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Sample records for ryanodine receptor expression

  1. Pre-Slaughter Stress Affects Ryanodine Receptor Protein Gene Expression and the Water-Holding Capacity in Fillets of the Nile Tilapia.

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    Elenice S R Goes

    Full Text Available Current study evaluated the effect of pre-slaughter stress on serum cortisol levels, pH, colorimetry, water-holding capacity (WHC and gene expression of ryanodine receptors (RyR1 and RyR3 in the Nile tilapia. A 3x4 factorial scheme experiment was conducted comprising three densities (100, 200, 400 kg/m³ with four transportation times (60, 120, 180, and 240 minutes.Transportation times alone reduced cortisol levels up to 180 minutes, followed by increased WHC and mRNA expression, RyR1 and RyR3 (200 kg/m³ density. No effect of density x transportation time interacted on the evaluated parameters. Results provided the first evidence that pre-slaughter stress affected ryanodine gene expression receptors and, consequently, the water-holding capacity in tilapia fillets.

  2. Ryanodine receptor genes of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis: Molecular cloning, alternative splicing and expression profiling.

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    Peng, Y C; Sheng, C W; Casida, John E; Zhao, C Q; Han, Z J

    2017-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) of the calcium release channel is the main target of anthranilic and phthalic diamide insecticides which have high selective insecticidal activity relative to mammalian toxicity. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Chilo suppressalis RyR (CsRyR) was isolated and characterized. The CsRyR mRNA has an open reading frame (ORF) of 15,387bp nucleotides, which encodes 5128 amino acids with GenBank ID: KR088972. Comparison of protein sequences showed that CsRyR shared high identities with other insects of 77-96% and lower identity to mammals and nematodes with only 42-45%. One alternative splicing site (KENLG) unique to Lepidoptera was found and two exclusive exons of CsRyR (I /II) were revealed. Spatial and temporal expression of CsRyR mRNA was at the highest relative level in 3rd instar larvae and head (including brain and muscle), and at the lowest expression level in egg and fat body. The expression levels of whole body CsRyR mRNA were increased remarkably after injection of 4th instar larvae with chlorantraniliprole at 0.004 to 0.4μg/g. This structural and functional information on CsRyR provides the basis for further understanding the selective action of chlorantraniliprole and possibly other diamide insecticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression profiling of a ryanodine receptor gene in Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenee.

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    Li Cui

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptor (RyR Ca(2+ release channel is the target of diamide insecticides, which show selective insecticidal activity against lepidopterous insects. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the species-specific action of diamide insecticides, we have cloned and characterized the entire cDNA sequence of RyR from Ostrinia furnacalis (named as OfRyR. The OfRyR mRNA has an Open Reading Frame of 15324 bp nucleotides and encodes a 5108 amino acid polypeptide that displays 79-97% identity with other insects RyR proteins and shows the greatest identity with Cnaphalocrocis medinalis RyR (97%. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the OfRyR was expressed at the lowest level in egg and the highest level in adult. The relative expression level of OfRyR in first, third and fifth-instar larva were 1.28, 1.19 and 1.99 times of that in egg. Moreover, two alternative splicing sites were identified in the OfRyR gene. One pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b were present in the central part of the predicted SPRY domain, and an optional exon (c was located between the third and fourth RyR domains. Diagnostic PCR demonstrated that exons a and b existed in all developmental stages of OfRyR cDNA, but exon c was not detected in the egg cDNA. And the usage frequencies of these exons showed a significant difference between different developmental stages. These results provided the crucial basis for the functional expression of OfRyR and for the discovery of compound with potentially selective insect activtity.

  4. Molecular cloning, characterisation and mRNA expression of the ryanodine receptor from the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae.

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    Troczka, B J; Williams, A J; Bass, C; Williamson, M S; Field, L M; Davies, T G E

    2015-02-10

    The peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae, is one of the most important agricultural pests of temperate climates. It is mainly controlled through the judicious application of insecticides; however, over time, aphids have developed resistance to many insecticidal classes. The recent introduction of synthetic diamide insecticides, with a novel mode of action, potentially offers new tools to control aphid populations. These diamides act on the ryanodine receptor (RyR), a large endoplasmic calcium release channel. In this study we have cloned cDNAs encoding the complete open reading frame of the RyR from M. persicae. The open reading frame is 15,306 base pairs long and encodes a protein of 5101 amino acids. The aphid RyR shares many of the features of other insect and vertebrate RyRs, including a highly conserved transmembrane region. However, unlike the other RyRs characterised to date, the M. persicae channel does not display alternative splicing at any stage of its developmental cycle, so it cannot generate functional variants of the channel. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. CPVT-associated cardiac ryanodine receptor mutation G357S with reduced penetrance impairs Ca2+ release termination and diminishes protein expression.

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    Yingjie Liu

    Full Text Available Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is one of the most lethal inherited cardiac arrhythmias mostly linked to cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2 mutations with high disease penetrance. Interestingly, a novel RyR2 mutation G357S discovered in a large family of more than 1400 individuals has reduced penetrance. The molecular basis for the incomplete disease penetrance in this family is unknown. To gain insights into the variable disease expression in this family, we determined the impact of the G357S mutation on RyR2 function and expression. We assessed spontaneous Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells expressing RyR2 wildtype and the G357S mutant during store Ca2+ overload, also known as store overload induced Ca2+ release (SOICR. We found that the G357S mutation reduced the percentage of RyR2-expressing cells that showed SOICR. However, in cells that displayed SOICR, G357S reduced the thresholds for the activation and termination of SOICR. Furthermore, G357S decreased the thermal stability of the N-terminal domain of RyR2, and markedly reduced the protein expression of the full-length RyR2. On the other hand, the G357S mutation did not alter the Ca2+ activation of [3H]ryanodine binding or the Ca2+ induced release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores in HEK293 cells. These data indicate that the CPVT-associated G357S mutation enhances the arrhythmogenic SOICR and reduces RyR2 protein expression, which may be attributable to the incomplete penetrance of CPVT in this family.

  6. From insulin synthesis to secretion: Alternative splicing of type 2 ryanodine receptor gene is essential for insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells.

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    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Shin; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Increases in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in pancreatic islets, resulting from the Ca2+ mobilization from the intracellular source through the ryanodine receptor, are essential for insulin secretion by glucose. Cyclic ADP-ribose, a potent Ca2+ mobilizing second messenger synthesized from NAD+ by CD38, regulates the opening of ryanodine receptor. A novel ryanodine receptor mRNA (the islet-type ryanodine receptor) was found to be generated from the type 2 ryanodine receptor gene by the alternative splicing of exons 4 and 75. The islet-type ryanodine receptor mRNA is expressed in a variety of tissues such as pancreatic islets, cerebrum, cerebellum, and other neuro-endocrine cells, whereas the authentic type 2 ryanodine receptor mRNA (the heart-type ryanodine receptor) was found to be generated using GG/AG splicing of intron 75 and is expressed in the heart and the blood vessel. The islet-type ryanodine receptor caused a greater increase in the Ca2+ release by caffeine when expressed in HEK293 cells pre-treated with cyclic ADP-ribose, suggesting that the novel ryanodine receptor is an intracellular target for the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose signal system in mammalian cells and that the tissue-specific alternative splicing of type 2 ryanodine receptor mRNA plays an important role in the functioning of the cyclic ADP-ribose-sensitive Ca2+ release. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy

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    Ke-Yi Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR, an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action.

  8. The decrease of expression of ryanodine receptor sub-type 2 is reversed by gentamycin sulphate in vascular myocytes from mdx mice.

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    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Fritz, Nicolas; Henaff, Morgana; Mironneau, Jean; Macrez, Nathalie

    2009-09-01

    The mdx mouse, a model of the human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, displays impaired contractile function in skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles. We explored the possibility that ryanodine receptor (RYR) expression could be altered in vascular muscle. The three RYR sub-types were expressed in portal vein myocytes. As observed through mRNA and protein levels, RYR2 expression was strongly decreased in mdx myocytes, whereas RYR3 and RYR1 expression were unaltered. The use of antisense oligonucleotide directed against RYR sub-types indicated that caffeine-induced Ca(2+) response and Ca(2+) spark frequency depended on RYR2 and RYR1. In mdx mice, caffeine-induced Ca(2+) responses were decreased in both amplitude and maximal rate of rise, and the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks was also strongly decreased. The gentamycin treatment was able to increase both the expression of RYR2 and the caffeine-induced Ca(2+) response to the same level as that observed in wild-type mice. Taken together, these results confirm that both RYR1 and RYR2 are required for vascular Ca(2+) signalling and indicate that inhibition of RYR2 expression may account for the decreased Ca(2+) release from the SR in mdx vascular myocytes. Finally, we suggest that gentamycin can restore the Ca(2+) signalling in smooth muscle from mdx mice by increasing RYR2 and dystrophin expression. These results may help explain the reduced efficacy of contraction in vascular myocytes of mdx mice and Duchenne muscular dystrophy-afflicted patients. Gentamycin treatment could be a good therapeutic tool to restore the vascular function.

  9. Quantitative differential expression of alpha and beta ryanodine receptor genes in PSE (Pale, Soft, Exudative meat from two chicken lines: broiler and layer

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    Sandra Helena Inoue Oda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Total RNA isolated from Pectoralis major muscle from PSE (L*24h>53.0, pH"53 meats of two phenotypically distinct chicken lines, broiler and layer, was used to investigate the α-ryr and β-ryr gene expression by real-time RT-PCR approach. Mean relative quantification (RQ values were lower (p0.05 in α-ryr gene expression regardless of line studied. The β-ryr RQ results suggested that in PSE samples an alteration might occur in the regular ratio (1:1 of α-RyR/β-RyR normally found in avian muscles. These results provided the first evidence of PSE meat occurrence as a result of the differential expression of ryanodine receptor genes which might lead to an increased in Ca2+ availability at the cell milieu.As proteínas α-RyR e β-RyR apresentam papéis distintos no mecanismo de excitação-contração com diferenças em seus mecanismos de ativação e respostas a ligantes. O RNA total de filé de peito (Pectoralis major m com PSE (L*24h>53,0; pH 5,8 e não-PSE (4453 de duas linhagens distintas, de corte e de postura, foram utilizadas para estudar a expressão gênica dos genes α-ryr β-ryr por PCR-em-tempo-real. Os valores médios de expressão gênicas relativas (RQ foram inferiores (p0,05 na expressão do , independentemente da linhagem estudada. Os resultados de RQ para β-ryr indicaram nas amostras PSE, uma alteração na proporção (1:1 de α-RyR/β-RyR comumente encontrada em músculos de aves. Estes resultados originam a primeira evidência da ocorrência de carnes PSE como resultado de uma disponibilidade acentuada de Ca2+ no citosol pela expressão diferenciada de proteínas receptoras de rianodina.

  10. Molecular characteristics, mRNA expression, and alternative splicing of a ryanodine receptor gene in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel.

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    Guo-Rui Yuan

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs are a distinct class of ligand-gated channels controlling the release of calcium from intracellular stores. The emergence of diamide insecticides, which selectively target insect RyRs, has promoted the study of insect RyRs. In the present study, the full-length RyR cDNA (BdRyR was cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, a serious pest of fruits and vegetables throughout East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The cDNA of BdRyR contains a 15,420-bp open reading frame encoding 5,140 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 582.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.38. BdRyR shows a high level of amino acid sequence identity (78 to 97% to other insect RyR isoforms. All common structural features of the RyRs are present in the BdRyR, including a well-conserved C-terminal domain containing consensus calcium-binding EF-hands and six transmembrane domains, and a large N-terminal domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that BdRyR was expressed at the lowest and highest levels in egg and adult, respectively, and that the BdRyR expression levels in the third instar larva, pupa and adult were 166.99-, 157.56- and 808.56-fold higher, respectively, than that in the egg. Among different adult body parts, the highest expression level was observed in the thorax compared with the head and abdomen. In addition, four alternative splice sites were identified in the BdRyR gene, with the first, ASI, being located in the central part of the predicted second spore lysis A/RyR domain. Diagnostic PCR analyses revealed that alternative splice variants were generated not only in a tissue-specific manner but also in a developmentally regulated manner. These results lay the foundation for further understanding the structural and functional properties of BdRyR, and the molecular mechanisms for target site resistance in B. dorsalis.

  11. Mapping Ryanodine Binding Sites in the Pore Cavity of Ryanodine Receptors.

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    Ngo, Van A; Perissinotti, Laura L; Miranda, Williams; Chen, S R Wayne; Noskov, Sergei Y

    2017-04-25

    Ryanodine (Ryd) irreversibly targets ryanodine receptors (RyRs), a family of intracellular calcium release channels essential for many cellular processes ranging from muscle contraction to learning and memory. Little is known of the atomistic details about how Ryd binds to RyRs. In this study, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with both enhanced and bidirectional sampling to gain direct insights into how Ryd interacts with major residues in RyRs that were experimentally determined to be critical for its binding. We found that the pyrrolic ring of Ryd displays preference for the R(4892)AGGG-F(4921) residues in the cavity of RyR1, which explain the effects of the corresponding mutations in RyR2 in experiments. Particularly, the mutant Q4933A (or Q4863A in RyR2) critical for both the gating and Ryd binding not only has significantly less interaction with Ryd than the wild-type, but also yields more space for Ryd and water molecules in the cavity. These results describe clear binding modes of Ryd in the RyR cavity and offer structural mechanisms explaining functional data collected on RyR blockade. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rectification of rabbit cardiac ryanodine receptor current by endogenous polyamines

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    Uehara, A.; Fill, M; Vélez, P; Yasukochi, M; Imanaga, I

    1996-01-01

    The actions of three endogenous polyamines (spermine, spermidine, and putrescine) were defined on Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyRs) isolated from rabbit cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. The current-voltage relationship of the RyR channel was N-shaped in the presence of polyamine (1-5 mM). Polyamine blocked conduction near 0 mV, but the blockade was relieved at large potentials. Polyamines acted (blocked) from both sides of the channel. Polyamine efficacy was dependent on curren...

  13. Functional characterization of the cardiac ryanodine receptor pore-forming region.

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    Joanne Euden

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors are homotetrameric intracellular calcium release channels. The efficiency of these channels is underpinned by exceptional rates of cation translocation through the open channel and this is achieved at the expense of the high degree of selectivity characteristic of many other types of channel. Crystallization of prokaryotic potassium channels has provided insights into the structures and mechanisms responsible for ion selection and movement in these channels, however no equivalent structural detail is currently available for ryanodine receptors. Nevertheless both molecular modeling and cryo-electron microscopy have identified the probable pore-forming region (PFR of the ryanodine receptor (RyR and suggest that this region contains structural elements equivalent to those of the PFRs of potassium-selective channels. The aim of the current study was to establish if the isolated putative cardiac RyR (RyR2 PFR could form a functional ion channel. We have expressed and purified the RyR2 PFR and shown that function is retained following reconstitution into planar phospholipid bilayers. Our data provide the first direct experimental evidence to support the proposal that the conduction pathway of RyR2 is formed by structural elements equivalent to those of the potassium channel PFR.

  14. Comparison between gentamycin and exon skipping treatments to restore ryanodine receptor subtype 2 functions in mdx mouse duodenum myocytes.

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    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Mironneau, Jean; Henaff, Morgana; Macrez, Nathalie; Morel, Jean-Luc

    2010-02-25

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a stop-codon mutation in the dystrophin gene induces an impairment of skeletal and smooth muscles contraction. In duodenum from mdx mouse, the disease model, the decrease of contractility was linked with the decrease of calcium signals encoded by ryanodine receptor subtype 2. Aminoglycoside and antisense oligonucleotide strategies were investigated to restore calcium signalling in the mdx mouse. Mdx mice were treated by intraperitoneal injection of gentamycin or 2-O-methyl antisense ribonucleotide directed against exon 23 of dystrophin for 2 weeks. The efficiency of both therapeutic strategies was determined by the level of dystrophin protein expression. The physiological effects of both treatments on ryanodine receptor expression and function were followed by RT-PCR, western blot and calcium measurements. Fourteen days after injection of gentamycin or anti-dystrophin antisense, the expression of dystrophin was recovered in skeletal muscle from treated mdx mice. In duodenum cells, RT-PCR and western blot indicated that the expression of ryanodine receptor subtype 2 was similar in treated mice than in control mice in association with the recovery of caffeine-induced Ca(2+) response. No significant difference was observed in the ryanodine subtype 3-dependent spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in untreated and treated mice. Conclusions - these results may help to explain the efficiency of aminoglycoside and anti-dystrophin antisense treatments in smooth muscle. Both treatments could be an interesting therapeutic option to restore smooth muscle contraction in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  15. Observation of Network Dynamics of Ryanodine Receptors on Skeletal Muscle Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Membranes

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    Hongli Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rabbit muscle vesicles derived from sarcoplasmic reticulum were used as a material in studying networks of ryanodine receptors by cryo electron tomography. Three-dimensional analysis reveals the dynamical features of these networks. It was found that the connection angles were rotated along the transmembrane axis of ryanodine receptors. Majority of the connections was observed at domains 6/6 of ryanodine receptors while a small group of connections were showed at domains 9/10. The flexible rotation and connection shift seem to facilitate the extension of an annular network on the wall of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a triad.

  16. Fluorescent Probes for Insect Ryanodine Receptors: Candidate Anthranilic Diamides

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    Yi Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Diamide insecticides with high efficacy against pests and good environmental safety are broadly applied in crop protection. They act at a poorly-defined site in the very complex ryanodine (Ry receptor (RyR potentially accessible to a fluorescent probe. Two N-propynyl analogs of the major anthranilic diamide insecticides chlorantraniliprole (Chlo and cyantraniliprole (Cyan were accordingly synthesized and converted into two fluorescent ligands by click reaction coupling with 3-azido-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one. The new diamide analogs and fluorescent ligands were shown to be nearly as potent as Chlo and Cyan in inhibition of [3H]Chlo binding and stimulation of [3H]Ry binding in house fly thoracic muscle RyR. Although the newly synthesized compounds had only moderate activity in insect larvicidal activity assays, their high in vitro potency in a validated insect RyR binding assay encourages further development of fluorescent probes for insect RyRs.

  17. Levamisole and ryanodine receptors (I): A contraction study in Ascaris suum

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    Robertson, Alan P.; Clark, Cheryl L.; Martin, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Cholinergic anthelmintics (like levamisole) are important drugs but resistance with reduced responses by the parasite to these compounds is a concern. There is a need to study and understand mechanisms that affect the amplitude of the responses of parasites to these drugs. In this paper, we study interactions of levamisole and ryanodine receptors on contractions of Ascaris suum body muscle flaps. In our second paper, we extend these observations to examine electrophysiological interactions of levamisole, ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and AF2. We report that the maximum force of contraction, gmax, was dependent on the extracellular concentration of calcium but the levamisole EC50(0.8 μM) was not. The relationship between maximum force of contraction and extracellular calcium was described by the Michaelis-Menten equation with a Km of 1.8 mM. Ryanodine inhibited gmax without effect on EC50; ryanodine inhibited only 44% of the maximum contraction (Ki of 40 nM), revealing a ryanodine-insensitive component in the levamisole excitation-contraction pathway. Dantrolene had the same effect as ryanodine but was less potent. The neuropeptide AF2 (1 μM) decreased the levamisole EC50 to 0.2 μM without effect on gmax; 0.1 μM ryanodine and 100 μM dantrolene, inhibited the gmax of the AF2-potentiated levamisole response. High concentrations of caffeine, 30 mM, produced weak contraction of the body flap preparation. Caffeine behaved like ryanodine in that it inhibited the maximum force of contraction, gmax, without effects on the levamisole EC50. Thus, RyRs play a modulatory role in the levamisole-excitation contraction pathway by affecting the maximum force of contraction without an effect on levamisole EC50. The levamisole-excitation contraction coupling is graded and has at least two pathways: one sensitive to ryanodine and one not. PMID:20064566

  18. Mecp2 Mediates Experience-Dependent Transcriptional Upregulation of Ryanodine Receptor Type-3

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    Rodrigo F. Torres

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mecp2 is a DNA methylation reader that plays a critical role in experience-dependent plasticity. Increasing evidence supports a role for epigenetic modifications in activity-induced gene expression. Hence, candidate genes related to such phenomena are of great interest. Ryanodine receptors are intracellular calcium channels that contribute to hippocampal synaptic plasticity, dendritic spine remodeling, and participate in learning and memory processes. Here we exposed mice to the enriched environment (EE paradigm, which through increased stimulation induces experience dependent-plasticity, to explore a role for methyl-cytosines, and Mecp2 in directing Ryanodine receptor 3 (Ryr3 transcriptional activity. EE induced a hippocampal-specific increase in the methylation of discrete cytosines located at a Ryr3 isoform promoter; chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that EE increased Mecp2 binding to this Ryr3 isoform promoter. Interestingly, the experimental paradigm induced robust Ryr3 upregulation, accompanied by miR132-dependent suppression of p250GAP, a pathway driving synaptogenesis. In contrast to WT mice, Mecp2-null mice showed diminished levels of Ryr3 and displayed impaired EE-induced Ryr3 upregulation, compromising miR132 dependent suppression of p250GAP and experience-dependent structural plasticity. Based on these results, we propose that Mecp2 acts as a transcriptional activator of Ryr3, contributing to experience-dependent plasticity.

  19. Functional Characterization of C-terminal Ryanodine Receptor 1 Variants Associated with Central Core Disease or Malignant Hyperthermia.

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    Parker, Remai; Schiemann, Anja H; Langton, Elaine; Bulger, Terasa; Pollock, Neil; Bjorksten, Andrew; Gillies, Robyn; Hutchinson, David; Roxburgh, Richard; Stowell, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    Central core disease and malignant hyperthermia are human disorders of skeletal muscle resulting from aberrant Ca2+ handling. Most malignant hyperthermia and central core disease cases are associated with amino acid changes in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the skeletal muscle Ca2+-release channel. Malignant hyperthermia exhibits a gain-of-function phenotype, and central core disease results from loss of channel function. For a variant to be classified as pathogenic, functional studies must demonstrate a correlation with the pathophysiology of malignant hyperthermia or central core disease. We assessed the pathogenicity of four C-terminal variants of the ryanodine receptor using functional analysis. The variants were identified in families affected by either malignant hyperthermia or central core disease. Four variants were introduced separately into human cDNA encoding the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor. Following transient expression in HEK-293T cells, functional studies were carried out using calcium release assays in response to an agonist. Two previously characterized variants and wild-type skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor were used as controls. The p.Met4640Ile variant associated with central core disease showed no difference in calcium release compared to wild-type. The p.Val4849Ile variant associated with malignant hyperthermia was more sensitive to agonist than wild-type but did not reach statistical significance and two variants (p.Phe4857Ser and p.Asp4918Asn) associated with central core disease were completely inactive. The p.Val4849Ile variant should be considered a risk factor for malignant hyperthermia, while the p.Phe4857Ser and p.Asp4918Asn variants should be classified as pathogenic for central core disease.

  20. Characterization of ryanodine receptor type 1 single channel activity using "on-nucleus" patch clamp.

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    Wagner, Larry E; Groom, Linda A; Dirksen, Robert T; Yule, David I

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we provide the first description of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) expressed in a native membrane using the on-nucleus configuration of the patch clamp technique. A stable cell line expressing rabbit RyR1 was established (HEK-RyR1) using the FLP-in 293 cell system. In contrast to untransfected cells, RyR1 expression was readily demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry in HEK-RyR1 cells. In addition, the RyR1 agonists 4-CMC and caffeine activated Ca(2+) release that was inhibited by high concentrations of ryanodine. On nucleus patch clamp was performed in nuclei prepared from HEK-RyR1 cells. Raising the [Ca(2+)] in the patch pipette resulted in the appearance of a large conductance cation channel with well resolved kinetics and the absence of prominent subconductance states. Current versus voltage relationships were ohmic and revealed a chord conductance of ∼750pS or 450pS in symmetrical 250mM KCl or CsCl, respectively. The channel activity was markedly enhanced by caffeine and exposure to ryanodine resulted in the appearance of a subconductance state with a conductance ∼40% of the full channel opening with a Po near unity. In total, these properties are entirely consistent with RyR1 channel activity. Exposure of RyR1 channels to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPr), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) or dantrolene did not alter the single channel activity stimulated by Ca(2+), and thus, it is unlikely these molecules directly modulate RyR1 channel activity. In summary, we describe an experimental platform to monitor the single channel properties of RyR channels. We envision that this system will be influential in characterizing disease-associated RyR mutations and the molecular determinants of RyR channel modulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cardiac ryanodine receptor in metabolic syndrome: is JTV519 (K201 future therapy?

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    Dincer UD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available U Deniz DincerDepartment of Pharmacology, Ufuk University School of Medicine. Mevlana Bulvari, Balgat, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a combination of obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. This multifaceted syndrome is often accompanied by a hyperdynamic circulatory state characterized by increased blood pressure, total blood volume, cardiac output, and metabolic tissue demand. Experimental, epidemiological, and clinical studies have demonstrated that patients with metabolic syndrome have significantly elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. One of the main and frequent complications seen in metabolic syndrome is cardiovascular disease. The primary endpoints of cardiometabolic risk are coronary and peripheral arterial disease, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and stroke. Alterations in expression and/or functioning of several key proteins involved in regulating and maintaining ionic homeostasis can cause cardiac disturbances. One such group of proteins is known as ryanodine receptors (intracellular calcium release channels, which are the major channels through which Ca2+ ions leave the sarcoplasmic reticulum, leading to cardiac muscle contraction. The economic cost of metabolic syndrome and its associated complications has a significant effect on health care budgets. Improvements in body weight, blood lipid profile, and hyperglycemia can reduce cardiometabolic risk. However, constant hyperadrenergic stimulation still contributes to the burden of disease. Normalization of the hyperdynamic circulatory state with conventional therapies is the most reasonable therapeutic strategy to date. JTV519 (K201 is a newly developed 1,4-benzothiazepine drug with antiarrhythmic and cardioprotective properties. It appears to be very effective in not only preventing but also in reversing the characteristic myocardial changes and preventing

  2. Aging Effects of Caenorhabditis elegans Ryanodine Receptor Variants Corresponding to Human Myopathic Mutations

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    Katie Nicoll Baines

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Delaying the decline in skeletal muscle function will be critical to better maintenance of an active lifestyle in old age. The skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor, the major intracellular membrane channel through which calcium ions pass to elicit muscle contraction, is central to calcium ion balance and is hypothesized to be a significant factor for age-related decline in muscle function. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a key model system for the study of human aging, and strains were generated with modified C. elegans ryanodine receptors corresponding to human myopathic variants linked with malignant hyperthermia and related conditions. The altered response of these strains to pharmacological agents reflected results of human diagnostic tests for individuals with these pathogenic variants. Involvement of nerve cells in the C. elegans responses may relate to rare medical symptoms concerning the central nervous system that have been associated with ryanodine receptor variants. These single amino acid modifications in C. elegans also conferred a reduction in lifespan and an accelerated decline in muscle integrity with age, supporting the significance of ryanodine receptor function for human aging.

  3. Levamisole and ryanodine receptors (II): An electrophysiological study in Ascaris suum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttachary, Sreekanth; Robertson, Alan P.; Clark, Cheryl L.; Martin, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to antinematodal drugs like levamisole has increased and there is a need to understand what factors affect the responses to these anthelmintics. In our previous study, we examined the role of ryanodine receptors in muscle contraction pathways. Here we have examined interactions of levamisole receptors, ryanodine receptors (RyRs), the excitatory neuropeptide AF2, and coupling to electrophysiological responses. We examined the effects of a brief application of levamisole on Ascaris suum body muscle under current-clamp. The levamisole responses were characterized as an initial primary depolarization, followed by a slow secondary depolarizing response. We examined the effects of AF2 (KHEYLRFamide), 1 μM applied for 2 min. We found that AF2 potentiated the secondary response to levamisole and had no significant effect on the primary depolarization [1]. Further, the reversal potentials observed during the secondary response suggested that more than one ion was involved in producing this potential. AF2 potentiated the secondary response in the presence of 30 μM mecamylamine suggesting the effect was independent of levamisole sensitive acetylcholine receptors. The secondary response, potentiated by AF2, appeared to be dependent on cytoplasmic events triggered by the primary depolarization. Ion-substitution experiments showed that the AF2 potentiated secondary response was dependent on extracellular calcium and chloride suggesting a role for the calcium-activated anion channel. Caffeine mimicked the AF2 secondary response and 0.1 μM ryanodine inhibited it. 1.0 μM ryanodine increased spiking showing that it affected membrane excitability. A model is proposed showing ryanodine receptors mediating effects of AF2 on levamisole responses. PMID:20064567

  4. Cloning and characterization of fiber type-specific ryanodine receptor isoforms in skeletal muscles of fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, J P; Morrissette, J; Keen, J E; Londraville, R L; Beamsley, M; Block, B A

    1998-08-01

    We have cloned a group of cDNAs that encodes the skeletal ryanodine receptor isoform (RyR1) of fish from a blue marlin extraocular muscle library. The cDNAs encode a protein of 5,081 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 576,302 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence shows strong sequence identity to previously characterized RyR1 isoforms. An RNA probe derived from a clone of the full-length marlin RyR1 isoform hybridizes to RNA preparations from extraocular muscle and slow-twitch skeletal muscle but not to RNA preparations from fast-twitch skeletal or cardiac muscle. We have also isolated a partial RyR clone from marlin and toadfish fast-twitch muscles that shares 80% sequence identity with the corresponding region of the full-length RyR1 isoform, and a RNA probe derived from this clone hybridizes to RNA preparations from fast-twitch muscle but not to slow-twitch muscle preparations. Western blot analysis of slow-twitch muscles in fish indicates the presence of only a single high-molecular-mass RyR protein corresponding to RyR1. [3H]ryanodine binding assays revealed the fish slow-twitch muscle RyR1 had a greater sensitivity for Ca2+ than the fast-twitch muscle RyR1. The results indicate that, in fish muscle, fiber type-specific RyR1 isoforms are expressed and the two proteins are physiologically distinct.

  5. Ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel PKA phosphorylation: A critical mediator of heart failure progression

    OpenAIRE

    Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Reiken, Steven; Vest, John A.; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R.

    2006-01-01

    Defective regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2)/calcium release channel, required for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart, has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. For example, diastolic calcium “leak” via RyR2 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been identified as an important factor contributing to impaired contractility in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death. In patients with heart failure, chronic activat...

  6. Intermolecular failure of L-type Ca2+ channel and ryanodine receptor signaling in hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure overload-induced hypertrophy is a key step leading to heart failure. The Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release (CICR process that governs cardiac contractility is defective in hypertrophy/heart failure, but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. To examine the intermolecular aspects of CICR during hypertrophy, we utilized loose-patch confocal imaging to visualize the signaling between a single L-type Ca(2+ channel (LCC and ryanodine receptors (RyRs in aortic stenosis rat models of compensated (CHT and decompensated (DHT hypertrophy. We found that the LCC-RyR intermolecular coupling showed a 49% prolongation in coupling latency, a 47% decrease in chance of hit, and a 72% increase in chance of miss in DHT, demonstrating a state of "intermolecular failure." Unexpectedly, these modifications also occurred robustly in CHT due at least partially to decreased expression of junctophilin, indicating that intermolecular failure occurs prior to cellular manifestations. As a result, cell-wide Ca(2+ release, visualized as "Ca(2+ spikes," became desynchronized, which contrasted sharply with unaltered spike integrals and whole-cell Ca(2+ transients in CHT. These data suggested that, within a certain limit, termed the "stability margin," mild intermolecular failure does not damage the cellular integrity of excitation-contraction coupling. Only when the modification steps beyond the stability margin does global failure occur. The discovery of "hidden" intermolecular failure in CHT has important clinical implications.

