscle membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.L.; Alvarez, R.M.; Fill, M.; Hawkes, M.J.; Brush, K.L.; Schilling, W.P.; Stefani, E.

    1989-01-01

    Skeletal muscle membranes derived either from the tubular (T) network or from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were characterized with respect to the binding of the dihydropyridine, [ 3 H]PN200-110, and the alkaloid, [ 3 H]ryanodine; polypeptide composition; and ion channel activity. Conditions for optimizing the binding of these radioligands are discussed. A bilayer pulsing technique is described and is used to examine the channels present in these membranes. Fusion of T-tubule membranes into bilayers revealed the presence of chloride channels and dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels with three distinct conductances. The dihydropyridine-sensitive channels were further characterized with respect to their voltage dependence. Pulsing experiments indicated that two different populations of dihydropyridine-sensitive channels existed. Fusion of heavy SR vesicles revealed three different ion channels; the putative calcium release channel, a potassium channel, and a chloride channel. Thus, this fractionation procedure provides T-tubules and SR membranes which, with radioligand binding and single channel recording techniques, provide a useful tool to study the characteristics of skeletal muscle ion channels and their possible role in excitation-contraction coupling

  4. Separation and formation of ryanodine from dehydroryanodine. Preparation of tritium-labelled ryanodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutko, J.L.; Thompson, L.J.; Schlatterer, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The commercially available preparation of the naturally occurring diterpene ester ryanodine contains several compounds in addition to ryanodine. These compounds were separated and purified using high performance liquid chromatography. The two major components, ryanodine and dehydroryanodine represented 90% of the material present. A method for the efficient reduction of dehydroryanodine to ryanodine was developed and used to produce ryanodine having tritium atoms at positions 19 and 20 and a specific activity of 60.8 Ci/mmole. (author)

  5. Aging Effects of Caenorhabditis elegans Ryanodine Receptor Variants Corresponding to Human Myopathic Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Nicoll Baines

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Delaying the decline in skeletal muscle function will be critical to better maintenance of an active lifestyle in old age. The skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor, the major intracellular membrane channel through which calcium ions pass to elicit muscle contraction, is central to calcium ion balance and is hypothesized to be a significant factor for age-related decline in muscle function. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a key model system for the study of human aging, and strains were generated with modified C. elegans ryanodine receptors corresponding to human myopathic variants linked with malignant hyperthermia and related conditions. The altered response of these strains to pharmacological agents reflected results of human diagnostic tests for individuals with these pathogenic variants. Involvement of nerve cells in the C. elegans responses may relate to rare medical symptoms concerning the central nervous system that have been associated with ryanodine receptor variants. These single amino acid modifications in C. elegans also conferred a reduction in lifespan and an accelerated decline in muscle integrity with age, supporting the significance of ryanodine receptor function for human aging.

  6. Insect Ryanodine Receptor: Distinct But Coupled Insecticide Binding Sites for [N-C3H3]Chlorantraniliprole, Flubendiamide, and [3H]Ryanodine

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, André K.; Qi, Suzhen; Sarpong, Richmond; Casida, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabeled anthranilic diamide insecticide [N-C3H3]chlorantraniliprole was synthesized at high specific activity and compared with phthalic diamide insecticide flubendiamide and [3H]ryanodine in radioligand binding studies with house fly muscle membranes to provide the first direct evidence with a native insect ryanodine receptor that the major anthranilic and phthalic diamide insecticides bind at different allosterically coupled sites, i.e. there are three distinct Ca2+-release channel tar...

  7. The action of ryanodine on rat fast and slow intact skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, M W; Lamb, G D; Neering, I R

    1989-07-01

    1. The action of ryanodine on force development of bundles dissected from rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles has been examined. 2. Ryanodine (100-5000 nM) irreversibly depressed twitch and tetanic tension of both muscle types in a dose-related manner. 3. At concentrations above 250 nM, ryanodine induced a slowly developing, dose-dependent contracture which could not be blocked by 5 mM-Co2+. Increasing the stimulation rate or decreasing the oxygenation of the preparation accelerated the rate of contracture development while the total removal of extracellular Ca2+ was required to prevent it. 4. Following the relaxation of the initial contracture (IC) in Ca2+-free solution, a second type of contracture (SC) could be induced by the readdition of Ca2+. This contracture differed from IC in that it was dependent on Ca2+ in the millimolar range and was prevented by 5 mM-Co2+. Both IC and SC were relaxed by perfusion with Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing solution. 5. Subcontracture doses of ryanodine (100 nM) markedly potentiated caffeine contractures of both muscle types. 6. Asymmetric charge movement in EDL fibres was recorded with the Vaseline-gap technique. The amount of charge moved near threshold was virtually unaffected by the presence of 10 microM-ryanodine over the time examined. 7. The results are consistent with the suggestion that ryanodine locks the calcium release channels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in an open subconductance state with reduced conductance. It appears that lowering the external calcium concentration might still inactivate the release channels after they have been blocked open by ryanodine, possibly by an effect on the T-tubular voltage sensor.

  8. Channel Gating Dependence on Pore Lining Helix Glycine Residues in Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Mowrey, David D; Mendez Giraldez, Raul; Wang, Ying; Pasek, Daniel A; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2015-07-10

    Type 1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) release Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to initiate skeletal muscle contraction. The role of RyR1-G4934 and -G4941 in the pore-lining helix in channel gating and ion permeation was probed by replacing them with amino acid residues of increasing side chain volume. RyR1-G4934A, -G4941A, and -G4941V mutant channels exhibited a caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release response in HEK293 cells and bound the RyR-specific ligand [(3)H]ryanodine. In single channel recordings, significant differences in the number of channel events and mean open and close times were observed between WT and RyR1-G4934A and -G4941A. RyR1-G4934A had reduced K(+) conductance and ion selectivity compared with WT. Mutations further increasing the side chain volume at these positions (G4934V and G4941I) resulted in reduced caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells, low [(3)H]ryanodine binding levels, and channels that were not regulated by Ca(2+) and did not conduct Ca(2+) in single channel measurements. Computational predictions of the thermodynamic impact of mutations on protein stability indicated that although the G4934A mutation was tolerated, the G4934V mutation decreased protein stability by introducing clashes with neighboring amino acid residues. In similar fashion, the G4941A mutation did not introduce clashes, whereas the G4941I mutation resulted in intersubunit clashes among the mutated isoleucines. Co-expression of RyR1-WT with RyR1-G4934V or -G4941I partially restored the WT phenotype, which suggested lessening of amino acid clashes in heterotetrameric channel complexes. The results indicate that both glycines are important for RyR1 channel function by providing flexibility and minimizing amino acid clashes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. C[sub 10]-O[sub eq]-N-(4-azido-5-[sup 125]iodo salicyloyl)-[beta]-alanyl-[beta] alanyl ryanodine (Az-[beta]AR), a novel photo-affinity ligand for the ryanodine binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidasee, K.R.; Besch, H.R. Jr.; Kwon, Sangyeol; Emmick, J.T.; Besch, K.T.; Gerzon, Koert; Humerickhouse, R.A. (Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States). School of Medicine)

    1994-01-01

    A high affinity, photoactivatable, radio-iodinated ligand for the ryanodine binding site(s) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channel, C[sub 10]-O[sub e]-N-(4-azido-5-[sup 125]iodo salicyloyl)-[beta]-alanyl-[beta]-alanyl ryanodine (Az-[beta]AR), was synthesized at a specific activity of 1400mCi/mmol. (Author).

  10. Alteration of Airway Reactivity and Reduction of Ryanodine Receptor Expression by Cigarette Smoke in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Chantal; Seow, Huei Jiunn; Royce, Simon G; Bourke, Jane E; Vlahos, Ross

    2015-10-01

    Small airways are a major site of airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Despite the detrimental effects of long-term smoking in COPD, the effects of acute cigarette smoke (CS) exposure on small airway reactivity have not been fully elucidated. Balb/C mice were exposed to room air (sham) or CS for 4 days to cause airway inflammation. Changes in small airway lumen area in response to contractile agents were measured in lung slices in situ using phase-contrast microscopy. Separate slices were pharmacologically maintained at constant intracellular Ca(2+) using caffeine/ryanodine before contractile measurements. Gene and protein analysis of contractile signaling pathways were performed on separate lungs. Monophasic contraction to serotonin became biphasic after CS exposure, whereas contraction to methacholine was unaltered. This altered pattern of contraction was normalized by caffeine/ryanodine. Expression of contractile agonist-specific receptors was unaltered; however, all isoforms of the ryanodine receptor were down-regulated. This is the first study to show that acute CS exposure selectively alters small airway contraction to serotonin and down-regulates ryanodine receptors involved in maintaining Ca(2+) oscillations in airway smooth muscle. Understanding the contribution of ryanodine receptors to altered airway reactivity may inform the development of novel treatment strategies for COPD.

  11. One Dimensional Finite Element Method Approach to Study Effect of Ryanodine Receptor and Serca Pump on Calcium Distribution in Oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Parvaiz Ahmad; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2013-11-01

    Oocyte is a female gametocyte or germ cell involved in reproduction. Calcium ions (Ca2+) impact nearly all aspects of cellular life as they play an important role in a variety of cellular functions. Calcium ions contributes to egg activation upon fertilization. Since it is the internal stores which provide most of the calcium signal, much attention has been focused on the intracellular channels. There are mainly two types of calcium channels which release calcium from the internal stores to the cytoplasm in many cell types. These channels are IP3-Receptor and Ryanodine Receptor (RyR). Further it is essential to maintain low cytosolic calcium concentration, the cell engages the Serco/Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases (SERCA) present on the ER or SR membrane for the re-uptake of cytosolic calcium at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. In view of above an attempt has been made to study the effect of the Ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the SERCA pump on the calcium distribution in oocytes. The main aim of this paper is to study the calcium concentration in absence and presence of these parameters. The FEM is used to solve the proposed Mathematical model under appreciate initial and boundary conditions. The program has been developed in MATLAB 7.10 for the entire problem to get numerical results.

  12. True Molecular Scale Visualization of Variable Clustering Properties of Ryanodine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru Jayasinghe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Signaling nanodomains rely on spatial organization of proteins to allow controlled intracellular signaling. Examples include calcium release sites of cardiomyocytes where ryanodine receptors (RyRs are clustered with their molecular partners. Localization microscopy has been crucial to visualizing these nanodomains but has been limited by brightness of markers, restricting the resolution and quantification of individual proteins clustered within. Harnessing the remarkable localization precision of DNA-PAINT (<10 nm, we visualized punctate labeling within these nanodomains, confirmed as single RyRs. RyR positions within sub-plasmalemmal nanodomains revealed how they are organized randomly into irregular clustering patterns leaving significant gaps occupied by accessory or regulatory proteins. RyR-inhibiting protein junctophilin-2 appeared highly concentrated adjacent to RyR channels. Analyzing these molecular maps showed significant variations in the co-clustering stoichiometry between junctophilin-2 and RyR, even between nearby nanodomains. This constitutes an additional level of complexity in RyR arrangement and regulation of calcium signaling, intrinsically built into the nanodomains. : Jayasinghe et al. resolve the distribution of single ryanodine receptors (RyRs within intracellular signaling domains in cardiac myocytes with DNA-PAINT, a super-resolution microscopy approach. Individual RyRs are resolved within irregular cluster arrays. Quantitative imaging reveals significant variation in the co-clustering stoichiometry between RyRs and the regulatory protein junctophilin-2. Keywords: nanodomains, DNA-PAINT, single-molecule localization microscopy, ryanodine receptor, super-resolution imaging, junctophilin, heart

  13. Environment-sensitive ion-track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaru

    1996-01-01

    Development of an environment-sensitive porous membrane from ion-track membranes may realize by combining the techniques of ion beam radiation and those of molecular designing and synthesis for intelligent materials. Now, the development of such membrane is progressing with an aim at selecting some specific substances and accurately control its pore size in response to any small environmental stimulus such as temperature change. The authors have been studying the molecular design, synthesis and functional expression of intelligent materials, which are called here as environment-sensitive gels. In this report, the outlines of the apparatus for the production of such porous membrane was described. An organic polymer membrane was irradiated with an ion beam and followed by chemical etching to make ion track pores. Scanning electron microscopic observation for the cross section of the membrane showed that the pore shape varies greatly depending on the ion nuclide used. The characteristics of newly produced porous membranes consisting of CR-30/A-ProDMe and polyethylene-telephtharate were investigated in respect of pore size change responding to temperature. These studies of design, synthesis and functions of such gels would enable to substitute artificial materials for the functions of human sensors. (M.N.). 54 refs

  14. A sensitive fluorescent sensor of lanthanide ions

    CERN Document Server

    Bekiari, V; Lianos, P

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescent probe bearing a diazostilbene chromophore and a benzo-15-crown-5 ether moiety is a very efficient sensor of lanthanide ions. The ligand emits strong fluorescence only in the presence of specific ions, namely lanthanide ions, while the emission wavelength is associated with a particular ion providing high sensitivity and resolution.

  15. Cardiac ryanodine receptor in metabolic syndrome: is JTV519 (K201 future therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dincer UD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available U Deniz DincerDepartment of Pharmacology, Ufuk University School of Medicine. Mevlana Bulvari, Balgat, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a combination of obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. This multifaceted syndrome is often accompanied by a hyperdynamic circulatory state characterized by increased blood pressure, total blood volume, cardiac output, and metabolic tissue demand. Experimental, epidemiological, and clinical studies have demonstrated that patients with metabolic syndrome have significantly elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. One of the main and frequent complications seen in metabolic syndrome is cardiovascular disease. The primary endpoints of cardiometabolic risk are coronary and peripheral arterial disease, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and stroke. Alterations in expression and/or functioning of several key proteins involved in regulating and maintaining ionic homeostasis can cause cardiac disturbances. One such group of proteins is known as ryanodine receptors (intracellular calcium release channels, which are the major channels through which Ca2+ ions leave the sarcoplasmic reticulum, leading to cardiac muscle contraction. The economic cost of metabolic syndrome and its associated complications has a significant effect on health care budgets. Improvements in body weight, blood lipid profile, and hyperglycemia can reduce cardiometabolic risk. However, constant hyperadrenergic stimulation still contributes to the burden of disease. Normalization of the hyperdynamic circulatory state with conventional therapies is the most reasonable therapeutic strategy to date. JTV519 (K201 is a newly developed 1,4-benzothiazepine drug with antiarrhythmic and cardioprotective properties. It appears to be very effective in not only preventing but also in reversing the characteristic myocardial changes and preventing

  16. Double-Nanodomain Coupling of Calcium Channels, Ryanodine Receptors, and BK Channels Controls the Generation of Burst Firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomohiko; Trussell, Laurence O

    2017-11-15

    Action potentials clustered into high-frequency bursts play distinct roles in neural computations. However, little is known about ionic currents that control the duration and probability of these bursts. We found that, in cartwheel inhibitory interneurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the likelihood of bursts and the interval between their spikelets were controlled by Ca 2+ acting across two nanodomains, one between plasma membrane P/Q Ca 2+ channels and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) ryanodine receptors and another between ryanodine receptors and large-conductance, voltage- and Ca 2+ -activated K + (BK) channels. Each spike triggered Ca 2+ -induced Ca 2+ release (CICR) from the ER immediately beneath somatic, but not axonal or dendritic, plasma membrane. Moreover, immunolabeling demonstrated close apposition of ryanodine receptors and BK channels. Double-nanodomain coupling between somatic plasma membrane and hypolemmal ER cisterns provides a unique mechanism for rapid control of action potentials on the millisecond timescale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A structural model of the pore-forming region of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Ramachandran

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs are ion channels that regulate muscle contraction by releasing calcium ions from intracellular stores into the cytoplasm. Mutations in skeletal muscle RyR (RyR1 give rise to congenital diseases such as central core disease. The absence of high-resolution structures of RyR1 has limited our understanding of channel function and disease mechanisms at the molecular level. Here, we report a structural model of the pore-forming region of RyR1. Molecular dynamics simulations show high ion binding to putative pore residues D4899, E4900, D4938, and D4945, which are experimentally known to be critical for channel conductance and selectivity. We also observe preferential localization of Ca(2+ over K(+ in the selectivity filter of RyR1. Simulations of RyR1-D4899Q mutant show a loss of preference to Ca(2+ in the selectivity filter as seen experimentally. Electrophysiological experiments on a central core disease mutant, RyR1-G4898R, show constitutively open channels that conduct K(+ but not Ca(2+. Our simulations with G4898R likewise show a decrease in the preference of Ca(2+ over K(+ in the selectivity filter. Together, the computational and experimental results shed light on ion conductance and selectivity of RyR1 at an atomistic level.

  18. A case of late-onset, thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis with ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies and concomitant granulomatous myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, M I; Komorowski, L; Kade, S; Bornemann, A; Ziemann, U; Synofzik, M

    2016-09-13

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder, which has only rarely been reported to co-manifest with myositis. The diagnosis of concomitant myositis in patients with myasthenia gravis is clinically challenging, and requires targeted investigations for the differential diagnosis, including EMG, autoantibody assays, muscle biopsy and, importantly, imaging of the mediastinum for thymoma screening. This report presents a case-vignette of a 72-year-old woman with progressive proximal muscle weakness and myalgias, diagnosed with thymoma-associated myasthenia and bioptically verified granulomatous myositis, with positive autoantibody status for ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies. The diagnosis of concurrent myositis and myasthenia gravis, especially in the presence of ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies, should lead neurologists to adopt different treatment strategies compared to those applied in myasthenia or myositis alone. Moreover, further evidence is warranted that titin and, particularly, ryanodine receptor antibodies may co-occur or be pathophysiologically involved in myasthenia-myositis cases.

  19. pH- and ion-sensitive polymers for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are important for effective, safe, and convenient administration of drugs. pH- and ion-responsive polymers have been widely employed in DDS for site-specific drug release due to their abilities to exploit specific pH- or ion-gradients in the human body. Areas covered Having pH-sensitivity, cationic polymers can mask the taste of drugs and release drugs in the stomach by responding to gastric low pH. Anionic polymers responsive to intestinal high pH are used for preventing gastric degradation of drug, colon drug delivery and achieving high bioavailability of weak basic drugs. Tumor-targeted DDSs have been developed based on polymers with imidazole groups or poly(β-amino ester) responsive to tumoral low pH. Polymers with pH-sensitive chemical linkages, such as hydrazone, acetal, ortho ester and vinyl ester, pH-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides and cationic polymers undergoing pH-dependent protonation have been studied to utilize the pH gradient along the endocytic pathway for intracellular drug delivery. As ion-sensitive polymers, ion-exchange resins are frequently used for taste-masking, counterion-responsive drug release and sustained drug release. Polymers responding to ions in the saliva and gastrointestinal fluids are also used for controlled drug release in oral drug formulations. Expert opinion Stimuli-responsive DDSs are important for achieving site-specific and controlled drug release; however, intraindividual, interindividual and intercellular variations of pH should be considered when designing DDSs or drug products. Combination of polymers and other components, and deeper understanding of human physiology are important for development of pH- and ion-sensitive polymeric DDS products for patients. PMID:23930949

  20. pH- and ion-sensitive polymers for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are important for effective, safe, and convenient administration of drugs. pH- and ion-responsive polymers have been widely employed in DDS for site-specific drug release due to their abilities to exploit specific pH- or ion-gradients in the human body. Having pH-sensitivity, cationic polymers can mask the taste of drugs and release drugs in the stomach by responding to gastric low pH. Anionic polymers responsive to intestinal high pH are used for preventing gastric degradation of drug, colon drug delivery and achieving high bioavailability of weak basic drugs. Tumor-targeted DDSs have been developed based on polymers with imidazole groups or poly(β-amino ester) responsive to tumoral low pH. Polymers with pH-sensitive chemical linkages, such as hydrazone, acetal, ortho ester and vinyl ester, pH-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides and cationic polymers undergoing pH-dependent protonation have been studied to utilize the pH gradient along the endocytic pathway for intracellular drug delivery. As ion-sensitive polymers, ion-exchange resins are frequently used for taste-masking, counterion-responsive drug release and sustained drug release. Polymers responding to ions in the saliva and gastrointestinal fluids are also used for controlled drug release in oral drug formulations. Stimuli-responsive DDSs are important for achieving site-specific and controlled drug release; however, intraindividual, interindividual and intercellular variations of pH should be considered when designing DDSs or drug products. Combination of polymers and other components, and deeper understanding of human physiology are important for development of pH- and ion-sensitive polymeric DDS products for patients.

  1. High-field modulated ion-selective field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors with sensitivity higher than the ideal Nernst sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Sarangadharan, Indu; Sukesan, Revathi; Hseih, Ching-Yen; Lee, Geng-Yen; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2018-05-29

    Lead ion selective membrane (Pb-ISM) coated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) was used to demonstrate a whole new methodology for ion-selective FET sensors, which can create ultra-high sensitivity (-36 mV/log [Pb 2+ ]) surpassing the limit of ideal sensitivity (-29.58 mV/log [Pb 2+ ]) in a typical Nernst equation for lead ion. The largely improved sensitivity has tremendously reduced the detection limit (10 -10  M) for several orders of magnitude of lead ion concentration compared to typical ion-selective electrode (ISE) (10 -7  M). The high sensitivity was obtained by creating a strong filed between the gate electrode and the HEMT channel. Systematical investigation was done by measuring different design of the sensor and gate bias, indicating ultra-high sensitivity and ultra-low detection limit obtained only in sufficiently strong field. Theoretical study in the sensitivity consistently agrees with the experimental finding and predicts the maximum and minimum sensitivity. The detection limit of our sensor is comparable to that of Inductively-Coupled-Plasma Mass Spectrum (ICP-MS), which also has detection limit near 10 -10  M.

  2. Multiple-channel detection of cellular activities by ion-sensitive transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Satoru; Shimada, Hideto; Motoyama, Yumi

    2018-04-01

    An ion-sensitive field-effect transistor to record cellular activities was demonstrated. This field-effect transistor (bio transistor) includes cultured cells on the gate insulator instead of gate electrode. The bio transistor converts a change in potential underneath the cells into variation of the drain current when ion channels open. The bio transistor has high detection sensitivity to even minute variations in potential utilizing a subthreshold swing region. To open ion channels, a reagent solution (acetylcholine) was added to a human-originating cell cultured on the bio transistor. The drain current was successfully decreased with the addition of acetylcholine. Moreover, we attempted to detect the opening of ion channels using a multiple-channel measurement circuit containing several bio transistors. As a consequence, the drain current distinctly decreased only after the addition of acetylcholine. We confirmed that this measurement system including bio transistors enables to observation of cellular activities sensitively and simultaneously.

  3. Characterization of ryanodine receptor and Ca2+-ATPase isoforms in the thermogenic heater organ of blue marlin (Makaira nigricans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Jeffery M; Franck, Jens P G; Block, Barbara A

    2003-03-01

    A thermogenic organ is found beneath the brain of billfishes (Istiophoridae), swordfish (Xiphiidae) and the butterfly mackerel (Scombridae). The heater organ has been shown to warm the brain and eyes up to 14 degrees C above ambient water temperature. Heater cells are derived from extraocular muscle fibers and express a modified muscle phenotype with an extensive transverse-tubule (T-tubule) network and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) enriched in Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pumps and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Heater cells have a high mitochondria content but have lost most of the contractile myofilaments. Thermogenesis has been hypothesized to be associated with release and reuptake of Ca(2+). In this study, Ca(2+) fluxes in heater SR vesicles derived from blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) were measured using fura-2 fluorescence. Upon the addition of MgATP, heater SR vesicles rapidly sequestered Ca(2+). Uptake of Ca(2+) was thapsigargin sensitive, and maximum loading ranged between 0.8 micro mol Ca(2+) mg(-1) protein and 1.0 micro mol Ca(2+) mg(-1) protein. Upon the addition of 10 mmol l(-1) caffeine or 350 micro mol l(-1) ryanodine, heater SR vesicles released only a small fraction of the loaded Ca(2+). However, ryanodine could elicit a much larger Ca(2+) release event when the activity of the SERCA pumps was reduced. RNase protection assays revealed that heater tissue expresses an RyR isoform that is also expressed in fish slow-twitch skeletal muscle but is distinct from the RyR expressed in fish fast-twitch skeletal muscle. The heater and slow-twitch muscle RyR isoform has unique physiological properties. In the presence of adenine nucleotides, this RyR remains open even though cytoplasmic Ca(2+) is elevated, a condition that normally closes RyRs. The fast Ca(2+) sequestration by the heater SR, coupled with a physiologically unique RyR, is hypothesized to promote Ca(2+) cycling, ATP turnover and heat generation. A branch of the oculomotor nerve innervates heater organs

  4. Biocompatibility Research of a Novel pH Sensitive Ion Exchange Resin Microsphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfei; Shi, Shuangshuang; Pan, Weisan; Sun, Changshan; Zou, Xiaomian; Fu, Min; Feng, Yingshu; Ding, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate biocompatibility and provide in-vivo pharmacological and toxicological evidence for further investigation of the possibility of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere for clinical utilizations. Acute toxicity study and general pharmacological studies were conducted on the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere we prepared. The general pharmacological studies consist of the effects of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere on the nervous system of mice, the functional coordination of mice, the hypnosis of mice treated with nembutal at subliminal dose, the autonomic activities of tested mice, and the heart rate, blood pressure, ECG and breathing of the anesthetic cats. The LD50 of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere after oral administration was more than 18.84 g·Kg(-1). Mice were orally administered with 16 mg·Kg(-1), 32 mg·Kg(-1) and 64 mg·Kg(-1) of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere and there was no significant influence on mice nervous system, general behavior, function coordination, hypnotic effect treated with nembutal at subliminal dose and frequency of autonomic activities. Within the 90 min after 5 mg·Kg(-1), 10 mg·Kg(-1), 20 mg·Kg(-1) pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere was injected to cat duodenum, the heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and ECG of the cats didn't make significant changes in each experimental group compared with the control group. The desirable pharmacological and toxicological behaviors of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere exhibited that it has safe biocompatibility and is possible for clinical use.

  5. Ryanodine receptors, a family of intracellular calcium ion channels, are expressed throughout early vertebrate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Houdini HT

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium signals ([Ca2+]i direct many aspects of embryo development but their regulation is not well characterised. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs are a family of intracellular Ca2+ release channels that control the flux of Ca2+ from internal stores into the cytosol. RyRs are primarily known for their role in excitation-contraction coupling in adult striated muscle and ryr gene mutations are implicated in several human diseases. Current evidence suggests that RyRs do not have a major role to play prior to organogenesis but regulate tissue differentiation. Findings The sequences of the five zebrafish ryr genes were confirmed, their evolutionary relationship established and the primary sequences compared to other vertebrates, including humans. RyRs are differentially expressed in slow (ryr1a, fast (ryr3 and both types (ryr1b of developing skeletal muscle. There are two ryr2 genes (ryr2a and ryr2b which are expressed exclusively in developing CNS and cardiac tissue, respectively. In addition, ryr3 and ryr2a mRNA is detectable in the initial stages of development, prior to embryonic axis formation. Conclusions Our work reveals that zebrafish ryr genes are differentially expressed throughout the developing embryo from cleavage onwards. The data suggests that RyR-regulated Ca2+ signals are associated with several aspects of embryonic development, from organogenesis through to the differentiation of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and nervous system. These studies will facilitate further work to explore the developmental function of RyRs in each of these tissue types.

  6. A very sensitive ion collection device for plasma-laser characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, S; Torrisi, L; Cutroneo, M; Amato, A; Sarta, F; Wen, L

    2012-06-01

    In this paper a very sensitive ion collection device, for diagnostic of laser ablated-target plasma, is described. It allows for reducing down to few microvolts the signal threshold at digital scope input. A standard ion collector is coupled to a transimpedance amplifier, specially designed, which increases data acquisition sensitivity by a gain ≈1100 and does not introduce any significant distortion of input signal. By time integration of current intensity, an amount of charge as small as 2.7 × 10(-2) pC can be detected for photopeak events.

  7. Spatial profile measurements of ion-confining potentials using novel position-sensitive ion-energy spectrometer arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Cho, T.; Hirata, M.; Ito, H.; Kohagura, J.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.

    2003-01-01

    The first experimental demonstration of simultaneous measurements of temporally and spatially resolved ion-confining potentials phi c and end-loss-ion fluxes I ELA has been carried out during a single plasma discharge alone by the use of newly designed ion-energy-spectrometer arrays installed in both end regions of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. This position-sensitive ion-detector structure is proposed to obtain precise ion-energy spectra without any perturbations from simultaneously incident energetic electrons into the arrays. The relation between phi c and I ELA is physically interpreted in terms of Pastukhov's potential confinement theory. In particular, the importance of axisymmetric phi c formation is found for the plasma confinement

  8. Glucose-Dependent Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic β-Cell Islets from Male Rats Requires Ca2+ Release via ROS-Stimulated Ryanodine Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Llanos

    Full Text Available Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS from pancreatic β-cells requires an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]. Glucose uptake into β-cells promotes Ca2+ influx and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. In other cell types, Ca2+ and ROS jointly induce Ca2+ release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR channels. Therefore, we explored here if RyR-mediated Ca2+ release contributes to GSIS in β-cell islets isolated from male rats. Stimulatory glucose increased islet insulin secretion, and promoted ROS generation in islets and dissociated β-cells. Conventional PCR assays and immunostaining confirmed that β-cells express RyR2, the cardiac RyR isoform. Extended incubation of β-cell islets with inhibitory ryanodine suppressed GSIS; so did the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, which also decreased insulin secretion induced by glucose plus caffeine. Inhibitory ryanodine or NAC did not affect insulin secretion induced by glucose plus carbachol, which engages inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Incubation of islets with H2O2 in basal glucose increased insulin secretion 2-fold. Inhibitory ryanodine significantly decreased H2O2-stimulated insulin secretion and prevented the 4.5-fold increase of cytoplasmic [Ca2+] produced by incubation of dissociated β-cells with H2O2. Addition of stimulatory glucose or H2O2 (in basal glucose to β-cells disaggregated from islets increased RyR2 S-glutathionylation to similar levels, measured by a proximity ligation assay; in contrast, NAC significantly reduced the RyR2 S-glutathionylation increase produced by stimulatory glucose. We propose that RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release, induced by the concomitant increases in [Ca2+] and ROS produced by stimulatory glucose, is an essential step in GSIS.

  9. Measuring the sensitivity of a boron-lined ion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    Boron-lined ion chambers are used to monitor external neutron flux from fissionable materials assembled at the Los Alamos Critical Assembly Experiment Facility. The sensitivity of these chambers must be measured periodically in order to detect changes in filling gas and to evaluate other factors that may affect chamber performance. We delineate a procedure to measure ion chamber response using a particular neutron source ( 239 PuBe) in a particular moderating geometry of polyethylene. We also discuss use of the amplifier, high-voltage power supply, recorders, and scram circuits that comprise the complete ion chamber monitoring system

  10. Pre-Slaughter Stress Affects Ryanodine Receptor Protein Gene Expression and the Water-Holding Capacity in Fillets of the Nile Tilapia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice S R Goes

    Full Text Available Current study evaluated the effect of pre-slaughter stress on serum cortisol levels, pH, colorimetry, water-holding capacity (WHC and gene expression of ryanodine receptors (RyR1 and RyR3 in the Nile tilapia. A 3x4 factorial scheme experiment was conducted comprising three densities (100, 200, 400 kg/m³ with four transportation times (60, 120, 180, and 240 minutes.Transportation times alone reduced cortisol levels up to 180 minutes, followed by increased WHC and mRNA expression, RyR1 and RyR3 (200 kg/m³ density. No effect of density x transportation time interacted on the evaluated parameters. Results provided the first evidence that pre-slaughter stress affected ryanodine gene expression receptors and, consequently, the water-holding capacity in tilapia fillets.

  11. Modified graphene oxide sensors for ultra-sensitive detection of nitrate ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wen; Mura, Stefania; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-10-01

    Nitrate ions is a very common contaminant in drinking water and has a significant impact on the environment, necessitating routine monitoring. Due to its chemical and physical properties, it is hard to directly detect nitrate ions with high sensitivity in a simple and inexpensive manner. Herein with amino group modified graphene oxide (GO) as a sensing element, we show a direct and ultra-sensitive method to detect nitrate ions, at a lowest detected concentration of 5 nM in river water samples, much lower than the reported methods based on absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, unlike the reported strategies based on absorption spectroscopy wherein the nitrate concentration is determined by monitoring an increase in aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), our method evaluates the concentration of nitrate ions based on reduction in aggregation of GNPs for monitoring in real samples. To improve sensitivity, several optimizations were performed, including the assessment of the amount of modified GO required, concentration of GNPs and incubation time. The detection methodology was characterized by zeta potential, TEM and SEM. Our results indicate that an enrichment of modified GO with nitrate ions contributed to excellent sensitivity and the entire detection procedure could be completed within 75 min with only 20 μl of sample. This simple and rapid methodology was applied to monitor nitrate ions in real samples with excellent sensitivity and minimum pretreatment. The proposed approach paves the way for a novel means to detect anions in real samples and highlights the potential of GO based detection strategy for water quality monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ca2+ and voltage dependence of cardiac ryanodine receptor channel block by sphingosylphosphorylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukochi, Midori; Uehara, Akira; Kobayashi, Sei; Berlin, Joshua R

    2003-03-01

    The effect of sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and voltage dependence of channel gating by cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR) was examined in lipid bilayer experiments. Micromolar concentrations of the lysosphingolipid SPC added to cis solutions rapidly and reversibly decreased the single-channel open probability (P(o)) of reconstituted RyR channels. The SPC-induced decrease in P(o) was marked by an increase in mean closed time and burst-like channel gating. Gating kinetics during intraburst periods were unchanged from those observed in the absence of the sphingolipid, although SPC induced a long-lived closed state that appeared to explain the observed decrease in channel P(o). SPC effects were observed over a broad range of cis [Ca(2+)] but were not competitive with Ca(2+). Interestingly, the sphingolipid-induced, long-lived closed state displayed voltage-dependent kinetics, even though other channel gating kinetics were not sensitive to voltage. Assuming SPC effects represent channel blockade, these results suggest that the blocking rate is independent of voltage whereas the unblocking rate is voltage dependent. Together, these results suggest that SPC binds directly to the cytoplasmic side of the RyR protein in a location in or near the membrane dielectric, but distinct from cytoplasmic Ca(2+) binding sites on the protein.

  13. Angle-resolved ion TOF spectrometer with a position sensitive detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Norio [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Heiser, F; Wieliczec, K; Becker, U

    1996-07-01

    A angle-resolved ion time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a position sensitive anode has been investigated. Performance of this spectrometer has been demonstrated by measuring an angular distribution of a fragment ion pair, C{sup +} + O{sup +}, from CO at the photon energy of 287.4 eV. The obtained angular distribution is very close to the theoretically expected one. (author)

  14. Rapid selection for resistance to diamide insecticides in Plutella xylostella via specific amino acid polymorphisms in the ryanodine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troczka, Bartlomiej J; Williamson, Martin S; Field, Linda M; Davies, T G Emyr

    2017-05-01

    Diamide insecticides, such as flubendiamide and chlorantraniliprole, are a new class of insecticide with a novel mode of action, selectively activating the insect ryanodine receptor (RyR). They are particularly active against lepidopteran pests of cruciferous vegetable crops, including the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. However, within a relatively short period following their commercialisation, a comparatively large number of control failures have been reported in the field. In this review we summarise the current body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms of diamide resistance in P. xylostella. Resistant phenotypes collected from different countries can often be linked to specific target-site mutation(s) in the ryanodine receptors' transmembrane domain. Metabolic mechanisms of resistance have also been proposed. Rapid resistance development is probably a consequence of over-reliance on this one class of chemistry for diamondback moth control. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor channels by alkaline earth cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula L Diaz-Sylvester

    Full Text Available Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2 function is modulated by Ca(2+ and Mg(2+. To better characterize Ca(2+ and Mg(2+ binding sites involved in RyR2 regulation, the effects of cytosolic and luminal earth alkaline divalent cations (M(2+: Mg(2+, Ca(2+, Sr(2+, Ba(2+ were studied on RyR2 from pig ventricle reconstituted in bilayers. RyR2 were activated by M(2+ binding to high affinity activating sites at the cytosolic channel surface, specific for Ca(2+ or Sr(2+. This activation was interfered by Mg(2+ and Ba(2+ acting at low affinity M(2+-unspecific binding sites. When testing the effects of luminal M(2+ as current carriers, all M(2+ increased maximal RyR2 open probability (compared to Cs(+, suggesting the existence of low affinity activating M(2+-unspecific sites at the luminal surface. Responses to M(2+ vary from channel to channel (heterogeneity. However, with luminal Ba(2+or Mg(2+, RyR2 were less sensitive to cytosolic Ca(2+ and caffeine-mediated activation, openings were shorter and voltage-dependence was more marked (compared to RyR2 with luminal Ca(2+or Sr(2+. Kinetics of RyR2 with mixtures of luminal Ba(2+/Ca(2+ and additive action of luminal plus cytosolic Ba(2+ or Mg(2+ suggest luminal M(2+ differentially act on luminal sites rather than accessing cytosolic sites through the pore. This suggests the presence of additional luminal activating Ca(2+/Sr(2+-specific sites, which stabilize high P(o mode (less voltage-dependent and increase RyR2 sensitivity to cytosolic Ca(2+ activation. In summary, RyR2 luminal and cytosolic surfaces have at least two sets of M(2+ binding sites (specific for Ca(2+ and unspecific for Ca(2+/Mg(2+ that dynamically modulate channel activity and gating status, depending on SR voltage.

  16. Abnormal interactions of calsequestrin with the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel complex linked to exercise-induced sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Nori, Alessandra; Santoro, Massimo; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Serge; Kubalova, Zuzana; Gyorke, Inna; Terentyeva, Radmila; Vedamoorthyrao, Srikanth; Blom, Nico A.; Valle, Giorgia; Napolitano, Carlo; Williams, Simon C.; Volpe, Pompeo; Priori, Silvia G.; Gyorke, Sandor

    2006-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a familial arrhythmogenic disorder associated with mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) genes. Previous in vitro studies suggested that RyR2 and CASQ2 interact as parts of a multimolecular

  17. ISFET pH Sensitivity: Counter-Ions Play a Key Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizi, Kokab B; Xu, Xiaoqing; Pal, Ashish; Hu, Xiaolin; Wong, H S Philip

    2017-02-02

    The Field Effect sensors are broadly used for detecting various target analytes in chemical and biological solutions. We report the conditions under which the pH sensitivity of an Ion Sensitive Field Effect transistor (ISFET) sensor can be significantly enhanced. Our theory and simulations show that by using pH buffer solutions containing counter-ions that are beyond a specific size, the sensor shows significantly higher sensitivity which can exceed the Nernst limit. We validate the theory by measuring the pH response of an extended gate ISFET pH sensor. The consistency and reproducibility of the measurement results have been recorded in hysteresis free and stable operations. Different conditions have been tested to confirm the accuracy and validity of our experiment results such as using different solutions, various oxide dielectrics as the sensing layer and off-the-shelf versus IC fabricated transistors as the basis of the ISFET sensor.

  18. Coupling of SK channels, L-type Ca2+ channels, and ryanodine receptors in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Coulibaly, Zana A; Chen, Wei Chun; Ledford, Hannah A; Lee, Jeong Han; Sirish, Padmini; Dai, Gu; Jian, Zhong; Chuang, Frank; Brust-Mascher, Ingrid; Yamoah, Ebenezer N; Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2018-03-16

    Small-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + (SK) channels regulate the excitability of cardiomyocytes by integrating intracellular Ca 2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. The inextricable interplay between activation of SK channels and Ca 2+ dynamics suggests the pathology of one begets another. Yet, the exact mechanistic underpinning for the activation of cardiac SK channels remains unaddressed. Here, we investigated the intracellular Ca 2+ microdomains necessary for SK channel activation. SK currents coupled with Ca 2+ influx via L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCCs) continued to be elicited after application of caffeine, ryanodine or thapsigargin to deplete SR Ca 2+ store, suggesting that LTCCs provide the immediate Ca 2+ microdomain for the activation of SK channels in cardiomyocytes. Super-resolution imaging of SK2, Ca v 1.2 Ca 2+ channel, and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) was performed to quantify the nearest neighbor distances (NND) and localized the three molecules within hundreds of nanometers. The distribution of NND between SK2 and RyR2 as well as SK2 and Ca v 1.2 was bimodal, suggesting a spatial relationship between the channels. The activation mechanism revealed by our study paved the way for the understanding of the roles of SK channels on the feedback mechanism to regulate the activities of LTCCs and RyR2 to influence local and global Ca 2+ signaling.

  19. Sensitivity of Electron Transfer Mediated Decay to Ion Pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Marvin N; Richter, Clemens; Lugovoy, Evgeny; Seidel, Robert; Slavíček, Petr; Aziz, Emad F; Abel, Bernd; Winter, Bernd; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2017-08-17

    Ion pairing in electrolyte solutions remains a topic of discussion despite a long history of research. Very recently, nearest-neighbor mediated electronic de-excitation processes of core hole vacancies (electron transfer mediated decay, ETMD) were proposed to carry a spectral fingerprint of local solvation structure and in particular of contact ion pairs. Here, for the first time, we apply electron-electron coincidence detection to a liquid microjet, and record ETMD spectra of Li 1s vacancies in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride (LiCl) in direct comparison to lithium acetate (LiOAc). A change in the ETMD spectrum dependent on the electrolyte anion identity is observed for 4.5 M salt concentration. We discuss these findings within the framework of the formation and presence of contact ion pairs and the unique sensitivity of ETMD spectroscopy to ion pairing.

  20. Highly Sensitive and Patchable Pressure Sensors Mimicking Ion-Channel-Engaged Sensory Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Son, Young Jun; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-04-26

    Biological ion channels have led to much inspiration because of their unique and exquisite operational functions in living cells. Specifically, their extreme and dynamic sensing abilities can be realized by the combination of receptors and nanopores coupled together to construct an ion channel system. In the current study, we demonstrated that artificial ion channel pressure sensors inspired by nature for detecting pressure are highly sensitive and patchable. Our ion channel pressure sensors basically consisted of receptors and nanopore membranes, enabling dynamic current responses to external forces for multiple applications. The ion channel pressure sensors had a sensitivity of ∼5.6 kPa(-1) and a response time of ∼12 ms at a frequency of 1 Hz. The power consumption was recorded as less than a few μW. Moreover, a reliability test showed stability over 10 000 loading-unloading cycles. Additionally, linear regression was performed in terms of temperature, which showed no significant variations, and there were no significant current variations with humidity. The patchable ion channel pressure sensors were then used to detect blood pressure/pulse in humans, and different signals were clearly observed for each person. Additionally, modified ion channel pressure sensors detected complex motions including pressing and folding in a high-pressure range (10-20 kPa).

  1. Improved abundance sensitivity of molecular ions in positive-ion APCI MS analysis of petroleum in toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2010-03-01

    Positive-ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) analyses of petroleum sample were performed with higher sensitivity by switching the solvent composition from toluene and methanol or acetonitrile to a one-component system consisting only of toluene. In solvent blends, molecular ions were more abundant than were protonated ions with increasing percentages of toluene. In 100% toluene, the double-bond equivalence (DBE) distributions of molecular ions obtained by APCI MS for each compound class were very similar to those obtained in dopant assisted atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) MS analyses. Therefore, it was concluded that charge-transfer reaction, which is important in toluene-doped APPI processes, also plays a major role in positive-ion APCI. In the DBE distributions of S(1), S(2), and SO heteroatom classes, a larger enhancement in the relative abundance of molecular ions at fairly specific DBE values was observed as the solvent was progressively switched to toluene. This enhanced abundance of molecular ions was likely dependent on molecular structure. Copyright 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels Biophysics of Molecular Excitability

    CERN Document Server

    Leuchtag, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive ion channels are macromolecules embedded in the membranes of nerve and muscle fibers of animals. Because of their physiological functions, biochemical structures and electrical switching properties, they are at an intersection of biology, chemistry and physics. Despite decades of intensive research under the traditional approach of gated structural pores, the relation between the structure of these molecules and their function remains enigmatic. This book critically examines physically oriented approaches not covered in other ion-channel books. It looks at optical and thermal as well as electrical data, and at studies in the frequency domain as well as in the time domain. Rather than presenting the reader with only an option of mechanistic models at an inappropriate pseudo-macroscopic scale, it emphasizes concepts established in organic chemistry and condensed state physics. The book’s approach to the understanding of these unique structures breaks with the unproven view of ion channels as...

  3. Nasal delivery of analgesic ketorolac tromethamine thermo- and ion-sensitive in situ hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Du, Lina; Chen, Xu; Ge, Pingju; Wang, Yu; Fu, Yangmu; Sun, Haiyan; Jiang, Qingwei; Jin, Yiguang

    2015-07-15

    Ketorolac tromethamine (KT) was potent to treat moderate to moderately severe pains. However, KT solutions for nasal delivery lost quickly from the nasal route. Thermo- and ion-sensitive in-situ hydrogels (ISGs) are appropriate for nasal drug delivery because the intranasal temperature maintains ∼37 °C and nasal fluids consist of plentiful cations. In this study, a novel nasal thermo- and ion-sensitive ISG of KT was prepared with thermo-sensitive poloxamer 407 (P407) and ion-sensitive deacetylated gellan gum (DGG). The optimal formulation of the KT ISG consisted of 3% (w/v) DGG and 18% (w/v) P407 and its viscosity was up to 7.63 Pas at 37 °C. Furthermore, penetration enhancers and bacterial inhibitors were added and their fractions in the ISG were optimized based on transmucosal efficiencies and toxicity on toad pili. Sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin of 2.5% (w/v) and chlorobutanol of 0.5% (w/v) were chosen as the penetration enhancer and the bacterial inhibitor, respectively. The Fick's diffusion and dissolution of KT could drive it continuous release from the dually sensitive ISG according to the in vitro investigation. Two methods, writhing frequencies induced by acetic acid and latency time of tails retracting from hot water, were used to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of the KT ISG on the mouse models. The writhing frequencies significantly decreased and the latency time of tail retracting was obviously prolonged (pthermo- and ion-sensitive KT ISG had appropriate gelation temperature, sustained drug release, improved intranasal absorption, obvious pharmacodynamic effect, and negligible nasal ciliotoxicity. It is a promising intranasal analgesic formulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Piezoelectric sensor for sensitive determination of metal ions based on the phosphate-modified dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. H.; Shen, C. Y.; Lin, Y. M.; Du, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Heavy metal ions arising from human activities are retained strongly in water; therefore public water supplies must be monitored regularly to ensure the timely detection of potential problems. A phosphate-modified dendrimer film was investigated on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for sensing metal ions in water at room temperature in this study. The chemical structures and sensing properties were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and QCM measurement, respectively. This phosphate-modified dendrimer sensor can directly detect metal ions in aqueous solutions. This novel sensor was evaluated for its capacity to sense various metal ions. The sensor exhibited a higher sensitivity level and shorter response time to copper(II) ions than other sensors. The linear detection range of the prepared QCM based on the phosphate-modified dendrimer was 0.0001 ∼ 1 μM Cu(II) ions (R2 = 0.98). The detection properties, including sensitivity, response time, selectivity, reusability, maximum adsorption capacity, and adsorption equilibrium constants, were also investigated.

  5. Iron oxide nanoparticle-micelles (ION-micelles for sensitive (molecular magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas W E Starmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs are a promising nanoplatform for contrast-enhanced MRI. Recently, magnetic particle imaging (MPI was introduced as a new imaging modality, which is able to directly visualize magnetic particles and could serve as a more sensitive and quantitative alternative to MRI. However, MPI requires magnetic particles with specific magnetic properties for optimal use. Current commercially available iron oxide formulations perform suboptimal in MPI, which is triggering research into optimized synthesis strategies. Most synthesis procedures aim at size control of iron oxide nanoparticles rather than control over the magnetic properties. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel ION platform for sensitive MPI and MRI. METHODS AND RESULTS: IONs were synthesized using a thermal-decomposition method and subsequently phase-transferred by encapsulation into lipidic micelles (ION-Micelles. Next, the material and magnetic properties of the ION-Micelles were analyzed. Most notably, vibrating sample magnetometry measurements showed that the effective magnetic core size of the IONs is 16 nm. In addition, magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS measurements were performed. MPS is essentially zero-dimensional MPI and therefore allows to probe the potential of iron oxide formulations for MPI. ION-Micelles induced up to 200 times higher signal in MPS measurements than commercially available iron oxide formulations (Endorem, Resovist and Sinerem and thus likely allow for significantly more sensitive MPI. In addition, the potential of the ION-Micelle platform for molecular MPI and MRI was showcased by MPS and MRI measurements of fibrin-binding peptide functionalized ION-Micelles (FibPep-ION-Micelles bound to blood clots. CONCLUSIONS: The presented data underlines the potential of the ION-Micelle nanoplatform for sensitive (molecular MPI and warrants further investigation of the FibPep-ION

  6. Boosting Sensitivity in Liquid Chromatography–Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Product Ion Analysis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo eNakabayashi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In metabolomics, the analysis of product ions in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS is noteworthy to chemically assign structural information. However, the development of relevant analytical methods are less advanced. Here, we developed a method to boost sensitivity in liquid chromatography–Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance–tandem mass spectrometry analysis (MS/MS boost analysis. To verify the MS/MS boost analysis, both quercetin and uniformly labeled 13C quercetin were analyzed, revealing that the origin of the product ions is not the instrument, but the analyzed compounds resulting in sensitive product ions. Next, we applied this method to the analysis of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs. The comparative analyses of MIAs having indole basic skeleton (ajmalicine, catharanthine, hirsuteine, and hirsutine and oxindole skeleton (formosanine, isoformosanine, pteropodine, isopteropodine, rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, and mitraphylline identified 86 and 73 common monoisotopic ions, respectively. The comparative analyses of the three pairs of stereoisomers showed more than 170 common monoisotopic ions in each pair. This method was also applied to the targeted analysis of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus and Uncaria rhynchophylla to profile indole and oxindole compounds using the product ions. This analysis is suitable for chemically assigning features of the metabolite groups, which contributes to targeted metabolome analysis.

  7. Boosting Sensitivity in Liquid Chromatography–Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Product Ion Analysis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    In metabolomics, the analysis of product ions in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is noteworthy to chemically assign structural information. However, the development of relevant analytical methods are less advanced. Here, we developed a method to boost sensitivity in liquid chromatography–Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance–tandem mass spectrometry analysis (MS/MS boost analysis). To verify the MS/MS boost analysis, both quercetin and uniformly labeled 13C quercetin were analyzed, revealing that the origin of the product ions is not the instrument, but the analyzed compounds resulting in sensitive product ions. Next, we applied this method to the analysis of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). The comparative analyses of MIAs having indole basic skeleton (ajmalicine, catharanthine, hirsuteine, and hirsutine) and oxindole skeleton (formosanine, isoformosanine, pteropodine, isopteropodine, rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, and mitraphylline) identified 86 and 73 common monoisotopic ions, respectively. The comparative analyses of the three pairs of stereoisomers showed more than 170 common monoisotopic ions in each pair. This method was also applied to the targeted analysis of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus and Uncaria rhynchophylla to profile indole and oxindole compounds using the product ions. This analysis is suitable for chemically assigning features of the metabolite groups, which contributes to targeted metabolome analysis. PMID:26734034

  8. The Influence of Several Doped Ions on Gas Sensitivity of Hematite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The dehydrating activation energies of the hematite with several doped ions used for the alcohol sensor were determinated by thermogravimetric differential thermal analyzer (TG-DTA) and the grain size of the samples were observed with TEM. The hematites with different doping amounts of Sn4 + were investigated by Mossbauer spectrometer. It shows that the different doped ion is of influence for grain growth of the hematite. The decrease of grain size stemmed from the doped ion causes gas sensitivity for alcohol to increase and the dehydrating activation energy to decrease correspondingly. When the different amounts of Sn4 + is doped in hematite, the microstructure of the hematite can be influenced.

  9. The ion-sensitive field effect transistor in rapid acid-base titrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.; Bergveld, Piet; van Veen-Blaauw, A.M.W.

    1979-01-01

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) are used as the pH sensor in rapid acid—base titrations. Titration speeds at least five times greater than those with glass electrodes are possible for accuracies better than ±1%.

  10. New membrane materials for potassium-selective ion-sensitive field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, P.D.; van der Wal, Peter D.; Skowronska-Ptasinska, Maria; van den Berg, Albert; Bergveld, Piet; Sudholter, Ernst; Sudholter, Ernst J.R.; Reinhoudt, David

    1990-01-01

    Several polymeric materials were studied as membrane materials for potassium-selective ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) to overcome the problems related with the use of conventional plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes casted on ISFET gate surfaces. Several acrylate materials,

  11. The Environmental Neurotoxicant PCB 95 Promotes Synaptogenesis via Ryanodine Receptor-Dependent miR132 Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Adam; Zhu, Mingyan; Chen, Hao; Appleyard, Suzanne M.; Impey, Soren; Wayman, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Non–dioxin-like (NDL) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread environmental contaminants linked to neuropsychological dysfunction in children. NDL PCBs increase spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in neurons by stabilizing ryanodine receptor (RyR) calcium release channels in the open configuration, which results in CREB-dependent dendritic outgrowth. In this study, we address the question of whether activation of CREB by NDL PCBs also triggers dendritic spine formation. Nanomolar concentrations of PCB 95, a NDL congener with potent RyR activity, significantly increased spine density and the frequency of miniature EPSCs in primary dissociated rat hippocampal cultures coincident with upregulation of miR132. Inhibition of RyR, CREB, or miR132 as well as expression of a mutant p250GAP cDNA construct that is not suppressed by miR132 blocked PCB 95 effects on spines and miniature EPSCs. PCB 95 also induced spine formation via RyR- and miR132-dependent mechanisms in hippocampal slice cultures. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of PCB developmental neurotoxicity whereby RyR sensitization modulates spine formation and synaptogenesis via CREB-mediated miR132 upregulation, which in turn suppresses the translation of p250GAP, a negative regulator of synaptogenesis. In light of recent evidence implicating miR132 dysregulation in Rett syndrome and schizophrenia, these findings identify NDL PCBs as potential environmental risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24431430

  12. Highly sensitive heavy metal ion detection using AlQ3 microwire functionalized QCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Nursel; Aǧar, Meltem; Altındal, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) microwires was successfully synthesized for the fabrication of Alq3 microwires-coated QCM sensors to detect the heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) of 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency having gold electrodes were used as transducers. Typical measuring cycle consisted of repeated flow of target measurands through the flow cell and subsequent washing to return the baseline. The QCM results indicated that the Alq3 microwires exhibit excellent sensitivity, stability and short response-recovery time, which are much attractive for the development of portable and highly sensitive heavy metal ion sensors in water samples.

  13. Transport and error sensitivity in a heavy-ion recirculator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1991-05-01

    An envelope code has been developed to facilitate the design of a recirculating accelerator for a heavy-ion fusion reactor. A novel feature of the model is the treatment of the beam charge density as a Lagrangian fluid in the axial direction. Transport results for a preliminary recirculator design are presented, and sensitivity of the transport to errors in the magnet strength is discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs

  14. Radiochromic film sensitivity calibrations using ion beams from a Pelletron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ward, R. J.; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is a transparent detector film that permanently changes color following exposure to ionizing radiation. The optical density of the film increases with increasing absorbed dose. RCF is convenient to use because it requires no chemical processing and can be scanned using commercially available document scanners. RCF is used frequently in medical applications, but is also used in a variety of diagnostics in high energy density physics. The film consists of a single or double layer of radiation-sensitive organic microcrystal monomers placed onto a polyester backing. GafchromicTM manufactures a large number of different types of RCF, and new types of film frequently replace older products. In this study, the sensitivity of several types of RCF to ion beams of different energies was measured. Ion beams produced by the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator were directed into a target chamber where they scattered off of a gold foil. A sample of RCF was exposed to the scattered ions. The fluence of incident particles on the film was measured using a surface barrier detector. Results of these calibrations will be presented. This work was funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  15. Evaluation of strain-rate sensitivity of ion-irradiated austenitic steel using strain-rate jump nanoindentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University Gokasho, Uji 611-0011, Kyoto (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University Gokasho, Uji 611-0011, Kyoto (Japan); Hamaguchi, Dai; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We examined strain-rate jump nanoindentation on ion-irradiated stainless steel. • We observed irradiation hardening of the ion-irradiated stainless steel. • We found that strain-rate sensitivity parameter was slightly decreased after the ion-irradiation. - Abstract: The present study investigated strain-rate sensitivity (SRS) of a single crystal Fe–15Cr–20Ni austenitic steel before and after 10.5 MeV Fe{sup 3+} ion-irradiation up to 10 dpa at 300 °C using a strain-rate jump (SRJ) nanoindentation test. It was found that the SRJ nanoindentation test is suitable for evaluating the SRS at strain-rates from 0.001 to 0.2 s{sup −1}. Indentation size effect was observed for depth dependence of nanoindentation hardness but not the SRS. The ion-irradiation increased the hardness at the shallow depth region but decreased the SRS slightly.

  16. PCB 136 Atropselectively Alters Morphometric and Functional Parameters of Neuronal Connectivity in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons via Ryanodine Receptor-Dependent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca2+-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (−)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (−)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca2+-sensitive dye demonstrates that (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations. Similarly, (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure. PMID:24385416

  17. Dielectrophoretic analysis of changes in cytoplasmic ion levels due to ion channel blocker action reveals underlying differences between drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, L; Shelmerdine, H; Hughes, M P; Coley, H M; Huebner, Y; Labeed, F H

    2008-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP)-the motion of particles in non-uniform AC fields-has been used in the investigation of cell electrophysiology. The technique offers the advantages of rapid determination of the conductance and capacitance of membrane and cytoplasm. However, it is unable to directly determine the ionic strengths of individual cytoplasmic ions, which has potentially limited its application in assessing cell composition. In this paper, we demonstrate how dielectrophoresis can be used to investigate the cytoplasmic ion composition by using ion channel blocking agents. By blocking key ion transporters individually, it is possible to determine their overall contribution to the free ions in the cytoplasm. We use this technique to evaluate the relative contributions of chloride, potassium and calcium ions to the cytoplasmic conductivities of drug sensitive and resistant myelogenous leukaemic (K562) cells in order to determine the contributions of individual ion channel activity in mediating multi-drug resistance in cancer. Results indicate that whilst K + and Ca 2+ levels were extremely similar between sensitive and resistant lines, levels of Cl - were elevated by three times to that in the resistant line, implying increased chloride channel activity. This result is in line with current theories of MDR, and validates the use of ion channel blockers with DEP to investigate ion channel function. (note)

  18. Highly Sensitive and Selective Potassium Ion Detection Based on Graphene Hall Effect Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqi Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K+ ion is an important biological substance in the human body and plays a critical role in the maintenance of transmembrane potential and hormone secretion. Several detection techniques, including fluorescent, electrochemical, and electrical methods, have been extensively investigated to selectively recognize K+ ions. In this work, a highly sensitive and selective biosensor based on single-layer graphene has been developed for K+ ion detection under Van der Pauw measurement configuration. With pre-immobilization of guanine-rich DNA on the graphene surface, the graphene devices exhibit a very low limit of detection (≈1 nM with a dynamic range of 1 nM–10 μM and excellent K+ ion specificity against other alkali cations, such as Na+ ions. The origin of K+ ion selectivity can be attributed to the fact that the formation of guanine-quadruplexes from guanine-rich DNA has a strong affinity for capturing K+ ions. The graphene-based biosensors with improved sensing performance for K+ ion recognition can be applied to health monitoring and early disease diagnosis.

  19. Beyond the Nernst-limit with dual-gate ZnO ion-sensitive field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkman, M.; Smits, E.C.P.; Cillessen, J.F.M.; Biscarini, F.; Blom, P.W.M.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of conventional ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) is limited to 59 mV/pH, which is the maximum detectable change in electrochemical potential according to the Nernst equation. Here we demonstrate a transducer based on a ZnO dual-gate field-effect transistor that

  20. Normal axonal ion channel function in large peripheral nerve fibers following chronic ciguatera sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2008-03-01

    Although the acute clinical effects of ciguatera poisoning, due to ingestion of ciguatoxin, are mediated by activation of transient Na+ channels, the mechanisms underlying ciguatera sensitization remain undefined. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the median motor and sensory nerves in two patients with ciguatera sensitization. Excitability parameters were all within normal limits, thereby arguing against dysfunction of axonal membrane ion channels in large-diameter fibers in ciguatera sensitization.

  1. Parameters Identification and Sensitive Characteristics Analysis for Lithium-Ion Batteries of Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly investigates the sensitive characteristics of lithium-ion batteries so as to provide scientific basises for simplifying the design of the state estimator that adapt to various environments. Three lithium-ion batteries are chosen as the experimental samples. The samples were tested at various temperatures (−20 ∘ C, −10 ∘ C, 0 ∘ C , 10 ∘ C , 25 ∘ C and various current rates (0.5C, 1C, 1.5C using a battery test bench. A physical equivalent circuit model is developed to capture the dynamic characteristics of the batteries. The experimental results show that all battery parameters are time-varying and have different sensitivity to temperature, current rate and state of charge (SOC. The sensitivity of battery to temperature, current rate and SOC increases the difficulty in battery modeling because of the change of parameters. The further simulation experiments show that the model output has a higher sensitivity to the change of ohmic resistance than that of other parameters. Based on the experimental and simulation results obtained here, it is expected that the adaptive parameter state estimator design could be simplified in the near future.

  2. Ryanodine receptor gating controls generation of diastolic calcium waves in cardiac myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovič, Pavol; Valent, Ivan; Cocherová, Elena; Pavelková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating in the initiation and propagation of calcium waves was investigated using a mathematical model comprising a stochastic description of RyR gating and a deterministic description of calcium diffusion and sequestration. We used a one-dimensional array of equidistantly spaced RyR clusters, representing the confocal scanning line, to simulate the formation of calcium sparks. Our model provided an excellent description of the calcium dependence of the frequency of diastolic calcium sparks and of the increased tendency for the production of calcium waves after a decrease in cytosolic calcium buffering. We developed a hypothesis relating changes in the propensity to form calcium waves to changes of RyR gating and tested it by simulation. With a realistic RyR gating model, increased ability of RyR to be activated by Ca2+ strongly increased the propensity for generation of calcium waves at low (0.05–0.1-µM) calcium concentrations but only slightly at high (0.2–0.4-µM) calcium concentrations. Changes in RyR gating altered calcium wave formation by changing the calcium sensitivity of spontaneous calcium spark activation and/or the average number of open RyRs in spontaneous calcium sparks. Gating changes that did not affect RyR activation by Ca2+ had only a weak effect on the propensity to form calcium waves, even if they strongly increased calcium spark frequency. Calcium waves induced by modulating the properties of the RyR activation site could be suppressed by inhibiting the spontaneous opening of the RyR. These data can explain the increased tendency for production of calcium waves under conditions when RyR gating is altered in cardiac diseases. PMID:26009544

  3. Mesocosm Community Response Sensitivities to Specific Conductivity Comprised of Different Major Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional toxicity test assays have been used to evaluate the relative sensitivity to different major ion mixtures as a proxy for understanding what the response of aquatic species growing in their natural environment would be during exposure to specific conductivity stress ema...

  4. DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence polarization for the sensitive detection of silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongke; Wang, Shuangli; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Liu, Yufang

    2018-04-05

    Despite their practical applications, Ag + ions are environmental pollutants and affect human health. So the effective detection methods of Ag + ions are imperative. Herein, we developed a simple, sensitive, selective, and cost-effective fluorescence polarization sensor for Ag + detection in aqueous solution using thiol-DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this sensing strategy, Ag + ions can specifically interact with a cytosine-cytosine (CC) mismatch in DNA duplexes and form stable metal-mediated cytosine-Ag + -cytosine (C-Ag + -C) base pairs. The formation of the C-Ag + -C complex results in evident changes in the molecular volume and fluorescence polarization signal. To achieve our aims, we prepared two complementary DNA strands containing C-base mismatches (probe A: 5'-SH-A 10 -TACCACTCCTCAC-3' and probe B: 5'-TCCTCACCAGTCCTA-FAM-3'). The stable hybridization between probe A and probe B occurs with the formation of the C-Ag + -C complex in the presence of Ag + ions, leading to obvious fluorescence quenching in comparison to the system without AuNP enhancement. The assay can be used to identify nanomolar levels of Ag + within 6 min at room temperature, and has extremely high specificity for Ag + , even in the presence of higher concentrations of interfering metal ions. Furthermore, the sensor was successfully applied to the detection of Ag + ions in environmental water samples and showed excellent selectivity and high sensitivity, implying its promising application in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Terbium(III) ions as sensitizers of oxidation of indole and its derivatives in Fenton system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl; Staninski, Krzysztof

    2017-03-15

    Oxidation of indole and its derivatives in the Fenton system as a source of oxidising agents, in the presence of terbium(III) ions was studied by chemiluminescence methods to get the kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence. Terbium(III) ions acted as a sensitizer of the mixtures Tb(III)-Fe(II)/Fe(III)-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-indole or its derivative (tryptophan, tryptamine, indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetyl aspartic acid). For the above indolic compounds, linear dependencies of integrated intensity of chemiluminescence on concentration of indolic compound in water and in water-acetonitrile solution were obtained. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of the indolic compounds studied were found to be by one or two orders of magnitude lower in the system with terbium(III) ions than without them. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence emitted on oxidation of indolic compounds in Fenton system. • Tb (III) ions as sensitizers of indolic compounds oxidation in solutions. • Linear relations between CL intensity and indolic compound concentration.

  6. Geographic spread, genetics and functional characteristics of ryanodine receptor based target-site resistance to diamide insecticides in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Denise; Gutbrod, Oliver; Lümmen, Peter; Matthiesen, Svend; Schorn, Corinna; Nauen, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Anthranilic diamides and flubendiamide belong to a new chemical class of insecticides acting as conformation sensitive activators of the insect ryanodine receptor (RyR). These compounds control a diverse range of different herbivorous insects including diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), a notorious global pest on cruciferous crops, which recently developed resistance due to target-site mutations located in the trans-membrane domain of the Plutella RyR. In the present study we further investigated the genetics and functional implications of a RyR G4946E target-site mutation we recently identified in a Philippine diamondback moth strain (Sudlon). Strain Sudlon is homozygous for the G4946E mutation and has been maintained under laboratory conditions without selection pressure for almost four years, and still exhibit stable resistance ratios of >2000-fold to all commercial diamides. Its F1 progeny resulting from reciprocal crosses with a susceptible strain (BCS-S) revealed no maternal effects and a diamide susceptible phenotype, suggesting an autosomally almost recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequent back-crosses indicate a near monogenic nature of the diamide resistance in strain Sudlon. Radioligand binding studies with Plutella thoracic microsomal membrane preparations provided direct evidence for the dramatic functional implications of the RyR G4946E mutation on both diamide specific binding and its concentration dependent modulation of [(3)H]ryanodine binding. Computational modelling based on a cryo-EM structure of rabbit RyR1 suggests that Plutella G4946E is located in trans-membrane helix S4 close to S4-S5 linker domain supposed to be involved in the modulation of the voltage sensor, and another recently described mutation, I4790M in helix S2 approx. 13 Å opposite of G4946E. Genotyping by pyrosequencing revealed the presence of the RyR G4946E mutation in larvae collected in 2013/14 in regions of ten different countries where

  7. A large area position-sensitive ionization chamber for heavy-ion-induced reaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, L M; Dinesh, B V; Thomas, R G; Saxena, A; Sawant, Y S; Choudhury, R K

    2002-01-01

    A large area position-sensitive ionization chamber with a wide dynamic range has been developed to measure the mass, charge and energy of the heavy ions and the fission fragments produced in heavy-ion-induced reactions. The split anode geometry of the detector makes it suitable for both particle identification and energy measurements for heavy ions and fission fragments. The detector has been tested with alpha particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am- sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu source, fission fragments from sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and the heavy-ion beams from the 14UD Mumbai Pelletron accelerator facility. Using this detector, measurements on mass and total kinetic energy distributions in heavy-ion-induced fusion-fission reactions have been carried out for a wide range of excitation energies. Results on deep inelastic collisions and mass-energy correlations on different systems using this detector setup are discussed.

  8. SH Oxidation Stimulates Calcium Release Channels (Ryanodine Receptors From Excitable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA HIDALGO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of redox reagents on the activity of the intracellular calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors of skeletal and cardiac muscle, or brain cortex neurons, was examined. In lipid bilayer experiments, oxidizing agents (2,2'-dithiodipyridine or thimerosal modified the calcium dependence of all single channels studied. After controlled oxidation channels became active at sub µM calcium concentrations and were not inhibited by increasing the calcium concentration to 0.5 mM. Subsequent reduction reversed these effects. Channels purified from amphibian skeletal muscle exhibited the same behavior, indicating that the SH groups responsible for modifying the calcium dependence belong to the channel protein. Parallel experiments that measured calcium release through these channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles showed that following oxidation, the channels were no longer inhibited by sub mM concentrations of Mg2+. It is proposed that channel redox state controls the high affinity sites responsible for calcium activation as well as the low affinity sites involved in Mg2+ inhibition of channel activity. The possible physiological and pathological implications of these results are discussed

  9. Integrated ion imprinted polymers-paper composites for selective and sensitive detection of Cd(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Kai [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Chen, Ying [Hubei Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 6 ZhuoDao Quan North Road, 430079, Wuhan (China); Zhou, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Zhao, Xiaoya [Hubei Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of PRC, No.588 Qingtaidadao Road, Hubei, 430022, Wuhan (China); Liu, Jiafa [Hubei Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 6 ZhuoDao Quan North Road, 430079, Wuhan (China); Mei, Surong; Zhou, Yikai [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China); Jing, Tao, E-mail: jingtao@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Health - Incubation, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Health Wuhan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, #13 Hangkong Road, Hubei, 430030, Wuhan (China)

    2017-07-05

    Highlights: • IIPs are first grafted on the low-cost A4 print paper to develop an integrated paper-based device. • As an imprinted composite, the adsorption capacity is 155.2 mg g{sup –1} and the imprinted factor is more than 3.0. • As an analytical method, the limit of detection is 0.4 ng mL{sup –1}. • Based on the water quality standards, it could be used to determine Cd(II) ions in drinking water. - Abstract: Paper-based sensor is a new alternative technology to develop a portable, low-cost, and rapid analysis system in environmental chemistry. In this study, ion imprinted polymers (IIPs) using cadmium ions as the template were directly grafted on the surface of low-cost print paper based on the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. It can be applied as a recognition element to selectively capture the target ions in the complex samples. The maximum adsorption capacity of IIPs composites was 155.2 mg g{sup –1} and the imprinted factor was more than 3.0. Then, IIPs-paper platform could be also applied as a detection element for highly selective and sensitive detection of Cd(II) ions without complex sample pretreatment and expensive instrument, due to the selective recognition, formation of dithizone-cadmium complexes and light transmission ability. Under the optimized condition, the linear range was changed from 1 to 100 ng mL{sup –1} and the limit of detection was 0.4 ng mL{sup –1}. The results were in good agreement with the classic ICP-MS method. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be developed for detection of other heavy metals by designing of new IIPs.

  10. Sensitivity to Heavy-Metal Ions of Unfolded Fullerene Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Ciotta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel type of graphene-like quantum dots, synthesized by oxidation and cage-opening of C60 buckminsterfullerene, has been studied as a fluorescent and absorptive probe for heavy-metal ions. The lattice structure of such unfolded fullerene quantum dots (UFQDs is distinct from that of graphene since it includes both carbon hexagons and pentagons. The basic optical properties, however, are similar to those of regular graphene oxide quantum dots. On the other hand, UFQDs behave quite differently in the presence of heavy-metal ions, in that multiple sensitivity to Cu2+, Pb2+ and As(III was observed through comparable quenching of the fluorescent emission and different variations of the transmittance spectrum. By dynamic light scattering measurements and transmission electron microscope (TEM images we confirmed, for the first time in metal sensing, that this response is due to multiple complexation and subsequent aggregation of UFQDs. Nonetheless, the explanation of the distinct behaviour of transmittance in the presence of As(III and the formation of precipitate with Pb2+ require further studies. These differences, however, also make it possible to discriminate between the three metal ions in view of the implementation of a selective multiple sensor.

  11. Quaternary ammonium promoted ultra selective and sensitive fluorescence detection of fluoride ion in water and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ji, Yuzhuo; Tang, Xinjing

    2014-10-21

    Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probes with a quaternary ammonium moiety have been rationally designed and developed for fast and sensitive fluorescence detection of fluoride ion (F(-) from NaF, not TBAF) in aqueous solution and living cells. With the sequestration effect of quaternary ammonium, the detection time was less than 2 min and the detection limit of fluoride ion was as low as 0.57 ppm that is among the lowest detection limits in aqueous solutions of many fluoride fluorescence probes in the literature.

  12. On velocity-space sensitivity of fast-ion D-alpha spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Moseev, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The velocity-space observation regions and sensitivities in fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy measurements are often described by so-called weight functions. Here we derive expressions for FIDA weight functions accounting for the Doppler shift, Stark splitting, and the charge-exchange reaction...... and electron transition probabilities. Our approach yields an efficient way to calculate correctly scaled FIDA weight functions and implies simple analytic expressions for their boundaries that separate the triangular observable regions in (v‖, v⊥)-space from the unobservable regions. These boundaries...

  13. Study of the effect of heavy ion energy on the sensitivity of electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raine, M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis studies the sensitivity of advanced electronic devices in radiative environments. The work deals with the detailed modeling of the deposited energy induced by heavy-ion in matter, and the influence of taking it into account in the tools simulating the response of irradiated devices. To do so, a simulation chain was developed, combining different calculation codes at various scales. In a first step, the particle-matter interaction code Geant4 is used to model the heavy ion track. These tracks are then implemented in a TCAD simulator, in order to study the response of elementary transistors to these detailed energy deposits. This step is completed with experimental measurements. Finally, the study is extended to the circuit level, by interfacing the heavy ion tracks with a SEE prediction tool. These different steps evidence the need for taking into account the radial extension of the ion track to all simulation levels, to adequately model the response of advanced devices under heavy ion irradiations. (author) [fr

  14. Simulation of the effect of rogue ryanodine receptors on a calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Ye, Xuesong; Cheng, Heping

    2010-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is considered to be one of the most important factors for the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. However, under some pathological conditions, such as heart failure (HF), calcium homeostasis is disordered, and spontaneous waves may occur. In this study, we developed a mathematical model of formation and propagation of a calcium wave based upon a governing system of diffusion–reaction equations presented by Izu et al (2001 Biophys. J. 80 103–20) and integrated non-clustered or 'rogue' ryanodine receptors (rogue RyRs) into a two-dimensional (2D) model of ventricular myocytes isolated from failing hearts in which sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca 2+ pools are partially unloaded. The model was then used to simulate the effect of rogue RyRs on initiation and propagation of the calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with HF. Our simulation results show that rogue RyRs can amplify the diastolic SR Ca 2+ leak in the form of Ca 2+ quarks, increase the probability of occurrence of spontaneous Ca 2+ waves even with smaller SR Ca 2+ stores, accelerate Ca 2+ wave propagation, and hence lead to delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) and cardiac arrhythmia in the diseased heart. This investigation suggests that incorporating rogue RyRs in the Ca 2+ wave model under HF conditions provides a new view of Ca 2+ dynamics that could not be mimicked by adjusting traditional parameters involved in Ca 2+ release units and other ion channels, and contributes to understanding the underlying mechanism of HF

  15. Simulation of the effect of rogue ryanodine receptors on a calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Ye, Xuesong; Cheng, Heping

    2010-06-01

    Calcium homeostasis is considered to be one of the most important factors for the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. However, under some pathological conditions, such as heart failure (HF), calcium homeostasis is disordered, and spontaneous waves may occur. In this study, we developed a mathematical model of formation and propagation of a calcium wave based upon a governing system of diffusion-reaction equations presented by Izu et al (2001 Biophys. J. 80 103-20) and integrated non-clustered or 'rogue' ryanodine receptors (rogue RyRs) into a two-dimensional (2D) model of ventricular myocytes isolated from failing hearts in which sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pools are partially unloaded. The model was then used to simulate the effect of rogue RyRs on initiation and propagation of the calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with HF. Our simulation results show that rogue RyRs can amplify the diastolic SR Ca2+ leak in the form of Ca2+ quarks, increase the probability of occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ waves even with smaller SR Ca2+ stores, accelerate Ca2+ wave propagation, and hence lead to delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) and cardiac arrhythmia in the diseased heart. This investigation suggests that incorporating rogue RyRs in the Ca2+ wave model under HF conditions provides a new view of Ca2+ dynamics that could not be mimicked by adjusting traditional parameters involved in Ca2+ release units and other ion channels, and contributes to understanding the underlying mechanism of HF.

  16. Molecular characterization and expression profiling of ryanodine receptor gene in the pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shun-Fan; Zhao, Dan-Dan; Huang, Jing-Mei; Zhao, Si-Qi; Zhou, Li-Qi; Gao, Cong-Fen

    2018-04-01

    The susceptibilities of three field populations of pink stem borer (PSB), Sesamia inferens (walker) to diamide insecticides, chlorantraniliprole and flubendiamide, were evaluated in this study. The results showed that these PSB field populations were still sensitive to the two diamide insecticides after many years of exposure. To further understand PSB and diamide insecticide, the full-length ryanodine receptor (RyR) cDNA (named as SiRyR), the molecular target of diamide insecticides was cloned from PSB and characterized. The SiRyR gene contains an open reading frame of 15,420 nucleotides, encoding 5140 amino acid residues, which shares 77% to 98% sequence identity with RyR homologous of other insects. All hallmarks of RyR proteins are conserved in the SiRyR protein, including the conserved C-terminal domain with the consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif), the six transmembrane domains, as well as mannosyltransferase, IP3R and RyR (pfam02815) (MIR) domains. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of SiRyR were observed in pupa and adults, especially in males. SiRyR was expressed at the highest level in thorax, and the lowest level in wing. The full genetic characterization of SiRyR could provide useful information for future functional expression studies and for discovery of new insecticides with selective insecticidal activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Leak in Circulating B-Lymphocytes as a Biomarker in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Alexander; Santulli, Gaetano; Reiken, Steven R; Coromilas, Ellie; Godfrey, Sarah J; Brunjes, Danielle L; Colombo, Paolo C; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Sokol, Seth I; Kitsis, Richard N; Marks, Andrew R

    2018-03-28

    Background -Advances in congestive heart failure (CHF) management depend on biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic response. During systole, intracellular Ca2 + is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into the cytoplasm through type 2 ryanodine receptor/Ca2 + release channels (RyR2). In CHF, chronically elevated circulating catecholamine levels cause pathologic remodeling of RyR2 resulting in diastolic SR Ca2 + leak, and decreased myocardial contractility. Similarly, skeletal muscle contraction requires SR Ca2 + release through type-1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1), and chronically elevated catecholamine levels in CHF cause RyR1 mediated SR Ca2 + leak, contributing to myopathy and weakness. Circulating B-lymphocytes express RyR1 and catecholamine responsive signaling cascades, making them a potential surrogate for defects in intracellular Ca2 + handling due to leaky RyR channels in CHF. Methods -Whole blood was collected from patients with CHF, CHF status-post left-ventricular assist devices (LVAD), and controls. Blood was also collected from mice with ischemic CHF, ischemic CHF + S107 (a drug that specifically reduces RyR channel Ca2 + leak), and WT controls. Channel macromolecular complex was assessed by immunostaining RyR1 immunoprecipitated from lymphocyte enriched preparations. RyR1 Ca2 + leak was assessed using flow cytometry to measure Ca2 + fluorescence in B-lymphocytes, in the absence and presence of RyR1 agonists that empty RyR1 Ca2 + stores within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Results -Circulating B-lymphocytes from humans and mice with CHF exhibited remodeled RyR1 and decreased ER Ca2 + stores, consistent with chronic intracellular Ca2 + leak. This Ca2 + leak correlated with circulating catecholamine levels. The intracellular Ca2 + leak was significantly reduced in mice treated with the Rycal S107. CHF patients treated with LVAD exhibited a heterogeneous response. Conclusions -In CHF, B-lymphocytes exhibit remodeled leaky

  18. Quantitative analysis of genes regulating sensitivity to heavy ion irradiation in cultured cell lines of malignant choroid melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Ken; Adachi, Nanao; Nimura, Yoshinori

    2004-01-01

    As a treatment strategy for malignant melanoma, heavy ion irradiation has been planned in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). However, the molecular biology of the malignant melanoma cell after irradiation of heavy ion is still unknown. In this study, we used resistant and sensitive cell lines of malignant melanoma to study the effects of heavy ion irradiation. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of early response genes for heavy ion irradiation was carried out on these cell lines using microarray technology. (author)

  19. Quantitative analysis of genes regulating sensitivity to heavy ion irradiation in cultured cell lines of malignant choroid melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Ken; Nimura, Yoshinori; Kato, Masaki; Seki, Naohiko; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Mizuho; Shino, Yayoi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Mizota, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    As a treatment strategy for malignant melanoma, heavy ion irradiation has been planned in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). However, the molecular biology of the malignant melanoma cell after irradiation of heavy ion is still unknown. In this study, we used resistant and sensitive cell lines of malignant melanoma to study the effects of heavy ion irradiation. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of early response genes for heavy ion irradiation was carried out on these cell lines using microarray technology. (author)

  20. Novel skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor mutation in a large Brazilian family with malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, S; Nelson, T; Sudo, R T; Zapata-Sudo, G; Batti, M; Sambuughin, N

    2002-07-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes susceptible individuals to a potentially life-threatening crisis when exposed to commonly used anesthetics. Mutations in the skeletal muscle calcium release channel, ryanodine receptor (RYR1) are associated with MH in over 50% of affected families. Linkage analysis of the RYR1 gene region at 19q13 was performed in a large Brazilian family and a distinct disease co-segregating haplotype was revealed in the majority of members with diagnosis of MH. Subsequent sequencing of RYR1 mutational hot spots revealed a nucleotide substitution of C to T at position 7062, causing a novel amino acid change from Arg2355 to Cys associated with MH in the family. Haplotype analysis of the RYR1 gene area at 19q13 in the family with multiple MH members is an important tool in identification of genetic cause underlying this disease.

  1. Dual Regulation of Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels by PIP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo A Rodríguez Menchaca

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 16 years, there has been an impressive number of ion channels shown to be sensitive to the major phosphoinositide in the plasma membrane, phosphatidilinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Among them are voltage-gated channels, which are crucial for both neuronal and cardiac excitability. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav channels were shown to be regulated bidirectionally by PIP2. On one hand, PIP2 stabilized their activity by reducing current rundown but on the other hand it produced a voltage-dependent inhibition by shifting the activation curve to more positive voltages. For voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels PIP2 was first shown to prevent N-type inactivation. Careful examination of the effects of PIP2 on the activation mechanism of Kv1.2 has shown a similar bidirectional regulation as in the Cav channels. The two effects could be distinguished kinetically, in terms of their sensitivities to PIP2 and by distinct molecular determinants. The rightward shift of the Kv1.2 voltage dependence implicated basic residues in the S4-S5 linker and was consistent with stabilization of the inactive state of the voltage sensor. A third type of a voltage-gated ion channel modulated by PIP2 is the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channel. PIP2 has been shown to enhance the opening of HCN channels by shifting their voltage-dependent activation toward depolarized potentials. The sea urchin HCN channel, SpIH, showed again a PIP2-mediated bidirectional effect but in reverse order than the depolarization-activated Cav and Kv channels: a voltage-dependent potentiation, like the mammalian HCN channels, but also an inhibition of the cGMP-induced current activation. Just like the Kv1.2 channels, distinct molecular determinants underlied the PIP2 dual effects on SpIH channels. The dual regulation of these very different ion channels, all of which are voltage dependent, points to conserved mechanisms of regulation of these channels by PIP2.

  2. Effects of procaine on a central neuron of the snail, Achatina fulica Ferussac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Tsai, Ming-Cheng

    2005-02-18

    Effects of procaine on a central neuron (RP1) of the giant African snail (Achatina fulica Ferussac) were studied pharmacologically. The RP1 neuron showed spontaneous firing of action potential. Extra-cellular application of procaine (10 mM) reversibly elicited bursts of potential. The bursts of potential elicited by procaine were not blocked after administration of (1) prazosin, propranolol, atropine, d-tubocurarine, (2) calcium-free solution, (3) ryanodine (4) pretreatment with KT-5720 or chelerythrine. The bursts of potential elicited by procaine were blocked by adding U73122 (10 microM) and the bursts of potential were decreased if physiological sodium ion was replaced with lithium ion or incubated with either neomycin (3.5 mM) or high magnesium solution (30 mM). Preatment with U73122 (10 microM) blocked the initiation of bursts of potential. Ruthenium red (100 microM) or caffeine (10 mM) facilitated the procaine-elicited bursts of potential. It is concluded that procaine reversibly elicits bursts of potential in the central snail neuron. This effect was not directly related to (1) the extra-cellular calcium ion fluxes, (2) the ryanodine sensitive calcium channels in the neuron, or (3) the PKC or PKA related messenger systems. The procaine-elicited bursts of potential were associated with the phospholipase activity and the calcium mobilization in the neuron.

  3. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, T; Philipp, P; Audinot, J-N; Dowsett, D; Eswara, S

    2015-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM). (paper)

  4. Stream mesocosm response sensitivities to simulated ion stress in produced waters from resource extraction activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    To increase the ecological relevance of laboratory exposures intent on determining species sensitivity to ion stress from resource extraction activities we have conducted several stream mesocosm dosing studies that pair single-species and community-level responses in-situ and all...

  5. Highly Sensitive Aluminium(III) Ion Sensor Based on a Self-assembled Monolayer on a Gold Nanoparticles Modified Screen-printed Carbon Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Wong Pooi; Heng, Lee Yook; Nathan, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    A new approach for the development of a highly sensitive aluminium(III) ion sensor via the preconcentration of aluminium(III) ion with a self-assembled monolayer on a gold nanoparticles modified screen-printed carbon electrode and current mediation by potassium ferricyanide redox behavior during aluminium(III) ion binding has been attempted. A monolayer of mercaptosuccinic acid served as an effective complexation ligand for the preconcentration of trace aluminium; this led to an enhancement of aluminium(III) ion capture and thus improved the sensitivity of the sensor with a detection limit of down to the ppb level. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the sensor exhibited a wide linear dynamic range from 0.041 to 12.4 μM. The lower detection limit of the developed sensor was 0.037 μM (8.90 ppb) using a 10 min preconcentration time. The sensor showed excellent selectivity towards aluminium(III) ion over other interference ions.

  6. Rigid versus Flexible Ligands on Carbon Nanotubes for the Enhanced Sensitivity of Cobalt Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian Matthew; Star, Alexander

    2013-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes have shown great promise in the fabrication of ultra-compact and highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors. Additional chemical functionalization schemes can controllably improve selectivity of the carbon nanotube-based sensors; however the exact transduction mechanism is still under debate. In this article we detail the synthesis and selective response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with polyazomethine (PAM) polymer towards the application of a specific trace metal ion detector. The response of the polymer system was compared to shape persistent macrocycle (MAC) comprised of identical ion coordination ligands. While ion detection with rigid MAC/SWNT chemiresistor was comparable to bare SWNT, flexible PAM offers significant SWNT signal amplification, allowing for picomolar detection of Co{sup 2+} ions with both selectivity and a fast response. We hypothesized that rearrangement of the flexible PAM on the SWNT network is a sensing mechanism which allows for ultrasensitive detection of metal ions. The electron transfer and polymer rearrangement on the SWNT was studied by a combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical measurements - ultimately allowing for a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms that prompt device response.

  7. Selective and sensitized spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of Ni(II) ion using α-benzyl dioxime in surfactant media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang

    2007-02-01

    Highly sensitive and interference-free sensitized spectrophotometric method for the determination of Ni(II) ions is described. The method is based on the reaction between Ni(II) ion and benzyl dioxime in micellar media in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The absorbance is linear from 0.1 up to 25.0 μg mL -1 in aqueous solution with repeatability (RSD) of 1.0% at a concentration of 1 μg mL -1 and a detection limit of 0.12 ng mL -1 and molar absorption coefficient of 68,600 L mol -1 cm -1. The influence of reaction variables including type and amount of surfactant, pH, and amount of ligand and complexation time and the effect of interfering ions are investigated. The proposed procedure was applied to the determination of trace amounts of Ni(II) ion in tap water, river water, chocolate and vegetable without separation or organic solvent extraction.

  8. Histidine–dialkoxyanthracene dyad for selective and sensitive detection of mercury ions

    KAUST Repository

    Patil, Sachin

    2017-12-18

    Histidine-dialkoxyanthracene (HDA) was synthesised as a turn off type fluorescent sensor for fast and sensitive detection of mercury ions (Hg2+) in aqueous media. The two histidine moieties act as ‘claws’ to selectively complex Hg2+. The binding ratio of HDA to Hg2+ was 1:1 (metal-to-ligand ratio). The association constant for Hg2+ towards the receptor HDA obtained from Benesi–Hildebrand plot was found to be 3.22 × 104 M−1 with detection limit as low as 4.7 nM (0.94 μg/L).

  9. RYR1-related rhabdomyolysis: A common but probably underdiagnosed manifestation of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voermans, N C; Snoeck, M; Jungbluth, H

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene are associated with a wide spectrum of inherited myopathies presenting throughout life. Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS)-related RYR1 mutations have emerged as a common cause of exertional rhabdomyolysis, accounting for up to 30% of rhabdomyolysis episodes in otherwise healthy individuals. Common triggers are exercise and heat and, less frequently, viral infections, alcohol and drugs. Most subjects are normally strong and have no personal or family history of malignant hyperthermia. Heat intolerance and cold-induced muscle stiffness may be a feature. Recognition of this (probably not uncommon) rhabdomyolysis cause is vital for effective counselling, to identify potentially malignant hyperthermia-susceptible individuals and to adapt training regimes. Studies in various animal models provide insights regarding possible pathophysiological mechanisms and offer therapeutic perspectives. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Visual and sensitive fluorescent sensing for ultratrace mercury ions by perovskite quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li-Qiang; Tan, Tian; Tian, Xi-Ke; Li, Yong; Deng, Pan

    2017-09-15

    Mercury ions sensing is an important issue for human health and environmental safety. A novel fluorescence nanosensor was designed for rapid visual detection of ultratrace mercury ions (Hg 2+ ) by using CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots (QDs) based on the surface ion-exchange mechanism. The synthesized CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 QDs can emitt intense green fluorescence with high quantum yield of 50.28%, and can be applied for Hg 2+ sensing with the detection limit of 0.124 nM (24.87 ppt) in the range of 0 nM-100 nM. Furthermore, the interfering metal ions have no any influence on the fluorescence intensity of QDs, showing the perovskite QDs possess the high selectivity and sensitivity for Hg 2+ detection. The sensing mechanism of perovskite QDs for Hg 2+ is has also been investigated by XPS, EDX studies, showing Pb 2+ on the surface of perovskite QDs has been partially replaced by Hg 2+ . Spot plate test shows that the perovskite QDs can also be used for visual detection of Hg 2+ . Our research indicated the perovskite QDs are promising candidates for the visual fluorescence detection of environmental micropollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly sensitive urea sensing with ion-irradiated polymer foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Dietmar; Muñoz Hernandez, Gerardo; Alfonta, Lital

    2012-01-01

    Recently we prepared urea-sensors by attaching urease to the inner walls of etched ion tracks within thin polymer foil. Here, alternative track-based sensor configurations are examined where the enzyme remained in solution. The conductivities of systems consisting of two parallel irradiated polymer foils and confining different urea/urease mixtures in between were examined. The correlations between conductivity and urea concentration differed strongly for foils with unetched and etched tracks, which points at different sensing mechanisms – tentatively attributed to the adsorption of enzymatic reaction products on the latent track entrances and to the enhanced conductivity of reaction product-filled etched tracks, respectively. All examined systems enable in principle, urea sensing. They point at the possibility of sensor cascade construction for more sensitive or selective sensor systems.

  12. Sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions by fluorescent Ag nanoclusters synthesized via a hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Ren, Xiangling; Meng, Xianwei; Fang, Zheng; Tang, Fangqiong

    2013-09-01

    An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg2+) or copper (Cu2+) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg2+ or Cu2+ ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu2+, Hg2+ was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu2+ with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a reusable detection method for Cu2+. Furthermore, the different quenching phenomena caused by the two metals ions such as changes in visible colour, shifts of UV absorbance peaks and changes in size of Ag NCs make it easy to distinguish between them. Therefore the easily synthesized fluorescent Ag NCs may have great potential as Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions sensors.An easily prepared fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ and Cu2+ ions was developed here. The Ag NCs were synthesized by using polymethacrylic acid sodium salt as a template via a convenient hydrothermal process. The as-prepared fluorescent Ag NCs were monodispersed, uniform and less than 2 nm in diameter, and can be quenched in the presence of mercury (Hg2+) or copper (Cu2+) ions. Excellent linear relationships existed between the quenching degree of the Ag NCs and the concentrations of Hg2+ or Cu2+ ions in the range of 10 nM to 20 μM or 10 nM to 30 μM, respectively. By using ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) as the masking agent of Cu2+, Hg2+ was exclusively detected in coexistence with Cu2+ with high sensitivity (LOD = 10 nM), which also provided a

  13. Mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 ion channels can be tuned by cellular membrane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amanda H; Grandl, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels mediate the conversion of mechanical forces into electrical signals and are critical for responsiveness to touch in metazoans. The apparent mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 varies substantially across cellular environments, stimulating methods and protocols, raising the fundamental questions of what precise physical stimulus activates the channel and how its stimulus sensitivity is regulated. Here, we measured Piezo1 currents evoked by membrane stretch in three patch configurations, while simultaneously visualizing and measuring membrane geometry. Building on this approach, we developed protocols to minimize resting membrane curvature and tension prior to probing Piezo1 activity. We find that Piezo1 responds to lateral membrane tension with exquisite sensitivity as compared to other mechanically activated channels and that resting tension can drive channel inactivation, thereby tuning overall mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1. Our results explain how Piezo1 can function efficiently and with adaptable sensitivity as a sensor of mechanical stimulation in diverse cellular contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12088.001 PMID:26646186

  14. High sensitive detection of copper II ions using D-penicillamine-coated gold nanorods based on localized surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yoochan; Jo, Seongjae; Park, Joohyung; Park, Jinsung; Yang, Jaemoon

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a nanoplasmonic biosensor based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect that enables a sensitive and selective recognition of copper II ions. First, we fabricated the nanoplasmonics as LSPR substrates using gold nanorods (GNR) and the nano-adsorption method. The LSPR sensitivity of the nanoplasmonics was evaluated using various solvents with different refractive indexes. Subsequently, D-penicillamine (DPA)—a chelating agent of copper II ions—was conjugated to the surface of the GNR. The limit of detection (LOD) for the DPA-conjugated nanoplasmonics was 100 pM. Furthermore, selectivity tests were conducted using various divalent cations, and sensitivity tests were conducted on the nanoplasmonics under blood-like environments. Finally, the developed nanoplasmonic biosensor based on GNR shows great potential for the effective recognition of copper II ions, even in human blood conditions.

  15. The pH sensitive properties of carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles cross-linked with calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliola, Simo; Repo, Eveliina; Srivastava, Varsha; Heiskanen, Juha P; Sirviö, Juho Antti; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Sillanpää, Mika

    2017-05-01

    In environmental applications the applied materials are required to be non-toxic and biodegradable. Carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles cross-linked with Ca 2+ ions (CMC-Ca) fulfill these requirements, and they are also renewable. These nanoparticles were applied to oil-spill treatment in our previous study and here we focused on enhancing their properties. It was found that while the divalent Ca 2+ ions are crucial for the formation of the CMC-Ca, the attractive interaction between NH 3 + and COO - groups contributed significantly to the formation and stability of the CMC-Ca. The stability decreased as a function of pH due to the deprotonation of the amino groups. Therefore, the nanoparticles were found to be fundamentally pH sensitive in solution, if the pH deviated from the pH (7-9) that was used in the synthesis of the nanoparticles. The pH sensitive CMC-Ca synthesized in pH 7 and 8 were most stable in the studied conditions and could find applications in oil-spill treatment or controlled-release of substances. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of sensitizer ions tunable-distribution in fluoride nanoparticles for efficient accretive three-center energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hui; Yu, Hua; Lao, Aiqing; Chang, Lifen; Gao, Shaohua; Zhang, Haoxiong; Zhou, Taojie; Zhao, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative upconversion luminescence of Yb 3+ -Yb 3+ couples and three-center energy transfer mechanisms have been deeply investigated in Yb 3+ doped and Yb 3+ -Tb 3+ co-doped β-PbF 2 nanoparticles. As sensitizer ions, the distribution of Yb 3+ ions, which is a key factor that affects the cooperative upconversion luminescence and three-center energy transfer processes, can be tuned by the structure of nanoparticles. Based on the three-center distributions in tetragonal PbYb x Tb 1−x F 5 nanoparticles, two different energy transfer models, Cooperative Energy Transfer (CET) and Accretive Energy Transfer (AET) mechanisms were established. Especially, AET model is observed and verified in this work for the first time. Experimental results obtained from photoluminescence spectroscopy study are in agreement with the theoretical calculations by applying rate equations in these models, strongly supporting the proposed three-center energy transfer mechanisms. The sensitization between Yb 3+ ions only existing in AET process can greatly improve the energy transfer rates, further to enhance the quantum efficiency. The results that the calculated luminescence quantum efficiency in AET quantum cutting process is much higher than that in CET process (134% and 104%, respectively), can benefit for further increasing the conversion efficiency of c-Si solar cells.

  17. Differential regulation of proton-sensitive ion channels by phospholipids: a comparative study between ASICs and TRPV1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Jin Kweon

    Full Text Available Protons are released in pain-generating pathological conditions such as inflammation, ischemic stroke, infection, and cancer. During normal synaptic activities, protons are thought to play a role in neurotransmission processes. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are typical proton sensors in the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS. In addition to ASICs, capsaicin- and heat-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 channels can also mediate proton-mediated pain signaling. In spite of their importance in perception of pH fluctuations, the regulatory mechanisms of these proton-sensitive ion channels still need to be further investigated. Here, we compared regulation of ASICs and TRPV1 by membrane phosphoinositides, which are general cofactors of many receptors and ion channels. We observed that ASICs do not require membrane phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4P or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2 for their function. However, TRPV1 currents were inhibited by simultaneous breakdown of PI(4P and PI(4,5P2. By using a novel chimeric protein, CF-PTEN, that can specifically dephosphorylate at the D3 position of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P3, we also observed that neither ASICs nor TRPV1 activities were altered by depletion of PI(3,4,5P3 in intact cells. Finally, we compared the effects of arachidonic acid (AA on two proton-sensitive ion channels. We observed that AA potentiates the currents of both ASICs and TRPV1, but that they have different recovery aspects. In conclusion, ASICs and TRPV1 have different sensitivities toward membrane phospholipids, such as PI(4P, PI(4,5P2, and AA, although they have common roles as proton sensors. Further investigation about the complementary roles and respective contributions of ASICs and TRPV1 in proton-mediated signaling is necessary.

  18. Combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy and p53-gene therapy by radio- and hypoxia-sensitizing promoter for glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oga, Masaru; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Takenaga, Keizo; Iwadate, Yasuo; Nojima, Kumie

    2006-01-01

    In this study we have started to investigate the anti-tumor effect of the combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy, inducing p53-independent apoptosis, and p53-gene therapy, inducing p53-dependent apoptosis for glioma. To enhance the p53-dependent apoptosis, we chose the strategy to utilize the heavy-ion irradiation itself as a ''trigger'' by using radio-sensitizing E 9ns-2 /cytomegalovirus (CMV) chimeric promoter (Scott et al: 2003) in p53-gene therapy. Our study in the first year, however, suggested the uselessness of E 9ns-2 /CMV chimeric promoter. Then we applied E 9ns-2 /Epo5/CMV-radio and hypoxia-sensitizing chimeric promoter to amplify p53 gene exopression. P53 gene with E 9ns2 /Epo5/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in p53-mutant U373MG human glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 1 Gy of high linear energy transfer (LET)-carbon ion beam or low-LET X-ray under various hypoxic conditions. The result suggested the possible role of 1 Gy of high LET-carbon ion beam as a ''useful trigger'' to enhance a selective anti-tumor effect toward glioma under hypoxic condition through amplification of p53 gene expression. (author)

  19. Ion-selective solid-phase electrode sensitive to ammonium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, Yu.G.; Milonova, M.S.; Antonov, P.P.; Bychkov, E.A.; Ehfa, A.Ya.

    1983-01-01

    Ammonium phosphomolybdate is investigated for the purpose of using it as membrane material of ammonium-selective solid-phase electrodes. Estimation of proton mobility and ion conductivity of ammonium phosphomolybdate is performed

  20. Photoinduced proton transfer coupled with energy transfer: Mechanism of sensitized luminescence of terbium ion by salicylic acid doped in polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Vinita; Mishra, Hirdyesh

    2008-06-28

    In the present work, excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in salicylic acid (SA) monoanion and subsequent sensitization of Tb(3+) ion in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) have been studied. The study has been carried out both by steady state and time domain fluorescence measurement techniques at room temperature. It is found that the SA completely ionizes and exists as monoanion in PVA. It exhibits a large Stokes shifted blue emission (10 000 cm(-1)) due to ESIPT and shows a decay time of 6.85 ns. On the other hand, Tb(3+) ion shows a very weak green emission and a decay time of approximately 641 mus in PVA film. Upon incorporating Tb(3+) ion in SA doped PVA film, both intensity and decay time of SA decrease and sensitized emission from Tb(+3) ion along with 3.8 mus rise time is observed. Energy transfer is found to take place both from excited singlet as well as triplet states. A brief description of the properties of the present system from the viewpoint of luminescent solar collector material is addressed.

  1. Highly selective and sensitive phosphate anion sensors based on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors functionalized by ion imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiuling; Chen, Dunjun; Bin, Liu; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-06-09

    A novel ion-imprinted electrochemical sensor based on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) was developed to detect trace amounts of phosphate anion. This sensor combined the advantages of the ion sensitivity of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs and specific recognition of ion imprinted polymers. The current response showed that the fabricated sensor is highly sensitive and selective to phosphate anions. The current change exhibited approximate linear dependence for phosphate concentration from 0.02 mg L(-1) to 2 mg L(-1), the sensitivity and detection limit of the sensor is 3.191 μA/mg L(-1) and 1.97 μg L(-1), respectively. The results indicated that this AlGaN/GaN HEMT-based electrochemical sensor has the potential applications on phosphate anion detection.

  2. 17beta-estradiol rapidly mobilizes intracellular calcium from ryanodine-receptor-gated stores via a PKC-PKA-Erk-dependent pathway in the human eccrine sweat gland cell line NCL-SG3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Muchekehu, Ruth W

    2008-09-01

    We describe a novel rapid non-genomic effect of 17beta-estradiol (E2) on intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) signalling in the eccrine sweat gland epithelial cell line NCL-SG3. E2 had no observable effect on basal [Ca2+]i, however exposure of cells to E2 in the presence of the microsomal Ca2+ ATPase pump inhibitor, thapsigargin, produced a secondary, sustained increase in [Ca2+]i compared to thapsigargin treatment alone, where cells responded with a transient single spike-like increase in [Ca2+]i. The E2-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was not dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was completely abolished by ryanodine (100 microM). The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 (1 microM) prevented the E2-induced effects suggesting a role for the estrogen receptor in the release of [Ca2+]i from ryanodine-receptor-gated stores. The E2-induced effect on [Ca2+]i could also be prevented by the protein kinase C delta (PKCdelta)-specific inhibitor rottlerin (10 microM), the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3\\

  3. Organic secondary ion mass spectrometry: sensitivity enhancement by gold deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcorte, A; Médard, N; Bertrand, P

    2002-10-01

    Hydrocarbon oligomers, high-molecular-weight polymers, and polymer additives have been covered with 2-60 nmol of gold/cm2 in order to enhance the ionization efficiency for static secondary ion mass spectrometry (s-SIMS) measurements. Au-cationized molecules (up to -3,000 Da) and fragments (up to the trimer) are observed in the positive mass spectra of metallized polystyrene (PS) oligomer films. Beyond 3,000 Da, the entanglement of polymer chains prevents the ejection of intact molecules from a "thick" organic film. This mass limit can be overcome by embedding the polymer chains in a low-molecular-weight matix. The diffusion of organic molecules over the metal surfaces is also demonstrated for short PS oligomers. In the case of high-molecular-weight polymers (polyethylene, polypropylene, PS) and polymer additives (Irganox 1010, Irgafos 168), the metallization procedure induces a dramatic increase of the fingerprint fragment ion yields as well as the formation of new Aucationized species that can be used for chemical diagnostics. In comparison with the deposition of submonolayers of organic molecules on metallic surfaces, metal evaporation onto organic samples provides a comparable sensitivity enhancement. The distinct advantage of the metal evaporation procedure is that it can be used for any kind of organic sample, irrespective of thickness, opening new perspectives for "real world" sample analysis and chemical imaging by s-SIMS.

  4. Modeling of pH Dependent Electrochemical Noise in Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors ISFET

    OpenAIRE

    M. P. Das; M. Bhuyan

    2013-01-01

    pH ISFETs are very important sensor for in vivo continuous monitoring application of physiological and environmental system. The accuracy of Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET) output measurement is greatly affected by the presences of noise, drift and slow response of the device. Although the noise analysis of ISFET so far performed in different literature relates only to sources originated from Field Effect Transistor (FET) structure which are almost constant for a particular devi...

  5. Selective and sensitive fluorescence-shift probes based on two dansyl groups for mercury(ii) ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Jun; Liu, Jialun; Deng, Lefang; Zhao, Meili; Deng, Zhifu; Li, Xutian; Tang, Jian; Yang, Liting

    2014-11-01

    Two probes ( and ) bearing two dansyl fluorophores were synthesized and applied to the detection of mercury(ii) ions in aqueous solution. These probes exhibited a selective response to Hg(2+) in a buffered solution, with high sensitivity and a unique fluorescence response signal which displayed a blue-shift effect in the fluorescence emission peak. The Hg(2+) recognition mechanisms of the probes were determined by NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that probe and mercury(ii) ions formed an unusual 2:2 stoichiometric ratio complex, while probe and Hg(2+) formed a multidentate complex with a stoichiometric ratio of 2:1.

  6. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescence detection of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ions by using an acridine sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, A; Bachmann, S; Schnegelsberg, C; Teuteberg, T; Mata, R A; Stalke, D

    2016-04-07

    Fluorescence spectroscopy investigations of the new acridine derivative bis(N,N-dimethylaminemethylene)acridine (3) show remarkable selectivity and sensitivity towards Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ions in methanol and for the latter even in water. Through the chelation of the metal ions the present PET effect is quenched, significantly enhancing the emission intensity of the fluorophore. In solution, the bonding situation is studied by fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy, as well as ESI-TOF mass-spectrometry measurements. The solid state environment is investigated by X-ray diffraction and computational calculations. Here, we can show the complexation of the zinc and cadmium ions by the methylene bridged amine receptors as well as by the nitrogen atom of the acridine system.

  7. Sensitive and selective detection of Cu(II) ion: A new effective 1,8-naphthalimide-based fluorescence 'turn off' sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guozhen; Li, Chuang; Han, Xintong; Aderinto, Stephen Opeyemi; Shen, Kesheng; Mao, Shanshan; Wu, Huilu

    2018-06-01

    The present study reports the development of a new 1,8-naphthalimide-based fluorescent sensor V for monitoring Cu(II) ions. The sensor exhibited pH independence over a wide pH range 2.52-9.58, and indicated its possible use for monitoring Cu(II) ions in a competitive pH medium. The sensor also showed high selectivity and sensitivity towards the Cu(II) ions over other competitive metal ions in DMSO-HEPES buffer (v/v, 1:1; pH 7.4) with a fluorescence 'turn off' mode of 79.79% observed. A Job plot indicated the formation of a 1:1 binding mode of the sensor with Cu(II) ions. The association constant and detection limit were 1.14 × 10 6  M -1 and 4.67 × 10 -8 M, respectively. The fluorescence spectrum of the sensor was quenched due to the powerful paramagnetic nature of the Cu(II) ions. Potential application of this sensor was also demonstrated when determining Cu(II) ion levels in two different water samples. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Performance of a position sensitive Si(Li) x-ray detector dedicated to Compton polarimetry of stored and trapped highly-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G; Braeuning, H; Hess, S; Maertin, R; Spillmann, U; Stoehlker, Th

    2010-01-01

    We report on a novel two-dimensional position sensitive Si(Li) detector dedicated to Compton polarimetry of x-ray radiation arising from highly-charged ions. The performance of the detector system was evaluated in ion-atom collision experiments at the ESR storage ringe at GSI, Darmstadt. Based on the data obtained, the polarimeter efficiency is estimated in this work.

  9. A novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection of mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Michaelis, Monika; Wei, Gang; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio

    2015-08-07

    We have developed a novel aptasensor based on single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) capable of detecting mercury ions (Hg(2+)) with sub-nM sensitivity. The single-strand (ss) DNA aptamer used in this work is rich in thymine (T) and readily forms T-Hg(2+)-T complexes in the presence of Hg(2+). The aptamer was conjugated to an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe, and the adhesion force between the probe and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). The presence of Hg(2+) ions above a concentration threshold corresponding to the affinity constant of the ions for the aptamer (about 5 × 10(9) M(-1)) could be easily detected by a change of the measured adhesion force. With our chosen aptamer, we could reach an Hg(2+) detection limit of 100 pM, which is well below the maximum allowable level of Hg(2+) in drinking water. In addition, this aptasensor presents a very high selectivity for Hg(2+) over other metal cations, such as K(+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Cd(2+). Furthermore, the effects of the ionic strength and loading rate on the Hg(2+) detection were evaluated. Its simplicity, reproducibility, high selectivity and sensitivity make our SMFS-based aptasensor advantageous with respect to other current Hg(2+) sensing methods. It is expected that our strategy can be exploited for monitoring the pollution of water environments and the safety of potentially contaminated food.

  10. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine [Institute of Nuclear Theory, University of Washington,Seattle, WA 98195-1550 (United States); Tywoniuk, Konrad [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2017-04-21

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the “soft drop declustering” procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  11. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    2017-04-21

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the "soft drop declustering" procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  12. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2017-04-01

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the "soft drop declustering" procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  13. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the “soft drop declustering” procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  14. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal [beta]-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, Fernando J.; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J.; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; (Toronto)

    2009-12-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+}. Ca{sup 2+} is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca{sup 2+} transient by activation of a class of Ca{sup 2+} release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca{sup 2+} transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR{sub NTD}) at 2.5 {angstrom}. The RyR{sub NTD} structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the 'arm' domain in IP3Rsup. The N-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP{sub 3}R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyRNTD, supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions.

  15. Study of the effect of positive ions impinging sensitive emulsions in mass spectrography; Etude de l'action des ions positifs sur les emulsions sensibles en spectrographie de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavard, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-08-01

    Experimental relationships have been established between the blackening of emulsions by impinging ions and the following parameters: number, mass and energy of impinging particles. Mean energy ions (about twenty keV) give rise to a latent image probably made of small specks of metallic silver located at the surface or in the bulk of the silver halide grain. A specific developer for ion sensitive emulsion was perfected. Sensitivity and detection threshold are increased by a factor of two or three, compared with values observed using a classical developer. Low energy particles sputtered from superficial layers of the emulsion by the impinging twenty keV ions, produce a latent image close to the surface of the silver halide grain. An oxidizing process bleaches superficial latent image and then reduces background fog. The improved signal over background ratio allows to observe lines undetectable when the plates are developed by usual process. (author) [French] On a etabli les relations experimentales entre le noircissement resultant de l'action des ions sur l'emulsion sensible et les parametres suivants: nombre de particules incidentes, masse et energie de ces particules. L'effet sur les grains d'halogenure d'argent a ete examine: les ions d'energie moyenne (de l'ordre de 20 keV) creent une image latente vraisemblablement constituee d'argent, situee a la fois a la surface et a l'interieur du grain. Un revelateur specifique pour le developpement des emulsions sensibles exposees aux ions a ete mis au point: il accroit la sensibilite d'un facteur deux a trois et le facteur de contraste par rapport a un revelateur usuel. Les particules de faible energie, emises par pulverisation des couches superficielles de l'emulsion au cours de l'enregistrement des spectres de masse des ions d'energie moyenne, creent essentiellement dans les grains d'halogenure d'argent, une image latente superficielle, responsable du fond. Un traitement oxydant est propose pour eliminer cette image en

  16. Highly sensitive luminescent sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution based on PEG-coated ZnS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Surinder K; Salaria, Khushboo; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-03-15

    Using polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated ZnS nanoparticles (NPs), a novel and highly sensitive luminescent sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution has been presented. ZnS NPs have been used to develop efficient luminescence sensor which exhibits high reproducibility and stability with the lowest limit of detection of 1.29×10(-6) mol L(-1). The observed limit of detection of the fabricated sensor is ~6 times lower than maximum value of cyanide permitted by United States Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water (7.69×10(-6) mol L(-1)). The interfering studies show that the developed sensor possesses good selectivity for cyanide ion even in presence of other coexisting ions. Importantly, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which demonstrates the utilization of PEG- coated ZnS NPs for efficient luminescence sensor for cyanide ion detection in aqueous solution. This work demonstrates that rapidly synthesized ZnS NPs can be used to fabricate efficient luminescence sensor for cyanide ion detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel ion imager for secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuya; Miyata, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsutomu

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new area detector for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) ion microscope, and its performance. The operational principle is based on detecting the change in potential of a floating photodiode caused by the ion-induced secondary-electron emission and the incoming ion itself. The experiments demonstrated that 10 1 -10 5 aluminum ions per pixel can be detected with good linear response. Moreover, relative ion sensitivities from hydrogen to lead were constant within a factor of 2. The performance of this area detector provides the potential for detection of kiloelectronvolt ion images with current ion microscopy

  18. Mono(pyridine-N-oxide) analog of DOTA as a suitable organic reagent for a sensitive and selective fluorimetric determination of Ln(III) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanek, Jakub [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Lubal, Premysl, E-mail: lubal@chemi.muni.cz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Sevcikova, Romana [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Polasek, Miloslav; Hermann, Petr [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Hlavova 2030, 128 40, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    The mono(pyridine-N-oxide) analog of the H{sub 4}dota macrocylic ligand, H{sub 3}do3a-py{sup NO}, is capable of forming thermodynamically stable and kinetically inert Ln(III) complexes. Its Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes display a strong long-lived fluorescence as a result of the antenna effect of the pyridine-N-oxide fluorophore in the reagent. It is shown that H{sub 3}do3a-py{sup NO} can be used as a fluorogenic reagent for the determination of Eu(III) and Tb(III) at pH 6.5 and c{sub L}=1 mM. At an excitation wavelength of 286 nm, the emission maxima are 615 nm (Eu(III)-complex), and 547 nm (Tb(III)complex). Detection limits are at concentrations around 1.0 {mu}M and linearity of the method spans over 2 orders of magnitude. The method was applied to artificial and real samples (spiked mineral waters, extracts from cathode ray tube luminophore dust) and gave satisfactory results. The method is simple, rapid, and hardly interfered by other metal ions. - Graphical Abstract: A DOTA-like ligand with pyridine-N-oxide pendant arm is used for a quick, selective and sensitive determination of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions through sensitized emission with excitation at 286 nm. The presented fluorimetric method is not interfered by transition metal or other lanthanide(III) ions and has a high dynamic range. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quick, selective and sensitive determination of Eu{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} ions was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitized emission with excitation at 286 nm through pyridine-N-oxide pendant arm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No interference of transition metal or other Ln(III) ions within high dynamic range.

  19. Sensing small neurotransmitter-enzyme interaction with nanoporous gated ion-sensitive field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Alexandre; Stockmann, Regina; Jansen, Michael; Yegin, Ugur; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Mourzina, Yulia

    2012-01-15

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors with gates having a high density of nanopores were fabricated and employed to sense the neurotransmitter dopamine with high selectivity and detectability at micromolar range. The nanoporous structure of the gates was produced by applying a relatively simple anodizing process, which yielded a porous alumina layer with pores exhibiting a mean diameter ranging from 20 to 35 nm. Gate-source voltages of the transistors demonstrated a pH-dependence that was linear over a wide range and could be understood as changes in surface charges during protonation and deprotonation. The large surface area provided by the pores allowed the physical immobilization of tyrosinase, which is an enzyme that oxidizes dopamine, on the gates of the transistors, and thus, changes the acid-base behavior on their surfaces. Concentration-dependent dopamine interacting with immobilized tyrosinase showed a linear dependence into a physiological range of interest for dopamine concentration in the changes of gate-source voltages. In comparison with previous approaches, a response time relatively fast for detecting dopamine was obtained. Additionally, selectivity assays for other neurotransmitters that are abundantly found in the brain were examined. These results demonstrate that the nanoporous structure of ion-sensitive field effect transistors can easily be used to immobilize specific enzyme that can readily and selectively detect small neurotransmitter molecule based on its acid-base interaction with the receptor. Therefore, it could serve as a technology platform for molecular studies of neurotransmitter-enzyme binding and drugs screening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The putative imidazoline receptor agonist, harmane, promotes intracellular calcium mobilisation in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Paul E; Hills, Claire E; Rogers, Gareth J; Garland, Patrick; Farley, Sophia R; Morgan, Noel G

    2004-10-06

    beta-Carbolines (including harmane and pinoline) stimulate insulin secretion by a mechanism that may involve interaction with imidazoline I(3)-receptors but which also appears to be mediated by actions that are additional to imidazoline receptor agonism. Using the MIN6 beta-cell line, we now show that both the imidazoline I(3)-receptor agonist, efaroxan, and the beta-carboline, harmane, directly elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) and increase insulin secretion but that these responses display different characteristics. In the case of efaroxan, the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) was readily reversible, whereas, with harmane, the effect persisted beyond removal of the agonist and resulted in the development of a repetitive train of Ca(2+)-oscillations whose frequency, but not amplitude, was concentration-dependent. Initiation of the Ca(2+)-oscillations by harmane was independent of extracellular calcium but was sensitive to both dantrolene and high levels (20 mM) of caffeine, suggesting the involvement of ryanodine receptor-gated Ca(2+)-release. The expression of ryanodine receptor-1 and ryanodine receptor-2 mRNA in MIN6 cells was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and, since low concentrations of caffeine (1 mM) or thimerosal (10 microM) stimulated increases in [Ca(2+)](i), we conclude that ryanodine receptors are functional in these cells. Furthermore, the increase in insulin secretion induced by harmane was attenuated by dantrolene, consistent with the involvement of ryanodine receptors in mediating this response. By contrast, the smaller insulin secretory response to efaroxan was unaffected by dantrolene. Harmane-evoked changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) were maintained by nifedipine-sensitive Ca(2+)-influx, suggesting the involvement of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channels. Taken together, these data imply that harmane may interact with ryanodine receptors to generate sustained Ca(2+)-oscillations in pancreatic beta-cells and that this effect

  1. CdTe quantum dots functionalized with 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide as luminescent nanoprobe for the sensitive recognition of bromide ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Hosten, Eric; McCleland, Cedric; Nyokong, Tebello

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A bromide ion-selective modified nanoprobe sensor based on 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide (4AT)-functionalized CdTe quantum dots (QDs-4AT) showed a high selectivity and sensitivity for the determination of bromide ion using fluorescence recovery. Highlights: ► Water soluble CdTe quantum dots interact with tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide. ► Quantum dots fluorescence is quenched by the radical. ► In the presence of bromide ions the fluorescence is restored. ► The sensor is more selective to bromine ions than other common ions. - Abstract: A novel bromide ion-selective modified nanoprobe sensor based on 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide (4AT)-functionalized CdTe quantum dots (QDs-4AT) has been developed. Fluorescence quenching of the QDs by 4AT was observed. The functionalized QDs-4AT nanoprobe allowed a highly sensitive determination of bromide ion via analyte-induced change in the photoluminescence (fluorescence recovery) of the modified QDs. A detection limit of 0.6 nM of bromide ion was obtained, while the interfering effect of other inorganic cations and anions was investigated to examine the selectivity of the nanoprobe. The linear range was between 0.01 and 0.13 μM. Combined fluorescence lifetime and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements confirmed electron transfer processes between bromide ion and QDs-4AT.