  7. ARRHYTHMOGENIC CALMODULIN MUTATIONS AFFECT THE ACTIVATION AND TERMINATION OF CARDIAC RYANODINE RECEPTOR MEDIATED CA2+ RELEASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Mads Toft; Chazin, Walter J.; Chen, Wayne S.R.

    long QT syndrome (LQTS) (D95V and D129G)2, on spontaneous Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells expressing the RyR2 channel. Furthermore, we studied the impact of these mutations on the interactions between CaM and a peptide corresponding to the RyR2 CaM binding domain (CaMBD) residue number 3581......M in the presence of RyR2 CaMBD. The D95V, N97S and D129G mutations lowered the affinity of Ca2+ binding of the C-lobe of CaM, to apparent KDs of ~ 140, 150, and 4000 nM, respectively, consistent with the critical role of these residues in Ca2+ binding to the C-lobe. Thus, we suggest that these mutations may shift...... in the other two CaM genes (CALM2 and CALM3). All CaM mutations are associated with severe ventricular arrhythmias. CaM regulates several key proteins governing cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), including the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) Ca2+ release channel. RyR2 mutations also dominantly...

  8. Dantrolene: A Selective Ryanodine Receptor Antagonist, Protects Against Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizure in Mice

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    Mojtaba Keshavarz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptor abnormalities has implicated in the generation and maintenance of seizure. Dantrolene, a selective ryanodine receptor antagonist, may be a potential drug for the prevention of seizure. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the protective effects of dantrolene against pentylenetetrazole seizure in mice. Male albino mice were received an intra-peritoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole (80 mg/kg in seven separate groups (n=8. We used dantrolene (10,20 and 40 mg/kg, caffeine (200 mg/kg, dantrolene (40 mg/kg + caffeine (200 mg/kg, diazepam (5 mg/kg as a positive control and vehicle 30 minutes before the injection of pentylenetetrazole. Then, we registered the latency time of the first seizure, the severity of seizures and the incidence of seizure and death. Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney and Fisher’s exact test were used to analyze the data. Dantrolene (10,20 and 40 mg/kg significantly increased the latency time for the first seizure. Furthermore, dantrolene (20 and 40 mg/kg, but not 10 mg/kg attenuated the severity of seizures in comparison to the vehicle group. Moreover, dantrolene only at the dose of 40 mg/kg prevented from tonic-clonic seizure and death in comparison to the vehicle group. In contrast, the addition of caffeine abolished the protective effects of dantrolene on the tonic-clonic seizure/death and inhibited the beneficial effects of dantrolene on the severity of pentylenetetrazol seizures. The acute dantrolene administration produced an anticonvulsant effect in the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure. Moreover, caffeine prevented from dantrolene anticonvulsant effects. These results may imply about ryanodine receptors and intracellular calcium roles in the generation and control of pentylenetetrazole seizure.

  9. The ryanodine receptor leak: how a tattered receptor plunges the failing heart into crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas H; Maier, Lars S; Sossalla, Samuel

    2013-07-01

    It has been persuasively shown in the last two decades that the development of heart failure is closely linked to distinct alterations in Ca(2+) cycling. A crucial point in this respect is an increased spontaneous release of Ca(2+) out of the sarcoplasmic reticulum during diastole via ryanodine receptors type 2 (RyR2). The consequence is a compromised sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) storage capacity, which impairs systolic contractility and possibly diastolic cardiac function due to Ca(2+) overload. Additionally, leaky RyR2 are more and more regarded to potently induce proarrhythmic triggers. Elimination of spontaneously released Ca(2+) via RyR2 in diastole can cause a transient sarcolemmal inward current and hence delayed after depolarisations as substrate for cardiac arrhythmias. In this article, the pathological role and consequences of the SR Ca(2+)-leak and its regulation are reviewed with a main focus on protein kinase A and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent kinase II. We summarise clinical consequences of "leaky RyR2" as well as possible therapeutic strategies in order to correct RyR2 dysfunction and discuss the significance of the available data.

  10. Characterization of ryanodine receptor and Ca2+-ATPase isoforms in the thermogenic heater organ of blue marlin (Makaira nigricans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Jeffery M; Franck, Jens P G; Block, Barbara A

    2003-03-01

    A thermogenic organ is found beneath the brain of billfishes (Istiophoridae), swordfish (Xiphiidae) and the butterfly mackerel (Scombridae). The heater organ has been shown to warm the brain and eyes up to 14 degrees C above ambient water temperature. Heater cells are derived from extraocular muscle fibers and express a modified muscle phenotype with an extensive transverse-tubule (T-tubule) network and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) enriched in Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pumps and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Heater cells have a high mitochondria content but have lost most of the contractile myofilaments. Thermogenesis has been hypothesized to be associated with release and reuptake of Ca(2+). In this study, Ca(2+) fluxes in heater SR vesicles derived from blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) were measured using fura-2 fluorescence. Upon the addition of MgATP, heater SR vesicles rapidly sequestered Ca(2+). Uptake of Ca(2+) was thapsigargin sensitive, and maximum loading ranged between 0.8 micro mol Ca(2+) mg(-1) protein and 1.0 micro mol Ca(2+) mg(-1) protein. Upon the addition of 10 mmol l(-1) caffeine or 350 micro mol l(-1) ryanodine, heater SR vesicles released only a small fraction of the loaded Ca(2+). However, ryanodine could elicit a much larger Ca(2+) release event when the activity of the SERCA pumps was reduced. RNase protection assays revealed that heater tissue expresses an RyR isoform that is also expressed in fish slow-twitch skeletal muscle but is distinct from the RyR expressed in fish fast-twitch skeletal muscle. The heater and slow-twitch muscle RyR isoform has unique physiological properties. In the presence of adenine nucleotides, this RyR remains open even though cytoplasmic Ca(2+) is elevated, a condition that normally closes RyRs. The fast Ca(2+) sequestration by the heater SR, coupled with a physiologically unique RyR, is hypothesized to promote Ca(2+) cycling, ATP turnover and heat generation. A branch of the oculomotor nerve innervates heater organs

  11. A mechanism for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): Stress-induced leak via ryanodine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, David J.; Dura, Miroslav; Carturan, Elisa; Reiken, Steven; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of postneonatal mortality in the United States. Mutations in the RyR2-encoded cardiac ryanodine receptor cause the highly lethal catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT1) in the young. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum and prevalence of RyR2 mutations in a large cohort of SIDS cases. METHODS Using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, and direct DNA sequencing, a targeted mutational analysis of RyR2 was performed on genomic DNA isolated from frozen necropsy tissue on 134 unrelated cases of SIDS (57 females, 77 males; 83 white, 50 black, 1 Hispanic; average age = 2.7 months). RyR2 mutations were engineered by site-directed mutagenesis, heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells, and functionally characterized using single-channel recordings in planar lipid bilayers. RESULTS Overall, two distinct and novel RyR2 mutations were identified in two cases of SIDS. A 6-month-old black female hosted an R2267H missense mutation, and a 4-week-old white female infant harbored a S4565R mutation. Both nonconservative amino acid substitutions were absent in 400 reference alleles, involved conserved residues, and were localized to key functionally significant domains. Under conditions that simulate stress [Protein Kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation] during diastole (low activating [Ca2+]), SIDS-associated RyR2 mutant channels displayed a significant gain-of-function phenotype consistent with the functional effect of previously characterized CPVT-associated RyR2 mutations. CONCLUSIONS Here we report a novel pathogenic mechanism for SIDS, whereby SIDS-linked RyR2 mutations alter the response of the channels to sympathetic nervous system stimulation such that during stress the channels become “leaky” and thus potentially trigger fatal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:17556193

  12. FRET-based localization of fluorescent protein insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta A Raina

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein (FP insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1, a large intracellular Ca(2+ release channel that plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. A series of full-length His-tagged GFP-RyR1 fusion constructs were created, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293T cells and then complexed with Cy3NTA, a His-tag specific FRET acceptor. FRET efficiency values measured from each GFP donor to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag acceptor site were converted into intermolecular distances and the positions of each inserted GFP were then triangulated relative to a previously published X-ray crystal structure of a 559 amino acid RyR1 fragment. We observed that the chromophoric centers of fluorescent proteins inserted into RyR1 can be located as far as 45 Å from their insertion sites and that the fused proteins can also be located in internal cavities within RyR1. These findings should prove useful in interpreting structural results obtained in cryo EM maps using fusions of small fluorescent proteins. More accurate point-to-point distance information may be obtained using complementary orthogonal labeling systems that rely on fluorescent probes that bind directly to amino acid side chains.

  13. A novel late-onset axial myopathy associated with mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loseth, S.; Voermans, N.C.; Torbergsen, T.; Lillis, S.; Jonsrud, C.; Lindal, S.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Broman, M.; Dekomien, G.; Maddison, P.; Muntoni, F.; Sewry, C.; Radunovic, A.; Visser, M. de; Straub, V.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Jungbluth, H.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene are a common cause of inherited neuromuscular disorders and have been associated with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from various congenital myopathies to the malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) trait without any associated

  14. Is ryanodine receptor phosphorylation key to the fight or flight response and heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    In situations of stress the heart beats faster and stronger. According to Marks and colleagues, this response is, to a large extent, the consequence of facilitated Ca²+ release from intracellular Ca²+ stores via ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2), thought to be due to catecholamine-induced increases in RyR2 phosphorylation at serine 2808 (S2808). If catecholamine stimulation is sustained (for example, as occurs in heart failure), RyR2 becomes hyperphosphorylated and "leaky," leading to arrhythmias and other pathology. This "leaky RyR2 hypothesis" is highly controversial. In this issue of the JCI, Marks and colleagues report on two new mouse lines with mutations in S2808 that provide strong evidence supporting their theory. Moreover, the experiments revealed an influence of redox modifications of RyR2 that may account for some discrepancies in the field.

  15. Optical single-channel resolution imaging of the ryanodine receptor distribution in rat cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, David; Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Lam, Leo; Rossberger, Sabrina; Cannell, Mark B; Soeller, Christian

    2009-12-29

    We have applied an optical super-resolution technique based on single-molecule localization to examine the peripheral distribution of a cardiac signaling protein, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), in rat ventricular myocytes. RyRs form clusters with a mean size of approximately 14 RyRs per cluster, which is almost an order of magnitude smaller than previously estimated. Clusters were typically not circular (as previously assumed) but elongated with an average aspect ratio of 1.9. Edge-to-edge distances between adjacent RyR clusters were often distribution, is compatible with a stochastic cluster assembly process. We suggest that calcium sparks may be the result of the concerted activation of several RyR clusters forming a functional "supercluster" whose gating is controlled by both cytosolic and sarcoplasmic reticulum luminal calcium levels.

  16. Mediation of autophagic cell death by type 3 ryanodine receptor (RyR3 in adult hippocampal neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min eChung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and IP3 receptors (IP3Rs, the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death. Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs — especially RyR3 — were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished autophagic cell death of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology.

  17. Phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor mediates the cardiac fight or flight response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jian; Kushnir, Alexander; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Reiken, Steven; Li, Jingdong; Lehnart, Stephan E; Lindegger, Nicolas; Mongillo, Marco; Mohler, Peter J; Marks, Andrew R

    2010-12-01

    During the classic "fight-or-flight" stress response, sympathetic nervous system activation leads to catecholamine release, which increases heart rate and contractility, resulting in enhanced cardiac output. Catecholamines bind to β-adrenergic receptors, causing cAMP generation and activation of PKA, which phosphorylates multiple targets in cardiac muscle, including the cardiac ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel (RyR2) required for muscle contraction. PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 enhances channel activity by sensitizing the channel to cytosolic calcium (Ca²+). Here, we found that mice harboring RyR2 channels that cannot be PKA phosphorylated (referred to herein as RyR2-S2808A+/+ mice) exhibited blunted heart rate and cardiac contractile responses to catecholamines (isoproterenol). The isoproterenol-induced enhancement of ventricular myocyte Ca²+ transients and fractional shortening (contraction) and the spontaneous beating rate of sinoatrial nodal cells were all blunted in RyR2-S2808A+/+ mice. The blunted cardiac response to catecholamines in RyR2-S2808A+/+ mice resulted in impaired exercise capacity. RyR2-S2808A+/+ mice were protected against chronic catecholaminergic-induced cardiac dysfunction. These studies identify what we believe to be new roles for PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 in both the heart rate and contractile responses to acute catecholaminergic stimulation.

  18. Amyloid β production is regulated by β2-adrenergic signaling-mediated post-translational modifications of the ryanodine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussiere, Renaud; Lacampagne, Alain; Reiken, Steven; Liu, Xiaoping; Scheuerman, Valerie; Zalk, Ran; Martin, Cécile; Checler, Frederic; Marks, Andrew R; Chami, Mounia

    2017-06-16

    Alteration of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling has been reported in Alzheimer disease (AD) models. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying altered RyR-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) release in AD remain to be fully elucidated. We report here that RyR2 undergoes post-translational modifications (phosphorylation, oxidation, and nitrosylation) in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells expressing the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) harboring the familial double Swedish mutations (APPswe). RyR2 macromolecular complex remodeling, characterized by depletion of the regulatory protein calstabin2, resulted in increased cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and mitochondrial oxidative stress. We also report a functional interplay between amyloid β (Aβ), β-adrenergic signaling, and altered Ca(2+) signaling via leaky RyR2 channels. Thus, post-translational modifications of RyR occur downstream of Aβ through a β2-adrenergic signaling cascade that activates PKA. RyR2 remodeling in turn enhances βAPP processing. Importantly, pharmacological stabilization of the binding of calstabin2 to RyR2 channels, which prevents Ca(2+) leakage, or blocking the β2-adrenergic signaling cascade reduced βAPP processing and the production of Aβ in APPswe-expressing SH-SY5Y cells. We conclude that targeting RyR-mediated Ca(2+) leakage may be a therapeutic approach to treat AD. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Physiology and physiopathology of ryanodine receptors in swine. Significance of sensitivity to stress, stress myopathies, malignant hyperthermia and meat quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, H

    1997-01-01

    During the last decades intensive breeding of pigs has improved the growth rate, food conversion and the ratio between meat and fat. However, this improvement is very often associated in certain breeds of pig with the porcine stress syndrome, a higher incidence of muscle diseases and a reduced meat quality referred to as pale, soft exudative pork (PSE). These problems are well known since decades and are obviously caused by a variety of factors. The discovery of a mutation in the ryanodine receptor or Ca-release channel in the striated muscles of affected pigs has concentrated research on the function of this protein. The mutation of the ryanodine receptor or Ca-release channel may account for the problems mentioned above because the changed ryanodine receptor can be activated much easier and there is no doubt that the inactivation is delayed or-under some circumstances-even impossible. Consequently, the cytosolic Ca concentration in skeletal muscle cells will increase and induce uncontrolled muscle activity. The recommendation is given to breed out this mutation for elimination of a major reason of the porcine stress syndrome and PSE.

  1. The Environmental Neurotoxicant PCB 95 Promotes Synaptogenesis via Ryanodine Receptor-Dependent miR132 Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Adam; Zhu, Mingyan; Chen, Hao; Appleyard, Suzanne M.; Impey, Soren; Wayman, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Non–dioxin-like (NDL) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread environmental contaminants linked to neuropsychological dysfunction in children. NDL PCBs increase spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in neurons by stabilizing ryanodine receptor (RyR) calcium release channels in the open configuration, which results in CREB-dependent dendritic outgrowth. In this study, we address the question of whether activation of CREB by NDL PCBs also triggers dendritic spine formation. Nanomolar concentrations of PCB 95, a NDL congener with potent RyR activity, significantly increased spine density and the frequency of miniature EPSCs in primary dissociated rat hippocampal cultures coincident with upregulation of miR132. Inhibition of RyR, CREB, or miR132 as well as expression of a mutant p250GAP cDNA construct that is not suppressed by miR132 blocked PCB 95 effects on spines and miniature EPSCs. PCB 95 also induced spine formation via RyR- and miR132-dependent mechanisms in hippocampal slice cultures. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of PCB developmental neurotoxicity whereby RyR sensitization modulates spine formation and synaptogenesis via CREB-mediated miR132 upregulation, which in turn suppresses the translation of p250GAP, a negative regulator of synaptogenesis. In light of recent evidence implicating miR132 dysregulation in Rett syndrome and schizophrenia, these findings identify NDL PCBs as potential environmental risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24431430

  2. Ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel PKA phosphorylation: A critical mediator of heart failure progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Reiken, Steven; Vest, John A.; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R.

    2006-01-01

    Defective regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2)/calcium release channel, required for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart, has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. For example, diastolic calcium “leak” via RyR2 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been identified as an important factor contributing to impaired contractility in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death. In patients with heart failure, chronic activation of the “fight or flight” stress response leads to protein kinase A (PKA) hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2808. PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 Ser-2808 reduces the binding affinity of the channel-stabilizing subunit calstabin2, resulting in leaky RyR2 channels. We developed RyR2-S2808A mice to determine whether Ser-2808 is the functional PKA phosphorylation site on RyR2. Furthermore, mice in which the RyR2 channel cannot be PKA phosphorylated were relatively protected against the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Taken together, these data show that PKA phosphorylation of Ser-2808 on the RyR2 channel appears to be a critical mediator of progressive cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction. PMID:16407108

  3. True Molecular Scale Visualization of Variable Clustering Properties of Ryanodine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru Jayasinghe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Signaling nanodomains rely on spatial organization of proteins to allow controlled intracellular signaling. Examples include calcium release sites of cardiomyocytes where ryanodine receptors (RyRs are clustered with their molecular partners. Localization microscopy has been crucial to visualizing these nanodomains but has been limited by brightness of markers, restricting the resolution and quantification of individual proteins clustered within. Harnessing the remarkable localization precision of DNA-PAINT (<10 nm, we visualized punctate labeling within these nanodomains, confirmed as single RyRs. RyR positions within sub-plasmalemmal nanodomains revealed how they are organized randomly into irregular clustering patterns leaving significant gaps occupied by accessory or regulatory proteins. RyR-inhibiting protein junctophilin-2 appeared highly concentrated adjacent to RyR channels. Analyzing these molecular maps showed significant variations in the co-clustering stoichiometry between junctophilin-2 and RyR, even between nearby nanodomains. This constitutes an additional level of complexity in RyR arrangement and regulation of calcium signaling, intrinsically built into the nanodomains.

  4. Single-Particle Cryo-EM of the Ryanodine Receptor Channel in an Aqueous Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mariah R; Fan, Guizhen; Serysheva, Irina I

    2015-01-07

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated Ca(2+) release channels that are responsible for the increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration leading to muscle contraction. Our current understanding of RyR channel gating and regulation is greatly limited due to the lack of a high-resolution structure of the channel protein. The enormous size and unwieldy shape of Ca(2+) release channels make X-ray or NMR methods difficult to apply for high-resolution structural analysis of the full-length functional channel. Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is one of the only effective techniques for the study of such a large integral membrane protein and its molecular interactions. Despite recent developments in cryo-EM technologies and break-through single-particle cryo-EM studies of ion channels, cryospecimen preparation, particularly the presence of detergent in the buffer, remains the main impediment to obtaining atomic-resolution structures of ion channels and a multitude of other integral membrane protein complexes. In this review we will discuss properties of several detergents that have been successfully utilized in cryo-EM studies of ion channels and the emergence of the detergent alternative amphipol to stabilize ion channels for structure-function characterization. Future structural studies of challenging specimen like ion channels are likely to be facilitated by cryo-EM amenable detergents or alternative surfactants.

  5. Evolution of Vertebrate Ryanodine Receptors Family in Relation to Functional Divergence and Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhiwen; Peng, Juan; Liang, Yanyan; Yang, Chunjie; Jiang, Guoliang; Ren, Jun; Zou, Yunzeng

    2017-12-12

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), the large homotetrameric protein complexes, regulate the release of calcium from intracellular stores into the cytosol and play vital roles in the excitation-contraction coupling of cells. However, the evolutionary relationship of RyRs in vertebrates has yet to be elucidated. We identified 22 RyRs from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Gallus gallus, Anolis carolinensis, Rana catesbeiana, and Danio rerio. The phylogenetic relationship, motifs analysis and reconstruction of ancestral RyRs showed that the members of RyR family in vertebrates were grouped into three clades: the RyR1 clade, the RyR2 clade, and the RyR3 clade. Positive selection existed in RyR gene evolution, which is consistent in three site models, and gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the evolution of RyR family in vertebrates promotes RyRs function differentiation. At last, we predicted 140 mutation sites which may be involved in diseases and 57 phosphorylation sites among RyR1 sequence in human, as well as 61 mutation sites and 70 phosphorylation sites in human RyR2 sequences. Most of these potential sites are arranged in clusters. Our work provides insight into the origin and evolutionary process of RyRs in vertebrates, facilitating their functional investigations in the future.

  6. Characterization of the Ryanodine Receptor Gene With a Unique 3'-UTR and Alternative Splice Site From the Oriental Fruit Moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L N; Zhang, H J; Quan, L F; Yan, W T; Yue, Q; Li, Y Y; Qiu, G S

    2016-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR), the largest calcium channel protein, has been studied because of its key roles in calcium signaling in cells. Insect RyRs are molecular targets for novel diamide insecticides. The target has been focused widely because of the diamides with high activity against lepidopterous pests and safety for nontarget organisms. To study our understanding of effects of diamides on RyR, we cloned the RyR gene from the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta, which is the most serious pest of stone and pome tree fruits throughout the world, to investigate the modulation of diamide insecticides on RyR mRNA expression in G. molesta (GmRyR). The full-length cDNAs of GmRyR contain a unique 3'-UTR with 625 bp and an open reading frame of 15,402 bp with a predicted protein consisting of 5,133 amino acids. GmRyR possessed a high level of overall amino acid homology with insect and vertebrate isoforms, with 77-92% and 45-47% identity, respectively. Furthermore, five alternative splice sites were identified in GmRyR. Diagnostic PCR showed that the inclusion frequency of one optional exon (f) differed between developmental stages, a finding only found in GmRyR. The lowest expression level of GmRyR mRNA was in larvae, the highest was in male pupae, and the relative expression level in male pupae was 25.67 times higher than that of in larvae. The expression level of GmRyR in the male pupae was 8.70 times higher than in female pupae, and that in male adults was 5.70 times higher than female adults. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  7. KChIP2 regulates the cardiac Ca2+ transient and myocyte contractility by targeting ryanodine receptor activity.

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    Drew M Nassal

    Full Text Available Pathologic electrical remodeling and attenuated cardiac contractility are featured characteristics of heart failure. Coinciding with these remodeling events is a loss of the K+ channel interacting protein, KChIP2. While, KChIP2 enhances the expression and stability of the Kv4 family of potassium channels, leading to a more pronounced transient outward K+ current, Ito,f, the guinea pig myocardium is unique in that Kv4 expression is absent, while KChIP2 expression is preserved, suggesting alternative consequences to KChIP2 loss. Therefore, KChIP2 was acutely silenced in isolated guinea pig myocytes, which led to significant reductions in the Ca2+ transient amplitude and prolongation of the transient duration. This change was reinforced by a decline in sarcomeric shortening. Notably, these results were unexpected when considering previous observations showing enhanced ICa,L and prolonged action potential duration following KChIP2 loss, suggesting a disruption of fundamental Ca2+ handling proteins. Evaluation of SERCA2a, phospholamban, RyR, and sodium calcium exchanger identified no change in protein expression. However, assessment of Ca2+ spark activity showed reduced spark frequency and prolonged Ca2+ decay following KChIP2 loss, suggesting an altered state of RyR activity. These changes were associated with a delocalization of the ryanodine receptor activator, presenilin, away from sarcomeric banding to more diffuse distribution, suggesting that RyR open probability are a target of KChIP2 loss mediated by a dissociation of presenilin. Typically, prolonged action potential duration and enhanced Ca2+ entry would augment cardiac contractility, but here we see KChIP2 fundamentally disrupts Ca2+ release events and compromises myocyte contraction. This novel role targeting presenilin localization and RyR activity reveals a significance for KChIP2 loss that reflects adverse remodeling observed in cardiac disease settings.

  8. Blockage of the Ryanodine Receptor via Azumolene Does Not Prevent Mechanical Ventilation-Induced Diaphragm Atrophy.

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    Erin E Talbert

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life-saving intervention for patients in respiratory failure. However, prolonged MV causes the rapid development of diaphragm muscle atrophy, and diaphragmatic weakness may contribute to difficult weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a therapeutic countermeasure to protect against MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy is important. MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is due, at least in part, to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS from diaphragm mitochondria and the activation of key muscle proteases (i.e., calpain and caspase-3. In this regard, leakage of calcium through the ryanodine receptor (RyR1 in diaphragm muscle fibers during MV could result in increased mitochondrial ROS emission, protease activation, and diaphragm atrophy. Therefore, these experiments tested the hypothesis that a pharmacological blockade of the RyR1 in diaphragm fibers with azumolene (AZ would prevent MV-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS production, protease activation, and diaphragmatic atrophy. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 12 hours of full-support MV while receiving either AZ or vehicle. At the end of the experiment, mitochondrial ROS emission, protease activation, and fiber cross-sectional area were determined in diaphragm muscle fibers. Decreases in muscle force production following MV indicate that the diaphragm took up a sufficient quantity of AZ to block calcium release through the RyR1. However, our findings reveal that AZ treatment did not prevent the MV-induced increase in mitochondrial ROS emission or protease activation in the diaphragm. Importantly, AZ treatment did not prevent MV-induced diaphragm fiber atrophy. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of the RyR1 in diaphragm muscle fibers is not sufficient to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy.

  9. Ryanodine receptor gating controls generation of diastolic calcium waves in cardiac myocytes

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    Petrovič, Pavol; Valent, Ivan; Cocherová, Elena; Pavelková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating in the initiation and propagation of calcium waves was investigated using a mathematical model comprising a stochastic description of RyR gating and a deterministic description of calcium diffusion and sequestration. We used a one-dimensional array of equidistantly spaced RyR clusters, representing the confocal scanning line, to simulate the formation of calcium sparks. Our model provided an excellent description of the calcium dependence of the frequency of diastolic calcium sparks and of the increased tendency for the production of calcium waves after a decrease in cytosolic calcium buffering. We developed a hypothesis relating changes in the propensity to form calcium waves to changes of RyR gating and tested it by simulation. With a realistic RyR gating model, increased ability of RyR to be activated by Ca2+ strongly increased the propensity for generation of calcium waves at low (0.05–0.1-µM) calcium concentrations but only slightly at high (0.2–0.4-µM) calcium concentrations. Changes in RyR gating altered calcium wave formation by changing the calcium sensitivity of spontaneous calcium spark activation and/or the average number of open RyRs in spontaneous calcium sparks. Gating changes that did not affect RyR activation by Ca2+ had only a weak effect on the propensity to form calcium waves, even if they strongly increased calcium spark frequency. Calcium waves induced by modulating the properties of the RyR activation site could be suppressed by inhibiting the spontaneous opening of the RyR. These data can explain the increased tendency for production of calcium waves under conditions when RyR gating is altered in cardiac diseases. PMID:26009544

  10. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group.

  11. Frog alpha- and beta-ryanodine receptors provide distinct intracellular Ca2+ signals in a myogenic cell line.

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    Taku Kashiyama

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In frog skeletal muscle, two ryanodine receptor (RyR isoforms, alpha-RyR and beta-RyR, are expressed in nearly equal amounts. However, the roles and significance of the two isoforms in excitation-contraction (E-C coupling remains to be elucidated.In this study, we expressed either or both alpha-RyR and beta-RyR in 1B5 RyR-deficient myotubes using the herpes simplex virus 1 helper-free amplicon system. Immunological characterizations revealed that alpha-RyR and beta-RyR are appropriately expressed and targeted at the junctions in 1B5 myotubes. In Ca(2+ imaging studies, each isoform exhibited caffeine-induced Ca(2+ transients, an indicative of Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release (CICR. However, the fashion of Ca(2+ release events was fundamentally different: alpha-RyR mediated graded and sustained Ca(2+ release observed uniformly throughout the cytoplasm, whereas beta-RyR supported all-or-none type regenerative Ca(2+ oscillations and waves. alpha-RyR but not beta-RyR exhibited Ca(2+ transients triggered by membrane depolarization with high [K(+](o that were nifedipine-sensitive, indicating that only alpha-RyR mediates depolarization-induced Ca(2+ release. Myotubes co-expressing alpha-RyR and beta-RyR demonstrated high [K(+](o-induced Ca(2+ transients which were indistinguishable from those with myotubes expressing alpha-RyR alone. Furthermore, procaine did not affect the peak height of high [K(+](o-induced Ca(2+ transients, suggesting minor amplification of Ca(2+ release by beta-RyR via CICR in 1B5 myotubes.These findings suggest that alpha-RyR and beta-RyR provide distinct intracellular Ca(2+ signals in a myogenic cell line. These distinct properties may also occur in frog skeletal muscle and will be important for E-C coupling.

  12. Ryanodine receptor point mutations confer diamide insecticide resistance in tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditakis, Emmanouil; Steinbach, Denise; Moritz, Gerald; Vasakis, Emmanouil; Stavrakaki, Marianna; Ilias, Aris; García-Vidal, Lidia; Martínez-Aguirre, María Del Rosario; Bielza, Pablo; Morou, Evangelia; Silva, Jefferson E; Silva, Wellington M; Siqueira, Ηerbert A A; Iqbal, Sofia; Troczka, Bartlomiej J; Williamson, Martin S; Bass, Chris; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia; Vontas, John; Nauen, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Insect ryanodine receptors (RyR) are the molecular target-site for the recently introduced diamide insecticides. Diamides are particularly active on Lepidoptera pests, including tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). High levels of diamide resistance were recently described in some European populations of T. absoluta, however, the mechanisms of resistance remained unknown. In this study the molecular basis of diamide resistance was investigated in a diamide resistant strain from Italy (IT-GELA-SD4), and additional resistant field populations collected in Greece, Spain and Brazil. The genetics of resistance was investigated by reciprocally crossing strain IT-GELA-SD4 with a susceptible strain and revealed an autosomal incompletely recessive mode of inheritance. To investigate the possible role of target-site mutations as known from diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), we sequenced respective domains of the RyR gene of T. absoluta. Genotyping of individuals of IT-GELA-SD4 and field-collected strains showing different levels of diamide resistance revealed the presence of G4903E and I4746M RyR target-site mutations. These amino acid substitutions correspond to those recently described for diamide resistant diamondback moth, i.e. G4946E and I4790M. We also detected two novel mutations, G4903V and I4746T, in some of the resistant T. absoluta strains. Radioligand binding studies with thoracic membrane preparations of the IT-GELA-SD4 strain provided functional evidence that these mutations alter the affinity of the RyR to diamides. In combination with previous work on P. xylostella our study highlights the importance of position G4903 (G4946 in P. xylostella) of the insect RyR in defining sensitivity to diamides. The discovery of diamide resistance mutations in T. absoluta populations of diverse geographic origin has serious implications for the efficacy of diamides under applied conditions. The implementation of appropriate resistance

  13. Null mutations causing depletion of the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1) are commonly associated with recessive structural congenital myopathies with cores.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monnier, N.; Marty, I.; Faure, J.; Castiglioni, C.; Desnuelle, C.; Sacconi, S.; Estournet, B.; Ferreiro, A.; Romero, N.; Laquerriere, A.; Lazaro, L.; Martin, J.J.; Morava, E.; Rossi, A.; Kooi, A. van der; Visser, M. de; Verschuuren, C.; Lunardi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations of the ryanodine receptor cause dominant and recessive forms of congenital myopathies with cores. Quantitative defects of RYR1 have been reported in families presenting with recessive forms of the disease and epigenic regulation has been recently proposed to explain potential maternal

  14. Synthesis, Larvicidal Activities and Antifungal Activities of Novel Chlorantraniliprole Derivatives and Their Target in the Ryanodine Receptor

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    Qichao Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify novel chlorantraniliprole derivatives as potential insecticides or fungicides, 25 analogues of chlorantraniliprole were synthesized. The insecticidal activities against oriental armyworm and the antifungal activities against five typical fungi of these derivatives were tested. Compounds 2u, 2x and 2y exhibited good activities against oriental armyworm, especially compounds 2u and 2x which showed higher larvicidal activities than indoxacarb. Moreover, all of the tested compounds exhibited activities against five typical fungi. The Ki values of all synthesized compounds were calculated using AutoDock4. The relationship between the Ki values and the results of insecticidal activities against oriental armyworm further indicated that the membrane-spanning domain protein of the ryanodine receptor might contain chlorantraniliprole binding sites.