  2. Colorimetric and luminescent bifunctional iridium(III) complexes for the sensitive recognition of cyanide ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiudan; Wang, Huili; Li, Jing; Hu, Wenqin; Li, Mei-Jin

    2017-02-01

    Two new cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes [(ppy)2Irppz]Cl (1) and [(ppy)2Irbppz]Cl (2) (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, ppz = 4,7-phenanthrolino-5,6:5,6-pyrazine, bppz = 2.3-di-2-pyridylpyrazine), were designed and synthesized. The structure of [(ppy)2Irppz]Cl was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Their photophysical properties were also studied. This kind of complexes could coordinate with Cu2 +, the photoluminescence (PL) of the complex was quenched, and the color changed from orange-red to green. The forming M-Cu (M: complexes 1 and 2) ensemble could be further utilized as a colorimetric and emission ;turn-on; bifunctional detection for CN-, especially for complex 1-Cu2 + showed a high sensitivity toward CN- with a limit of diction is 97 nM. Importantly, this kind of iridium(III) complexes shows a unique recognition of cyanide ions over other anions which makes it an eligible sensing probe for cyanide ions.

  3. Highly sensitive colour change system within slight differences in metal ion concentrations based on homo-binuclear complex formation equilibrium for visual threshold detection of trace metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, Hitoshi; Atsumi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Keigo; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Kudo, Yuki; Endo, Masatoshi; Yokota, Fumihiko; Shida, Junichi; Yotsuyanagi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    A new technique of expressing slight differences in metal ion concentrations by clear difference in colour was established for visual threshold detection of trace metal ions. The proposed method is based on rapid change of the mole fraction of the homo-binuclear complex (M 2 L) about a ligand in a narrow range of the total metal ion concentration (M T ) in a small excess, in case the second metal ion is bound to the reagent molecule which can bind two metal ions. Theoretical simulations showed that the highly sensitive colour change within slight differences in metal ion concentrations would be realized under the following conditions: (i) both of the stepwise formation constants of complex species are sufficiently large; (ii) the stepwise formation constant of the 1:1 complex (ML) is larger than that of M 2 L; and (iii) the absorption spectrum of M 2 L is far apart from the other species in the visible region. Furthermore, the boundary of the colour region in M T would be readily controlled by the total ligand concentration (L T ). Based on this theory, the proposed model was verified with the 3,3'-bis[bis(carboxymethyl)amino]methyl derivatives of sulphonephthalein dyes such as xylenol orange (XO), methylthymol blue (MTB), and methylxylenol blue (MXB), which can bind two metal ions at both ends of a π-electron conjugated system. The above-mentioned model was proved with the iron(III)-XO system at pH 2. In addition, MTB and MXB were suitable reagents for the visual threshold detection of trivalent metal ions such as iron(III), aluminium(III), gallium(III) and indium(III) ion in slightly acidic media. The proposed method has been applied successfully as a screening test for aluminium(III) ion in river water sampled at the downstream area of an old mine

  4. Oxygen-coupled Redox Regulation of the Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor/Ca2+ Release Channel (RyR1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-An; Wang, Benlian; Miyagi, Masaru; Hess, Douglas T.; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian skeletal muscle, Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through the ryanodine receptor/Ca2+-release channel RyR1 can be enhanced by S-oxidation or S-nitrosylation of separate Cys residues, which are allosterically linked. S-Oxidation of RyR1 is coupled to muscle oxygen tension (pO2) through O2-dependent production of hydrogen peroxide by SR-resident NADPH oxidase 4. In isolated SR (SR vesicles), an average of six to eight Cys thiols/RyR1 monomer are reversibly oxidized at high (21% O2) versus low pO2 (1% O2), but their identity among the 100 Cys residues/RyR1 monomer is unknown. Here we use isotope-coded affinity tag labeling and mass spectrometry (yielding 93% coverage of RyR1 Cys residues) to identify 13 Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled S-oxidation in SR vesicles. Eight additional Cys residues are oxidized at high versus low pO2 only when NADPH levels are supplemented to enhance NADPH oxidase 4 activity. pO2-sensitive Cys residues were largely non-overlapping with those identified previously as hyperreactive by administration of exogenous reagents (three of 21) or as S-nitrosylated. Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled oxidation are distributed widely within the cytoplasmic domain of RyR1 in multiple functional domains implicated in RyR1 activity-regulating interactions with the L-type Ca2+ channel (dihydropyridine receptor) and FK506-binding protein 12 as well as in “hot spot” regions containing sites of mutation implicated in malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. pO2-coupled disulfide formation was identified, whereas neither S-glutathionylated nor sulfenamide-modified Cys residues were observed. Thus, physiological redox regulation of RyR1 by endogenously generated hydrogen peroxide is exerted through dynamic disulfide formation involving multiple Cys residues. PMID:23798702

  5. Highly selective and sensitive coumarin-triazole-based fluorometric 'turn-off' sensor for detection of Pb2+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaily; Kumar, Ajay; Parveen, Iram; Ahmed, Naseem

    2018-06-01

    Exposure to even very low concentrations of Pb 2+ is known to cause cardiovascular, neurological, developmental, and reproductive disorders, and affects children in particular more severely. Consequently, much effort has been dedicated to the development of colorimetric and fluorescent sensors that can selectively detect Pb 2+ ions. Here, we describe the development of a triazole-based fluorescent sensor L5 for Pb 2+ ion detection. The fluorescence intensity of chemosensor L5 was selectively quenched by Pb 2+ ions and a clear color change from colorless to yellow could be observed by the naked eye. Chemosensor L5 exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity towards Pb 2+ ions in phosphate-buffered solution [20 mM, 1:9 DMSO/H 2 O (v/v), pH 8.0] with a 1:1 binding stoichiometry, a detection limit of 1.9 nM and a 6.76 × 10 6  M -1 binding constant. Additionally, low-cost and easy-to-prepare test strips impregnated with chemosensor L5 were also produced for efficient of Pb 2+ detection and proved the practical use of this test. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. CdTe quantum dots functionalized with 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide as luminescent nanoprobe for the sensitive recognition of bromide ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan [Department of Chemistry, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Hosten, Eric; McCleland, Cedric [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (South Campus), Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Nyokong, Tebello, E-mail: t.nyokong@ru.ac.za [Department of Chemistry, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa)

    2012-04-06

    Graphical abstract: A bromide ion-selective modified nanoprobe sensor based on 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide (4AT)-functionalized CdTe quantum dots (QDs-4AT) showed a high selectivity and sensitivity for the determination of bromide ion using fluorescence recovery. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water soluble CdTe quantum dots interact with tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum dots fluorescence is quenched by the radical. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the presence of bromide ions the fluorescence is restored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensor is more selective to bromine ions than other common ions. - Abstract: A novel bromide ion-selective modified nanoprobe sensor based on 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide (4AT)-functionalized CdTe quantum dots (QDs-4AT) has been developed. Fluorescence quenching of the QDs by 4AT was observed. The functionalized QDs-4AT nanoprobe allowed a highly sensitive determination of bromide ion via analyte-induced change in the photoluminescence (fluorescence recovery) of the modified QDs. A detection limit of 0.6 nM of bromide ion was obtained, while the interfering effect of other inorganic cations and anions was investigated to examine the selectivity of the nanoprobe. The linear range was between 0.01 and 0.13 {mu}M. Combined fluorescence lifetime and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements confirmed electron transfer processes between bromide ion and QDs-4AT.

  7. Lanthanide ions (III) as sensitizers of melatonin oxidation in reaction mixtures providing reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of the reactive systems providing strong oxidants (reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen) containing lanthanide ions (III) and melatonin, was studied. Kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence were obtained. Analysis of differences in the intensity of chemiluminescence and CL spectra proved that excitation of Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions takes place with the energy transfer from the products of melatonin oxidation: N{sup 1}-acetyl-N{sup 2}-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N{sup 1}-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) to the lanthanide ions. In the system Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) a linear correlation was established between the integrated CL intensity and melatonin concent. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence (CL) of melatonin (Mel) oxidation by reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. • Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions as sensitizers of a melatonin oxidation process. • New CL method for determination of melatonin in pharmaceutical preparations based on CL of Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) system.

  8. Sensitive detection of hydrogen in a-Si:H by coincidence measurement of elastically scattered 100 MeV /sup 3/He/sup 2 +/ ions and recoil protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukada, Noboru; Imura, Takeshi; Hiraki, Akio [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Itahashi, Takahisa; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    1982-09-01

    We have drastically improved the sensitivity of the nuclear elastic scattering (NES) method for determining hydrogen concentrations in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films. A beam of 100 MeV /sup 3/He/sup 2 +/ ions was used in the experiment. By taking the coincidence of detection of the scattered /sup 3/He ion with that of the recoil proton, we could achieve a sensitivity of 0.1 atomic percent with a precision of about 1 percent for 1 ..mu..m films.

  9. Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane injury and sugar contents in salt-sensitive rice ( Oryza sativa L. spp. indica ) roots under isoosmotic conditions. ... The accumulation of sugars in PT1 roots may be a primary salt-defense mechanism and may function as an osmotic control. Key words: ...

  10. Effect of thermal oxidation treatment on pH sensitivity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure ion-sensitive field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Bu, Yuyu [Institute of Science and Technology, Tokushima University, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Li, Liuan, E-mail: liliuan@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Ao, Jin-Ping, E-mail: jpao@ee.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Institute of Science and Technology, Tokushima University, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • AlGaN/GaN ISFETs were fabricated and evaluated with thermal oxidation treatment. • Sensitivity was improved to 57.7 mV/pH after 700 °C treatment. • Sensitivity became poor after 800 °C treatment. • The pure α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal phase generated on the surface of the 700 °C treatment sample. • Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase content in the metal oxide layer increased after 800 °C treatment. - Abstract: In this article, AlGaN/GaN heterostructure ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) were prepared and evaluated by thermal oxidation treatment on the AlGaN surface. The ISFETs were fabricated on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure and then thermally oxidized with dry oxygen in 600, 700, and 800 °C, respectively. It indicates that the performance of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure ISFETs, such as noise and sensitivity, has been improved owing to the thermal oxidation treatment process at different temperatures. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that after thermal oxidation treatment at different temperatures, hydroxide who possesses high surface state density will transfer to oxide owing to the higher chemical stability of the latter. Moreover, a crystalline α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase generated at 700 °C can not only provide a relatively smooth surface, but also improve the sensitivity to 57.7 mV/pH for the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure ISFETs, which is very close to the Nernstian limit.

  11. CaMKII Regulation of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors and Inositol Triphosphate Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eCamors

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and inositol triphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs are structurally related intracellular calcium release channels that participate in multiple primary or secondary amplified Ca2+ signals, triggering muscle contraction and oscillatory Ca2+ waves, or activating transcription factors. In the heart, RyRs play an indisputable role in the process of excitation-contraction coupling as the main pathway for Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR, and a less prominent role in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Conversely, InsP3Rs are believed to contribute in subtle ways, only, to contraction of the heart, and in more important ways to regulation of transcription factors. Because uncontrolled activity of either RyRs or InsP3Rs may elicit life-threatening arrhythmogenic and/or remodeling Ca2+ signals, regulation of their activity is of paramount importance for normal cardiac function. Due to their structural similarity, many regulatory factors, accessory proteins, and posttranslational processes are equivalent for RyRs and InsP3Rs. Here we discuss regulation of RyRs and InsP3Rs by CaMKII phosphorylation, but touch on other kinases whenever appropriate. CaMKII is emerging as a powerful modulator of RyR and InsP3R activity but interestingly, some of the complexities and controversies surrounding phosphorylation of RyRs also apply to InsP3Rs, and a clear-cut effect of CaMKII on either channel eludes investigators for now. Nevertheless, some effects of CaMKII on global cellular activity, such as SR Ca2+ leak or force-frequency potentiation, appear clear now, and this constrains the limits of the controversies and permits a more tractable approach to elucidate the effects of phosphorylation at the single channel level.

  12. Intermolecular failure of L-type Ca2+ channel and ryanodine receptor signaling in hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure overload-induced hypertrophy is a key step leading to heart failure. The Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release (CICR process that governs cardiac contractility is defective in hypertrophy/heart failure, but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. To examine the intermolecular aspects of CICR during hypertrophy, we utilized loose-patch confocal imaging to visualize the signaling between a single L-type Ca(2+ channel (LCC and ryanodine receptors (RyRs in aortic stenosis rat models of compensated (CHT and decompensated (DHT hypertrophy. We found that the LCC-RyR intermolecular coupling showed a 49% prolongation in coupling latency, a 47% decrease in chance of hit, and a 72% increase in chance of miss in DHT, demonstrating a state of "intermolecular failure." Unexpectedly, these modifications also occurred robustly in CHT due at least partially to decreased expression of junctophilin, indicating that intermolecular failure occurs prior to cellular manifestations. As a result, cell-wide Ca(2+ release, visualized as "Ca(2+ spikes," became desynchronized, which contrasted sharply with unaltered spike integrals and whole-cell Ca(2+ transients in CHT. These data suggested that, within a certain limit, termed the "stability margin," mild intermolecular failure does not damage the cellular integrity of excitation-contraction coupling. Only when the modification steps beyond the stability margin does global failure occur. The discovery of "hidden" intermolecular failure in CHT has important clinical implications.

  13. Expression of Dihydropyridine and Ryanodine Receptors in Type IIA Fibers of Rat Skeletal Muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anttila, Katja; Mänttäri, Satu; Järvilehto, Matti

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the fiber type specificity of dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in different rat limb muscles was investigated. Western blot and histochemical analyses provided for the first time evidence that the expression of both receptors correlates to a specific myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. We observed a significant (p=0.01) correlation between DHP as well as Ry receptor density and the expression of MHC IIa (correlation factor r=0.674 and r=0.645, respectively) in one slow-twitch, postural muscle (m. soleus), one mixed, fast-twitch muscle (m. gastrocnemius) and two fast-twitch muscles (m. rectus femoris, m. extensor digitorum longus). The highest DHP and Ry receptor density was found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (0.058±0.0060 and 0.057±0.0158 ODu, respectively). As expected, the highest relative percentage of MHC IIa was also found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (70.0±7.77%). Furthermore, histochemical experiments revealed that the IIA fibers stained most strongly for the fluorophore-conjugated receptor blockers. Our data clearly suggest that the expression of DHPRs and RyRs follows a fiber type-specific pattern, indicating an important role for these proteins in the maintenance of an effective Ca 2+ cycle in the fast contracting fiber type IIA

  14. Effect of metal ion Fe(III on the performance of chlorophyll as photosensitizers on dye sensitized solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsasi Setyawati

    Full Text Available The energy crisis is a major problem facing the world today and will need a renewable energy source that is environmentally friendly; one of these is the dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC. DSSC is photochemical electric cell that can convert solar energy into electrical energy. This research aims to study the characteristics of chlorophyll compounds with the addition of metal ions Fe(III and to determine the effect of Fe(III on the performance of chlorophyll as a photosensitizer in the DSSC. The formation of complex compounds of Fe(III-chlorophyll is shown by the phenomenon of metal ligand charge transfer (MLCT at a wavelength of 263.00 nm and absorption transition d-d at 745.00 nm. Fourier transform infrared characterization of the binding of Fe-O complex compounds appears at 486.06 cm−1. The complex compound of Fe(III-chlorophyll has a magnetic moment value of 9.62 Bohr Magneton (BM. The existence of ion Fe(III in chlorophyll can improve the performance of chlorophyll as a dye sensitizer with a maximum current of 4.00 mA/cm2, maximum voltage of 0.18 volts and efficiency values of 1.35%. Keywords: Fe(III-chlorophyll, Dye sensitized solar cell, Metal ligand charge transfer, Photosensitizer

  15. Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in highly charged ions revealed by resonant electron-ion recombination in storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of few-electron ions has evolved into a sensitive spectroscopic tool for highly charged ions. This is due to technological advances in electron-beam preparation and ion-beam cooling techniques at heavy-ion storage rings. Recent experiments prove unambiguously that DR collision spectroscopy has become sensitive to 2nd order QED and to nuclear effects. This review discusses the most recent developments in high-resolution spectroscopy of low-energy DR resonances, ...

  16. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-25

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ryanodine receptor 1 and associated pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Fauré , Julien; Lunardi , Joël; Monnier , Nicole; Marty , Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle a rise in the cytosolic calcium concentration is the first trigger able to initiate the contraction of the sarcomere. Intracellular calcium levels are tightly controlled by channels and pumps, and it is not surprising that many inherited skeletal muscle disorders arise from mutations altering the players regulating calcium ions concentration (Betzenhauser et al., 2010). In this chapter, we will focus on the pathologies linked to the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium channel-Ry...

  18. Rapid, quantitative and sensitive immunochromatographic assay based on stripping voltammetric detection of a metal ion label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Fang; Wang, Kaihua; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-10-10

    A novel, sensitive immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) which combines an immunochromatographic strip technique with an electrochemical detection technique is demonstrated. The IEB takes advantages of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic test kits and high-sensitivity of stripping voltammetry. Bismuth ions (Bi3+) have been coupled with the antibody through the bifunctional chelating agent diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). After immunoreactions, Bi3+ was released and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry at a built-in single-use screen-printed electrode. As an example for the applications of such novel device, the detection of human chorionic gonadotronphin (HCG) in a specimen was performed. This biosensor provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive immunoassay for such analysis in specimens than currently available test kits.

  19. Scanning ion microscopy with low energy lithium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twedt, Kevin A.; Chen, Lei; McClelland, Jabez J.

    2014-01-01

    Using an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms, we have developed a scanning ion microscope with probe sizes of a few tens of nanometers and beam energies from 500 eV to 5 keV. These beam energies are much lower than the typical operating energies of the helium ion microscope or gallium focused ion beam systems. We demonstrate how low energy can be advantageous in ion microscopy when detecting backscattered ions, due to a decreased interaction volume and the potential for surface sensitive composition analysis. As an example application that demonstrates these advantages, we non-destructively image the removal of a thin residual resist layer during plasma etching in a nano-imprint lithography process. - Highlights: • We use an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms. • The ion source makes possible a low energy (500 eV to 5 keV) scanning ion microscope. • Low energy is preferred for ion microscopy with backscattered ions. • We use the microscope to image a thin resist used in nano-imprint lithography

  20. Green Nanotechnology from Waste Carbon-Polyaniline Composite: Generation of Wavelength-Independent Multiband Photoluminescence for Sensitive Ion Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Goswami, Sumita

    2017-12-11

    This study reports on the qualitative analysis of photoluminescence effect generated from waste carbon of cooking oven by facile cost-effective material engineering. The waste carbon product as a form of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) is incorporated within a conjugate polymer, namely, polyaniline (PANI) to produce CNP-PANI composites that have shown excitation-wavelength-independent triple-band photoluminescence emission effect and highly sensitive Fe+3 ion detection ability. Herein the waste carbon material, while functionalized within the conjugated polymer, needs no further acid treatment or surface modification thus making the process cheaper, environmentally benign, and useful for green nanotechnology. The excitation-wavelength-independent unique triple-band photoluminescence spectrum is the direct consequence of carbon–polyaniline synergy in π–π transition and the surface passivation of CNPs by the [BOND]NH2 group rich aniline during in-situ polymerization. The current scenario has been studied for the samples prepared with different CNP concentrations for different reaction times and discussed in details with supportive physico-chemical characterizations. Moreover, the present study has demonstrated that the current material can be used as a fluorescent sensing platform for Fe+3 ions with high sensitivity and selectivity criteria where the detection limit of the sensing probe has a value as low as 12 × 10−9 nM.

  1. l-Tryptophan-capped carbon quantum dots for the sensitive and selective fluorescence detection of mercury ion in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Xuejuan; Li, Shifeng; Zhuang, Lulu; Tang, Jiaoning, E-mail: tjn@szu.edu.cn [Shenzhen University, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-07-15

    l-Tryptophan-capped carbon quantum dots (l-CQDs) were facilely synthesized through “green” methodology, and the obtained material was utilized as a sensitive and selective fluorescence sensor for mercury ion (Hg{sup 2+}) in pure aqueous solutions. Carboxyl-functionalized CQDs were first green synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal route, and l-tryptophan was then attached to CQDs via direct surface condensation reaction in aqueous solution at room temperature. The as-synthesized l-CQDs had an average size of ca. 5 nm with a good dispersity in water, and exhibited a favorable selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} ions over a range of other common metal cations in aqueous solution (10 mM PBS buffer, pH 6.0). Upon the addition of Hg{sup 2+}, a complete fluorescence quenching (ON–OFF switching) of l-CQDs was evident from the fluorescence titration experiment, and the fluorescence detection limit of Hg{sup 2+} was calculated to be 11 nM, which indicated that the obtained environmentally friendly l-CQDs had sensitive detection capacity for Hg{sup 2+} in aqueous solution.

  2. Sensitive beam-bunch phase detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, S; Shepard, K W

    1984-11-15

    A sensitive heavy-ion beam-bunch phase detector has been developed by first examining the relationship between the sensitivity of an rf resonant cavity as a particle bunch detector and the shunt impedance of the same cavity as an accelerating structure. Then the various high shunt impedance rf cavities previously developed for accelerating heavy ions were evaluated for use as bunch detectors. A spiral-loaded geometry was chosen, built, and tested with beam. The sensitivity obtained, 14 V per electrical nA of beam, is a factor 3 higher than previously reported. (orig.).

  3. Sensitive beam-bunch phase detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, S; Shepard, K W [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Physics Div.

    1984-11-15

    A sensitive heavy-ion beam-bunch phase detector has been developed by first examining the relationship between the sensitivity of an RF resonant cavity as a particle bunch detector and the shunt impedance of the same cavity as an accelerating structure. Then the various high shunt impedance RF cavities previously developed for accelerating heavy ions were evaluated for use as bunch detectors. A spiral-loaded geometry was chosen, built, and tested with beam. The sensitivity obtained, 14 ..mu.. V per electrical nA of beam, is a factor 3 higher than previously reported.

  4. Novel mutations and mutation combinations of ryanodine receptor in a chlorantraniliprole resistant population of Plutella xylostella (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Liang, Pei; Zhou, Xuguo; Gao, Xiwu

    2014-01-01

    A previous study documented a glycine to glutamic acid mutation (G4946E) in ryanodine receptor (RyR) was highly correlated to diamide insecticide resistance in field populations of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae). In this study, a field population collected in Yunnan province, China, exhibited a 2128-fold resistance to chlorantraniliprole. Sequence comparison between resistant and susceptible P. xylostella revealed three novel mutations including a glutamic acid to valine substitution (E1338D), a glutamine to leucine substitution (Q4594L) and an isoleucine to methionine substitution (I4790M) in highly conserved regions of RyR. Frequency analysis of all four mutations in this field population showed that the three new mutations showed a high frequency of 100%, while the G4946E had a frequency of 20%. Furthermore, the florescent ligand binding assay revealed that the RyR containing multiple mutations displayed a significantly lower affinity to the chlorantraniliprole. The combined results suggested that the co-existence of different combinations of the four mutations was involved in the chlorantraniliprole resistance. An allele-specific PCR based method was developed for the diagnosis of the four mutations in the field populations of P. xylostella. PMID:25377064

  5. Strong activation of bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) by ursodeoxycholic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemuth, Dominik; Sahin, Hacer; Lefèvre, Cathérine M.T.; Wasmuth, Hermann E.; Gründer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC gene family of unknown function. Rat BASIC (rBASIC) is inactive at rest. We have recently shown that cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining the bile ducts, are the main site of BASIC expression in the liver and identified bile acids, in particular hyo- and chenodeoxycholic acid, as agonists of rBASIC. Moreover, it seems that extracellular divalent cations stabilize the resting state of rBASIC, because removal of extracellular divalent cations opens the channel. In this addendum, we demonstrate that removal of extracellular divalent cations potentiates the activation of rBASIC by bile acids, suggesting an allosteric mechanism. Furthermore, we show that rBASIC is strongly activated by the anticholestatic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), suggesting that BASIC might mediate part of the therapeutic effects of UDCA. PMID:23064163

  6. miRNAs regulated overexpression of ryanodine receptor is involved in chlorantraniliprole resistance in Plutella xylostella (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuxia; Guo, Lei; Zhou, Xuguo; Gao, Xiwu; Liang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid mutations in ryanodine receptor (RyR) and elevated activity of detoxification enzymes have been associated with the diamide insecticide resistance in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). The up-regulation of P. xylostella RyR mRNA (PxRyR) expression has also been reported in field populations of different graphical origin. However, whether the up-regulation of PxRyR is involved in diamide resistance remains unknown. In this paper, 2.28- to 4.14-fold higher expression of PxRyR was detected in five field collected resistant populations, compared to that in a susceptible population. The expression of PxRyR was up-regulated 5.0- and 7.2-fold, respectively, after P. xylostella was treated with LC50 and LC75 of chlorantraniliprole for 12 h. Suppression of PxRyR using RNA interference restored the toxicity of chlorantraniliprole against the fourth instar larvae from the resistant population. More importantly, the expression of PxRyR is regulated by two miRNAs, miR-7a and miR-8519. These findings provide an empirical evidence of the involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of insecticide resistance, and shed light on the novel targets for the sustainable management of this devastating insect pest. PMID:26370154

  7. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release: activation of type 1 ryanodine receptor by endogenous nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1.

  8. Novel single-cell mega-size chambers for electrochemical etching of panorama position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    A novel development is made here by inventing panorama single-cell mega-size electrochemical etching (MS-ECE) chamber systems for processing panorama position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate ion image detectors (MS-PCIDs) of potential for many neutron and ion detection applications in particular hydrogen ions or proton tracks and images detected for the first time in polycarbonates in this study. The MS-PCID is simply a large polycarbonate sheet of a desired size. The single-cell MS-ECE invented consists of two large equally sized transparent Plexiglas sheets as chamber walls holding a MS-PCID and the ECE chamber components tightly together. One wall has a large flat stainless steel electrode (dry cell) attached to it which is directly in contact with the MS-PCID and the other wall has a rod electrode with two holes to facilitate feeding and draining out the etching solution from the wet cell. A silicon rubber washer plays the role of the wet cell to hold the etchant and the electrical insulator to isolate the dry cell from the wet cell. A simple 50 Hz-HV home-made generator provides an adequate field strength through the two electrodes across the MS-ECE chamber. Two panorama single-cell MS-ECE chamber systems (circular and rectangular shapes) constructed were efficiently applied to processing the MS-PCIDs for 4π ion emission image detection of different gases in particular hydrogen ions or protons in a 3.5 kJ plasma focus device (PFD as uniquely observed by the unaided eyes). The panorama MS-PCID/MS-ECE image detection systems invented are novel with high potential for many applications in particular as applied to 4π panorama ion emission angular distribution image detection studies in PFD space, some results of which are presented and discussed.

  9. Deactivation kinetics of acid-sensing ion channel 1a are strongly pH-sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, David M; Jayaraman, Vasanthi

    2017-03-21

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are trimeric cation-selective ion channels activated by protons in the physiological range. Recent reports have revealed that postsynaptically localized ASICs contribute to the excitatory postsynaptic current by responding to the transient acidification of the synaptic cleft that accompanies neurotransmission. In response to such brief acidic transients, both recombinant and native ASICs show extremely rapid deactivation in outside-out patches when jumping from a pH 5 stimulus to a single resting pH of 8. Given that the resting pH of the synaptic cleft is highly dynamic and depends on recent synaptic activity, we explored the kinetics of ASIC1a and 1a/2a heteromers to such brief pH transients over a wider [H + ] range to approximate neuronal conditions better. Surprisingly, the deactivation of ASICs was steeply dependent on the pH, spanning nearly three orders of magnitude from extremely fast (pH 8 to very slow (>300 ms) at pH 7. This study provides an example of a ligand-gated ion channel whose deactivation is sensitive to agonist concentrations that do not directly activate the receptor. Kinetic simulations and further mutagenesis provide evidence that ASICs show such steeply agonist-dependent deactivation because of strong cooperativity in proton binding. This capacity to signal across such a large synaptically relevant bandwidth enhances the response to small-amplitude acidifications likely to occur at the cleft and may provide ASICs with the ability to shape activity in response to the recent history of the synapse.

  10. Effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on transparent conducting oxide electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hemant Kr.; Avasthi, D. K.; Aggarwal, Shruti

    2015-06-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are used as electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) because of their properties such as high transmittance and low resistivity. In the present work, the effects of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on various types of TCOs are presented. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of SHI on TCOs. For the present study, three different types of TCOs are considered, namely, (a) FTO (fluorine-doped tin oxide, SnO2:F) on a Nippon glass substrate, (b) ITO (indium tin oxide, In2O3:Sn) coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) on a Corning glass substrate, and (c) ITO on a Corning glass substrate. These films are irradiated with 120 MeV Ag+9 ions at fluences ranging from 3.0 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 3.0 × 1013 ions/cm2. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties are studied via X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and four-probe resistivity measurements, respectively. The ITO-PET electrode is found to exhibit superior conductivity and transmittance properties in comparison with the others after irradiation and, therefore, to be the most suitable for solar cell applications.

  11. High-sensitivity assay for Hg (II) and Ag (I) ion detection: A new class of droplet digital PCR logic gates for an intelligent DNA calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nan; Zhu, Pengyu; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Yang, Zhansen; Xu, Wentao

    2016-10-15

    The first example of droplet digital PCR logic gates ("YES", "OR" and "AND") for Hg (II) and Ag (I) ion detection has been constructed based on two amplification events triggered by a metal-ion-mediated base mispairing (T-Hg(II)-T and C-Ag(I)-C). In this work, Hg(II) and Ag(I) were used as the input, and the "true" hierarchical colors or "false" green were the output. Through accurate molecular recognition and high sensitivity amplification, positive droplets were generated by droplet digital PCR and viewed as the basis of hierarchical digital signals. Based on this principle, YES gate for Hg(II) (or Ag(I)) detection, OR gate for Hg(II) or Ag(I) detection and AND gate for Hg(II) and Ag(I) detection were developed, and their sensitively and selectivity were reported. The results indicate that the ddPCR logic system developed based on the different indicators for Hg(II) and Ag(I) ions provides a useful strategy for developing advanced detection methods, which are promising for multiplex metal ion analysis and intelligent DNA calculator design applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultra-sensitive and selective detection of mercury ion (Hg2+) using free-standing silicon nanowire sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan; Gao, Anran; Jin, Qinghui; Li, Tie; Wang, Yuelin; Zhao, Jianlong

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, ultra-sensitive and highly selective Hg2+ detection in aqueous solutions was studied by free-standing silicon nanowire (SiNW) sensors. The all-around surface of SiNW arrays was functionalized with (3-Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane serving as Hg2+ sensitive layer. Due to effective electrostatic control provided by the free-standing structure, a detection limit as low as 1 ppt was obtained. A linear relationship (R 2 = 0.9838) between log(CHg2+ ) and a device current change from 1 ppt to 5 ppm was observed. Furthermore, the developed SiNW sensor exhibited great selectivity for Hg2+ over other heavy metal ions, including Cd2+. Given the extraordinary ability for real-time Hg2+ detection, the small size and low cost of the SiNW device, it is expected to be a potential candidate in field detection of environmentally toxic mercury.

  13. Fluorescence enhancement of CdTe/CdS quantum dots by coupling of glyphosate and its application for sensitive detection of copper ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhengqing; Liu Shaopu; Yin Pengfei; He Youqiu

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Glyphosate (Glyp) had been used to modify the surface of CdTe/CdS QDs, resulting in the enhancement of fluorescence intensity. The Glyp-functionalized QDs fluorescent probe offers good sensitivity and selectivity for detecting Cu 2+ based on the fluorescence quenching. Highlights: ► Water soluble CdTe/CdS quantum dots capped with glyphosate were firstly synthesized. ► The fluorescence of the Glyp-functionalized QDs was quenched by copper ion. ► A new fluorescent sensor for copper ion was developed based on the prepared QDs. ► The sensor exhibited high sensitivity and good selectivity for copper ion. - Abstract: A novel fluorescent probe for Cu 2+ determination based on the fluorescence quenching of glyphosate (Glyp)-functionalized quantum dots (QDs) was firstly reported. Glyp had been used to modify the surface of QDs to form Glyp-functionalized QDs following the capping of thioglycolic acid on the core–shell CdTe/CdS QDs. Under the optimal conditions, the response was linearly proportional to the concentration of Cu 2+ between 2.4 × 10 −2 μg mL −1 and 28 μg mL −1 , with a detection limit of 1.3 × 10 −3 μg mL −1 (3δ). The Glyp-functionalized QDs fluorescent probe offers good sensitivity and selectivity for detecting Cu 2+ . The fluorescent probe was successfully used for the determination of Cu 2+ in environmental samples. The mechanism of reaction was also discussed.

  14. Effect of capping agent on selectivity and sensitivity of CdTe quantum dots optical sensor for detection of mercury ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeb, Mohmed; Sakr, Abdel-Hamed; Soliman, Moataz; Abdel-Fettah, Tarek M.; Ebrahim, Shaker

    2018-05-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) were prepared from an aqueous solution containing CdCl2 and Te precursor in the presence of thioglycolic acid (TGA) or L-cysteine as capping agents. Two optical sensors have been developed for Hg2+ ions with very low concentration in the range of nanomolar (nM) or picomolar (pM) depending on the type of capping agents and based on photoluminescence (PL) quenching of CdTe QDs. It was observed that low concentrations of Hg2+ ions quench the fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs and TGA capped CdTe QDs exhibited a linear response to Hg2+ ions in the concentration range from 1.25 to 10 nM. Moreover, it was found that L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs optical sensor with a sensitivity of 6 × 109 M-1, exhibited a linear coefficient of 0.99 and showed a detection limit of 2.7 pM in range from 5 to 25 pM of Hg2+ ions was achieved. In contrast to the significant response that was observed for Hg2+, a weak signal response was noted upon the addition of other metal ions indicating an excellent selectivity of CdTe QDs towards Hg2+.

  15. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-06

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  16. 3D Mapping of the SPRY2 domain of ryanodine receptor 1 by single-particle cryo-EM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Perálvarez-Marín

    Full Text Available The type 1 skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1 is principally responsible for Ca(2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and for the subsequent muscle contraction. The RyR1 contains three SPRY domains. SPRY domains are generally known to mediate protein-protein interactions, however the location of the three SPRY domains in the 3D structure of the RyR1 is not known. Combining immunolabeling and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy we have mapped the SPRY2 domain (S1085-V1208 in the 3D structure of RyR1 using three different antibodies against the SPRY2 domain. Two obstacles for the image processing procedure; limited amount of data and signal dilution introduced by the multiple orientations of the antibody bound in the tetrameric RyR1, were overcome by modifying the 3D reconstruction scheme. This approach enabled us to ascertain that the three antibodies bind to the same region, to obtain a 3D reconstruction of RyR1 with the antibody bound, and to map SPRY2 to the periphery of the cytoplasmic domain of RyR1. We report here the first 3D localization of a SPRY2 domain in any known RyR isoform.

  17. Highly sensitive detection of lead(II) ion using multicolor CdTe quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, W.; Zhang, C.; Gao, Q.; Li, H.

    2012-01-01

    Multicolor and water-soluble CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized with thioglycolic acid (TGA) as stabilizer. These QDs have a good size distribution, display high fluorescence quantum yield, and can be applied to the ultrasensitive detection of Pb(II) ion by virtue of their quenching effect. The size of the QDs exerts a strong effect on sensitivity, and quenching of luminescence is most effective for the smallest particles. The quenching mechanism is discussed. Fairly selective detection was accomplished by utilizing QDs with a diameter of 1. 6 nm which resulted in a detection limit of 4. 7 nmol L -1 concentration of Pb(II). The method was successfully applied to the determination of Pb(II) in spinach and citrus leaves, and the results are in good agreement with those obtained with atomic absorption spectrometry. (author)

  18. TAS-116, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, selectively enhances radio-sensitivity of human cancer cells to X-rays and carbon ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghyun; Sunada, Shigeaki; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Fujimori, Akira; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 inhibitors have been investigated as cancer therapeutics in mono-therapy and to augment radiotherapy, however serious adverse effects of early generation Hsp90 inhibitors limited their development. TAS-116 is a novel Hsp90 inhibitor with lower adverse effects than other Hsp90 inhibitors, and here we investigated the radio-sensitizing effects of TAS-116 in low LET X-ray, and high LET carbon ion irradiated human cancer cells and mouse tumor xenografts. TAS-116 decreased cell survival of both X-ray and carbon ion-irradiated human cancer cell lines (HeLa and H1299 cells), and similar to other Hsp90 inhibitors, it did not affect radiosensitivity of non-cancerous human fibroblasts. TAS-116 increased the number of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, and delayed the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). TAS-116 reduced the expression of proteins that mediate repair of DSBs by homologous recombination (RAD51) and non-homologous end joining (Ku, DNA-PKcs), and suppressed formation of RAD51 foci and phosphorylation/activation of DNA-PKcs. TAS-116 also decreased expression of the cdc25 cell cycle progression marker, markedly increasing G2/M arrest. Combined treatment of mouse tumor xenografts with carbon ions and TAS-116 showed promising delay in tumor growth compared to either individual treatment. These results demonstrate that TAS-116 radio-sensitizes human cancer cells to both X rays and carbon ions by inhibiting the two major DSB repair pathways, and these effects were accompanied by marked cell cycle arrest. The promising results of combination TAS-116 + carbon ion radiation therapy of tumor xenografts justify further exploration of TAS-116 as an adjunct to radiotherapy using low or high LET radiation. PMID:28062703

  19. A sensitive whole-cell biosensor for the simultaneous detection of a broad-spectrum of toxic heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerminati, S; Soncini, F C; Checa, S K

    2015-04-07

    Bacterial biosensors are simple, cost-effective and efficient analytical tools for detecting bioavailable heavy metals in the environment. This work presents the design, construction and calibration of a novel whole-cell fluorescent biosensory device that, simultaneously and with high sensitivity, reports the presence of toxic mercury, lead, cadmium and/or gold ions in aqueous samples. This bio-reporter can be easily applied as an immediate alerting tool for detecting the presence of harmful pollutants in drinking water.

  20. Ion sensors based on novel fiber organic electrochemical transistors for lead ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuedan; Zhou, Zhou; Qing, Xing; Zhong, Weibing; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wang, Wenwen; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Fiber organic electrochemical transistors (FECTs) based on polypyrrole and nanofibers have been prepared for the first time. FECTs exhibited excellent electrical performances, on/off ratios up to 10(4) and low applied voltages below 2 V. The ion sensitivity behavior of the fiber organic electrochemical transistors was investigated. It exhibited that the transfer curve of FECTs shifted to lower gate voltage with increasing cations concentration, the sensitivity reached to 446 μA/dec in the 10(-5)-10(-2) M Pb(2+) concentration range. The ion selective properties of the FECTs have also been systematically studied for the detection of potassium, calcium, aluminum, and lead ions. The devices with different cations showed great difference in response curves. It was suitable for selectively monitoring Pb(2+) with respect to other cations. The results indicated FECTs were very effective for electrochemical sensing of lead ion, which opened a promising perspective for wearable electronics in healthcare and biological application. Graphical Abstract The schematic diagram of fiber organic electrochemical transistors based on polypyrrole and nanofibers for ion sensing.

  1. Development of sensitive holographic devices for physiological metal ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabad-e.-Gul; Martin, Suzanne; Cassidy, John; Naydenova, Izabela

    2017-08-01

    The development of selective alkali metal ions sensors in particular is a subject of significant interest. In this respect, the level of blood electrolytes, particularly H+, Na+, K+ and Cl- , is widely used to monitor aberrant physiologies associated with pulmonary emphysema, acute and chronic renal failure, heart failure, diabetes. The sensors reported in this paper are created by holographic recording of surface relief structures in a self-processing photopolymer material. The structures are functionalized by ionophores dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DC) and tetraethyl 4-tert-butylcalix[4]arene (TBC) in plasticised polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix. Interrogation of these structures by light allows indirect measurements of chemical analytes' concentration in real time. We present results on the optimisation and testing of the holographic sensor. A self-processing acrylamide-based photopolymer was used to fabricate the required photonic structures. The performance of the sensors for detection of K+ and Na+ was investigated. It was observed that the functionalisation with DC provides a selective response of the devices to K+ over Na+ and TBC coated surface structures are selectively sensitive to Na+. The sensor responds to Na+ within the physiological ranges. Normal levels of Na+ and K+ in human serum lie within the ranges 135-148mM and 3.5-5.3 mM respectively.

  2. Effects of pO2 on the activation of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors by NO: a cautionary note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Eunji; Tumbev, Vassil; Stoyanovsky, Detcho; Salama, Guy

    2005-11-01

    Eu et al., reported that O2 dynamically controls the redox state of 6-8 out of 50 thiols per skeletal ryanodine receptor (RyR1) subunit and thereby tunes the response of Ca2+-release channels to authentic nitric oxide (NO) [J.P. Eu, J. Sun, L. Xu, J.S. Stamler, G. Meissner, The skeletal muscle calcium release channel: coupled O2 sensor and NO signaling functions, Cell 102 (2000) 499-509]. A role for O2 was based on the observation that RyR1 can be activated by submicromolar NO at physiological ( approximately 10 mmHg) but not ambient (approximately 150 mmHg) pO2. At ambient pO2, these critical thiols were oxidized but incubation at low pO2 reset the redox state of these thiols, closed RyR1 channels and made these thiols available for nitrosation by low NO concentrations. Eu et al., postulated the existence of a redox/O2sensor that couples channel activity to NO and pO2 and explained that "the nature of the 'redox/O2 sensor' that couples channel activity to intracellular redox chemistry is a mystery". Here, we re-examined the effect of pO2 on RyR1 and find that incubation of RyR1 at low pO2 did not alter channel activity and NO (0.5-50 microM) failed to activate RyR1 despite a wide range of pO2 pre-incubation conditions. We show that low levels of NO do not activate RyR1, do not reverse the inhibition of RyR1 by calmodulin (CaM) even at physiological pO2. Similarly, the pre-incubation of SR vesicles in low pO2 (for 10-80 min) did not inhibit channel activity or sensitization of RyR1 to NO. We discuss the significance of these findings and propose that caution should be taken when considering a role for pO2 and nitrosation by NO as mechanisms that tune RyRs in striated muscles.

  3. Fluorescence enhancement of CdTe/CdS quantum dots by coupling of glyphosate and its application for sensitive detection of copper ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhengqing; Liu Shaopu; Yin Pengfei [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); He Youqiu, E-mail: heyq@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Graphical abstract: Glyphosate (Glyp) had been used to modify the surface of CdTe/CdS QDs, resulting in the enhancement of fluorescence intensity. The Glyp-functionalized QDs fluorescent probe offers good sensitivity and selectivity for detecting Cu{sup 2+} based on the fluorescence quenching. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water soluble CdTe/CdS quantum dots capped with glyphosate were firstly synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the Glyp-functionalized QDs was quenched by copper ion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new fluorescent sensor for copper ion was developed based on the prepared QDs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensor exhibited high sensitivity and good selectivity for copper ion. - Abstract: A novel fluorescent probe for Cu{sup 2+} determination based on the fluorescence quenching of glyphosate (Glyp)-functionalized quantum dots (QDs) was firstly reported. Glyp had been used to modify the surface of QDs to form Glyp-functionalized QDs following the capping of thioglycolic acid on the core-shell CdTe/CdS QDs. Under the optimal conditions, the response was linearly proportional to the concentration of Cu{sup 2+} between 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} {mu}g mL{sup -1} and 28 {mu}g mL{sup -1}, with a detection limit of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {mu}g mL{sup -1} (3{delta}). The Glyp-functionalized QDs fluorescent probe offers good sensitivity and selectivity for detecting Cu{sup 2+}. The fluorescent probe was successfully used for the determination of Cu{sup 2+} in environmental samples. The mechanism of reaction was also discussed.

  4. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B [Los Lunas, NM; Rohde, Steven B [Corrales, NM

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  5. FRET-based localization of fluorescent protein insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta A Raina

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein (FP insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1, a large intracellular Ca(2+ release channel that plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. A series of full-length His-tagged GFP-RyR1 fusion constructs were created, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293T cells and then complexed with Cy3NTA, a His-tag specific FRET acceptor. FRET efficiency values measured from each GFP donor to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag acceptor site were converted into intermolecular distances and the positions of each inserted GFP were then triangulated relative to a previously published X-ray crystal structure of a 559 amino acid RyR1 fragment. We observed that the chromophoric centers of fluorescent proteins inserted into RyR1 can be located as far as 45 Å from their insertion sites and that the fused proteins can also be located in internal cavities within RyR1. These findings should prove useful in interpreting structural results obtained in cryo EM maps using fusions of small fluorescent proteins. More accurate point-to-point distance information may be obtained using complementary orthogonal labeling systems that rely on fluorescent probes that bind directly to amino acid side chains.

  6. Bell-shaped calcium-response curves of lns(l,4,5)P3- and calcium-gated channels from endoplasmic reticulum of cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezprozvanny, Llya; Watras, James; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    1991-06-01

    RELEASE of calcium from intracellular stores occurs by two pathways, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-gated channel1-3 and a calcium-gated channel (ryanodine receptor)4-6. Using specific antibodies, both receptors were found in Purkinje cells of cerebellum7,8. We have now compared the functional properties of the channels corresponding to the two receptors by incorporating endoplasmic reticulum vesicles from canine cerebellum into planar bilayers. InsP3-gated channels were observed most frequently. Another channel type was activated by adenine nucleotides or caffeine, inhibited by ruthenium red, and modified by ryanodine, characteristics of the ryanodine receptor/channel6. The open probability of both channel types displayed a bell-shaped curve for dependence on calcium. For the InsP3-gated channel, the maximum probability of opening occurred at 0.2 µM free calcium, with sharp decreases on either side of the maximum. Maximum activity for the ryanodine receptor/channel was maintained between 1 and 100 µM calcium. Thus, within the physiological range of cytoplasmic calcium, the InsP3-gated channel itself allows positive feed-back and then negative feedback for calcium release, whereas the ryanodine receptor/channel behaves solely as a calcium-activated channel. The existence in the same cell of two channels with different responses to calcium and different ligand sensitivities provides a basis for complex patterns of intracellular calcium regulation.

  7. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes grown on graphene paper as electrodes in lithium-ion batteries and dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shisheng; Yu, Wanjing; Hou, Pengxiang; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming [Shenyang National Laboratory of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Luo, Yanhong; Meng, Qingbo [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lv, Wei; Wu, Sida; Yang, Quanhong [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are grown directly on a free-standing graphene paper (GP). The desirable carrier transport ability of the VACNTs, good conductivity and mechanical properties of the GP, and strong bonding between the VACNTs and the GP endow the hybrid structure with superior performance when utilized as the electrodes of lithium-ion batteries and dye-sensitized solar cells. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on transparent conducting oxide electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Hemant Kr.; Avasthi, D.K.; Aggarwal, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •The objective is to study the effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on photoanode of DSSC for better efficiency. •This work presents the effect of SHI irradiation on various Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). •Effects are studied in terms of conductivity and transmittance of TCOs. •ITO-PET gives best results in comparison to ITO and FTO for DSSC application under SHI irradiation. -- Abstract: Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are used as electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) because of their properties such as high transmittance and low resistivity. In the present work, the effects of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on various types of TCOs are presented. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of SHI on TCOs. For the present study, three different types of TCOs are considered, namely, (a) FTO (fluorine-doped tin oxide, SnO 2 :F) on a Nippon glass substrate, (b) ITO (indium tin oxide, In 2 O 3 :Sn) coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) on a Corning glass substrate, and (c) ITO on a Corning glass substrate. These films are irradiated with 120 MeV Ag +9 ions at fluences ranging from 3.0 × 10 11 ions/cm 2 to 3.0 × 10 13 ions/cm 2 . The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties are studied via X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy and four-probe resistivity measurements, respectively. The ITO-PET electrode is found to exhibit superior conductivity and transmittance properties in comparison with the others after irradiation and, therefore, to be the most suitable for solar cell applications

  9. Effect of liquid gate bias rising time in pH sensors based on Si nanowire ion sensitive field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jungkyu; Choi, Sungju; Kim, Jungmok; Park, Tae Jung; Park, Byung-Gook; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Dae Hwan; Mo, Hyun-Sun

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of rising time (TR) of liquid gate bias (VLG) on transient responses in pH sensors based on Si nanowire ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs). As TR becomes shorter and pH values decrease, the ISFET current takes a longer time to saturate to the pH-dependent steady-state value. By correlating VLG with the internal gate-to-source voltage of the ISFET, we found that this effect occurs when the drift/diffusion of mobile ions in analytes in response to VLG is delayed. This gives us useful insight on the design of ISFET-based point-of-care circuits and systems, particularly with respect to determining an appropriate rising time for the liquid gate bias.

  10. A single optical sensor with high sensitivity for detection of Fe{sup 3+} and CN{sup −} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshani, Jafar [School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Badiei, Alireza, E-mail: abadiei@khayam.ut.ac.ir [School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanobiomedicine Center of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research Center, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, Maryam; Shayesteh, Alireza; Karimi, Mehdi; Lashgari, Negar [School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi Ziarani, Ghodsi [Department of Chemistry, Alzahra University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    1,2-Bis(2-hydroxymethylphenoxy)ethane was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, and single crystal X-ray diffraction method. The sensing ability of the sensor was studied in the presence of different cations and anions. Following the excitation wavelengths at 275 nm in EtOH/H{sub 2}O (1:9, v/v) and 310 nm in MeCN/H{sub 2}O (1:9, v/v), two distinct emissions at 305 and 356 nm were obtained, respectively. Fe{sup 3+} and CN{sup −} ions were successfully detected in EtOH/H{sub 2}O and MeCN/H{sub 2}O mixtures, respectively. While the fluorescence intensity of the sensor quenched considerably in the presence of Fe{sup 3+} cation at 305 nm, it enhanced in the presence of CN{sup −} anion at 356 nm. Selectivity of the sensor toward these ions was verified in the presence of a variety of common interfering ions. The detection limits of Fe{sup 3+} and CN{sup −} were calculated as 5.4 × 10{sup −9} mol L{sup −1} and 1.9 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}, respectively which shows the high sensitivity of the sensor toward the target ions. Finally, the interaction of the sensor and CN{sup −} anion was determined by computational studies.

  11. Atom location using recoil ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Low energy ion scattering (LEIS) using inert gas and alkali ions is widely used in studies of the surface atomic layer. The extreme surface sensitivity of this technique ensures that it yields both compositional and structural information on clean and adsorbate covered surfaces. Low Energy Negative recoil Spectroscopy (LENRS) has been applied to a study of oxygen on Ni(110) to gauge the sensitivity to coverage and site location

  12. Depth sensitivity of Lexan polycarbonate detector

    CERN Document Server

    Awad, E M

    1999-01-01

    The dependence of the registration sensitivity of Lexan polycarbonate with depth inside the detector was studied. Samples of Lexan from General Electric were irradiated to two long range ions. These were Ni and Au ions with a projectile energy of 0.3 and 1 GeV/n. Two independent techniques, the track-diameter technique (TDT) and the track profile technique (TPT), were used. The registration sensitivity was measured at depths of 7, 10, 15, 18, 20, 28, 35 and 40 mu m inside the detector. The results of the two techniques show that the detector sensitivity decreases gradually with the depth inside the detector. It reaches 20 % less compared to sensitivity at the surface after 40 mu m have been removed.

  13. Partition/Ion-Exclusion Chromatographic Ion Stacking for the Analysis of Trace Anions in Water and Salt Samples by Ion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Fouzia; Saito, Shingo; Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Shibukawa, Masami

    2018-01-01

    A new analytical methodology for a simple and efficient on-line preconcentration of trace inorganic anions in water and salt samples prior to ion chromatographic determination is proposed. The preconcentration method is based on partition/ion-exclusion chromatographic ion stacking (PIEC ion stacking) with a hydrophilic polymer gel column containing a small amount of fixed anionic charges. The developed on-line PIEC ion stacking-ion chromatography method was validated by recovery experiments for the determination of nitrate in tap water in terms of both accuracy and precision, and the results showed the reliability of the method. The method proposed was also successfully applied to the determination of trace impurity nitrite and nitrate in reagent-grade salts of sodium sulfate. A low background level can be achieved since pure water is used as the eluant for the PIEC ion stacking. It is possible to reach sensitive detection at sub-μg L -1 levels by on-line PIEC ion stacking-ion chromatography.

  14. Near-UV sensitized 1.06 μm emission of Nd{sup 3+} ions via monovalent copper in phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez, José A., E-mail: jose.jimenez@unf.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Sendova, Mariana [Optical Spectroscopy & Nano-Materials Lab, New College of Florida, Sarasota, FL 34243 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Monovalent copper ions effectively incorporated in Nd-containing phosphate glass by a single-step melt-quench method have been established as near-ultraviolet (UV) sensitizers of Nd{sup 3+} ions, resulting in a remarkable {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} emission at 1.06 μm. The spectroscopic data indicates an efficient energy conversion process. The Cu{sup +} ions first absorb photons broadly around 360 nm, and subsequently transfer the energy from the Stokes-shifted emitting states to resonant Nd{sup 3+} energy levels in the visible. Ultimately, the Nd{sup 3+} electronic excited states decay and the upper lasing state {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} is populated, leading to the enhanced emission at 1.06 μm. The characteristic features of the Cu{sup +} visible emission spectra and the reduced lifetime of the corresponding Cu{sup +} donor states indicate an efficient non-radiative transfer. The Cu{sup +}/Nd{sup 3+} co-doped phosphate glass appears suitable as solid-state laser material with enhanced pump range in the near-UV part of the spectrum and for solar spectral conversion in photovoltaic cells. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Monovalent copper ions effectively stabilized in Nd{sup 3+}-containing phosphate glass. • Enhanced Nd{sup 3+} near-infrared emission observed upon the Cu{sup +} ions incorporation. • Cu{sup +} → Nd{sup 3+} non-radiative energy transfer efficiencies and likely energy transfer pathways evaluated. • Potential for solid-state lasers and solar spectral conversion suggested.

  15. Association of cardiac myosin binding protein-C with the ryanodine receptor channel: putative retrograde regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Paulina J; Seidel, Monika; White, Judith; Viero, Cedric; George, Christopher H; Zissimopoulos, Spyros; Lai, F Anthony

    2018-06-21

    The cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor-Ca 2+ release channel (RyR2) constitutes the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca 2+ efflux mechanism that initiates myocyte contraction, while cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) mediates regulation of acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling. In this report, we provide the first evidence for the presence of direct interaction between these two proteins, forming a RyR2:cMyBP-C complex. The C-terminus of cMyBP-C binds with the RyR2 N-terminus in mammalian cells and is not mediated by a fibronectin-like domain. Notably, we detected complex formation between both recombinant cMyBP-C and RyR2, as well as with the native proteins in cardiac tissue. Cellular Ca 2+ dynamics in HEK293 cells is altered upon co-expression of cMyBP-C and RyR2, with lowered frequency of RyR2-mediated spontaneous Ca 2+ oscillations, suggesting cMyBP-C exerts a potential inhibitory effect on RyR2-dependent Ca 2+ release. Discovery of a functional RyR2 association with cMyBP-C provides direct evidence for a putative mechanistic link between cytosolic soluble cMyBP-C and SR-mediated Ca 2+ release, via RyR2. Importantly, this interaction may have clinical relevance to the observed cMyBP-C and RyR2 dysfunction in cardiac pathologies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Sensitivity of ion-induced sputtering to the radial distribution of energy transfers: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, S.; Khan, S. A.; Roy, A.; Beuve, M.; Toulemonde, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using different models for the deposition of energy on the lattice and a classical molecular dynamics approach to the subsequent transport, we evaluate how the details of the energy deposition model influence sputtering yield from a Lennard-Jones target irradiated with a MeV/u ion beam. Two energy deposition models are considered: a uniform, instantaneous deposition into a cylinder of fixed radius around the projectile ion track, used in earlier molecular dynamics and fluid dynamics simulations of sputtering yields; and an energy deposition distributed in time and space based on the formalism developed in the thermal spike model. The dependence of the sputtering yield on the total energy deposited on the target atoms is very sensitive to the energy deposition model. To clarify the origin of this strong dependence, we explore the role of the radial expansion of the electronic system prior to the transfer of its energy to the lattice. The results imply that observables such as the sputtering yield may be used as signatures of the fast electron-lattice energy transfer in the electronic energy-loss regime, and indicate the need for more experimental and theoretical investigations of these processes

  17. Effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on transparent conducting oxide electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hemant Kr. [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Inter University Accelerator Center, Post Box 10502, New Delhi (India); Aggarwal, Shruti, E-mail: shruti.al@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: •The objective is to study the effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on photoanode of DSSC for better efficiency. •This work presents the effect of SHI irradiation on various Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). •Effects are studied in terms of conductivity and transmittance of TCOs. •ITO-PET gives best results in comparison to ITO and FTO for DSSC application under SHI irradiation. -- Abstract: Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are used as electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) because of their properties such as high transmittance and low resistivity. In the present work, the effects of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on various types of TCOs are presented. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of SHI on TCOs. For the present study, three different types of TCOs are considered, namely, (a) FTO (fluorine-doped tin oxide, SnO{sub 2}:F) on a Nippon glass substrate, (b) ITO (indium tin oxide, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Sn) coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) on a Corning glass substrate, and (c) ITO on a Corning glass substrate. These films are irradiated with 120 MeV Ag{sup +9} ions at fluences ranging from 3.0 × 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2} to 3.0 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties are studied via X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy and four-probe resistivity measurements, respectively. The ITO-PET electrode is found to exhibit superior conductivity and transmittance properties in comparison with the others after irradiation and, therefore, to be the most suitable for solar cell applications.