  15. Sound Waves Induce Neural Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ryanodine Receptor-Induced Calcium Release and Pyk2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yura; Park, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Jong Seob; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil; Jeon, Songhee

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown considerable promise as an adaptable cell source for use in tissue engineering and other therapeutic applications. The aims of this study were to develop methods to test the hypothesis that human MSCs could be differentiated using sound wave stimulation alone and to find the underlying mechanism. Human bone marrow (hBM)-MSCs were stimulated with sound waves (1 kHz, 81 dB) for 7 days and the expression of neural markers were analyzed. Sound waves induced neural differentiation of hBM-MSC at 1 kHz and 81 dB but not at 1 kHz and 100 dB. To determine the signaling pathways involved in the neural differentiation of hBM-MSCs by sound wave stimulation, we examined the Pyk2 and CREB phosphorylation. Sound wave induced an increase in the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and CREB at 45 min and 90 min, respectively, in hBM-MSCs. To find out the upstream activator of Pyk2, we examined the intracellular calcium source that was released by sound wave stimulation. When we used ryanodine as a ryanodine receptor antagonist, sound wave-induced calcium release was suppressed. Moreover, pre-treatment with a Pyk2 inhibitor, PF431396, prevented the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and suppressed sound wave-induced neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs. These results suggest that specific sound wave stimulation could be used as a neural differentiation inducer of hBM-MSCs.

  16. Juxtaglomerular cell CaSR stimulation decreases renin release via activation of the PLC/IP(3) pathway and the ryanodine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Capisano, M Cecilia; Reddy, Mahendranath; Mendez, Mariela; Garvin, Jeffrey L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2013-02-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-coupled protein expressed in renal juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. Its activation stimulates calcium-mediated decreases in cAMP content and inhibits renin release. The postreceptor pathway for the CaSR in JG cells is unknown. In parathyroids, CaSR acts through G(q) and/or G(i). Activation of G(q) stimulates phospholipase C (PLC), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)), releasing calcium from intracellular stores. G(i) stimulation inhibits cAMP formation. In afferent arterioles, the ryanodine receptor (RyR) enhances release of stored calcium. We hypothesized JG cell CaSR activation inhibits renin via the PLC/IP(3) and also RyR activation, increasing intracellular calcium, suppressing cAMP formation, and inhibiting renin release. Renin release from primary cultures of isolated mouse JG cells (n = 10) was measured. The CaSR agonist cinacalcet decreased renin release 56 ± 7% of control (P PLC inhibitor U73122 reversed cinacalcet inhibition of renin (104 ± 11% of control). The IP(3) inhibitor 2-APB also reversed inhibition of renin from 56 ± 6 to 104 ± 11% of control (P PLC/IP(3) pathway, activating RyR, increasing intracellular calcium, and resulting in calcium-mediated renin inhibition.

  17. Juxtaglomerular cell CaSR stimulation decreases renin release via activation of the PLC/IP3 pathway and the ryanodine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Capisano, M. Cecilia; Reddy, Mahendranath; Mendez, Mariela; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-coupled protein expressed in renal juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. Its activation stimulates calcium-mediated decreases in cAMP content and inhibits renin release. The postreceptor pathway for the CaSR in JG cells is unknown. In parathyroids, CaSR acts through Gq and/or Gi. Activation of Gq stimulates phospholipase C (PLC), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), releasing calcium from intracellular stores. Gi stimulation inhibits cAMP formation. In afferent arterioles, the ryanodine receptor (RyR) enhances release of stored calcium. We hypothesized JG cell CaSR activation inhibits renin via the PLC/IP3 and also RyR activation, increasing intracellular calcium, suppressing cAMP formation, and inhibiting renin release. Renin release from primary cultures of isolated mouse JG cells (n = 10) was measured. The CaSR agonist cinacalcet decreased renin release 56 ± 7% of control (P renin (104 ± 11% of control). The IP3 inhibitor 2-APB also reversed inhibition of renin from 56 ± 6 to 104 ± 11% of control (P renin from 61 ± 8 to 118 ± 22% of control (P renin inhibition (65 ± 12 to 41 ± 8% of control, P renin inhibition. PMID:23220722

  18. Comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of ryanodine receptor type3 (RyR3 knockout mice: Decreased social contact duration in two social interaction tests

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    Naoki Matsuo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic regulation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration is crucial for various neuronal functions such as synaptic transmission and plasticity, and gene expression. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs are a family of intracellular calcium release channels that mediate calcium-induced calcium release (CICR from the endoplasmic reticulum. Among the three RyR isoforms, RyR3 is preferentially expressed in the brain especially in the hippocampus and striatum. To investigate the behavioral effects of RyR3 deficiency, we subjected RyR3 knockout (RyR3-/- mice to a battery of behavioral tests. RyR3-/- mice exhibited significantly decreased social contact duration in two different social interaction tests, where two mice can freely move and make contacts with each other. They also exhibited hyperactivity and mildly impaired prepulse inhibition and latent inhibition while they did not show significant abnormalities in motor function and working and reference memory tests. These results suggest that RyR3 has an important role in locomotor activity and social behavior.

  19. Differential rescue of spatial memory deficits in aged rats by L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, S C; D'Angelo, H M; Royer, S E; Kaercher, R M; Adzovic, L; Wenk, G L

    2014-11-07

    Age-associated memory impairments may result as a consequence of neuroinflammatory induction of intracellular calcium (Ca(+2)) dysregulation. Altered L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC) and ryanodine receptor (RyR) activity may underlie age-associated learning and memory impairments. Various neuroinflammatory markers are associated with increased activity of both L-VDCCs and RyRs, and increased neuroinflammation is associated with normal aging. In vitro, pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs and RyRs has been shown to be anti-inflammatory. Here, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs or RyRs with the drugs nimodipine and dantrolene, respectively, could improve spatial memory and reduce age-associated increases in microglia activation. Dantrolene and nimodipine differentially attenuated age-associated spatial memory deficits but were not anti-inflammatory in vivo. Furthermore, RyR gene expression was inversely correlated with spatial memory, highlighting the central role of Ca(+2) dysregulation in age-associated memory deficits. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D Mapping of the SPRY2 domain of ryanodine receptor 1 by single-particle cryo-EM.

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    Alex Perálvarez-Marín

    Full Text Available The type 1 skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1 is principally responsible for Ca(2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and for the subsequent muscle contraction. The RyR1 contains three SPRY domains. SPRY domains are generally known to mediate protein-protein interactions, however the location of the three SPRY domains in the 3D structure of the RyR1 is not known. Combining immunolabeling and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy we have mapped the SPRY2 domain (S1085-V1208 in the 3D structure of RyR1 using three different antibodies against the SPRY2 domain. Two obstacles for the image processing procedure; limited amount of data and signal dilution introduced by the multiple orientations of the antibody bound in the tetrameric RyR1, were overcome by modifying the 3D reconstruction scheme. This approach enabled us to ascertain that the three antibodies bind to the same region, to obtain a 3D reconstruction of RyR1 with the antibody bound, and to map SPRY2 to the periphery of the cytoplasmic domain of RyR1. We report here the first 3D localization of a SPRY2 domain in any known RyR isoform.

  1. Antiarrhythmic potential of drugs targeting the cardiac ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channel: case study of dantrolene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acsai, Karoly; Nagy, Norbert; Marton, Zoltan; Oravecz, Kinga; Varro, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Driven by the limitations of the traditional antiarrhythmic pharmacology, current antiarrhythmic research is trying to identify new avenues for the development of specific and safe antiarrhythmic drugs. One of the most promising approaches in this field is the amelioration of the abnormal events in cellular Ca(2+) handling originating from the dysfunction of ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release complex (RyR), which is an inevitable key factor in the pathology of myocardial dysfunction, remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. Accordingly, both in experimental and clinical situations, inhibition of abnormal activity of RyR, regardless of being the primary cause or a consequence during the pathogenesis appears to exert beneficial effect on disease outcome, including a marked antiarrhythmic defense. Considerable amount of our knowledge in this field originates from studies using dantrolene, a human drug with RyR stabilizing effect. Our review summarizes the cardiovascular pharmacology of dantrolene and the results of its use in experimental models of cardiac diseases, which emphasize a promising perspective for the possible antiarrhythmic application of RyR inhibition in the future.

  2. Modeling CaMKII-mediated regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in the heart

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    Joseph L Greenstein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-contraction coupling (ECC in the cardiac myocyte is mediated by a number of highly integrated mechanisms of intracellular Ca2+ transport. Voltage- and Ca2+-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs allow for Ca2+ entry into the myocyte, which then binds to nearby ryanodine receptors (RyRs and triggers Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a process known as Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. The highly coordinated Ca2+-mediated interaction between LCCs and RyRs is further regulated by the cardiac isoform of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII. Because CaMKII targets and modulates the function of many ECC proteins, elucidation of its role in ECC and integrative cellular function is challenging and much insight has been gained through the use of detailed computational models. Multiscale models that can both reconstruct the detailed nature of local signaling events within the cardiac dyad and predict their functional consequences at the level of the whole cell have played an important role in advancing our understanding of CaMKII function in ECC. Here, we review experimentally based models of CaMKII function with a focus on LCC and RyR regulation, and the mechanistic insights that have been gained through their application.

  3. HIV-1 Tat activates neuronal ryanodine receptors with rapid induction of the unfolded protein response and mitochondrial hyperpolarization.

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    John P Norman

    Full Text Available Neurologic disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is ultimately refractory to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART because of failure of complete virus eradication in the central nervous system (CNS, and disruption of normal neural signaling events by virally induced chronic neuroinflammation. We have previously reported that HIV-1 Tat can induce mitochondrial hyperpolarization in cortical neurons, thus compromising the ability of the neuron to buffer calcium and sustain energy production for normal synaptic communication. In this report, we demonstrate that Tat induces rapid loss of ER calcium mediated by the ryanodine receptor (RyR, followed by the unfolded protein response (UPR and pathologic dilatation of the ER in cortical neurons in vitro. RyR antagonism attenuated both Tat-mediated mitochondrial hyperpolarization and UPR induction. Delivery of Tat to murine CNS in vivo also leads to long-lasting pathologic ER dilatation and mitochondrial morphologic abnormalities. Finally, we performed ultrastructural studies that demonstrated mitochondria with abnormal morphology and dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER in brain tissue of patients with HIV-1 inflammation and neurodegeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that abnormal RyR signaling mediates the neuronal UPR with failure of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and is a critical locus for the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 in the CNS.

  4. The ryanodine receptor type 1 gene variants in African American men with exertional rhabdomyolysis and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambuughin, N; Capacchione, J; Blokhin, A; Bayarsaikhan, M; Bina, S; Muldoon, S

    2009-12-01

    It has been suggested that exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) and malignant hyperthermia (MH) are related syndromes. We hypothesize that patients with unexplained ER harbor mutations in the ryanodine receptor gene type 1 (RYR1), a primary gene implicated in MH, and therefore ER patients are at increased risk for MH. Although there are reported cases of MH in individuals of African descent, there are no data available on molecular characterization of these patients. We analyzed RYR1 in six, unrelated African American men with unexplained ER, who were subsequently diagnosed as MH susceptible (MHS) by the Caffeine Halothane Contracture Test. Three novel and two variants, previously reported in Caucasian MHS subjects, were found in five studied patients. The novel variants were highly conserved amino acids and were absent among 230 control subjects of various ethnic backgrounds. These results emphasize the importance of performing muscle contracture testing and RYR1 mutation screening in patients with unexplained ER. The MHS-associated variant Ala1352Gly was identified as a polymorphism predominant in individuals of African descent. Our data underscore the need for investigating RYR1 across different ethnic groups and will contribute to interpretation of genetic screening results of individuals at risk for MH.

  5. Characterization of the Ryanodine Receptor Gene With a Unique 3′-UTR and Alternative Splice Site From the Oriental Fruit Moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L. N.; Zhang, H. J.; Quan, L. F.; Yan, W. T.; Yue, Q.; Li, Y. Y.; Qiu, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR), the largest calcium channel protein, has been studied because of its key roles in calcium signaling in cells. Insect RyRs are molecular targets for novel diamide insecticides. The target has been focused widely because of the diamides with high activity against lepidopterous pests and safety for nontarget organisms. To study our understanding of effects of diamides on RyR, we cloned the RyR gene from the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta, which is the most serious pest of stone and pome tree fruits throughout the world, to investigate the modulation of diamide insecticides on RyR mRNA expression in G. molesta (GmRyR). The full-length cDNAs of GmRyR contain a unique 3′-UTR with 625 bp and an open reading frame of 15,402 bp with a predicted protein consisting of 5,133 amino acids. GmRyR possessed a high level of overall amino acid homology with insect and vertebrate isoforms, with 77–92% and 45–47% identity, respectively. Furthermore, five alternative splice sites were identified in GmRyR. Diagnostic PCR showed that the inclusion frequency of one optional exon (f) differed between developmental stages, a finding only found in GmRyR. The lowest expression level of GmRyR mRNA was in larvae, the highest was in male pupae, and the relative expression level in male pupae was 25.67 times higher than that of in larvae. The expression level of GmRyR in the male pupae was 8.70 times higher than in female pupae, and that in male adults was 5.70 times higher than female adults. PMID:28076278

  6. Genetic ablation of ryanodine receptor 2 phosphorylation at Ser-2808 aggravates Ca(2+)-dependent cardiomyopathy by exacerbating diastolic Ca2+ release.

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    Liu, Bin; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Velez-Cortes, Florencia; Lou, Qing; Valdivia, Carmen R; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Valdivia, Hector H; Gyorke, Sandor

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorylation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) by protein kinase A (PKA) at Ser-2808 is suggested to mediate the physiological 'fight or flight' response and contribute to heart failure by rendering the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) leaky for Ca(2+). In the present study, we examined the potential role of RyR2 phosphorylation at Ser-2808 in the progression of Ca(2+)-dependent cardiomyopathy (CCM) by using mice genetically modified to feature elevated SR Ca(2+) leak while expressing RyR2s that cannot be phosphorylated at this site (S2808A). Surprisingly, rather than alleviating the disease phenotype, constitutive dephosphorylation of Ser-2808 aggravated CCM as manifested by shortened survival, deteriorated in vivo cardiac function, exacerbated SR Ca(2+) leak and mitochondrial injury. Notably, the deteriorations of cardiac function, myocyte Ca(2+) handling, and mitochondria integrity were consistently worse in mice with heterozygous ablation of Ser-2808 than in mice with complete ablation. Wild-type (WT) and CCM myocytes expressing unmutated RyR2s exhibited a high level of baseline phosphorylation at Ser-2808. Exposure of these CCM cells to protein phosphatase 1 caused a transitory increase in Ca(2+) leak attributable to partial dephosphorylation of RyR2 tetramers at Ser-2808 from more fully phosphorylated state. Thus, exacerbated Ca(2+) leak through partially dephosphorylated RyR2s accounts for the prevalence of the disease phenotype in the heterozygous S2808A CCM mice. These results do not support the importance of RyR2 hyperphosphorylation in Ca(2+)-dependent heart disease, and rather suggest roles for the opposite process, the RyR2 dephosphorylation at this residue in physiological and pathophysiological Ca(2+) signalling.

  7. Genetic ablation of ryanodine receptor 2 phosphorylation at Ser-2808 aggravates Ca2+-dependent cardiomyopathy by exacerbating diastolic Ca2+ release

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    Liu, Bin; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Velez-Cortes, Florencia; Lou, Qing; Valdivia, Carmen R; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Valdivia, Hector H; Gyorke, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) by protein kinase A (PKA) at Ser-2808 is suggested to mediate the physiological ‘fight or flight’ response and contribute to heart failure by rendering the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) leaky for Ca2+. In the present study, we examined the potential role of RyR2 phosphorylation at Ser-2808 in the progression of Ca2+-dependent cardiomyopathy (CCM) by using mice genetically modified to feature elevated SR Ca2+ leak while expressing RyR2s that cannot be phosphorylated at this site (S2808A). Surprisingly, rather than alleviating the disease phenotype, constitutive dephosphorylation of Ser-2808 aggravated CCM as manifested by shortened survival, deteriorated in vivo cardiac function, exacerbated SR Ca2+ leak and mitochondrial injury. Notably, the deteriorations of cardiac function, myocyte Ca2+ handling, and mitochondria integrity were consistently worse in mice with heterozygous ablation of Ser-2808 than in mice with complete ablation. Wild-type (WT) and CCM myocytes expressing unmutated RyR2s exhibited a high level of baseline phosphorylation at Ser-2808. Exposure of these CCM cells to protein phosphatase 1 caused a transitory increase in Ca2+ leak attributable to partial dephosphorylation of RyR2 tetramers at Ser-2808 from more fully phosphorylated state. Thus, exacerbated Ca2+ leak through partially dephosphorylated RyR2s accounts for the prevalence of the disease phenotype in the heterozygous S2808A CCM mice. These results do not support the importance of RyR2 hyperphosphorylation in Ca2+-dependent heart disease, and rather suggest roles for the opposite process, the RyR2 dephosphorylation at this residue in physiological and pathophysiological Ca2+ signalling. PMID:24445321

  8. Calcium dysregulation via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels and ryanodine receptors underlies memory deficits and synaptic dysfunction during chronic neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Sarah C; D'Angelo, Heather M; Royer, Sarah E; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Crockett, Alexis M; Adzovic, Linda; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-03-25

    Chronic neuroinflammation and calcium (Ca(+2)) dysregulation are both components of Alzheimer's disease. Prolonged neuroinflammation produces elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species which can alter neuronal Ca(+2) homeostasis via L-type voltage-dependent Ca(+2) channels (L-VDCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Chronic neuroinflammation also leads to deficits in spatial memory, which may be related to Ca(+2) dysregulation. The studies herein use an in vivo model of chronic neuroinflammation: rats were infused intraventricularly with a continuous small dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) for 28 days. The rats were treated with the L-VDCC antagonist nimodipine or the RyR antagonist dantrolene. LPS-infused rats had significant memory deficits in the Morris water maze, and this deficit was ameliorated by treatment with nimodipine. Synaptosomes from LPS-infused rats had increased Ca(+2) uptake, which was reduced by a blockade of L-VDCCs either in vivo or ex vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that Ca(+2) dysregulation during chronic neuroinflammation is partially dependent on increases in L-VDCC function. However, blockade of the RyRs also slightly improved spatial memory of the LPS-infused rats, demonstrating that other Ca(+2) channels are dysregulated during chronic neuroinflammation. Ca(+2)-dependent immediate early gene expression was reduced in LPS-infused rats treated with dantrolene or nimodipine, indicating normalized synaptic function that may underlie improvements in spatial memory. Pro-inflammatory markers are also reduced in LPS-infused rats treated with either drug. Overall, these data suggest that Ca(+2) dysregulation via L-VDCCs and RyRs play a crucial role in memory deficits resulting from chronic neuroinflammation.

  9. Molecular characterization of a ryanodine receptor gene in the rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Wang

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs are the targets of two novel classes of synthetic insecticidal chemicals, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. Isolation of full-length RyR cDNAs is a critical step towards the structural and functional characterization of insect RyRs and an understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the species selective toxicity of diamide insecticides. However, there has been little research on the insect RyR genes due to the high molecular weight of the RyR proteins. In this study, we isolated a full-length RyR cDNA (named as CmRyR from Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, an important rice pest throughout Southeast Asia. The composite CmRyR gene contains an ORF of 15264 bp encoding a protein of 5087 amino acid residues, which shares 79% overall identity with its Drosophila melanogaster homologue. All hallmarks of the RyR proteins are conserved in the CmRyR protein, suggesting that CmRyR is a structural and functional analogue of known RyRs. A multiple sequence alignment illustrates that the insect RyRs share high levels of amino acid sequence identity at the the COOH-terminal region. However, the amino acid residues analogous to the CmRyR residues N(4922, N(4924, N(4935, L(4950, L(4981, N(5013 and T(5064 are unique to lepidopteran RyRs compared with non-lepidopteran insect RyRs. This finding suggests that these residues may be involved in the differences in channel properties between lepidopteran and non-lepidopteran insect RyRs and in the species selective toxicity of diamide insecticides. Furthermore, two alternative splicing sites were identified in the CmRyR gene, one of which was located in the central part of the predicted second SPRY domain. Diagnostic PCR showed that the inclusion frequencies of two mutually exclusive exons (a/b and one optional exon (c differed between developmental stages or adult anatomical regions. Our results imply that alternative splicing may be a major means of generating functional

  10. Toward decrypting the allosteric mechanism of the ryanodine receptor based on coarse-grained structural and dynamic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2015-12-01

    The ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of calcium (Ca) channels that regulate Ca release by undergoing a closed-to-open gating transition in response to action potential or Ca binding. The allosteric mechanism of RyRs gating, which is activated/regulated by ligand/protein binding >200 Å away from the channel gate, remains elusive for the lack of high-resolution structures. Recent solution of the closed-form structures of the RyR1 isoform by cryo-electron microscopy has paved the way for detailed structure-driven studies of RyRs functions. Toward elucidating the allosteric mechanism of RyRs gating, we performed coarse-grained modeling based on the newly solved closed-form structures of RyR1. Our normal mode analysis captured a key mode of collective motions dominating the observed structural variations in RyR1, which features large outward and downward movements of the peripheral domains with the channel remaining closed, and involves hotspot residues that overlap well with key functional sites and disease mutations. In particular, we found a key interaction between a peripheral domain and the Ca-binding EF hand domain, which may allow for direct coupling of Ca binding to the collective motions as captured by the above mode. This key mode was robustly reproduced by the normal mode analysis of the other two closed-form structures of RyR1 solved independently. To elucidate the closed-to-open conformational changes in RyR1 with amino-acid level of details, we flexibly fitted the closed-form structures of RyR1 into a 10-Å cryo-electron microscopy map of the open state. We observed extensive structural changes involving the peripheral domains and the central domains, resulting in the channel pore opening. In sum, our findings have offered unprecedented structural and dynamic insights to the allosteric mechanism of RyR1 via modulation of the key collective motions involved in RyR1 gating. The predicted hotspot residues and open-form conformation of RyR1 will guide

  11. The Role of Parvalbumin, Sarcoplasmatic Reticulum Calcium Pump Rate, Rates of Cross-Bridge Dynamics, and Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Current on Peripheral Muscle Fatigue: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Verena

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of the excitation-contraction pathway, which has previously been validated for slow-twitch and fast-twitch skeletal muscles, is employed to investigate key biophysical processes leading to peripheral muscle fatigue. Special emphasis hereby is on investigating how the model's original parameter sets can be interpolated such that realistic behaviour with respect to contraction time and fatigue progression can be obtained for a continuous distribution of the model's parameters across the muscle units, as found for the functional properties of muscles. The parameters are divided into 5 groups describing (i) the sarcoplasmatic reticulum calcium pump rate, (ii) the cross-bridge dynamics rates, (iii) the ryanodine receptor calcium current, (iv) the rates of binding of magnesium and calcium ions to parvalbumin and corresponding dissociations, and (v) the remaining processes. The simulations reveal that the first two parameter groups are sensitive to contraction time but not fatigue, the third parameter group affects both considered properties, and the fourth parameter group is only sensitive to fatigue progression. Hence, within the scope of the underlying model, further experimental studies should investigate parvalbumin dynamics and the ryanodine receptor calcium current to enhance the understanding of peripheral muscle fatigue. PMID:27980606

  12. An Extended Structure-Activity Relationship of Nondioxin-Like PCBs Evaluates and Supports Modeling Predictions and Identifies Picomolar Potency of PCB 202 Towards Ryanodine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Erika B; Feng, Wei; Zheng, Jing; Dong, Yao; Li, Xueshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Pessah, Isaac N

    2017-01-01

    Nondioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL PCBs) activate ryanodine-sensitive Ca(2+ )channels (RyRs) and this activation has been associated with neurotoxicity in exposed animals. RyR-active congeners follow a distinct structure-activity relationship and a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) predicts that a large number of PCBs likely activate the receptor, which requires validation. Additionally, previous structural based conclusions have been established using receptor ligand binding assays but the impact of varying PCB structures on ion channel gating behavior is not understood. We used [(3)H]Ryanodine ([(3)H]Ry) binding to assess the RyR-activity of 14 previously untested PCB congeners evaluating the predictability of the QSAR. Congeners determined to display widely varying potency were then assayed with single channel voltage clamp analysis to assess direct influences on channel gating kinetics. The RyR-activity of individual PCBs assessed in in vitro assays followed the general pattern predicted by the QSAR but binding and lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated higher potency than predicted. Of the 49 congeners tested to date, tetra-ortho PCB 202 was found to be the most potent RyR-active congener increasing channel open probability at 200 pM. Shifting meta-substitutions to the para-position resulted in a > 100-fold reduction in potency as seen with PCB 197. Non-ortho PCB 11 was found to lack activity at the receptor supporting a minimum mono-ortho substitution for PCB RyR activity. These findings expand and support previous SAR assessments; where out of the 49 congeners tested to date 42 activate the receptor demonstrating that the RyR is a sensitive and common target of PCBs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Intense resistance exercise induces early and transient increases in ryanodine receptor 1 phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gehlert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1 critically contributes to skeletal muscle contraction abilities by mediating Ca²⁺ion oscillation between sarcoplasmatic and myofibrillar compartments, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK senses contraction-induced energetic stress by phosphorylation at Thr¹⁷². Phosphorylation of RyR1 at serine²⁸⁴³ (pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ results in leaky RyR1 channels and impaired Ca²⁺homeostasis. Because acute resistance exercise exerts decreased contraction performance in skeletal muscle, preceded by high rates of Ca²⁺-oscillation and energetic stress, intense myofiber contractions may induce increased RyR1 and AMPK phosphorylation. However, no data are available regarding the time-course and magnitude of early RyR1 and AMPK phosphorylation in human myofibers in response to acute resistance exercise. PURPOSE: Determine the effects and early time-course of resistance exercise on pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ and pAMPKThr¹⁷² in type I and II myofibers. METHODS: 7 male subjects (age 23±2 years, height: 185±7 cm, weight: 82±5 kg performed 3 sets of 8 repetitions of maximum eccentric knee extensions. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, 15, 30 and 60 min post exercise. pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ and pAMPKThr¹⁷² levels were determined by western blot and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry techniques. RESULTS: While total RyR1 and total AMPK levels remained unchanged, RyR1 was significantly more abundant in type II than type I myofibers. pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ increased 15 min and peaked 30 min (p<0.01 post exercise in both myofiber types. Type I fibers showed relatively higher increases in pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ levels than type II myofibers and remained elevated up to 60 min post resistance exercise (p<0.05. pAMPKThr¹⁷² also increased 15 to 30 min post exercise (p<0.01 in type I and II myofibers and in whole skeletal muscle. CONCLUSION: Resistance exercise induces acutely increased pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ and

  14. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal [beta]-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, Fernando J.; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J.; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; (Toronto)

    2009-12-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+}. Ca{sup 2+} is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca{sup 2+} transient by activation of a class of Ca{sup 2+} release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca{sup 2+} transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR{sub NTD}) at 2.5 {angstrom}. The RyR{sub NTD} structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the 'arm' domain in IP3Rsup. The N-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP{sub 3}R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyRNTD, supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions.

  15. Enantioselectivity of 2,2',3,5',6-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 95) Atropisomers toward Ryanodine Receptors (RyRs) and Their Influences on Hippocampal Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Zheng, Jing; Robin, Gaëlle; Dong, Yao; Ichikawa, Makoto; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Mori, Tadashi; Nakano, Takeshi; Pessah, Isaac N

    2017-12-19

    Nineteen ortho-substituted PCBs are chiral and found enantioselectively enriched in ecosystems. Their differential actions on biological targets are not understood. PCB 95 (2,2',3,5',6-pentachlorobiphenyl), a chiral PCB of current environmental relevance, is among the most potent toward modifying ryanodine receptors (RyR) function and Ca2+ signaling. PCB 95 enantiomers are separated and assigned aR- and aS-PCB 95 using three chiral-column HPLC and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Studies of RyR1-enriched microsomes show aR-PCB 95 with >4× greater potency (EC50 = 0.20 ± 0.05 μM), ∼ 1.3× higher efficacy (Bmax = 3.74 ± 0.07 μM) in [3H]Ryanodine-binding and >3× greater rates (R = 7.72 ± 0.31 nmol/sec/mg) of Ca2+ efflux compared with aS-PCB 95, whereas racemate has intermediate activity. aR-PCB 95 has modest selectivity for RyR2, and lower potency than racemate toward the RyR isoform mixture in brain membranes. Chronic exposure of hippocampal neuronal networks to nanomolar PCB 95 during a critical developmental period shows divergent influences on synchronous Ca2+ oscillation (SCO): rac-PCB 95 increasing and aR-PCB 95 decreasing SCO frequency at 50 nM, although the latter's effects are nonmonotonic at higher concentration. aS-PCB95 shows the greatest influence on inhibiting responses to 20 Hz electrical pulse trains. Considering persistence of PCB 95 in the environment, stereoselectivity toward RyRs and developing neuronal networks may clarify health risks associated with enantioisomeric enrichment of PCBs.

  16. Differential neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonists in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Sarah C; Royer, Sarah E; D'Angelo, Heather M; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Fisher, David A; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-03-01

    Neuroinflammation and degeneration of catecholaminergic brainstem nuclei occur early in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Neuroinflammation increases levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species which can alter neuronal calcium (Ca(+2)) homoeostasis via L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-VDCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Alterations in Ca(+2) channel activity in the SN and LC can lead to disruption of normal pacemaking activity in these areas, contributing to behavioral deficits. Here, we utilized an in vivo model of chronic neuroinflammation: rats were infused intraventricularly with a continuous small dose (0.25 μg/h) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) for 28 days. Rats were treated with either the L-VDCC antagonist nimodipine or the RyR antagonist dantrolene. LPS-infused rats had significant motor deficits in the accelerating rotarod task as well as abnormal behavioral agitation in the forced swim task and open field. Corresponding with these behavioral deficits, LPS-infused rats also had significant increases in microglia activation and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and locus coeruleus (LC). Treatment with nimodipine or dantrolene normalized LPS-induced abnormalities in the rotarod and forced swim, restored the number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the LC, and significantly reduced microglia activation in the SNpc. Only nimodipine significantly reduced microglia activation in the LC, and neither drug increased TH immunoreactivity in the SNpc. These findings demonstrate that the Ca(+2) dysregulation in the LC and SN brainstem nuclei is differentially altered by chronic neuroinflammation. Overall, targeting Ca + 2 dysregulation may be an important target for ameliorating neurodegeneration in the SNpc and LC.

  17. A model of cardiac ryanodine receptor gating predicts experimental Ca2+-dynamics and Ca2+-triggered arrhythmia in the long QT syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dan; Ermentrout, Bard; Němec, Jan; Salama, Guy

    2017-09-01

    Abnormal Ca2+ handling is well-established as the trigger of cardiac arrhythmia in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and digoxin toxicity, but its role remains controversial in Torsade de Pointes (TdP), the arrhythmia associated with the long QT syndrome (LQTS). Recent experimental results show that early afterdepolarizations (EADs) that initiate TdP are caused by spontaneous (non-voltage-triggered) Ca2+ release from Ca2+-overloaded sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) rather than the activation of the L-type Ca2+-channel window current. In bradycardia and long QT type 2 (LQT2), a second, non-voltage triggered cytosolic Ca2+ elevation increases gradually in amplitude, occurs before overt voltage instability, and then precedes the rise of EADs. Here, we used a modified Shannon-Puglisi-Bers model of rabbit ventricular myocytes to reproduce experimental Ca2+ dynamics in bradycardia and LQT2. Abnormal systolic Ca2+-oscillations and EADs caused by SR Ca2+-release are reproduced in a modified 0-dimensional model, where 3 gates in series control the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) conductance. Two gates control RyR2 activation and inactivation and sense cytosolic Ca2+ while a third gate senses luminal junctional SR Ca2+. The model predicts EADs in bradycardia and low extracellular [K+] and cessation of SR Ca2+-release terminate salvos of EADs. Ca2+-waves, systolic cell-synchronous Ca2+-release, and multifocal diastolic Ca2+ release seen in subcellular Ca2+-mapping experiments are observed in the 2-dimensional version of the model. These results support the role of SR Ca2+-overload, abnormal SR Ca2+-release, and the subsequent activation of the electrogenic Na+/Ca2+-exchanger as the mechanism of TdP. The model offers new insights into the genesis of cardiac arrhythmia and new therapeutic strategies.

  18. The effects of ryanodine receptor (RYR1) mutation on natural killer cell cytotoxicity, plasma cytokines and stress hormones during acute intermittent exercise in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Borman, A; Myślińska, D; Pałczyńska, P; Kamyczek, M

    2016-04-01

    Stress susceptibility has been mapped to a single recessive gene, the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene or halothane (Hal) gene. Homozygous (Hal(nn)), mutated pigs are sensitive to halothane and susceptible to Porcine Stress Syndrome (PSS). Previous studies have shown that stress-susceptible RYR1 gene mutated homozygotes in response to restraint stress showed an increase in natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) accompanied by more pronounced stress-related hormone and anti-inflammatory cytokine changes. In order to determine the relationship of a RYR1 gene mutation with NKCC, plasma cytokines and stress-related hormones following a different stress model - exercise - 36 male pigs (representing different genotypes according to RYR1 gene mutation: NN, homozygous dominant; Nn, heterozygous; nn, homozygous recessive) were submitted to an intermittent treadmill walking. During the entire experiment the greatest level of NKCC and the greatest concentrations of interleukin (IL-) 6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon (IFN-)γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and stress-related hormones (adrenaline, prolactin, beta-endorphin) were observed in nn pigs, and the greatest concentration of IL-1 and growth hormone in NN pigs. Immunostimulatory effects of intermittent exercise on NKCC in nn pigs were concomitant with increases in IL-2, IL-12 and IFN-γ, the potent NKCC activators. Our findings suggest that stress-susceptible pigs RYR1 gene mutated pigs develop a greater level of NKCC and cytokine production in response to exercise stress. These results suggest that the heterogeneity of immunological and neuroendocrine response to exercise stress in pigs could be influenced by RYR1 gene mutation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. PCB 136 atropselectively alters morphometric and functional parameters of neuronal connectivity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via ryanodine receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D; Pessah, Isaac N; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J

    2014-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca²⁺-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (-)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (-)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca²⁺-sensitive dye demonstrates that (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ oscillations. Similarly, (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure.

  20. Dystrophin Threshold Level Necessary for Normalization of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase, Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, and Ryanodine Receptor-Calcium Release Channel Type 1 Nitrosylation in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy Dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Christel; Le Guiner, Caroline; Falcone, Sestina; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Benkhelifa-Ziyyat, Sofia; Guigand, Lydie; Montus, Marie; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Piétri-Rouxel, France

    2016-09-01

    At present, the clinically most advanced strategy to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the exon-skipping strategy. Whereas antisense oligonucleotide-based clinical trials are underway for DMD, it is essential to determine the dystrophin restoration threshold needed to ensure improvement of muscle physiology at the molecular level. A preclinical trial has been conducted in golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs treated in a forelimb by locoregional delivery of rAAV8-U7snRNA to promote exon skipping on the canine dystrophin messenger. Here, we exploited rAAV8-U7snRNA-transduced GRMD muscle samples, well characterized for their percentage of dystrophin-positive fibers, with the aim of defining the threshold of dystrophin rescue necessary for normalization of the status of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mu (nNOSμ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel type 1 (RyR1), crucial actors for efficient contractile function. Results showed that restoration of dystrophin in 40% of muscle fibers is needed to decrease abnormal cytosolic nNOSμ expression and to reduce overexpression of iNOS, these two parameters leading to a reduction in the NO level in the muscle fibers. Furthermore, the same percentage of dystrophin-positive fibers of 40% was associated with the normalization of RyR1 nitrosylation status and with stabilization of the RyR1-calstabin1 complex that is required to facilitate coupled gating. We concluded that a minimal threshold of 40% of dystrophin-positive fibers is necessary for the reinstatement of central proteins needed for proper muscle contractile function, and thus identified a rate of dystrophin expression significantly improving, at the molecular level, the dystrophic muscle physiology.

  1. 17beta-estradiol rapidly mobilizes intracellular calcium from ryanodine-receptor-gated stores via a PKC-PKA-Erk-dependent pathway in the human eccrine sweat gland cell line NCL-SG3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Muchekehu, Ruth W

    2008-09-01

    We describe a novel rapid non-genomic effect of 17beta-estradiol (E2) on intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) signalling in the eccrine sweat gland epithelial cell line NCL-SG3. E2 had no observable effect on basal [Ca2+]i, however exposure of cells to E2 in the presence of the microsomal Ca2+ ATPase pump inhibitor, thapsigargin, produced a secondary, sustained increase in [Ca2+]i compared to thapsigargin treatment alone, where cells responded with a transient single spike-like increase in [Ca2+]i. The E2-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was not dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was completely abolished by ryanodine (100 microM). The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 (1 microM) prevented the E2-induced effects suggesting a role for the estrogen receptor in the release of [Ca2+]i from ryanodine-receptor-gated stores. The E2-induced effect on [Ca2+]i could also be prevented by the protein kinase C delta (PKCdelta)-specific inhibitor rottlerin (10 microM), the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3\\

  2. Detección de una mutación puntual en el gen receptor Ryanodina (Ryr 1 en cerdos criollos colombianos Detection of a single mutation point in Ryanodine receptor gene (Ryr 1 in colombian creole pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwin Y Hernández

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de estrés porcino (PSS es una enfermedad hereditaria monogénica recesiva relacionada con el gen receptor ryanodina (Ryr1. Utilizando PCR-SSCP y PCR-RFLP se tipificaron genéticamente 14 individuos de cerdos comerciales con el rasgo sindactilia (Casco de Mula-CM, 21 San Pedreños -SP y 100 Zungos- ZN. Las razas CM y SP tuvieron las mismas frecuencias alélicas (F(H = 0.79 y F(h = 0.21, mientras que en los cerdos ZN no se encontró el alelo recesivo (h. La heterocigosidad (He fue de 0.28% para los cerdos CM y 0.23% para los SP. La He para la muestra poblacional fue de 0.066.The Porcine Stress Syndrome is a hereditary monogenic recessive disease related with Ryanodine Receptor gen (Ryr1. Using PCR-SSCP and PCR-RFLP 14 animals of commercial breed with Mule foot characteristic (CM, 21 San Pedreño breed (SP and 100 Zungo breed (ZN were genotipificated. Allelic frequency for CM and SP was the same (F(H = 0.79 y F(h = 0.21, while in ZN there was no evidence of recessive allele (h. Heterocigosity (He was 0.28% for CM and 0.23% for SP. He value for population sample was 0.066.

  3. Ablation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor phospho-site Ser2808 does not alter the adrenergic response or the progression to heart failure in mice. Elimination of the genetic background as critical variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Francisco J; Chen, Xi; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2017-02-01

    Phosphorylation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) phospho-site S2808 has been touted by the Marks group as a hallmark of heart failure (HF) and a critical mediator of the physiological fight-or-flight response of the heart. In support of this hypothesis, mice unable to undergo phosphorylation at RyR2-S2808 (S2808A) were significantly protected against HF and displayed a blunted response to adrenergic stimulation. However, the issue remains highly controversial because several groups have been unable to reproduce these findings. An important variable not considered before is the genetic background of the mice used to obtain these divergent results. We backcrossed a RyR2-S2808A mouse into a congenic C57Bl/6 strain, the same strain used by the Marks group to conduct their experiments. We then performed several key experiments to confirm or discard the genetic background of the mouse as a relevant variable, including induction of HF by myocardial infarction and tests of integrity of adrenergic response. Congenic C57Bl/6 harboring the S2808A mutation showed similar echocardiographic parameters that indicated identical progression towards HF compared to wild type controls, and had a normal response to adrenergic stimulation in whole animal and cellular experiments. The genetic background of the different mouse models is unlikely to be the source of the divergent results obtained by the Marks group in comparison to several other groups. Cardiac adrenergic response and progression towards HF proceed unaltered in mice harboring the RyR2-S2808A mutation. Preventing RyR2-S2808 phosphorylation does not preclude a normal sympathetic response nor mitigates the pathophysiological consequences of MI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Calcitonin receptor expression in medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappagli, Virginia; Potes, Catarina Soares; Ferreira, Luciana Bueno; Tavares, Catarina; Eloy, Catarina; Elisei, Rossella; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Wookey, Peter J; Soares, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Calcitonin expression is a well-established marker for medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC); yet the role of calcitonin receptor (CTR), its seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor, remains to be established in C-cells derived thyroid tumors. The aim of this work was to investigate CTR expression in MTC and to correlate such expression with clinicopathological features in order to evaluate its possible role as a prognostic indicator of disease aggressiveness and outcome. Calcitonin receptor expression was analyzed in a series of 75 MTCs by immunohistochemistry, and by qPCR mRNA quantification in specimens from four patients. Statistical tests were used to evaluate the correlation between CTR expression and the clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of patients and tumors. Calcitonin receptor expression was detected in 62 out of 75 samples (82.7%), whereas 13 of the 75 samples (17.3%) were completely negative. CTR expression was significantly associated with expression of cytoplasmatic phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 and osteopontin, as well as with wild type RET/RAS genes and absence of tumor stroma, suggesting that CTR expression do not associate with clinicopathological signs of worse prognosis. Calcitonin receptor expression appears to be associated in MTC with more differentiated status of the neoplastic cells.

  5. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  6. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore...... to examine whether human bladder tumor cells express VDR. Tumor biopsies were obtained from 26 patients with TCC. Expression of VDR was examined by immunohistochemical experiments. All tumors expressed VDR. Biopsies from advanced disease contained more VDR positive cells than low stage disease (p ....05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...

  7. cADP-ribose/ryanodine channel/Ca2+-release signal transduction pathway in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufi, A N; Cheng, J; Thompson, M A; Dousa, T P; Warner, G M; Walker, H J; Grande, J P

    2001-07-01

    Signaling via release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores is mediated by several systems, including the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and cADP-ribose (cADPR) pathway. We recently discovered a high capacity for cADPR synthesis in rat glomeruli and cultured mesangial cells (MC). We sought to determine whether 1) cADPR synthesis in MC is regulated by cytokines and hormones, 2) ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are expressed in MC, and 3) Ca2+ is released through RyRs in response to cADPR. We found that ADP-ribosyl cyclase, a CD38-like enzyme that catalyzes cADPR synthesis, is upregulated in MC by tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and all-trans retinoic acid (atRA). [3H]ryanodine binds to microsomal fractions from MC with high affinity in a Ca2+-dependent manner; binding is enhanced by specific RyR agonists and blocked by ruthenium red and cADPR. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of RyR in MC. Release of 45Ca2+ from MC microsomes was stimulated by cADPR; release was blocked by ruthenium red and 8-bromo-cADPR. ADPR (non-cyclic) was without effect. In MC, TNF-alpha and atRA amplified the increment of cytoplasmic Ca2+ elicited by vasopressin. We conclude that MC possess elements of a novel ADP-ribosyl cyclase-->cADPR-->RyR-->Ca2+-release signaling pathway subject to regulation by proinflammatory cytokines and steroid superfamily hormones.

  8. Cloning and expression of a widely expressed receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; D'Eustachio, P; Givol, D

    1990-01-01

    and Bmp-2a loci. The corresponding mRNA (3.0 kilobases) is expressed in most murine tissues and most abundantly expressed in brain and kidney. Antibodies against a synthetic peptide of R-PTP-alpha identified a 130-kDa protein in cells transfected with the R-PTP-alpha cDNA.......We describe the identification of a widely expressed receptor-type (transmembrane) protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase; EC 3.1.3.48). Screening of a mouse brain cDNA library under low-stringency conditions with a probe encompassing the intracellular (phosphatase) domain of the CD45 lymphocyte...... antigen yielded cDNA clones coding for a 794-amino acid transmembrane protein [hereafter referred to as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (R-PTP-alpha)] with an intracellular domain displaying clear homology to the catalytic domains of CD45 and LAR (45% and 53%, respectively). The 142-amino acid...

  9. The expression of the ACTH receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L.K. Elias

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal glucocorticoid secretion is regulated by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH acting through a specific cell membrane receptor (ACTH-R. The ACTH-R is a member of the G protein superfamily-coupled receptors and belongs to the subfamily of melanocortin receptors. The ACTH-R is mainly expressed in the adrenocortical cells showing a restricted tissue specificity, although ACTH is recognized by the other four melanocortin receptors. The cloning of the ACTH-R was followed by the study of this gene in human diseases such as familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD and adrenocortical tumors. FGD is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by glucocorticoid deficiency, elevated plasma ACTH levels and preserved renin/aldosterone secretion. This disorder has been ascribed to an impaired adrenal responsiveness to ACTH due to a defective ACTH-R, a defect in intracellular signal transduction or an abnormality in adrenal cortical development. Mutations of the ACTH-R have been described in patients with FGD in segregation with the disease. The functional characterization of these mutations has been prevented by difficulties in expressing human ACTH-R in cells that lack endogenous melanocortin receptor activity. To overcome these difficulties we used Y6 cells, a mutant variant of the Y1 cell line, which possesses a non-expressed ACTH-R gene allowing the functional study without any background activity. Our results demonstrated that the several mutations of the ACTH-R found in FGD result in an impaired cAMP response or loss of sensitivity to ACTH stimulation. An ACTH-binding study showed an impairment of ligand binding with loss of the high affinity site in most of the mutations studied.

  10. IL-21 Receptor Expression in Human Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tendinopathy remain unclear, with much debate as to whether inflammation or degradation has the prominent role. Increasing evidence points toward an early inflammatory infiltrate and associated inflammatory cytokine production in human and animal models of tendon disease. The IL-21/IL-21R axis is a proinflammatory cytokine complex that has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. This project aimed to investigate the role and expression of the cytokine/receptor pair IL-21/IL-21R in human tendinopathy. We found significantly elevated expression of IL-21 receptor message and protein in human tendon samples but found no convincing evidence of the presence of IL-21 at message or protein level. The level of expression of IL-21R message/protein in human tenocytes was significantly upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα/IL-1β in vitro. These findings demonstrate that IL-21R is present in early human tendinopathy mainly expressed by tenocytes and macrophages. Despite a lack of IL-21 expression, these data again suggest that early tendinopathy has an inflammatory/cytokine phenotype, which may provide novel translational targets in the treatment of tendinopathy.

  11. Expression of Plant Receptor Kinases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Hidefumi; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    Although more than 600 single-transmembrane receptor kinase genes have been found in the Arabidopsis genome, only a few of them have known physiological functions, and even fewer plant receptor kinases have known specific ligands. Ligand-binding analysis must be operated using the functionally expressed receptor form. However, the relative abundance of native receptor kinase molecules in the plasma membrane is often quite low. Here, we present a method for stable and functional expression of plant receptor kinases in tobacco BY-2 cells that allows preparation of microsomal fractions containing the receptor. This procedure provides a sufficient amount of receptor proteins while maintaining its ligand-binding activities.

  12. Hormone-receptor expression and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Köbel, Martin; Longacre, Teri A

    2013-01-01

    Few biomarkers of ovarian cancer prognosis have been established, partly because subtype-specific associations might be obscured in studies combining all histopathological subtypes. We examined whether tumour expression of the progesterone receptor (PR) and oestrogen receptor (ER) was associated...

  13. Growth hormone receptor gene expression in puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, S; Meazza, C; Gertosio, C; Bozzola, E; Bozzola, M

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms regulating the synergic effect of growth hormone and other hormones during pubertal spurt are not completely clarified. We enrolled 64 females of Caucasian origin and normal height including 22 prepubertal girls, 26 pubertal girls, and 16 adults to evaluate the role of Growth Hormone/Insulin-like growth factor-I axis (GH/IGF-I) during the pubertal period. In these subjects both serum IGF-I and growth hormone binding protein levels, as well as quantitative growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene expression were evaluated in peripheral lymphocytes of all individuals by real-time PCR. Our results showed significantly lower IGF-I levels in women (148±10 ng/ml) and prepubertal girls (166.34±18.85 ng/ml) compared to pubertal girls (441.95±29.42 ng/ml; p<0.0001). Serum GHBP levels were significantly higher in prepubertal (127.02±20.76 ng/ml) compared to pubertal girls (16.63±2.97 ng/ml; p=0.0001) and adult women (19.95±6.65 ng/ml; p=0.0003). We also found higher GHR gene expression levels in pubertal girls [174.73±80.22 ag (growth hormone receptor)/5×10(5) ag (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)] compared with other groups of subjects [women: 42.52±7.66 ag (growth hormone receptor)/5×10(5) ag (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase); prepubertal girls: 58.45±0.18.12 ag (growth hormone receptor)/5×10(5) ag (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)], but the difference did not reach statistical significance. These results suggest that sexual hormones could positively influence GHR action, during the pubertal period, in a dual mode, that is, increasing GHR mRNA production and reducing GHR cleavage leading to GHBP variations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Expressing exogenous functional odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomina Alla F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory discrimination depends on the large numbers of odorant receptor genes and differential ligand-receptor signaling among neurons expressing different receptors. In this study, we describe an in vitro system that enables the expression of exogenous odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons. Olfactory sensory neurons in the culture express characteristic signaling molecules and, therefore, provide a system to study receptor function within its intrinsic cellular environment. Results We demonstrate that cultured olfactory sensory neurons express endogenous odorant receptors. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer enables successful ectopic expression of odorant receptors. We show that the ectopically expressed mouse I7 is functional in the cultured olfactory sensory neurons. When two different odorant receptors are ectopically expressed simultaneously, both receptor proteins co-localized in the same olfactory sensory neurons up to 10 days in vitro. Conclusion This culture technique provided an efficient method to culture olfactory sensory neurons whose morphology, molecular characteristics and maturation progression resembled those observed in vivo. Using this system, regulation of odorant receptor expression and its ligand specificity can be studied in its intrinsic cellular environment.

  15. Functional expression of rat VPAC1 receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.K.; Tams, J.W.; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1999-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide......G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide...

  16. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2 in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation.

  17. Estrogen Receptor α Is Required for Maintaining Baseline Renin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ko-Ting; Keen, Henry L; Weatherford, Eric T; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel; Sigmund, Curt D

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatic cleavage of angiotensinogen by renin represents the critical rate-limiting step in the production of angiotensin II, but the mechanisms regulating the initial expression of the renin gene remain incomplete. The purpose of this study is to unravel the molecular mechanism controlling renin expression. We identified a subset of nuclear receptors that exhibited an expression pattern similar to renin by reanalyzing a publicly available microarray data set. Expression of some of these nuclear receptors was similarly regulated as renin in response to physiological cues, which are known to regulate renin. Among these, only estrogen receptor α (ERα) and hepatic nuclear factor α have no known function in regulating renin expression. We determined that ERα is essential for the maintenance of renin expression by transfection of small interfering RNAs targeting Esr1, the gene encoding ERα, in renin-expressing As4.1 cells. We also observed that previously characterized negative regulators of renin expression, Nr2f2 and vitamin D receptor, exhibited elevated expression in response to ERα inhibition. Therefore, we tested whether ERα regulates renin expression through an interaction with Nr2f2 and vitamin D receptor. Renin expression did not return to baseline when we concurrently suppressed both Esr1 and Nr2f2 or Esr1 and vitamin D receptor mRNAs, strongly suggesting that Esr1 regulates renin expression independent of Nr2f2 and vitamin D receptor. ERα directly binds to the hormone response element within the renin enhancer region. We conclude that ERα is a previously unknown regulator of renin that directly binds to the renin enhancer hormone response element sequence and is critical in maintaining renin expression in renin-expressing As4.1 cells. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Regulation of gonadotropin receptor gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); R. Kraaij (Robert); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe receptors for the gonadotropins differ from the other G protein-coupled receptors by having a large extracellular hormone-binding domain, encoded by nine or ten exons. Alternative splicing of the large pre-mRNA of approximately 100 kb can result in mRNA species that encode truncated

  19. IDENTIFICATION DE NOUVEAUX DETERMINANTS MOLECULAIRES DE L'INTERACTION DU RECEPTEUR DES DIHYDROPYRIDINES AVEC LE RECEPTEUR A LA RYANODINE

    OpenAIRE

    Bichraoui, Hicham

    2010-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the action potential triggers muscle contraction through a massive calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). This process, called excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), requires physical interactions between two calcium channels: (1) the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), a voltage-dependent channel composed of four subunits among which the 1S subunit, that forms both the pore and the voltage-sensor, and the 1a subunit fully cytoplasmic, and (2) the ryanodine r...

  20. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER 2)/neu expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... 3Department of Pathology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430060, China. 4Department of ... To investigate the relationship between the expression/amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor ... epidermal growth factor receptor family; HER 2, human epidermal ...

  1. Insulin receptor and glucose transporter-4 expression in the skeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    linked immunosorbent assay. Glucose metabolism was assessed by glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin tolerance test (ITT), and expression of insulin receptor (INSR) and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscle. Results: The ...

  2. An expression system for Gustatory receptors - and why it failed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrein, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    A recent paper by the Dahankuar laboratory suggested that single Drosophila sugar receptors proteins accurately mediate sugar detection when ectopically expressed in olfactory neurons of the antenna. These findings contra-dict numerous previously published electrophysiological and behavioral investigations, which all point towards heteromultimeric sugar taste receptors. Here, I provide some explanation why this "pseudo-heterologous" expression system may have led to this misleading conclusion.

  3. Increased expression of cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in Achilles tendinosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmelie Björklund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in the control of pain. However, little is known as to the integrity of the cannabinoid system in human pain syndromes. Here we investigate the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB₁ in human Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers and from patients with Achilles tendinosis. METHODOLOGY: Cannabinoid CB₁ receptor immunoreactivity (CB₁IR was evaluated in formalin-fixed biopsies from individuals suffering from painful Achilles tendinosis in comparison with healthy human Achilles tendons. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CB₁IR was seen as a granular pattern in the tenocytes. CB₁IR was also observed in the blood vessel wall and in the perineurium of the nerve. Quantification of the immunoreactivity in tenocytes showed an increase of CB₁ receptor expression in tendinosis tissue compared to control tissue. CONCLUSION: Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 is increased in human Achilles tendinosis suggesting that the cannabinoid system may be dysregulated in this disorder.

  4. Increased Expression of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Achilles Tendinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Emmelie; Forsgren, Sture; Alfredson, Håkan; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in the control of pain. However, little is known as to the integrity of the cannabinoid system in human pain syndromes. Here we investigate the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in human Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers and from patients with Achilles tendinosis. Methodology Cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity (CB1IR) was evaluated in formalin-fixed biopsies from individuals suffering from painful Achilles tendinosis in comparison with healthy human Achilles tendons. Principal Findings CB1IR was seen as a granular pattern in the tenocytes. CB1IR was also observed in the blood vessel wall and in the perineurium of the nerve. Quantification of the immunoreactivity in tenocytes showed an increase of CB1 receptor expression in tendinosis tissue compared to control tissue. Conclusion Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 is increased in human Achilles tendinosis suggesting that the cannabinoid system may be dysregulated in this disorder. PMID:21931835

  5. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman S. Cheung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  6. Expression of Novel Steroid/Receptors in Mammary Development: Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimble, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    ...) are expressed in the mammary gland and regulated during physiologic and pathologic events. The PPARs are nuclear hormone receptors which bind to fatty acids as ligands and control transcription of lipid metabolic genes...

  7. Ontogeny of estrogen receptor-beta expression in rat testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, A. M.; de rooij, D. G.; van der Burg, B.; van der Saag, P. T.; Gustafsson, J. A.; Kuiper, G. G.

    1999-01-01

    The recently discovered estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) is expressed in rodent and human testes. To obtain insight in the physiological role of ERbeta we have investigated the cell type-specific expression pattern of ERbeta messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in the testis of rats of various ages by in

  8. Increased neutrophil expression of pattern recognition receptors during COPD exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Simon D.; Van Geffen, Wouter H.; Jonker, Marnix R.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Heijink, Irene H.

    Previously, we observed increased serum levels of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) during COPD exacerbations. Here, gene expression of DAMP receptors was measured in peripheral blood neutrophils of COPD patients during stable disease and severe acute exacerbation. The expression of

  9. Regulation of Mu Opioid Receptor Expression in Developing T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lily; Belkowski, Judith Sliker; Briscoe, Tammi; Rogers, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that functionally active μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are constitutively expressed at relatively low levels by developing T cells in the thymus. However, very little is known about the regulation of MOR expression by immature T cells. In this report, we first attempted to determine the effect of T cell receptor-induced T cell activation on the expression of MOR. We activated T cells with either the combination of anti-CD3 and CD28, or with superantigen, and observed a ...

  10. Ryanodine-, IP3- and NAADP-dependent calcium stores control acetylcholine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chameau, P; Van de Vrede, Y; Fossier, P; Baux, G

    2001-11-01

    Injections of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) into the presynaptic neurone of an identified cholinergic synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica increased the amplitude of the inhibitory postsynaptic current evoked by a presynaptic action potential. This suggests that Ca2+ release from various Ca2+ stores can modulate acetylcholine (ACh) release. Specific blockade of the calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) mechanism with ryanodine, or of IP3-induced calcium release with heparin, abolished the effects of IP3, but not the effects of NAADP, suggesting the presence of an intracellular Ca2+ pool independent of those containing ryanodine receptors (RyR) or IP3 receptors. To reinforce electrophysiological observations, intracellular [Ca2+]i changes were measured using the fluorescent dye rhod-2. Injections of cyclic ADP-ribose (an activator of RyR), IP3 or NAADP into the presynaptic neurone induced transient increases in the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration. RyR- and IP3-induced increases were prevented by application of respective selective antagonists but not NAADP-induced increases. Our results show that RyR-dependent, IP3-dependent, and NAADP-dependent Ca2+ stores are present in the same presynaptic terminal but are differently involved in the regulation of the presynaptic Ca2+ concentration that triggers transmitter release.

  11. Behavioral analysis of Drosophila transformants expressing human taste receptor genes in the gustatory receptor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Ryota; Sasaki, Yuko; Morita, Hiromi; Komai, Michio; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Goto, Tomoko; Furuyama, Akira; Isono, Kunio

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic Drosophila expressing human T2R4 and T2R38 bitter-taste receptors or PKD2L1 sour-taste receptor in the fly gustatory receptor neurons and other tissues were prepared using conventional Gal4/UAS binary system. Molecular analysis showed that the transgene mRNAs are expressed according to the tissue specificity of the Gal4 drivers. Transformants expressing the transgene taste receptors in the fly taste neurons were then studied by a behavioral assay to analyze whether transgene chemoreceptors are functional and coupled to the cell response. Since wild-type flies show strong aversion against the T2R ligands as in mammals, the authors analyzed the transformants where the transgenes are expressed in the fly sugar receptor neurons so that they promote feeding ligand-dependently if they are functional and activate the neurons. Although the feeding preference varied considerably among different strains and individuals, statistical analysis using large numbers of transformants indicated that transformants expressing T2R4 showed a small but significant increase in the preference for denatonium and quinine, the T2R4 ligands, as compared to the control flies, whereas transformants expressing T2R38 did not. Similarly, transformants expressing T2R38 and PKD2L1 also showed a similar preference increase for T2R38-specific ligand phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and a sour-taste ligand, citric acid, respectively. Taken together, the transformants expressing mammalian taste receptors showed a small but significant increase in the feeding preference that is taste receptor and also ligand dependent. Although future improvements are required to attain performance comparable to the endogenous robust response, Drosophila taste neurons may serve as a potential in vivo heterologous expression system for analyzing chemoreceptor function.

  12. 5-HT1A receptor expression during memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Munguía, H; Manuel-Apolinar, L; Rocha, L; Meneses, A

    2005-09-01

    It has been reported that 5-HT(1A) receptors modulate learning and memory and diverse pharmacological and genetic evidence supports this notion. Nevertheless, there are few works about expression of these receptors during memory formation. We aimed to determine 5-HT(1A) receptor expression in brain areas of untrained, passive, and autoshaping trained groups of rats. Ex vivo receptor autoradiography using the ligand agonist [(3)H]8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino]tetralin] (8-OH-DPAT) was used. The trained group relative to untrained animals showed increases of 5-HT(1A) receptor expression in 14 brain areas, decrements in 7, and no changes in 12. Thus, in contrast to untrained rats, 5-HT(1A) receptor expression of autoshaping trained rats was augmented in the tubercule olfactory, septal nucleus, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, globus pallidus, striate, and parietal (1 and 2), temporal cortex (1 and 3), granular retrosplenial cortex (1), amygdala, and median and dorsal raphe nuclei. In contrast, in the latter group, receptors were decreased in the CA1 area, hypothalamus dorsal, frontal cortex (1 and 3), occipital cortex, cingulate cortex (1 and 2), and cuneiform nucleus. There were significant differences between passive vs trained groups, but not regarding untrained rats, in the lateral olfactory tract, dentate gyrus, CA3 area, ventromedial hypothalamic, lateral hypothalamus, preoptic medial, frontal cortex (2), granular retrosplenial cortex (2), entorhinal cortex (1 and 2), piriform cortex, and substantia nigra. These data suggest that upregulated, downregulated, and "silence" of 5-HT(1A) receptors in brain areas form part of neural circuits engaged in memory formation by demonstrating a high degree of specificity and memory mapping.