  18. Influence of plasticizer on the selectivity of nitrate-sensitive CHEMFETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stauthamer, W.P.R.V.; Stauthamer, W.P.R.V.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    1994-01-01

    By chemical modification of an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor, a sensor (CHEMFET) has been developed whose sensitivity for nitrate has been tested. A plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane, which contains lipophilic tetra-n-octyl-ammonium ions, is responsible for the nitrate

  19. A [Cyclentetrakis(methylene)]tetrakis[2-hydroxybenzamide]Ligand That Complexes and Sensitizes Lanthanide(III) Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aleo, Anthony; Xu, Jide; Do, King; Muller, Gilles; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-04-30

    The synthesis of a cyclen derivative containing four isophthalamide groups (L{sup 1}) is described. The spectroscopic properties of the Ln(III) complexes of L{sup 1} (Ln = Gd, Tb, Yb, Eu) reveal changes of the UV/visible absorption, circular dichroism absorption, luminescence and circularly polarized luminescence properties. It is shown that at least two metal complex species are present in solution, whose relative amounts are pH dependent. When at pH > 8.0, an intense long lived emission is observed (for [L{sup 1}Tb] and [L{sup 1}Yb]) while at pH < 8.0, a weaker, shorter-lived species predominates. Unconventional Ln(III) emitters (Pr, Nd, Sm, Dy and Tm) were sensitized in basic solution, both in the visible and in the near infra-red, to measure the emission of these ions.

  20. Sawtooth activity of the ion cloud in an electron-beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, R.; Biedermann, C.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of highly charged Ar and Ba ions in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) was studied by recording time-resolved x-ray spectra emitted from trapped ions. Sawtoothlike signatures manifest in the spectra for a variety of EBIT operating conditions indicating a sudden collapse of the ion inventory in the trap. The collapse occurs on a time scale of approximately 100 ms and the evolution of the sawteeth is very sensitive to parameters such as electron-beam current and axial trap depth. Analysis of the measurements is based on a time-dependent calculation of the trapping process showing that sawtooth activity is caused by the feedback between the low-Z argon and high-Z barium ions. This unexpected behavior demonstrates the importance of nonlinear effects in electron-beam traps containing more than a single ion species

  1. NKS1, Na+- and K+-sensitive 1, regulates ion homeostasis in an SOS-independent pathway in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Wonkyun

    2011-04-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, nks1-1, exhibiting enhanced sensitivity to NaCl was identified in a screen of a T-DNA insertion population in the genetic background of Col-0 gl1 sos3-1. Analysis of the genome sequence in the region flanking the T-DNA left border indicated two closely linked mutations in the gene encoded at locus At4g30996. A second allele, nks1-2, was obtained from the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. NKS1 mRNA was detected in all parts of wild-type plants but was not detected in plants of either mutant, indicating inactivation by the mutations. Both mutations in NKS1 were associated with increased sensitivity to NaCl and KCl, but not to LiCl or mannitol. NaCl sensitivity was associated with nks1 mutations in Arabidopsis lines expressing either wild type or alleles of SOS1, SOS2 or SOS3. The NaCl-sensitive phenotype of the nks1-2 mutant was complemented by expression of a full-length NKS1 allele from the CaMV35S promoter. When grown in medium containing NaCl, nks1 mutants accumulated more Na+ than wild type and K +/Na+ homeostasis was perturbed. It is proposed NKS1, a plant-specific gene encoding a 19 kDa endomembrane-localized protein of unknown function, is part of an ion homeostasis regulation pathway that is independent of the SOS pathway. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. NKS1, Na+- and K+-sensitive 1, regulates ion homeostasis in an SOS-independent pathway in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Wonkyun; Baek, Dongwon; Oh, Dongha; Park, Jiyoung; Hong, Hyewon; Kim, Woeyeon; Bohnert, Hans Jü rgen; Bressan, Ray Anthony; Park, Hyeongcheol; Yun, Daejin

    2011-01-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, nks1-1, exhibiting enhanced sensitivity to NaCl was identified in a screen of a T-DNA insertion population in the genetic background of Col-0 gl1 sos3-1. Analysis of the genome sequence in the region flanking the T-DNA left border indicated two closely linked mutations in the gene encoded at locus At4g30996. A second allele, nks1-2, was obtained from the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. NKS1 mRNA was detected in all parts of wild-type plants but was not detected in plants of either mutant, indicating inactivation by the mutations. Both mutations in NKS1 were associated with increased sensitivity to NaCl and KCl, but not to LiCl or mannitol. NaCl sensitivity was associated with nks1 mutations in Arabidopsis lines expressing either wild type or alleles of SOS1, SOS2 or SOS3. The NaCl-sensitive phenotype of the nks1-2 mutant was complemented by expression of a full-length NKS1 allele from the CaMV35S promoter. When grown in medium containing NaCl, nks1 mutants accumulated more Na+ than wild type and K +/Na+ homeostasis was perturbed. It is proposed NKS1, a plant-specific gene encoding a 19 kDa endomembrane-localized protein of unknown function, is part of an ion homeostasis regulation pathway that is independent of the SOS pathway. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensitive spectrophotometric determination of aceclofenac following azo dye formation with 4-carboxyl-2,6-dinitrobenzene diazonium ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderibigbe, Segun A; Adegoke, Olajire A; Idowu, Olakunle S; Olaleye, Sefiu O

    2012-01-01

    The study is a description of a sensitive spectrophotometric determination of aceclofenac following azo dye formation with 4-carboxyl-2,6-dinitrobenzenediazonium ion (CDNBD). Spot test and thin layer chromatography revealed the formation of a new compound distinct from CDNBD and aceclofenac. Optimization studies established a reaction time of 5 min at 30 degrees C after vortex mixing the drug/CDNBD for 10 s. An absorption maximum of 430 nm was selected as analytical wavelength. A linear response was observed over 1.2-4.8 μg/mL of aceclofenac with a correlation coefficient of 0.9983 and the drug combined with CDNBD at stoichiometric ratio of 2 : 1. The method has a limit of detection of 0.403 μg/mL, limit of quantitation of 1.22 μg/mL and is reproducible over a three day assessment. The method gave Sandell's sensitivity of 3.279 ng/cm2. Intra- and inter-day accuracies (in terms of errors) were less than 6% while precisions were of the order of 0.03-1.89% (RSD). The developed spectrophotometric method is of equivalent accuracy (p > 0.05) with British Pharmacopoeia, 2010 potentiometric method. It has the advantages of speed, simplicity, sensitivity and more affordable instrumentation and could found application as a rapid and sensitive analytical method of aceclofenac. It is the first described method by azo dye derivatization for the analysis of aceclofenac in bulk samples and dosage forms.

  4. Highly selective apo-arginase based method for sensitive enzymatic assay of manganese (II) and cobalt (II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Zakalskiy, Andriy; Zakalska, Oksana; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2018-03-01

    A novel enzymatic method of manganese (II) and cobalt (II) ions assay, based on using apo-enzyme of Mn2 +-dependent recombinant arginase I (arginase) and 2,3-butanedione monoxime (DMO) as a chemical reagent is proposed. The principle of the method is the evaluation of the activity of L-arginine-hydrolyzing of arginase holoenzyme after the specific binding of Mn2 + or Co2 + with apo-arginase. Urea, which is the product of enzymatic hydrolysis of L-arginine (Arg), reacts with DMO and the resulted compound is detected by both fluorometry and visual spectrophotometry. Thus, the content of metal ions in the tested samples can be determined by measuring the level of urea generated after enzymatic hydrolysis of Arg by reconstructed arginase holoenzyme in the presence of tested metal ions. The linearity range of the fluorometric apo-arginase-DMO method in the case of Mn2 + assay is from 4 pM to 1.10 nM with a limit of detection of 1 pM Mn2 +, whereas the linearity range of the present method in the case of Co2 + assay is from 8 pM to 45 nM with a limit of detection of 2.5 pM Co2 +. The proposed method being highly sensitive, selective, valid and low-cost, may be useful to monitor Mn2 + and Co2 + content in clinical laboratories, food industry and environmental control service.

  5. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impact ionization for highly sensitive chemical structure characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, K., E-mail: k.hirata@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Narumi, K. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Energetic cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater were applied to time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry. This gave various advantages including enhancement of SIs required for chemical structure characterization and prevention of charging effects in SI mass spectra for organic targets. We report some characteristic features of TOF SI mass spectrometry using energetic cluster ion impact ionization and discuss two future applications of it.

  6. Ion-implanted PLZT ceramics: a new high-sensitivity image storage medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Results were presented of our studies of photoferroelectric (PFE) image storage in H- and He-ion implanted PLZT (lead lanthanum zirconate titanate) ceramics which demonstrate that the photosensitivity of PLZT can be significantly increased by ion implantation in the ceramic surface to be exposed to image light. More recently, implantations of Ar and Ar + Ne into the PLZT surface have produced much greater photosensitivity enhancement. For example, the photosensitivity after implantation with 1.5 x 10 14 350 keV Ar/cm 2 + 1 x 10 15 500 keV Ne/cm 2 is increased by about four orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. Measurements indicate that the photosensitivity enhancement in ion-implanted PLZT is controlled by implantation-produced disorder which results in marked decreases in dielectric constant and dark conductivity and changes in photoconductivity of the implanted layer. The effects of Ar- and Ar + Ne-implantation are presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage V/sub c/ as a function of near-uv light intensity for both unimplanted and implanted PLZT. The model, used in conjunction with calculations of the profiles of implantation-produced disorder, has provided the information needed for co-implanting ions of different masses, e.g., Ar and Ne, to improve photosensitivity

  7. Combination of Heavy-ion radiotherapy and p53-gene therapy by radio-sensitizing promoter for glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oga, Masaru; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Takenaga, Keizo; Iwadate, Yasuo; Nojima, Kumie

    2005-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the anti-tumor effect of the combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy, inducing p53-independent apoptosis, and p53-gene therapy, inducing p53-dependent apoptosis for glioma. To enhance the p53-dependent apoptosis, we chose the strategy to utilize the heavy-ion irradiation itself as a ''trigger'' by using radio-sensitizing promoter-E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter (Scott et al:2003) in p53-gene therapy. First, EGFP reporter gene with E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in C6 rat glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 3, 5, 10 Gy respectively with charged carbon particle (290 MeV/nucleon). The light upregulation of EGFP was observed in 24 hours after 5 Gy irradiation. On the basis of this result, p53 gene with E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in p53-mutant U373MG human glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 5 Gy. There was, however, no obvious p53-upregulation at any time-point, so far. Further investigation is needed to clarify the appropriate experimental system. (author)

  8. Amyloid β production is regulated by β2-adrenergic signaling-mediated post-translational modifications of the ryanodine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussiere, Renaud; Lacampagne, Alain; Reiken, Steven; Liu, Xiaoping; Scheuerman, Valerie; Zalk, Ran; Martin, Cécile; Checler, Frederic; Marks, Andrew R; Chami, Mounia

    2017-06-16

    Alteration of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling has been reported in Alzheimer disease (AD) models. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying altered RyR-mediated intracellular Ca 2+ release in AD remain to be fully elucidated. We report here that RyR2 undergoes post-translational modifications (phosphorylation, oxidation, and nitrosylation) in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells expressing the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) harboring the familial double Swedish mutations (APPswe). RyR2 macromolecular complex remodeling, characterized by depletion of the regulatory protein calstabin2, resulted in increased cytosolic Ca 2+ levels and mitochondrial oxidative stress. We also report a functional interplay between amyloid β (Aβ), β-adrenergic signaling, and altered Ca 2+ signaling via leaky RyR2 channels. Thus, post-translational modifications of RyR occur downstream of Aβ through a β2-adrenergic signaling cascade that activates PKA. RyR2 remodeling in turn enhances βAPP processing. Importantly, pharmacological stabilization of the binding of calstabin2 to RyR2 channels, which prevents Ca 2+ leakage, or blocking the β2-adrenergic signaling cascade reduced βAPP processing and the production of Aβ in APPswe-expressing SH-SY5Y cells. We conclude that targeting RyR-mediated Ca 2+ leakage may be a therapeutic approach to treat AD. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Ion climate and radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busbarna, L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristic values of radon concentration in natural ion climate and in open air were compared and the effect of artificially produced negative ion excess on the radon concentration of air was studied. The results show that the radon concentration measurable at the rise of negative ion excess is smaller than that in the case of natural equilibrium. This effect can be utilized lowering the background of the scintillation chambers, thus increasing their sensitivity. The negative ions of the artificial ion climate lower radon concentration in closed space. The question arises whether only the ion climate is responsible for the effects on the organism and on the nervous system or the radon concentration of the air also contributes to them. (author)

  10. Highly sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric determination of metoclopramide hydrochloride in pharmaceutical tablets and serum samples using Eu3+ ion doped in sol-gel matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, M S; Aboaly, M M

    2010-06-30

    A simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method for the determination of Metoclopramide hydrochloride (MCP) is developed. The MCP can remarkably enhances the luminescence intensity of the Eu(3+) ion doped in sol-gel matrix at lambda(ex)=380 nm in DMSO at pH 8.7. The intensity of the emission band of Eu(3+) ion doped in sol-gel matrix increases due to energy transfer from MCP to Eu(3+) in the excited state. The enhancement of the emission band of Eu(3+) ion doped in sol-gel matrix at 617 nm was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of MCP with a dynamic range of 5 x 10(-9) - 1.0 x 10(-6) mol L(-1) and detection limit of 2.2 x10(-11) mol L(-1). Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cadmium-sensitive electrode based on tetracetone derivatives of p-tert-butylcalix[8]arene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dernane, C. [Université de Jijel, Laboratoire de Matériaux: Elaborations-Propriétés-Applications, BP 98, Ouled Aissa, 18000 Jijel (Algeria); Zazoua, A., E-mail: azazoua@yahoo.fr [Université de Jijel, Laboratoire de Matériaux: Elaborations-Propriétés-Applications, BP 98, Ouled Aissa, 18000 Jijel (Algeria); Kazane, I. [Université de Jijel, Laboratoire de Matériaux: Elaborations-Propriétés-Applications, BP 98, Ouled Aissa, 18000 Jijel (Algeria); Jaffrezic-Renault, N. [Université de Lyon, LSA-UMR 5180 CNRS, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2013-10-15

    The performance of a cadmium-sensitive electrode based on the tetracetone derivatives of p-tert butylcalix[8]arene was investigated. The ion-sensitivity of the calix[8]arene was examined via cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, UV/Vis spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy. The sensitive membrane containing the active ionophore was cast onto the surface of a gold electrode. The electrode exhibited a linear relationship between the charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) and the logarithm of the detected ion concentration. The cathodic peak at a potential of 0.56 V increased linearly as the Cd{sup 2+} ion concentration increased. The detection limit of the device reached 10{sup −7} M with high sensitivity toward cadmium. - Highlights: • The performances of cadmium-sensitive electrode were investigated. • The sensitive membrane was casted on the surface of a gold electrode. • The electrode showed a linear relationship between the R{sub ct} and the ion concentration. • The detection limit of the device was 10{sup −7} M with high sensitivity toward cadmium.

  12. Development of two highly sensitive immunoassays for detection of copper ions and a suite of relevant immunochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongwei; Nan Tiegui; Tan Guiyu; Gao Wei; Cao Zhen; Sun Shuo; Li Zhaohu; Li, Qing X.; Wang Baomin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Two highly sensitive immunoassays for determination of Cu(II) at sub ppb levels. · The heterologous competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for heavy metals. · Haptenated protein directly conjugated with HRP can reduce the loss of HRP activity. - Abstract: Availability of highly sensitive assays for metal ions can help monitor and manage the environmental and food contamination. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody against Copper(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was used to develop two sensitive ELISAs for Cu(II) analysis. Cobalt(II)-EDTA-BSA was the coating antigen in a heterologous indirect competitive ELISA (hicELISA), whereas Co(II)-EDTA-BSA-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was the enzyme tracer in a heterologous direct competitive ELISA (hdcELISA). Both ELISAs were validated for detecting the content of Cu(II) in environmental waters. The ELISA data agreed well with those from graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. The methods of developing the Cu(II) hicELISA and hdcELISA are potentially applicable for developing ELISAs for other metals. The chelator-protein complexes such as EDTA-BSA and EDTA-BSA-HRP can form a suite of metal complexes having the consistent hapten density, location and orientation on the conjugates except the difference of the metal core, which can be used as ideal reagents to investigate the relationship between assay sensitivity and antibody affinities for the haptens and the analytes. The strategy of conjugating a haptenated protein directly with HRP can reduce the loss of HRP activity during the conjugation reaction and thus can be applicable for the development of ELISAs for small molecules.

  13. Development of two highly sensitive immunoassays for detection of copper ions and a suite of relevant immunochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Hongwei [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Nan Tiegui; Tan Guiyu; Gao Wei; Cao Zhen; Sun Shuo; Li Zhaohu [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Li, Qing X., E-mail: qingl@hawaii.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wang Baomin, E-mail: wbaomin@263.com [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {center_dot} Two highly sensitive immunoassays for determination of Cu(II) at sub ppb levels. {center_dot} The heterologous competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for heavy metals. {center_dot} Haptenated protein directly conjugated with HRP can reduce the loss of HRP activity. - Abstract: Availability of highly sensitive assays for metal ions can help monitor and manage the environmental and food contamination. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody against Copper(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was used to develop two sensitive ELISAs for Cu(II) analysis. Cobalt(II)-EDTA-BSA was the coating antigen in a heterologous indirect competitive ELISA (hicELISA), whereas Co(II)-EDTA-BSA-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was the enzyme tracer in a heterologous direct competitive ELISA (hdcELISA). Both ELISAs were validated for detecting the content of Cu(II) in environmental waters. The ELISA data agreed well with those from graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. The methods of developing the Cu(II) hicELISA and hdcELISA are potentially applicable for developing ELISAs for other metals. The chelator-protein complexes such as EDTA-BSA and EDTA-BSA-HRP can form a suite of metal complexes having the consistent hapten density, location and orientation on the conjugates except the difference of the metal core, which can be used as ideal reagents to investigate the relationship between assay sensitivity and antibody affinities for the haptens and the analytes. The strategy of conjugating a haptenated protein directly with HRP can reduce the loss of HRP activity during the conjugation reaction and thus can be applicable for the development of ELISAs for small molecules.

  14. Effect of oxygen pressure on sensitivity of CR-39 used for astronauts radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, T.; Yabe, S.; Nagamatsu, A.; Tawara, H.; Kumagai, H.; Miyazawa, Y.; Kitajo, K.; Kodaira, S.; Yasuda, N.

    2006-01-01

    The personal radiation dosimeters for astronauts are exposed to low-pressure oxygen gas (0.29 atmospheres) during extra-vehicle activities. CR-39 plastic track detectors are one of the typical passive dosimeters for space radiation monitoring. We investigated change in track formation sensitivity of the antioxidant-doped CR-39 plastic with which oxygen gas comes in contact at different pressures up to 2 atmospheres for 1h to 10 days. The oxygen effect on sensitivity was measured for the C, Si and Fe ions (10-200 keV/μm) from the HIMAC heavy ion accelerator. The sensitivity is obviously sensitive to oxygen pressure at heavy-ion exposures, but not sensitive to the experience of oxygen atmosphere before and after the ion exposures. The maximum sensitivity is obtained at 0.29 atmospheres. The present experimental data suggested that the effect depends on LET of incident particles. (author)

  15. Electrochemical evidences and consequences of significant differences in ions diffusion rate in polyacrylate-based ion-selective membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźnica, Emilia; Mieczkowski, Józef; Michalska, Agata

    2011-11-21

    The origin and effect of surface accumulation of primary ions within the ion-selective poly(n-butyl acrylate)-based membrane, obtained by thermal polymerization, is discussed. Using a new method, based on the relation between the shape of a potentiometric plot and preconditioning time, the diffusion of copper ions in the membrane was found to be slow (the diffusion coefficient estimated to be close to 10(-11) cm(2) s(-1)), especially when compared to ion-exchanger counter ions--sodium cations diffusion (a diffusion coefficient above 10(-9) cm(2) s(-1)). The higher mobility of sodium ions than those of the copper-ionophore complex results in exposed ion-exchanger role leading to undesirably exposed sensitivity to sodium or potassium ions.

  16. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Squeezing of Ion Populations and Peaks in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations and Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations using Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin M.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-11-02

    In this work, we report an approach for spatial and temporal gas phase ion population manipulation, and demonstrate its application for the collapse of the ion distributions in ion mobility (IM) separations into tighter packets providing higher sensitivity measurements in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS). We do this for ions moving from a conventionally traveling wave (TW)-driven region to a region where the TW is intermittently halted or ‘stuttered’. This approach causes the ion packets spanning a number of TW-created traveling traps (TT) to be redistributed into fewer TT, resulting in spatial compression. The degree of spatial compression is controllable and determined by the ratio of stationary time of the TW in the second region to its moving time. This compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach has been implemented using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) in conjunction with MS. CRIMP with the SLIM-MS platform is shown to provide increased peak intensities, reduced peak widths, and improved S/N ratios with MS detection. CRIMP also provides a foundation for extremely long path length and multi-pass IM separations in SLIM providing greatly enhanced IM resolution by reducing the detrimental effects of diffusional peak broadening due to increasing peak widths.

  18. Super TOF secondary ion mass spectroscopy using very highly charged primary ions up to Th70+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briere, M.A.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, D.

    1995-01-01

    The LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) has made low emittance beams of slow highly charged ions available for ion-solid interaction studies. Such interactions feature the dominance of electronic over collisional effects, and the shock waves generated by the ionized target atoms can desorb large numbers of large molecular species from the surface. This paper presents the first systematic study of the sputtering process due to the incidence of slow very highly charged ions; Th 70+ ions are extracted from EBIT at 7 keV * q and directed onto thin SiO 2 films on Si. Results suggest secondary ion yields of up to 25 per incident ion for Th 70+ (secondary ion yield is increased over that for singly or moderately charged ions). Correlations of the negative, positive, and negative cluster ion yields show promise for application of highly charged ion induced sputtering for enhanced sensitivity and quantitative (absolute) SIMS analysis of deep submicron scale surface layers and polymeric and biomolecular material analysis

  19. Potential Roles of Amiloride-Sensitive Sodium Channels in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siguang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ENaC/degenerin ion channel superfamily includes the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC and acid sensitive ionic channel (ASIC. ENaC is a multimeric ion channel formed by heteromultimeric membrane glycoproteins, which participate in a multitude of biological processes by mediating the transport of sodium (Na+ across epithelial tissues such as the kidney, lungs, bladder, and gut. Aberrant ENaC functions contribute to several human disease states including pseudohypoaldosteronism, Liddle syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and salt-sensitive hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels not only regulate ion homeostasis and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and migration. Indeed, ENaCs/ASICs had been reported to be associated with cancer characteristics. Given their cell surface localization and pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target ENaC/ASIC family members may be promising cancer therapeutics.

  20. Intracellular Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum regulates slow wave currents and pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei Hong; Sung, Tae Sik; O'Driscoll, Kate; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2015-04-15

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide pacemaker activity in gastrointestinal muscles that underlies segmental and peristaltic contractions. ICC generate electrical slow waves that are due to large-amplitude inward currents resulting from anoctamin 1 (ANO1) channels, which are Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. We investigated the hypothesis that the Ca(2+) responsible for the stochastic activation of ANO1 channels during spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) and synchronized activation of ANO1 channels during slow wave currents comes from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. ICC, obtained from the small intestine of Kit(+/copGFP) mice, were studied under voltage and current clamp to determine the effects of blocking Ca(2+) uptake into stores and release of Ca(2+) via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent and ryanodine-sensitive channels. Cyclocpiazonic acid, thapsigargin, 2-APB, and xestospongin C inhibited STICs and slow wave currents. Ryanodine and tetracaine also inhibited STICs and slow wave currents. Store-active compounds had no direct effects on ANO1 channels expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Under current clamp, store-active drugs caused significant depolarization of ICC and reduced spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs). After block of ryanodine receptors with ryanodine and tetracaine, repolarization did not restore STDs. ANO1 expressed in ICC has limited access to cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration, suggesting that pacemaker activity depends on Ca(2+) dynamics in restricted microdomains. Our data from studies of isolated ICC differ somewhat from studies on intact muscles and suggest that release of Ca(2+) from both IP3 and ryanodine receptors is important in generating pacemaker activity in ICC. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Intracellular Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum regulates slow wave currents and pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of Cajal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei Hong; Sung, Tae Sik; O'Driscoll, Kate; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide pacemaker activity in gastrointestinal muscles that underlies segmental and peristaltic contractions. ICC generate electrical slow waves that are due to large-amplitude inward currents resulting from anoctamin 1 (ANO1) channels, which are Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. We investigated the hypothesis that the Ca2+ responsible for the stochastic activation of ANO1 channels during spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) and synchronized activation of ANO1 channels during slow wave currents comes from intracellular Ca2+ stores. ICC, obtained from the small intestine of Kit+/copGFP mice, were studied under voltage and current clamp to determine the effects of blocking Ca2+ uptake into stores and release of Ca2+ via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent and ryanodine-sensitive channels. Cyclocpiazonic acid, thapsigargin, 2-APB, and xestospongin C inhibited STICs and slow wave currents. Ryanodine and tetracaine also inhibited STICs and slow wave currents. Store-active compounds had no direct effects on ANO1 channels expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Under current clamp, store-active drugs caused significant depolarization of ICC and reduced spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs). After block of ryanodine receptors with ryanodine and tetracaine, repolarization did not restore STDs. ANO1 expressed in ICC has limited access to cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, suggesting that pacemaker activity depends on Ca2+ dynamics in restricted microdomains. Our data from studies of isolated ICC differ somewhat from studies on intact muscles and suggest that release of Ca2+ from both IP3 and ryanodine receptors is important in generating pacemaker activity in ICC. PMID:25631870

  2. Anomalous surface behavior of hydrated guanidinium ions due to ion pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Victor; Vazdar, Mario; Mason, Philip E.; Bialik, Erik; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Werner, Josephina; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Jungwirth, Pavel; Björneholm, Olle

    2018-04-01

    Surface affinity of aqueous guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is compared to that of aqueous tetrapropylammonium chloride (TPACl) upon addition of sodium chloride (NaCl) or disodium sulfate (Na2SO4). The experimental results have been acquired using the surface sensitive technique X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid jet. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to produce radial distribution functions and surface density plots. The surface affinities of both TPA+ and Gdm+ increase upon adding NaCl to the solution. With the addition of Na2SO4, the surface affinity of TPA+ increases, while that of Gdm+ decreases. From the results of MD simulations it is seen that Gdm+ and SO4 2 - ions form pairs. This finding can be used to explain the decreased surface affinity of Gdm+ when co-dissolved with SO4 2 - ions. Since SO4 2 - ions avoid the surface due to the double charge and strong water interaction, the Gdm+-SO4 2 - ion pair resides deeper in the solutions' bulk than the Gdm+ ions. Since TPA+ does not form ion pairs with SO4 2 -, the TPA+ ions are instead enriched at the surface.

  3. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  4. Sensitive measurement of vinorelbine in dog plasma by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry utilizing transitions from double-charged precursor ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Makoto; Kawashiro, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    A sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for measuring vinorelbine was developed. A 100 µL aliquot of plasma was spiked with deuterium-labeled internal standard and subjected to solid-phase extraction using an Oasis HLB μ-elution plate. Two microliters of the extracted samples was directly injected into LC/MS/MS. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Capcell Pak C18 UG column (2 × 75 mm) with a gradient elution of methanol (mobile phase B) against 0.05% formic acid in aqueous 10 mm ammonium formate (mobile phase A). The LC flow rate was set to 0.28 mL/min and the gradient (solvent B concentration) was processed from 40 to 90%. In mass spectrometric detection, observation of the reaction from a double-charged precursor ion [M + 2H](2+) (m/z 390) to product ion m/z 122 provided very high sensitivity. The method was validated with a lower limit of detection of 0.2 ng/mL with 0.1 mL of plasma, and the method was used to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of vinorelbine in dogs. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  6. Three-dimensional activated graphene network-sulfonate-terminated polymer nanocomposite as a new electrode material for the sensitive determination of dopamine and heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yijia; Yang, Lu; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji

    2015-03-07

    We report here that three-dimensional activated graphene networks (3DAGNs) are a better matrix to prepare graphene-polymer nanocomposites for sensitive electroanalysis than two-dimensional graphene nanosheets (2DGNs). 3DAGNs were synthesized in advance by the direct carbonization and simultaneous chemical activation of a cobalt ion-impregnated D113-type ion exchange resin, which showed an interconnected network structure and a large specific surface area. Then, the 3DAGN-sulfonate-terminated polymer (STP) nanocomposite was prepared via the in situ chemical co-polymerization of m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid and aniline in the presence of 3DAGNs. The 3DAGN-STP nanocomposite can adsorb dopamine (DA) and heavy metal ions, which was confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance studies. The 3DAGN-STP modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used for the electrochemical detection of DA in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid, with a linear response range of 0.1-32 μM and a limit of detection of 10 nM. In addition, differential pulse voltammetry was used for the simultaneous determination of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) at the 3DAGN-STP/GCE further modified with a bismuth film, exhibiting linear response ranges of 1-70 μg L(-1) for Cd(2+) and 1-80 μg L(-1) for Pb(2+) with limits of detection of 0.1 μg L(-1) for Cd(2+) and 0.2 μg L(-1) for Pb(2+). Because the 3DAGN-STP can integrate the advantages of 3DAGNs with STPs, the 3DAGN-STP/GCE was more sensitive than the bare GCE, 3DAGN/GCE, and 2DGN-STP/GCE for the determination of DA and heavy metal ions.

  7. Functional analysis of a point mutation in the ryanodine receptor of Plutella xylostella (L.) associated with resistance to chlorantraniliprole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Xuguo; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Shangzhong; Pei, Liang; Gao, Xiwu

    2014-07-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) has developed extremely high resistance to chlorantraniliprole and other diamide insecticides in the field. A glycine to glutamic acid substitution (G4946E) in the P. xylostella ryanodine receptor (PxRyR) has been found in two resistant populations collected in Thailand and Philippines and was considered associated with the diamide insecticides resistance but no experimental evidence was provided. The present study aimed to clarify the function of the reported mutation in chlorantraniliprole resistance in P. xylostella. We identified the same mutation (G4946E) in PxRyR from four field collected chlorantraniliprole resistant populations of Plutella xylostella in China. Most importantly, we found that the frequency of the G4946E mutation is significantly correlated to the chlorantraniliprole resistance ratios in P. xylostella (R(2)  = 0.82, P = 0.0003). Ligand binding assays showed that the binding affinities of the PxRyR to the chlorantraniliprole in three field resistant populations were 2.41-, 2.54- and 2.60-times lower than that in the susceptible one. For the first time we experimentally proved that the G4946E mutation in PxRyR confers resistance to chlorantraniliprole in Plutella xylostella. These findings pave the way for the complete understanding of the mechanisms of diamide insecticides resistance in insects. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Improved analytical sensitivity for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples: Cavity ion source thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingeneri, Kristofer; Riciputi, L.

    2001-01-01

    Following successful field trials, environmental sampling has played a central role as a routine part of safeguards inspections since early 1996 to verify declared and to detect undeclared activity. The environmental sampling program has brought a new series of analytical challenges, and driven a need for advances in verification technology. Environmental swipe samples are often extremely low in concentration of analyte (ng level or lower), yet the need to analyze these samples accurately and precisely is vital, particularly for the detection of undeclared nuclear activities. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is the standard method of determining isotope ratios of uranium and plutonium in the environmental sampling program. TIMS analysis typically employs 1-3 filaments to vaporize and ionize the sample, and the ions are mass separated and analyzed using magnetic sector instruments due to their high mass resolution and high ion transmission. However, the ionization efficiency (the ratio of material present to material actually detected) of uranium using a standard TIMS instrument is low (0.2%), even under the best conditions. Increasing ionization efficiency by even a small amount would have a dramatic impact for safeguards applications, allowing both improvements in analytical precision and a significant decrease in the amount of uranium and plutonium required for analysis, increasing the sensitivity of environmental sampling

  9. An ion-neutral model to investigate chemical ionization mass spectrometry analysis of atmospheric molecules - application to a mixed reagent ion system for hydroperoxides and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikes, Brian G.; Treadaway, Victoria; McNeill, Ashley S.; Silwal, Indira K. C.; O'Sullivan, Daniel W.

    2018-04-01

    An ion-neutral chemical kinetic model is described and used to simulate the negative ion chemistry occurring within a mixed-reagent ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). The model objective was the establishment of a theoretical basis to understand ambient pressure (variable sample flow and reagent ion carrier gas flow rates), water vapor, ozone and oxides of nitrogen effects on ion cluster sensitivities for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl peroxide (CH3OOH), formic acid (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc). The model development started with established atmospheric ion chemistry mechanisms, thermodynamic data and reaction rate coefficients. The chemical mechanism was augmented with additional reactions and their reaction rate coefficients specific to the analytes. Some existing reaction rate coefficients were modified to enable the model to match laboratory and field campaign determinations of ion cluster sensitivities as functions of CIMS sample flow rate and ambient humidity. Relative trends in predicted and observed sensitivities are compared as instrument specific factors preclude a direct calculation of instrument sensitivity as a function of sample pressure and humidity. Predicted sensitivity trends and experimental sensitivity trends suggested the model captured the reagent ion and cluster chemistry and reproduced trends in ion cluster sensitivity with sample flow and humidity observed with a CIMS instrument developed for atmospheric peroxide measurements (PCIMSs). The model was further used to investigate the potential for isobaric compounds as interferences in the measurement of the above species. For ambient O3 mixing ratios more than 50 times those of H2O2, O3-(H2O) was predicted to be a significant isobaric interference to the measurement of H2O2 using O2-(H2O2) at m/z 66. O3 and NO give rise to species and cluster ions, CO3-(H2O) and NO3-(H2O), respectively, which interfere in the measurement of CH3OOH using O2-(CH3OOH) at m/z 80. The CO3-(H2O

  10. Comparison of secondary ion emission yields for poly-tyrosine between cluster and heavy ion impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Narumi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Emission yields of secondary ions necessary for the identification of poly-tyrosine were compared for incident ion impacts of energetic cluster ions (0.8 MeV C 8 + , 2.4 MeV C 8 + , and 4.0 MeV C 8 + ) and swift heavy monoatomic molybdenum ions (4.0 MeV Mo + and 14 MeV Mo 4+ ) with similar mass to that of the cluster by time-of-flight secondary ion mass analysis combined with secondary ion electric current measurements. The comparison revealed that (1) secondary ion emission yields per C 8 + impact increase with increasing incident energy within the energy range examined, (2) the 4.0 MeV C 8 + impact provides higher emission yields than the impact of the monoatomic Mo ion with the same incident energy (4.0 MeV Mo + ), and (3) the 2.4 MeV C 8 + impact exhibits comparable emission yields to that for the Mo ion impact with higher incident energy (14 MeV Mo 4+ ). Energetic cluster ion impacts effectively produce the characteristic secondary ions for poly-tyrosine, which is advantageous for highly sensitive amino acid detection in proteins using time-of-flight secondary ion mass analysis.

  11. Quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high-sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, B.; Topper, J. L.; Farnell, C. C.; Yalin, A. P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements of different target materials due to ion bombardment. The differential sputter yields can be integrated to find total yields. Possible ion beam conditions include ion energies in the range of 30-350 eV and incidence angles of 0 deg. - 70 deg. from normal. A four-grid ion optics system is used to achieve a collimated ion beam at low energy (<100 eV) and a two-grid ion optics is used for higher energies (up to 750 eV). A complementary weight loss approach is also used to measure total sputter yields. Validation experiments are presented that confirm high sensitivity and accuracy of sputter yield measurements.

  12. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group.

  13. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J.; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T.; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca2+ leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca2+ release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca2+-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group. PMID:26575622

  14. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  15. Effect of the Ion Mass and Energy on the Response of 70-nm SOI Transistors to the Ion Deposited Charge by Direct Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raine, M.; Gaillardin, M.; Sauvestre, J.E.; Flament, O.; Bournel, A.; Aubry-Fortuna, V.

    2010-01-01

    The response of SOI transistors under heavy ion irradiation is analyzed using Geant4 and Synopsys Sentaurus device simulations. The ion mass and energy have a significant impact on the radial ionization profile of the ion deposited charge. For example, for an identical LET, the higher the ion energy per nucleon, the wider the radial ionization track. For a 70-nm SOI technology, the track radius of high energy ions (≥ 10 MeV/a) is larger than the transistor sensitive volume; part of the ion charge recombines in the highly doped source or drain regions and does not participate to the transistor electric response. At lower energy (≤ 10 MeV/a), as often used for ground testing, the track radius is smaller than the transistor sensitive volume, and the entire charge is used for the transistor response. The collected charge is then higher, corresponding to a worst-case response of the transistor. Implications for the hardness assurance of highly-scaled generations are discussed. (authors)

  16. Involvement of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels, IP3 receptors, and ryanodine receptors in the generation of spontaneous rhythmic contractions of the cricket lateral oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamashiro, Hirotake; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, the isolated cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) lateral oviduct exhibited spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRCs) with a frequency of 0.29±0.009 Hz (n=43) and an amplitude of 14.6±1.25 mg (n=29). SRCs completely disappeared following removal of extracellular Ca2+ using a solution containing 5mM EGTA. Application of the non-specific Ca2+ channel blockers Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+ also decreased both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs in dose-dependent manners, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through plasma membrane Ca2+ channels is essential for the generation of SRCs. Application of ryanodine (30 μM), which depletes intracellular Ca2+ by locking ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca2+ channels in an open state, gradually reduced the frequency and amplitude of SRCs. A RyR antagonist, tetracaine, reduced both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs, whereas a RyR activator, caffeine, increased the frequency of SRCs with a subsequent increase in basal tonus, indicating that RyRs are essential for generating SRCs. To further investigate the involvement of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in SRCs, we examined the effect of a PLC inhibitor, U73122, and an IP3R antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), on SRCs. Separately, U73122 (10 μM) and 2-APB (30-50 μM) both significantly reduced the amplitude of SRCs with little effect on their frequency, further indicating that the PLC/IP3R signaling pathway is fundamental to the modulation of the amplitude of SRCs. A hypotonic-induced increase in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs and a hypertonic-induced decrease in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs indicated that mechanical stretch of the lateral oviduct is involved in the generation of SRCs. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-pump ATPase inhibitors thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid impaired or suppressed the relaxation phase of SRCs. Taken together, the present results indicate that Ca2+ influx through plasma membrane Ca2

  17. Aptamer based vanillin sensor using an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Alexander; Komarova, Natalia; Andrianova, Maria; Grudtsov, Vitaliy; Kuznetsov, Evgeniy

    2017-12-02

    An aptamer for vanillin was obtained and then used for the development of an aptasensor based on an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET). This aptamer (a single-stranded DNA;ssDNA) was selected using the Capture-SELEX protocol, which suites well for selection of aptamers to small molecules. Among six aptamer candidates, the aptamer Van_74 with the highest affinity for vanillin was chosen (elution of 35% of the aptamer from a solid support in the presence of 2 mM of vanillin). Van_74 was characterized using nondenaturating PAGE of washouts from magnetic beads. It is shown that Van_74 binds to vanillin with an dissociation constant of >7.8 μM (determined by nondenaturating PAGE) and it was specific to vanillin in comparison with interferents: benzaldehyde, guaiacol, furaneol, ethyl guaiacol and ethyl vanillin. Also it was shown that change of buffer composition greatly affected the binding ability of Van_74. For biosensor fabrication aptamer was immobilised on the Ta 2 O 5 -sensitive surface of the ISFET via "click-chemistry". Detection scheme implied dehybridisation of the ssDNA probe from the aptamer and release in the solution during the addition of vanillin. As a result, the surface potential increase upon vanillin binding with the aptamer was detected by the transistor. The biosensor had a detection limit of 1.55 × 10 -7  M and a dynamic range from 1.55 × 10 -7  M to 1 × 10 -6  M. Effective constant K d,eff for vanillin binding on biosensor surface was calculated to be (9 ± 3) × 10 -7  M. This allows selective detection of vanillin in the mixture of interferents and in samples of coffee extract. Graphical abstract A biosensor for vanillin was developed on the basis of an aptamer that was obtained via Capture-SELEX and by using an ISFET. This biosensor can be used for vanillin detection in presence of interferents and in real sample using an approach of ssDNA probe dehybridization.

  18. Development of a method for comprehensive and quantitative analysis of plant hormones by highly sensitive nanoflow liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Yoshihiro; Okazawa, Atsushi; Bamba, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Akio; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2009-01-01

    In recent plant hormone research, there is an increased demand for a highly sensitive and comprehensive analytical approach to elucidate the hormonal signaling networks, functions, and dynamics. We have demonstrated the high sensitivity of a comprehensive and quantitative analytical method developed with nanoflow liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS) under multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) in plant hormone profiling. Unlabeled and deuterium-labeled isotopomers of four classes of plant hormones and their derivatives, auxins, cytokinins (CK), abscisic acid (ABA), and gibberellins (GA), were analyzed by this method. The optimized nanoflow-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS method showed ca. 5-10-fold greater sensitivity than capillary-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) of several plant hormones were in the sub-fmol range. The results showed excellent linearity (R 2 values of 0.9937-1.0000) and reproducibility of elution times (relative standard deviations, RSDs, <1.1%) and peak areas (RSDs, <10.7%) for all target compounds. Further, sample purification using Oasis HLB and Oasis MCX cartridges significantly decreased the ion-suppressing effects of biological matrix as compared to the purification using only Oasis HLB cartridge. The optimized nanoflow-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS method was successfully used to analyze endogenous plant hormones in Arabidopsis and tobacco samples. The samples used in this analysis were extracted from only 17 tobacco dry seeds (1 mg DW), indicating that the efficiency of analysis of endogenous plant hormones strongly depends on the detection sensitivity of the method. Our analytical approach will be useful for in-depth studies on complex plant hormonal metabolism.

  19. Development of a method for comprehensive and quantitative analysis of plant hormones by highly sensitive nanoflow liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Yoshihiro; Okazawa, Atsushi; Bamba, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Akio [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukusaki, Eiichiro, E-mail: fukusaki@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-08-26

    In recent plant hormone research, there is an increased demand for a highly sensitive and comprehensive analytical approach to elucidate the hormonal signaling networks, functions, and dynamics. We have demonstrated the high sensitivity of a comprehensive and quantitative analytical method developed with nanoflow liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS) under multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) in plant hormone profiling. Unlabeled and deuterium-labeled isotopomers of four classes of plant hormones and their derivatives, auxins, cytokinins (CK), abscisic acid (ABA), and gibberellins (GA), were analyzed by this method. The optimized nanoflow-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS method showed ca. 5-10-fold greater sensitivity than capillary-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) of several plant hormones were in the sub-fmol range. The results showed excellent linearity (R{sup 2} values of 0.9937-1.0000) and reproducibility of elution times (relative standard deviations, RSDs, <1.1%) and peak areas (RSDs, <10.7%) for all target compounds. Further, sample purification using Oasis HLB and Oasis MCX cartridges significantly decreased the ion-suppressing effects of biological matrix as compared to the purification using only Oasis HLB cartridge. The optimized nanoflow-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS method was successfully used to analyze endogenous plant hormones in Arabidopsis and tobacco samples. The samples used in this analysis were extracted from only 17 tobacco dry seeds (1 mg DW), indicating that the efficiency of analysis of endogenous plant hormones strongly depends on the detection sensitivity of the method. Our analytical approach will be useful for in-depth studies on complex plant hormonal metabolism.

  20. Measurements of the sensitivity of radiochromic film using ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidle, J. A.; Shortino, J. P.; Ellison, D. M.; Freeman, C. G.; Sangster, T. C.

    2013-10-01

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is used in several diagnostics as a dosimeter that chromatically responds to incident particles. This response depends on the fluence, energy, and species of the incident particles. A 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator is used to create a monoenergetic ion beam which is scattered off a thin gold target onto a strip of RCF. A surface barrier detector is positioned behind a small hole in the film to measure the ion fluence on the nearby film. Once the film develops, it is scanned to examine its optical density. A response curve is acquired by fitting a three parameter formula to optical density and dose. These calibration curves can be used to help determine incident doses in a variety of situations.

  1. Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, B

    2013-01-01

    The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

  2. Compact high-sensitivity potentiometer for detection of low ion concentrations in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevicius, Z.; Lescinskas, R.; Celiesiute, R.; Stirke, A.; Balevicius, S.; Kersulis, S.; Bleizgys, V.; Maciuleviciene, R.; Ramanavicius, A.; Zurauskiene, N.

    2018-04-01

    The compact potentiometer, based on an electronic circuit protected from electrostatic and electromagnetic interference, was developed for the measurement of low ion concentrations in liquids. The electronic circuit of the potentiometer, consisting of analogous and digital parts, enables the measurement of fA currents. This makes it possible to perform reliable measurements of ion concentrations in liquids that are as small as 10-8-10-7M. The instrument was tested using electrodes that were selective for tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) ions. It was demonstrated that the characteristic response time of the potentiometer electronic circuit to changes in the concentration of these ions in a liquid was in the order of 10 s. An investigation of TPP+ absorption by baker yeast has shown that this device can be successfully used for long term (several hours) measurements with zero signal drift, which was about 1 μV/s. Finally, due to the small dimensions of the electronic circuit (7.5 × 2 × 1.5 cm), this potentiometer can be easily installed at a large apparatus in the laboratory condition (≈25 °C), such as high pulsed electrical generators of magnetic fields that are used in electroporation studies of biological cells.

  3. Sensitivity of Rabbit Ventricular Action Potential and Ca2+ Dynamics to Small Variations in Membrane Currents and Ion Diffusion Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Hung Lo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how small variations in ionic currents and Ca2+ and Na+ diffusion coefficients impact action potential and Ca2+ dynamics in rabbit ventricular myocytes. We applied sensitivity analysis to quantify the sensitivity of Shannon et al. model (Biophys. J., 2004 to 5%–10% changes in currents conductance, channels distribution, and ion diffusion in rabbit ventricular cells. We found that action potential duration and Ca2+ peaks are highly sensitive to 10% increase in L-type Ca2+ current; moderately influenced by 10% increase in Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, Na+-K+ pump, rapid delayed and slow transient outward K+ currents, and Cl− background current; insensitive to 10% increases in all other ionic currents and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ fluxes. Cell electrical activity is strongly affected by 5% shift of L-type Ca2+ channels and Na+-Ca2+ exchanger in between junctional and submembrane spaces while Ca2+-activated Cl−-channel redistribution has the modest effect. Small changes in submembrane and cytosolic diffusion coefficients for Ca2+, but not in Na+ transfer, may alter notably myocyte contraction. Our studies highlight the need for more precise measurements and further extending and testing of the Shannon et al. model. Our results demonstrate usefulness of sensitivity analysis to identify specific knowledge gaps and controversies related to ventricular cell electrophysiology and Ca2+ signaling.

  4. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for femtomolar detection of silver ion in aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Daniel Arulraj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical sensing for the trace level detection of silver ion in aqueous solution still remains a challenge using simple, rapid, and inexpensive method. We report that thionine can be used as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Ag+ ion. The successive addition of Ag+ ion to the solution containing thionine quenches (turns-off the fluorescence intensity of thionine. Association and quenching constants have been estimated by the Benesi–Hildebrand method and Stern–Volmer plot, respectively. From the plot, the nature of the fluorescence quenching was confirmed as static quenching. An important feature of our chemosensor is high selectivity towards the determination of silver ion in aqueous solution over the other competitive metal ions. The detection limit of the sensor achieved 5 fM for Ag+ ion, which is superior to all previously reported chemosensors. The NMR and FT-IR studies were also carried out to support the complex formation between thionine and Ag+ ion. The practicality of the proposed chemosensor for determination of Ag+ ion was carried in untreated water samples.

  5. Proton upset rate prediction: a new sensitive volume concept definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inguimbert, Christophe

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for predicting proton induced single event upset rate. The approach uses heavy ion cross section experimental data combined with nuclear reaction calculations in order to determine the proton upset cross section. The p+Si nuclear reaction as well as the Si(p, p)Si Coulombic scattering are described. The upset rate calculation depends on the energy deposited available in the charge collection region (sensitive region). This region is treated as a rectangular parallelepiped of thickness d at depth h. The sensitive thickness d is used as an input parameter in our model we have developed an original method to probe the sensitive region to evaluate d with reasonable accuracy d. We use short range ions and we propose a new mathematical analysis of these experimental data to determine h and d. This method consists in de-convoluting the heavy ion upset cross section σ_S_E_U(r) by the LET function of the incident ion LET(r) (r is the range of the incident ion). Our results are in relatively good agreement with other models. The accuracy of the method allows us to discuss the validity of the sensitive volume concept. Furthermore, we extrapolate an internal gain factor α that permit to take into account the charge collection mechanisms. α and d serve for quick and reasonably accurate prediction of proton induced SEU cross section in microelectronic devices. (author) [fr

  6. Investigating the role of ion-pair strategy in regulating nicotine release from patch: Mechanistic insights based on intermolecular interaction and mobility of pressure sensitive adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaoyun; Wan, Xiaocao; Liu, Chao; Fang, Liang

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare a drug-in-adhesive patch of nicotine (NIC) and use ion-pair strategy to regulate drug delivery rate. Moreover, the mechanism of how ion-pair strategy regulated drug release was elucidated at molecular level. Formulation factors including pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), drug loading and counter ions (C 4 , C 6 , C 8 , C 10 , and C 12 ) were screened. In vitro release experiment and in vitro transdermal experiment were conducted to determine the rate-limiting step in drug delivery process. FT-IR and molecular modeling were used to characterize the interaction between drug and PSA. Thermal analysis and rheology study were conducted to investigate the mobility variation of PSA. The optimized patch prepared with NIC-C 8 had the transdermal profile fairly close to that of the commercial product (p > 0.05). The release rate constants (k) of NIC, NIC-C 4 and NIC-C 10 were 21.1, 14.4 and 32.4, respectively. Different release rates of NIC ion-pair complexes were attributed to the dual effect of ion-pair strategy on drug release. On one hand, ion-pair strategy enhanced the interaction between drug and PSA, which inhibited drug release. On the other hand, using ion-pair strategy improved the mobility of PSA, which facilitated drug release. Drug release behavior was determined by combined effect of two aspects above. These conclusions provided a new idea for us to regulate drug release behavior from patch. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Global versus local mechanisms of temperature sensing in ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Cristina; Minor, Daniel L

    2018-05-01

    Ion channels turn diverse types of inputs, ranging from neurotransmitters to physical forces, into electrical signals. Channel responses to ligands generally rely on binding to discrete sensor domains that are coupled to the portion of the channel responsible for ion permeation. By contrast, sensing physical cues such as voltage, pressure, and temperature arises from more varied mechanisms. Voltage is commonly sensed by a local, domain-based strategy, whereas the predominant paradigm for pressure sensing employs a global response in channel structure to membrane tension changes. Temperature sensing has been the most challenging response to understand and whether discrete sensor domains exist for pressure and temperature has been the subject of much investigation and debate. Recent exciting advances have uncovered discrete sensor modules for pressure and temperature in force-sensitive and thermal-sensitive ion channels, respectively. In particular, characterization of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (BacNa V ) thermal responses has identified a coiled-coil thermosensor that controls channel function through a temperature-dependent unfolding event. This coiled-coil thermosensor blueprint recurs in other temperature sensitive ion channels and thermosensitive proteins. Together with the identification of ion channel pressure sensing domains, these examples demonstrate that "local" domain-based solutions for sensing force and temperature exist and highlight the diversity of both global and local strategies that channels use to sense physical inputs. The modular nature of these newly discovered physical signal sensors provides opportunities to engineer novel pressure-sensitive and thermosensitive proteins and raises new questions about how such modular sensors may have evolved and empowered ion channel pores with new sensibilities.

  8. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielejec, E; Seamons, J A; Carroll, M S

    2010-01-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 μm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ∼600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of -1 and 10 -4 for operation temperatures of ∼300 K and ∼77 K, respectively. Low temperature operation and reduced false, 'dark', counts are critical to achieving high confidence in single ion arrival. For the device performance in this work, the confidence is calculated as a probability of >98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10 -4 at an average ion number per gated window of 0.015.

  9. Sensing properties of separative paper-based extended-gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistor for cost effective pH sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Ju; Lim, Cheol-Min

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we developed a cost-effective ion-sensing field-effect transistor (FET) with an extended gate (EG) fabricated on a separative paper substrate. The pH sensing characteristics of the paper EG was compared with those of other EGs fabricated on silicon, glass, or polyimide substrates. The fabricated paper-based EGFET exhibited excellent sensitivity close to the Nernst response limit as well as to that of the other substrate-based EGFETs. In addition, we found that all EGFETs, regardless of the substrate, have similar non-ideal behavior, i.e., drift phenomenon and hysteresis width. To investigate the degradation and durability of the paper EG after prolonged use, aging-effect tests were carried out in terms of the hysteresis width and sensitivity over a course of 30 days. As a result, the paper EG maintained stable pH sensing characteristics after 30 days. Therefore, we expect that paper EGFETs can provide a cost-effective sensor platform.

  10. Effects of positron density and temperature on large amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an electron-positron-ion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejoh, Y.N.

    1997-01-01

    The nonlinear wave structures of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves are studied in a plasma with positrons. We have presented the region of existence of the ion-acoustic waves by analysing the structure of the pseudopotential. The region of existence sensitively depends on the positron to electron density ratio, the ion to electron mass ratio and the positron to electron temperature ratio. It is shown that the maximum Mach number increases as the positron temperature increases and the region of existence of the ion-acoustic waves spreads as the positron temperature increases. 12 refs., 6 figs

  11. Preparation of cold Mg+ion clouds for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions at SPECTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazan, Radu Mircea

    2012-02-01

    The bound electrons in hydrogen-like or lithium-like heavy ions experience extremely strong electric and magnetic fields in the surrounding of the nucleus. Laser spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting in the lead region provides a sensitive tool to test strong-field quantum electro dynamics (QED), especially in the magnetic sector. Previous measurements on hydrogen-like systems performed in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) or at the experimental storage ring (ESR) were experimentally limited in accuracy due to statistics, the large Doppler broadening and the ion energy. The full potential of the QED test can only be exploited if measurements for hydrogen- and lithium-like ions are performed with accuracy improved by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the new Penning trap setup SPECTRAP - dedicated for laser spectroscopy on trapped and cooled highly charged ions - is currently commissioned at GSI Darmstadt. Heavy highly charged ions will be delivered to this trap by the HITRAP facility in the future. SPECTRAP is a cylindrical Penning trap with axial access for external ion injection and radial optical access mounted inside a cold-bore superconducting Helmholtz-type split-coil magnet. To reach the targeted accuracy in laser spectroscopy, an efficient and fast cooling process for the highly charged ions must be employed. This can be realized by sympathetic cooling with a cloud of laser-cooled light ions. Within this thesis work, a laser system and an ion source for the production of such a 24 Mg + ion cloud was developed and commissioned at SPECTRAP. An all-solid-state laser system for the generation of 279.6 nm light was designed and built. It consists of a fiber laser at 1118.5 nm followed by frequency quadrupling using two successive second-harmonic generation stages with actively stabilized ring resonators and nonlinear crystals. The laser system can deliver more than 15 mW of UV laser power under optimal conditions and requires little maintenance

  12. Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming (CRIMP) Accumulation and Compression of Billions of Ions for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Webb, Ian K.; Attah, Isaac K.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Zheng, Xueyun; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Baker, Erin M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-05-25

    We report on the implementation of a traveling wave (TW) based compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach within Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) that enables both greatly enlarged trapped ion charge capacities and also their subsequent efficient compression for use in ion mobility (IM) separations. Ion accumulation is conducted in a long serpentine path TW SLIM region after which CRIMP allows the large ion populations to be ‘squeezed’. The compression process occurs at an interface between two SLIM regions, one operating conventionally and the second having an intermittently pausing or ‘stuttering’ TW, allowing the contents of multiple bins of ions from the first region to be merged into a single bin in the second region. In this initial work stationary voltages in the second region were used to block ions from exiting the first (trapping) region, and the resumption of TWs in the second region allows ions to exit, and the population to also be compressed if CRIMP is applied. In our initial evaluation we show that the number of charges trapped for a 40 s accumulation period was ~5×109, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported charge capacity using an ion funnel trap. We also show that over 1×109 ions can be accumulated with high efficiency in the present device, and that the extent of subsequent compression is only limited by the space charge capacity of the trapping region. Lower compression ratios allow increased IM peak heights without significant loss of signal, while excessively large compression ratios can lead to ion losses and other artifacts. Importantly, we show that extended ion accumulation in conjunction with CRIMP and multiple passes provides the basis for a highly desirable combination of ultra-high sensitivity and ultra-high resolution IM separations using SLIM.

  13. Defect Generation for a Hydrated Layer and Thermal Stability Based on Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3/SiO2 as H+ Sensitive Layer in Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yuan; Chou, Jung-Chuan; Chou, Hsueh-Tao

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel sensitive ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) membrane based on Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3 (BST)/SiO2 fabricated by sputtering deposition. The proposed device exhibits a linear shift in acidic solutions in the pH range from 1 to 10. The device sensitivity was about 50-55 mV/pH for different deposition times. We also examined the trapping behavior of the surface hydrated layer using the metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure. Results show that the hydration layer gives rise to stress polarity dependence of electron injection when immersed in pH buffer solutions. Injection from the gate electrode produces larger positive charges and interface state densities in contrast to the substrate injection, which causes simultaneous positive and negative charge trapping. A physical model that quantitatively describes the asymmetry associated with the hydrated diffusion layer is presented, and the temperature effects of BST/SiO2 ISFET devices in the range from 25 to 65 °C were examined. We observed that pH sensitivity increases with increasing temperature. The temperature coefficient of sensitivity (TCS) can be divided into two different ranges: 0.08 mV/pH °C between 25 and 45 °C, and 0.57 mV/pH °C between 45 and 65 °C. A better thermal stability is produced in the 25 and 45 °C range in comparison with other sensitive layers.

  14. Valency stabilization of polyvalent ions during gamma irradiation of their aqueous solutions by sacrificial protection. I- Valency stabilization of Fe (II) ions by sulphate ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barakat, M F [Nuclear chemistry department, hot lab. center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt); Abdel-Hamid, M M [Arab Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 402 El-Manzah-1004 Tunis, (Tunisia)

    1995-10-01

    Polyvalent ions are very sensitive to gamma irradiation in aqueous solutions. The present work is a part of a more comprehensive study dealing with the stabilization or protection of certain oxidation states of some polyvalent ions during their gamma irradiation in aqueous systems. The behaviour of aqueous acidic Fe (II) solutions during gamma irradiation, in presence the prevailing protection mechanism. The conditions and stabilization limits in the studied case has been found out. 9 figs.