  13. Beta-adrenergic receptors are expressed across diverse cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Steven L; Amaya, Clarissa N; Bryan, Brad A

    2017-07-01

    Based largely on retrospective analyses and a handful of prospective case reports, pharmacological inhibition of the beta adrenergic receptors using beta blockers has shown clinical anti-cancer efficacy in reproductive cancers, as well as angiosarcoma and multiple myeloma. Because of the potential promise of beta blockers as an adjunct to standard anti-cancer therapy, it is imperative to identify other tumor types expressing beta adrenergic (β-AR) receptors so future preclinical and clinical studies can be directed at the most promising tumor targets. We performed immunohistochemical detection of β1-AR, β2-AR, and β3-AR across 29 of the most common human cancer types (389 tissues total) and 19 matching non-diseased controls (100 tissues total). Our analysis revealed all three β-AR receptors were expressed most strongly in melanoma relative to other cancer types. Other malignancies that revealed relatively higher levels of β-AR receptors were esophagus, pancreas, kidney, and lung cancers. Moreover, particular β-AR receptors exhibited significant overexpression in tumor tissue relative to their matching normal tissue in urogenital/reproductive malignancies including breast, endometrium, ovarian, and urothelial cancer, as well as colon, lung, and thyroid cancer. This study identifies several cancer types expressing the β-AR receptors which should be evaluated in future studies for susceptibility to beta blockade.

  14. Multiple melanocortin receptors are expressed in bone cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qing; Sridhar, Supriya; Ruan, Ling; Ding, Ke-Hong; Xie, Ding; Insogna, Karl; Kang, Baolin; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Roni J.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2005-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled family of receptors. There are five members of this receptor family labeled MC1R-MC5R. These receptors are activated by fragments derived from a larger molecule, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and include ACTH, alpha beta and gamma-MSH and beta-endorphin. Because of in vitro and in vivo data suggesting direct effects of these POMC molecules on bone and bone turnover, we examined bone and bone derived cells for the presence of the various members of the melanocortin receptor family. We report that the five known melanocortin receptors are expressed to varying degrees in osteoblast-like and osteoclastic cells. POMC fragments increased proliferation and expression of a variety of genes in osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, POMC mRNA was detected in osteoclastic cells. These data demonstrate that POMC-derived peptide hormones acting through high affinity melanocortin receptors have specific effects on bone cells. Thus, in addition to the indirect effects of POMC-derived hormones on bone turnover through their modulation of steroid hormone secretion, POMC fragments may have direct and specific effects on bone cell subpopulations.

  15. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer...... in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer.......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival...

  16. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  17. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    OpenAIRE

    Fatouma Alimirah; Ravichandran Panchanathan; Jianming Chen; Xiang Zhang; Shuk-Mei Ho; Divaker Choubey

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer (PC) is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in hu...

  18. Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Expression during Mouse Adrenal Gland Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahring, Lorise C.; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7G). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7G expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7G cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7G expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7G, TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7G. Occasional α7G cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7G cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood. PMID:25093893

  19. Neurotrophin receptors expression and JNK pathway activation in human astrocytomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraziotis Theodore

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are growth factors that regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis in the nervous system. Their diverse actions are mediated through two different transmembrane – receptor signaling systems: Trk receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and p75NTR neurotrophin receptor. Trk receptors promote cell survival and differentiation while p75NTR induces, in most cases, the activity of JNK-p53-Bax apoptosis pathway or suppresses intracellular survival signaling cascades. Robust Trk activation blocks p75NTR -induced apoptosis by suppressing the JNK-p53-Bax pathway. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the expression levels of neurotrophin receptors, Trks and p75NTR, and the activation of JNK pathway in human astrocytomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic brain tissue. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded serial sections from 33 supratentorial astrocytomas (5 diffuse fibrillary astrocytomas, WHO grade II; 6 anaplastic astrocytomas, WHO grade III; 22 glioblastomas multiforme, WHO grade IV were immunostained following microwave pretreatment. Polyclonal antibodies against TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and monoclonal antibodies against p75NTR and phosphorylated forms of JNK (pJNK and c-Jun (pc-Jun were used. The labeling index (LI, defined as the percentage of positive (labeled cells out of the total number of tumor cells counted, was determined. Results Moderate to strong, granular cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for TrkA, TrkB and TrkC receptors was detected in greater than or equal to 10% of tumor cells in the majority of tumors independently of grade; on the contrary, p75NTR receptor expression was found in a small percentage of tumor cells (~1% in some tumors. The endothelium of tumor capillaries showed conspicuous immunoreactivity for TrkB receptor. Trk immunoreactivity seemed to be localized in some neurons and astrocytes in non-neoplastic tissue. Phosphorylated forms of JNK (pJNK and c-Jun (pc-Jun were

  20. Cultured rat microglia express functional beta-chemokine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddeke, EWGM; Meigel, [No Value; Frentzel, S; Gourmala, NG; Harrison, JK; Buttini, M; Spleiss, O; Gebicke-Harter, P

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the functional expression of the beta-chemokine receptors CCR1 to 5 in cultured rat microglia. RT-PCR analysis revealed constitutive expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA. The beta-chemokines MCP-1 (1-30 nM) as well as RANTES and MIP-1 alpha (100-1000 nM) evoked calcium

  1. Consequences of sleep deprivation on neurotransmitter receptor expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longordo, Fabio; Kopp, Caroline; Lüthi, Anita

    2009-05-01

    Several pieces of evidence suggest that sleep deprivation causes marked alterations in neurotransmitter receptor function in diverse neuronal cell types. To date, this has been studied mainly in wake- and sleep-promoting areas of the brain and in the hippocampus, which is implicated in learning and memory. This article reviews findings linking sleep deprivation to modifications in neurotransmitter receptor function, including changes in receptor subunit expression, ligand affinity and signal transduction mechanisms. We focus on studies using sleep deprivation procedures that control for side-effects such as stress. We classify the changes with respect to their functional consequences on the activity of wake-promoting and/or sleep-promoting systems. We suggest that elucidation of how sleep deprivation affects neurotransmitter receptor function will provide functional insight into the detrimental effects of sleep loss.

  2. Genes involved in Drosophila glutamate receptor expression and localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Featherstone David E

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A clear picture of the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor expression, localization, and stability remains elusive, possibly due to an incomplete understanding of the proteins involved. We screened transposon mutants generated by the ongoing Drosophila Gene Disruption Project in an effort to identify the different types of genes required for glutamate receptor cluster development. Results To enrich for non-silent insertions with severe disruptions in glutamate receptor clustering, we identified and focused on homozygous lethal mutants in a collection of 2185 BG and KG transposon mutants generated by the BDGP Gene Disruption Project. 202 lethal mutant lines were individually dissected to expose glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions, stained using antibodies that recognize neuronal membrane and the glutamate receptor subunit GluRIIA, and viewed using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. We identified 57 mutants with qualitative differences in GluRIIA expression and/or localization. 84% of mutants showed loss of receptors and/or clusters; 16% of mutants showed an increase in receptors. Insertion loci encode a variety of protein types, including cytoskeleton proteins and regulators, kinases, phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases, mucins, cell adhesion proteins, transporters, proteins controlling gene expression and protein translation, and proteins of unknown/novel function. Expression pattern analyses and complementation tests, however, suggest that any single mutant – even if a mutant gene is uniquely tagged – must be interpreted with caution until the mutation is validated genetically and phenotypically. Conclusion Our study identified 57 transposon mutants with qualitative differences in glutamate receptor expression and localization. Despite transposon tagging of every insertion locus, extensive validation is needed before one can have confidence in the role of any individual gene. Alternatively, one can focus on the

  3. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  4. Expression of haemopexin receptors by cultured human cytotrophoblast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dijk (Hans); M.J. Kroos; J.S. Starreveld; H.G. van Eijk (Henk); S.P. Tang; D.X. Song

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe expression of cell-surface haemopexin (Hx) receptors on human cytotrophoblasts was assessed by using four different Hx species purified from plasma: human Hx isolated by wheatgerm-affinity chromatography, human Hx isolated by haem-agarose-affinity

  5. Regulation of HIV receptor expression in cervical epithelial cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. HIV receptor .... PCR product. Results were calculated using the comparative cycle threshold ... data were expressed relative to an endogenous control of HeLa cell. cDNA included in ... Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the ...

  6. Regulation of HIV receptor expression in cervical epithelial cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of HeLa cells with LPS increased expression of the primary HIV chemokine ... and several alternative HIV receptors including CCR2b (p<0.01), CXCR6 (p<0.05) and GPR1 ... Cervical cancer tissue specimens were obtained at the time of surgery ..... body, including the gastrointestinal tract, prostate and cervix, has.

  7. Problem-Solving Test: Expression Cloning of the Erythropoietin Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cytokines, cytokine receptors, cDNA library, cDNA synthesis, poly(A)[superscript +] RNA, primer, template, reverse transcriptase, restriction endonucleases, cohesive ends, expression vector, promoter, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, poly(A) signal, DNA helicase, DNA ligase, topoisomerases,…

  8. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptors in human endometrial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Ottesen, B

    1993-01-01

    Little data exist on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-Rs) in human endometrial cancer. EGF-R status was studied in 65 patients with endometrial carcinomas and in 26 women with nonmalignant postmenopausal endometria, either inactive/atrophic endometrium or adenomatous...

  9. Dopamine receptor expression and function in corticotroph pituitary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pivonello (Rosario); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); D. Ferone (Diego); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); J.M. Kros (Johan); M.L. de Caro; M. Arvigo; L. Annunziato; G. Lombardi (Gaetano); A. Colao (Annamaria); L.J. Hofland (Leo)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe role of dopamine agonist treatment in corticotroph pituitary tumors is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate D(2) receptor expression in 20 corticotroph pituitary tumors and to correlate it to the in vitro effect of dopamine agonists on ACTH secretion

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 expression in mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ida Holst; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Vetter-Kauczok, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Here, we have studied vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) expression in mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Immunohistochemistry revealed that in two-thirds of 34 patients, VEGFR-3 was expressed in situ by both tumor and stromal...... cells irrespective of the disease stage. The natural VEGFR-3 ligand, VEGF-C, partially protected malignant T-cell lines from growth inhibition by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Whereas the malignant T cells did not produce VEGF-C in vitro, its expression...

  11. Muscle Dysfunction in Androgen Deprivation: Role of Ryanodine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    calcium leak and contractile dysfunction in chronic muscle fatigue , heart failure and muscular dystrophy (13-16). RyR1 is the skeletal muscle...controlled trial. Jama . Nov 13 2002;288(18):2282-2292. 8. Snyder PJ, Peachey H, Berlin JA, et al. Effects of testosterone replacement in hypogonadal men. J...385. 14. Allen DG, Lamb GD, Westerblad H. Skeletal muscle fatigue : cellular mechanisms. Physiol Rev. Jan 2008;88(1):287-332. 15. Bellinger AM, Reiken S

  12. Steroidal Hormone Receptor Expression in Male Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Homaei-Shandiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The etiology of male breast cancer is unclear, but hormonal levels may play a role in development of this disease. It seems that the risk of male breast cancer related to increased lifelong exposure to estrogen or reduced androgen. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the steroid hormone receptors including estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR in Iranian cases with male breast cancer. Methods: This is a prospective review of 18 cases of male breast cancer in in Omid Hospital, Mashhad, North East of Iran, between October 2001 and October 2006. ER and PR were measured by immunohistochemistry. Clinicopathologic features and family history were obtained by interview. Data were analyzed with SPSS 13 using descriptive statistics.  Results: The median age was 63.2 year. All the cases were infiltrating ductal carcinoma. A high rate of expression of ER (88.8% and PR (66.6% was found in the studied cases. Conclusion: Cancers of the male breast are significantly more likely than cancers of the female breast to express hormonal receptors.

  13. Characterisation of the expression of NMDA receptors in human astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chak Lee

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have long been perceived only as structural and supporting cells within the central nervous system (CNS. However, the discovery that these glial cells may potentially express receptors capable of responding to endogenous neurotransmitters has resulted in the need to reassess astrocytic physiology. The aim of the current study was to characterise the expression of NMDA receptors (NMDARs in primary human astrocytes, and investigate their response to physiological and excitotoxic concentrations of the known endogenous NMDAR agonists, glutamate and quinolinic acid (QUIN. Primary cultures of human astrocytes were used to examine expression of these receptors at the mRNA level using RT-PCR and qPCR, and at the protein level using immunocytochemistry. The functionality role of the receptors was assessed using intracellular calcium influx experiments and measuring extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity in primary cultures of human astrocytes treated with glutamate and QUIN. We found that all seven currently known NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, NR2D, NR3A and NR3B are expressed in astrocytes, but at different levels. Calcium influx studies revealed that both glutamate and QUIN could activate astrocytic NMDARs, which stimulates Ca2+ influx into the cell and can result in dysfunction and death of astrocytes. Our data also show that the NMDAR ion channel blockers, MK801, and memantine can attenuate glutamate and QUIN mediated cell excitotoxicity. This suggests that the mechanism of glutamate and QUIN gliotoxicity is at least partially mediated by excessive stimulation of NMDARs. The present study is the first to provide definitive evidence for the existence of functional NMDAR expression in human primary astrocytes. This discovery has significant implications for redefining the cellular interaction between glia and neurons in both physiological processes and pathological conditions.

  14. GABAA receptor-expressing neurons promote consumption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Cheung

    Full Text Available Feeding decisions are highly plastic and bidirectionally regulated by neurons that either promote or inhibit feeding. In Drosophila melanogaster, recent studies have identified four GABAergic interneurons that act as critical brakes to prevent incessant feeding. These GABAergic neurons may inhibit target neurons that drive consumption. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining GABA receptors and neurons that promote consumption. We find that Resistance to dieldrin (RDL, a GABAA type receptor, is required for proper control of ingestion. Knockdown of Rdl in a subset of neurons causes overconsumption of tastants. Acute activation of these neurons is sufficient to drive consumption of appetitive substances and non-appetitive substances and acute silencing of these neurons decreases consumption. Taken together, these studies identify GABAA receptor-expressing neurons that promote Drosophila ingestive behavior and provide insight into feeding regulation.

  15. GABAA receptor-expressing neurons promote consumption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Samantha K; Scott, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Feeding decisions are highly plastic and bidirectionally regulated by neurons that either promote or inhibit feeding. In Drosophila melanogaster, recent studies have identified four GABAergic interneurons that act as critical brakes to prevent incessant feeding. These GABAergic neurons may inhibit target neurons that drive consumption. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining GABA receptors and neurons that promote consumption. We find that Resistance to dieldrin (RDL), a GABAA type receptor, is required for proper control of ingestion. Knockdown of Rdl in a subset of neurons causes overconsumption of tastants. Acute activation of these neurons is sufficient to drive consumption of appetitive substances and non-appetitive substances and acute silencing of these neurons decreases consumption. Taken together, these studies identify GABAA receptor-expressing neurons that promote Drosophila ingestive behavior and provide insight into feeding regulation.

  16. Regulation of bradykinin B2-receptor expression by oestrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Demontis, Maria Piera; Anania, Vittorio; Gorioso, Nicola; Chao, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein is overexpressed in the kidney of female rats, this sexual dimorphism being associated with a greater effect of early blockade of bradykinin B2-receptors on female blood pressure phenotype. We evaluated the effect of ovariectomy and oestradiol benzoate (50 μg kg−1 every two days for two weeks) on the vasodepressor response to intra-arterial injection of bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) and on the expression of bradykinin B2-receptors.Ovariectomy reduced the magnitude of the vasodepressor response to bradykinin and unmasked a secondary vasopressor effect. Oestrogen replacement restored the vasodepressor response to bradykinin in ovariectomized rats.The vasodepressor responses to sodium nitroprusside (3–18 μg kg−1), acetylcholine (30–600 ng kg−1), desArg9-bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) or prostaglandin E2 (30–600 ng kg−1) were significantly reduced by ovariectomy. Oestrogen restored to normal the responses to desArg9-bradykinin, acetylcholine and prostaglandin E2, but not that to sodium nitroprusside.B2-receptor mRNA levels were decreased by ovariectomy in the aorta and kidney and they were restored to normal levels by oestrogen. Neither ovariectomy nor oestradiol affected receptor expression in the heart and uterus.These results indicate that oestrogen regulates B2-receptor gene expression and function. Since kinins exert a cardiovascular protective action, reduction in their vasodilator activity after menopause might contribute to the increased risk of pathological cardiovascular events. Conversely, the cardioprotective effects of oestrogen replacement might be, at least in part, mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. PMID:9283715

  17. Vitamin D Receptor, Retinoid X Receptor, Ki-67, Survivin, and Ezrin Expression in Canine Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Davies

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine osteosarcoma (OS is an aggressive malignant bone tumor. Prognosis is primarily determined by clinical parameters. Vitamin D has been postulated as a novel therapeutic option for many malignancies. Upon activation, vitamin D receptors (VDRs combine with retinoid receptor (RXR forming a heterodimer initiating a cascade of events. Vitamin D's antineoplastic activity and its mechanism of action in OS remain to be clearly established. Expression of VDR, RXR, Ki-67, survivin, and ezrin was studied in 33 archived, canine OS specimens. VDR, RXR, survivin, and ezrin were expressed in the majority of cases. There was no statistically significant difference in VDR expression in relationship with tumor grade, type, or locations or animal breed, age, and/or sex. No significant association (p=0.316 between tumor grade and Ki-67 expression was found; in particular, no difference in Ki-67 expression between grades 2 and 3 OSs was found, while a negative correlation was noted between Ki-67 and VDR expression (ρ=−0.466, a positive correlation between survivin and RXR expression was found (p=0.374. A significant relationship exists between VDR and RXR expression in OSs and proliferative/apoptosis markers. These results establish a foundation for elucidating mechanisms by which vitamin D induces antineoplastic activity in OS.

  18. Growth hormone receptor expression and function in pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lene R; Kristiansen, Mikkel T; Rasmussen, Lars M

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Hypopituitarism, in particular GH deficiency, is prevalent in patients with clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) both before and after surgery. The factors regulating the growth of pituitary adenomas in general and residual tumour tissue in particular....... CONCLUSION: GH receptors are expressed in human pituitary adenoma cells but their functional role is uncertain. GH and IGF-I do not consistently influence the proliferation of cultured pituitary adenoma cells....... are not fully characterized, and the effect of GH and IGF-I on human pituitary cell proliferation has not previously been reported. In NFPA tissue from 14 patients we evaluated GH receptor (GHR) expression and signal transduction, and the effect of GH and IGF-I exposure on cell proliferation and hormone...

  19. HER family receptor expression and prognosis in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittoni, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Santoni, Matteo; Alfonsi, Simona; Lanese, Andrea; Loretelli, Cristian; Pellei, Chiara; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-07-22

    HER family receptors play a key role in tumor progression in several malignancies, such as colorectal, lung or breast cancer. The aims of this study were to investigate expression of HER-1, HER-2 and HER-3 in pancreatic cancer (PC) samples and evaluate the association between HER-family receptor expression and patients' clinical outcomes. Tissue samples from 91 PC patients were subjected to immunohistochemical staining to assess the expression of HER-1, HER-2 and HER-3. Semiquantitative scores of zero (no staining or staining in less than 10% of cancer cells), 1+, 2+ or 3+ were assigned to each sample based on the intensity of staining for HER receptors. Scores of 2+ or 3+ were defined as positive staining. HER-1 overexpression was observed in 41 out of 91 samples (45.1%), while HER-2 was not overexpressed in any of the analyzed samples. HER-3 was overexpressed in 37 samples (40.7%) and was found to be associated with advanced TNM stage. In particular, HER-3 was overexpressed in 12 out of 16 stage IV patients (75%) compared with only 33.3% of stage I-III patients (p = 0.02). Among 79 patients with available survival data, the 6 patients with strong HER-3 expression (score 3+) had a shorter survival compared with remaining patients (median overall survival 6.9 months vs. 12.3 months, respectively). HER-1 and HER-3 were found to be expressed in a significant proportion of PC patients. Strong HER-3 expression represents an indicator of poor prognosis in PC patients, being associated with advanced stage and shorter survival.

  20. Transferrin Receptor 2 Is Frequently and Highly Expressed in Glioblastomas

    OpenAIRE

    Calzolari, Alessia; Larocca, Luigi Maria; Deaglio, Silvia; Finisguerra, Veronica; Boe, Alessandra; Raggi, Carla; Ricci-Vitani, Lucia; Pierconti, Francesco; Malavasi, Fabio; De Maria, Ruggero; Testa, Ugo; Pallini, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) is expressed in the liver and its balance is related to the cell cycle rather than to intracellular iron levels. We recently showed that TfR2 is highly expressed in glioblastoma cell lines. Here, we demonstrate that, in these cells, TfR2 appears to localize in lipid rafts, induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation after transferrin binding, and contributes to cell proliferation, as shown by RNA silencing exp...

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayalu S.L. Naik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To evaluate the expression pattern of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in urinary bladder cancer and its association with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, epidermal growth factor (EGF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and high risk human papilloma virus (HPV types 16 and 18. Materials and Methods : Thirty cases of urothelial carcinoma were analyzed. EGFR, HER2, EGF, and IL-6 expressions in the tissue were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. For HPV, DNA from tissue samples was extracted and detection of HPV was done by PCR technique. Furthermore, evaluation of different intracellular molecules associated with EGFR signaling pathways was performed by the western blot method using lysates from various cells and tissues. Results : In this study, the frequencies of immunopositivity for EGFR, HER2, EGF, and IL-6 were 23%, 60%, 47%, and 80%, respectively. No cases were positive for HPV-18, whereas HPV-16 was detected in 10% cases. Overall, expression of EGFR did not show any statistically significant association with the studied parameters. However, among male patients, a significant association was found only between EGFR and HER2. Conclusions : Overexpression of EGFR and/or HER2, two important members of the same family of growth factor receptors, was observed in a considerable proportion of cases. Precise knowledge in this subject would be helpful to formulate a rational treatment strategy in patients with urinary bladder cancer.

  2. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, M; Biegner, T; Teriete, P; Hoefert, S; Krimmel, M; Munz, A; Reinert, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC.

  3. Unique expression pattern of the three insulin receptor family members in the rat mammary gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Henning; Klopfleisch, Robert; Vienberg, Sara Gry

    2011-01-01

    Supra-pharmacological doses of the insulin analog X10 (AspB10) increased the incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley rats in chronic toxicity studies, most likely via receptor-mediated mechanisms. However, little is known about the expression of the insulin receptor family in the rat...... mammary gland. Using laser micro-dissection, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression of IR (insulin receptor), IGF-1R (IGF-1 receptor), IRR (insulin receptor-related receptor), ERα (estrogen receptor alpha), ERβ (estrogen receptor beta) and PR (progesteron receptor......) in young, virgin, female Sprague-Dawley rats and compared to expression in reference organs. The mammary gland displayed the highest expression of IRR and IGF-1R. In contrast, low expression of IR transcripts was observed in the mammary gland tissue with expression of the IR-A isoform being 5-fold higher...

  4. Leptin Receptor JAK2/STAT3 Signaling Modulates Expression of Frizzled Receptors in Articular Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Seigo; Lanigan, Thomas M.; Roessler, Blake J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Differentiated articular chondrocytes express a functional isoform of the leptin receptor (LRb); however, leptin-LRb signaling in these cells is poorly understood. We hypothesized that leptin-LRb signaling in articular chondrocytes functions to modulate canonical Wnt signaling events by altering the expression of Frizzled receptors. Methods Human chondrocyte cell lines and primary articular chondrocytes were grown in serum containing growth media for 24 hrs, followed by a media change to DMEM containing 1% Nutridoma-SP to obtain a serum-deficient environment for 24 hours before treatment. Treatments included recombinant human leptin (10–100 nM), recombinant human IL-6 (0.3-3 nM), or recombinant human erythropoietin (10 mU/ml). Cells were harvested 30 min to 48 hrs after treatment and whole cell lysates were analyzed using immunoblots or luciferase assays. Results Treatment of cells with leptin resulted in activation of JAK2 and subsequent phosphorylation of specific tyrosine residues on LRb, followed by dose- and time-dependent increases in the expression of Frizzled-1 (Fzd1) and Frizzled-7 (Fzd7). Leptin-mediated increases in the expression of Fzd1 and Fzd7 were blocked by pre-treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide or the JAK2 inhibitor AG490. Experiments using a series of hybrid erythropoietin extracellular domain-leptin intracellular domain receptors (ELR) harboring mutations of specific tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail showed that increases in the expression of Fzd1 and Fzd7 were dependent on LRb-mediated phosphorylation of STAT3, but not ERK1/2 or STAT5. Leptin pre-treatment of chondrocytes prior to Wnt-3a stimulation resulted in an increased magnitude of canonical Wnt signaling. Conclusion These experiments show that leptin-LRb signaling in articular chondrocytes modulates expression of canonical Wnt signaling receptors and suggests that direct cross-talk between these pathways is important in determining chondrocyte

  5. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorov, E. [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferrari, M.F.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fior-Chadi, D.R. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Camarini, R. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Felício, L.F. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  6. Differential expression of VEGF ligands and receptors in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, David J; Opeskin, Kenneth; Coso, Sanja; Wu, Di; Baldwin, Megan E; Williams, Elizabeth D

    2013-05-01

    Prostate cancer disseminates to regional lymph nodes, however the molecular mechanisms responsible for lymph node metastasis are poorly understood. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ligand and receptor family have been implicated in the growth and spread of prostate cancer via activation of the blood vasculature and lymphatic systems. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively examine the expression pattern of VEGF ligands and receptors in the glandular epithelium, stroma, lymphatic vasculature and blood vessels in prostate cancer. The localization of VEGF-A, VEGF-C, VEGF-D, VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-1, VEGFR-2, and VEGFR-3 was examined in cancerous and adjacent benign prostate tissue from 52 subjects representing various grades of prostate cancer. Except for VEGFR-2, extensive staining was observed for all ligands and receptors in the prostate specimens. In epithelial cells, VEGF-A and VEGFR-1 expression was higher in tumor tissue compared to benign tissue. VEGF-D and VEGFR-3 expression was significantly higher in benign tissue compared to tumor in the stroma and the endothelium of lymphatic and blood vessels. In addition, the frequency of lymphatic vessels, but not blood vessels, was lower in tumor tissue compared with benign tissue. These results suggest that activation of VEGFR-1 by VEGF-A within the carcinoma, and activation of lymphatic endothelial cell VEGFR-3 by VEGF-D within the adjacent benign stroma may be important signaling mechanisms involved in the progression and subsequent metastatic spread of prostate cancer. Thus inhibition of these pathways may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the management of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Endothelin-1 downregulates Mas receptor expression in human cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiheng; Tang, Yamei; Yang, Zuocheng; Liu, Shaojun; Liu, Yong; Li, Yan; He, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction. The Mas receptor is a functional binding site for angiotensin (Ang)‑(1-7), which is now considered a critical component of the RAS and exerts cardioprotective effects. To the best of our knowledge, the present study aimed to examine, for the first time, the effects of ET-1 on Mas expression in cultured human cardiomyocytes. Human cardiomyocytes were treated with ET-1 at different concentrations (1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 nM) for varied time periods (0.5, 1.5, 3, 4.5 or 6 h) with or without the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, endothelin A (ETA) receptor blocker BQ123 and ETB receptor blocker BQ788, or different kinase inhibitors. ET-1 decreased the Mas mRNA level in a statistically significant dose- and time-dependent manner within 4.5 h, which was reflected in the dose-dependent downregulation of Mas promoter activity, Mas protein levels and Ang-(1-7) binding on the cell membrane. Actinomycin D (1 mg/ml), BQ123 (1 µM), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) siRNA and inhibitor PD169316 (25 µM), completely eliminated the inhibitory effects of ET-1 on Mas expression in human cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that ET-1 downregulates Mas expression at the transcription level in human cardiomyocytes via the ETA receptor by a p38 MAPK‑dependent mechanism. This study provides novel insights into the function of ET-1 and the Ang‑(1-7)/Mas axis in cardiac pathophysiology.

  8. Lola regulates glutamate receptor expression at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Fukui

    2012-02-01

    Communication between pre- and post-synaptic cells is a key process in the development and modulation of synapses. Reciprocal induction between pre- and postsynaptic cells involves regulation of gene transcription, yet the underlying genetic program remains largely unknown. To investigate how innervation-dependent gene expression in postsynaptic cells supports synaptic differentiation, we performed comparative microarray analysis of Drosophila muscles before and after innervation, and of prospero mutants, which show a delay in motor axon outgrowth. We identified 84 candidate genes that are potentially up- or downregulated in response to innervation. By systematic functional analysis, we found that one of the downregulated genes, longitudinals lacking (lola, which encodes a BTB-Zn-finger transcription factor, is required for proper expression of glutamate receptors. When the function of lola was knocked down in muscles by RNAi, the abundance of glutamate receptors (GluRs, GluRIIA, GluRIIB and GluRIII, as well as that of p-21 activated kinase (PAK, was greatly reduced at the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs. Recordings of the synaptic response revealed a decrease in postsynaptic quantal size, consistent with the reduction in GluR levels. Lola appears to regulate the expression of GluRs and PAK at the level of transcription, because the amount of mRNAs encoding these molecules was also reduced in the mutants. The transcriptional level of lola, in turn, is downregulated by increased neural activity. We propose that Lola coordinates expression of multiple postsynaptic components by transcriptional regulation.

  9. Cannabinoid receptor expression in peripheral arterial chemoreceptors during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Gabrielle L; Cooper, Reed Z B; Richardson, Kimberlei A; Mason, Ariel V; Marshall, Cathleen; Northington, Frances J; Gauda, Estelle B

    2004-10-01

    Prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Marijuana is frequently smoked in conjunction with tobacco, and perinatal exposure to marijuana is associated with increased incidence of SIDS. Abnormalities in peripheral arterial chemoreceptor responses during sleep may be operative in infants at risk for SIDS, and nicotine exposure adversely affects peripheral arterial chemoreceptor responses. To determine whether marijuana could potentially affect the activity of peripheral arterial chemoreceptors during early postnatal development, we used in situ hybridization histochemistry to characterize the pattern and level of mRNA expression for cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) in the carotid body, superior cervical ganglia (SCG), and nodose-petrosal-jugular ganglia (NG-PG-JG) complex in newborn rats. We used immunohistochemistry and light, confocal, and electron microscopy to characterize the pattern of CB1R and tyrosine hydroxylase protein expression. CB1R mRNA expression was intense in the NG-PG-JG complex, low to moderate in the SCG, and sparse in the carotid body. With maturation, CB1R gene expression significantly increased (P peripheral arterial chemoreceptors. The novel finding of nuclear localization of CB1Rs in peripheral ganglion cells suggests that these receptors may have an, as yet, undetermined role in nuclear signaling in sensory and autonomic neurons.

  10. Ovary-independent estrogen receptor expression in neonatal porcine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarleton, B J; Wiley, A A; Spencer, T E; Moss, A G; Bartol, F F

    1998-04-01

    Effects of age and ovariectomy (OVX) at birth on uterine growth, endometrial development, and estrogen receptor (ER) expression were determined for intact and OVX gilts (n = 5 per day) hysterectomized on postnatal days (PND) 0, 15, 30, 60, 90, or 120. Uteri were evaluated histologically, and ER protein and mRNA expression were characterized immunohistochemically and by in situ hybridization. OVX did not affect uterine weight or endometrial thickness until after PND 60, when both increased more rapidly in intact gilts. Neither did it affect genesis of uterine glands, which were present and which proliferated after PND 0, or endometrial ER expression patterns in glandular epithelium (GE), luminal epithelium (LE), or stroma (S) between PND 0 and 120. Endometrium was ER negative at birth. On PND 15, the ER signal was strong in GE, weak in S, and effectively absent in LE. Thereafter, although the ER signal remained strong in GE and increased through PND 60 in S, it was not evident consistently until after PND 30 in LE. The data indicate that 1) porcine uterine growth and endometrial morphogenesis are ovary-independent processes before PND 60; 2) uterine gland genesis is associated temporally with development of ER-positive endometrial GE and S; and 3) regulation of endometrial ER expression is ovary independent between PND 0 and 120. The results establish the ER as a marker of GE differentiation and implicate this receptor in mechanisms regulating endometrial morphogenesis in the neonatal pig.

  11. Transferrin receptor 2 is frequently and highly expressed in glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolari, Alessia; Larocca, Luigi Maria; Deaglio, Silvia; Finisguerra, Veronica; Boe, Alessandra; Raggi, Carla; Ricci-Vitani, Lucia; Pierconti, Francesco; Malavasi, Fabio; De Maria, Ruggero; Testa, Ugo; Pallini, Roberto

    2010-04-01

    Under physiological conditions, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) is expressed in the liver and its balance is related to the cell cycle rather than to intracellular iron levels. We recently showed that TfR2 is highly expressed in glioblastoma cell lines. Here, we demonstrate that, in these cells, TfR2 appears to localize in lipid rafts, induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation after transferrin binding, and contributes to cell proliferation, as shown by RNA silencing experiments. In vitro hypoxic conditions induce a significant TfR2 up-regulation, suggesting a role in tumor angiogenesis. As assessed by immunohistochemistry, the level of TfR2 expression in astrocytic tumors is related to histologic grade, with the highest expression observed in glioblastomas. The level of TfR2 expression represents a favorable prognostic factor, which is associated with the higher sensitivity to temozolomide of TfR2-positive tumor cells in vitro. The endothelial cells of glioblastoma vasculature also stain for TfR2, whereas those of the normal brain vessels do not. Importantly, TfR2 is expressed by the subpopulation of glioblastoma cells with properties of cancer-initiating cells. TfR2-positive glioblastoma cells retain their TfR2 expression on xenografting in immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, our observations demonstrate that TfR2 is a neoantigen for astrocytomas that seems attractive for developing target therapies.

  12. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    ) in the endothelia of Apoe(-/-) mice (Irs1/Apoe(-/-)) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE(-/-) mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin's enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable......Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1...... induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca(2+)]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1...

  13. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-09-22

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore, these data suggest that CANs

  14. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudle Robert M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs, co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. Results CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Conclusion Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned

  15. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  16. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double......Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20...... receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed...

  17. Steroid hormone receptor expression in ovarian cancer: progesterone receptor B as prognostic marker for patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenhard Miriam

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is partially conflicting evidence on the influence of the steroid hormones estrogen (E and progesterone (P on the development of ovarian cancer (OC. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of the receptor isoforms ER-α/-β and PR-A/-B in OC tissue and to analyze its impact on clinical and pathological features and patient outcome. Methods 155 OC patients were included who had been diagnosed and treated between 1990 and 2002. Patient characteristics, histology and follow-up data were available. ER-α/-β and PR-A/-B expression were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results OC tissue was positive for ER-α/-β in 31.4% and 60.1% and PR-A/-B in 36.2% and 33.8%, respectively. We identified significant differences in ER-β expression related to the histological subtype (p=0.041, stage (p=0.002 and grade (p=0.011 as well as PR-A and tumor stage (p=0.03. Interestingly, median receptor expression for ER-α and PR-A/-B was significantly higher in G1 vs. G2 OC. Kaplan Meier analysis revealed a good prognosis for ER-α positive (p=0.039 and PR-B positive (p Conclusion ER-α/-β and PR-A/-B are frequently expressed in OC with a certain variability relating to histological subtype, grade and stage. Univariate analysis indicated a favorable outcome for ER-α positive and PR-B positive OC, while multivariate analysis showed PR-B to be the only independent prognostic marker for patient survival. In conclusion, ER and PR receptors may be useful targets for a more individualized OC therapy.

  18. Estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer: association with growth factor receptor expression and tamoxifen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpino, Grazia; Weiss, Heidi; Lee, Adrian V; Schiff, Rachel; De Placido, Sabino; Osborne, C Kent; Elledge, Richard M

    2005-09-07

    Clinical data indicate that estrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-negative (ER+/PR-) breast cancers are less sensitive to tamoxifen than are ER+/PR+ tumors. It has also been reported that tamoxifen may be less effective in tumors that overexpress either HER-2 or HER-1 (epidermal growth factor receptor) and that signaling through these receptors reduces PR expression in experimental models. We hypothesized that ER+/PR- breast tumors are more likely than ER+/PR+ breast tumors to have an aggressive phenotype, to express HER-1 and overexpress HER-2, and are less likely to benefit from tamoxifen adjuvant therapy. Clinical and biological features of 31 415 patients with ER+/PR+ tumors were compared with those of 13,404 patients with ER+/PR- tumors. Association between disease-free survival (DFS) and HER-1 and HER-2 status was analyzed in a subset of 11,399 patients receiving adjuvant tamoxifen therapy. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox regression or Kaplan-Meier analyses, and all statistical tests were two-sided. ER+/PR- tumors were more frequent in older patients, were larger in size, had a higher S-phase fraction, and were more likely to be aneuploid than ER+/PR+ tumors. Furthermore, three times as many ER+/PR- tumors as ER+/PR+ tumors expressed HER-1 (25% versus 8%; P HER-1-expressing tumors than with HER-1-negative tumors (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0 to 3.5; P = .05); a stronger association between worse DFS and HER-2 overexpression was observed (HR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.2 to 4.3; P = .006). However, results varied by PR status. Among tamoxifen-treated women with ER+/PR+ tumors, HER-1 or HER-2 status was not associated with worse DFS. Among women with ER+/PR- tumors, however, both HER-1 expression (HR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.0 to 5.4; P = .036) and HER-2 overexpression (HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1 to 6.0; P = .022) were associated with a higher likelihood of recurrence. ER+/PR- tumors express higher levels of HER-1 and HER-2 and

  19. Differentiated expression of estrogen receptors (ER and progesterone receptors (PgR in ductal breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dziegiel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Contents of estrogen receptors (ER and progesterone receptors (PgR in cells of breast cancers represent strong predictive factors. The higher is the contents of ER and PgR in breast cancer, the higher is a probability of obtaining a response to hormonal therapy and prognosis for the patient is better. In a routine manner, all tumours of mammary gland are subjected to evaluation of ER and PgR expression using immunohistochemistry. Forty ductal breast cancers (pT2N0 were subjected to an immunohistochemical evaluation (IHC aimed at detection of ER and PgR expression. From every tumour three samples were taken for immunohistochemical studies: the lateral one from the side of axilla (ER-1; PgR-1; the median one (ER-2; PgR-2 and the medial one from the side of sternum (ER-3; PgR-3. The levels of both ER and PgR expression proved to be highly differentiated between the medial zone of the tumour and its periphery. The distinct expression of ER and PgR in ductal breast cancers, dependent on evaluated zone of the tumour, confirms its heterogeneous character and exerts an effect on the type of applied treatment.

  20. Genetic variation in 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT4 receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennings, Katie Ann; Licht, Cecilie Löe; Bruce, Aynsley

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation in 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) expression is a key risk factor for psychiatric disorder and has been linked to changes in the expression of certain 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study investigated the effect of variation in 5-HTT expression on 5-HT4 receptor levels in both 5-HTT......). Together, these findings suggest that variation in 5-HTT expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT4 receptor levels which are directly linked to alterations in 5-HT availability....

  1. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1......) in the endothelia of Apoe(-/-) mice (Irs1/Apoe(-/-)) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE(-/-) mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin's enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable...... overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE(-/-) mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway...

  2. Constitutive activity of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor regulates the function of co-expressed Mu opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Meritxell; Milligan, Graeme

    2008-04-25

    The human mu opioid receptor was expressed stably in Flp-In T-REx HEK293 cells. Occupancy by the agonist DAMGO (Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol) resulted in phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases, which was blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone but not the cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist SR141716A. Expression of the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor in these cells from the inducible Flp-In T-REx locus did not alter expression levels of the mu opioid receptor. This allowed the cannabinoid CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 to stimulate ERK1/2 phosphorylation but resulted in a large reduction in the capacity of DAMGO to activate these kinases. Although lacking affinity for the mu opioid receptor, co-addition of SR141716A caused recovery of the effectiveness of DAMGO. In contrast co-addition of the CB1 receptor neutral antagonist O-2050 did not. Induction of the CB1 receptor also resulted in an increase of basal [(35)S]guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS) binding and thereby a greatly reduced capacity of DAMGO to further stimulate [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding. CB1 inverse agonists attenuated basal [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding and restored the capacity of DAMGO to stimulate. Flp-In T-REx HEK293 cells were generated, which express the human mu opioid receptor constitutively and harbor a modified D163N cannabinoid CB1 receptor that lacks constitutive activity. Induction of expression of the modified cannabinoid CB1 receptor did not limit DAMGO-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase phosphorylation and did not allow SR141716A to enhance the function of DAMGO. These data indicate that it is the constitutive activity inherent in the cannabinoid CB1 receptor that reduces the capacity of co-expressed mu opioid receptor to function.

  3. Altered expression of insulin receptor isoforms in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Huang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Insulin-like growth factor (IGF signaling through human insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A contributes to tumorigenesis and intrinsic resistance to anti-IGF1R therapy. In the present study, we (a developed quantitative TaqMan real time-PCR-based assays (qRT-PCR to measure human insulin receptor isoforms with high specificity, (b evaluated isoform expression levels in molecularly-defined breast cancer subtypes, and (c identified the IR-A:IR-B mRNA ratio as a potential biomarker guiding patient stratification for anti-IGF therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: mRNA expression levels of IR-A and IR-B were measured in 42 primary breast cancers and 19 matched adjacent normal tissues with TaqMan qRT-PCR assays. The results were further confirmed in 165 breast cancers. The tumor samples were profiled using whole genome microarrays and subsequently subtyped using the PAM50 breast cancer gene signature. The relationship between the IR-A:IR-B ratio and cancer subtype, as well as markers of proliferation were characterized. RESULTS: The mRNA expression levels of IR-A in the breast tumors were similar to those observed in the adjacent normal tissues, while the mRNA levels of IR-B were significantly decreased in tumors. The IR-A:IR-B ratio was significantly higher in luminal B breast cancer than in luminal A. Strong concordance between the IR-A:IR-B ratio and the composite Oncotype DX proliferation score was observed for stratifying the latter two breast cancer subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in IR-B expression is the key to the altered IR-A:IR-B ratio observed in breast cancer. The IR-A:IR-B ratio may have biomarker utility in guiding a patient stratification strategy for an anti-IGF therapeutic.

  4. Heterogeneous expression of Drosophila gustatory receptors in enteroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can provide a simple and genetically tractable system to study the chemosensory functions of enteroendocrine cells in vivo. To establish Drosophila enteroendocrine cells as a model for studying gut chemosensation, we used the GAL4/UAS system to examine the expression of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs) in the intestine. We find that 12 Gr-GAL4 drivers label subsets of enteroendocrine cells in the midgut, and examine colocalization of these drivers with the regulatory peptides neuropeptide F (NPF), locustatachykinin (LTK), and diuretic hormone 31 (DH31). RT-PCR analysis provides additional evidence for the presence of Gr transcripts in the gut. Our results suggest that the Drosophila Grs have chemosensory roles in the intestine to regulate physiological functions such as food uptake, nutrient absorption, or sugar homeostasis.

  5. Small expression tags enhance bacterial expression of the first three transmembrane segments of the apelin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Aditya; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2014-08-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are inherently dynamic membrane protein modulators of various important cellular signaling cascades. The apelin receptor (AR or APJ) is a class A GPCR involved in numerous physiological processes, implicated in angiogenesis during tumour formation and as a CD4 co-receptor for entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to cells. Due to the lack of efficient methods to produce full-length GPCRs enriched with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active (15)N, (13)C, and (or) (2)H isotopes, small GPCR fragments typically comprising 1-2 transmembrane segments are frequently studied using NMR spectroscopy. Here, we report successful overexpression of transmembrane segments 1-3 of AR (AR_TM1-3) in the C41(DE3) strain of Escherichia coli using an AT-rich gene tag previously reported to enhance cell-free expression yields. The resulting protein, with 6 additional N-terminal residues due to the expression tag, was purified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Far UV circular dichroism spectropolarimetry demonstrates that AR_TM1-3 has the predicted ~40% α-helical character in membrane-mimetic environments. (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR experiments imply amenability to high-resolution NMR structural characterization and stability in solution for weeks. Notably, this small expression tag approach may also be generally applicable to other membrane proteins that are difficult to express in E. coli.

  6. Cardiac contractility modulation electrical signals improve myocardial gene expression in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butter, Christian; Rastogi, Sharad; Minden, Hans-Heinrich; Meyhöfer, Jürgen; Burkhoff, Daniel; Sabbah, Hani N

    2008-05-06

    The objective of this study was to test whether cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) electric signals induce reverse molecular remodeling in myocardium of patients with heart failure. Heart failure is associated with up-regulation of myocardial fetal and stretch response genes and down-regulation of Ca(2+) cycling genes. Treatment with CCM signals has been associated with improved symptoms and exercise tolerance in heart failure patients. We tested the impact of CCM signals on myocardial gene expression in 11 patients. Endomyocardial biopsies were obtained at baseline and 3 and 6 months thereafter. The CCM signals were delivered in random order of ON for 3 months and OFF for 3 months. Messenger ribonucleic acid expression was analyzed in the core lab by investigators blinded to treatment sequence. Expression of A- and B-type natriuretic peptides and alpha-myosin heavy chain (MHC), the sarcoplasmic reticulum genes SERCA-2a, phospholamban and ryanodine receptors, and the stretch response genes p38 mitogen activated protein kinase and p21 Ras were measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and bands quantified in densitometric units. The 3-month therapy OFF phase was associated with increased expression of A- and B-type natriuretic peptides, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase, and p21 Ras and decreased expression of alpha-MHC, SERCA-2a, phospholamban, and ryanodine receptors. In contrast, the 3-month ON therapy phase resulted in decreased expression of A- and B-type natriuretic peptides, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase and p21 Ras and increased expression of alpha-MHC, SERCA-2a, phospholamban, and ryanodine receptors. The CCM signal treatment reverses the cardiac maladaptive fetal gene program and normalizes expression of key sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) cycling and stretch response genes. These changes may contribute to the clinical effects of CCM.

  7. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  8. Expression of Oestrogen and progesterone receptors, Ki-67,p53 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of Oestrogen and progesterone receptors, Ki-67,p53 and bcl-2 proteins, cathepsin D, urokinase plasminogen activator and urokinase plasminogen activator-receptors in carcinomas of the female breast in an African population.

  9. Expression of CysLT2 receptors in asthma lung, and their possible role in bronchoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Sekioka

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: CysLT2 receptors were expressed in lung specimens isolated from asthma subjects. Activation of CysLT2 receptors may contribute to antigen-induced bronchoconstriction in certain asthma population.

  10. Decreased expression of serum and microvascular vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in meningococcal sepsis*.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, M. van der; Baerveldt, E.M.; Miedema, A.; Hartwig, N.G.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Emonts, M.; Groot, R. de; Prens, E.P.; Vught, A.J. van; Jansen, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the skin microvessel expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and serum-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 levels in children with meningococcal sepsis. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Two tertiary academic children hospital PICUs.

  11. Substance P receptor binding sites are expressed by glia in vivo after neuronal injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantyh, P W; Johnson, D J; Boehmer, C G; Catton, M D; Vinters, H V; Maggio, J E; Too, H P; Vigna, S R

    1989-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, we examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide ...

  12. Equine insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor expression in digital lamellar tissue and insulin target tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, A; Weber, P S; Bishop, J B; Roux, T M; Norby, B; Burns, T A; McCutcheon, L J; Belknap, J K; Geor, R J

    2016-09-01

    Hyperinsulinaemia is implicated in the pathogenesis of endocrinopathic laminitis. Insulin can bind to different receptors: two insulin receptor isoforms (InsR-A and InsR-B), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and InsR/IGF-1R hybrid receptor (Hybrid). Currently, mRNA expression of these receptors in equine tissues and the influence of body type and dietary carbohydrate intake on expression of these receptors is not known. The study objectives were to characterise InsR-A, InsR-B, IGF-1R and Hybrid expression in lamellar tissue (LT) and insulin responsive tissues from horses and examine the effect of dietary nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) on mRNA expression of these receptors in LT, skeletal muscle, liver and two adipose tissue (AT) depots of lean and obese ponies. In vivo experiment. Lamellar tissue samples were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) for receptor mRNA expression (n = 8) and immunoblotting for protein expression (n = 3). Archived LT, skeletal muscle, liver and AT from lean and obese mixed-breed ponies fed either a low (~7% NSC as dry matter; 5 lean, 5 obese) or high NSC diet (~42% NSC as dry matter; 6 lean, 6 obese) for 7 days were evaluated by RT-qPCR to determine the effect of body condition and diet on expression of the receptors in different tissues. Significance was set at P≤0.05. Lamellar tissue expresses both InsR isoforms, IGF-1R and Hybrid. LT IGF-1R gene expression was greater than either InsR isoform and InsR-A expression was greater than InsR-B (P≤0.05). Obesity significantly lowered IGF-1R, InsR-A and InsR-B mRNA expression in LT and InsR-A in tailhead AT. High NSC diet lowered expression of all three receptor types in liver; IGF-1R and InsR-A in LT and InsR-A in tailhead AT. Lamellar tissue expresses IGF-1R, InsR isoforms and Hybrids. The functional characteristics of these receptors and their role in endocrinopathic laminitis warrants further investigation. © 2015 EVJ

  13. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voith, G.; Dingermann, T. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I{gamma} promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I{gamma} promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Differential microRNA expression is associated with androgen receptor expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yaqin; Yang, Fang; Sun, Zijia; Zhang, Wenwen; Gu, Jun; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is frequently expressed in breast cancer; however, its prognostic value remains unclear. AR expression in breast cancer has been associated with improved outcomes in estrogen receptor (ER)‑positive breast cancer compared with ER‑negative disease. Eliminating AR function in breast cancer is critically important for breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism underlying AR regulation remains poorly understood. The study of microRNAs (miRNAs) has provided important insights into the pathogenesis of hormone‑dependent cancer. To determine whether miRNAs function in the AR regulation of breast cancer, the present study performed miRNA expression profiling in AR‑positive and ‑negative breast cancer cell lines. A total of 153 miRNAs were differentially expressed in AR‑positive compared with AR‑negative breast cancer cells; 52 were upregulated and 101 were downregulated. A number of these have been extensively associated with breast cancer cell functions, including proliferation, invasion and drug‑resistance. Furthermore, through pathway enrichment analysis, signaling pathways associated with the prediction targets of the miRNAs were characterized, including the vascular endothelial growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the expression of miRNAs may be involved in the mechanism underlying AR regulation of breast cancer, and may improve understanding of the role of AR in breast cancer.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE OLFACTORY RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eFlegel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicated that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa and demonstrates that ORs are involved in the physiological processes.

  16. Unliganded estrogen receptor α stimulates bone sialoprotein gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Hideki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Matsui, Sari; Kim, Kyung Mi; Mezawa, Masaru; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2014-04-10

    Estrogen is one of the steroid hormones essential for skeletal development. The estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcription factor and a member of the steroid receptor superfamily. There are two different forms of the ER, usually referred to as α and β, each encoded by a separate gene. Hormone-activated ERs form dimers, since the two forms are coexpressed in many cell types. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a tissue-specific acidic glycoprotein that is expressed by differentiated osteoblasts, odontoblasts and cementoblasts during the initial formation of mineralized tissue. To determine the molecular basis of the tissue-specific expression of BSP and its regulation by estrogen and the ER, we have analyzed the effects of β-estradiol and ERα on BSP gene transcription. ERα protein levels were increased after ERα overexpression in ROS17/2.8 cells. While BSP mRNA levels were increased by ERα overexpression, the endogenous and overexpressed BSP mRNA levels were not changed by β-estradiol (10(-8)M, 24 h). Luciferase activities of different sized BSP promoter constructs (pLUC3~6) were increased by ERα overexpression, whereas basal and induced luciferase activities by ERα overexpression were not influenced by β-estradiol. Effects of ERα overexpression were abrogated by 2 bp mutations in either the cAMP response element (CRE) or activator protein 1 (AP1)/glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Gel shift analyses showed that ERα overexpression increased binding to the CRE and AP1/GRE elements. Notably, the CRE-protein complexes were disrupted by ERα, CREB and phospho-CREB antibodies. The AP1/GRE-protein complexes were supershifted by the c-Fos antibody. These studies demonstrate that ERα stimulates BSP gene transcription in a ligand-independent manner by targeting the CRE and AP1/GRE elements in the rat BSP gene promoter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Human prostatic urethra expresses vitamin D receptor and responds to vitamin D receptor ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeglio, P; Chavalmane, A K; Fibbi, B; Filippi, S; Marchetta, M; Marini, M; Morelli, A; Penna, G; Vignozzi, L; Vannelli, G B; Adorini, L; Maggi, M

    2010-11-01

    Chronic inflammation is now considered a determinant of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), promoting, together with the hormonal milieu, prostate overgrowth and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Prostatic urethra actively participates in determining progression of LUTS associated with BPH. To investigate the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the ability of the VDR agonist elocalcitol to reduce inflammatory responses in human prostatic urethra (hPU) cells. Human prostatic urethra, prostate and bladder neck were obtained from patients affected by BPH. Immunohistochemical studies for VDR expression were performed in tissue samples, from which primary cell cultures were also derived. In hPU cells, proliferation and chemiotaxis were studied, along with Rho kinase (ROCK) activity (MYPT-1 phosphorylation) by western blot. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed for VDR, cyclooxygenase (COX-2), and interleukin (IL)-8 expression. Urethra displays higher VDR expression compared to prostate and bladder neck tissues. The VDR agonist elocalcitol partially reverts COX-2 and IL-8 mRNA upregulation induced by a pro-inflammatory cytokine mixture (IL-17, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α) and inhibits cell migration in urethral cells. Elocalcitol prevents activation of ROCK, as previously demonstrated in bladder and prostate cell cultures. Our results suggest that prostatic urethra is, within the lower urinary tract, a novel target for VDR agonists, as shown by the capacity of elocalcitol to inhibit ROCK activity and to limit inflammatory responses in human primary urethra cells.

  18. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  19. Expression density of receptors to IL-1β in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshevskaya, Alina A; Lopatnikova, Julia A; Krugleeva, Olga L; Nepomnyschih, Vera M; Lukinov, Vitaliy L; Karaulov, Aleksander V; Sennikov, Sergey V

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1 β) and the system for regulation of its biological effects play an important role in the development and behavior of inflammatory processes in atopic dermatitis. Notably, cells that are actively involved in the pathological process have altered expression of cytokine receptors. However, standard evaluation of cells by flow cytometry measures only the percentage of cells expressing the appropriate marker, which is not enough for a full assessment of these changes. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the expression of IL-1β cytokine receptors in patients with atopic dermatitis by both percentage of cells with receptors in various subsets and the absolute number of membrane-bound receptors themselves. It was found that an increase or decrease in the percentage of cells expressing the receptors in subsets of immune cells in patients with atopic dermatitis was not associated with a change in the number of receptors on the cell surface. Moreover, the changes in the percentage of cells and the number of receptors may occur in different directions, as shown for IL-1R2 expression on B cells and IL-1R1 expression for monocytes. Changes in the parameters of IL-1β receptor expressions are associated with disease severity index SCORAD in atopic dermatitis. These findings underline the importance of studying the density of cytokine receptor expression in the pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) decreases during progression of pigmented skin lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brożyna, Anna A.; Jozwicki, Wojciech; Janjetovic, Zorica; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2010-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 affects proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and protects DNA against oxidative damage with a net tumorostatic and anticancerogenic effects. It acts through a specific nuclear receptor that is widely distributed through the body. Although a beneficial role of vitamin D in melanoma patients has been suggested, there is a lack of information on the changes in the expression pattern of vitamin D receptor during progression of pigmented lesions. Using immunohistochemistry, we analyzed expression of vitamin D receptor in 140 samples obtained form 82 patients, including 25 benign nevi, 70 primary cutaneous melanomas, 35 metastases, 5 re-excisions, and 5 normal skin biopsies. The strongest expression was observed in normal skin that significantly decreased in melanocytic proliferations with the following order of expression: normal skin > melanocytic nevi > melanomas = metastases. The vitamin D receptor expression in skin surrounding nevi and melanoma was also significantly reduced as compared to normal skin. Tumor-infiltrating and lymph node lymphocytes retained high levels of vitamin D receptor. There was negative correlation between tumor progression and vitamin D receptor expression with a remarkable decrease of the immunoreactivity in nuclei of melanoma cells at vertical versus radial growth phases, and with metastatic melanomas showing the lowest cytoplasmic receptor staining. Furthermore, lack of the receptor expression in primary melanomas and metastases was related to shorter overall patients’ survival. In addition, the receptor expression decreased in melanized melanoma cells in comparison to amelanotic or poorly pigmented cells. Therefore, we propose that reduction or absence of vitamin D receptor is linked to progression of melanocytic lesions, that its lack affects survival of melanoma patients, and that melanogenesis can attenuate the receptor expression. In conclusion, changes in vitamin D receptor expression pattern can

  1. Expression of vitamin D receptor decreases during progression of pigmented skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brożyna, Anna A; Jozwicki, Wojciech; Janjetovic, Zorica; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2011-05-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 affects proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and protects DNA against oxidative damage with a net tumorostatic and anticarcinogenic effect. It acts through a specific nuclear receptor that is widely distributed through the body. Although a beneficial role of vitamin D in melanoma patients has been suggested, there is lack of information on the changes in the expression pattern of vitamin D receptor during progression of pigmented lesions. Using immunohistochemistry, we analyzed the expression of vitamin D receptor in 140 samples obtained form 82 patients, including 25 benign nevi, 70 primary cutaneous melanomas, 35 metastases, 5 re-excisions, and 5 normal skin biopsies. The strongest expression was observed in normal skin that significantly decreased in melanocytic proliferations with the following order of expression: normal skin > melanocytic nevi > melanomas = metastases. The vitamin D receptor expression in skin surrounding nevi and melanoma was also significantly reduced as compared to normal skin. Tumor-infiltrating and lymph node lymphocytes retained high levels of vitamin D receptor. There was negative correlation between tumor progression and vitamin D receptor expression with a remarkable decrease of the immunoreactivity in nuclei of melanoma cells at vertical versus radial growth phases and with metastatic melanomas showing the lowest cytoplasmic receptor staining. Furthermore, lack of the receptor expression in primary melanomas and metastases was related to shorter overall patients' survival. In addition, the receptor expression decreased in melanized melanoma cells in comparison to amelanotic or poorly pigmented cells. Therefore, we propose that reduction or absence of vitamin D receptor is linked to progression of melanocytic lesions, that its lack affects survival of melanoma patients, and that melanogenesis can attenuate receptor expression. In conclusion, changes in vitamin D receptor expression pattern can serve

  2. Expression of androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen in male breast carcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kidwai, Noman; Gong, Yun; Sun, Xiaoping; Deshpande, Charuhas G; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Rao, M Sambasiva; Badve, Sunil

    .... In this study we analyzed the expression of PSA, PSAP and androgen receptor (AR) by immunohistochemistry in 26 cases of male breast carcinomas and correlated these with the expression of other prognostic markers...

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in triple negative and nontriple negative breast carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arathi A Changavi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: EGFR is an important marker to stratify patients with breast cancer according to molecular classification. Its expression correlated positively with young age, higher SBR grade, necrosis, lymphocytic infiltrate and inversely with hormonal receptor expression.

  4. Sequence genomic organization and expression of two channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Ghrelin receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two ghrelin receptor (GHS-R) genes were isolated from channel catfish tissue and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The two receptors were characterized by determining tissue distribution, ontogeny of receptor mRNA expression, and effects of exogenous homologous ghrelin administration ...

  5. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β2-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β2-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β2-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β2-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  6. Expression of mRNA of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in feline mammary adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, S; Nakadai, T; Furuoka, H; Oomachi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Omata, Y; Koyama, T; Hondo, E; Uzuka, Y; Sarashina, T; Ducusin, R J T; Shida, T; Dorf, M E

    2002-12-14

    The expression of mRNA of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in 65 surgically resected mammary adenocarcinomas from cats was investigated by in situ hybridisation. No expression of the receptor's mRNA was detectable in the mammary tissue of healthy cats, but it was expressed in areas adjacent to necrosis, surrounding blood vessels and cells infiltrating the lymphatics of 47 (72.3 per cent) of the 65 samples. There was a significant relationship between lymphatic infiltration by neoplastic cells and the expression of the receptor's mRNA (P < 0.005), but there was no significant relationship between its expression and the one-year survival of the cats.

  7. CALCIUM-SENSING RECEPTOR GENE: REGULATION OF EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Noel Hendy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes – promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation – as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2 have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the tumor suppressor activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2 – the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR––the calciostat––is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  8. Flow cytometry application for studies on adenosine A2A receptors expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Tomasz; Bereta, Michał; Faron-Górecka, Agata; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors belong to the heptaspanning membrane receptors family A, also known as G protein-coupled receptors. In human brain they are highly expressed in striatum, where they co-exist and co-function with adenosine A1, glutamate mGlu5 and dopamine D2 receptors. As glutaminergic neurotransmission modulators in GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons, adenosine A2A receptors are attractive targets for new, alternative therapies of neurodegenerative disorders, like Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. The aim of the research was to obtained fluorescently tagged adenosine A2A receptors. Gene encoding human adenosine A2A receptor was inserted into plasmid pEYFP-N1, bearing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP). The construct was expressed in HEK 293 cells. Fluorescence was observed by flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy. Functional ligand binding properties were investigated by saturation binding analysis of adenosine A2A receptors specific agonist [3H] CGS 21680.

  9. Expression of a novel D4 dopamine receptor in the lamprey brain. Evolutionary considerations about dopamine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan ePérez-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous data reported in lampreys, which belong to the phylogenetically oldest branch of vertebrates, show that the dopaminergic system was already well developed at the dawn of vertebrate evolution. The expression of dopamine in the lamprey brain is well conserved when compared to other vertebrates, and this is also true for the D2 receptor. Additionally, the key role of dopamine in the striatum, modulating the excitability in the direct and indirect pathways through the D1 and D2 receptors, has also been recently reported in these animals. The moment of divergence regarding the two whole genome duplications occurred in vertebrates suggests that additional receptors, apart from the D1 and D2 previously reported, could be present in lampreys. We used in situ hybridization to characterize the expression of a novel dopamine receptor, which we have identified as a D4 receptor according to the phylogenetic analysis. The D4 receptor shows in the sea lamprey a more restricted expression pattern than the D2 subtype, as reported in mammals. Its main expression areas are the striatum, lateral and ventral pallial sectors, several hypothalamic regions, habenula, and mesencephalic and rhombencephalic motoneurons. Some expression areas are well conserved through vertebrate evolution, as is the case of the striatum or the habenula, but the controversies regarding the D4 receptor expression in other vertebrates hampers for a complete comparison, especially in rhombencephalic regions. Our results further support that the dopaminergic system in vertebrates is well conserved and suggest that at least some functions of the D4 receptor were already present before the divergence of lampreys.