  15. Valency stabilization of polyvalent ions during gamma irradiation of their aqueous solutions by sacrificial protection. I- Valency stabilization of Fe (II) ions by sulphate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, M.F.; Abdel-Hamid, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polyvalent ions are very sensitive to gamma irradiation in aqueous solutions. The present work is a part of a more comprehensive study dealing with the stabilization or protection of certain oxidation states of some polyvalent ions during their gamma irradiation in aqueous systems. The behaviour of aqueous acidic Fe (II) solutions during gamma irradiation, in presence the prevailing protection mechanism. The conditions and stabilization limits in the studied case has been found out. 9 figs

  16. The future of the SIRAD SEE facility Ion-Electron Emission Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wyss, J; Kaminski, A; Magalini, A; Nigro, M; Pantano, D; Sedhykh, S

    2002-01-01

    The SIRAD facility is dedicated to radiation damage studies on semiconductor detectors, electronic devices and systems, using proton and ion beams delivered by a 15 MV tandem accelerator. It is routinely used by groups involved in detector development for elementary particle physics, electronic device physics and space applications. In particular, Single Event Effect studies are very important to the latter two activities. Presently, the facility can only characterize the global sensitivity of a device or system to single ion impacts. To map out the sensitivity of a device with micrometric resolution, following an idea developed at SANDIA, we will implement an Ion-Electron Emission Microscope (IEEM) to reconstruct the X,Y and time coordinates of an impacting energetic ion by imaging the secondary electrons emitted by the sample using a standard emission electron microscope and position sensitive detector system. After describing typical Single Event Effect activities at SIRAD we will discuss the basic princip...

  17. Microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging with a Timepix detector.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, A.; Jungmann, JH; Smith, D.F.; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In-vacuum active pixel detectors enable high sensitivity, highly parallel time- and space-resolved detection of ions from complex surfaces. For the first time, a Timepix detector assembly was combined with a secondary ion mass spectrometer for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

  18. Dualism of Sensitivity and Selectivity of Porphyrin Dimers in Electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-04-04

    This work uncovers the application of porphyrin dimers for the use in electroanalysis, such as potentiometric determination of ions. It also puts in question a current perception of an occurrence of the super-Nernstian response, as a result of the possible dimerization of single porphyrins within an ion-selective membrane. To study that, four various porphyrin dimers were used as ionophores, namely, freebase-freebase, Zn-Zn, Zn-freebase, and freebase-Zn. Since the Zn-freebase and freebase-Zn porphyrin dimers carried both anion- and cation-sensitive porphyrin units, their application in ISEs was utilized in both anion- and cation-sensitive sensors. With respect to the lipophilic salt added, both porphyrins dimers were found anion- and cation-sensitive. This allowed using a single molecule as novel type of versatile ionophore (anion- and cation-selective), simply by varying the membrane composition. All anion-sensitive sensors were perchlorate-sensitive, while the cation-selective sensors were silver-sensitive. The selectivity of the sensors depended primarily on the porphyrin dimers in the ion-selective membrane. Furthermore, the selectivity of cation-sensitive dimer based sensors was found significantly superior to the ones measured for the single porphyrin unit based sensors (precursors of the porphyrin dimers). Thus, the dimerization of single porphyrins may actually be a factor to increase or modulate porphyrin selectivity. Moreover, in the case of cation-sensitive sensors, the selectivity vastly depended on the order of porphyrin units in the dimer. This opens a new approach of regulating and adjusting sensitivity and selectivity of the sensor through the application of complex porphyrin systems with more than one porphyrin units with mix sensitive porphyrins.

  19. Quasilinear ion distribution function during first harmonic ion cyclotron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1993-12-01

    The quasilinear modification of the ion distribution function during first harmonic ion cyclotron (FHIC) heating is investigated both with a simple already well established analytic one-dimensional approach, and with a new two dimensional steady state solver of the quasilinear kinetic equation, SSFPQL. By accepting to disregard the effects of ion trapping in banana orbits, but including finite Larmor radius effects, the latter code has been made much faster than full surface-averaged codes; yet it can provide most of the relevant information on the suprathermal ion tail produced by this heating method. With SSFPQL we confirm that the one-dimensional model gives fair approximations for global properties of the distribution function, such as the average energy content of the tail and the fusion reactivity. On the other hand the tail is found to be very anisotropic, the increase of the parallel effective temperature being a small fraction of the total energy increase. Information on the anisotropy is essential to study the feedback of the fast ion tail on wave propagation and absorption, which is quite sensitive to the distribution of parallel velocities. The insight gained in the derivation and discussion of this model can be used to build a selfconsistent description of this heating scenario, whose implementation requires only a reasonable numerical effort. (orig.)

  20. Lithium adduct as precursor ion for sensitive and rapid quantification of 20 (S)-protopanaxadiol in rat plasma by liquid chromatography/quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry and application to rat pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuanwu; Wang, Quanying; Tang, Pingming

    2013-03-01

    A novel, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry [LC-ESI-(QqLIT)MS/MS] method was developed and validated for the quantification of protopanaxadiol (PPD) in rat plasma. Oleanolic acid (OA) was used as internal standard (IS). A simple protein precipitation based on acetonitrile (ACN) was employed. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Sepax GP-C18 column (50 × 2.1 mm, 5 μM) with a mobile phase consisting of ACN-water and 1.5 μM formic acid and 25 mM lithium acetate (90 : 10, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.4 ml/min for 3.0 min. Multiple-reaction-monitoring mode was performed using lithium adduct ion as precursor ion of m/z 467.5/449.4 and 455.6/407.4 for the drug and IS, respectively. Calibration curve was recovered over a concentration range of 0.5-100 ng/ml with a correlation coefficient >0.99. The limit of detection was 0.2 ng/ml in rat plasma for PPD. The results of the intraday and interday precision and accuracy studies were well within the acceptable limits. The validated method was successfully applied to investigate the pharmacokinetic study of PPD after intravenous and gavage administration to rat. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Modeling of pH Dependent Electrochemical Noise in Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors ISFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Das

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available pH ISFETs are very important sensor for in vivo continuous monitoring application of physiological and environmental system. The accuracy of Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET output measurement is greatly affected by the presences of noise, drift and slow response of the device. Although the noise analysis of ISFET so far performed in different literature relates only to sources originated from Field Effect Transistor (FET structure which are almost constant for a particular device, the pH dependent electrochemical noise has not been substantially explored and analyzed. In this paper we have investigated the low frequency pH dependent electrochemical noise that originates from the ionic conductance of the electrode-electrolyte-Field Effect Transistor structure of the device and that the noise depends on the concentration of the electrolyte and 1/f in nature. The statistical and frequency analysis of this electrochemical noise of a commercial ISFET sensor, under room temperature has been performed for six different pH values ranging from pH2 to pH9.2. We have also proposed a concentration dependent a/f & b/f2 model of the noise with different values of the coefficients a, b.

  2. Preparation of cold Mg{sup +}ion clouds for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions at SPECTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazan, Radu Mircea

    2012-02-15

    The bound electrons in hydrogen-like or lithium-like heavy ions experience extremely strong electric and magnetic fields in the surrounding of the nucleus. Laser spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting in the lead region provides a sensitive tool to test strong-field quantum electro dynamics (QED), especially in the magnetic sector. Previous measurements on hydrogen-like systems performed in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) or at the experimental storage ring (ESR) were experimentally limited in accuracy due to statistics, the large Doppler broadening and the ion energy. The full potential of the QED test can only be exploited if measurements for hydrogen- and lithium-like ions are performed with accuracy improved by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the new Penning trap setup SPECTRAP - dedicated for laser spectroscopy on trapped and cooled highly charged ions - is currently commissioned at GSI Darmstadt. Heavy highly charged ions will be delivered to this trap by the HITRAP facility in the future. SPECTRAP is a cylindrical Penning trap with axial access for external ion injection and radial optical access mounted inside a cold-bore superconducting Helmholtz-type split-coil magnet. To reach the targeted accuracy in laser spectroscopy, an efficient and fast cooling process for the highly charged ions must be employed. This can be realized by sympathetic cooling with a cloud of laser-cooled light ions. Within this thesis work, a laser system and an ion source for the production of such a {sup 24}Mg{sup +} ion cloud was developed and commissioned at SPECTRAP. An all-solid-state laser system for the generation of 279.6 nm light was designed and built. It consists of a fiber laser at 1118.5 nm followed by frequency quadrupling using two successive second-harmonic generation stages with actively stabilized ring resonators and nonlinear crystals. The laser system can deliver more than 15 mW of UV laser power under optimal conditions and requires little

  3. Portable, universal, and visual ion sensing platform based on the light emitting diode-based self-referencing-ion selective field-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Han, Yanchao; Li, Jing; Zhang, Libing; Jia, Xiaofang; Wang, Erkang

    2014-02-04

    In this work, a novel and universal ion sensing platform was presented, which enables the visual detection of various ions with high sensitivity and selectivity. Coaxial potential signals (millivolt-scale) of the sample from the self-referencing (SR) ion selective chip can be transferred into the ad620-based amplifier with an output of volt-scale potentials. The amplified voltage is high enough to drive a light emitting diode (LED), which can be used as an amplifier and indicator to report the sample information. With this double amplification device (light emitting diode-based self-referencing-ion selective field-effect transistor, LED-SR-ISFET), a tiny change of the sample concentration can be observed with a distinguishable variation of LED brightness by visual inspection. This LED-based luminescent platform provided a facile, low-cost, and rapid sensing strategy without the need of additional expensive chemiluminescence reagent and instruments. Moreover, the SR mode also endows this device excellent stability and reliability. With this innovative design, sensitive determination of K(+), H(+), and Cl(-) by the naked eye was achieved. It should also be noticed that this sensing strategy can easily be extended to other ions (or molecules) by simply integrating the corresponding ion (or molecule) selective electrode.

  4. Microwave annealing effect for highly reliable biosensor: dual-gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistor using amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Kwan Hyi; Lee, Seok; Cho, Won-Ju

    2014-12-24

    We used a microwave annealing process to fabricate a highly reliable biosensor using amorphous-InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs), which usually experience threshold voltage instability. Compared with furnace-annealed a-IGZO TFTs, the microwave-annealed devices showed superior threshold voltage stability and performance, including a high field-effect mobility of 9.51 cm(2)/V·s, a low threshold voltage of 0.99 V, a good subthreshold slope of 135 mV/dec, and an outstanding on/off current ratio of 1.18 × 10(8). In conclusion, by using the microwave-annealed a-IGZO TFT as the transducer in an extended-gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistor biosensor, we developed a high-performance biosensor with excellent sensing properties in terms of pH sensitivity, reliability, and chemical stability.

  5. Carbon Nanotube-Based Ion Selective Sensors for Wearable Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumyendu; David-Pur, Moshe; Hanein, Yael

    2017-10-11

    Wearable electronics offer new opportunities in a wide range of applications, especially sweat analysis using skin sensors. A fundamental challenge in these applications is the formation of sensitive and stable electrodes. In this article we report the development of a wearable sensor based on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode arrays for sweat sensing. Solid-state ion selective electrodes (ISEs), sensitive to Na + ions, were prepared by drop coating plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) doped with ionophore and ion exchanger on CNT electrodes. The ion selective membrane (ISM) filled the intertubular spaces of the highly porous CNT film and formed an attachment that was stronger than that achieved with flat Au, Pt, or carbon electrodes. Concentration of the ISM solution used influenced the attachment to the CNT film, the ISM surface morphology, and the overall performance of the sensor. Sensitivity of 56 ± 3 mV/decade to Na + ions was achieved. Optimized solid-state reference electrodes (REs), suitable for wearable applications, were prepared by coating CNT electrodes with colloidal dispersion of Ag/AgCl, agarose hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl, and a passivation layer of PVC doped with NaCl. The CNT-based REs had low sensitivity (-1.7 ± 1.2 mV/decade) toward the NaCl solution and high repeatability and were superior to bare Ag/AgCl, metals, carbon, and CNT films, reported previously as REs. CNT-based ISEs were calibrated against CNT-based REs, and the short-term stability of the system was tested. We demonstrate that CNT-based devices implemented on a flexible support are a very attractive platform for future wearable technology devices.

  6. Li-Ion Batteries for Forensic Neutron Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Li-Ion Batteries for Forensic Neutron Dosimetry Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. March...ion batteries are the common technology for powering portable electronics. The nuclear reactions within the batteries are sensitive to neutrons. By...and chemical changes within the battery . These changes can be determined by mass spectrometry or gamma and beta spectroscopy of long-lived

  7. New insights into methane-oxygen ion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B.S.; Chen, Bingjie; Han, Jie; Selim, Hatem; Belhi, Memdouh; Karakaya, Yasin; Kasper, Tina; Sarathy, Mani; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    External electric fields may reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of combustion processes. In-depth, quantitative understanding of ion chemistry in flames enables predictive models to describe the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasma. This study presents detailed cation profile measurements in low-pressure, burner-stabilized, methane/oxygen/argon flames. A quadrupole molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) coupled to a low-pressure (P =30Torr) combustion chamber was utilized to measure ion signals as a function of height above the burner. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames were examined to evaluate the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Additionally, for the first time, cataloging of flame cations is performed using a high mass resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) to distinguish ions with the same nominal mass. In the lean and stoichiometric flames, the dominant ions were HO, CHO , CHO, CHO and CHO, whereas large signals were measured for HO, CH and CHO in the rich flame. The spatial distribution of cations was compared with results from numerical simulations constrained by thermocouple-measured flame temperatures. Across all flames, the predicted HO decay rate was noticeably faster than observed experimentally. Sensitivity analysis showed that the mole fraction of HO is most sensitive to the rate of chemi-ionization CH+O↔CHO +E. To our knowledge, this work represents the first detailed measurements of positive ions in canonical low-pressure methane flames.

  8. New insights into methane-oxygen ion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B.S.

    2016-06-15

    External electric fields may reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of combustion processes. In-depth, quantitative understanding of ion chemistry in flames enables predictive models to describe the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasma. This study presents detailed cation profile measurements in low-pressure, burner-stabilized, methane/oxygen/argon flames. A quadrupole molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) coupled to a low-pressure (P =30Torr) combustion chamber was utilized to measure ion signals as a function of height above the burner. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames were examined to evaluate the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Additionally, for the first time, cataloging of flame cations is performed using a high mass resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) to distinguish ions with the same nominal mass. In the lean and stoichiometric flames, the dominant ions were HO, CHO , CHO, CHO and CHO, whereas large signals were measured for HO, CH and CHO in the rich flame. The spatial distribution of cations was compared with results from numerical simulations constrained by thermocouple-measured flame temperatures. Across all flames, the predicted HO decay rate was noticeably faster than observed experimentally. Sensitivity analysis showed that the mole fraction of HO is most sensitive to the rate of chemi-ionization CH+O↔CHO +E. To our knowledge, this work represents the first detailed measurements of positive ions in canonical low-pressure methane flames.

  9. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo Jordan, M Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Lubag, Angelo J M; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-09-13

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols.

  10. KChIP2 regulates the cardiac Ca2+ transient and myocyte contractility by targeting ryanodine receptor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew M Nassal

    Full Text Available Pathologic electrical remodeling and attenuated cardiac contractility are featured characteristics of heart failure. Coinciding with these remodeling events is a loss of the K+ channel interacting protein, KChIP2. While, KChIP2 enhances the expression and stability of the Kv4 family of potassium channels, leading to a more pronounced transient outward K+ current, Ito,f, the guinea pig myocardium is unique in that Kv4 expression is absent, while KChIP2 expression is preserved, suggesting alternative consequences to KChIP2 loss. Therefore, KChIP2 was acutely silenced in isolated guinea pig myocytes, which led to significant reductions in the Ca2+ transient amplitude and prolongation of the transient duration. This change was reinforced by a decline in sarcomeric shortening. Notably, these results were unexpected when considering previous observations showing enhanced ICa,L and prolonged action potential duration following KChIP2 loss, suggesting a disruption of fundamental Ca2+ handling proteins. Evaluation of SERCA2a, phospholamban, RyR, and sodium calcium exchanger identified no change in protein expression. However, assessment of Ca2+ spark activity showed reduced spark frequency and prolonged Ca2+ decay following KChIP2 loss, suggesting an altered state of RyR activity. These changes were associated with a delocalization of the ryanodine receptor activator, presenilin, away from sarcomeric banding to more diffuse distribution, suggesting that RyR open probability are a target of KChIP2 loss mediated by a dissociation of presenilin. Typically, prolonged action potential duration and enhanced Ca2+ entry would augment cardiac contractility, but here we see KChIP2 fundamentally disrupts Ca2+ release events and compromises myocyte contraction. This novel role targeting presenilin localization and RyR activity reveals a significance for KChIP2 loss that reflects adverse remodeling observed in cardiac disease settings.

  11. Ion beam extraction from a matrix ECR plasma source by discrete ion-focusing effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Draghici, Mihai

    2010-01-01

    -ECR plasma source [3] with transversal magnetic filter for electron temperature control. 12 ECR plasma cells are placed 7.5 cm apart on the top of a cubic chamber 40x40x40 cm3. Each cell can be controlled independently by tuning the injected microwave power. The discharge is operated at pressures below 1 m......Positive or negative ion beams extracted from plasma are used in a large variety of surface functionalization techniques such as implantation, etching, surface activation, passivation or oxidation. Of particular importance is the surface treatment of materials sensitive to direct plasma exposure...... due to high heath fluxes, the controllability of the ion incidence angle, and charge accumulation when treating insulating materials. Despite of a large variety of plasma sources available for ion beam extraction, there is a clear need for new extraction mechanisms that can make available ion beams...

  12. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-06-01

    As for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) interferometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the introduction of pulsed Fourier transform techniques revolutionized ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: increased speed (factor of 10,000), increased sensitivity (factor of 100), increased mass resolution (factor of 10,000-an improvement not shared by the introduction of FT techniques to IR or NMR spectroscopy), increased mass range (factor of 500), and automated operation. FT-ICR mass spectrometry is the most versatile technique for unscrambling and quantifying ion-molecule reaction kinetics and equilibria in the absence of solvent (i.e., the gas phase). In addition, FT-ICR MS has the following analytically important features: speed (~1 second per spectrum); ultrahigh mass resolution and ultrahigh mass accuracy for analysis of mixtures and polymers; attomole sensitivity; MSn with one spectrometer, including two-dimensional FT/FT-ICR/MS; positive and/or negative ions; multiple ion sources (especially MALDI and electrospray); biomolecular molecular weight and sequencing; LC/MS; and single-molecule detection up to 108 Dalton. Here, some basic features and recent developments of FT-ICR mass spectrometry are reviewed, with applications ranging from crude oil to molecular biology.

  13. Er sensitization by a thin Si layer: Interaction-distance dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julsgaard, Brian; Lu, Ying-Wei; Jensen, Rasmus Vincentz Skougaard

    2011-01-01

    From photoluminescence measurements on sensitized erbium in a-Si/SiO2:Er/SiO2 multilayers, we determine the characteristic interaction length of the sensitization process from the silicon-layer sensitizer to the erbium-ion receiver to be 0.22±0.02 nm. By using sufficiently low temperatures in the...

  14. Target-Triggered Switching on and off the Luminescence of Lanthanide Coordination Polymer Nanoparticles for Selective and Sensitive Sensing of Copper Ions in Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pengcheng; Wu, Fangying; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-07-07

    Copper ions (Cu(2+)) in the central nervous system play a crucial role in the physiological and pathological events, so simple, selective, and sensitive detection of cerebral Cu(2+) is of great importance. In this work, we report a facile yet effective fluorescent method for sensing of Cu(2+) in rat brain using one kind of lanthanide coordination polymer nanoparticle, adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and terbium ion (Tb(3+)), i.e., AMP-Tb, as the sensing platform. Initially, a cofactor ligand, 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA), as the sensitizer, was introduced into the nonluminescent AMP-Tb suspension, resulting in switching on the luminescence of AMP-Tb by the removal of coordinating water molecules and concomitant energy transfer from SSA to Tb(3+). The subsequent addition of Cu(2+) into the resulting SSA/AMP-Tb can strongly quench the fluorescence because the specific coordination interaction between SSA and Cu(2+) rendered energy transfer from SSA to Tb(3+) inefficient. The decrease ratio of the fluorescence intensities of SSA/AMP-Tb at 550 nm show a linear relationship for Cu(2+) within the concentration range from 1.5 to 24 μM with a detection limit of 300 nM. The method demonstrated here is highly selective and is free from the interference of metal ions, amino acids, and the biological species commonly existing in the brain such as dopamine, lactate, and glucose. Eventually, by combining the microdialysis technique, the present method has been successfully applied in the detection of cerebral Cu(2+) in rat brain with the basal dialysate level of 1.91 ± 0.40 μM (n = 3). This method is very promising to be used for investigating the physiological and pathological events that cerebral Cu(2+) participates in.

  15. Active stabilization of ion trap radiofrequency potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K. G.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Restelli, A.; Landsman, K. A.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C. [Joint Quantum Institute and University of Maryland Department of Physics, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to be better than 10 Hz or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  16. Crystal structure of ryanodine receptor N-terminal domain from Plutella xylostella reveals two potential species-specific insecticide-targeting sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lianyun; Liu, Chen; Qin, Juan; Wang, Jie; Dong, Shengjie; Chen, Wei; He, Weiyi; Gao, Qingzhi; You, Minsheng; Yuchi, Zhiguang

    2018-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are large calcium-release channels located in sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. They play a central role in excitation-contraction coupling of muscle cells. Three commercialized insecticides targeting pest RyRs generate worldwide sales over 2 billion U.S. dollars annually, but the structure of insect RyRs remains elusive, hindering our understanding of the mode of action of RyR-targeting insecticides and the development of insecticide resistance in pests. Here we present the crystal structure of RyR N-terminal domain (NTD) (residue 1-205) at 2.84 Å resolution from the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, a destructive pest devouring cruciferous crops all over the world. Similar to its mammalian homolog, DBM RyR NTD consists of a beta-trefoil folding motif and a flanking alpha helix. Interestingly, two regions in NTD interacting with neighboring domains showed distinguished conformations in DBM relative to mammalian RyRs. Using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation, we created a structural model of the N-terminal three domains, showing two unique binding pockets that could be targeted by potential species-specific insecticides. Thermal melt experiment showed that the stability of DBM RyR NTD was higher than mammalian RyRs, probably due to a stable intra-domain disulfide bond observed in the crystal structure. Previously DBM NTD was shown to be one of the two critical regions to interact with insecticide flubendiamide, but isothermal titration calorimetry experiments negated DBM NTD alone as a major binding site for flubendiamide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of ion chromatography to the determination of water-soluble inorganic and organic ions in atmospheric aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue-Chun; He, Ke-Bin; Ma, Yong-Liang; Yang, Fu-Mo; Duan, Feng-Kui; Zheng, Ai-Hua; Zhao, Cheng-Yi

    2004-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and convenient ion chromatography(IC) method was established for the simultaneous determination of twelve water-soluble inorganic anions(F- , Cl- , NO2(-), NO3(-), SO3(2-), SO4(2-) , PO4(3-)), and fifteen water-soluble organic ions(formate, acetate, MSA, oxalate, malonate, succinate, phthalates, etc.) in atmospheric aerosols. The linear concentrations ranged from 0.005 microg/m3 to 500 microg/m3 ( r = 0.999-0.9999). The relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.43%-2.00% and the detection limits were from 2.7 ng/m3 to 88 ng/m3. The proposed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of those inorganic ions and organic ions in PM2.5 of Beijing.

  18. Principles of fuel ion ratio measurements in fusion plasmas by collective Thomson scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    ratio. Measurements of the fuel ion ratio will be important for plasma control and machine protection in future experiments with burning fusion plasmas. Here we examine the theoretical basis for fuel ion ratio measurements by CTS. We show that the sensitivity to plasma composition is enhanced......For certain scattering geometries collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements are sensitive to the composition of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. CTS therefore holds the potential to become a new diagnostic for measurements of the fuel ion ratio—i.e. the tritium to deuterium density...... by the signatures of ion cyclotron motion and ion Bernstein waves which appear for scattering geometries with resolved wave vectors near perpendicular to the magnetic field. We investigate the origin and properties of these features in CTS spectra and give estimates of their relative importance for fuel ion ratio...

  19. A calorimeter-Faraday cup to measure energy content of ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, G.

    1984-01-01

    A calorimeter-Faraday cup to measure energy content of ion beams is described. It uses an HP quartz thermometer having a 10 -40 C sensitivity; contact potential problems, arising when working with thermocouples, are so avoided. Calibration has been performed with a resistive filament and with an electron beam. The apparatus is profitable if the measured ion beams are constant in time. The measured sensitivity was 10 -40 C/10 -5 W. (author)

  20. Ion feedback effect in the multi GEM structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Yong Kyun; Han, Sang Hyo; Ha, Jang Ho; Moon, Byung Soo; Chung, Chong Eun

    2003-01-01

    The feedback of positive ions in a gas electron multiplier (GEM) has to be suppressed to reduce the photocathode degradation in GEM photomultipliers and to prevent the field distortion in a time projection chamber (TPC). The ion feedback dependency on the drift electric field, the transfer field, the asymmetry in the voltages across the GEM, and the effective gain was carefully measured in various gases. The ion feedback is sensitive to the drift field and the effective gain. A model prediction of the ion feedback in a double GEM structure was compared with the measurement. Our systematic study of the ion feedback effect can lead to progress in gas detectors with GEMs.

  1. A sensitive zinc-activated 129Xe MRI probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotera, N.; Delacour, L.; Traore, T.; Buisson, D.A.; Taran, F.; Coudert, S.; Rousseau, B.; Tassali, N.; Leonce, E.; Boutin, C.; Berthault, P.; Brotin, T.; Dutasta, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we propose the use of hyper-polarized 129 Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the sensitive detection of Zn 2+ ions. To achieve this goal, the noble gas is encapsulated in dedicated host systems bearing a ligand that chelates the Zn 2+ ions. Cryptophanes, aromatic cage molecules made of cyclotriveratrylene groups, are perfectly suited to this purpose as 1) they can easily be rendered water-soluble, 2) the noble gas has a high affinity for their cavity, 3) when xenon is encapsulated, it takes a specific NMR frequency, and 4) xenon exchange in and out of the cavity insures a continuous refreshment of the Xe-cryptophane environment in hyper-polarization. We constructed a powerful 129 Xe NMR-based sensor of Zn 2+ ions, which enables for the first time measurement of Zn 2+ concentrations as low as 100 nm. This high sensitivity was achieved thanks to a smart 129 Xe MRI sensor, where the binding of the ion to the target is accompanied by a change in NMR parameters. We have also demonstrated the importance of working with enantiopure cryptophane derivatives. (O.M.)

  2. Energy and angle resolved ion scattering spectroscopy: new possibilities for surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellings, G.J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis the design and development of a novel, very sensitive and high-resolving spectrometer for surface analysis is described. This spectrometer is designed for Energy and Angle Resolved Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (EARISS). There are only a few techniques that are sensitive enough to study the outermost atomic layer of surfaces. One of these techniques, Low-Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS), is discussed in chapter 2. Since LEIS is destructive, it is important to make a very efficient use of the scattered ions. This makes it attractive to simultaneously carry out energy and angle dependent measurements (EARISS). (Auth.)

  3. Etching behavior of poly (vinylidene fluoride) thin films irradiated with ion beams. Effect of irradiated ions and pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Tetsuya; Rohani, Rosiah; Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shuichi; Hasegawa, Shin; Asano, Masaharu; Maekawa, Yasunari; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Neumann, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Poly (vinylidene fluoride) thin films irradiated with four kinds of ion beams were exposed to a 9M KOH aqueous solution after their storage in air for 30 or 90 days at different temperatures. According to the conductometry, the heating at 120degC was found to enhance the etch rate in the latent track without changing that in the bulk, thereby enabling us to obtain very high etching sensitivity for the preparation of nano-sized through-pores. The formation of hydroperoxides during this pretreatment should facilitate the introduction of the etching agent to improve etchability. Additionally, the irradiation of higher-LET ions, causing each track to contain more activated sites (like radicals), was preferable to achieve high sensitivity of the etching. (author)

  4. Luminescence enhancement of uranyl ion by benzoic acid in acetonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satendra Kumar; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2014-01-01

    Uranyl ion is known for its characteristic green luminescence and therefore luminescence spectroscopy is a suitable technique for characterizing different uranyl species. In aqueous medium, luminescence of uranyl ion is generally weak due to its quenching by water molecules and therefore in order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H 3 PO 4 , H 2 SO 4 , HCIO 4 have been widely used. The other method to enhance the uranyl luminescence is by ligand sensitized luminescence, a method well established for lanthanides. In this work, luminescence of uranyl ion is found to be enhanced by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium. In aqueous medium benzoic acid does not enhance the uranyl luminescence although it forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with uranyl ion. Luminescence spectra of uranyl benzoate revealed that enhancement is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by benzoate ions. UV-Vis spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize the specie formed in the in acetonitrile medium. UV-Vis spectroscopy along with luminescence spectra revealed that the specie to be tribenzoate complex of uranyl (UO 2 (C 6 H 5 COO) 3 ) - having D 3 h symmetry. (author)

  5. Ion induced optical emission for surface and depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Low-energy ion bombardment of solid surfaces results in the emission of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation produced by inelastic ion-solid collision processes. The emitted optical radiation provides important insight into low-energy particle-solid interactions and provides the basis for an analysis technique which can be used for surface and depth profile analysis with high sensitivity. The different kinds of collision induced optical radiation emitted as a result of low-energy particle-solid collisions are reviewed. Line radiation arising from excited states of sputtered atoms or molecules is shown to provide the basis for surface and depth profile analysis. The spectral characteristics of this type of radiation are discussed and applications of the ion induced optical emission technique are presented. These applications include measurements of ion implant profiles, detection sensitivities for submonolayer quantities of impurities on elemental surfaces, and the detection of elemental impurities on complex organic substrates

  6. Laser-cooling effects in few-ion clouds of Yb+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.S.; Gill, P.; Klein, H.A.; Levick, A.P.; Rowley, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    We report some laser-cooling effects in a few 172 Yb + ions held in a Paul trap. Pronounced cloud-to-crystal phase transitions have been observed as discontinuities in the Yb + fluorescence spectrum of the 369 nm cooling transition. The first reported two-dimensional images of Yb + clouds with evidence of crystal structure have been recorded using a photon-counting position-sensitive detector. An ion temperature of 100 mK has been estimated from the size of a single ion image. Stepwise cooling of a re-heated, few-ion Yb + cloud was also observed. (orig.)

  7. Warm-ion drift Alfven turbulence and the L-H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.

    1998-01-01

    Computations of fluid drift turbulence treating ions and electrons on equal footing, including both temperatures, are conducted in a model toroidal geometry. The resulting 'ion mixing mode' turbulence bears features of both electron drift-Alfven and ion temperature gradient turbulence, and nonlinear sensitivity to the relative strengths of the density and temperature gradients provides a possible route to the bifurcation needed for the L-H transition. (author)

  8. Two different avian cold-sensitive sensory neurons: Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8)-dependent and -independent activation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A; Takahashi, K; Saito, S; Tominaga, M; Ohta, T

    2016-12-01

    Sensing the ambient temperature is an important function for survival in animals. Some TRP channels play important roles as detectors of temperature and irritating chemicals. There are functional differences of TRP channels among species. TRPM8 in mammals is activated by cooling compounds and cold temperature, but less information is available on the functional role of TRPM8 in avian species. Here we investigated the pharmacological properties and thermal sensitivities of chicken TRPM8 (cTRPM8) and cold-sensitive mechanisms in avian sensory neurons. In heterologously expressed cTRPM8, menthol and its derivative, WS-12 elicited [Ca 2+ ] i increases, but icilin did not. In chicken sensory neurons, icilin increased [Ca 2+ ] i, in a TRPA1-dependent manner. Icilin selectively stimulated heterologously expressed chicken TRPA1 (cTRPA1). Similar to mammalian orthologue, cTRPM8 was activated by cold. Both heterologous and endogenous expressed cTRPM8 were sensitive to mammalian TRPM8 antagonists. There are two types of cold-sensitive cells regarding menthol sensitivity in chicken sensory neurons. The temperature threshold of menthol-insensitive neurons was significantly lower than that of menthol-sensitive ones. The population of menthol-insensitive neurons was large in chicken but almost little in mammals. The cold-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increases were not abolished by the external Ca 2+ removal or by blockades of PLC-IP 3 pathways and ryanodine channels. The cold stimulation failed to evoke [Ca 2+ ] i increases after intracellular Ca 2+ store-depletion. These results indicate that cTRPM8 acts as a cold-sensor similar to mammals. It is noteworthy that TRPM8-independent cold-sensitive neurons are abundant in chicken sensory neurons. Our results suggest that most of the cold-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increases are mediated via Ca 2+ release from intracellular stores and that these mechanisms may be specific to avian species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Channeling of molecular ions with relativistic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Muranaka, Tomoko; Kondo, Chikara; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Komaki, Kenichiro; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Takabayashi, Yuichi; Murakami, Takeshi; Takada, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    When energetic ions are injected into a single crystal parallel to a crystal axis or plane, they proceed in an open space guided by the crystal potential without colliding with atoms in the atomic plane or string, which is called channeling. We aimed to study dynamics of molecular ions, H 2 + , of 160 MeV/u and their fragment ions, H + ions in a Si crystal under the channeling condition. The molecular ions, H 2 + , are soon ionized, i.e. electron-stripped in the crystal, and a pair of bare nuclei, H + ions, travels in the crystal potential with mutual Coulomb repulsion. We developed a 2D position sensitive detector for the angular-distribution measurement of the H + ions transmitted through the crystal, and observed the detailed angular distribution. In addition we measured the case of H + on incidence for comparison. As a result, the channeled component and non-channeling were clearly separated. The incident angular divergence is critical to discuss the effect of Coulomb explosion of molecular H 2 + ions. (author)

  10. Heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevski, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to study high-p T physics in proton-proton collisions at the LHC design luminosity. The detector capabilities for heavy-ion physics are now being evaluated. This paper reports on a preliminary assessment of the baseline ATLAS detector potential for heavy-ion physics. The ATLAS sensitivity to some of the expected signatures from the quark-gluon plasma (e.g. jet quenching, Υ suppression) is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor for femtomolar detection of silver ion in aqueous medium

    OpenAIRE

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2015-01-01

    The chemical sensing for the trace level detection of silver ion in aqueous solution still remains a challenge using simple, rapid, and inexpensive method. We report that thionine can be used as a fluorescent probe for the detection of Ag+ ion. The successive addition of Ag+ ion to the solution containing thionine quenches (turns-off) the fluorescence intensity of thionine. Association and quenching constants have been estimated by the Benesi–Hildebrand method and Stern–Volmer plot, respectiv...

  12. A highly sensitive CaF{sub 2}:Dy nanophosphor as an efficient low energy ion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadane, Mahesh S.; Hareesh, K.; Dahiwale, S.S.; Sature, K.R. [Microtron Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Patil, B.J. [Department of Physics, Abasaheb Garware College, Pune 411004 (India); Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Microtron Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Microtron Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • CaF{sub 2}:Dy nanophosphor synthesized by chemical co-precipitation route. • Phosphors are irradiated by H, Ar and N low energy ions at different fluences. • LEBI irradiated phosphors are characterized by XRD, TEM, FTIR and PL spectroscopy. • First time report to LEIB irradiated for thermoluminescence dosimetric applications. - Abstract: Dysprosium doped calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}:Dy) powers synthesized by co-precipitation method were irradiated with low energy ion beams (LEIB) viz. 100 keV H, 200 keV Ar and 350 keV N beams at different fluences and demonstrated for low energy ion dosimetric application. X-ray Diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of highly crystalline cubic structured particles with size ∼45–50 nm. FTIR spectra of the CaF{sub 2}:Dy samples show changes of some bonds such as N–O asymmetric, C–F bonding and C–H aromatic contain stretching mode after LEIB irradiation. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve peaks were observed at 207 °C for Ar ion, at 203 °C for H ion and at 216 °C and 270 °C for N ion. It has been found that CaF{sub 2}:Dy nanophosphor shows a linear response with minimum fading for all the ion species. Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution was performed for TL curve of high fluence ion irradiated nanophosphor to estimate the trapping parameters and the respective figure of merit (FOM) found to be very appropriate for all the nanophosphor. These results indicated that the CaF{sub 2}:Dy can be used as a low energy ion detector or dose.

  13. How to reduce the ion feedback in GEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. H.; Kang, S. M.; Kim, Y. G.

    2003-01-01

    The feedback of positive ions in Gas Electron Multiplier(GEM) has to be suppressed to reduce the photocathode degradation in GEM photomultiplier and to prevent the field distortion in a Time Projection Chamber(TPC). The ion feedback dependency on the drift electric field, the transfer field, the asymmetry in the voltages across the GEM, and the effective gain was measured in various gases. The ion feedback is sensitive to the drift field and the effective gain. A model prediction of the ion feedback in multiple GEM was compared with the measurement. The ion gating method, which is being studyed in TPC, is introduced to reduce the ion feedback in GEM. With Maxwell and Garfield calculation, we obtained the reduction of the ion feedback by placing the wires between the drift plate and the GEM. We calculated the depedency of the ion feedback with respect to the bias voltage on the wire, the distance between the wires, and the distance between the wire and the GEM

  14. Improvement of herbage by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongmei; Hao Jifang; Wei Zengquan; Xie Zhongkui; Li Fengqin; Wang Yajun

    2004-01-01

    Herbage seeds of legume and grass were irradiated in penetration by 80 MeV/u 20 Ne 10+ ions. The results of field tests and observations of the root-tip cells showed that growth of the seedling was obviously weakened with increasing doses. Frequencies of chromosomal aberration and micronucleus increased significantly with increasing doses. According to the field growth tests, radiation sensitivity of grass herbage to the heavy ion beams was much higher than leguminous herbage, and suitable dose of the heavy ion irradiation for the grass and leguminous herbage is 20-30 Gy and 150 Gy, respectively

  15. The nonlinear dustgrain-charging on large amplitude electrostatic waves in a dusty plasma with trapped ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-N. Nejoh

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear dustgrain-charging and the influence of the ion density and temperature on electrostatic waves in a dusty plasma having trapped ions are investigated by numerical calculation. This work is the first approach to the effect of trapped ions in dusty plasmas. The nonlinear variation of the dust-charge is examined, and it is shown that the characteristics of the dustcharge number sensitively depend on the plasma potential, Mach number, dust mass-to-charge ratio, trapped ion density and temperature. The fast and slow wave modes are shown in this system. An increase of the ion temperature decreases the dust-charging rate and the propagation speed of ion waves. It is found that the existence of electrostatic ion waves sensitively depends on the ion to electron density ratio. New findings of the variable-charge dust grain particles, ion density and temperature in a dusty plasma with trapped ions are predicted.

  16. Hip implants - Paper VI - Ion concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargeant, A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH 45810 (United States); Goswami, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH 45810 (United States)]. E-mail: t-goswami@onu.edu

    2007-07-01

    Total hip-joint arthroplasty is performed in increasing numbers where it translates to about 0.16-0.2% of population per year in industrial countries. In most cases, an implant is a metallic component articulating with a metal, ceramic or poly-ethylene liner as seen in the case of hip, knee and spine. The metal implants release ions in vivo. Therefore, there is a need to study metallic implants and ions released as a result. Toxic concentrations of ions can lead to many adverse physiological effects, including cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and metal sensitivity. There is a need to map ion concentrations establishing boundaries between normal and toxic levels; which however, does not exist. Reference levels of ion concentrations in body fluids and tissues determined by many studies are compiled, reviewed, and presented in this paper. The concentrations of ions released from different alloys, including cobalt, chromium, nickel, molybdenum titanium, aluminum, and vanadium, are presented in this paper. This paper reviews the literature pertaining to clinical data on metal ion concentrations in patients with metal joint prostheses, and laboratory data on the physiological effects of the metals.

  17. Silicon nanowire structures as high-sensitive pH-sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belostotskaya, S O; Chuyko, O V; Kuznetsov, A E; Kuznetsov, E V; Rybachek, E N

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive elements for pH-sensors created on silicon nanostructures were researched. Silicon nanostructures have been used as ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) for the measurement of solution pH. Silicon nanostructures have been fabricated by 'top-down' approach and have been studied as pH sensitive elements. Nanowires have the higher sensitivity. It was shown, that sensitive element, which is made of 'one-dimensional' silicon nanostructure have bigger pH-sensitivity as compared with 'two-dimensional' structure. Integrated element formed from two p- and n-type nanowire ISFET ('inverter') can be used as high sensitivity sensor for local relative change [H+] concentration in very small volume.

  18. Role played by acid-sensitive ion channels in evoking the exercise pressor reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Shawn G; McCord, Jennifer L; Rainier, Jon; Liu, Zhuqing; Kaufman, Marc P

    2008-10-01

    The exercise pressor reflex arises from contracting skeletal muscle and is believed to play a role in evoking the cardiovascular responses to static exercise, effects that include increases in arterial pressure and heart rate. This reflex is believed to be evoked by the metabolic and mechanical stimulation of thin fiber muscle afferents. Lactic acid is known to be an important metabolic stimulus evoking the reflex. Until recently, the only antagonist for acid-sensitive ion channels (ASICs), the receptors to lactic acid, was amiloride, a substance that is also a potent antagonist for both epithelial sodium channels as well as voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, a second compound, A-317567, has been shown to be an effective and selective antagonist to ASICs in vitro. Consequently, we measured the pressor responses to the static contraction of the triceps surae muscles in decerebrate cats before and after a popliteal arterial injection of A-317567 (10 mM solution; 0.5 ml). We found that this ASIC antagonist significantly attenuated by half (Pacid injection into the popliteal artery. In contrast, A-317567 had no effect on the pressor responses to tendon stretch, a pure mechanical stimulus, and to a popliteal arterial injection of capsaicin, which stimulated transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channels. We conclude that ASICs on thin fiber muscle afferents play a substantial role in evoking the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex.

  19. Light ion beam transport research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshelwood, D.D.; Boller, J.R.; Cooperstein, G.

    1996-01-01

    Transport of light ion beams through low-pressure background gas is under investigation at NRL in support of the light-ion ICF program at Sandia National Laboratories. Scaling experiments and the field solver/orbit code ATHETA have been used to design and construct a focusing, extraction applied-B diode for transport experiments. An active anode source has been developed to provide a high proton fraction in the ion beam and a fast ion turn-on time. A very sensitive Zeeman diagnostic is being developed to determine the net current distribution in the beam/transport system. Both analytical and numerical techniques using several codes are being applied to transport modeling, leading to the capability of full system studies. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 10 refs

  20. Light ion beam transport research at NRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinshelwood, D D; Boller, J R; Cooperstein, G [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Plasma Physics Div.; and others

    1997-12-31

    Transport of light ion beams through low-pressure background gas is under investigation at NRL in support of the light-ion ICF program at Sandia National Laboratories. Scaling experiments and the field solver/orbit code ATHETA have been used to design and construct a focusing, extraction applied-B diode for transport experiments. An active anode source has been developed to provide a high proton fraction in the ion beam and a fast ion turn-on time. A very sensitive Zeeman diagnostic is being developed to determine the net current distribution in the beam/transport system. Both analytical and numerical techniques using several codes are being applied to transport modeling, leading to the capability of full system studies. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 10 refs.

  1. Ejection of Coulomb Crystals from a Linear Paul Ion Trap for Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K A E; Pollum, L L; Petralia, L S; Tauschinsky, A; Rennick, C J; Softley, T P; Heazlewood, B R

    2015-12-17

    Coulomb crystals are being increasingly employed as a highly localized source of cold ions for the study of ion-molecule chemical reactions. To extend the scope of reactions that can be studied in Coulomb crystals-from simple reactions involving laser-cooled atomic ions, to more complex systems where molecular reactants give rise to multiple product channels-sensitive product detection methodologies are required. The use of a digital ion trap (DIT) and a new damped cosine trap (DCT) are described, which facilitate the ejection of Coulomb-crystallized ions onto an external detector for the recording of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra. This enables the examination of reaction dynamics and kinetics between Coulomb-crystallized ions and neutral molecules: ionic products are typically cotrapped, thus ejecting the crystal onto an external detector reveals the masses, identities, and quantities of all ionic species at a selected point in the reaction. Two reaction systems are examined: the reaction of Ca(+) with deuterated isotopologues of water, and the charge exchange between cotrapped Xe(+) with deuterated isotopologues of ammonia. These reactions are examples of two distinct types of experiment, the first involving direct reaction of the laser-cooled ions, and the second involving reaction of sympathetically-cooled heavy ions to form a mixture of light product ions. Extensive simulations are conducted to interpret experimental results and calculate optimal operating parameters, facilitating a comparison between the DIT and DCT approaches. The simulations also demonstrate a correlation between crystal shape and image shape on the detector, suggesting a possible means for determining crystal geometry for nonfluorescing ions.

  2. Single-ion quantum lock-in amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Keselman, Anna; Ozeri, Roee

    2011-05-05

    Quantum metrology uses tools from quantum information science to improve measurement signal-to-noise ratios. The challenge is to increase sensitivity while reducing susceptibility to noise, tasks that are often in conflict. Lock-in measurement is a detection scheme designed to overcome this difficulty by spectrally separating signal from noise. Here we report on the implementation of a quantum analogue to the classical lock-in amplifier. All the lock-in operations--modulation, detection and mixing--are performed through the application of non-commuting quantum operators to the electronic spin state of a single, trapped Sr(+) ion. We significantly increase its sensitivity to external fields while extending phase coherence by three orders of magnitude, to more than one second. Using this technique, we measure frequency shifts with a sensitivity of 0.42 Hz Hz(-1/2) (corresponding to a magnetic field measurement sensitivity of 15 pT Hz(-1/2)), obtaining an uncertainty of less than 10 mHz (350 fT) after 3,720 seconds of averaging. These sensitivities are limited by quantum projection noise and improve on other single-spin probe technologies by two orders of magnitude. Our reported sensitivity is sufficient for the measurement of parity non-conservation, as well as the detection of the magnetic field of a single electronic spin one micrometre from an ion detector with nanometre resolution. As a first application, we perform light shift spectroscopy of a narrow optical quadrupole transition. Finally, we emphasize that the quantum lock-in technique is generic and can potentially enhance the sensitivity of any quantum sensor. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  3. Highly selective and sensitive paper-based colorimetric sensor using thiosulfate catalytic etching of silver nanoplates for trace determination of copper ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyo, Sudkate; Siangproh, Weena; Apilux, Amara; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2015-03-25

    A novel, highly selective and sensitive paper-based colorimetric sensor for trace determination of copper (Cu(2+)) ions was developed. The measurement is based on the catalytic etching of silver nanoplates (AgNPls) by thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)). Upon the addition of Cu(2+) to the ammonium buffer at pH 11, the absorption peak intensity of AuNPls/S2O3(2-) at 522 nm decreased and the pinkish violet AuNPls became clear in color as visible to the naked eye. This assay provides highly sensitive and selective detection of Cu(2+) over other metal ions (K(+), Cr(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), As(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Hg(2+) and Bi(3+)). A paper-based colorimetric sensor was then developed for the simple and rapid determination of Cu(2+) using the catalytic etching of AgNPls. Under optimized conditions, the modified AgNPls coated at the test zone of the devices immediately changes in color in the presence of Cu(2+). The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 1.0 ng mL(-1) by visual detection. For semi-quantitative measurement with image processing, the method detected Cu(2+) in the range of 0.5-200 ng mL(-1)(R(2)=0.9974) with an LOD of 0.3 ng mL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to detect Cu(2+) in the wide range of real samples including water, food, and blood. The results were in good agreement according to a paired t-test with results from inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Binding Affinity of a Highly Sensitive Au/Ag/Au/Chitosan-Graphene Oxide Sensor Based on Direct Detection of Pb2+ and Hg2+ Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hasiba Kamaruddin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of binding affinity is essential in surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensing because it allows researchers to quantify the affinity between the analyte and immobilised ligands of an SPR sensor. In this study, we demonstrate the derivation of the binding affinity constant, K, for Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions according to their SPR response using a gold/silver/gold/chitosan–graphene oxide (Au/Ag/Au/CS–GO sensor for the concentration range of 0.1–5 ppm. The higher affinity of Pb2+ to binding with the CS–GO sensor explains the outstanding sensitivity of 2.05 °ppm−1 against 1.66 °ppm−1 of Hg2+. The maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR upon detection of Pb2+ is 1.53, and exceeds the suggested logical criterion of an SNR. The Au/Ag/Au/CS–GO SPR sensor also exhibits excellent repeatability in Pb2+ due to the strong bond between its functional groups and this cation. The adsorption data of Pb2+ and Hg2+ on the CS–GO sensor fits well with the Langmuir isotherm model where the affinity constant, K, of Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions is computed. The affinity of Pb2+ ions to the Au/Ag/Au/CS–GO sensor is significantly higher than that of Hg2+ based on the value of K, 7 × 105 M−1 and 4 × 105 M−1, respectively. The higher shift in SPR angles due to Pb2+ and Hg2+ compared to Cr3+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions also reveals the greater affinity of the CS–GO SPR sensor to them, thus supporting the rationale for obtaining K for these two heavy metals. This study provides a better understanding on the sensing performance of such sensors in detecting heavy metal ions.

  5. Ion beam induced optical and surface modification in plasmonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udai B., E-mail: udaibhansingh123@gmail.com; Gautam, Subodh K.; Kumar, Sunil; Hooda, Sonu; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-15

    In present work, ion irradiation induced nanostructuring has been exploited as an efficient and effective tool for synthesis of coupled plasmonics nanostructures by using 1.2 MeV Xe ions on Au/ZnO/Au system deposited on glass substrate. The results are correlated on the basis of their optical absorption, surface morphologies and enhanced sensitivity of evolved phonon modes by using UV Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. Optical absorbance spectra of plasmonic nanostructures (NSs) show a decrease in band gap, which may be ascribed to the formation of defects with ion irradiation. The surface morphology reveals the formation of percolated NSs upon ion irradiation and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) study clearly shows the formation of multilayer system. Furthermore, RS measurements on samples are studied to understand the enhanced sensitivity of ion irradiation induced phonon mode at 573 cm{sup −1} along with other modes. As compared to pristine sample, a stronger and pronounced evolution of these phonon modes is observed with further ion irradiation, which indicates localized surface plasmon results with enhanced intensity of phonon modes of Zinc oxide (ZnO) material. Thus, such plasmonic NSs can be used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates.

  6. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-01-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ≥2). 14 N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (C n+ → C - ) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14 N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14 C in enriched samples of CO 2 gas with 14 C/ 12 C isotopic ratio down to the 10 -9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14 C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development

  7. Enhanced quantum sensing with multi-level structures of trapped ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aharon, N.; Drewsen, Michael; Retzker, A.

    2017-01-01

    , robustness to both external and controller noise is achieved. We consider trapped-ion based implementation via the dipole transitions, which is relevant for several types of ions, such as the $^{40}{\\rm{Ca}}^{+}$, $^{88}{\\rm{Sr}}^{+}$, and the $^{138}{\\rm{Ba}}^{+}$ ions. Taking experimental errors...... of magnitude of the sensitivity. In addition, we present a microwave based sensing scheme that is suitable for ions with a hyperfine structure, such as the $^{9}{\\rm{Be}}^{+}$,$^{25}{\\rm{Mg}}^{+}$,$^{43}{\\rm{Ca}}^{+}$,$^{87}{\\rm{Sr}}^{+}$,$^{137}{\\rm{Ba}}^{+}$,$^{111}{\\rm{Cd}}^{+}$,$^{171}{\\rm...

  8. Isolation and characterization of cobalt-sensitive mutant of Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnapuram Rashmi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate and demonstrate the mechanism of metal transport in cobalt-sensitive mutant (CSM of Neurospora crassa (N. crassa. Methods: Isolation of CSM of N. crassa, I50 determination, growth measurements, metal ion uptake studies and sexual crosses were performed to determine the mechanism of sensitivity and locus. Results: CSMs of N. crassa were isolated by mutagenesis with diethyl sulfate. More than 500 isolates were screened and out of these isolates, CSM-I was 5-fold and CSM-II was 10-fold sensitive to Co on liquid medium as compared to the wild type. Compositional analysis of cell wall revealed the decrease in total phosphate content. N. crassa CSM bound much less cobalt to cell wall fraction than wild type. The data indicated closer linkage between resistance and mating type locus (mat, which is, located on LG I. Conclusions: A CSM of N. crassa is 5-fold more sensitive than wild type and cross sensitive to nickel and copper and hyper-accumulates 2-4 fold more toxic metal ions over wild type. The mechanism for sensitivity is decreased in cobalt-binding to cell wall fraction and increased intracellular uptake. N. crassa-acon-3 morphologically resembles the CSM, cobalt-sensitive and maps to similar locus.

  9. A novel fluorescence imaging approach to monitor salt stress-induced modulation of ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity in sunflower seedling roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumya; Bhatla, Satish Chander

    2014-04-01

    Seedlings exposed to salt stress are expected to show modulation of intracellular accumulation of sodium ions through a variety of mechanisms. Using a new methodology, this work demonstrates ouabain (OU)-sensitive ATPase activity in the roots of sunflower seedlings subjected to salt stress (120 mM NaCl). 9-Anthroylouabain (a derivative of ouabain known to inhibit Na(+), K(+) -ATPase activity in animal systems, EC 3.6.3.9) has been used as a probe to analyze OU-sensitive ATPase activity in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seedling roots by spectrofluorometric estimation and localization of its spatial distribution using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Salt stress for 48 h leads to a significant induction of OU-sensitive ATPase activity in the meristematic region of the seedling roots. Calcium ions (10 mM) significantly inhibit enzyme activity and a parallel accumulation of sodium ions in the cytosol of the columella cells, epidermis and in the cells of the meristematic region of the roots is evident. As a rapid response to NaCl stress, the activity of OU-sensitive ATPase gets localized in the nuclear membrane of root protoplasts and it gets inhibited after treatment with calcium ions. Nuclear membrane localization of the OU-sensitive ATPase activity highlights a possible mechanism to efflux sodium ions from the nucleus. Thus, a correlation between OU-sensitive ATPase activity, its modulation by calcium ions and accumulation of sodium ions in various regions of the seedling roots, has been demonstrated using a novel approach in a plant system. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  10. Mutagenic effects of carbon ions near the range end in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, Yoshihiro, E-mail: hase.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Narumi, Issay [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2012-03-01

    To gain insight into the mutagenic effects of accelerated heavy ions in plants, the mutagenic effects of carbon ions near the range end (mean linear energy transfer (LET): 425 keV/{mu}m) were compared with the effects of carbon ions penetrating the seeds (mean LET: 113 keV/{mu}m). Mutational analysis by plasmid rescue of Escherichia coli rpsL from irradiated Arabidopsis plants showed a 2.7-fold increase in mutant frequency for 113 keV/{mu}m carbon ions, whereas no enhancement of mutant frequency was observed for carbon ions near the range end. This suggested that carbon ions near the range end induced mutations that were not recovered by plasmid rescue. An Arabidopsis DNA ligase IV mutant, deficient in non-homologous end-joining repair, showed hyper-sensitivity to both types of carbon-ion irradiation. The difference in radiation sensitivity between the wild type and the repair-deficient mutant was greatly diminished for carbon ions near the range end, suggesting that these ions induce irreparable DNA damage. Mutational analysis of the Arabidopsis GL1 locus showed that while the frequency of generation of glabrous mutant sectors was not different between the two types of carbon-ion irradiation, large deletions (>{approx}30 kb) were six times more frequently induced by carbon ions near the range end. When 352 keV/{mu}m neon ions were used, these showed a 6.4 times increase in the frequency of induced large deletions compared with the 113 keV/{mu}m carbon ions. We suggest that the proportion of large deletions increases with LET in plants, as has been reported for mammalian cells. The nature of mutations induced in plants by carbon ions near the range end is discussed in relation to mutation detection by plasmid rescue and transmissibility to progeny.

  11. Characterization of high-T/sub c/ Nb--Ge thin films by ion scattering, ion-induced x-rays, and ion resonance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.W.; Appleton, E.R.; Murphree, Q.C.; Gavaler, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Thin films of high-T/sub c/ (21-22 0 K) Nb--Ge were analyzed using three ion bombardment techniques. The depth dependence of stoichiometry in these superconducting thin films is determined by the deconvolution of a series of Rutherford backscattering spectra using 2.0-3.2 MeV 4 He ions at several incidence and scattering angles. Confirmation of these results is provided by studying the yields of Nb and Ge characteristic X-rays as a function of the angle of beam incidence. The depth dependence of oxygen, or oxides of Nb and Ge, is of particular interest, but more difficult to determine. A very sharp ion scattering resonance 16 O (α,α) at 3.045 MeV was utilized to enhance the backscattered yield and depth sensitivity of oxygen determination. The combined use of these three techniques now provides a nearly complete and nondestructive means for the characterization of such films

  12. Profiling hydrogen in materials using ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, J.F.; Wu, C.P.; Williams, P.

    1977-01-01

    Over the last few years many ion beam techniques have been reported for the profiling of hydrogen in materials. Nine of these were evaluated using similar samples of hydrogen ion-implanted into silicon. When possible the samples were analyzed using two or more techniques to confirm the ion-implanted accuracy. The results of this analysis which has produced a consensus profile of H in silicon which is useful as a calibration standard are reported. The analytical techniques used have capabilities ranging from very high depth resolution (approximately 50 A) and high sensitivity (less than 1 ppM) to deep probes for hydrogen which can sample throughout thin sheets

  13. 2013 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, FEBRUARY 24 - MARCH 1, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Evan

    2013-03-01

    The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The long-standing goal of our community is to develop new strategies for capturing complex molecular architectures as gas phase ions where they can be isolated, characterized and manipulated with great sensitivity. Emergent areas of interest include catalytic mechanisms, cryogenic processing of ions extracted from solution, ion fragmentation mechanisms, and new methods for ion formation and structural characterization. The conference will cover theoretical and experimental advances on systems ranging from model studies at the molecular scale to preparation of nanomaterials and characterization of large biological molecules.

  14. A Hybrid Constant and Oscillatory Field Ion Mobility Analyzer Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Aneesh; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.; Ewing, Robert G.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2018-02-01

    Here we explore the combination of constant and oscillatory fields applied in a single device to affect the continuous separation and filtering of ions based on their mobilities. The device explored allows confining and manipulating ions utilizing a combination of radio frequency (rf), direct current (DC) fields, and traveling waves (TW) in a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) module. We have investigated theoretically and experimentally a concept for continuous filtering of ions based on their mobilities where ions are mobility separated and selected by passage through two regions, both of which incorporated combined TW and constant fields providing opposing forces on the ions. The SLIM module was composed of two surfaces with mirror-image arrays of electrodes and had two regions where the different TW and opposing DC fields could be applied. The filtering capabilities are determined by the applied DC gradient and the TW parameters, such as speed, amplitude, and the TW sequence (i.e., the duty cycle of the traveling wave). The effects of different parameters on the sensitivity and the ion mobility (IM) resolution of the device have been investigated. By appropriately choosing the DC gradient and TW parameters for the two sections, it is possible to transmit ions of a selected mobility while filtering out others of both higher and lower mobility. The novel device described here provides a basis for the targeted analysis of compounds based upon the continuous selection of ions according to their mobility and without the need for high electric fields or pulsed injection.

  15. Structure and luminescent property of complexes of aryl carboxylic acid-functionalized polystyrene with Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Baojiao; Shi, Nan; Qiao, Zongwen

    2015-11-05

    Via polymer reactions, naphthoic acid (NA) and benzoic acid (BA) were bonded onto the side chains of polystyrene (PS), respectively, and two aryl carboxylic acid-functionalized polystyrenes, PSNA and PSBA, were obtained. Using PSNA and PSBA as macromolecule ligands and Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions as central ions, various luminescent binary polymer-rare earth complexes were prepared. At the same time, with 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) and 4,4'-bipyridine (Bipy) as small-molecule co-ligands, various ternary polymer-rare earth complexes were also prepared. On the basis of characterizing PSNA, PSBA and complexes, the relationship between structure and luminescent property for these prepared complexes were mainly investigated. The study results show that the macromolecule ligands PSNA and PSBA, or the bonded NA and BA ligands, can strongly sensitize the fluorescence emissions of Eu(3+) ion or Tb(3+) ion, but the sensitization effect is strongly dependent on the structure of the ligands and the property of the central ions, namely it is strongly dependent on the matching degree of energy levels. The fluorescence emission of the binary complex PS-(NA)3-Eu(III) is stronger than that PS-(BA)3-Eu(III), indicating ligand NA has stronger sensitization action for Eu(3+) ion than ligand BA; the binary complex PS-(BA)3-Tb(III) emit strong characteristic fluorescence of Tb(3+) ion, displaying that ligand BA can strongly sensitize Tb(3+) ion, whereas the binary complex PS-(NA)3-Tb(III) nearly does not emit the characteristic fluorescence of Tb(3+) ion, showing that ligand NA does not sensitize Tb(3+) ion. The fluorescence intensity of the ternary complexes is much stronger than that of the binary complexes in the same series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Generation of Dehydroalanine Residues in Protonated Polypeptides: Ion/Ion Reactions for Introducing Selective Cleavages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhou; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-09-01

    We examine a gas-phase approach for converting a subset of amino acid residues in polypeptide cations to dehydroalanine (Dha). Subsequent activation of the modified polypeptide ions gives rise to specific cleavage N-terminal to the Dha residue. This process allows for the incorporation of selective cleavages in the structural characterization of polypeptide ions. An ion/ion reaction within the mass spectrometer between a multiply protonated polypeptide and the sulfate radical anion introduces a radical site into the multiply protonated polypeptide reactant. Subsequent collisional activation of the polypeptide radical cation gives rise to radical side chain loss from one of several particular amino acid side chains (e.g., leucine, asparagine, lysine, glutamine, and glutamic acid) to yield a Dha residue. The Dha residues facilitate preferential backbone cleavages to produce signature c- and z-ions, demonstrated with cations derived from melittin, mechano growth factor (MGF), and ubiquitin. The efficiencies for radical side chain loss and for subsequent generation of specific c- and z-ions have been examined as functions of precursor ion charge state and activation conditions using cations of ubiquitin as a model for a small protein. It is noted that these efficiencies are not strongly dependent on ion trap collisional activation conditions but are sensitive to precursor ion charge state. Moderate to low charge states show the greatest overall yields for the specific Dha cleavages, whereas small molecule losses (e.g., water/ammonia) dominate at the lowest charge states and proton catalyzed amide bond cleavages that give rise to b- and y-ions tend to dominate at high charge states. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Error analysis and prevention of cosmic ion-induced soft errors in static CMOS RAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, S.E.; Ochoa, A. Jr.; Dressendorfer, P.V.; Koga, R.; Kolasinski, W.A.

    1982-06-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with memory cells are known to cause temporary, random, bit errors in some designs. The sensitivity of polysilicon gate CMOS static RAM designs to logic upset by impinging ions has been studied using computer simulations and experimental heavy ion bombardment. Results of the simulations are confirmed by experimental upset cross-section data. Analytical models have been extended to determine and evaluate design modifications which reduce memory cell sensitivity to cosmic ions. A simple design modification, the addition of decoupling resistance in the feedback path, is shown to produce static RAMs immune to cosmic ray-induced bit errors

  18. A compact quadrupole ion filter for helium detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A compact quadrupole ion filter was conceived and constructed for optimum performance at the mass four region of the mass spectra. It was primarely designed for geological applications in the measurements of helium of soil-gases. The whole ion filter structure is 15 cm long by 3.5 cm diameter, including ion source and collecting plate. The sensitivity to helium is of the order of 10 - 2 A.torr - 1 measured at a total pressure of 6x10 - 6 torr and resolution 6. The system can be easily adapted to work as a dynamic residual gas analyser for other purposes. (Author) [pt

  19. Applications of the ion microprobe to geochemistry and cosmochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, N.; Hart, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    When a solid surface is subjected to a bombardment of energetic ions, material is ejected from the surface in a process known as sputtering. A part of the sputtered material is ionized and these secondary ions can be analyzed with a mass spectrometer according to a technique known as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). A description is presented of the present status of geochemical and cosmochemical applications of the ion microprobe. Attention is given to the sputtering event, molecular ion interferences, aspects of isotopic fractionation, secondary ion intensities in polycomponent materials, and questions of trace element analysis. Geochemical applications of the ion microprobe are based on certain advantages over other analytical techniques. These advantages are related to high sensitivity, low background, and the capability of in situ analysis of isotopic composition. The distribution of trace elements in minerals is considered, along with isotope anomalies, isotope zoning, diffusion studies, and depth profiling

  20. Separation of the lanthanides on high-efficiency bonded phases and conventional ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elchuk, S.; Cassidy, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatographic separations (< 20 min) of the lanthanides are illustrated for both 5- and 10-μm bonded-phase strong-acid ion exchangers. The performance of these bonded phase packings is compared with that obtained with a 13-μm styrene-divinylbenzene resin. The eluted metal ions are detected with a variable-wavelength detector after a post-column complexation reaction. The requirements and characteristics of post-column reaction for sensitive metal ion detection after separation on high-performance columns are discussed and the linearity, reproducibility, and sensitivity of the system used in the work are illustrated. The potential of on-column preconcentration for the ultratrace (pg/mL) determination of metal ions is also discussed and illustrated. 7 figures, 2 tables

  1. Optical properties of pH-sensitive carbon-dots with different modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Weiguang, E-mail: 11236095@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Wu, Huizhen, E-mail: hzwu@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Ye, Zhenyu, E-mail: yzheny@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Li, Ruifeng, E-mail: hbrook@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Xu, Tianning, E-mail: xtn9886@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Department of Science, Zhijiang College of Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310024 (China); Zhang, Bingpo, E-mail: 11006080@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Carbon dots with unique characters of chemical inertness, low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility, demonstrate important applications in biology and optoelectronics. In this paper we report the optical properties of pH-sensitive carbon dots with different surface modifications. The as-prepared carbon dots can be well dispersed in water by modifying with acid, alkali or metal ions though they tend to form a suspension when being directly dispersed in water. We find that the carbon dots dispersed in water show a new emission and absorption character which is tunable due to the pH-sensitive nature. It is firstly proved that the addition of bivalent copper ions offers a high color contrast for visual colorimetric assays for pH measurement. The effect of surface defects with different modification on the performances of the carbon dots is also explored with a core–shell model. The hydro-dispersed carbon dots can be potentially utilized for cellular imaging or metal ion probes in biochemistry. -- Highlights: • The dispersibility in water of as-prepared carbon dots is effectively improved by the addition of acid, alkali or metal ions. • The effect of hydrolysis on the optical properties of the carbon dots is studied. • The luminescent carbon dots show a pH-sensitive fluorescence and absorption property. • The addition of bivalent copper ions in the post-treated carbon dots offers a high color contrast for visual colorimetric assays for pH measurement. • The effect of surface defects and ligands on the performances of the carbon dots is also explored.

  2. Colloidal GdVO4:Eu3+@SiO2 nanocrystals for highly selective and sensitive detection of Cu2+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanjie; Noh, Hyeon Mi; Park, Sung Heum; Choi, Byung Chun; Jeong, Jung Hyun

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, in view of health and safety demands, the controlled design of selective and sensitive sensors for Cu2+ detection is of considerable importance. Therefore, we construct herein core-shell colloidal GdVO4:Eu3+@SiO2 nanocrystals (NCs) as optical sensor for the detection of Cu2+, which were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal reaction and encapsulated with a uniform layer of ultrathin silica through a sol-gel strategy. The NCs present strong red emission due to energy transfer from VO43- groups to Eu3+ when exciting with ultraviolet (UV) light. This intense red emission from Eu3+ could be selectively quenched in the presence of Cu2+ in comparison to other metal ions and the limit of detection is as low as 80 nM in aqueous solution. It is revealed that the spectral overlap between the emission band of NCs and the absorption of Cu2+ accounts for this intriguing luminescence behavior. The detection ability is highly reversible by the addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with the recovery of almost 100% of the original luminescence. The luminescence quenching and recovery processes can be performed repeatedly with good sensing ability. These remarkable performances allow the colloidal GdVO4:Eu3+@SiO2 NCs a promising fluorescence chemosensor for detecting Cu2+ ions in aqueous solution.

  3. Acceleration effect of alcohols on ion association of molbdophosphate with malachite green and its use to the sensitive flow-injection determination of phosphate. Molybdo rinsan ion-malachite green ion kaigotai seisei ni oyobosu alcohol no hanno sokushinkoka to sore wo riyosuru rin no kokando flow injection bunseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motomizu, S; Yasuda, Y; Oshima, M [Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1991-12-10

    Molibdophosphoric acid (PMo) reacts with malachite green (MG{sup +}) to form a colored ion associate (MG{sup +}- PMo) in an acidic solution according to the formula : HMG{sup 2+}+H{sub 3}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{yields}(MG{sup +})H{sub 2}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}+2H{sup +}. A protonated form HMG{sup 2+} is yellow (the absorption mximum at 446 nm), whereas the ion associate MG{sup +} is blue green (the absorption maximum at 650 nm). MG{sup +} is found to accelerate the formation of PMo. Water-miscible organic solvents such as methanol,ethanol and propanol also accelerate the formation of PMo as well as the formation of MG sup + - PMo. Some anionic surfactants decelerate the reaction, however, contribute to the suppression of the baseline drift in a flow injection analysis (FIA). By the use of the proposed reaction accelerator and surfactant. a highly sensitive FIA system is established for,orthophosphate up to the range of several ppb. 16 figs.. 11 refs.

  4. Highly selective and sensitive optical sensor for determination of Pb2+and Hg2+ ions based on the covalent immobilization of dithizone on agarose membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargoosh, Kiomars; Babadi, Fatemeh Farhadian

    2015-02-01

    A highly sensitive and selective optical membrane for determination of Hg2+ and Pb2+ was prepared by covalent immobilization of dithizone on agarose membrane. In addition to its high stability, reproducibility and relatively long lifetime, the proposed optical sensor revealed good selectivity for target ions over a large number of alkali, alkaline earth, transition, and heavy metal ions. The proposed optical membrane displays linear responses from 1.1 × 10-8 to 2.0 × 10-6 mol L-1 and 1.2 × 10-8 to 2.4 × 10-6 mol L-1 for Hg2+ and Pb2+, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) were 2.0 × 10-9 mol L-1 and 4.0 × 10-9 mol L-1 for Hg2+ and Pb2, respectively. The prepared optical membrane was successfully applied to the determination of Hg2+ and Pb2+ in industrial wastes, spiked tap water and natural waters without any preconcentration step.

  5. Synthesis and application of a thermo sensitive tri-block copolymer as an efficient sample treatment technique for preconcentration and ultra-trace detection of lead ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behbahani, Mohammad; Abandansari, Hamid Sadeghi; Babapour, Meysam; Bagheri, Akbar; Nabid, Mohammad Reza; Salarian, Mani

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a thermo sensitive tri-block copolymer for selective trace extraction of Pb(II) ions from biological and food samples. The polymer was characterized by Fourier transform IR and NMR spectroscopy, and by gel permeation chromatography. The critical aggregation concentration and lower critical solution temperature were determined via fluorescence and UV spectrophotometry, respectively. The effects of solution pH value, amount of copolymer, of the temperature on extraction and on phase separation, and of the matrix on the extraction of Pb(II) were optimized. Pb(II) ions were then quantified by FAAS. The use of this copolymer resulted in excellent figures of merit including a calibration plot extending from 0.5 to 160 μg L −1 (with an R 2 of >0.99), a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 90 pg L −1 , an extraction efficiency of >98 %, and relative standard deviations of <4 % for eight separate extraction experiments. (author)

  6. Coordinate-sensitive charged particle detector for spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorenko V. P.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors have designed, manufactured and tested a coordinate-sensitive detector for charged particle spectroscopy. The detector can be used in the devices for the elemental analysis of materials, providing simultaneous analysis of all the elemental composition with high sensitivity and precision. The designed device is based on an integrated circuit (IC and a microchannel plate (MCP electron multiplier. The IC is mounted on a ceramic substrate. Ions fall on the MCP mounted above the IC. Giving rise to a pulse which typically exceeds 106 electrons, each ion falls on the detector electrodes and these pulses are counted. In this research, a two stage stack of MCPs (Hamamatsu was used. The MCPs have a channel diameter of 12 μm on a 15 μm pitch. The results of tests carried out in a mass spectrometer are presented. The designed detector is small, light, and low-power.

  7. Sheath-lens probe for negative ion detection in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamate, E.; Sugai, H.; Takai, O.; Ohe, K.

    2004-01-01

    A method that allows easy and inexpensive detection of negative ions is introduced. The method is based upon the electrostatic lens effect of the sheath layer evolving to a positively biased planar probe that focuses the negative charges to distinct regions on the surface. Trajectories of negative ions inside the sheath are obtained after computing the potential and electric field distribution by solving in three dimensions the nonlinear Poisson equation. The negative ions' flux to square and disk probes is developed in Ar/SF 6 and O 2 plasmas. The method allows negative ion detection with sensitivity higher than that of Langmuir probes

  8. Laser-cooling effects in few-ion clouds of Yb[sup +

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, C.S. (National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)); Gill, P. (National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)); Klein, H.A. (National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)); Levick, A.P. (National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)); Rowley, W.R.C. (National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    We report some laser-cooling effects in a few [sup 172]Yb[sup +] ions held in a Paul trap. Pronounced cloud-to-crystal phase transitions have been observed as discontinuities in the Yb[sup +] fluorescence spectrum of the 369 nm cooling transition. The first reported two-dimensional images of Yb[sup +] clouds with evidence of crystal structure have been recorded using a photon-counting position-sensitive detector. An ion temperature of 100 mK has been estimated from the size of a single ion image. Stepwise cooling of a re-heated, few-ion Yb[sup +] cloud was also observed. (orig.)

  9. Novel wave/ion beam interaction approach to isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Lowder, R.S.; Schwager, L.A.; Barr, W.L.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-02-01

    Numerical simulations and experimental studies have been made related to the possibility of employing an externally imposed electrostatic potential wave to separate isotopes. This wave/ion interaction is a sensitive function of the wave/ion difference velocity and for the appropriate wave amplitude and wave speed, a lighter faster isotope will be reflected by the wave to a higher energy while leaving heavier, slower isotopes virtually undisturbed in energy -- allowing subsequent ion separation by simple energy discrimination. In these experiments, a set of some 200 individual, electrodes, which surrounded a microamp beam of neon ions, was used to generate the wave. Measurements of the wave amplitudes needed for ion reflection and measurements of the final energies of those reflected ions are consistent with values expected from simple kinetic arguments and with the more detailed results of numeric simulations

  10. Counting individual ions in the air by tagging them with particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, B.

    2017-07-01

    The quantification of ultra-low concentrations of molecules and ions in gases is of fundamental and practical importance for science and technology, for example, the detection of explosives in airports or biomarkers in medical diagnostics. Often the Faraday cup is employed to transfer ion concentrations in an electric current that is then amplified and measured. One of the main challenges is to increase the sensitivity of detection. A novel concept has been developed that enables detection of individual ions in gases by tagging them with neutral nano-objects. The concentration of ionized molecules was measured and a detection limit of 5 cm-3 was observed. It is anticipated that this concept opens doors for advances in detection sensitivity for many applications including security, medical diagnostic, trace chemical analysis.

  11. Emission sensitization processes involving Nd{sup 3+} in YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupei, V., E-mail: lupei_voicu@yahoo.com [National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Lupei, A.; Gheorghe, C. [National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Ikesue, A. [World Lab. Co., Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    The paper investigates the characteristics of sensitization processes of Nd{sup 3+} emission in YAG ceramics under broad band pumping by co-doping with Cr{sup 3+} and the prospect of using Nd{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} for sensitization of emission of Yb{sup 3+}. It is evidenced that the energy transfer from Cr{sup 3+} to Nd{sup 3+} involves both direct and weak migration-assisted processes and is thus dependent on the concentrations of both species. It is also found that the ion–ion interaction responsible for the direct transfer contains besides the dipole–dipole coupling strong superexchange contribution that dominates the transfer to the Nd{sup 3+} ions up to the third coordination sphere and has major implication in sensitization. Investigation of (Cr, Nd, Yb)-doped YAG ceramics shows that Cr{sup 3+} can sensitize the emission of Yb{sup 3+} both via the chain Cr–Nd–Yb or by direct Cr–Yb energy transfer. The prospect of utilization of these processes in the solar-pumped laser is discussed. - Highlights: • The efficiency of sensitization increases at high Cr and Nd doping concentrations. • The Cr-to-Nd energy transfer involves both direct and migration-assisted processes. • The direct transfer implies both dipole–dipole and superexchange interactions. • The superexchange interaction has major influence on sensitization. • Sensitized emission of Yb{sup 3+} in (Cr,Nd,Yb):YAG by Cr–Nd–Yb and Cr–Yb transfers.

  12. Defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geonyeop; Yang, Gwangseok; Cho, Ara; Han, Jeong Woo; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-05-25

    We report defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (e.g., 33% improvement in NO2 sensing and 614% improvement in NH3 sensing). A conventional reactive ion etching system was used to introduce the defects in a controlled manner. The sensitivity of graphene-based chemical sensors increased with increasing defect density until the vacancy-dominant region was reached. In addition, the mechanism of gas sensing was systematically investigated via experiments and density functional theory calculations, which indicated that the vacancy defect is a major contributing factor to the enhanced sensitivity. This study revealed that defect engineering in graphene has significant potential for fabricating ultra-sensitive graphene chemical sensors.

  13. Fluorescent sensing and determination of mercury (II) ions in water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we report on a fluorescent sensing probe based on a naphthyl azo dye modified dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6) for the detection and determination of mercury (II) ions in water. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity towards the mercury (II) ion among various alkali, alkaline earth, and transition ...

  14. Ryanodine receptors contribute to the induction of nociceptive input-evoked long-term potentiation in the rat spinal cord slice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhi-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous study demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO contributes to long-term potentiation (LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials by tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in the spinal cord in vivo. Ryanodine receptor (RyR is a downstream target for NO. The present study further explored the role of RyR in synaptic plasticity of the spinal pain pathway. Results By means of field potential recordings in the adult male rat in vivo, we showed that RyR antagonist reduced LTP of C-fiber-evoked responses in the spinal dorsal horn by tetanic stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Using spinal cord slice preparations and field potential recordings from superficial dorsal horn, high frequency stimulation of Lissauer's tract (LT stably induced LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs. Perfusion of RyR antagonists blocked the induction of LT stimulation-evoked spinal LTP, while Ins(1,4,5P3 receptor (IP3R antagonist had no significant effect on LTP induction. Moreover, activation of RyRs by caffeine without high frequency stimulation induced a long-term potentiation in the presence of bicuculline methiodide and strychnine. Further, in patch-clamp recordings from superficial dorsal horn neurons, activation of RyRs resulted in a large increase in the frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs. Immunohistochemical study showed that RyRs were expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. Likewise, calcium imaging in small DRG neurons illustrated that activation of RyRs elevated [Ca2+]i in small DRG neurons. Conclusions These data indicate that activation of presynaptic RyRs play a crucial role in the induction of LTP in the spinal pain pathway, probably through enhancement of transmitter release.

  15. Bayesian analysis of ion beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, U. von; Fischer, R.; Dose, V.

    2001-01-01

    Ion beam diagnostics are routinely used for quantitative analysis of the surface composition of mixture materials up to a depth of a few μm. Unfortunately, advantageous properties of the diagnostics, like high depth resolution in combination with a large penetration depth, no destruction of the surface, high sensitivity for large as well as for small atomic numbers, and high sensitivity are mutually exclusive. Among other things, this is due to the ill-conditioned inverse problem of reconstructing depth distributions of the composition elements. Robust results for depth distributions are obtained with adaptive methods in the framework of Bayesian probability theory. The method of adaptive kernels allows for distributions which contain only the significant information of the data while noise fitting is avoided. This is achieved by adaptively reducing the degrees of freedom supporting the distribution. As applications for ion beam diagnostics Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and particle induced X-ray emission are shown

  16. The role of ion optics modeling in the design and development of ion mobility spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Matthew T.

    2005-05-01

    Detection of trace gases by ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS) has become common in recent years. In fact, IMS devices are the most commonly deployed military devices for the detection of classical chemical warfare agents (CWA). IMS devices are protecting the homeland by aiding first responders in the identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and providing explosive and narcotic screening systems. Spurred by the asymmetric threat posed by new threat agents and the ever expanding list of toxic chemicals, research in the development, improvement, and optimization of IMS systems has increased. Much of the research is focused on increasing the sensitivity and selectivity of IMS systems. Ion optics is a large area of study in the field of mass spectrometry, but has been mostly overlooked in the design and development of IMS systems. Ion optics provides insight into particle trajectories, duty cycle, and efficiency of these systems. This paper will outline the role that ion optics can have in the development of IMS systems and introduce the trade space for traditional IMS as well as differential mobility spectroscopy.

  17. Realistic modelling of jets in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Clint; Schenke, Björn; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of jets in heavy-ion collisions provides insight into the dynamics of hard partons in media. Unlike the spectrum of single hadrons, the spectrum of jets is highly sensitive to q -hat ⊥ , as well as being sensitive to partonic energy loss and radiative processes. We use martini, an event generator, to study how finite-temperature processes at leading order affect dijets

  18. Long-term changes in the sensitivity of quadrupole mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, W.R.; McCarthy, P.J.; Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.; Simpkins, J.E.

    1986-02-01

    We routinely use quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS) to monitor vacuum conditions, gas purity, and plasma-wall interactions in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton. Two QMS systems have been operating on TFTR continuously for a two-year period. Both QMS systems are absolutely calibrated at weekly intervals using a six-part standard gas mixture. The calibration procedure is based on the use of transfer standards (ion gauge and capacitance manometer) that are calibrated against a primary standard (spinning rotor gauge) on an external vacuum system. We have identified variations in the efficiency of the QMS ionizer and drifts in the sensitivity of the electron multiplier ion detector to be the major reasons for the observed changes in overall OMS sensitivity. Weekly variations in sensitivity greater than 100% have been observed following system bakeout at 150 0 C and with the use of rhenium filaments which were initially in the QMS ionizer. Operation of the QMS systems with tungsten filaments and at constant temperature has yielded more stable operation with weekly sensitivity changes generally being less than 10%. 7 refs., 7 figs

  19. Performance comparison of four lithium–ion battery technologies under calendar aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddahech, Akram; Briat, Olivier; Vinassa, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    This work depicts the calendar aging results of four Li-ion battery technologies. The differences in the chemistry of Li-ion batteries was studied and revealed that cathodes containing manganese are more sensitive to state-of-charge and temperature increase than lithium–iron-phosphate or lithium–nickel–cobalt–aluminum batteries. The first step in presenting the differences in technology of the Li-ion battery is through the study of the battery voltage evolution versus the amount of charge at various states of health. This study revealed a significant increase in resistance on lithium–nickel–manganese–cobalt and lithium–manganese-oxide cells; a result which was confirmed through impedance spectroscopy measurements. Finally, a study of the comparison of the different types of Li-ion batteries was undertaken, based on the analysis of the evolution of energy efficiency with respect to aging. - Highlights: • Calendar aging results of four Li-ion battery technologies are presented. • High temperature and/or the increased state-of-charge accelerated battery aging. • We analyzed the evolution of energy efficiency with respect to aging. • Cathodes with manganese are more sensitive to SOC and temperature increase

  20. Design of the compact permanent-magnet ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Ahn, J. K.; Lee, H. S.; Won, M. S.; Lee, B. S.; Bae, J. S.; Bang, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) for multiply charged ion beams keep regularly improving and expanding since the pioneer time of R. Geller and his coworkers about twenty years age. It has been widely utilized in a variety of research areas ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to material sciences. Because of the unique capability of producing highly charged ion beams, the ECR ion source has become increasingly popular in heavy-ion accelerators where the principle of acceleration sensitively depends on the charge-to-mass ratio (q=M) of the injected positive ion beam. The potential usages of beam based research development is still developing and there are plenty of rooms to be part of it. On the basis of ECR ion source technology, we will explore possible applications in the field of plasma technology, radiation technology, plastic deformation, adding more and new functionality by implantation, MEMS applications, developing new generation mass analysis system, fast neutron radiography system, etc

  1. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and nitric oxide synthase 1-dependent modulation of ryanodine receptors during β-adrenergic stimulation is restricted to the dyadic cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dries, Eef; Santiago, Demetrio J; Johnson, Daniel M; Gilbert, Guillaume; Holemans, Patricia; Korte, Sanne M; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Sipido, Karin R

    2016-10-15

    The dyadic cleft, where coupled ryanodine receptors (RyRs) reside, is thought to serve as a microdomain for local signalling, as supported by distinct modulation of coupled RyRs dependent on Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) activation during high-frequency stimulation. Sympathetic stimulation through β-adrenergic receptors activates an integrated signalling cascade, enhancing Ca 2+ cycling and is at least partially mediated through CaMKII. Here we report that CaMKII activation during β-adrenergic signalling is restricted to the dyadic cleft, where it enhances activity of coupled RyRs thereby contributing to the increase in diastolic events. Nitric oxide synthase 1 equally participates in the local modulation of coupled RyRs. In contrast, the increase in the Ca 2+ content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and related increase in the amplitude of the Ca 2+ transient are primarily protein kinase A-dependent. The present data extend the concept of microdomain signalling in the dyadic cleft and give perspectives for selective modulation of RyR subpopulations and diastolic events. In cardiac myocytes, β-adrenergic stimulation enhances Ca 2+ cycling through an integrated signalling cascade modulating L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCCs), phospholamban and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are proposed as prime mediators for increasing RyR open probability. We investigate whether this pathway is confined to the high Ca 2+ microdomain of the dyadic cleft and thus to coupled RyRs. Pig ventricular myocytes are studied under whole-cell voltage-clamp and confocal line-scan imaging with Fluo-4 as a [Ca 2+ ] i indicator. Following conditioning depolarizing pulses, spontaneous RyR activity is recorded as Ca 2+ sparks, which are assigned to coupled and non-coupled RyR clusters. Isoproterenol (ISO) (10 nm) increases Ca 2+ spark frequency in both populations of RyRs. However, CaMKII inhibition reduces

  2. Detection of heavy metal ions in contaminated water by surface plasmon resonance based optical fibre sensor using conducting polymer and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D

    2015-01-01

    Optical fibre surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions in the drinking water is designed. Silver (Ag) metal and indium tin oxide (ITO) are used for the fabrication of the SPR probe which is further modified with the coating of pyrrole and chitosan composite. The sensor works on the wavelength interrogation technique and is capable of detecting trace amounts of Cd(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+) heavy metal ions in contaminated water. Four types of sensing probes are fabricated and characterised for heavy metal ions out of these pyrrole/chitosan/ITO/Ag coated probe is found to be highly sensitive among all other probes. Further, the cadmium ions bind strongly to the sensing surface than other ions and due to this the sensor is highly sensitive for Cd(2+) ions. The sensor's performance is best for the low concentrations of heavy metal ions and its sensitivity decreases with the increasing concentration of heavy metal ions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the Decelerating Field of an Electron Multiplier under Negative Ion Impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Kjeldgaard, K.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of the decelerating field of an electron multiplier towards negative ions was investigated under standard mass spectrometric conditions. Diminishing of this decelerating field by changing of the potential of the electron multiplier increased the overall sensitivity to negative ions...

  4. Ion-ion collisions and ion storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowat, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Improved understanding of fundamental ion-ion interactions is expected to emerge from research carried out with ion storage rings. In this short survey the significant advantages and unique features that make stored ions useful targets for collision experiments are reviewed and discussed. It is pointed out that improvements to existing ion-ion experiments, as well as qualitatively new experiments, should occur over the next few years as ion storage rings become available for atomic physics. Some new experiments are suggested which are difficult if not impossible with present-day technology, but which seem feasible at storage rings facilities. (orig.)

  5. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for heavy ion physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhof, P.; Kraft-Bermuth, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2005-05-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors have the potential to become powerful tools for applications in many fields of heavy ion physics. A brief overview of heavy ion physics at present and at the next generation heavy ion facilities is given with a special emphasis on the conditions for heavy ion detection and the potential advantage of cryogenic detectors for applications in heavy ion physics. Two types of calorimetric low temperature detectors for the detection of energetic heavy ions have been developed and their response to the impact of heavy ions was investigated systematically for a wide range of energies (E=0.1-360 MeV/amu) and ion species ({sup 4}He.. {sup 238}U). Excellent results with respect to energy resolution, {delta}E/E ranging from 1 to 5 x 10{sup -3} even for the heaviest ions, and other basic detector properties such as energy linearity with no indication of a pulse height defect, energy threshold, detection efficiency and radiation hardness have been obtained, representing a considerable improvement as compared to conventional heavy ion detectors based on ionization. With the achieved performance, calorimetric low temperature detectors bear a large potential for applications in various fields of basic and applied heavy ion research. A brief overview of a few prominent examples, such as high resolution nuclear spectroscopy, high resolution nuclear mass determination, which may be favourably used for identification of superheavy elements or in direct reaction experiments with radioactive beams, as well as background discrimination in accelerator mass spectrometry, is given, and first results are presented. For instance, the use of cryogenic detectors allowed to improve the sensitivity in trace analysis of {sup 236}U by one order of magnitude and to determine the up to date smallest isotope ratio of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U = 6.1 x 10{sup -12} in a sample of natural uranium. Besides the detection of heavy ions, the concept of cryogenic detectors also

  6. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhof, P.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mainz Univ.

    2005-07-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors have the potential to become powerful tools for applications in many fields of heavy ion physics. A brief overview of heavy ion physics at present and at the next generation heavy ion facilities is given with a special emphasis on the conditions for heavy ion detection and the potential advantage of cryogenic detectors for applications in heavy ion physics. Two types of calorimetric low temperature detectors for the detection of energetic heavy ions have been developed and their response to the impact of heavy ions was investigated systematically for a wide range of energies (E=0.1-360 MeV/amu) and ion species ( 4 He.. 238 U). Excellent results with respect to energy resolution, ΔE/E ranging from 1 to 5 x 10 -3 even for the heaviest ions, and other basic detector properties such as energy linearity with no indication of a pulse height defect, energy threshold, detection efficiency and radiation hardness have been obtained, representing a considerable improvement as compared to conventional heavy ion detectors based on ionization. With the achieved performance, calorimetric low temperature detectors bear a large potential for applications in various fields of basic and applied heavy ion research. A brief overview of a few prominent examples, such as high resolution nuclear spectroscopy, high resolution nuclear mass determination, which may be favourably used for identification of superheavy elements or in direct reaction experiments with radioactive beams, as well as background discrimination in accelerator mass spectrometry, is given, and first results are presented. For instance, the use of cryogenic detectors allowed to improve the sensitivity in trace analysis of 236 U by one order of magnitude and to determine the up to date smallest isotope ratio of 236 U/ 238 U = 6.1 x 10 -12 in a sample of natural uranium. Besides the detection of heavy ions, the concept of cryogenic detectors also provides considerable advantage for X

  7. Studying heavy-ion collisions with FAUST-QTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cammarata P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy-ion collisions at lower energies provide a rich environment for investigating reaction dynamics. Recent theory has suggested a sensitivity to the symmetry energy and the equation of state via deformations of the reaction system and ternary breaking of the deformed reaction partners into three heavy fragments. A new detection system has been commissioned at Texas A&M University in an attempt to investigate some of the observables sensitive to the nuclear equation of state.

  8. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on sucrose radical production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Sato, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    We investigated sucrose radicals produced by heavy-ion irradiation with various LETs (linear energy transfer) and the possibility for a sucrose ESR (electron spin resonance) dosimeter. The obtained spectral pattern was the same as that for helium (He) ions, carbon (C) ions, neon (Ne) ions, argon (Ar) ions, and iron (Fe) ions. Identical spectra were measured after one year, but the initial intensities decreased by a few percent when the samples were kept in ESR tubes with the caps at ambient temperature. The total spin concentration obtained by heavy-ion irradiation had a linear relation with the absorbed dose, and correlated logarithmically with the LET. Qualitative ESR analyses showed that the production of sucrose radicals depended on both the particle identity and the LET at the same dose. The production of spin concentration by He ions was the most sensitive to LET. Empirical relations between the LET and the spin yield for various particles imply that the LET at a certain dose can be estimated by the spin concentration. (authors)

  9. Selective layer-free blood serum ionogram based on ion-specific interactions with a nanotransistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumarasamy, R.; Hartkamp, R.; Siboulet, B.; Dufrêche, J.-F.; Nishiguchi, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Clément, N.

    2018-05-01

    Despite being ubiquitous in the fields of chemistry and biology, the ion-specific effects of electrolytes pose major challenges for researchers. A lack of understanding about ion-specific surface interactions has hampered the development and application of materials for (bio-)chemical sensor applications. Here, we show that scaling a silicon nanotransistor sensor down to 25 nm provides a unique opportunity to understand and exploit ion-specific surface interactions, yielding a surface that is highly sensitive to cations and inert to pH. The unprecedented sensitivity of these devices to Na+ and divalent ions can be attributed to an overscreening effect via molecular dynamics. The surface potential of multi-ion solutions is well described by the sum of the electrochemical potentials of each cation, enabling selective measurements of a target ion concentration without requiring a selective organic layer. We use these features to construct a blood serum ionogram for Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, in an important step towards the development of a versatile, durable and mobile chemical or blood diagnostic tool.

  10. Evaluation of hand-held ion-mobility explosives vapor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.A.; Thoma, P.J.

    1979-12-01

    Two types of ion-mobility detectors were evaluated in both laboratory and field tests. Laboratory test results show that these detectors are highly sensitive to dynamite and pistol powder and have good false-alarm agent rejection. Field tests of these two detectors revealed that they would detect dynamite and Ball-C-Propellent in free air. However, neither of the ion-mobility detectors would detect these explosives if the explosives were concealed

  11. Defects formed during ion beam modification of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Dooley, S.P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Raman spectroscopy was found to be sensitive to the presence of these specific defects and also to the overall level of damage produced in the sample when diamond was implanted with doses in the range of 10{sup 16}-10{sup l8} ions/cm{sup 2} H or He with energies greater than 1 MeV. The main series of experiments discussed herein used 1x10{sup 16} -3x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} of 3.5 MeV He{sup +}. Use of a geometry in which ions were implanted into the edge of a diamond slab allowed the damage to be measured as a function of distance along the ion track by both Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) and Raman spectroscopy. 1 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Defects formed during ion beam modification of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K W; Prawer, S; Dooley, S P; Jamieson, D N [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Raman spectroscopy was found to be sensitive to the presence of these specific defects and also to the overall level of damage produced in the sample when diamond was implanted with doses in the range of 10{sup 16}-10{sup l8} ions/cm{sup 2} H or He with energies greater than 1 MeV. The main series of experiments discussed herein used 1x10{sup 16} -3x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} of 3.5 MeV He{sup +}. Use of a geometry in which ions were implanted into the edge of a diamond slab allowed the damage to be measured as a function of distance along the ion track by both Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) and Raman spectroscopy. 1 refs., 1 fig.

  13. A phase-imaging ion-cyclotron-resonance technique for mass measurements of short-lived nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, Sergey; Blaum, Klaus; Doerr, Andreas; Eronen, Tommi; Goncharov, Mikhail; Hoecker, Martin; Ketter, Jochen; Ramirez, Enrique Minaya; Simon, Vanessa [Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Block, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany); Chenmarev, Stanislav; Filjanin, Pavel; Nesterenko, Dmitriy; Novikov, Yuri [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Droese, Christian; Schweikhard, Lutz [Institute for Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A novel approach to mass measurements on the sub-ppb level even for short-lived nuclides with half-lives well below one second is presented. It is based on the projection of the radial ion motion in a Penning trap onto a position sensitive detector. Compared to the presently employed time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance technique, the novel approach is 25-times faster and provides a 40-fold gain in resolving power. With the new technique low-lying isomeric states with excitation energy on the 10-keV level can be separated from the ground state. Moreover, the new technique possesses a substantially higher sensitivity since just two ions are sufficient to determine the ion cyclotron frequency. A measurement of the mass difference of singly charged ions of {sup 132}Xe and {sup 131}Xe with an uncertainty of 25 eV has demonstrated the great potential of the new approach.

  14. Isotopic rubidium ion efflux assay for the functional characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on clonal cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukas, R.J.; Cullen, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    An isotopic rubidium ion efflux assay has been developed for the functional characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on cultured neurons. This assay first involves the intracellular sequestration of isotopic potassium ion analog by the ouabain-sensitive action of a sodium-potassium ATPase. Subsequently, the release of isotopic rubidium ion through nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-coupled monovalent cation channels is activated by application of nicotinic agonists. Specificity of receptor-mediated efflux is demonstrated by its sensitivity to blockade by nicotinic, but not muscarinic, antagonists. The time course of agonist-mediated efflux, within the temporal limitations of the assay, indicates a slow inactivation of receptor function on prolonged exposure to agonist. Dose-response profiles (i) have characteristic shapes for different nicotinic agonists, (ii) are described by three operationally defined parameters, and (iii) reflect different affinities of agonists for binding sites that control receptor activation and functional inhibition. The rubidium ion efflux assay provides fewer hazards but greater sensitivity and resolution than isotopic sodium or rubidium ion influx assays for functional nicotinic receptors

  15. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  16. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  17. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-01-01

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He + 2 . The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He + 2 , which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD + is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  18. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  19. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2003-01-01

    Proper function of ion channels is crucial for all living cells. Ion channel dysfunction may lead to a number of diseases, so-called channelopathies, and a number of common diseases, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and type II diabetes, are primarily treated by drugs that modulate ion channels....... A cornerstone in current drug discovery is high throughput screening assays which allow examination of the activity of specific ion channels though only to a limited extent. Conventional patch clamp remains the sole technique with sufficiently high time resolution and sensitivity required for precise and direct...... characterization of ion channel properties. However, patch clamp is a slow, labor-intensive, and thus expensive, technique. New techniques combining the reliability and high information content of patch clamping with the virtues of high throughput philosophy are emerging and predicted to make a number of ion...

  20. Mass and energy deposition effects of implanted ions on solid sodium formate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiangqin E-mail: clshao@mail.ipp.ac.cn; Shao Chunlin; Yao Jianming; Yu Zengliang

    2000-07-01

    Solid sodium formate was implanted by low energy N{sup +}, H{sup +}, and Ar{sup +} ions. Measured with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR), it was observed that new -CH{sub 2}-, -CH{sub 3}- groups and COO{sup -} radical ion were produced in the implanted sodium formate. Analyzing with the highly sensitive ninhydrin reaction, it was found that a new -NH{sub 2} functional group was formed upon N{sup +} ion implantation, and its yield increased along with implantation dose but decreased with the ion's energy.

  1. On velocity space interrogation regions of fast-ion collective Thomson scattering at ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    the collective scattering in well-defined regions in velocity space, here dubbed interrogation regions. Since the CTS instrument measures entire spectra of scattered radiation, many different interrogation regions are probed simultaneously. We here give analytic expressions for weight functions describing...... the interrogation regions, and we show typical interrogation regions of the proposed ITER CTS system. The backscattering system with receivers on the low-field side is sensitive to fast ions with pitch |p| = |v/v| ... scattering system with receivers on the high-field side would be sensitive to co- and counter-passing fast ions in narrow interrogation regions with pitch |p| > 0.6–0.8. Additionally, we use weight functions to reconstruct 2D fast-ion distribution functions, given two projected 1D velocity distribution...

  2. Multianalyte biosensor based on pH-sensitive ZnO electrolyte–insulator–semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haur Kao, Chyuan; Chun Liu, Che; Ueng, Herng-Yih; Chen, Hsiang; Cheng Chu, Yu; Jie Chen, Yu; Ling Lee, Ming; Ming Chang, Kow

    2014-01-01

    Multianalyte electrolyte–insulator–semiconductor (EIS) sensors with a ZnO sensing membrane annealed on silicon substrate for use in pH sensing were fabricated. Material analyses were conducted using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy to identify optimal treatment conditions. Sensing performance for various ions of Na + , K + , urea, and glucose was also tested. Results indicate that an EIS sensor with a ZnO membrane annealed at 600 °C exhibited good performance with high sensitivity and a low drift rate compared with all other reported ZnO-based pH sensors. Furthermore, based on well-established pH sensing properties, pH-ion-sensitive field-effect transistor sensors have also been developed for use in detecting urea and glucose ions. ZnO-based EIS sensors show promise for future industrial biosensing applications

  3. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  4. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation

  5. Digital pulse processor for ion beam microprobe imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogovac, M.; Jaksic, M.; Wegrzynek, D.; Markowicz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Capabilities of spectroscopic ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques that are available in ion microprobe facilities can be greatly improved by the use of digital pulse processing. We report here development of a digital multi parameter data acquisition system suitable for IBA imaging applications. Input signals from charge sensitive preamplifier are conditioned by using a simple circuit and digitized with fast ADCs. The digitally converted signals are processed in real time using FPGA. Implementation of several components of the system is presented.

  6. The analgesic effect of trans-resveratrol is regulated by calcium channels in the hippocampus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijie; Yu, Yingcong; Li, Jing; Wang, Lin; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Chong; Zhen, Linlin; Ding, Lianshu; Wang, Gang; Sun, Xiaoyang; Xu, Ying

    2017-08-01

    Resveratrol has been widely studied in terms of it's potential to slow the progression of many diseases. But little is known about the mechanism of action in neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is the main type of chronic pain associated with tissue injury. Calcium channels and calcium/caffeine-sensitive pools are associated with analgesic pathway involving neuropathic pain. Our previous study suggested that the antinociceptive effect of resveratrol was involved in Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent signaling in the spinal cord of mice. The aim of this study was to explore the involvement of Ca 2+ in analgesic effects of trans-resveratrol in neuropathic pain and signal pathway in hippocampus. Hot plate test was used to assess antinociceptive response when mice were treated with trans-resveratrol alone or in combination with Mk 801, nimodipine, CaCl 2 , ryanodine or EGTA. The effects of trans-resveratrol and the combination on Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) expression in hippocampus were also investigated. The results showed that trans-resveratrol increased paw withdraw latency in the hot plate test. The effect of resveratrol was enhanced by Mk 801 and nimodipine. Central administration of Ca 2+ , however, abolished the antinociceptive effects of resveratrol. In contrast, centrally administered EGTA or ryanodine improved trans-resveratrol induced antinociception. There was a significant increase in p-CaMKII and BDNF expression in the hippocampus when resveratrol were combined with Mk 801, nimodipine, ryanodine and EGTA. Administration of CaCl 2 blocked changes in p-CaMKII and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that trans-resveratrol exerts the effects of antinociception through regulation of calcium channels and calcium/caffeine-sensitive pools.

  7. Hydrostatic Pressure–Induced Release of Stored Calcium in Cultured Rat Optic Nerve Head Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Elevated intraocular pressure is associated with glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Other investigators have shown functional changes in optic nerve head astrocytes subjected to elevated hydrostatic pressure (HP) for 1 to 5 days. Recently, the authors reported ERK1/2, p90RSK and NHE1 phosphorylation after 2 hours. Here they examine calcium responses at the onset of HP to determine what precedes ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Methods. Cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured in cultured rat optic nerve astrocytes loaded with fura-2. The cells were placed in a closed imaging chamber and subjected to an HP increase of 15 mm Hg. Protein phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analysis. Results. The increase of HP caused an immediate slow increase in [Ca2+]i. The response persisted in calcium-free solution and when nickel chloride (4 mM) was added to suppress channel-mediated calcium entry. Previous depletion of the ER calcium stores by cyclopiazonic acid abolished the HP-induced calcium level increase. The HP-induced increase persisted in cells exposed to xestospongin C, an inhibitor of IP3R-mediated calcium release. In contrast, ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist ruthenium red (10 μM) or dantrolene (25 μM) inhibited the HP-induced calcium increase. The HP-induced calcium increase was abolished when ryanodine-sensitive calcium stores were pre-depleted with caffeine (3 mM). HP caused ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The magnitude of the ERK1/2 phosphorylation response was reduced by ruthenium red and dantrolene. Conclusions. Increasing HP causes calcium release from a ryanodine-sensitive cytoplasmic store and subsequent ERK1/2 activation. Calcium store release appears to be a required early step in the initial astrocyte response to an HP increase. PMID:20071675

  8. A new approach to nuclear microscopy: The ion-electron emission microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Walsh, D.S.; Senftinger, B.; Mellon, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new multidimensional high lateral resolution ion beam analysis technique, Ion-Electron Emission Microscopy or IEEM is described. Using MeV energy ions, IEEM is shown to be capable of Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) measurements in semiconductors. IEEM should also be capable of microscopically and multidimensionally mapping the surface and bulk composition of solids. As such, IIEM has nearly identical capabilities as traditional nuclear microprobe analysis, with the advantage that the ion beam does not have to be focused. The technique is based on determining the position where an individual ion enters the surface of the sample by projection secondary electron emission microscopy. The x-y origination point of a secondary electron, and hence the impact coordinates of the corresponding incident ion, is recorded with a position sensitive detector connected to a standard photoemission electron microscope (PEEM). These signals are then used to establish coincidence with IBICC, atomic, or nuclear reaction induced ion beam analysis signals simultaneously caused by the incident ion

  9. Highly selective and sensitive determination of copper ion by two novel optical sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrorang Ghaedi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available New optical sensors for the determination of copper ion by incorporation of 1,1′-(4-nitro-1,2-phenylenebis(azan-1-yl-1-ylidenebis(methan-1-yl-1-lidenedinaphthalen-2-ol(L1, 1,1′-2,2′-(1,2-phenylenebis(ethene-2,1-diyldinaphthalen-2-ol 1(L2, dibutylphthalate (DBP and sodium tetraphenylborate (Na-TPB to the plasticized polyvinyl chloride matrices were prepared. The tendency of both ionophores (L2 and L1 as chromoionophore was significantly enhanced by the addition of DBP to the membrane. The proposed sensors benefit from advantages such as high stability, reproducibility and relatively long lifetime, good selectivity for Cu2+ ion determination over a large number of alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions. At optimum values of membrane compositions and experimental conditions, both sensors’ response was linear over a concentration range of 7.98 × 10−6 to 1.31 × 10−4mol L−1 and 1.99 × 10−6 to 5.12 × 10−5 mol L−1 for L2 and L1, respectively. Sensor detection limit based on the definition that the concentration of the sample leads to a signal equal to the blank signal plus three times of its standard deviation was found to be 3.99 × 10−7 and 5.88 × 10−7 mol L−1 for L2 and L1, respectively. The response time of the optodes (defined as the time required reaching the 90% of the peak signal was found to be 5–8 min for L2 and 20–25 min for L1 based sensor. The proposed optical sensors were applied successfully for the determination of Cu2+ ion content in water samples.

  10. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2003-01-01

    . A cornerstone in current drug discovery is high throughput screening assays which allow examination of the activity of specific ion channels though only to a limited extent. Conventional patch clamp remains the sole technique with sufficiently high time resolution and sensitivity required for precise and direct....... The introduction of new powerful HTS electrophysiological techniques is predicted to cause a revolution in ion channel drug discovery....

  11. Volume generation of negative ions in high density hydrogen discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.; Karo, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    A parametric survey is made of a high-density tandem two-chamber hydrogen negative ion system. The optimum extracted negative ion current densities are sensitive to the atom concentration in the discharge and to the system scale length. For scale lengths ranging from 10 cm to 0.1 cm optimum current densities range from of order 1 to 100 mA cm -2 , respectively

  12. Cold highly charged ions in a cryogenic Paul trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, O. O., E-mail: oscar.versolato@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Schwarz, M.; Windberger, A.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Schmidt, P. O. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Drewsen, M. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Narrow optical transitions in highly charged ions (HCIs) are of particular interest for metrology and fundamental physics, exploiting the high sensitivity of HCIs to new physics. The highest sensitivity for a changing fine structure constant ever predicted for a stable atomic system is found in Ir{sup 17 + }. However, laser spectroscopy of HCIs is hindered by the large ({approx} 10{sup 6} K) temperatures at which they are produced and trapped. An unprecedented improvement in such laser spectroscopy can be obtained when HCIs are cooled down to the mK range in a linear Paul trap. We have developed a cryogenic linear Paul trap in which HCIs will be sympathetically cooled by {sup 9}Be{sup + } ions. Optimized optical access for laser light is provided while maintaining excellent UHV conditions. The Paul trap will be connected to an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) which is able to produce a wide range of HCIs. This EBIT will also provide the first experimental input needed for the determination of the transition energies in Ir{sup 17 + }, enabling further laser-spectroscopic investigations of this promising HCI.

  13. U/Th dating by SHRIMP RG ion-microprobe mass spectrometry using single ion-exchange beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, J.L.; Wooden, J.; Murphy, F.; Williams, Ross W.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new analytical method for U-series isotopes using the SHRIMP RG (Sensitive High mass Resolution Ion MicroProbe) mass spectrometer that utilizes the preconcentration of the U-series isotopes from a sample onto a single ion-exchange bead. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is capable of producing Th ionization efficiencies in excess of 2%. Analytical precision is typically better than alpha spectroscopy, but not as good as thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Like TIMS and ICP-MS the method allows analysis of small samples sizes, but also adds the advantage of rapidity of analysis. A major advantage of ion-microprobe analysis is that U and Th isotopes are analyzed in the same bead, simplifying the process of chemical separation. Analytical time on the instrument is ???60 min per sample, and a single instrument-loading can accommodate 15-20 samples to be analyzed in a 24-h day. An additional advantage is that the method allows multiple reanalyses of the same bead and that samples can be archived for reanalysis at a later time. Because the ion beam excavates a pit only a few ??m deep, the mount can later be repolished and reanalyzed numerous times. The method described of preconcentrating a low concentration sample onto a small conductive substrate to allow ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is potentially applicable to many other systems. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Ion exchange resins as high-dose radiation dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alian, A.; Dessouki, A.; El-Assay, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports on the possibility of using various types of ion exchange resins as high-dose radiation dosimeters, by analysis of the decrease in exchange capacity with absorbed dose. The resins studied are Sojuzchim-export-Moscow Cation Exchanger KU-2 and Anion Exchanger AV-17 and Merck Cation Exchanger I, and Merck Anion Exchangers II and III. Over the dose range 1 to 100 kGy, the systems show linearity between log absorbed dose and decrease in resin ion exchange capacity. The slope of this response function differs for the different resins, depending on their ionic form and degree of cross-linking. The radiation sensitivity increases in the order KU-2; Exchanger I; AV-17; Exchanger II; Exchanger III. Merck resins with moisture content of 21% showed considerably higher radiation sensitivity than those with 2 to 3% moisture content. The mechanism of radiation-induced denaturing of the ion exchanger resins involves cleavage and decomposition of functional substituents, with crosslinking playing a stabilizing role, with water and its radiolytic products serving to inhibit radical recombination and interfering with the protection cage effect of crosslinking. (author)

  15. Salt sensitivity in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.): ions in reproductive tissues and yield components in contrasting genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotula, Lukasz; Khan, Hammad A; Quealy, John; Turner, Neil C; Vadez, Vincent; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Clode, Peta L; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-08-01

    The reproductive phase in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is affected by salinity, but little is known about the underlying cause. We investigated whether high concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the reproductive structures influence reproductive processes. Chickpea genotypes contrasting in tolerance were subjected to 0, 35 or 50 mm NaCl applied to soil in pots. Flower production and abortion, pod number, percentage of empty pods, seed number and size were evaluated. The concentrations of Na(+) , K(+) and Cl(-) were measured in various plant tissues and, using X-ray microanalysis, in specific cells of developing reproductive structures. Genotypic variation in reproductive success measured as seed yield in saline conditions was associated with better maintenance of flower production and higher numbers of filled pods (and thus seed number), whereas seed size decreased in all genotypes. Despite the variation in reproductive success, the accumulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the early reproductive tissues of developing pods did not differ between a tolerant (Genesis836) and a sensitive (Rupali) genotype. Similarly, salinity tolerance was not associated with the accumulation of salt ions in leaves at the time of reproduction or in seeds at maturity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Mutation induction in yeast by very heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J.

    1994-10-01

    Resistance to canavanine was studied in haploid yeast after exposure to heavy ions (argon to uranium) of energies between 1 and 10 MeV/u covering a LET-range up to about 10000 keV/μm. Mutations were found in all instances but the induction cross sections increased with ion energy. This is taken to mean that the contribution of penumbra electrons plays an important role. The probability to recover surviving mutants is highest if the cell is not directly hit by the particle. The experiments demonstrate that the geometrical dimensions of the target cell nucleus as well as its sensitivity in terms of survival have a critical influence on mutation induction with very heavy ions.

  17. Bifenthrin causes transcriptomic alterations in mTOR and ryanodine receptor-dependent signaling and delayed hyperactivity in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Daniel F; Miller, Galen W; Harvey, Danielle J; Brander, Susanne M; Geist, Juergen; Connon, Richard E; Lein, Pamela J

    2018-04-18

    Over the last few decades, the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin has been increasingly employed for pest control in urban and agricultural areas, putting humans and wildlife at increased risk of exposure. Exposures to nanomolar (nM) concentrations of bifenthrin have recently been reported to alter calcium oscillations in rodent neurons. Neuronal calcium oscillations are influenced by ryanodine receptor (RyR) activity, which modulates calcium-dependent signaling cascades, including the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. RyR activity and mTOR signaling play critical roles in regulating neurodevelopmental processes. However, whether environmentally relevant levels of bifenthrin alter RyR or mTOR signaling pathways to influence neurodevelopment has not been addressed. Therefore, our main objectives in this study were to examine the transcriptomic responses of genes involved in RyR and mTOR signaling pathways in zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to low (ng/L) concentrations of bifenthrin, and to assess the potential functional consequences by measuring locomotor responses to external stimuli. Wildtype zebrafish were exposed for 1, 3 and 5 days to 1, 10 and 50 ng/L bifenthrin, followed by a 14 d recovery period. Bifenthrin elicited significant concentration-dependent transcriptional responses in the majority of genes examined in both signaling cascades, and at all time points examined during the acute exposure period (1, 3, and 5 days post fertilization; dpf), and at the post recovery assessment time point (19 dpf). Changes in locomotor behavior were not evident during the acute exposure period, but were observed at 19 dpf, with main effects (increased locomotor behavior) detected in fish exposed developmentally to bifenthrin at 1 or 10 ng/L, but not 50 ng/L. These findings illustrate significant influences of developmental exposures to low (ng/L) concentrations of bifenthrin on neurodevelopmental processes in zebrafish. Copyright © 2018

  18. Ion exchange separation of nitrate from uranium compounds and its determination by spectrophotometry and ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Atalla, L.T.; Abrao, A.

    1985-11-01

    A procedure for the separation of nitrate from uranium compounds by retaintion of uranyl ion on a cationic ion exchanger and its determination in the effluent is described. Nitrate is analysed by the spectrometric method with 1-phenol-2,4-dissulphonic acid. This determination covers the 1 to 10 μg NO - 3 /mL range and requires an amount of 10 to 100 μg NO - 3 . The main interference is uranium (VI) due its own intense yellow color. This difficulty is overcome by the complete separation of UO 2 ++ with the cationic resin. Alternatively, the ion chromatography technique is used for the determination of nitrate in the effluent of the cationic resin. The determination was easily made by the comparison of the nitrate peak hights of the analyte and the standard solutions. The ion chromatography method is very sensitive (0,3 μg NO - 3 /mL), reproducible and suitable for routine analysis and permits the determination of fraction of part per million of nitrate in uranium. The results of nitrate determination using both spectrophotometric and ion chromatography techniques are compared. The method is being routinely applied for the quality control of uranium compounds in the fuel cycle, specially uranium oxide, ammonium diuranate, uranium peroxide and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. (Author) [pt

  19. An Electrochemical Sensor Based on Novel Ion Imprinted Polymeric Nanoparticles for Selective Detection of Lead Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Ghanei-Motlagh

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the novel surface ion-imprinted polymer (IIP particles were prepared and applied as a electrode modifier in stripping voltammetric detection of lead(II ion. A carbon paste electrode (CPE modified with IIP nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs was used for accumulation of toxic lead ions. Various factors that govern on electrochemical signals including carbon paste composition, pH of the preconcentration solution, supporting electrolyte, stirring time, reduction potential and time were studied in detail. The best electrochemical response for Pb(II ions was obtained with a paste composition of 7% (w/w of lead IIP, 10% MWCNTs, 53% (w/w of graphite powder and 30% (w/w of paraffin oil using a solution of 0.1 mol L-1 acetat buffer solution (pH=4.5 with a extraction time of 15 min. A sensitive response for Pb(II ions in the concentration range of 3 to 55 µg L-1 was achived. The proposed electrochemical sensor showed low detection limit (0.5 µg L-1, remarkable selectivity and good reproducibility (RSD = 3.1%. Determination of lead(II content in different environmental water samples was also realized adopting graphite furnace atomic absorptions spectrometry (GF-AAS and the obtained results were satisfactory.

  20. Selective Thallium (I Ion Sensor Based on Functionalised ZnO Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Ibupoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Well controlled in length and highly aligned ZnO nanorods were grown on the gold-coated glass substrate by hydrothermal growth method. ZnO nanorods were functionalised with selective thallium (I ion ionophore dibenzyldiaza-18-crown-6 (DBzDA18C6. The thallium ion sensor showed wide linear potentiometric response to thallium (I ion concentrations ( M to  M with high sensitivity of 36.87 ± 1.49 mV/decade. Moreover, thallium (I ion demonstrated fast response time of less than 5 s, high selectivity, reproducibility, storage stability, and negligible response to common interferents. The proposed thallium (I ion-sensor electrode was also used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration, and it has shown good stoichiometric response for the determination of thallium (I ion.