  10. Neural stem cells express melatonin receptors and neurotrophic factors: colocalization of the MT1 receptor with neuronal and glial markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Catherine R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to optimize the potential benefits of neural stem cell (NSC transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, it is necessary to understand their biological characteristics. Although neurotrophin transduction strategies are promising, alternative approaches such as the modulation of intrinsic neurotrophin expression by NSCs, could also be beneficial. Therefore, utilizing the C17.2 neural stem cell line, we have examined the expression of selected neurotrophic factors under different in vitro conditions. In view of recent evidence suggesting a role for the pineal hormone melatonin in vertebrate development, it was also of interest to determine whether its G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 receptors are expressed in NSCs. Results RT-PCR analysis revealed robust expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in undifferentiated cells maintained for two days in culture. After one week, differentiating cells continued to exhibit high expression of BDNF and NGF, but GDNF expression was lower or absent, depending on the culture conditions utilized. Melatonin MT1 receptor mRNA was detected in NSCs maintained for two days in culture, but the MT2 receptor was not seen. An immature MT1 receptor of about 30 kDa was detected by western blotting in NSCs cultured for two days, whereas a mature receptor of about 40 – 45 kDa was present in cells maintained for longer periods. Immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that the MT1 receptor is expressed in both neural (β-tubulin III positive and glial (GFAP positive progenitor cells. An examination of the effects of melatonin on neurotrophin expression revealed that low physiological concentrations of this hormone caused a significant induction of GDNF mRNA expression in NSCs following treatment for 24 hours. Conclusions The phenotypic characteristics of C17.2 cells suggest that they are

  11. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene expression is altered in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osta, Walid A; El-Osta, Mohamed A; Pezhman, Eric A; Raad, Robert A; Ferguson, Kris; McKelvey, George M; Marsh, Harold M; White, Michael; Perov, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    Burn patients have been observed to be more susceptible to the hyperkalemic effect of the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine. Changes in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit composition may alter electrophysiologic, pharmacologic, and metabolic characteristics of the receptor inducing hyperkalemia on exposure to succinylcholine. No studies have been performed that show the upregulation and/or alteration of nAChR subunit composition in human burn patients. The scarcity of studies performed on humans with burn injury is mainly attributable to the technical and ethical difficulties in obtaining muscle biopsies at different time frames of illness in these acutely injured patients. nAChRs are expressed in oral keratinocytes and are upregulated or altered in smokers. However, no studies have addressed the expression of nAChRs in the oral mucosa of burn patients. Buccal mucosal scrapings were collected from 9 burn patients and 6 control nonburn surgical intensive care unit patients. For burn and control patients, tissues were collected upon presentation (time: 0 hour) and at time points 12, 24, and 48 hours, 1 week, and 2 weeks. Gene expression of the nAChR subunits alpha1, alpha7, gamma, and epsilon were performed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. alpha7 and gamma nAChR genes were significantly upregulated in burn patients, whereas alpha1 and epsilon nAChR genes were minimally affected, showing no significant changes over time. Over the 2 weeks of measurement, an upregulation of the alpha7 and gamma genes occurred in both burn and control patients; however, the proportion of alpha7 and gamma subunit increases was significantly higher in burn patients than in control surgical intensive care unit patients. The relationship between the thermal injury and the observed alteration in gene expression suggests a possible cause/effect relationship. This effect was observed at a site not affected by the burn injury and in

  12. N-glycosylation and disulfide bonding affects GPRC6A receptor expression, function, and dimerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Jørgensen, Stine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-01-01

    expression and function is very limited. Herein, we show that the nutrient-sensing class C G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A carries seven N-glycans and that one of these sites modulates surface expression whereas mutation of another site affects receptor function. GPRC6A has been speculated to form...

  13. Chemokine receptor expression on B cells and effect of interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Roed, Hanne; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the B-cell expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR5 and CCR5 in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients in relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in neurological controls. Chemokine receptor expression was also studied in interferon-beta-treated patients with r...

  14. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression was evaluated in a panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell lines with radioreceptor assay, affinity labeling, and Northern blotting. We found high-affinity receptors to be expressed in 10 cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding data demonstr...

  15. TRAIL Death Receptor-4, Decoy Receptor-1 and Decoy Receptor-2 Expression on CD8+ T Cells Correlate with the Disease Severity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisgin Atil

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorder. Although the pathogenesis of disease is unclear, it is well known that T cells play a major role in both development and perpetuation of RA through activating macrophages and B cells. Since the lack of TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL expression resulted in defective thymocyte apoptosis leading to an autoimmune disease, we explored evidence for alterations in TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression on peripheral T lymphocytes in the molecular mechanism of RA development. Methods The expression of TRAIL/TRAIL receptors on T cells in 20 RA patients and 12 control individuals were analyzed using flow cytometry. The correlation of TRAIL and its receptor expression profile was compared with clinical RA parameters (RA activity scored as per DAS28 using Spearman Rho Analysis. Results While no change was detected in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells between controls and RA patient groups, upregulation of TRAIL and its receptors (both death and decoy was detected on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in RA patients compared to control individuals. Death Receptor-4 (DR4 and the decoy receptors DcR1 and DcR2 on CD8+ T cells, but not on CD4+ T cells, were positively correlated with patients' DAS scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression profiles on T cells might be important in revelation of RA pathogenesis.

  16. Analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor specific transcriptome: effect of receptor expression level and an activating mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel W; Pedersen, Nina; Damstrup, Lars

    2005-01-01

    by interferons. Expression of this module was absent in the EGFRvIII-expressing cell line and the parental cell line. Treatment with the specific EGFR inhibitor AG1478 indicated that the regulations were primary, receptor-mediated events. Furthermore, activation of this module correlated with activation of STAT1...

  17. Estrogen Receptor Beta Expression in the Mouse Forebrain: Age and Sex Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Zuloaga, Damian G.; Zuloaga, Kristen L.; Hinds, Laura R.; Carbone, David L.; Handa, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors regulate multiple brain functions including stress, sexual, and memory associated behaviors as well as control of neuroendocrine and autonomic function. During development, estrogen signaling is involved in programming adult sex differences in physiology and behavior. Expression of estrogen receptor alpha changes across development in a region specific fashion. By contrast, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is expressed in many brain regions, yet few studies have explored sex an...

  18. Substance P Receptor Binding Sites are Expressed by Glia in vivo after Neuronal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyh, Patrick W.; Johnson, Donald J.; Boehmer, Christian G.; Catton, Mark D.; Vinters, Harry V.; Maggio, John E.; Too, Heng-Phon; Vigna, Steven R.

    1989-07-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, we examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were examined. Specific receptor binding sites for each of these neurotransmitters were identified in the rabbit forebrain but were not detected in the normal optic nerve or tract. In the transected optic nerve and tract, only receptor binding sites for substance P were expressed at detectable levels. The density of substance P receptor binding sites observed in this glial scar is among the highest observed in the rabbit forebrain. Ligand displacement and saturation experiments indicate that the substance P receptor binding site expressed by the glial scar has pharmacological characteristics similar to those of substance P receptors in the rabbit striatum, rat brain, and rat and canine gut. The present study demonstrates that glial cells in vivo express high concentrations of substance P receptor binding sites after transection of retinal ganglion cell axons. Because substance P has been shown to regulate inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues, substance P may also, by analogy, be involved in regulating the glial response to injury in the central nervous system.

  19. Oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK induces expression of the growth-promoting receptor ICOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, HongYi; Kantekure, Kanchan

    2011-01-01

    Here we report that T-cell lymphoma cells carrying the NPM-ALK fusion protein (ALK(+) TCL) frequently express the cell-stimulatory receptor ICOS. ICOS expression in ALK(+) TCL is moderate and strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK induces ICOS expression v...

  20. Expression of androgen receptor splice variants in clinical breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Theresa E; Irvine, Connie M; Dvinge, Heidi; Tarulli, Gerard A; Hanson, Adrienne R; Ryan, Natalie K; Pickering, Marie A; Birrell, Stephen N; Hu, Dong Gui; Mackenzie, Peter I; Russell, Roslin; Caldas, Carlos; Raj, Ganesh V; Dehm, Scott M; Plymate, Stephen R; Bradley, Robert K; Tilley, Wayne D; Selth, Luke A

    2015-12-29

    The importance of androgen receptor (AR) signaling is increasingly being recognized in breast cancer, which has elicited clinical trials aimed at assessing the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic disease. In prostate cancer, resistance to ADT is frequently associated with the emergence of androgen-independent splice variants of the AR (AR variants, AR-Vs) that lack the LBD and are constitutively active. Women with breast cancer may be prone to a similar phenomenon. Herein, we show that in addition to the prototypical transcript, the AR gene produces a diverse range of AR-V transcripts in primary breast tumors. The most frequently and highly expressed variant was AR-V7 (exons 1/2/3/CE3), which was detectable at the mRNA level in > 50% of all breast cancers and at the protein level in a subset of ERα-negative tumors. Functionally, AR-V7 is a constitutively active and ADT-resistant transcription factor that promotes growth and regulates a transcriptional program distinct from AR in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. Importantly, we provide ex vivo evidence that AR-V7 is upregulated by the AR antagonist enzalutamide in primary breast tumors. These findings have implications for treatment response in the ongoing clinical trials of ADT in breast cancer.

  1. Low Expression of Estrogen Receptor-α and Progesterone Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Tissues Is Associated With High-Grade Human Cytomegalovirus Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Afsar; Touma, Joel; Costa, Helena; Davoudi, Belghis; Bukholm, Ida Rashid; Sauer, Torill; Vetvik, Katja; Geisler, Jürgen; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia

    2017-11-01

    The underlying mechanisms for breast cancer (BC) are largely unknown. We investigated possible correlations between the expression levels of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins and established histopathological markers of BC, including expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, the progesterone receptor (PgR), and HER2. We retrospectively examined paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens of BC (n = 62), ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 19), and adjacent normal breast tissue (n = 42) for HCMV immediate-early protein (IE), HCMV late antigen, HCMV DNA and RNA, and investigated possible correlations between them and expression of ER-α, PgR, and HER2. HCMV DNA and RNA were detected in all examined infiltrating BCs. High-grade positivity for HCMV-IE was detected in 77% of infiltrating BCs, 39% of ductal carcinomas in situ, and 7% of tumor-free breast tissue samples. HCMV expression correlated inversely with ER-α (P = .02) and PgR (P = .003) expression. HER2 expression was also reduced in HCMV-positive samples without reaching a level of statistical significance (P = .09). The negative correlation between high-grade expression HCMV-IE and hormone receptor expression suggests a role for HCMV in hormone receptor-negative BC tumors, possibly by forcing BC cells into a more aggressive phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor expression in eosinophils of patients with allergic rhinitis, and effect of topical nasal steroid treatment on this receptor expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mackle, T

    2008-12-01

    Recent research has indicated that sphingosine 1-phosphate plays a role in allergy. This study examined the effect of allergen challenge on the expression of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors on the eosinophils of allergic rhinitis patients, and the effect of steroid treatment on this expression.

  3. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléciton Braga Tavares

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common type of primary central nervous system neoplasm. Astrocytomas are the most prevalent type of glioma and these tumors may be influenced by sex steroid hormones. A literature review for the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas was conducted in the PubMed database using the following MeSH terms: “estrogen receptor beta” OR “estrogen receptor alpha” OR “estrogen receptor antagonists” OR “progesterone receptors” OR “astrocytoma” OR “glioma” OR “glioblastoma”. Among the 111 articles identified, 13 studies met our inclusion criteria. The majority of reports showed the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas. Overall, higher tumor grades were associated with decreased estrogen receptor expression and increased progesterone receptor expression.

  4. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  5. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  6. ESR1 and PGR polymorphisms are associated with estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in breast tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Hertz, Daniel L.; Henry, N. Lynn; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Thomas, Dafydd; Goddard, Audrey; Azzouz, Faouzi; Speth, Kelly; Li, Lang; Banerjee, Mousumi; Thibert, Jacklyn N; Kleer, Celina G.; Stearns, Vered; Hayes, Daniel F.; Skaar, Todd C.; Rae, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancers express the estrogen (ERα) and/or progesterone (PgR) receptors. Inherited single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ESR1, the gene encoding ERα, have been reported to predict tamoxifen effectiveness. We hypothesized that these associations could be attributed to altered tumor gene/protein expression of ESR1/ERα and that SNPs in the PGR gene predict tumor PGR/PgR expression. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast cancer tumor specimens were analy...

  7. Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha and Beta is Decreased in Hypospadias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Weiss, Dana A.; Ferretti, Max; Risbridger, Gail; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Estrogenic endocrine disruptors acting via estrogen receptors α and β have been implicated in the etiology of hypospadias. However, the expression and distribution of estrogen receptors α and β in normal and hypospadiac human foreskins is unknown. We characterized the location and expression of estrogen receptors α and β in normal and hypospadiac foreskins. Materials and Methods We prospectively collected excess foreskin from 35 patients undergoing hypospadias repair and 15 patients undergoing elective circumcision. Hypospadias was classified as severe in 18 patients and mild in 17 based on the ectopic position of the meatus. mRNA expression levels in estrogen receptors α and β were quantified using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Receptor location was characterized by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally immunohistochemical analysis was performed in 4 archived human fetal penises. Results Mean ± SD ages were similar for the circumcision (9.5 ± 3 months) and hypospadias repair groups (9 ± 3 months, p = 0.75). mRNA expression levels in estrogen receptors α and β were significantly decreased in hypospadiac foreskin cases compared to controls (p hypospadias. Estrogen receptor β immunostaining was strong in normal foreskin but weak in hypospadiac foreskin. Estrogen receptor β immunoreactivity was most intense in the stratum basale and stratum spinosum. Estrogen receptor α immunostaining was weak in normal and mild hypospadias foreskin, and undetectable in severe hypospadias. Fetal penises expressed strong estrogen receptor β immunopositivity in the urethral plate epithelium, corpus spongiosum, corpora cavernosa and penile skin, while estrogen receptor α immunostaining was not detected. Conclusions These data demonstrate a difference in estrogen receptor α and β expression and location in the foreskin of patients with hypospadias compared to controls. These findings are consistent with aberrant estrogenic effects having

  8. Down-regulation of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum ryanodine channel in severely food-restricted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Vizotto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that myocardial dysfunction induced by food restriction is related to calcium handling. Although cardiac function is depressed in food-restricted animals, there is limited information about the molecular mechanisms that lead to this abnormality. The present study evaluated the effects of food restriction on calcium cycling, focusing on sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine channel (RYR2 mRNA expressions in rat myocardium. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 60 days old, were submitted to ad libitum feeding (control rats or 50% diet restriction for 90 days. The levels of left ventricle SERCA2, PLB, and RYR2 were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Body and ventricular weights were reduced in 50% food-restricted animals. RYR2 mRNA was significantly decreased in the left ventricle of the food-restricted group (control = 5.92 ± 0.48 vs food-restricted group = 4.84 ± 0.33, P < 0.01. The levels of SERCA2 and PLB mRNA were similar between groups (control = 8.38 ± 0.44 vs food-restricted group = 7.96 ± 0.45, and control = 1.52 ± 0.06 vs food-restricted group = 1.53 ± 0.10, respectively. Down-regulation of RYR2 mRNA expressions suggests that chronic food restriction promotes abnormalities in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

  9. Annotation, phylogenetics, and expression of the nuclear receptors in Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Gwijun

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear receptor superfamily currently consists of seven gene subfamilies that encompass over 80 distinct receptor proteins. These transcription factors typically share a common five-domain structure with a highly conserved DNA-binding domain. Some nuclear receptors are ubiquitous among the metazoans, while others are unique to specific phylogenetic groups. Crustaceans represent the second largest group of arthropods with insects being the largest. However, relative to insects, little is known about the nuclear receptors of crustaceans. The aim of this study was to identify putative nuclear receptors from the first assembled genome of a crustacean Daphnia pulex http://wFleaBase.org. Nuclear receptor expression was evaluated and receptors were subjected to phylogenetic analyses to gain insight into evolution and function. Results Twenty-five putative nuclear receptors were identified in D. pulex based on the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain. All of the nuclear receptor protein sequences contain a highly homologous DNA-binding domain and a less conserved ligand-binding domain with the exception of the NR0A group. These receptors lack a ligand-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of all seven receptor subfamilies. The D. pulex genome contains several nuclear receptors that have vertebrate orthologs. However, several nuclear receptor members that are represented in vertebrates are absent from D. pulex. Notable absences include receptors of the 1C group (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors, the 3A group (estrogen receptor, and the 3C group (androgen, progestogen, mineralcorticoid, and glucocorticoid receptors. The D. pulex genome also contains nuclear receptor orthologs that are present in insects and nematodes but not vertebrates, including putative nuclear receptors within the NR0A group. A novel group of receptors, designated HR97, was identified in D. pulex that groups with the HR

  10. Expression of serotonin receptors in the colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Qiu, Juanjuan; Wan, Jiajia; Wang, Fengyun; Tang, Xudong; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the difference among the expression of serotonin receptors (5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7receptors) in colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats. A rat model of chronic diarrhea was established by lactose diet. The expression of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7receptors in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting techniques. There is no significant difference on the protein expression of 5-HT3receptor between the normal group and the chronic diarrhea model group. The mRNA expression of 5-HT3receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group was significantly lower than that in the normal group (n = 10; Pchronic diarrhea model group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (n = 10; Pchronic diarrhea model group were significantly decreased compared with the normal group (n = 10; Pdiarrhea by lactose diet.

  11. Feasibility Study of Odor Biosensor Using Dissociate Neuronal Culture with Gene Expression of Ionotropic Odorant Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanada, Norio; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Bakkum, Douglas; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    We propose a highly sensitive and real-time odor biosensor by expressing ionotropic odorant receptors of insects into dissociated cultures of neurons of rats. The odorant-gated ion channel structure of insect odorant receptor is expected to allow easy functional expression into cells. The neuronal dissociated cultures of rats have two significant advantages: a long lifetime comparable to rats, i.e., a few years; and amplification ability from weak ionic currents of odorant receptors into easily detectable action potentials of neurons. In the present work, in order to show the feasibility of the proposed sensor, we attempt to express the pheromone receptors of silkmoth, Bombyx mori, into cultured neurons of rats. We demonstrate that 10% of neuronal cells transfected using Lipofectamine successfully expressed pheromone receptors, and that these cells showed significant increase of calcium signals by 50% at the presentation of pheromone.

  12. Estrogen receptor expression in melasma: results from facial skin of affected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Robert; Moy, Lawrence

    2008-05-01

    Melasma is a commonly acquired hypermelanosis of the skin due to various etiological factors, including pregnancy and oral contraceptives. Estrogen receptor expression in affected skin has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare estrogen receptor expression in hyperpigmented and normal facial skin of patients with melasma. Biopsies of 3 mm were taken from affected and unaffected forehead skin of 2 female patients with melasma. Frozen sections of the tissues were obtained and mouse monoclonal antibody against human estrogen receptors was tested at various dilutions to determine the optimum concentrations required for reproducible immunostaining with minimal background staining. Fluorescence was evaluated and compared qualitatively. The immunohistochemical staining of tissue from both patients reflected a qualitative increase in estrogen receptor expression in melasma-affected skin compared to unaffected skin. This study demonstrates the increased expression of estrogen receptors in melasma-affected skin and may establish the basis for exploring topical anti-estrogen therapies in melasma.

  13. Molecular cloning and function expression of a diuretic hormone receptor from the house cricket, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, J D

    1996-01-01

    Insect diuretic hormones regulate fluid and ion secretion and the receptors with which they interact are attractive targets for new insect control agents. Recently, a diuretic hormone receptor from the moth Manduca sexta was isolated by expression cloning and found to be a member of the calcitonin/secretin/corticotropin releasing factor family of G-protein coupled receptors [Reagan J. D. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 9-12]. Degenerate oligonucleotides were designed based upon conserved regions in this receptor family and used to isolate a diuretic hormone receptor from the house cricket, Acheta domesticus. The complementary DNA isolated encodes a protein consisting of 441 amino acids with seven putative membrane spanning regions. Interestingly, unlike the M. sexta diuretic hormone receptor, the cricket diuretic hormone receptor contains a putative signal sequence. The receptor shares 53% and 38% sequence identity with the M. sexta diuretic hormone and human corticotropin releasing factor receptors respectively. When expressed in COS-7 cells, the receptor binds A. domesticus diuretic hormone with high affinity and stimulates adenylate cyclase with high potency. Four other insect diuretic hormones are considerably less effective at stimulating adenylate cyclase in COS-7 cells transfected with the receptor. This is in contrast to the M. sexta diuretic hormone receptor which is stimulated by all five insect diuretic hormones with high potency.

  14. Analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor specific transcriptome: effect of receptor expression level and an activating mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mikkel W; Pedersen, Nina; Damstrup, Lars; Villingshøj, Mette; Sønder, Søren U; Rieneck, Klaus; Bovin, Lone F; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens; Poulsen, Hans S

    2005-10-01

    Overexpression or expression of activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is common in cancer and correlates with neoplastic progression. The present study employed Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to profile genes induced by ligand-activated EGFR with the receptor either moderately expressed or overexpressed at an in-itself transforming level. These changes were compared to those induced by the naturally occurring constitutively active variant EGFRvIII. This study provides novel insight on the activities and mechanisms of EGFRvIII and EGFR mediated transformation, as genes encoding proteins with functions in promoting cell proliferation, invasion, antiapoptosis, and angiogenesis featured prominently in the EGFRvIII- and EGFR-expressing cells. Surprisingly, it was found that ligand-activated EGFR induced the expression of a large group of genes known to be inducible by interferons. Expression of this module was absent in the EGFRvIII-expressing cell line and the parental cell line. Treatment with the specific EGFR inhibitor AG1478 indicated that the regulations were primary, receptor-mediated events. Furthermore, activation of this module correlated with activation of STAT1 and STAT3. The results thus demonstrate that ligand-activated EGFR at different expression levels results in different kinetics of signaling and induction of gene expression. In addition, the constitutively active variant EGFRvIII seems to activate only a subset of signal pathways and induce a subset of genes as compared to the ligand-activated EGFR. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Neurotrophin and GDNF family ligand receptor expression in vagal sensory nerve subtypes innervating the adult guinea pig respiratory tract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TinaMarie Lieu; Marian Kollarik; Allen C. Myers; Bradley J. Undem

    2011-01-01

    .... With respect to the neurotrophin receptors, the TRPV1-expressing jugular C-fiber neurons innervating both the trachea and lung compartments preferentially expressed tropomyosin-receptor kinase A (TrkA...

  16. Expression of functional growth hormone receptor in a mouse L cell line infected with recombinant vaccinia virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strous, G J; van Kerkhof, P; Verheijen, C; Rossen, J W; Liou, W; Slot, J W; Roelen, C A; Schwartz, A L

    The growth hormone receptor is a member of a large family of receptors including the receptors for prolactin and interleukins. Upon binding to one molecule of growth hormone two growth hormone receptor polypeptides dimerize. We have expressed the rabbit growth hormone receptor DNA in transfected

  17. CB1 cannabinoid receptor expression in the striatum: Association with corticostriatal circuits and developmental regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent eVan Waes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Corticostriatal circuits mediate various aspects of goal-directed behavior and are critically important for basal ganglia-related disorders. Activity in these circuits is regulated by the endocannabinoid system via stimulation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. CB1 receptors are highly expressed in projection neurons and select interneurons of the striatum, but expression levels vary considerably between different striatal regions (functional domains. We investigated CB1 receptor expression within specific corticostriatal circuits by mapping CB1 mRNA levels in striatal sectors defined by their cortical inputs in rats. We also assessed changes in CB1 expression in the striatum during development. Our results show that CB1 expression is highest in juveniles (P25 and then progressively decreases towards adolescent (P40 and adult (P70 levels. At every age, CB1 receptors are predominantly expressed in sensorimotor striatal sectors, with considerably lower expression in associative and limbic sectors. Moreover, for most corticostriatal circuits there is an inverse relationship between cortical and striatal expression levels. Thus, striatal sectors with high CB1 expression (sensorimotor sectors tend to receive inputs from cortical areas with low expression, while striatal sectors with low expression (associative/limbic sectors receive inputs from cortical regions with higher expression (medial prefrontal cortex. In so far as CB1 mRNA levels reflect receptor function, our findings suggest differential CB1 signaling between different developmental stages and between sensorimotor and associative/limbic circuits. The regional distribution of CB1 receptor expression in the striatum further suggests that, in sensorimotor sectors, CB1 receptors mostly regulate GABA inputs from local axon collaterals of projection neurons, whereas in associative/limbic sectors, CB1 regulation of GABA inputs from interneurons and glutamate inputs may be more important.

  18. EGF receptor activation stimulates endogenous gastrin gene expression in canine G cells and human gastric cell cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, M G; Valle, J D; Soroka, C J; Merchant, J L

    1997-01-01

    Gastrin release from the antral gastrin-expressing cell (G cell) is regulated by bombesin and luminal factors. Yet, these same extracellular regulators do not stimulate expression of the gene. Since the gastric mucosa expresses large quantities of EGF receptor ligands such as TGFalpha, we examined whether EGF receptor ligands stimulate gastrin gene expression in gastrin-expressing cell cultures. EGF receptor activation of primary cultures stimulated gastrin gene expression about twofold; wher...

  19. Transsynaptic Tracing from Taste Receptor Cells Reveals Local Taste Receptor Gene Expression in Gustatory Ganglia and Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Anja; Bojahr, Juliane; Narukawa, Masataka; Hübner, Sandra; Boehm, Ulrich; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    Taste perception begins in the oral cavity by interactions of taste stimuli with specific receptors. Specific subsets of taste receptor cells (TRCs) are activated upon tastant stimulation and transmit taste signals to afferent nerve fibers and ultimately to the brain. How specific TRCs impinge on the innervating nerves and how the activation of a subset of TRCs leads to the discrimination of tastants of different qualities and intensities is incompletely understood. To investigate the organization of taste circuits, we used gene targeting to express the transsynaptic tracer barley lectin (BL) in the gustatory system of mice. Because TRCs are not synaptically connected with the afferent nerve fibers, we first analyzed tracer production and transfer within the taste buds (TBs). Surprisingly, we found that BL is laterally transferred across all cell types in TBs of mice expressing the tracer under control of the endogenous Tas1r1 and Tas2r131 promotor, respectively. Furthermore, although we detected the BL tracer in both ganglia and brain, we also found local low-level Tas1r1 and Tas2r131 gene, and thus tracer expression in these tissues. Finally, we identified the Tas1r1 and Tas2r131-expressing cells in the peripheral and CNS using a binary genetic approach. Together, our data demonstrate that genetic transsynaptic tracing from bitter and umami receptor cells does not selectively label taste-specific neuronal circuits and reveal local taste receptor gene expression in the gustatory ganglia and the brain. Previous papers described the organization of taste pathways in mice expressing a transsynaptic tracer from transgenes in bitter or sweet/umami-sensing taste receptor cells. However, reported results differ dramatically regarding the numbers of synapses crossed and the reduction of signal intensity after each transfer step. Nevertheless, all groups claimed this approach appropriate for quality-specific visualization of taste pathways. In the present study, we

  20. Hormone receptor expression in male breast cancers | Akosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Male breast cancers are rare but have been found in higher proportions in Black Africans. Prognostic factors for breast cancers include tumour size, grade and stage, and hormone receptor status. The hormone receptor status is an invaluable guide in the use of adjuvant endocrine therapy, but none of the reports available ...

  1. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal “clock” gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbesi, Marta; Yildiz, Sevim; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Sharma, Rajiv; Manev, Hari; Uz, Tolga

    2009-01-01

    Using transgenic mice model (i.e., “clock” knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulate the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e., D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2, and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e., D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e., rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the DA receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e., intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  2. Functional pharmacology of H1 histamine receptors expressed in mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarean, I V

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Histamine H1 receptors are highly expressed in hypothalamic neurons and mediate histaminergic modulation of several brain-controlled physiological functions, such as sleep, feeding and thermoregulation. In spite of the fact that the mouse is used as an experimental model for studying histaminergic signalling, the pharmacological characteristics of mouse H1 receptors have not been studied. In particular, selective and potent H1 receptor agonists have not been identified. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ca2+ imaging using fura-2 fluorescence signals and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were carried out in mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons in culture. KEY RESULTS The H1 receptor antagonists mepyramine and trans-triprolidine potently antagonized the activation by histamine of these receptors with IC50 values of 0.02 and 0.2 μM respectively. All H1 receptor agonists studied had relatively low potency at the H1 receptors expressed by these neurons. Methylhistaprodifen and 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine had full-agonist activity with potencies similar to that of histamine. In contrast, 2-pyridylethylamine and betahistine showed only partial agonist activity and lower potency than histamine. The histamine receptor agonist, 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)heptanecarboxamide (HTMT) had no agonist activity at the H1 receptors H1 receptors expressed by mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons but displayed antagonist activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Methylhistaprodifen and 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine were identified as full agonists of mouse H1 receptors. These results also indicated that histamine H1 receptors in mice exhibited a pharmacological profile in terms of agonism, significantly different from those of H1 receptors expressed in other species. PMID:23808378

  3. Plasticity in D1-like receptor expression is associated with different components of cognitive processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Herold

    Full Text Available Dopamine D1-like receptors consist of D1 (D1A and D5 (D1B receptors and play a key role in working memory. However, their possibly differential contribution to working memory is unclear. We combined a working memory training protocol with a stepwise increase of cognitive subcomponents and real-time RT-PCR analysis of dopamine receptor expression in pigeons to identify molecular changes that accompany training of isolated cognitive subfunctions. In birds, the D1-like receptor family is extended and consists of the D1A, D1B, and D1D receptors. Our data show that D1B receptor plasticity follows a training that includes active mental maintenance of information, whereas D1A and D1D receptor plasticity in addition accompanies learning of stimulus-response associations. Plasticity of D1-like receptors plays no role for processes like response selection and stimulus discrimination. None of the tasks altered D2 receptor expression. Our study shows that different cognitive components of working memory training have distinguishable effects on D1-like receptor expression.

  4. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  5. DMPD: G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17456803 G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macropha...2007 Apr 24. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signali...ng in macrophages. PubmedID 17456803 Title G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function

  6. Profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Verbeurgt

    Full Text Available Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems, containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men. Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were

  7. Radiolabeled CCK/gastrin peptides for imaging and therapy of CCK2 receptor-expressing tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosenburg, Susan; Laverman, Peter; van Delft, Floris L; Boerman, Otto C

    2011-11-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors are overexpressed in numerous human cancers, like medullary thyroid carcinomas, small cell lung cancers and stromal ovarian cancers. The specific receptor-binding property of the endogenous ligands for these receptors can be exploited by labeling peptides with a radionuclide and using these as carriers to guide the radioactivity to the tissues that express the receptors. In this way, tumors can be visualized using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography imaging. A variety of radiolabeled CCK/gastrin-related peptides has been synthesized and characterized for imaging. All peptides have the C-terminal CCK receptor-binding tetrapeptide sequence Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH(2) in common or derivatives thereof. This review focuses on the development and application of radiolabeled CCK/gastrin peptides for radionuclide imaging and radionuclide therapy of tumors expressing CCK receptors. We discuss both preclinical studies as well as clinical studies with CCK and gastrin peptides.

  8. Purinergic receptors expressed in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, A; Ploug, Thorkil; Bune, L T

    2012-01-01

    Purinergic receptors are present in most tissues and thought to be involved in various signalling pathways, including neural signalling, cell metabolism and local regulation of the microcirculation in skeletal muscles. The present study aims to determine the distribution and intracellular content...... of purinergic receptors in skeletal muscle fibres in patients with type 2 diabetes and age-matched controls. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were obtained from six type 2 diabetic patients and seven age-matched controls. Purinergic receptors were analysed using light and confocal microscopy...