  1. Non-invasive screening for Alzheimer's disease by sensing salivary sugar using Drosophila cells expressing gustatory receptor (Gr5a immobilized on an extended gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (EG-ISFET biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chong Lau

    Full Text Available Body fluids are often used as specimens for medical diagnosis. With the advent of advanced analytical techniques in biotechnology, the diagnostic potential of saliva has been the focus of many studies. We recently reported the presence of excess salivary sugars, in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD. In the present study, we developed a highly sensitive, cell-based biosensor to detect trehalose levels in patient saliva. The developed biosensor relies on the overexpression of sugar sensitive gustatory receptors (Gr5a in Drosophila cells to detect the salivary trehalose. The cell-based biosensor was built on the foundation of an improved extended gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (EG-ISFET. Using an EG-ISFET, instead of a traditional ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET, resulted in an increase in the sensitivity and reliability of detection. The biosensor was designed with the gate terminals segregated from the conventional ISFET device. This design allows the construction of an independent reference and sensing region for simultaneous and accurate measurements of samples from controls and patients respectively. To investigate the efficacy of the cell-based biosensor for AD screening, we collected 20 saliva samples from each of the following groups: participants diagnosed with AD, participants diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD, and a control group composed of healthy individuals. We then studied the response generated from the interaction of the salivary trehalose of the saliva samples and the Gr5a in the immobilized cells on an EG-ISFET sensor. The cell-based biosensor significantly distinguished salivary sugar, trehalose of the AD group from the PD and control groups. Based on these findings, we propose that salivary trehalose, might be a potential biomarker for AD and could be detected using our cell-based EG-ISFET biosensor. The cell-based EG-ISFET biosensor provides a sensitive and direct approach for salivary sugar

  2. Non-invasive screening for Alzheimer's disease by sensing salivary sugar using Drosophila cells expressing gustatory receptor (Gr5a) immobilized on an extended gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (EG-ISFET) biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Hui-Chong; Lee, In-Kyu; Ko, Pan-Woo; Lee, Ho-Won; Huh, Jeung-Soo; Cho, Won-Ju; Lim, Jeong-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Body fluids are often used as specimens for medical diagnosis. With the advent of advanced analytical techniques in biotechnology, the diagnostic potential of saliva has been the focus of many studies. We recently reported the presence of excess salivary sugars, in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we developed a highly sensitive, cell-based biosensor to detect trehalose levels in patient saliva. The developed biosensor relies on the overexpression of sugar sensitive gustatory receptors (Gr5a) in Drosophila cells to detect the salivary trehalose. The cell-based biosensor was built on the foundation of an improved extended gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (EG-ISFET). Using an EG-ISFET, instead of a traditional ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET), resulted in an increase in the sensitivity and reliability of detection. The biosensor was designed with the gate terminals segregated from the conventional ISFET device. This design allows the construction of an independent reference and sensing region for simultaneous and accurate measurements of samples from controls and patients respectively. To investigate the efficacy of the cell-based biosensor for AD screening, we collected 20 saliva samples from each of the following groups: participants diagnosed with AD, participants diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD), and a control group composed of healthy individuals. We then studied the response generated from the interaction of the salivary trehalose of the saliva samples and the Gr5a in the immobilized cells on an EG-ISFET sensor. The cell-based biosensor significantly distinguished salivary sugar, trehalose of the AD group from the PD and control groups. Based on these findings, we propose that salivary trehalose, might be a potential biomarker for AD and could be detected using our cell-based EG-ISFET biosensor. The cell-based EG-ISFET biosensor provides a sensitive and direct approach for salivary sugar detection and

  3. The influence of electron inertia on the modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkes, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of electron inertia, ion streaming and weak relativistic effects on the modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma is investigated. The derivative expansion method is used to derive a nonlinear Schroedinger equation, from which an instability criterion is deduced. When electron inertia is ignored, ion streaming and weak relativistic effects have little effect on the instability criterion. It is shown that when electron inertia is taken into account, the instability criterion is sensitive to weakly relativistic ion streaming, but not to the ratio of electron mass to ion mass. (Author)

  4. Advanced characterization of materials using swift ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabacniks, Manfredo H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Swift ion beams are powerful non destructive tools for material analysis especially thin films. In spite of their high energy, usually several MeV/u, little energy is deposited by the ion on the sample. Energetic ions also use to stop far away (or outside) the inspected volume, hence producing negligible damage to the sample. Ion beam methods provide quantitative trace element analysis of any atomic element (and some isotopes) in a sample and are able to yield elemental depth profiles with spatial resolution of the order of 10mm. Relying on nuclear properties of the atoms, these methods are insensitive to the chemical environment of the element, consequently not limited by matrix effects. Ion beam methods are multielemental, can handle insulating materials, are quick (an analysis usually takes less than 15 minutes), and need little (if any) sample preparation. Ion beams are also sensitive to surface roughness and sample porosity and can be used to quickly inspect these properties in a sample. The Laboratory for Ion Beam Analysis of the University of Sao Paulo, LAMFI, is a multi-user facility dedicated to provide Ion Beam Methods like PIXE, RBS, FRS and NRA techniques for the analysis of materials and thin films. Operating since 1994, LAMFI is being used mostly by many researchers from within and outside USP, most of them non specialists in ion beam methods, but in need of ion beam analysis to carry out their research. At LAMFI, during the last 9 years, more than 50% of the accelerator time was dedicated to analysis, usually PIXE or RBS. 21% was down time and about 14% of the time was used for the development of ion beam methods which includes the use of RBS for roughness characterization exploring the shading of the beam by structures on the surface and by modeling the RBS spectrum as the product of a normalized RBS spectrum and a height density distribution function of the surface. Single element thick target PIXE analysis is being developed to obtain the thin

  5. Advanced characterization of materials using swift ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabacniks, Manfredo H.

    2011-01-01

    Swift ion beams are powerful non destructive tools for material analysis especially thin films. In spite of their high energy, usually several MeV/u, little energy is deposited by the ion on the sample. Energetic ions also use to stop far away (or outside) the inspected volume, hence producing negligible damage to the sample. Ion beam methods provide quantitative trace element analysis of any atomic element (and some isotopes) in a sample and are able to yield elemental depth profiles with spatial resolution of the order of 10mm. Relying on nuclear properties of the atoms, these methods are insensitive to the chemical environment of the element, consequently not limited by matrix effects. Ion beam methods are multielemental, can handle insulating materials, are quick (an analysis usually takes less than 15 minutes), and need little (if any) sample preparation. Ion beams are also sensitive to surface roughness and sample porosity and can be used to quickly inspect these properties in a sample. The Laboratory for Ion Beam Analysis of the University of Sao Paulo, LAMFI, is a multi-user facility dedicated to provide Ion Beam Methods like PIXE, RBS, FRS and NRA techniques for the analysis of materials and thin films. Operating since 1994, LAMFI is being used mostly by many researchers from within and outside USP, most of them non specialists in ion beam methods, but in need of ion beam analysis to carry out their research. At LAMFI, during the last 9 years, more than 50% of the accelerator time was dedicated to analysis, usually PIXE or RBS. 21% was down time and about 14% of the time was used for the development of ion beam methods which includes the use of RBS for roughness characterization exploring the shading of the beam by structures on the surface and by modeling the RBS spectrum as the product of a normalized RBS spectrum and a height density distribution function of the surface. Single element thick target PIXE analysis is being developed to obtain the thin

  6. Fast ion dynamics in ASDEX upgrade and TEXTOR measured by collective Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseev, D.

    2011-11-01

    Fast ions are an essential ingredient in burning nuclear fusion plasmas: they are responsible for heating the bulk plasma, carry a significant amount of plasma current and moreover interact with various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic is sensitive to the projection of fast ion velocity distribution function. This thesis is mainly devoted to investigations of fast ion physics in tokamak plasmas by means of CTS. (Author)

  7. Fast ion dynamics in ASDEX upgrade and TEXTOR measured by collective Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseev, D.

    2011-11-15

    Fast ions are an essential ingredient in burning nuclear fusion plasmas: they are responsible for heating the bulk plasma, carry a significant amount of plasma current and moreover interact with various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic is sensitive to the projection of fast ion velocity distribution function. This thesis is mainly devoted to investigations of fast ion physics in tokamak plasmas by means of CTS. (Author)

  8. Study of extraterrestrial material by means of a high sensitive mass spectrometer, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, O.; Kaneko, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Shimamura, T.

    1975-01-01

    In this report it is described about a high sensitive mass spectrometer for measurement of isotopic abundance of extraterrestrial material. Detecting isotopic anomalies in extraterrestrial matter induced by cosmic ray or solar wind irradiation, we can obtain many informations about interplanetary and/or intersteller space. For this purpose we reform the mass spectrometer of Low Energy Physics Division of INS to improve the sensitivity and the resolution. In section I--VI some improvements of the mass spectrometer (vacuum system, ion source, collector etc.) are described. In section VII--X newly developed ion counting system is discussed. (auth.)

  9. Beyond voltage-gated ion channels: Voltage-operated membrane proteins and cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianping; Chen, Xingjuan; Xue, Yucong; Gamper, Nikita; Zhang, Xuan

    2018-04-18

    Voltage-gated ion channels were believed to be the only voltage-sensitive proteins in excitable (and some non-excitable) cells for a long time. Emerging evidence indicates that the voltage-operated model is shared by some other transmembrane proteins expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about voltage-operated proteins, which are not classic voltage-gated ion channels as well as the voltage-dependent processes in cells for which single voltage-sensitive proteins have yet to be identified. Particularly, we will focus on the following. (1) Voltage-sensitive phosphoinositide phosphatases (VSP) with four transmembrane segments homologous to the voltage sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-gated ion channels; VSPs are the first family of proteins, other than the voltage-gated ion channels, for which there is sufficient evidence for the existence of the VSD domain; (2) Voltage-gated proton channels comprising of a single voltage-sensing domain and lacking an identified pore domain; (3) G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate the depolarization-evoked potentiation of Ca 2+ mobilization; (4) Plasma membrane (PM) depolarization-induced but Ca 2+ -independent exocytosis in neurons. (5) Voltage-dependent metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns[4,5]P 2 , PIP 2 ) in the PM. These recent discoveries expand our understanding of voltage-operated processes within cellular membranes. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Non-nitro radiation sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    This short communication aims to update the review of non-nitro radiation sensitizers (Shenoy and Singh 1985) and correct omissions. Work is mentioned and bibliography given for studied of cis-platinum, potassium permanganate, cobalt hexammine, sodium bromide, dimethylsulphoxide, zinc and copper ions, organic nitroxyl free radicals (TAN,TMPN and NPPN + PNAP), halogenated pyrimidines, organic and inorganic iodine containing compounds, diacetyl, acetone and acetophenone, rho-hydrobenzoic acid and its esters, pentobarbitone and secobarbitone, heparin and 9-anilinoacridines, dehydropiandosterone and paraquat. (U.K.)

  11. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  12. New Ion-Nucleation Mechanism Relevant for the Earth's Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.D.; Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    Experimental studies of ultra-fine aerosol nucleation in clean atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour suggest that the production rate of critical clusters is sensitive to ionisation. To assess this sensitivity numerical simulations of the initial...... stages of particle coagulation and condensation have been performed and compared with the experimental results. The simulations indicate that a stable distribution of sub 3nm particles exists that cannot be detected using standard techniques for measuring atmospheric aerosol, and that the nucleation rate...... of critical clusters generating this distribution is a function of the number of ions present. This provides a set of boundary conditions, which constrain the properties of a possible microphysical mechanism. The role of ions in the nucleation process of critical clusters provides a source for new aerosol...

  13. The JPL Hg(sup +) Extended Linear Ion Trap Frequency Standard: Status, Stability, and Accuracy Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave frequency standards based on room temperature (sup 199)Hg(sup +) ions in a Linear Ion Trap (LITS) presently achieve a Signal to Noise and line Q inferred short frequency stability. Long term stability has been measured for averaging intervals up to 5 months with apparent sensitivity to variations in ion number/temperature limiting the flicker floor.

  14. Automated Gain Control and Internal Calibration With External Ion Accumulation Capillary liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, Mikhail E.(VISITORS); Zhang, Rui (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Strittmatter, Eric F.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Prior, David C.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Tang, Keqi (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Smith, Richard D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-08-15

    When combined with capillary LC separations, Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (ESI-FTICR MS) has increasingly been applied for advanced characterization of proteolytic digests. Incorporation of external (to the ICR cell) ion accumulation multipoles with FTICR for ion pre selection and accumulation has enhanced the dynamic range, sensitivity and duty cycle of measurements. However, the highly variable ion production rate from an LC separation can result in overfilling of the external trap, resulting in m/z discrimination and fragmentation of peptide ions. An excessive space charge trapped in the ICR cell causes significant shifts in the detected ion cyclotron frequencies, reducing the achievable mass measurement accuracy (MMA) for protein identification. To eliminate m/z discrimination in the external ion trap, further increase the duty cycle and improve MMA, we developed a capability for data-dependent adjustment of ion accumulation times in the course of an LC separation, referred to as Automated Gain Control (AGC), in combination with low kinetic energy gated ion trapping and internal calibration using a dual-channel electrodynamic ion funnel. The system was initially evaluated in the analysis of a 0.5 mg/mL tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin. The implementation of LC/ESI/AGC/FTICR with internal calibration gave rise to a {approx} 10-fold increase in the number of identified tryptic peptides within mass measurement accuracy of 2 ppm as compared to that detected during the conventional LC/FTICR run with a fixed ion accumulation time and external calibration.

  15. Effect of Gold (Au) Doping on the Surface of CeO2 Materials Surface Gas Sensor to NH3, CO and HNO3 Detection Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayono; Tjipto Sujitno; Agus Santoso; Sunardi

    2002-01-01

    Research on the effect of various dose and energy of gold ions (1.2 x 10 16 ion/cm 2 , 40 keV; 4.4 x 10 16 ion/cm 2 , 60 keV and 4.6 x 10 16 ion/cm 2 , 80 keV) implanted into CeO 2 thin layer gas sensor has been carried out using ion accelerator. The effect such as their resistance and sensitivity for various temperature and gas sensor such as NH 3 , CO and HNO 3 has been done. It was found that the best resistance and sensitivity was achieved at ion dose 1.2 x 10 16 ion/cm 2 and 40 keV. At this conditions, the resistance was 2.22 MΩ and sensitivity was (70.3 ± 8.38)% for NH 3 ; (45 ± 6.78)% for CO and (30.3 ± 5.5)% for HNO 3 gas, at the sensor temperature of 325 o C and concentration of 4800 ppm. (author)

  16. Transport of electrons in the tunnel of an ion sensitive probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Adámek, Jiří; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gunn, J. P.; Pekárek, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2011), 015005-015005 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430901; GA MŠk 7G09042; GA MŠk LA08048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * plasma * katsumata probe * ExB drift * ion temperature * tunnel * electron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.425, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/1/015005/pdf/0741-3335_53_1_015005.pdf

  17. A novel voltammetric sensor for sensitive detection of mercury(II) ions using glassy carbon electrode modified with graphene-based ion imprinted polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud, E-mail: m.ghaneimotlagh@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kerman Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taher, Mohammad Ali; Heydari, Abolfazl [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanei-Motlagh, Reza [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gupta, Vinod K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a novel strategy was proposed to prepare ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) on the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Polymerization was performed using methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,2′–((9E,10E)–1,4–dihydroxyanthracene–9,10–diylidene) bis(hydrazine–1–carbothioamide) (DDBHCT) as the chelating agent and ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator, via surface imprinted technique. The RGO–IIP was characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE–SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrochemical procedure was based on the accumulation of Hg(II) ions at the surface of a modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with RGO–IIP. The prepared RGO–IIP sensor has higher voltammetric response compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), traditional IIP and RGO. The RGO–IIP modified electrode exhibited a linear relationship toward Hg(II) concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 80 μg L{sup −1}. The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.02 μg L{sup −1} (S/N = 3), below the guideline value from the World Health Organization (WHO). The applicability of the proposed electrochemical sensor to determination of mercury(II) ions in different water samples was reported. - Highlights: • The novel Hg(II)-imprinted polymer was synthesized and characterized. • The resulting RGO–IIP was applied for electrochemical monitoring of Hg(II) ions. • The proposed sensor was successfully applied for determination of Hg(II) in real water samples.

  18. Energy and pitch-angle dispersions of LLBL/cusp ions seen at middle altitudes: predictions by the open magnetosphere model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations are presented of the ion distribution functions seen by middle-altitude spacecraft in the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL and cusp regions when reconnection is, or has recently been, taking place at the equatorial magnetopause. From the evolution of the distribution function with time elapsed since the field line was opened, both the observed energy/observation-time and pitch-angle/energy dispersions are well reproduced. Distribution functions showing a mixture of magnetosheath and magnetospheric ions, often thought to be a signature of the LLBL, are found on newly opened field lines as a natural consequence of the magnetopause effects on the ions and their flight times. In addition, it is shown that the extent of the source region of the magnetosheath ions that are detected by a satellite is a function of the sensitivity of the ion instrument . If the instrument one-count level is high (and/or solar-wind densities are low, the cusp ion precipitation detected comes from a localised region of the mid-latitude magnetopause (around the magnetic cusp, even though the reconnection takes place at the equatorial magnetopause. However, if the instrument sensitivity is high enough, then ions injected from a large segment of the dayside magnetosphere (in the relevant hemisphere will be detected in the cusp. Ion precipitation classed as LLBL is shown to arise from the low-latitude magnetopause, irrespective of the instrument sensitivity. Adoption of threshold flux definitions has the same effect as instrument sensitivity in artificially restricting the apparent source regionKey words. Low-latitude boundary layer · Cusp regions · Open magnetosphere model · Mid-altitudes

  19. Colloquium: Quantum Networks with Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    observed be- tween two ions held in the same trap Eichmann et al., 1993; DeVoe and Brewer, 1996. Type-II links have the advantage of being less sensitive...Childress, E. Jiang, J. Togan, J. Maze, F. Jelezko, A. S. Zibrov, P. R. Hemmer, and M. D. Lukin, 2007, Science 316, 1312. Eichmann , U., J. C. Bergquist

  20. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical aptasensor for lead ion detection based on sensitization effect of CdTe QDs on MoS2-CdS:Mn nanocomposites by the formation of G-quadruplex structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jing-Chun; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Yan; Yang, Ping; He, Jie

    2018-06-01

    An ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) aptasensor for lead ion (Pb 2+ ) detection was fabricated based on MoS 2 -CdS:Mn nanocomposites and sensitization effect of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). MoS 2 -CdS:Mn modified electrode was used as the PEC matrix for the immobilization of probe DNA (pDNA) labeled with CdTe QDs. Target DNA (tDNA) were hybridized with pDNA to made the QDs locate away from the electrode surface by the rod-like double helix. The detection of Pb 2+ was based on the conformational change of the pDNA to G-quadruplex structure in the presence of Pb 2+ , which made the labeled QDs move close to the electrode surface, leading to the generation of sensitization effect and evident increase of the photocurrent intensity. The linear range was 50 fM to 100 nM with a detection limit of 16.7 fM. The recoveries of the determination of Pb 2+ in real samples were in the range of 102.5-108.0%. This proposed PEC aptasensor provides a new sensing strategy for various heavy metal ions at ultralow levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stress-tolerant mutants induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo; Bae, Chang-Hyu; Ozaki, Takuo

    2000-01-01

    Comparative study was made on mutagenesis in tobacco embryo induced by exposure to EMS (ethyl methane-sulfonate) ion beams during the fertilization cycle. Tobacco embryo cells immediately after pollination were exposed to heavy ion beam and the sensitivity to the irradiation was assessed in each developmental stage and compared with the effects of EMS, a chemical mutagen. Morphologically abnormality such as chlorophyll deficiency was used as a marker. A total of 17 salt-tolerant plants were selected from 3447 M 1 seeds. A cell line showed salt resistance. The cell growth and chlorophyll content were each two times higher than that of WT cells in the medium containing 154 mM NaCl. Seven strains of M 3 progeny of 17 salt-tolerant plants, showed strong resistance, but no salt tolerant progeny were obtained from Xanthi or Ne-ion irradiation. This shows that the sensitivity of plant embryo to this irradiation technique may vary among species. When exposed to 14 N ion beam for 24-108 hours after pollination, various morphological mutants appeared at 18% in M 1 progeny and herbicide tolerant and salt tolerant mutants were obtained. A strong Co-tolerant strain was obtained in two of 17 salt-tolerant strains and a total of 46 tolerant strains (0.2%) were obtained from 22,272 grains of M 1 seeds. In these tolerant strains, the absorption of Co was slightly decreased, but those of Mg and Mn were increased. Mutants induced with ion-beam irradiation have potential not only for practical use in the breeding of stress-tolerant plants but also for gene analysis that will surely facilitate the molecular understanding of the tolerance mechanisms. (M.N.)

  2. Heating tokamaks via the ion-cyclotron and ion-ion hybrid resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1977-04-01

    For the ion-ion hybrid resonance it is shown that: (1) the energy absorption occurs via a sequence of mode conversions; (2) a poloidal field component normal to the ion-ion hybrid mode conversion surface strongly influences the mode conversion process so that roughly equal electron and ion heating occurs in the present proton-deuterium experiments, while solely electron heating is predicted to prevail in deuterium-tritium reactors; (3) the ion-ion hybrid resonance suppresses toroidal eigenmodes; and (4) wave absorption in minority fundamental ion-cyclotron heating experiments will be dominated by ion-ion hybrid mode conversion absorption for minority concentrations exceeding roughly 1 percent. For the ion-cyclotron resonance, it is shown that: (1) ion-cyclotron mode conversion leads to surface electron heating; and (2) ion-cyclotron mode conversion absorption dominates fundamental ion-cyclotron absorption thereby preventing efficient ion heating

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 41Ca with a positive-ion source and the UNILAC accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhof, A.; Henning, W.; Mueller, M.; Roeckl, E.; Schuell, D.; Korschinek, G.; Nolte, E.; Paul, M.

    1987-06-01

    We have made first tests investigating the performance characteristics of the UNILAC accelerator system at GSI, in order to explore the sensitivity achievable in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 41 Ca with high-current positive-ion sources. Positively charged Ca 3+ ions of up to about 100 micro-amperes electrical current were injected from a penning-sputter source and, after further stripping to Ca 9+ , accelerated to 14.3 MeV/nucleon. The combination of velocity-focussing accelerator and magnetic ion-beam transport system completely eliminated background from the other calcium isotopes. Full-stripping and detection of 41 Ca 20+ ions with a magnetic spectrograph provides separation from isobaric 41 K and, at present, a level of sensitivity of 41 Ca/Ca ≅ 2x10 -15 . Future improvements and implications for dating of Pleistoscene samples will be discussed. (orig.)

  4. Ion mobility spectrometry for food quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautz, W; Zimmermann, D; Hartmann, M; Baumbach, J I; Nolte, J; Jung, J

    2006-11-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is known to be a fast and sensitive technique for the detection of trace substances, and it is increasingly in demand not only for protection against explosives and chemical warfare agents, but also for new applications in medical diagnosis or process control. Generally, a gas phase sample is ionized by help of ultraviolet light, ss-radiation or partial discharges. The ions move in a weak electrical field towards a detector. During their drift they collide with a drift gas flowing in the opposite direction and, therefore, are slowed down depending on their size, shape and charge. As a result, different ions reach the detector at different drift times, which are characteristic for the ions considered. The number of ions reaching the detector are a measure of the concentration of the analyte. The method enables the identification and quantification of analytes with high sensitivity (ng l(-1) range). The selectivity can even be increased - as necessary for the analyses of complex mixtures - using pre-separation techniques such as gas chromatography or multi-capillary columns. No pre-concentration of the sample is necessary. Those characteristics of the method are preserved even in air with up to a 100% relative humidity rate. The suitability of the method for application in the field of food quality and safety - including storage, process and quality control as well as the characterization of food stuffs - was investigated in recent years for a number of representative examples, which are summarized in the following, including new studies as well: (1) the detection of metabolites from bacteria for the identification and control of their growth; (2) process control in food production - beer fermentation being an example; (3) the detection of the metabolites of mould for process control during cheese production, for quality control of raw materials or for the control of storage conditions; (4) the quality control of packaging materials during

  5. Dual-sensing porphyrin-containing copolymer nanosensor as full-spectrum colorimeter and ultra-sensitive thermometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Yuan, Jinying; Kang, Yan; Cai, Zhinan; Zhou, Lilin; Yin, Yingwu

    2010-04-28

    A porphyrin-containing copolymer has dual-sensing in response to metal ions and temperature as a novel nanosensor. Triggered by ions, the sensor exhibits full-color tunable behavior as a cationic detector and colorimeter. Responding to temperature, the sensor displays an "isothermal" thermochromic point as an ultra-sensitive thermometer.

  6. Independency of Fe ions in hemoglobin on immunomagnetic reduction assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.Y.; Lan, C.B.; Chen, C.H.; Horng, H.E.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, H.C.; Lai, Y.K.; Lin, Y.H.; Teng, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Immunomagnetic reduction (IMR), which involves measuring the reduction in the ac magnetic susceptibility of magnetic reagents, is due to the association between bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and target bio-molecules. This has been demonstrated for assaying proteins in solutions free of Fe ions, such as serum. In this work, the validity of IMR assay for samples rich in Fe ions like hemoglobin (Hb) is investigated. According to the results, there is no magnetic signal contributed by Fe-ion-rich Hb. Furthermore, the results show a high sensitivity in assaying hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by using IMR.

  7. Independency of Fe ions in hemoglobin on immunomagnetic reduction assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.Y. [MagQu Co. Ltd., Sindian City, Taipei County 231, Taiwan (China); Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Lan, C.B.; Chen, C.H. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Horng, H.E. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: phyfv001@scc.ntnu.edu.tw; Hong, Chin-Yih [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nan-Kai University of Technology, Nantau County, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: cyhong@nkut.edu.tw; Yang, H.C. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hcyang@phys.ntu.edu.tw; Lai, Y.K. [College of Life Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Bioresources, Da-Yeh University, Changhua 515, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.H.; Teng, K.S. [Apex Biotechnology Co. Ltd., Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China)

    2009-10-15

    Immunomagnetic reduction (IMR), which involves measuring the reduction in the ac magnetic susceptibility of magnetic reagents, is due to the association between bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and target bio-molecules. This has been demonstrated for assaying proteins in solutions free of Fe ions, such as serum. In this work, the validity of IMR assay for samples rich in Fe ions like hemoglobin (Hb) is investigated. According to the results, there is no magnetic signal contributed by Fe-ion-rich Hb. Furthermore, the results show a high sensitivity in assaying hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by using IMR.

  8. Metal ion transport quantified by ICP-MS in intact cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Julio A. Landero; Stiner, Cory A.; Radzyukevich, Tatiana L.; Heiny, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of ICP-MS to measure metal ion content in biological tissues offers a highly sensitive means to study metal-dependent physiological processes. Here we describe the application of ICP-MS to measure membrane transport of Rb and K ions by the Na,K-ATPase in mouse skeletal muscles and human red blood cells. The ICP-MS method provides greater precision and statistical power than possible with conventional tracer flux methods. The method is widely applicable to studies of other metal ion transporters and metal-dependent processes in a range of cell types and conditions. PMID:26838181

  9. Automatic analyzing device for chlorine ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugibayashi, Shinji; Morikawa, Yoshitake; Fukase, Kazuo; Kashima, Hiromasa.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device of automatically analyzing a trance amount of chlorine ions contained in feedwater, condensate and reactor water of a BWR type power plant. Namely, zero-adjustment or span calibration in this device is conducted as follows. (1) A standard chlorine ion liquid is supplied from a tank to a mixer by a constant volume pump, and the liquid is diluted and mixed with purified water to form a standard liquid. (2) The pH of the standard liquid is adjusted by a pH adjuster. (3) The standard liquid is supplied to an electrode cell to conduct zero adjustment or span calibration. Chlorine ions in a specimen are measured by the device of the present invention as follows. (1) The specimen is supplied to a head tank through a line filter. (2) The pH of the specimen is adjusted by a pH adjuster. (3) The specimen is supplied to an electrode cell to electrically measure the concentration of the chlorine ions in the specimen. The device of the present invention can automatically analyze trance amount of chlorine ions at a high accuracy, thereby capable of improving the sensitivity, reducing an operator's burden and radiation exposure. (I.S.)

  10. Experiments with trapped ions and ultrafast laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kale Gifford

    Since the dawn of quantum information science, laser-cooled trapped atomic ions have been one of the most compelling systems for the physical realization of a quantum computer. By applying qubit state dependent forces to the ions, their collective motional modes can be used as a bus to realize entangling quantum gates. Ultrafast state-dependent kicks [1] can provide a universal set of quantum logic operations, in conjunction with ultrafast single qubit rotations [2], which uses only ultrafast laser pulses. This may present a clearer route to scaling a trapped ion processor [3]. In addition to the role that spin-dependent kicks (SDKs) play in quantum computation, their utility in fundamental quantum mechanics research is also apparent. In this thesis, we present a set of experiments which demonstrate some of the principle properties of SDKs including ion motion independence (we demonstrate single ion thermometry from the ground state to near room temperature and the largest Schrodinger cat state ever created in an oscillator), high speed operations (compared with conventional atom-laser interactions), and multi-qubit entanglement operations with speed that is not fundamentally limited by the trap oscillation frequency. We also present a method to provide higher stability in the radial mode ion oscillation frequencies of a linear radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap-a crucial factor when performing operations on the rf-sensitive modes. Finally, we present the highest atomic position sensitivity measurement of an isolated atom to date of 0.5 nm Hz. (-1/2) with a minimum uncertaintyof 1.7 nm using a 0.6 numerical aperature (NA) lens system, along with a method to correct aberrations and a direct position measurement of ion micromotion (the inherent oscillations of an ion trapped in an oscillating rf field). This development could be used to directly image atom motion in the quantum regime, along with sensing forces at the yoctonewton [10. (-24) N)] scale forgravity sensing

  11. Medium energy ion scattering (MEIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmann, K.; Markwitz, A.

    2009-01-01

    This report gives an overview about the technique and experimental study of medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) as a quantitative technique to determine and analyse the composition and geometrical structure of crystalline surfaces and near surface-layers by measuring the energy and yield of the backscattered ions. The use of a lower energy range of 50 to 500 keV accelerated ions impinging onto the target surface and the application of a high-resolution electrostatic energy analyser (ESA) makes medium energy ion scattering spectroscopy into a high depth resolution and surface-sensitive version of RBS with less resulting damage effects. This report details the first steps of research in that field of measurement technology using medium energetic backscattered ions detected by means of a semiconductor radiation detector instead of an ESA. The study of medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) has been performed using the 40 keV industrial ion implanter established at GNS Sciences remodelled with supplementary high voltage insulation for the ion source in order to apply voltages up to 45 kV, extra apertures installed in the beamline and sample chamber in order to set the beam diameter accurately, and a semiconductor radiation detector. For measurement purposes a beam of positive charged helium ions accelerated to an energy of about 80 keV has been used impinging onto target surfaces of lead implanted into silicon (PbSi), scandium implanted into aluminium (ScAl), aluminium foil (Al) and glassy carbon (C). First results show that it is possible to use the upgraded industrial implanter for medium energy ion scattering. The beam of 4 He 2+ with an energy up to 88 keV has been focussed to 1 mm in diameter. The 5 nA ion beam hit the samples under 2 x 10 -8 mbar. The results using the surface barrier detector show scattering events from the samples. Cooling of the detector to liquid nitrogen temperatures reduced the electronic noise in the backscattering spectrum close to zero. A

  12. Efficiency enhancement in dye-sensitized solar cells by in situ passivation of the sensitized nanoporous electrode with Li2CO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingbo; Zaban, Arie

    2008-01-01

    This work entails a method to improve the performance of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO 2 solar cells by adding surface passivating elements to the electrolyte. The presence of either CO 2 , Li 2 CO 3 or K 2 CO 3 in electrolyte increases both the photocurrent and the photovoltage, resulting in higher overall conversion efficiency of these solar cells. The additives are used to form a passivation layer of lithium carbonate on the dye free surface of the TiO 2 nanoparticles and the conductive substrate. This layer suppresses the rate of the main recombination reaction between the photoinjected electrons and the oxidized ions in the electrolyte solution. While blocking part of the recombination, the lithium carbonate layer allows motion of the Li + ions towards the TiO 2 surface for charge screening. Consequently using this simple treatment, the conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell most improved by 17.2% (from 6.4% to 7.5%)

  13. Measurement of chloride-ion concentration with long-period grating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jaw-Luen; Wang, Jian-Neng

    2007-06-01

    A simple and low-cost long-period fiber grating (LPG) sensor suited for chloride-ion concentration measurement is presented. The LPG sensor is found to be sensitive to the refractive index of the medium around the cladding surface of the sensing grating, thus offering the prospect of development of practical sensors such as an ambient index sensor or a chemical concentration indicator with high stability and reliability. We measured chloride ions in a typical concrete sample immersed in salt water solutions with different weight concentrations ranging from 0% to 25%. Results show that the LPG sensor exhibited a linear decrease in the transmission loss and resonance wavelength shift when the concentration increased. The measurement accuracy for the concentration of salt in water solution is estimated to be 0.6% and the limit of detection for chloride ions is about 0.04%. To further enhance its sensitivity for chloride concentrations, we coated a monolayer of colloidal gold nanoparticles as the active material on the grating surface of the LPG sensor. The operating principle of sensing is based on the sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance of self-assembled gold colloids on the grating section of the LPG. With this method, a factor of two increase in the sensitivity of detecting chemical solution concentrations was obtained. The advantages of this type of fiber-optic sensor are that it is compact, relatively simple to construct and easy to use. Moreover, the sensor has the potential capability for on-site, in vivo and remote sensing, and it has potential use as a disposable sensor.

  14. Dye sensitized solar cells. How do they work?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurie M, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSC), also known as Gratzel cells, harvest sunlight using a dye adsorbed onto the high surface area of a porous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide film. Photoexcitation of the dye results in the injection of electrons into the conduction band of the oxide. The dye is regenerated in its original state by donation of electrons from iodide ions presenting an electrolyte that permeates the porous oxide film. The regeneration cycle is completed at a platinum coated cathode at which tri-iodide ions are reduced to iodide ions. DSC has achieved solar conversion efficiencies of over 10% in the laboratory, with best module efficiencies of around 8%. This lecture will describe the fabrication of the basic DSC and discuss the basic Physics and Chemistry of the cell. (Full text)

  15. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  16. Electron spectroscopy with fast heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1983-01-01

    Since about 1970 the spectroscopy of Auger-electrons and characteristic x-rays following energetic ion-atom collisions has received a great deal of attention. An increasing number of accelerators, capable of providing a large number of projectile ion species over a wide range of projectile energies, became available for studying ion-atom collision phenomena. Many charged particles from protons up to heavy ions like uranium can be accelerated to energies ranging over six orders of magnitude. This allows us to study systematically a great variety of effects accompanied by dynamic excitation processes of the atomic shells in either the projectile- or target-atoms. The studies yield fundamental information regarding the excitation mechanism (e.g., Coulomb and quasi-molecular excitation) and allow sensitive tests of atomic structure theories. This information in turn is valuable to other fields in physics like plasma-, astro-, or solid-state (surface) physics. It is a characteristic feature of fast heavy-ion accelerators that they can produce highly stripped ion species which have in turn the capability to highly ionize neutral target atoms or molecules in a single collision. The ionization process, mainly due to the strong electrical fields that are involved, allows us to study few-electron atoms with high atomic numbers Z. High resolution spectroscopy performed with these atoms allows a particularly good test of relativistic and QED effects. The probability of producing these few electron systems is determined by the charge state and the velocity of the projectile ions. In this contribution the possibilities of using electron spectroscopy as a tool to investigate fast ion-atom collisions is discussed and demonstrated with a few examples. 30 references

  17. Sensitive and selective spectrophotometric assay of piroxicam in pure form, capsule and human blood serum samples via ion-pair complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2014-09-01

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid determination of piroxicam (PX) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method involves formation of stable yellow colored ion-pair complexes of the amino derivative (basic nitrogen) of PX with three sulphonphthalein acid dyes namely; bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) in acidic medium. The colored species exhibited absorption maxima at 438, 429 and 432 nm with molar absorptivity values of 9.400 × 103, 1.218 × 103 and 1.02 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 for PX-BCG, PX-BTB and PX-BPB complexes, respectively. The effect of optimum conditions via acidity, reagent concentration, time and solvent were studied. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature and the absorbance values remained constant for 48 h. Beer’s law was obeyed with a good correlation coefficient in the concentration ranges 1-100 μg mL-1 for BCG, BTB complexes and 1-95 μg mL-1 for BPB complex. The composition ratio of the ion-pair complexes were found to be 1:1 in all cases as established by Job’s method. No interference was observed from common additives and excipients which may be present in the pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PX in capsule and human blood serum samples with good accuracy and precision.

  18. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  19. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors

  20. Synthesis of photoluminescent o-phenylenediamine–m-phenylenediamine copolymer nanospheres: An effective fluorescent sensing platform for selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xun [Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Industry, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637002 (China); Sun, Huaiyu [Applied Technique College of Southwest Peteoleum University, Nanchong 637002 (China); Yang, Siwei; Zhao, Shizhen [Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Industry, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637002 (China); Liao, Fang, E-mail: liaozhang2003@163.com [Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Industry, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637002 (China)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we demonstrated a fluorescent o-phenylenediamine–m-phenylenediamine copolymer sensing system, which was synthesized by a facile and one-step hydrothermal method. The copolymer was first used as fluorescent probe for the detection of Chromium(VI) ion (Cr{sup 6+}) and showed high selectivity and sensitivity. The detection limit was 1×10{sup −11} M. It showed excellent linear relationships in wide range of 7×10{sup −11}–6×10{sup −10} M. Moreover, the addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) to the detection system could successfully combine with Cr{sup 6+} to form metal chelates, making the fluorescence recovery of o-phenylenediamine–m-phenylenediamine copolymer. What is important, the prepared process had no addition of initiating agent.

  1. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  2. Velocity-space sensitivities of neutron emission spectrometers at the tokamaks JET and ASDEX upgrade in deuterium plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.S.; Binda, F.; Cazzaniga, C.

    2017-01-01

    systems such as neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance heating. In order to diagnose these fast ions, several different fast-ion diagnostics have been developed and implemented in the various experiments around the world. The velocity-space sensitivities of fast-ion diagnostics are given by so......Future fusion reactors are foreseen to be heated by the energetic alpha particles produced in fusion reactions. For this to happen, it is important that the energetic ions are sufficiently confined. In present day fusion experiments, energetic ions are primarily produced using external heating...

  3. Sensitivity Increases for the TITAN Decay Spectroscopy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach K.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The TITAN facility at TRIUMF has recently initiated a program of performing decay spectroscopy measurements in an electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT. The unique environment of the EBIT provides backingfree storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles from the trap centre via the strong magnetic field. This measurement technique is able to provide a significant increase in detection sensitivity for photons which result from radioactive decay. A brief overview of this device is presented, along with methods of improving the signal-to-background ratio for photon detection by reducing Compton scattered events, and eliminating vibrational noise.

  4. Cationic effect on dye-sensitized solar cell properties using electrochemical impedance and transient absorption spectroscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Ravindra Kumar; Bedja, Idriss

    2017-01-01

    Redox-couple polymer electrolytes, (poly(ethylene oxide)-succinonitrile) blend/MI-I 2 , where M  =  Li or K, were prepared by the solution cast method. Owing to the plasticizing property of K + ions, the K + ion-based electrolyte exhibited better electrical conductivity than the Li + ion-based electrolyte, which did however exhibit better photovoltaic properties. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed faster redox species diffusions and interfacial processes in the Li + ion-based dye-sensitized solar cells than in the K + ion-based ones. Transient absorption spectroscopy ascertained faster dye-regeneration by the Li + ion-based electrolyte than the K + ion-based electrolyte. (paper)

  5. Ion temperature gradient mode driven solitons and shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir, U.; Adnan, Muhammad; Haque, Q.; Qamar, Anisa; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven solitons and shocks are studied in a plasma having gradients in the equilibrium number density and equilibrium ion temperature. In the linear regime, it is found that the ion temperature and the ratio of the gradient scale lengths, ηi=Ln/LT , affect both the real frequency and the growth rate of the ITG driven wave instability. In the nonlinear regime, for the first time we derive a Korteweg de Vries-type equation for the ITG mode, which admits solitary wave solution. It is found that the ITG mode supports only compressive solitons. Further, it is noticed that the soliton amplitude and width are sensitive to the parameter ηi=Ln/LT . Second, in the presence of dissipation in the system, we obtain a Burger type equation, which admits the shock wave solution. This work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma having density and ion temperature gradients. For illustration, the model has been applied to tokamak plasma.

  6. AMS of heavy elements with an ECR ion source and the ATLAS linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, M; Ahmad, I; Borasi, F; Caggiano, J; Davids, C N; Greene, J P; Harss, B; Heinz, A; Henderson, D J; Henning, W F; Jiang, C L; Pardo, R C; Rehm, K E; Rejoub, R; Seweryniak, D; Sonzogni, A; Uusitalo, J; Vondrasek, R C

    2000-01-01

    Detection of heavy elements by accelerator mass spectrometry with the electron cyclotron resonance ion source, Argonne linear accelerator and fragment mass analyzer (ECRIS-ATLAS-FMA) system has been developed. The use of the ECR-ATLAS system for AMS of heavy elements has two interesting features: (i) the efficient production of high-charge state ions in the ECR source ensures the elimination of molecular ions at the source stage, a highly attractive feature for any mass-spectrometric use not exploited so far; (ii) the linear acceleration based on velocity matching and the beam transport system act as a powerful mass filter for background suppression. We have shown that our system reaches an abundance sensitivity of 1x10 sup - sup 1 sup 4 for Pb isotopes. The sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U detection sensitivity is sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U/U > or approx. 1x10 sup - sup 1 sup 2 , limited mainly by the ion source output.

  7. Ultra-sensitive and selective Hg{sup 2+} detection based on fluorescent carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruihua; Li, Haitao; Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Tong, Cuiyan, E-mail: tongcy959@nenu.edu.cn [Chemisty Department, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Zhang, Xing [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Fluorescent carbon dots were efficiently synthesized by one-step sodium hydroxide-assisted reflux method from PEG and demonstrated to show high selectivity toward Hg2+ ions detection. - Highlights: • FCDs were synthesized by one-step sodium hydroxide-assisted reflux method from PEG. • The FCDs emit blue photoluminescence and have upconversion fluorescent property. • The FCDs show ultra-sensitive detective ability for Hg{sup 2+} ions. - Abstract: Fluorescent carbon dots (FCDs) were efficiently synthesized by one-step sodium hydroxide-assisted reflux method from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The obtained FCDs exhibit excellent water-solubility and high stability. Under the UV irradiation, the FCDs could emit bright blue photoluminescence, and also they were found to show excellent up-conversion fluorescence. It was further demonstrated that such FCDs can serve as effective fluorescent sensing platform for Hg{sup 2+} ions detection with ultra-sensitivity and selectivity. The sensing system achieved a limit of detection as low as 1 fM, which is much lower than all the previous reported sensing systems for Hg{sup 2+} ions detection. This FCDs sensing system has been successfully applied for the analysis of Hg{sup 2+} ions in water samples from river, lake, and tap water, showing good practical feasibility.

  8. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Kniazev, O.

    2001-01-01

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  9. Sensitization of TRPA1 by Protein Kinase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannis E Meents

    Full Text Available The TRPA1 ion channel is expressed in nociceptive (pain-sensitive somatosensory neurons and is activated by a wide variety of chemical irritants, such as acrolein in smoke or isothiocyanates in mustard. Here, we investigate the enhancement of TRPA1 function caused by inflammatory mediators, which is thought to be important in lung conditions such as asthma and COPD. Protein kinase A is an important kinase acting downstream of inflammatory mediators to cause sensitization of TRPA1. By using site-directed mutagenesis, patch-clamp electrophysiology and calcium imaging we identify four amino acid residues, S86, S317, S428, and S972, as the principal targets of PKA-mediated phosphorylation and sensitization of TRPA1.

  10. Fast quantum logic by selective displacement of hot trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasura, Marek; Steane, Andrew M.

    2003-01-01

    The 'pushing gate' proposed by Cirac and Zoller for quantum logic in ion traps is discussed, in which a force is used to give a controlled push to a pair of trapped ions and thus realize a phase gate. The original proposal had a weakness in that it involved a hidden extreme sensitivity to the size of the force. Also, the physical origin of this force was not fully addressed. Here, we discuss the sensitivity and present a way to avoid it by choosing the spatial form of the pushing force in an optimal way. We also analyze the effect of imperfections in a pair of π pulses which are used to implement a 'spin echo' to cancel correlated errors. We present a physical model for the force, namely, the dipole force, and discuss the impact of unwanted photon scattering, and of finite temperature of the ions. The main effect of the temperature is to blur the phase of the gate owing to the ions exploring a range of values of the force. When the distance scale of the force profile is smaller than the ion separation, this effect is more important than the high-order terms in the Coulomb repulsion which were originally discussed. Overall, we find that whereas the pushing gate is not as resistant to imperfection as was supposed, it remains a significant candidate for ion trap quantum computing since it does not require ground-state cooling, and in some cases it does not require the Lamb-Dicke limit, while the gate rate is fast, close to (rather than small compared to) the trap vibrational frequency

  11. Quantization of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data using external and internal standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnaser, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some aspects of multi-dimensional characterization of solids by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are given. A theoretical part discusses methods for the quantization of SIMS data and the most prominent effects of ion-solid interactions as related to SIMS. After a description of the instrument used for experiments (a quadrupole-equipped ion microprobe featuring a liquid metal ion source in addition to the standard duoplasmatron gas ion source) the first experimental section is devoted to the determination of practical sensitivities and relative sensitivity factors for selected pure elements, binary and treary alloys and multicomponent systems. For 23 pure elements practical sensitivities under O + 2 bombardment also have been compared to those under In + -bombardment; it was shown that on oxygen saturated surfaces yields under In + -bombardment are higher, this making feasible use of submicron In-beams for surface analysis. In the second experimental section boron implants in silicon have been used for studying depth profiling capabilities of the instrument. Sputtering yields of Si and degrees of ionization of both B and Si have been measured. It has been shown that implantation profiles may deviate considerably from Gaussian but can be described by means of mathematical distribution functions. In the third experimental section depth resolution of the erosion process has been studied by profiling a Ni/Cr multilayer sample (100 A single layer) and been found to be approximately constant over the depth range investigated. Quantization of depth profiles, usually distorted by matrix effects, has been attempted using the primary beam species (In) as internal implantation standard. Some problems in connection with the conversion of secondary ion micrographs to concentration maps are discussed. Elemental detection limits in multidimensional SIMS analysis are given in dependence of primary beam size and total eroded depth. (Author)

  12. Surface plasmon resonance sensing detection of mercury and lead ions based on conducting polymer composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz M Abdi

    Full Text Available A new sensing area for a sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury and lead ions. The gold surface used for SPR measurements were modified with polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI conducting polymer composite. The polymer layer was deposited on the gold surface by electrodeposition. This optical sensor was used for monitoring toxic metal ions with and without sensitivity enhancement by chitosan in water samples. The higher amounts of resonance angle unit (ΔRU were obtained for PPy-CHI film due to a specific binding of chitosan with Pb(2+ and Hg(2+ ions. The Pb(2+ ion bind to the polymer films most strongly, and the sensor was more sensitive to Pb(2+ compared to Hg(2+. The concentrations of ions in the parts per million range produced the changes in the SPR angle minimum in the region of 0.03 to 0.07. Data analysis was done by Matlab software using Fresnel formula for multilayer system.

  13. Ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettiol, Andrew A.; Mi, Zhaohong; Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Chen, Ce-belle; Tao, Ye; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Imaging fluorescence generated by MeV ions in biological systems such as cells and tissue sections requires a high resolution beam (<100 nm), a sensitive detection system and a fluorescent probe that has a high quantum efficiency and low bleaching rate. For cutting edge applications in bioimaging, the fluorescence imaging technique needs to break the optical diffraction limit allowing for sub-cellular structure to be visualized, leading to a better understanding of cellular function. In a nuclear microprobe this resolution requirement can be readily achieved utilizing low beam current techniques such as Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM). In recent times, we have been able to extend this capability to fluorescence imaging through the development of a new high efficiency fluorescence detection system, and through the use of new novel fluorescent probes that are resistant to ion beam damage (bleaching). In this paper we demonstrate ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in several biological samples, highlighting the advantages and challenges associated with using this technique

  14. Stress-tolerant mutants induced by heavy-ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Bae, Chang-Hyu [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea); Ozaki, Takuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Wang, Jing Ming [Akita Prefectural Univ. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Comparative study was made on mutagenesis in tobacco embryo induced by exposure to EMS (ethyl methane-sulfonate) ion beams during the fertilization cycle. Tobacco embryo cells immediately after pollination were exposed to heavy ion beam and the sensitivity to the irradiation was assessed in each developmental stage and compared with the effects of EMS, a chemical mutagen. Morphologically abnormality such as chlorophyll deficiency was used as a marker. A total of 17 salt-tolerant plants were selected from 3447 M{sub 1} seeds. A cell line showed salt resistance. The cell growth and chlorophyll content were each two times higher than that of WT cells in the medium containing 154 mM NaCl. Seven strains of M{sub 3} progeny of 17 salt-tolerant plants, showed strong resistance, but no salt tolerant progeny were obtained from Xanthi or Ne-ion irradiation. This shows that the sensitivity of plant embryo to this irradiation technique may vary among species. When exposed to {sup 14}N ion beam for 24-108 hours after pollination, various morphological mutants appeared at 18% in M{sub 1} progeny and herbicide tolerant and salt tolerant mutants were obtained. A strong Co-tolerant strain was obtained in two of 17 salt-tolerant strains and a total of 46 tolerant strains (0.2%) were obtained from 22,272 grains of M{sub 1} seeds. In these tolerant strains, the absorption of Co was slightly decreased, but those of Mg and Mn were increased. Mutants induced with ion-beam irradiation have potential not only for practical use in the breeding of stress-tolerant plants but also for gene analysis that will surely facilitate the molecular understanding of the tolerance mechanisms. (M.N.)

  15. Amperometric Sensor for Detection of Chloride Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene

    2008-09-15

    Chloride ion sensing is important in many fields such as clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. We have measured chloride ions at a carbon paste electrode (CPE) and at a CPE modified with solid AgNO₃, a solution of AgNO₃ and/or solid silver particles. Detection limits (3 S/N) for chloride ions were 100 μM, 100 μM and 10 μM for solid AgNO₃, solution of AgNO₃ and/or solid silver particles, respectively. The CPE modified with silver particles is the most sensitive to the presence chloride ions. After that we approached to the miniaturization of the whole electrochemical instrument. Measurements were carried out on miniaturized instrument consisting of a potentiostat with dimensions 35 × 166 × 125 mm, screen printed electrodes, a peristaltic pump and a PC with control software. Under the most suitable experimental conditions (Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 1.8 and working electrode potential 550 mV) we estimated the limit of detection (3 S/N) as 500 nM.

  16. Ion beam induced epitaxy in Ge- and B- coimplanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Tanoue, H.; Takahashi, H.; Shimoyama, K.; Kuriyama, K.

    1992-01-01

    The epitaxial regrowth of amorphous surface layers in and Si substrate has been studied under irradiation with 400 keV Ar + ions at the temperature range from 300 to 435degC. The amorphous layers were obtained by Ge + implantation, followed by B + implantation. The ion beam assisted epitaxy was found to be sensitive to both the substrate orientation and the implanted Ge concentration, and the layer-by-layer epitaxial regrowth seemed to be precluded in Si layers with high doses of Ge implants, e.g., 2.5 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Electrical activation of implanted dopant B was also measured in the recrystallized Si layer. (author)

  17. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for plasma arginine vasopressin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibonnier, M.; Soto, M.E.; Corvol, P.; Milliez, P.; Marchetti, J.; Menard, J.

    1980-01-01

    Using an ion exchange resin, a sensitive radioimmunoassay for plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) was developed. This assay was characterized by the absence of blank values, an excellent recovery rate, great sensitivity (0.1 pg of AVP was significantly detected) and reproducibility. In 8 normal men, plasma AVP after overnight dehydration was 1.57+-0.17 pg/ml, and dropped to 0.58+-0.11 pg/ml after 20 ml/kg oral water loading. Significant correlations between plasma AVP levels and plasma or urinary osmolality confirm the validity of this assay. In complete pituitary diabetes insipidus (n=4) plasma AVP was undetectable whereas it was frankly increased in Schwartz-Bartter syndrome (3 to 33 pg/ml, n=8) [fr

  18. Three-dimensional printed knotted reactors enabling highly sensitive differentiation of silver nanoparticles and ions in aqueous environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Whether silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) persist or release silver ions (Ag + ) when discharged into a natural environment has remained an unresolved issue. In this study, we employed a low-cost stereolithographic three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology to fabricate the angle-defined knotted reactors (KRs) to construct a simple differentiation scheme for quantitative assessment of Ag + ions and AgNPs in municipal wastewater samples. We chose xanthan/phosphate-buffered saline as a dispersion medium for in situ stabilization of the two silver species, while also facilitating their extraction from complicated wastewater matrices. After method optimization, we measured extraction efficiencies of 54.5 and 32.3% for retaining Ag + ions and AgNPs, respectively, in the printed KR (768-turn), with detection limits (DLs) of 0.86 and 0.52 ng L −1 when determining Ag + ions and AgNPs, respectively (sample run at pH 11 without a rinse solution), and 0.86 ng L −1 when determining Ag + ions alone (sample run at pH 12 with a 1.5-mL rinse solution). The proposed scheme is tolerant of the wastewater matrix and provides more reliable differentiation between Ag + /AgNPs than does a conventional filtration method. The concept and applicability of adopting 3DP technology to renew traditional KR devices were evidently proven by means of these significantly improved analytical performance. Our analytical data suggested that the concentrations of Ag + ions and AgNPs in the tested industrial wastewater sample were both higher than those in domestic wastewater, implying that industrial activity might be a main source of environmental silver species, rather than domestic discharge from AgNP-containing products. - Highlights: • 3D printed knotted reactors are utilized to differentiate AgNPs and Ag + ions. • Xanthan/phosphate-buffered saline is used for stabilizing the two silver species. • Extraction efficiency up to 54.5% is available for retaining Ag + ion species. • The

  19. An ion quencher operated lamp for multiplexed fluorescent bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Taiping; Sun, Huanhuan; He, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Xiaoqin; He, Dinggeng; Bu, Hongchang; Qiao, Zhenzhen; Wang, Kemin

    2018-02-01

    A novel and adjustable lamp based on competitive interaction among dsDNA-SYBR Green I (SGI), ion quencher, and analyte was designed for bioanalysis. The "filament" and switch of the lamp could be customized by employing different dsDNA and ion quencher. The poly(AT/TA) dsDNA was successfully screened as the most effective filament of the lamp. Two common ions, Hg 2+ and Fe 3+ , were selected as the model switch, and the corresponding ligand molecules cysteine (Cys) and pyrophosphate ions (PPi) were selected as the targets. When the fluorescence-quenched dsDNA/SGI-ion complex was introduced into a target-containing system, ions could be bound by competitive molecules and separate from the complex, thereby lighting the lamp. However, no light was observed if the biomolecule could not snatch the metal ions from the complex. Under the optimal conditions, sensitive and selective detection of Cys and PPi was achieved by the lamp, with practical applications in fetal bovine serum and human urine. This ion quencher regulated lamp for fluorescent bioassays is simple in design, fast in operation, and is more convenient than other methods. Significantly, as many molecules could form stable complexes with metal ions selectively, this ion quencher operated lamp has potential for the detection of a wide spectrum of analytes. Graphical abstract A novel and adjustable lamp on the basis of competitive interaction among dsDNA-SYBR Green I, ions quencher and analyte was designed for bioanalysis. The filament and switch of lamp could be customized by employing different dsDNA and ions quencher.

  20. Development of a TOF SIMS setup at the Zagreb heavy ion microbeam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadić, Tonči; Bogdanović Radović, Iva; Siketić, Zdravko; Cosic, Donny Domagoj; Skukan, Natko; Jakšić, Milko; Matsuo, Jiro

    2014-08-01

    We describe a new Time-of-flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS) setup for MeV SIMS application, which is constructed and installed at the heavy ion microbeam facility at the Ruđer Bošković Institute in Zagreb. The TOF-SIMS setup is developed for high sensitivity molecular imaging using a heavy ion microbeam that focuses ion beams (from C to I) with sub-micron resolution. Dedicated pulse processing electronics for MeV SIMS application have been developed, enabling microbeam-scanning control, incoming ion microbeam pulsing and molecular mapping. The first results showing measured MeV SIMS spectra as well as molecular maps for samples of interest are presented and discussed.

  1. Development of a TOF SIMS setup at the Zagreb heavy ion microbeam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadić, Tonči; Bogdanović Radović, Iva; Siketić, Zdravko; Cosic, Donny Domagoj; Skukan, Natko; Jakšić, Milko; Matsuo, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new Time-of-flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS) setup for MeV SIMS application, which is constructed and installed at the heavy ion microbeam facility at the Ruđer Bošković Institute in Zagreb. The TOF-SIMS setup is developed for high sensitivity molecular imaging using a heavy ion microbeam that focuses ion beams (from C to I) with sub-micron resolution. Dedicated pulse processing electronics for MeV SIMS application have been developed, enabling microbeam-scanning control, incoming ion microbeam pulsing and molecular mapping. The first results showing measured MeV SIMS spectra as well as molecular maps for samples of interest are presented and discussed

  2. Application of ion chromatography in clinical studies and pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Rajmund

    2014-01-01

    Ion chromatography is a well-established regulatory method for analyzing anions and cations in environmental, food and many other samples. It offers an enormous range of possibilities for selecting stationary and mobile phases. Additionally, it usually helps to solve various separation problems, particularly when it is combined with different detection techniques. Ion chromatography can also be used to determine many ions and substances in clinical and pharmaceutical samples. It provides: availability of high capacity stationary phases and sensitive detectors; simple sample preparation; avoidance of hazardous chemicals; decreased sample volumes; flexible reaction options on a changing sample matrix to be analyzed; or the option to operate a fully-automated system. This paper provides a short review of the ion chromatography applications for determining different inorganic and organic substances in clinical and pharmaceutical samples.

  3. A method for atomic spectroscopy of highly charged ions in the Pm isoelectronic sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Oe.

    1995-08-01

    The aim was to search for alkali-like spectra in the Promethium isoelectronic sequence. Pb 22+ ions were produced by means of an ECR-ion source and accelerated towards a target of He gas. Colliding with He atoms the Pb 22+ ions are likely to capture an electron, thus forming an excited Pm-like ion (Pb 21+ ). A 2 m grazing-incidence spectrometer was used for recording the spectra arising as the accelerated ions impinge on the target. No lines were recorded throughout the wavelength region where the spectrometer is sensitive. Further experiments are needed to make clear if this is due to experimental errors or not. 14 refs, 8 figs

  4. Biomaterial imaging with MeV-energy heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Toshio, E-mail: seki@sakura.nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Wakamatsu, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Shunichiro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Aoki, Takaaki [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ishihara, Akihiko [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Life Science, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto Univ., Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Matsuo, Jiro [Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    The spatial distribution of several chemical compounds in biological tissues and cells can be obtained with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). In conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with keV-energy ion beams, elastic collisions occur between projectiles and atoms of constituent molecules. The collisions produce fragments, making the acquisition of molecular information difficult. In contrast, ion beams with MeV-energy excite near-surface electrons and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules; hence, SIMS spectra of fragment-suppressed ionized molecules can be obtained with MeV-SIMS. To compare between MeV and conventional SIMS, we used the two methods based on MeV and Bi{sub 3}-keV ions, respectively, to obtain molecular images of rat cerebellum. Conventional SIMS images of m/z 184 were clearly observed, but with the Bi{sub 3} ion, the distribution of the molecule with m/z 772.5 could be observed with much difficulty. This effect was attributed to the low secondary ion yields and we could not get many signal counts with keV-energy beam. On the other hand, intact molecular ion distributions of lipids were clearly observed with MeV-SIMS, although the mass of all lipid molecules was higher than 500 Da. The peaks of intact molecular ions in MeV-SIMS spectra allowed us to assign the mass. The high secondary ion sensitivity with MeV-energy heavy ions is very useful in biomaterial analysis.

  5. Biomaterial imaging with MeV-energy heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Toshio; Wakamatsu, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Shunichiro; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishihara, Akihiko; Matsuo, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of several chemical compounds in biological tissues and cells can be obtained with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). In conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with keV-energy ion beams, elastic collisions occur between projectiles and atoms of constituent molecules. The collisions produce fragments, making the acquisition of molecular information difficult. In contrast, ion beams with MeV-energy excite near-surface electrons and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules; hence, SIMS spectra of fragment-suppressed ionized molecules can be obtained with MeV-SIMS. To compare between MeV and conventional SIMS, we used the two methods based on MeV and Bi 3 -keV ions, respectively, to obtain molecular images of rat cerebellum. Conventional SIMS images of m/z 184 were clearly observed, but with the Bi 3 ion, the distribution of the molecule with m/z 772.5 could be observed with much difficulty. This effect was attributed to the low secondary ion yields and we could not get many signal counts with keV-energy beam. On the other hand, intact molecular ion distributions of lipids were clearly observed with MeV-SIMS, although the mass of all lipid molecules was higher than 500 Da. The peaks of intact molecular ions in MeV-SIMS spectra allowed us to assign the mass. The high secondary ion sensitivity with MeV-energy heavy ions is very useful in biomaterial analysis

  6. Ion beam production and study of radioactive isotopes with the laser ion source at ISOLDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosseev, Valentin; Chrysalidis, Katerina; Day Goodacre, Thomas; Marsh, Bruce; Rothe, Sebastian; Seiffert, Christoph; Wendt, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    At ISOLDE the majority of radioactive ion beams are produced using the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS). This ion source is based on resonant excitation of atomic transitions by wavelength tunable laser radiation. Since its installation at the ISOLDE facility in 1994, the RILIS laser setup has been developed into a versatile remotely operated laser system comprising state-of-the-art solid state and dye lasers capable of generating multiple high quality laser beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. A continuous programme of atomic ionization scheme development at CERN and at other laboratories has gradually increased the number of RILIS-ionized elements. At present, isotopes of 40 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized by the ISOLDE RILIS. Studies related to the optimization of the laser-atom interaction environment have yielded new laser ion source types: the laser ion source and trap and the versatile arc discharge and laser ion source. Depending on the specific experimental requirements for beam purity or versatility to switch between different ionization mechanisms, these may offer a favourable alternative to the standard hot metal cavity configuration. In addition to its main purpose of ion beam production, the RILIS is used for laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes. In an ongoing experimental campaign the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of long isotopic chains have been measured by the extremely sensitive in-source laser spectroscopy method. The studies performed in the lead region were focused on nuclear deformation and shape coexistence effects around the closed proton shell Z = 82. The paper describes the functional principles of the RILIS, the current status of the laser system and demonstrated capabilities for the production of different ion beams including the high-resolution studies of short-lived isotopes and other applications of RILIS lasers for ISOLDE experiments. This article belongs to the Focus on

  7. A modified Katsumata probe - ion sensitive probe for measurement in non-magnetized plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čada, Martin; Hubička, Zdeněk; Adámek, Petr; Olejníček, Jiří; Kment, Štěpán; Adámek, Jiří; Stöckel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 7 (2015), "073510-1"-"073510-7" ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : Katsumata probe * non-magnetized plasma * magnetron * ion temperature * non-magnetized plasmas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.336, year: 2015

  8. Use of selenium to detect mercury in water and cells: an enhancement of the sensitivity and specificity of a seleno fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Ding, Baiyu; Xu, Kehua; Tong, Lili

    2009-01-01

    Seleno fluorescent probe: An organoselenium fluorescent probe (FSe-1) for mercury was designed based on the irreversible deselenation mechanism. FSe-1 exhibits an ultrahigh selectivity and sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection only for reactive selenium atom sites, due the strong affinity between Se and Hg. Furthermore, the new probe has been successfully used for imaging mercury ions in RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse macrophage cell line; see figure).Inspired by the antitoxic function of selenium towards heavy-metal ions, we designed an organoselenium fluorescent probe (FSe-1) for mercury. The reaction of FSe-1 and Hg(2+) is an irreversible deselenation mechanism based on the selenophilic character of mercury. FSe-1 exhibits an ultrahigh selectivity and sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection only for reactive selenium atom sites due to the strong affinity between Se and Hg. The experimental results proved that FSe-1 was selective for Hg(2+) ions over other relevant metal ions and bioanalytes, and also showed an enhancement in sensitivity of up to 1.0 nM, which is lower than the current Environmental Protection Agency standard for drinking water. Furthermore, the new probe has been successfully applied to the imaging of mercury ions in RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse macrophage cell line) with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  9. Parg deficiency confers radio-sensitization through enhanced cell death in mouse ES cells exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Hidenori; Fujimori, Hiroaki [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Gunji, Akemi [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Maeda, Daisuke [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Hirai, Takahisa [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Poetsch, Anna R. [ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Harada, Hiromi [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Yoshida, Tomoko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kyoritsu College of Pharmacy, 1-5-30 Shibakoen, Minatoku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Okayasu, Ryuichi [International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Science, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Masutani, Mitsuko, E-mail: mmasutan@ncc.go.jp [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •Parg{sup −/−} ES cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} ES cells. •Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. •Parg{sup −/−} cells showed defects in DSB repair after carbon-ion irradiation. •PAR accumulation was enhanced after carbon-ion irradiation compared to γ-irradiation. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (Parg) is the main enzyme involved in poly(ADP-ribose) degradation. Here, the effects of Parg deficiency on sensitivity to low and high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation were investigated in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mouse Parg{sup −/−} and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 deficient (Parp-1{sup −/−}) ES cells were used and responses to low and high LET radiation were assessed by clonogenic survival and biochemical and biological analysis methods. Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. Transient accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) was enhanced in Parg{sup −/−} cells. Augmented levels of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) from early phase were observed in Parg{sup −/−} ES cells. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was similar in wild-type and Parp-1{sup −/−} cells and apoptotic cell death process was mainly observed in the both genotypes. These results suggested that the enhanced sensitivity of Parg{sup −/−} ES cells to γ-irradiation involved defective repair of DNA double strand breaks. The effects of Parg and Parp-1 deficiency on the ES cell response to carbon-ion irradiation (LET13 and 70 keV/μm) and Fe-ion irradiation (200 keV/μm) were also examined. Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to LET 70 keV/μm carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. Enhanced apoptotic cell death also accompanied augmented levels of γ-H2AX in a biphasic manner peaked at 1 and 24 h. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was

  10. Parg deficiency confers radio-sensitization through enhanced cell death in mouse ES cells exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Hidenori; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Gunji, Akemi; Maeda, Daisuke; Hirai, Takahisa; Poetsch, Anna R.; Harada, Hiromi; Yoshida, Tomoko; Sasai, Keisuke; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Parg −/− ES cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1 −/− ES cells. •Parg −/− cells were more sensitive to carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1 −/− cells. •Parg −/− cells showed defects in DSB repair after carbon-ion irradiation. •PAR accumulation was enhanced after carbon-ion irradiation compared to γ-irradiation. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (Parg) is the main enzyme involved in poly(ADP-ribose) degradation. Here, the effects of Parg deficiency on sensitivity to low and high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation were investigated in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mouse Parg −/− and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 deficient (Parp-1 −/− ) ES cells were used and responses to low and high LET radiation were assessed by clonogenic survival and biochemical and biological analysis methods. Parg −/− cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1 −/− cells. Transient accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) was enhanced in Parg −/− cells. Augmented levels of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) from early phase were observed in Parg −/− ES cells. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was similar in wild-type and Parp-1 −/− cells and apoptotic cell death process was mainly observed in the both genotypes. These results suggested that the enhanced sensitivity of Parg −/− ES cells to γ-irradiation involved defective repair of DNA double strand breaks. The effects of Parg and Parp-1 deficiency on the ES cell response to carbon-ion irradiation (LET13 and 70 keV/μm) and Fe-ion irradiation (200 keV/μm) were also examined. Parg −/− cells were more sensitive to LET 70 keV/μm carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1 −/− cells. Enhanced apoptotic cell death also accompanied augmented levels of γ-H2AX in a biphasic manner peaked at 1 and 24 h. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was not different between wild-type and Parg −/− cells. The augmented

  11. A self-amplified transistor immunosensor under dual gate operation: highly sensitive detection of hepatitis B surface antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.-K.; Jeun, M.; Jang, H.-J.; Cho, W.-J.; Lee, K. H.

    2015-10-01

    Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor based on a self-amplified transistor under dual gate operation (immuno-DG ISFET) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen. To address the challenges in current ISFET-based immunosensors, we have enhanced the sensitivity of an immunosensor by precisely tailoring the nanostructure of the transistor. In the pH sensing test, the immuno-DG ISFET showed superior sensitivity (2085.53 mV per pH) to both standard ISFET under single gate operation (58.88 mV per pH) and DG ISFET with a non-tailored transistor (381.14 mV per pH). Moreover, concerning the detection of hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) using the immuno-DG ISFET, we have successfully detected trace amounts of HBsAg (22.5 fg mL-1) in a non-diluted 1× PBS medium with a high sensitivity of 690 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proposed immuno-DG ISFET can be a biosensor platform for practical use in the diagnosis of various diseases.Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor

  12. Atomic structure of highly-charged ions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, A. Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Atomic properties of multiply charged ions have been investigated using excitation of energetic heavy ion beams. Spectroscopy of excited atomic transitions has been applied from the visible to the extreme ultraviolet wavelength regions to provide accurate atomic structure and transition rate data in selected highly ionized atoms. High-resolution position-sensitive photon detection has been introduced for measurements in the ultraviolet region. The detailed structures of Rydberg states in highly charged beryllium-like ions have been measured as a test of long-range electron-ion interactions. The measurements are supported by multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations and by many-body perturbation theory. The high-angular-momentum Rydberg transitions may be used to establish reference wavelengths and improve the accuracy of ionization energies in highly charged systems. Precision wavelength measurements in highly charged few-electron ions have been performed to test the most accurate relativistic atomic structure calculations for prominent low-lying excited states. Lifetime measurements for allowed and forbidden transitions in highly charged few-electron ions have been made to test theoretical transition matrix elements for simple atomic systems. Precision lifetime measurements in laser-excited alkali atoms have been initiated to establish the accuracy of relativistic atomic many-body theory in many-electron systems

  13. Angular distributions of ions channeled in the Si crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, S.; Korica, S.; Kokkoris, M.; Neskovic, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we analyze the angular distributions of Ne 10+ ions channeled in the Si crystals. The ion energy is 60 MeV and the crystal thickness is varied from 286 to 3435 nm. This thickness range corresponds to the reduced crystal thickness range from 0.5 to 6, i.e. from the second to the twelfth rainbow cycle. The angular distributions were obtained via the numerical solution of the ion equations of motion and the computer simulation method. The analysis shows that the angular distribution has a periodic behavior. We also analyze the transmission patterns corresponding to the angular distributions. These patterns should be compared to the experimental patterns obtainable by a two-dimensional position sensitive detector. We demonstrate that, when the ion beam divergence is sufficiently large, i.e. much larger than the critical angle for channeling, the channeling star effect occurs in the transmission patterns

  14. Divalent Cations Regulate the Ion Conductance Properties of Diverse Classes of Aquaporins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Kourghi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are known to facilitate water and solute fluxes across barrier membranes. An increasing number of AQPs are being found to serve as ion channels. Ion and water permeability of selected plant and animal AQPs (plant Arabidopsis thaliana AtPIP2;1, AtPIP2;2, AtPIP2;7, human Homo sapiens HsAQP1, rat Rattus norvegicus RnAQP4, RnAQP5, and fly Drosophila melanogaster DmBIB were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined in chelator-buffered salines to evaluate the effects of divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Ba2+ and Cd2+ on ionic conductances. AtPIP2;1, AtPIP2;2, HsAQP1 and DmBIB expressing oocytes had ionic conductances, and showed differential sensitivity to block by external Ca2+. The order of potency of inhibition by Ca2+ was AtPIP2;2 > AtPIP2;1 > DmBIB > HsAQP1. Blockage of the AQP cation channels by Ba2+ and Cd2+ caused voltage-sensitive outward rectification. The channels with the highest sensitivity to Ca2+ (AtPIP2;1 and AtPIP2;2 showed a distinctive relief of the Ca2+ block by co-application of excess Ba2+, suggesting that divalent ions act at the same site. Recognizing the regulatory role of divalent cations may enable the discovery of other classes of AQP ion channels, and facilitate the development of tools for modulating AQP ion channels. Modulators of AQPs have potential value for diverse applications including improving salinity tolerance in plants, controlling vector-borne diseases, and intervening in serious clinical conditions involving AQPs, such as cancer metastasis, cardiovascular or renal dysfunction.

  15. A highly sensitive, selective and turn-off fluorescent sensor based on phenylamine-oligothiophene derivative for rapid detection of Hg{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xingxing; Niu, Qingfen, E-mail: qf_niu1216@qlu.edu.cn; Li, Tianduo; Cui, Yuezhi; Zhang, Shanshan

    2016-07-15

    A fluorescent sensor based on phenylamine-oligothiophene derivative 3TEA was reported. This sensor showed highly selective and sensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} ion in THF/H{sub 2}O (7/3, v/v) solution through fluorescence quenching. The detection was unaffected by other competitive metal ions. The detection limit was found to be as low as 3.952×10{sup −7} M estimated by the titration method. The recognition process is reversible and confirmed by EDTA experiment. The turn-off fluorescence behavior of mercury interaction with 3TEA has been found to be so fast that it can be used for its qualitative as well as quantitative estimation. - Highlights: • A highly sensitive and selective fluorescence chemosensor 3TEA was reported. • 3TEA features high sensitive with the detection limit for Hg{sup 2+} ions was as low as 3.952×10{sup −7} M. • 3TEA can detect Hg{sup 2+} ion on-line and in real time.

  16. Analysis of abused drugs by selected ion monitoring: quantitative comparison of electron impact and chemical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltz, R.L.; Knowlton, D.A.; Lin, D.C.K.; Fentiman, A.F. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison was made of the relative sensitivities of electron impact and chemical ionization when used for selected ion monitoring analysis of commonly abused drugs. For most of the drugs examined chemical ionization using ammonia as the reactant gas gave the largest single m/e ion current response per unit weight of sample. However, if maximum sensitivity is desired it is important to evaluate electron impact and chemical ionization with respect to both maximum response and degree of interference from background and endogenous materials

  17. Highly charged ion based time-of-flight emission microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, Alex V.; Barnes, Alan V.; Magee, Ed; Newman, Mike; Schenkel, Thomas; McDonald, Joseph W.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2000-01-01

    An emission microscope using highly charged ions as the excitation source has been designed, constructed, and operated. A novel ''acorn'' objective lens has been used to simultaneously image electron and secondary ion emission. A resistive anode-position sensitive detector is used to determine the x-y position and time of arrival of the secondary events at the microscope image plane. Contrast in the image can be based on the intensity of the electron emission and/or the presence of particular secondary ions. Spatial resolution of better than 1 μm and mass resolution m/Δm of better than 400 were demonstrated. Background rejection from uncorrelated events of greater than an order of magnitude is also achieved. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  18. Intrinsic rotation produced by ion orbit loss and X-loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W. M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Boedo, J. A. [University of California - San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Evans, T. E.; Groebner, R. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08453 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    A practical calculation model for the intrinsic rotation imparted to the edge plasma by the directionally preferential loss of ions on orbits that cross the last closed flux surface is presented and applied to calculate intrinsic rotation in several DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] discharges. The intrinsic rotation produced by ion loss is found to be sensitive to the edge temperature and radial electric field profiles, which has implications for driving intrinsic rotation in future large tokamaks.

  19. An evolutionarily conserved gene family encodes proton-selective ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yu-Hsiang; Cooper, Alexander J; Teng, Bochuan; Chang, Rui B; Artiga, Daniel J; Turner, Heather N; Mulhall, Eric M; Ye, Wenlei; Smith, Andrew D; Liman, Emily R

    2018-03-02

    Ion channels form the basis for cellular electrical signaling. Despite the scores of genetically identified ion channels selective for other monatomic ions, only one type of proton-selective ion channel has been found in eukaryotic cells. By comparative transcriptome analysis of mouse taste receptor cells, we identified Otopetrin1 (OTOP1), a protein required for development of gravity-sensing otoconia in the vestibular system, as forming a proton-selective ion channel. We found that murine OTOP1 is enriched in acid-detecting taste receptor cells and is required for their zinc-sensitive proton conductance. Two related murine genes, Otop2 and Otop3 , and a Drosophila ortholog also encode proton channels. Evolutionary conservation of the gene family and its widespread tissue distribution suggest a broad role for proton channels in physiology and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Irradiation of graphene field effect transistors with highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, P.; Kozubek, R.; Madauß, L.; Sonntag, J.; Lorke, A.; Schleberger, M., E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de

    2016-09-01

    In this work, graphene field-effect transistors are used to detect defects due to irradiation with slow, highly charged ions. In order to avoid contamination effects, a dedicated ultra-high vacuum set up has been designed and installed for the in situ cleaning and electrical characterization of graphene field-effect transistors during irradiation. To investigate the electrical and structural modifications of irradiated graphene field-effect transistors, their transfer characteristics as well as the corresponding Raman spectra are analyzed as a function of ion fluence for two different charge states. The irradiation experiments show a decreasing mobility with increasing fluences. The mobility reduction scales with the potential energy of the ions. In comparison to Raman spectroscopy, the transport properties of graphene show an extremely high sensitivity with respect to ion irradiation: a significant drop of the mobility is observed already at fluences below 15 ions/μm{sup 2}, which is more than one order of magnitude lower than what is required for Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Ion mobility analyzer - quadrupole mass spectrometer system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuna, C; Leuca, M; Lupsa, N; Mirel, V; Cuna, Stela; Cosma, V; Tusa, Florina; Bocos-Bintintan, V

    2009-01-01

    Because of their extremely high sensitivity for chemicals with elevated electronegativity or high proton affinity the ion mobility analysers are ideal for the ultra-trace detection of toxic or explosive chemicals, most of these situated often at concentration levels of sub-ppb (parts-per-billion). Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) can be used to identify illicit drugs or environmental pollutants. Since resolution of an IMS is relatively low, to achieve an accurate identification of target analyte it is recommended to couple the IMS with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) or a time of flight mass spectrometer, acquiring in this way confirmatory information. This coupling is made through a specific interface. In this paper, an experimental model of such a tandem instrument, IMS-QMS is described. Accomplishment of this general purpose will be done, overcoming a series of specific issues. This implies the solving, using innovative solutions, of a series of complex issues: ensuring the stability of the ions beam generated by ion source; transfer with a good efficiency of the ionic current from IMS analyser to QMS; and realization of a special electronic circuitry which will be able to detect both positive and negative ions.

  2. Ion mobility analyzer - quadrupole mass spectrometer system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuna, C; Leuca, M; Lupsa, N; Mirel, V; Cuna, Stela; Cosma, V; Tusa, Florina [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Bocos-Bintintan, V, E-mail: cornel.cuna@itim-cj.r [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, 3 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    Because of their extremely high sensitivity for chemicals with elevated electronegativity or high proton affinity the ion mobility analysers are ideal for the ultra-trace detection of toxic or explosive chemicals, most of these situated often at concentration levels of sub-ppb (parts-per-billion). Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) can be used to identify illicit drugs or environmental pollutants. Since resolution of an IMS is relatively low, to achieve an accurate identification of target analyte it is recommended to couple the IMS with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) or a time of flight mass spectrometer, acquiring in this way confirmatory information. This coupling is made through a specific interface. In this paper, an experimental model of such a tandem instrument, IMS-QMS is described. Accomplishment of this general purpose will be done, overcoming a series of specific issues. This implies the solving, using innovative solutions, of a series of complex issues: ensuring the stability of the ions beam generated by ion source; transfer with a good efficiency of the ionic current from IMS analyser to QMS; and realization of a special electronic circuitry which will be able to detect both positive and negative ions.

  3. Boron profiles in doped amorphous-silicon solar cells formed by plasma ion deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, C.T.H.; Hunt, C.P.; Coleman, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Amorphous silicon p-n junction solar cells of large area (100 cm 2 ) and having a quantum efficiency approaching 100% in the blue region have been prepared by plasma ion-plating, the p layer being formed from diborane and silane gases in a cathode glow-discharge. Surface secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with ion beam etching was found to be a very sensitive method with high in-depth resolution for obtaining the initial boron-silicon profile of the solar cell p-n junction. (author)

  4. Large amplitude ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejoh, Y.; Sanuki, H.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear wave structures of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves are studied in a plasma with an electron beam, by the pseudopotential method. The region of the existence of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves is examined, showing that the condition of the existence sensitively depends on the parameters such as the electron beam temperature, the ion temperature, the electrostatic potential, and the concentration of the electron beam density. It turns out that the region of the existence spreads as the beam temperature increases but the effect of the electron beam velocity is relatively small. New findings of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with an electron beam are predicted. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  5. Ion channel recordings on an injection-molded polymer chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanzi, Simone; Matteucci, Marco; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann

    2013-01-01

    state-of-the-art system for automated ion channel recordings. These experiments considered current–voltage (IV) relationships for activation and inactivation of the Nav1.7 channels and their sensitivity to a local anesthetic, lidocaine. Both IVs and lidocaine dose–response curves obtained from...

  6. A new pH-sensitive rectifying potassium channel in mitochondria from the embryonic rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajma, Anna; Szewczyk, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Patch-clamp single-channel studies on mitochondria isolated from embryonic rat hippocampus revealed the presence of two different potassium ion channels: a large-conductance (288±4pS) calcium-activated potassium channel and second potassium channel with outwardly rectifying activity under symmetric conditions (150/150mM KCl). At positive voltages, this channel displayed a conductance of 67.84pS and a strong voltage dependence at holding potentials from -80mV to +80mV. The open probability was higher at positive than at negative voltages. Patch-clamp studies at the mitoplast-attached mode showed that the channel was not sensitive to activators and inhibitors of mitochondrial potassium channels but was regulated by pH. Moreover, we demonstrated that the channel activity was not affected by the application of lidocaine, an inhibitor of two-pore domain potassium channels, or by tertiapin, an inhibitor of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. In summary, based on the single-channel recordings, we characterised for the first time mitochondrial pH-sensitive ion channel that is selective for cations, permeable to potassium ions, displays voltage sensitivity and does not correspond to any previously described potassium ion channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing toxicity of varying major ion concentrations to marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, D.R.; Quast, W.

    1993-01-01

    Recent regulatory developments have required that produced waters discharged in the Gulf of Mexico be monitored for toxicity to marine organisms. While produced water may contain a variety of indigenous and introduced chemicals, virtually all have moderate to high concentrations of major ions. Although seawater is also rich in these ions, excessive salinity can cause toxicity to marine organisms. Perhaps more importantly, toxicity to marine organisms can be caused by deviations from normal ion ratios even if the total salinity is within organism tolerances. To provide a better understanding of marine organism responses to variations in major ion concentrations, the authors conducted a series of laboratory experiments to quantify the responses of mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) to modifications of normal seawater chemistry. Acute testing included both increasing and decreasing the concentrations of individual ions relative to seawater, as well as altering total salinity. Results show these organisms can be adversely affected by this altered chemistry and their sensitivity is dependent upon the individual ions that are manipulated. Results from these studies are being incorporated into an overall strategy for evaluating the influence of major ion chemistry on produced water toxicity tests

  8. Radiation Environment Model of Protons and Heavier Ions at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Luz Maria Martinez; Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    We performed an in depth study of the methods used to review the geometric factors (GF) and sensitivity to charge particles of the Energetic Particle Detector instrument on board the Galileo Spacecraft. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the interactions of electrons and ions (i. e., protons and alphas) with the sensitive regions of the instrument. The DC0 and B0 channels were studied with the intention of using them to update the jovian proton radiation model. The results proved that the B0 is a clean proton chanel without any concerns for contamination by heavier ions and electrons. In contrast, DC0 was found to be contaminated by electrons. Furthermore, we also found out that the B2 channel is a clean alpha particle channel (in other words, no contamination by electrons and/or protons).

  9. Three-dimensional printed knotted reactors enabling highly sensitive differentiation of silver nanoparticles and ions in aqueous environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Cheng-Kuan, E-mail: chengkuan@ntou.edu.tw [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, 20224, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sun, Yuh-Chang, E-mail: ycsun@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-03-31

    Whether silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) persist or release silver ions (Ag{sup +}) when discharged into a natural environment has remained an unresolved issue. In this study, we employed a low-cost stereolithographic three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology to fabricate the angle-defined knotted reactors (KRs) to construct a simple differentiation scheme for quantitative assessment of Ag{sup +} ions and AgNPs in municipal wastewater samples. We chose xanthan/phosphate-buffered saline as a dispersion medium for in situ stabilization of the two silver species, while also facilitating their extraction from complicated wastewater matrices. After method optimization, we measured extraction efficiencies of 54.5 and 32.3% for retaining Ag{sup +} ions and AgNPs, respectively, in the printed KR (768-turn), with detection limits (DLs) of 0.86 and 0.52 ng L{sup −1} when determining Ag{sup +} ions and AgNPs, respectively (sample run at pH 11 without a rinse solution), and 0.86 ng L{sup −1} when determining Ag{sup +} ions alone (sample run at pH 12 with a 1.5-mL rinse solution). The proposed scheme is tolerant of the wastewater matrix and provides more reliable differentiation between Ag{sup +}/AgNPs than does a conventional filtration method. The concept and applicability of adopting 3DP technology to renew traditional KR devices were evidently proven by means of these significantly improved analytical performance. Our analytical data suggested that the concentrations of Ag{sup +} ions and AgNPs in the tested industrial wastewater sample were both higher than those in domestic wastewater, implying that industrial activity might be a main source of environmental silver species, rather than domestic discharge from AgNP-containing products. - Highlights: • 3D printed knotted reactors are utilized to differentiate AgNPs and Ag{sup +} ions. • Xanthan/phosphate-buffered saline is used for stabilizing the two silver species. • Extraction efficiency up to 54.5% is

  10. Mutation induction by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J.; Stoll, U.; Schneider, E.

    1994-10-01

    Mutation induction by heavy ions is compared in yeast and mammalian cells. Since mutants can only be recovered in survivors the influence of inactivation cross sections has to be taken into account. It is shown that both the size of the sensitive cellular site as well as track structure play an important role. Another parameter which influences the probability of mutation induction is repair: Contrary to naive assumptions primary radiation damage does not directly lead to mutations but requires modification to reconstitute the genetic machinery so that mutants can survive. The molecular structure of mutations was analyzed after exposure to deuterons by amplification with the aid of polymerase chain reaction. The results-although preliminary-demonstrate that even with densely ionizing particles a large fraction does not carry big deletions which suggests that point mutations may also be induced by heavy ions.

  11. Photoelectrochemical detection of copper ions by modulating the growth of CdS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyte, Ruta; Barroso, Javier; Díez-Buitrago, Beatriz; Saa, Laura; Möller, Marco; Pavlov, Valeri

    2017-09-15

    We discovered that copper ions (Cu 2+ ) catalyze the oxidation of cysteine (CSH) by oxygen (O 2 ) to modulate the growth of CSH-capped cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs). This new chemical process was applied to sensitive fluorogenic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection of Cu 2+ ions in real samples of mineral and tap water using the photocatalytic activity of the resulting NPs. Disposable screen-printed electrodes (SPCEs) modified with electroactive polyvinylpyridine bearing osmium complex (Os-PVP) by cyclic voltammetry (CV) were employed for PEC analytical system. CdS NPs formed during the assay photocatalyze oxidation of 1-thioglycerol (TG) upon application of 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl to SPCEs. Os-PVP complex mediated the electron transfer between the electrode surface and CdS NPs. We proved that our assays did not suffer from interference from other ions accompanying Cu 2+ and the sensitivity of our assays covers the European Union standard limit of Cu 2+ ions in drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Scanning ion deep level transient spectroscopy: II. Ion irradiated Au-Si Schottky junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, J S; Jagadish, C; Jamieson, D N; Legge, G J F

    2006-01-01

    Here we introduce a new technique called scanning ion deep level transient spectroscopy (SIDLTS) for the spatial analysis of electrically active defects in devices. In the first part of this paper, a simple theory behind SIDLTS was introduced and factors determining its sensitivity and resolution were discussed. In this paper, we demonstrate the technique on MeV boron implantation induced defects in an Au-Si Schottky junction. SIDLTS measurements are compared with capacitance DLTS measurements over the temperature range, 100-300 K. SIDLTS analyses indicate the presence of two levels, one of which was positively identified as the E c - 0.23 eV divacancy level. The high sensitivity of SIDLTS is verified and the advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed in light of non-exponential components in the charge transient response. Reasons for several undetected levels are also discussed

  13. Classical-limit S-matrix for heavy ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donangelo, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    An integral representation for the classical limit of the quantum mechanical S-matrix is developed and applied to heavy-ion Coulomb excitation and Coulomb-nuclear interference. The method combines the quantum principle of superposition with exact classical dynamics to describe the projectile-target system. A detailed consideration of the classical trajectories and of the dimensionless parameters that characterize the system is carried out. The results are compared, where possible, to exact quantum mechanical calculations and to conventional semiclassical calculations. It is found that in the case of backscattering the classical limit S-matrix method is able to almost exactly reproduce the quantum-mechanical S-matrix elements, and therefore the transition probabilities, even for projectiles as light as protons. The results also suggest that this approach should be a better approximation for heavy-ion multiple Coulomb excitation than earlier semiclassical methods, due to a more accurate description of the classical orbits in the electromagnetic field of the target nucleus. Calculations using this method indicate that the rotational excitation probabilities in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region should be very sensitive to the details of the potential at the surface of the nucleus, suggesting that heavy-ion rotational excitation could constitute a sensitive probe of the nuclear potential in this region. The application to other problems as well as the present limits of applicability of the formalism are also discussed

  14. Electron beam ion trap bi-annual report 1996/1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1999-01-01

    The research of the EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap) program in N Division of the Physics and Space Technology Directorate at LLNL continues to contribute significantly to the understanding of physical processes with low energy highly charged ions in atomic physics, plasma physics, and material science. Low-energy highly charged ions (up to U 92+ ), provided by the EBIT facilities, provide a unique laboratory opportunity to study high field effects in atomic structures and dynamic interaction processes. The formation, existence, and structure of highly charged ions in astrophysical environments and laboratory plasmas make highly charged ions desirable for diagnosing various plasma conditions. The strong interaction of highly charged ions with matter and the response of solid surfaces make them a sensitive analysis tool and possibly a future capability for materials modifications at the atomic scale (nano technology). These physical applications require a good understanding and careful study of the dynamics of the interactions of the ions with complex systems. The EBIT group hosted an international conference and a workshop on trapped charged particles. The various talks and discussions showed that physics research with trapped charged particles is a very active and attractive area of innovative research, and provides a basis for research efforts in new areas. It also became obvious that the EBIT/RETRAP project has unique capabilities to perform important new experiments with trapped very highly charged ions at rest, which are complementary to and competitive with research at heavy ion storage rings and other trapping facilities planned or in operation in Europe, Japan, and the United States. Atomic structure research at EBIT provides ever better and more experimental complete benchmark data, supplying data needed to improve atomic theories. Research highlights through 1996 and 1997 include hyperfine structure measurements in H-like ions, QED studies, lifetime and

  15. The Stanford-U.S. Geological Survey SHRIMP ion microprobe--a tool for micro-scale chemical and isotopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Grove, Marty; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Coble, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Answers to many questions in Earth science require chemical analysis of minute volumes of minerals, volcanic glass, or biological materials. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is an extremely sensitive analytical method in which a 5–30 micrometer diameter "primary" beam of charged particles (ions) is focused on a region of a solid specimen to sputter secondary ions from 1–5 nanograms of the sample under high vacuum. The elemental abundances and isotopic ratios of these secondary ions are determined with a mass spectrometer. These results can be used for geochronology to determine the age of a region within a crystal thousands to billions of years old or to precisely measure trace abundances of chemical elements at concentrations as low as parts per billion. A partnership of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Stanford University School of Earth Sciences operates a large SIMS instrument, the Sensitive High-Resolution Ion Microprobe with Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP–RG) on the Stanford campus.

  16. Calculation of ion storage in electron beams with account of ion-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel'shtejn, Eh.A.; Shirkov, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    Ion storage in relativistic electron beams was calculated taking account of ion-ion charge exchange and ionization. The calculations were made for nitrogen ion storage from residual gas during the compression of electron rings in the adhezator of the JINR heavy ion accelerator. The calculations were made for rings of various parameters and for various pressures of the residual gas. The results are compared with analogous calculations made without account of ion-ion processes. It is shown that at heavy loading of a ring by ions ion-ion collisions play a significant part, and they should be taken into account while calculating ion storage

  17. Electron-capture negative-ion mass spectrometry: a technique for environmental contaminant identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stemmler, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry (ECNIMS) is a method used to generate negative ions in a mass spectrometer by electron-molecule reactions. This technique facilitates the sensitive and selective detection of many toxic contaminants in environmental samples. Applications of this technique have been hindered by the limited understanding of instrumental parameters, by the questionable reproducibility of negative ion mass spectra, and by the inability to interpret negative ion mass spectra. Instrumental parameters which were important to control include the ion source temperature, ion source pressure, sample concentration, and the focus lens potential. The ability to obtain reproducible spectra was demonstrated by measurement of the spectrum of decafluorotriphenylphosphine (DFTPP) over a period of one year. Negative ion fragmentation mechanisms were studied by measuring the spectra of structurally related classes of compounds and isotopically labelled compounds. These results were combined with data obtained by other researchers. Fragmentations characteristic of particular functional groups or molecular structures have been summarized. From this data set, guidelines for the interpretation of electron capture negative ion mass spectra have been developed

  18. A model of cardiac ryanodine receptor gating predicts experimental Ca2+-dynamics and Ca2+-triggered arrhythmia in the long QT syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dan; Ermentrout, Bard; Němec, Jan; Salama, Guy

    2017-09-01

    Abnormal Ca2+ handling is well-established as the trigger of cardiac arrhythmia in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and digoxin toxicity, but its role remains controversial in Torsade de Pointes (TdP), the arrhythmia associated with the long QT syndrome (LQTS). Recent experimental results show that early afterdepolarizations (EADs) that initiate TdP are caused by spontaneous (non-voltage-triggered) Ca2+ release from Ca2+-overloaded sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) rather than the activation of the L-type Ca2+-channel window current. In bradycardia and long QT type 2 (LQT2), a second, non-voltage triggered cytosolic Ca2+ elevation increases gradually in amplitude, occurs before overt voltage instability, and then precedes the rise of EADs. Here, we used a modified Shannon-Puglisi-Bers model of rabbit ventricular myocytes to reproduce experimental Ca2+ dynamics in bradycardia and LQT2. Abnormal systolic Ca2+-oscillations and EADs caused by SR Ca2+-release are reproduced in a modified 0-dimensional model, where 3 gates in series control the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) conductance. Two gates control RyR2 activation and inactivation and sense cytosolic Ca2+ while a third gate senses luminal junctional SR Ca2+. The model predicts EADs in bradycardia and low extracellular [K+] and cessation of SR Ca2+-release terminate salvos of EADs. Ca2+-waves, systolic cell-synchronous Ca2+-release, and multifocal diastolic Ca2+ release seen in subcellular Ca2+-mapping experiments are observed in the 2-dimensional version of the model. These results support the role of SR Ca2+-overload, abnormal SR Ca2+-release, and the subsequent activation of the electrogenic Na+/Ca2+-exchanger as the mechanism of TdP. The model offers new insights into the genesis of cardiac arrhythmia and new therapeutic strategies.

  19. Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, Maxime; Paquet, Jean-Francois; Young, Clint; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles; Schenke, Bjoern

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the production of real thermal photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are performed. The space-time evolution of the colliding system is modelled using music, a 3+1D relativistic hydrodynamic simulation, using both its ideal and viscous versions. The inclusive spectrum and its azimuthal angular anisotropy are studied separately, and the relative contributions of the different photon sources are highlighted. It is shown that the photon v 2 coefficient is especially sensitive to the details of the microscopic dynamics like the equation of state, the ratio of shear viscosity over entropy density, η/s, and to the morphology of the initial state.

  20. High energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    High energy ion implantation offers the oppertunity for unique structures in semiconductor processing. The unusual physical properties of such implantations are discussed as well as the special problems in masking and damage annealing. A review is made of proposed circuit structures which involve deep implantation. Examples are: deep buried bipolar collectors fabricated without epitaxy, barrier layers to reduce FET memory sensitivity to soft-fails, CMOS isolation well structures, MeV implantation for customization and correction of completed circuits, and graded reach-throughs to deep active device components. (orig.)

  1. A method for atomic spectroscopy of highly charged ions in the Pm isoelectronic sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Oe

    1995-08-01

    The aim was to search for alkali-like spectra in the Promethium isoelectronic sequence. Pb{sup 22+} ions were produced by means of an ECR-ion source and accelerated towards a target of He gas. Colliding with He atoms the Pb{sup 22+} ions are likely to capture an electron, thus forming an excited Pm-like ion (Pb{sup 21+}). A 2 m grazing-incidence spectrometer was used for recording the spectra arising as the accelerated ions impinge on the target. No lines were recorded throughout the wavelength region where the spectrometer is sensitive. Further experiments are needed to make clear if this is due to experimental errors or not. 14 refs, 8 figs.

  2. High Resolution Separations and Improved Ion Production and Transmission in Metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O.; Page, Jason S.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Tang, Keqi; Ding, Jie; Shen, Yufeng; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-31

    The goal of metabolomics experiments is the detection and quantitation of as many sample components as reasonably possible in order to identify “features” that can be used to characterize the samples under study. When utilizing electrospray ionization to produce ions for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), it is imperative that metabolome sample constituents be efficiently separated prior to ion production, in order to minimize the phenomenon of ionization suppression. Similarly, optimization of the MS inlet can lead to increased measurement sensitivity. This review will focus on the role of high resolution liquid chromatography (LC) separations in conjunction with improved ion production and transmission for LC-MS-based metabolomics.

  3. Detection of Micrococcus Luteus Biofilm Formation in Microfluidic Environments by pH Measurement Using an Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Naruse

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation in microfluidic channels is difficult to detect because sampling volumes are too small for conventional turbidity measurements. To detect biofilm formation, we used an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET measurement system to measure pH changes in small volumes of bacterial suspension. Cells of Micrococcus luteus (M. luteus were cultured in polystyrene (PS microtubes and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA-based microfluidic channels laminated with polyvinylidene chloride. In microtubes, concentrations of bacteria and pH in the suspension were analyzed by measuring turbidity and using an ISFET sensor, respectively. In microfluidic channels containing 20 μL of bacterial suspension, we measured pH changes using the ISFET sensor and monitored biofilm formation using a microscope. We detected acidification and alkalinization phases of M. luteus from the ISFET sensor signals in both microtubes and microfluidic channels. In the alkalinization phase, after 2 day culture, dense biofilm formation was observed at the bottom of the microfluidic channels. In this study, we used an ISFET sensor to detect biofilm formation in clinical and industrial microfluidic environments by detecting alkalinization of the culture medium.

  4. Detection of Micrococcus luteus biofilm formation in microfluidic environments by pH measurement using an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Koji; Asano, Yuka; Yamada, Akira; Naruse, Keiji

    2013-02-18

    Biofilm formation in microfluidic channels is difficult to detect because sampling volumes are too small for conventional turbidity measurements. To detect biofilm formation, we used an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) measurement system to measure pH changes in small volumes of bacterial suspension. Cells of Micrococcus luteus (M. luteus) were cultured in polystyrene (PS) microtubes and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based microfluidic channels laminated with polyvinylidene chloride. In microtubes, concentrations of bacteria and pH in the suspension were analyzed by measuring turbidity and using an ISFET sensor, respectively. In microfluidic channels containing 20 μL of bacterial suspension, we measured pH changes using the ISFET sensor and monitored biofilm formation using a microscope. We detected acidification and alkalinization phases of M. luteus from the ISFET sensor signals in both microtubes and microfluidic channels. In the alkalinization phase, after 2 day culture, dense biofilm formation was observed at the bottom of the microfluidic channels. In this study, we used an ISFET sensor to detect biofilm formation in clinical and industrial microfluidic environments by detecting alkalinization of the culture medium. 

  5. Focused ion beam patterned Hall nano-sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candini, A.; Gazzadi, G.C.; Di Bona, A.; Affronte, M.; Ercolani, D.; Biasiol, G.; Sorba, L.

    2007-01-01

    By means of focused ion beam milling, we fabricate Hall magnetometers with active areas as small as 100x100nm 2 . The constituent material can either be metallic (Au), semimetallic (Bi) or doped bulk semiconducting (Si doped GaAs). We experimentally show that Au nano-probes can work from room temperature down to liquid helium with magnetic flux sensitivity -1 Φ 0

  6. Ion-Ion Plasmas Produced by Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernsler, R. F.; Leonhardt, D.; Walton, S. G.; Meger, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    The ability of plasmas to etch deep, small-scale features in materials is limited by localized charging of the features. The features charge because of the difference in electron and ion anisotropy, and thus one solution now being explored is to use ion-ion plasmas in place of electron-ion plasmas. Ion-ion plasmas are effectively electron-free and consist mainly of positive and negative ions. Since the two ion species behave similarly, localized charging is largely eliminated. However, the only way to produce ion-ion plasmas at low gas pressure is to convert electrons into negative ions through two-body attachment to neutrals. While the electron attachment rate is large at low electron temperatures (Te < 1 eV) in many of the halogen gases used for processing, these temperatures occur in most reactors only during the afterglow when the heating fields are turned off and the plasma is decaying. By contrast, Te is low nearly all the time in plasmas produced by electron beams, and therefore electron beams can potentially produce ion-ion plasmas continuously. The theory of ion-ion plasmas formed by pulsed electron beams is examined in this talk and compared with experimental results presented elsewhere [1]. Some general limitations of ion-ion plasmas, including relatively low flux levels, are discussed as well. [1] See the presentation by D. Leonhardt et al. at this conference.

  7. Experimental aspects of S.H.I.C. (Swift Heavy Ion Channeling)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quere, Y.; Mory, J.; Castro Faria, N.V. de; Chevallier, M.; Gaillard, M.J.; Genre, R.; Farizon-Mazuy, B.; Poizat, J.C.; Remillieux, J.; Dural, J.; Toulemonde, M.; Hage-Ali, M.

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the behaviour of swift heavy ions, of initial charge Z 0 , transmitted in a crystal. More precisely we have measured, for various values of Z 0 , the mean stopping power experienced by the ions of exit charge Z, together with the charge distribution n(Z). In this short note, we describe briefly the instrumental set-up, and give two specific results which make it possible to appreciate the accuracy and sensitivity of the experiment

  8. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Suzaki, F.; Izumikawa, T.; Miyazawa, S.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tokanai, F.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Position-sensitive detectors were developed for storage-ring decay spectroscopy. • Fiber scintillation and silicon strip detectors were tested with heavy ion beams. • A new fiber scintillation detector showed an excellent position resolution. • Position and energy detection by silicon strip detectors enable full identification. -- Abstract: As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments

  9. Modification of PMMA/graphite nanocomposites through ion beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Prachi; Rattan, Sunita; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar; Tripathi, Ambuj

    2013-08-01

    Swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation is a special technique for inducing physical and chemical modifications in bulk materials. In the present work, the SHI hs been used to prepare nanocomposites with homogeneously dispersed nanoparticles. The nanographite was synthesized from graphite using the intercalation-exfoliation method. PMMA Poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphite nanocomposites have been synthesized by in situ polymerization. The prepared PMMA/graphite nanocomposite films were irradiated with SHI irradiation (Ni ion beam, 80 MeV and C ion beam, 50 MeV) at a fluence of 1×1010 to 3×1012 ions/cm2. The nanocomposite films were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and were evaluated for their electrical and sensor properties. After irradiation, significant changes in surface morphology of nanocomposites were observed as evident from the SEM images, which show the presence of well-distributed nanographite platelets. The irradiated nanocomposites exhibit better electrical and sensor properties for the detection of nitroaromatics with marked improvement in sensitivity as compared with unirradiated nanocomposites.

  10. Sensitive detection of copper ions via ion-responsive fluorescence quenching of engineered porous silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Hwang, Mintai P.; Choi, Moonhyun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Hong, Jinkee; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-10-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been a problem since the advent of modern transportation, which despite efforts to curb emissions, continues to play a critical role in environmental pollution. Copper ions (Cu2+), in particular, are one of the more prevalent metals that have widespread detrimental ramifications. From this perspective, a simple and inexpensive method of detecting Cu2+ at the micromolar level would be highly desirable. In this study, we use porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs), obtained via anodic etching of Si wafers, as a basis for undecylenic acid (UDA)- or acrylic acid (AA)-mediated hydrosilylation. The resulting alkyl-terminated porous silicon nanoparticles (APS NPs) have enhanced fluorescence stability and intensity, and importantly, exhibit [Cu2+]-dependent quenching of fluorescence. After determining various aqueous sensing conditions for Cu2+, we demonstrate the use of APS NPs in two separate applications - a standard well-based paper kit and a portable layer-by-layer stick kit. Collectively, we demonstrate the potential of APS NPs in sensors for the effective detection of Cu2+.

  11. Dynamical limitations to heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, B.B.

    1983-01-01

    In spite of the many attempts to synthesize superheavy elements in recent years, these efforts have not yet been successful. Recent improved theoretical models of heavy-ion fusion reactions suggest that the formation of super-heavy elements is hindered by the dynamics of the process. Several recent experiments lend support to these theories. The necessity of an excess radial velocity (extra push) over the Coulomb barrier in order to induce fusion is observed experimentally as predicted by the theory. So is a new reaction mechanism, called quasi-fission which tend to exhaust the part of the reaction cross section, which would otherwise lead to fusion. The present study shows that the angular distribution of fragments from quasi-fission processes are very sensitive to the occurrence of this reaction mechanism. A slight modification of one parameter in the theory demanded by the observation of quasi-fission for lighter projectiles via the angular distributions, has the consequence of posing even more-stringent limitations on heavy-ion-fusion reactions. This reduces even further the possibility for synthesizing and identifying superheavy elements in heavy-ion-fusion reactions

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibition sensitizes osteosarcoma to heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Thiemann, Markus; Dittmar, Anne; Roth, Eva; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Ehemann, Volker; Weichert, Wilko; Huber, Peter E.; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Debus, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Minimal improvements in treatment or survival of patients with osteosarcoma have been achieved during the last three decades. Especially in the case of incomplete tumor resection, prognosis remains poor. Heavy ion radiotherapy (HIT) and modern anticancer drugs like histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising effects in osteosarcoma in vitro. In this study, we tested the effect of HIT and the combination of HIT and the HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in a xenograft mouse model. Osteosarcoma xenografts were established by subcutaneous injection of KHOS-24OS cells and treated with either vehicle (DMSO), SAHA, HIT or HIT and SAHA. Tumor growth was determined and tumor necrosis, proliferation rate, apoptotic rate as well as vessel density were evaluated. Here, we show that the combination of HIT and SAHA induced a significant delay of tumor growth through increased rate of apoptosis, increased expression of p53 and p21 Waf1/Cip1 , inhibition of proliferation and angiogenesis compared to tumors treated with HIT only. HIT and in particular the combination of HIT and histone deacetylase inhibition is a promising treatment strategy in OS and may be tested in clinical trials

  13. Amperometric Sensor for Detection of Chloride Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloride ion sensing is important in many fields such as clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and industrial applications. We have measured chloride ions at a carbon paste electrode (CPE and at a CPE modified with solid AgNO3, a solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles. Detection limits (3 S/N for chloride ions were 100 μM, 100 μM and 10 μM for solid AgNO3, solution of AgNO3 and/or solid silver particles, respectively. The CPE modified with silver particles is the most sensitive to the presence chloride ions. After that we approached to the miniaturization of the whole electrochemical instrument. Measurements were carried out on miniaturized instrument consisting of a potentiostat with dimensions 35 × 166 × 125 mm, screen printed electrodes, a peristaltic pump and a PC with control software. Under the most suitable experimental conditions (Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 1.8 and working electrode potential 550 mV we estimated the limit of detection (3 S/N as 500 nM.

  14. On the origin of increased sensitivity and mass resolution using silicon masks in MALDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diologent, Laurent; Franck, Julien; Wisztorski, Maxence; Treizebre, Anthony; Focsa, Cristian; Fournier, Isabelle; Ziskind, Michael

    2014-02-04

    Since its development, MALDI has proved its performance in the analysis of intact biomolecules up to high molecular weights, regardless of their polarity. Sensitivity of MALDI instruments is a key point for breaking the limits of observing biomolecules of lower abundances. Instrumentation is one way to improve sensitivity by increasing ion transmission and using more sensitive detection systems. On the other side, improving MALDI ion production yields would have important outcomes. MALDI ion production is still not well-controlled and, indeed, the amount of ions produced per laser shot with respect to the total volume of desorbed material is very low. This has particular implications for certain applications, such as MALDI MS imaging where laser beam focusing as fine as possible (5-10 μm) is searched in order to reach higher spatial resolution images. However, various studies point out an intrinsic decrease in signal intensity for strong focusing. We have therefore been interested in developing silicon mask systems to decrease an irradiated area by cutting rather than focusing the laser beam and to study the parameters affecting sensitivity using such systems. For this, we systematically examined variation with laser fluence of intensity and spectral resolution in MALDI of standard peptides when using silicon-etched masks of various aperture sizes. These studies demonstrate a simultaneous increase in spectral resolution and signal intensity. Origin of this effect is discussed in the frame of the two-step ionization model. Experimental data in the low fluence range are fitted with an increase of the primary ionization through matrix-silicon edge contact provided by the masks. On the other hand, behavior at higher fluence could be explained by an effect on the secondary ionization via changes in the plume dynamics.

  15. Analytical advantages of copolymeric microspheres for fluorimetric sensing - tuneable sensitivity sensors and titration agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Emilia; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2017-01-15

    Analytical benefits related to application of copolymeric microspheres containing different number of carboxylic acid mers have been studied on example of acrylate copolymers. These structures can be used as a reagent in heterogeneous pH titration, benefiting from different number of reactive groups - i.e. different concentration of a titrant - within the series of copolymers. Thus introducing the same amount of different microspheres from a series to the sample, different amount of the titrant is introduced. Copolymeric microspheres also can be used as optical sensors - in this respect the increasing number of reactive groups in the series is useful to improve the analytical performance of microprobes - sensitivity of determination or/and response range. The increase in ion-permeability of the spheres with increasing number of reactive mers is advantageous. It is shown that for pH sensitive microspheres containing higher number of carboxyl groups the higher sensitivity for alkaline pH samples is observed for an indicator present in the beads. The significant increase of optical responses is related to enhanced ion transport within the microspheres. For zinc or potassium ions model sensors tested it was shown that by choice of pH conditions and type of microspheres from the series, the optical responses can be tuned - to enhance sensitivity for analyte concentration change as well as to change the response pattern from sigmoidal (higher sensitivity, narrow range) to linear (broader response range). For classical optode systems (e.g. microspheres containing an optical transducer - pH sensitive dye and optically silent ionophore - receptor) copolymeric microspheres containing carboxylic acid mers in their structure allow application of the sensor in alkaline pH range, which is usually inaccessible for applied optical transducer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-02-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD.

  17. Simulating Heavy Ion SEUs in the ESA Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Noordeh, Emil

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed SEU measurements made of the ESA Monitor at GSI, RADEF, UCL, and TAMU. An IRPP model was implemented through the use of FLUKA that was calibrated to the measurements of ions above the LET threshold. The model proved successful in reproducing proton measurements that are entirely independent of the calibration. When applied to the sub-threshold region, experimental measurements were underestimated by a factor of $\\sim$3 for the high energy ions at GSI, a factor of $\\sim$10 for the ions at UCL/RADEF, and an anomalous factor of $\\sim$300 for the ion at TAMU. Several possible sources of systematic uncertainty were investigated including sensitive volume size, BEOL thickness, and substrate thickness. Additionally, the impact of including air between the beam and the DUT as well as side effects due to the simulated geometry were explored. It was found that none of these sources can provide a substantial enough impact on the SEU cross-section to reconcile the anomalous measurement made at TAMU.

  18. New approach to 3-D, high sensitivity, high mass resolution space plasma composition measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a new type of 3-D space plasma composition analyzer. The design combines high sensitivity, high mass resolution measurements with somewhat lower mass resolution but even higher sensitivity measurements in a single compact and robust design. While the lower resolution plasma measurements are achieved using conventional straight-through time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the high mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions reflected in a linear electric field (LEF), where the restoring force that an ion experiences is proportional to the depth it travels into the LEF region. Consequently, the ion's equation of motion in that dimension is that of a simple harmonic oscillator and its travel time is simply proportional to the square root of the ion's mass/charge (m/q). While in an ideal LEF, the m/q resolution can be arbitrarily high, in a real device the resolution is limited by the field linearity which can be achieved. In this paper we describe how a nearly linear field can be produced and discuss how the design can be optimized for various different plasma regimes and spacecraft configurations

  19. Ionization balance for Ti and Cr ions: effects of uncertainty in dielectronic recombination rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Il H

    2003-01-01

    The available electron-impact ionization cross sections for Ti and Cr ions are reviewed, and calculations of the ionization balance for the ions under coronal equilibrium are presented. The calculated ionic abundance fractions are compared with those of previous works. The effects of modelling uncertainty in dielectronic recombination on isoelectronic line ratios, which are formed using the same spectral line from two elements of slightly different atomic numbers, are discussed concentrating on high temperature ranges. Also discussed are the effects of modelling uncertainty on inter-ionization stage line ratios formed from adjacent ionization stages. It is demonstrated that the modelling uncertainty in dielectronic recombination tends to cancel out only when the isoelectronic line ratio of He-like ions is considered, and that the sensitivity of the isoelectronic line ratios to the modelling uncertainty tends to increase for less ionized stages. It is also found that the interstage line ratios are less sensitive to the typical ∼20% uncertainties of dielectronic rates than the isoelectronic line ratios, and that the interstage line ratio of He-to Li-like ions in Ti and Cr plasmas is a better choice for a temperature diagnostic in the temperature ranges from ∼0.6 to ∼1.5 keV in which Li-like ions have maximum ionic abundances

  20. Sensitive and direct determination of lithium by mixed-mode chromatography and charged aerosol detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lulu; Wigman, Larry; Zhang, Kelly

    2015-08-21

    A sensitive analytical method using mixed mode HPLC separation coupled with charged aerosol detection (CAD) was developed for quantitative analysis of lithium. The method is capable of separating lithium ion from different drug matrices and other ions in a single run thus eliminating the organic matrix and ionic analyte interferences without extensive sample preparation such as derivatization and extraction. The separation space and chromatographic conditions are defined by systematic studies of the retention behaviors of lithium and potential interfering ions and different type of pharmaceutical APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients) under reversed-phase, HILIC and cation/anion exchange mechanisms. Compared to other current analytical techniques for lithium analysis, the presented method provides a new approach and demonstrates high sensitivity (0.02ng for LOD and 0.08ng for LOQ in both standard and sample solution). The method has been validated for pharmaceutical samples and can be potentially applied to biological, food and environmental samples. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ion cyclotron emission due to collective instability of fusion products and beam ions in TFTR and JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendy, R.O.; McClements, K.G.; Lashmore Davies, C.N.; Cottrell, G.A.; Majeski, R.; Cauffman, S.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been observed from neutral beam heated TFTR and JET tritium experiments at sequential cyclotron harmonics of both fusion products and beam ions. The emission originates from the outer midplane plasma, where fusion products and beam ions are likely to have a drifting ring-type velocity-space distribution that is anisotropic and sharply peaked. Fusion product driven ICE can be attributed to the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, which involves the excitation of obliquely propagating waves on the fast Alfven/ion Bernstein branch at cyclotron harmonics of the fusion products. Differences between ICE observations in JET and TFTR appear to reflect the sensitivity of the instability growth rate to the ratio υ birth /c A , where υ birth is the fusion product birth speed and c A is the local Alfven speed: for fusion products in the outer midplane edge of TFTR supershots, υ birth A ; for alpha particles in the outer midplane edge of JET, the opposite inequality applies. If sub-Alfvenic fusion products are isotropic or have undergone even a moderate degree of thermalization, the magnetoacoustic instability cannot occur. In contrast, the super-Alfvenic alpha particles that are present in the outer midplane of JET can drive the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability even if they are isotropic or have a relatively broad distribution of speeds. These conclusions may account for the observation that fusion product driven ICE in JET persists for longer than fusion product driven ICE in TFTR. A separate mechanism is proposed for the excitation of beam driven ICE in TFTR: electrostatic ion cyclotron harmonic waves, supported by strongly sub-Alfvenic beam ions, can be destabilized by a low concentration of such ions with a very anrrow spread of velocities in the parallel direction. 25 refs, 14 figs

  2. Synthesis and application of novel ion-imprinted polymer coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for selective solid phase extraction of lead(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayazi, Maryam, E-mail: maryam.fayazi@yahoo.com [Mineral Industries Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taher, Mohammad Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afzali, Daryoush [Department of Environment, Institute of Science and High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Graduate University of Advanced Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud, E-mail: m.ghaneimotlagh@yahoo.com [Young Researchers Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    In this study, novel magnetic ion-imprinted polymer (MIIP) nanoparticles were utilized for the sensitive and selective detection of Pb(II) ions by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The Pb(II)-imprinted polymer was synthesized by using 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl) pyrazine (TPPZ) as the chelating agent and magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MMWCNTs) as the carrier. The synthesized MIIP materials were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Various analytical parameters such as extraction and desorption time, eluent type and concentration, pH and sample volume were systematically examined. The selectivity of MIIP sorbent for Pb(II) ions in the presence of some cations was also evaluated. The limit of detection (LOD, 3S{sub b}) and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 8, c = 25 ng L{sup −1}) were found to be 2.4 ng L{sup −1} and 5.6%, respectively. The maximum sorption capacity of the MIIP for Pb(II) was found to be 48.1 mg g{sup −1}. Finally, the proposed analytical procedure was successfully applied to monitoring lead in human hair and water samples with satisfactory results for the spiked samples. - Highlights: • A selective and sensitive method based on MSPE-GFAAS was proposed. • The MIIP nanoparticles were characterized using FE-SEM, XRD, VSM and FT-IR techniques. • The synthesized MIIP material is efficient at extracting lead ions. • The method was applied to determine lead ions in several real samples.

  3. Fluid simulations of toroidal ion temperature gradient turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, I.; Isliker, H.; Pavlenko, V.P.; Hizanidis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode instability is numerically studied by using the equations based on the standard reactive fluid model. The long-term dynamics of the instability are investigated using random-phase, small-amplitude fluctuations for initial conditions. The main events during the evolution of the instability that lead to the formation of large-scale coherent structures are described and the role of the dominant nonlinearities is clarified. The polarization drift nonlinearity leads to the inverse energy cascade while the convective ion heat nonlinearity is responsible for the saturation of the instability. Finally, the sensitivity of the saturated state to the initial plasma conditions is examined

  4. A highly sensitive fluorescent probe based on BODIPY for Hg2+ in aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Junwei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive fluorescent probe based on BODIPY and hydrazine for Hg2+ was designed and synthesized.This probe could detect mercury ions in aqueous solutions within 5 min.With the increase of Hg2+ mole concentration,an obvious red shift of UV-Vis absorption wavelength was observed and the fluorescence intensity significantly enhanced.It was found that the fluorescence intensity of an aqueous solution containing 0.1 μmol/L Hg2+ is much stronger than that of blank solution,which indicats that the fluorescent probe has high sensitivity.In addition,other metal ions could not cause the change of fluorescent spectra,which means this probe has good selectivity,as well.

  5. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blieck, J.

    2008-10-01

    87 Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na + projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  6. Measurement and simulation of the effects of ion-induced defects on ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) measurements in Si schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearne, S.M.; Lay, M.D.H.; Jamieson, D.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) technique is a very sensitive tool for investigating the elect