  9. The action of ryanodine on rat fast and slow intact skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, M W; Lamb, G D; Neering, I R

    1989-07-01

    1. The action of ryanodine on force development of bundles dissected from rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles has been examined. 2. Ryanodine (100-5000 nM) irreversibly depressed twitch and tetanic tension of both muscle types in a dose-related manner. 3. At concentrations above 250 nM, ryanodine induced a slowly developing, dose-dependent contracture which could not be blocked by 5 mM-Co2+. Increasing the stimulation rate or decreasing the oxygenation of the preparation accelerated the rate of contracture development while the total removal of extracellular Ca2+ was required to prevent it. 4. Following the relaxation of the initial contracture (IC) in Ca2+-free solution, a second type of contracture (SC) could be induced by the readdition of Ca2+. This contracture differed from IC in that it was dependent on Ca2+ in the millimolar range and was prevented by 5 mM-Co2+. Both IC and SC were relaxed by perfusion with Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing solution. 5. Subcontracture doses of ryanodine (100 nM) markedly potentiated caffeine contractures of both muscle types. 6. Asymmetric charge movement in EDL fibres was recorded with the Vaseline-gap technique. The amount of charge moved near threshold was virtually unaffected by the presence of 10 microM-ryanodine over the time examined. 7. The results are consistent with the suggestion that ryanodine locks the calcium release channels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in an open subconductance state with reduced conductance. It appears that lowering the external calcium concentration might still inactivate the release channels after they have been blocked open by ryanodine, possibly by an effect on the T-tubular voltage sensor.

  10. Delineation of the GPRC6A Receptor Signaling Pathways Using a Mammalian Cell Line Stably Expressing the Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie

    2013-01-01

    and divalent cations, and for the first time, we conclusively show that these responses are mediated through the Gq pathway. We were not able to confirm previously published data demonstrating Gi- and Gs-mediated signaling; neither could we detect agonistic activity of testosterone and osteocalcin. Generation......The GPRC6A receptor is a recently "deorphanized" class C G protein-coupled receptor. We and others have shown that this receptor is coactivated by basic l-α-amino acids and divalent cations, whereas other groups have also suggested osteocalcin and testosterone to be agonists. Likewise, the GPRC6A...... receptor has been suggested to couple to multiple G protein classes albeit via indirect methods. Thus, the exact ligand preferences and signaling pathways are yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we generated a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line that stably expresses mouse GPRC6A. In an effort...

  11. Class A scavenger receptor promotes osteoclast differentiation via the enhanced expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Kenichi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sakashita, Naomi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Lei, XiaoFeng; Ohnishi, Koji [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Kodama, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, Hiroshi [Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro, E-mail: takeya@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2010-01-22

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, and their differentiation depends on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is one of the principal functional molecules of macrophages, and its level of expression declines during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of SR-A in osteoclastogenesis, we examined pathological changes in femoral bone and the expression levels of osteoclastogenesis-related molecules in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. The femoral osseous density of SR-A{sup -/-} mice was higher than that of SR-A{sup +/+} mice, and the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly decreased. An in vitro differentiation assay revealed that the differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is impaired in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. Elimination of SR-A did not alter the expression level of the M-CSF receptor, c-fms; however, the expression levels of RANK and RANK-related osteoclast-differentiation molecules such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) significantly decreased. Furthermore, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL), an SR-A ligand, significantly increased the expression level of RANK and MITF during osteoclast differentiation. These data indicate that SR-A promotes osteoclastogenesis via augmentation of the expression level of RANK and its related molecules.

  12. Study of toll-like receptor 7 expression and interferon α in Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus is considered to be one of the most important devastating causes of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is a pathogen-recognition receptor that is expressed on innate immune cells. It recognizes viral RNA which induces its activation with a ...

  13. Molecular cloning and functional expression of the first two specific insect myosuppressin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Kristoffer; Reynisson, Eyjólfur; Hauser, Frank

    2003-01-01

    expressed the coding regions of the two corrected receptor genes in Chinese hamster ovary cells and found that each of them coded for a receptor that could be activated by low concentrations of Drosophila myosuppressin (EC50,4 x 10(-8) M). The insect myosuppressins are decapeptides that generally inhibit...

  14. Larvae of small white butterfly, Pieris rapae, express a novel serotonin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biogenic amine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter in vertebrates and invertebrates. It acts in regulation and modulation of many physiological and behavioral processes through G protein-coupled receptors. Insects express five 5-HT receptor subtypes that share high simila...

  15. Expressions of toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and relative cellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the expressions of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IFN-γ (IFN- gamma), interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with tuberculosis (TB) infection. Methods: Two groups of ...

  16. IgG and complement receptor expression in children treated by peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, AHM; Davin, JC; Krediet, RT; Schroder, CH; Monnens, LAH; Nauta, J; van de Winkel, JGJ; Out, TA

    Children treated by peritoneal dialysis (PD) are at increased risk of infections. IgG receptors (Fc gamma Rs) and complement receptors (CRs) on white blood cells (WBCs) are important for the phagocytic process. We have investigated Fc gamma R and CR expression on monocytes, macrophages and

  17. IgG and complement receptor expression in children treated by peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Davin, Jean-Claude; Krediet, Raymond T.; Schröder, Cornelis H.; Monnens, Leo A. H.; Nauta, Jeroen; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Out, Theo A.

    2005-01-01

    Children treated by peritoneal dialysis (PD) are at increased risk of infections. IgG receptors (FcgammaRs) and complement receptors (CRs) on white blood cells (WBCs) are important for the phagocytic process. We have investigated FcgammaR and CR expression on monocytes, macrophages and neutrophils

  18. Altered Sigma-1 Receptor Expression in Two Animal Models of Cognitive Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzhuppilly Ramakrishnan, Nisha; Marosi, Krisztina; Nyakas, Csaba J.; Kwizera, Chantal; Elsinga, Philip H.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Luiten, Paul G M; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; van Waarde, Aren

    PURPOSE: Sigma-1 receptors are involved in learning and memory processes. We assessed sigma-1 receptor expression and memory function in two animal models of cognitive impairment. PROCEDURES: Male Wistar-Hannover rats were either lesioned by unilateral injection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid in the

  19. Expression of the neurotrophin receptors Trk A and Trk B in adult ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neurotrophins and their receptors of the Trk family play a critical role in proliferation, differentiation and survival of the developing neurons. There are reports on their expression in neoplasms too, namely, the primitive neuroectodermal tumours of childhood, and in adult astrocytic gliomas. The involvement of Trk receptors in ...

  20. IgG and complement receptor expression in children treated by peritoneal dialysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, A.H.M.; Davin, J.C.; Krediet, R.T.; Schroder, C.H.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Nauta, J.; Winkel, J.G.J. van de; Out, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    Children treated by peritoneal dialysis (PD) are at increased risk of infections. IgG receptors (FcgammaRs) and complement receptors (CRs) on white blood cells (WBCs) are important for the phagocytic process. We have investigated FcgammaR and CR expression on monocytes, macrophages and neutrophils

  1. Low density lipoprotein induces upregulation of vasoconstrictive endothelin type B receptor expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Cang-Bao; Zheng, Jian-Pu; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Vasoconstrictive endothelin type B (ET(B)) receptors promote vasospasm and ischemic cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to examine if low density lipoprotein (LDL) induces upregulation of vasoconstrictive ET(B) receptor expression and if extracellular signal...

  2. Histamine H1 Receptor Gene Expression and Drug Action of Antihistamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Hisao; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2017-01-01

    The upregulation mechanism of histamine H1 receptor through the activation of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) and the receptor gene expression was discovered. Levels of histamine H1 receptor mRNA and IL-4 mRNA in nasal mucosa were elevated by the provocation of nasal hypersensitivity model rats. Pretreatment with antihistamines suppressed the elevation of mRNA levels. Scores of nasal symptoms were correlatively alleviated to the suppression level of mRNAs above. A correlation between scores of nasal symptoms and levels of histamine H1 receptor mRNA in the nasal mucosa was observed in patients with pollinosis. Both scores of nasal symptoms and the level of histamine H1 receptor mRNA were improved by prophylactic treatment of antihistamines. Similar to the antihistamines, pretreatment with antiallergic natural medicines showed alleviation of nasal symptoms with correlative suppression of gene expression in nasal hypersensitivity model rats through the suppression of PKCδ. Similar effects of antihistamines and antiallergic natural medicines support that histamine H1 receptor-mediated activation of histamine H1 receptor gene expression is an important signaling pathway for the symptoms of allergic diseases. Antihistamines with inverse agonist activity showed the suppression of constitutive histamine H1 receptor gene expression, suggesting the advantage of therapeutic effect.

  3. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M; Poulsen, H S

    1992-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression was evaluated in a panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell lines with radioreceptor assay, affinity labeling, and Northern blotting. We found high-affinity receptors to be expressed in 10 cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding data demonstrated that the cells bound between 3 and 52 fmol/mg protein with a KD ranging from 0.5 x 10(-10) to 2.7 x 10(-10) M. EGF binding to the receptor was confirmed by affinity-labeling EGF to the EGF receptor. The cross-linked complex had a M(r) of 170,000-180,000. Northern blotting showed the expression of EGF receptor mRNA in all 10 cell lines that were found to be EGF receptor-positive and in one cell line that was found to be EGF receptor-negative in the radioreceptor assay and affinity labeling. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that a large proportion of a broad panel of small cell lung cancer cell lines express the EGF receptor.

  4. Functional coupling between heterologously expressed dopamine D(2) receptors and KCNQ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungstrom, Trine; Grunnet, Morten; Jensen, Bo Skaaning

    2003-01-01

    Activation of KCNQ potassium channels by stimulation of co-expressed dopamine D(2) receptors was studied electrophysiologically in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in mammalian cells. To address the specificity of the interaction between D(2)-like receptors and KCNQ channels, combinations of KCNQ1...

  5. Preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled DOTA-derivatized cyclic minigastrin analogs for targeting cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guggenberg, E. von; Rangger, C.; Sosabowski, J.; Laverman, P.; Reubi, J.C.; Virgolini, I.J.; Decristoforo, C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Targeting of cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies such as medullary thyroid carcinoma is currently limited by low in vivo stability of radioligands. To increase the stability, we have developed and preclinically evaluated two cyclic

  6. Expression of the human ABCC6 gene is induced by retinoids through the retinoid X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajewski, Marcin; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Pulaski, Lukasz

    2006-12-01

    Mutations in the human ABCC6 gene are responsible for the disease pseudoxanthoma elasticum, although the physiological function or substrate of the gene product (an ABC transporter known also as MRP6) is not known. We found that the expression of this gene in cells of hepatic origin (where this gene is predominantly expressed in the body) is significantly upregulated by retinoids, acting as agonists of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) rather than the retinoid A receptor (RAR). The direct involvement of this nuclear receptor in the transcriptional regulation of ABCC6 gene expression was confirmed by transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This constitutes the first direct proof of previously suggested involvement of nuclear hormone receptors in ABCC6 gene expression and the first identification of a transcription factor which may be relevant to regulation of ABCC6 level in tissues and in some PXE patients.

  7. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its two receptors in normal human endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海燕; 陈贵安

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: We try to demonstrate the expression of vascular endothelial growthfactor (VEGF) and its receptors, flt-1 and KDR, in normal human emdometrium duringthe menstrual cycle.Methods: Immunohistochemical method was used to observe the expression ofVEGF and its two receptors in emdometrium throughout the normal menstrual cyclemeanwhile the isoforms of VEGF were also detected by Western blot analysis. The en-dothelial cells of micro-vessels were marked with Ⅷ factor antibody.Results: VEGF and its receptors existed in endometrial glandular, stromal and vas-cular endothelial cells of human endometrium. Their expressions were higher in the mid-secretory phase of menstrual cycle and highest at menstruation. VEGF121 and VEGF165were the predominant isoforms in normal human endometrium.Conclusion: The expression of VEGF and its two receptors showed cycle-dependentin human endometrium, probably involved in embryonic implantation and endometrialproliferation and differentiation.

  8. Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (s-TREM-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (s-TREM-1) from endotracheal aspirates in critically ill patients: A potential marker of the dynamic inflammatory burden of the lower respiratory tract.

  9. CB1 AND CB2 CANNABINOID RECEPTOR EXPRESSION DURING DEVELOPMENT AND IN EPILEPTOGENIC DEVELOPMENTAL PATHOLOGIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurolo, E.; Iyer, A. M.; Spliet, W. G. M.; van Rijen, P. C.; Troost, D.; Gorter, J. A.; Aronica, E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent data support the involvement of the endocannabinoid signaling in early brain development, as well as a key role of cannabinoid receptors (CBR) in pathological conditions associated with unbalanced neuronal excitability and inflammation. Using immunocytochemistry, we explored the expression

  10. CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor expression during development and in epileptogenic developmental pathologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurolo, E.; Iyer, A.M.; Spliet, W.G.M.; van Rijen, P.C.; Troost, D.; Gorter, J.A.; Aronica, E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent data support the involvement of the endocannabinoid signaling in early brain development, as well as a key role of cannabinoid receptors (CBR) in pathological conditions associated with unbalanced neuronal excitability and inflammation. Using immunocytochemistry, we explored the expression

  11. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination o...

  12. Flexible Programs of Chemokine Receptor Expression on Human Polarized T Helper 1 and 2 Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallusto, Federica; Lenig, Danielle; Mackay, Charles R.; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are important elements for the selective attraction of various subsets of leukocytes. To better understand the selective migration of functional subsets of T cells, chemokine receptor expression was analyzed using monoclonal antibodies, RNase protection assays, and the response to distinct chemokines. Naive T cells expressed only CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4, whereas the majority of memory/activated T cells expressed CXCR3, and a small proportion expressed CC chemokine receptor (CCR)3 and CCR5. When polarized T cell lines were analyzed, CXCR3 was found to be expressed at high levels on T helper cell (Th)0s and Th1s and at low levels on Th2s. In contrast, CCR3 and CCR4 were found on Th2s. This was confirmed by functional responses: only Th2s responded with an increase in [Ca2+]i to the CCR3 and CCR4 agonists eotaxin and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC), whereas only Th0s and Th1s responded to low concentrations of the CXCR3 agonists IFN-γ–inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig). Although CCR5 was expressed on both Th1 and Th2 lines, it was absent in several Th2 clones and its expression was markedly influenced by interleukin 2. Chemokine receptor expression and association with Th1 and Th2 phenotypes was affected by other cytokines present during polarization. Transforming growth factor β inhibited CCR3, but enhanced CCR4 and CCR7 expression, whereas interferon α inhibited CCR3 but upregulated CXCR3 and CCR1. These results demonstrate that chemokine receptors are markers of naive and polarized T cell subsets and suggest that flexible programs of chemokine receptor gene expression may control tissue-specific migration of effector T cells. PMID:9500790

  13. Upregulation of neurokinin-1 receptor expression in the lungs of patients with sarcoidosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Terence M

    2012-02-03

    Substance P (SP) is a proinflammatory neuropeptide that is secreted by sensory nerves and inflammatory cells. Increased levels of SP are found in sarcoid bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. SP acts by binding to the neurokinin-1 receptor and increases secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in many cell types. We sought to determine neurokinin-1 receptor expression in patients with sarcoidosis compared with normal controls. Neurokinin-1 receptor messenger RNA and protein expression were below the limits of detection by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers (n = 9) or patients with stage 1 or 2 pulmonary sarcoidosis (n = 10), but were detected in 1\\/9 bronchoalveolar lavage cells of controls compared with 8\\/10 patients with sarcoidosis (p = 0.012) and 2\\/9 biopsies of controls compared with 9\\/10 patients with sarcoidosis (p = 0.013). Immunohistochemistry localized upregulated neurokinin-1 receptor expression to bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, and sarcoid granulomas. The patient in whom neurokinin-1 receptor was not detected was taking corticosteroids. Incubation of the type II alveolar and bronchial epithelial cell lines A549 and SK-LU 1 with dexamethasone downregulated neurokinin-1 receptor expression. Upregulated neurokinin-1 receptor expression in patients with sarcoidosis may potentiate substance P-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in patients with sarcoidosis.

  14. Expression of steroid receptors in ameloblasts during amelogenesis in rat incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Houari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs play a part in the modern burst of diseases and interfere with the steroid hormone axis. Bisphenol A (BPA, one of the most active and widely used EDCs, affects ameloblast functions, leading to an enamel hypomineralization pattern similar to that of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH. In order to explore the molecular pathways stimulated by BPA during amelogenesis, we thoroughly investigated the receptors known to directly or indirectly mediate the effects of BPA. The expression patterns of high affinity BPA receptors (ERRγ, GPR30, of ketosteroid receptors (ERs, AR, PGR, GR, MR, of the retinoid receptor RXRα and PPARγ were established using RT-qPCR analysis of RNAs extracted from microdissected enamel organ of adult rats. Their expression was dependent on the stage of ameloblast differentiation, except that of ERβ and PPARγ which remained undetectable. An additional large scale microarray analysis revealed three main groups of receptors according to their level of expression in maturation stage ameloblasts. The expression level of RXRα was the highest, similar to the vitamin D receptor (VDR, whereas the others were 13 to 612 fold lower, with AR and GR being intermediate. Immunofluorescent analysis of VDR, ERα and AR confirmed their presence mainly in maturation- stage ameloblasts. These data provide further evidence that ameloblasts express a specific combination of hormonal receptors depending on their developmental stage. This study represents the first step towards understanding dental endocrinology as well as some of the effects of EDCs on the pathophysiology of amelogenesis.

  15. Long-term cognitive enrichment affects opioid receptor expression in the amygdala of domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbe, C; Puppe, B

    2010-02-01

    Enriching the housing environment by stimuli that challenge both reward and cognitive mechanisms may enhance behavioural experiences and can improve animal welfare, particularly in farm animals. A newly developed experimental feeding system for domestic pigs using food-rewarded learning of discriminatory and instrumental tasks enabled the animals to successfully master a cognitive challenge and to be rewarded ca. 30 times per day with small food portions. Reward-related behaviour is expected to be modulated by endogenous opioid systems. Furthermore, recent evidence supports a role for the amygdala in processing positive affects by stimulus-reward learning. Hence, the present study investigates mRNA expression of cerebral receptors, which are involved in these processes. In an initial step, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) provided the first evidence that transcripts of three different opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, KOR), as well as the neuropeptide Y 5 receptor (NPY5R), leptin receptor (LEPR) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), are expressed in both the porcine amygdala and hypothalamus. Using real-time PCR we could show that the expression of two receptors of the opioid system (amygdala: KOR, DOR), in addition to the expression of NPY5R (hypothalamus) in eight enriched housed pigs was markedly downregulated compared to that of conventionally housed and fed pigs. Focusing on opioid receptors in the amygdala, the present study shows that long-term cognitive enrichment acts as a biologically relevant stimulus that causes modifications of gene expression of reward-sensitive cerebral receptors in domestic pigs.

  16. Prolactin receptor, growth hormone receptor, and putative somatolactin receptor in Mozambique tilapia: tissue specific expression and differential regulation by salinity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A L; Fox, B K; Davis, L K; Visitacion, N; Kitahashi, T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2007-01-01

    In fish, pituitary growth hormone family peptide hormones (growth hormone, GH; prolactin, PRL; somatolactin, SL) regulate essential physiological functions including osmoregulation, growth, and metabolism. Teleost GH family hormones have both differential and overlapping effects, which are mediated by plasma membrane receptors. A PRL receptor (PRLR) and two putative GH receptors (GHR1 and GHR2) have been identified in several teleost species. Recent phylogenetic analyses and binding studies suggest that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. However, no studies have compared the tissue distribution and physiological regulation of all three receptors. We sequenced GHR2 from the liver of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for the three receptors, and assessed their tissue distribution and regulation by salinity and fasting. PRLR was highly expressed in the gill, kidney, and intestine, consistent with the osmoregulatory functions of PRL. PRLR expression was very low in the liver. GHR2 was most highly expressed in the muscle, followed by heart, testis, and liver, consistent with this being a GH receptor with functions in growth and metabolism. GHR1 was most highly expressed in fat, liver, and muscle, suggesting a metabolic function. GHR1 expression was also high in skin, consistent with a function of SL in chromatophore regulation. These findings support the hypothesis that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. In a comparison of freshwater (FW)- and seawater (SW)-adapted tilapia, plasma PRL was strongly elevated in FW, whereas plasma GH was slightly elevated in SW. PRLR expression was reduced in the gill in SW, consistent with PRL's function in freshwater adaptation. GHR2 was elevated in the kidney in FW, and correlated negatively with plasma GH, whereas GHR1 was elevated in the gill in SW. Plasma IGF-I, but not GH, was reduced by 4 weeks of fasting. Transcript levels of GHR1 and GHR2 were elevated by fasting in the muscle. However

  17. BMPR2 expression is suppressed by signaling through the estrogen receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Eric D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in multiple organ systems have shown cross-talk between signaling through the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2 and estrogen pathways. In humans, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH has a female predominance, and is associated with decreased BMPR2 expression. The goal of this study was to determine if estrogens suppress BMPR2 expression. Methods A variety of techniques were utilized across several model platforms to evaluate the relationship between estrogens and BMPR2 gene expression. We used quantitative RT-PCR, gel mobility shift, and luciferase activity assays in human samples, live mice, and cell culture. Results BMPR2 expression is reduced in lymphocytes from female patients compared with male patients, and in whole lungs from female mice compared with male mice. There is an evolutionarily conserved estrogen receptor binding site in the BMPR2 promoter, which binds estrogen receptor by gel-shift assay. Increased exogenous estrogen decreases BMPR2 expression in cell culture, particularly when induced to proliferate. Transfection of increasing quantities of estrogen receptor alpha correlates strongly with decreasing expression of BMPR2. Conclusions BMPR2 gene expression is reduced in females compared to males in live humans and in mice, likely through direct estrogen receptor alpha binding to the BMPR2 promoter. This reduced BMPR2 expression may contribute to the increased prevalence of PAH in females.

  18. Role of a ubiquitously expressed receptor in the vertebrate olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaria, Shannon; Berke, Allison P; Van Name, Eric; Heravian, Anisa; Ferreira, Todd; Ngai, John

    2013-09-18

    Odorant cues are recognized by receptors expressed on olfactory sensory neurons, the primary sensory neurons of the olfactory epithelium. Odorant receptors typically obey the "one receptor, one neuron" rule, in which the receptive field of the olfactory neuron is determined by the singular odorant receptor that it expresses. Odor-evoked receptor activity across the population of olfactory neurons is then interpreted by the brain to identify the molecular nature of the odorant stimulus. In the present study, we characterized the properties of a C family G-protein-coupled receptor that, unlike most other odorant receptors, is expressed in a large population of microvillous sensory neurons in the zebrafish olfactory epithelium and the mouse vomeronasal organ. We found that this receptor, OlfCc1 in zebrafish and its murine ortholog Vmn2r1, is a calcium-dependent, low-sensitivity receptor specific for the hydrophobic amino acids isoleucine, leucine, and valine. Loss-of-function experiments in zebrafish embryos demonstrate that OlfCc1 is required for olfactory responses to a diverse mixture of polar, nonpolar, acidic, and basic amino acids. OlfCc1 was also found to promote localization of other OlfC receptor family members to the plasma membrane in heterologous cells. Together, these results suggest that the broadly expressed OlfCc1 is required for amino acid detection by the olfactory system and suggest that it plays a role in the function and/or intracellular trafficking of other olfactory and vomeronasal receptors with which it is coexpressed.

  19. Expression of the HER-1-4 family of receptor tyrosine kinases in neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirajaskanthan, Rajaventhan; Shah, Tahir; Watkins, Jennifer; Marelli, Laura; Khan, Korsa; Caplin, Martyn E

    2010-04-01

    The type I receptor tyrosine kinase family comprises four homologous members: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER-2, HER-3 and HER-4. Studies have shown that EGFR and HER-2 play a critical role in oncogenesis. In this study we sought to determine the pattern of expression and the prognostic significance of EGFR, HER-2, HER-3 and HER-4 in a variety of neuroendocrine tumours using immunohistochemistry. HER family receptor expression in 82 paraffin-embedded specimens of neuroendocrine tumours using immunohistochemistry was examined. The pattern and protein expression levels for each receptor were correlated with clinical and pathological parameters. EGFR expression was identified in 86.6% samples, HER-2 was not expressed in any samples, HER-3 was expressed in 8.5% samples and HER-4 was expressed 91.5%. EGFR and HER-4 were co-expressed in 79.3% of cases. HER-3 was correlated with better survival. EGFR was not associated with poor prognosis. This study has demonstrated EGFR, HER-2 and HER-4 expression is not associated with poorer survival. HER-3 expression is correlated with better prognosis. Overexpression of EGFR and HER-4 may offer potential new therapeutic targets.

  20. Insulin induces upregulation of vascular AT1 receptor gene expression by posttranscriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickenig, G; Röling, J; Strehlow, K; Schnabel, P; Böhm, M

    1998-12-01

    An interaction of insulin with angiotensin II effects could be pathophysiologically important for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. We examined the effect of insulin on AT1 receptor gene expression in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). A 24-hour incubation with insulin (100 nmol/L) produced a 2-fold increase in AT1 receptor density on VSMCs, as assessed by radioligand binding assays. This enhanced AT1 receptor expression was caused by a time- and concentration-dependent upregulation of the AT1 receptor mRNA levels, as assessed by Northern analysis. The maximal effect was detected after a 24-hour incubation of cells with 100 nmol/L insulin (270+/-20%). AT1 receptor upregulation was caused by a stabilization of the AT1 receptor mRNA, because the AT1 receptor mRNA half-life was prolonged from 5 hours under basal conditions to 10 hours after insulin stimulation. In contrast, insulin had no influence on AT1 receptor gene transcription, as assessed by nuclear run-on assays. The insulin-induced AT1 receptor upregulation was followed by an increased functional response, because angiotensin II evoked a significantly elevated intracellular release of calcium in cells that were preincubated with 100 nmol/L insulin for 24 hours. The insulin-induced AT1 receptor upregulation was dependent on tyrosine kinases, as assessed by experiments with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Furthermore, experiments using the intracellular calcium chelator bis(2-amino-5-methylphenoxy)ethane-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester suggest that intracellular calcium release may be involved in AT1 receptor regulation. Insulin-induced upregulation of the AT1 receptor by posttranscriptional mechanisms may explain the association of hyperinsulinemia with hypertension and arteriosclerosis, because activation of the AT1 receptor plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis.

  1. Hedonic taste in Drosophila revealed by olfactory receptors expressed in taste neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hiroi

    Full Text Available Taste and olfaction are each tuned to a unique set of chemicals in the outside world, and their corresponding sensory spaces are mapped in different areas in the brain. This dichotomy matches categories of receptors detecting molecules either in the gaseous or in the liquid phase in terrestrial animals. However, in Drosophila olfactory and gustatory neurons express receptors which belong to the same family of 7-transmembrane domain proteins. Striking overlaps exist in their sequence structure and in their expression pattern, suggesting that there might be some functional commonalities between them. In this work, we tested the assumption that Drosophila olfactory receptor proteins are compatible with taste neurons by ectopically expressing an olfactory receptor (OR22a and OR83b for which ligands are known. Using electrophysiological recordings, we show that the transformed taste neurons are excited by odor ligands as by their cognate tastants. The wiring of these neurons to the brain seems unchanged and no additional connections to the antennal lobe were detected. The odor ligands detected by the olfactory receptor acquire a new hedonic value, inducing appetitive or aversive behaviors depending on the categories of taste neurons in which they are expressed i.e. sugar- or bitter-sensing cells expressing either Gr5a or Gr66a receptors. Taste neurons expressing ectopic olfactory receptors can sense odors at close range either in the aerial phase or by contact, in a lipophilic phase. The responses of the transformed taste neurons to the odorant are similar to those obtained with tastants. The hedonic value attributed to tastants is directly linked to the taste neurons in which their receptors are expressed.

  2. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  3. Expression of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the reproductive system of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Marcin; Chruścicka, Barbara; Lech, Tomasz; Burnat, Grzegorz; Pilc, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Although the presence of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors in the central nervous system is well documented, they have recently been found in peripheral and non-neuronal tissues. In the present study we investigated the expression of group III mGlu receptors in the reproductive system of male mice. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the presence of mGlu6, mGlu7 and mGlu8 (but not mGlu4) receptor transcripts in testes and epididymides from adult mice. In addition, expression of mGlu6 (Grm6) and mGlu8 receptor (Grm8) mRNA was detected in spermatozoa isolated from the vas deferens. The vas deferens was found to contain only mGlu7 receptor (Grm7) mRNA, which was particularly intense in 21-day-old male mice. In penile homogenates, only the mGlu7 receptor signal was detected. Genetic ablation of the mGlu7 receptor in males led to fertility disorders manifested by decreased insemination capability as well as deterioration of sperm parameters, particularly sperm motility, vitality, sperm membrane integrity and morphology, with a simultaneous increase in sperm concentration. These results indicate that constitutively expressed mGlu receptors in the male reproductive system may play an important role in ejaculation and/or erection processes, as well as in the formation and maturation of spermatozoa.

  4. Changes in GABA(A) receptor gene expression associated with selective alterations in receptor function and pharmacology after ethanol withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Enrico; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Busonero, Fabio; Talani, Giuseppe; Tranquilli, Stefania; Mameli, Manuel; Spiga, Saturnino; Follesa, Paolo; Biggio, Giovanni

    2003-12-17

    Changes in the expression of subunits of the GABA type A (GABA(A)) receptor are implicated in the development of ethanol tolerance and dependence as well as in the central hyperexcitability associated with ethanol withdrawal. The impact of such changes on GABA(A) receptor function and pharmacological sensitivity was investigated with cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to ethanol for 5 d and then subjected to ethanol withdrawal. Both ethanol treatment and withdrawal were associated with a marked decrease in the maximal density of GABA-evoked Cl- currents, whereas the potency of GABA was unaffected. Ethanol exposure also reduced the modulatory efficacy of the benzodiazepine receptor agonists lorazepam, zolpidem, and zaleplon as well as that of the inverse agonists Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142, effects that were associated with a reduced abundance of mRNAs encoding the receptor subunits alpha1, alpha3, gamma2L, and gamma2S. Ethanol withdrawal restored the efficacy of lorazepam, but not that of low concentrations of zolpidem or zaleplon, to control values. Flumazenil, which was ineffective in control neurons, and Ro 15-4513 each potentiated the GABA response after ethanol withdrawal. These effects of withdrawal were accompanied by upregulation of the alpha2, alpha3, and alpha4 subunit mRNAs as well as of the alpha4 protein. Diazepam or gamma-hydroxybutyrate, but not baclofen, prevented the changes in both GABA(A) receptor pharmacology and subunit mRNA levels induced by ethanol withdrawal. Changes in GABA(A) receptor gene expression induced by prolonged exposure to and withdrawal of ethanol are thus associated with altered GABA(A) receptor function and pharmacological sensitivity.

  5. Chromatin Modulatory Proteins and Olfactory Receptor Signaling in the Refinement and Maintenance of Fruitless Expression in Olfactory Receptor Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Hueston

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During development, sensory neurons must choose identities that allow them to detect specific signals and connect with appropriate target neurons. Ultimately, these sensory neurons will successfully integrate into appropriate neural circuits to generate defined motor outputs, or behavior. This integration requires a developmental coordination between the identity of the neuron and the identity of the circuit. The mechanisms that underlie this coordination are currently unknown. Here, we describe two modes of regulation that coordinate the sensory identities of Drosophila melanogaster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs involved in sex-specific behaviors with the sex-specific behavioral circuit identity marker fruitless (fru. The first mode involves a developmental program that coordinately restricts to appropriate ORNs the expression of fru and two olfactory receptors (Or47b and Ir84a involved in sex-specific behaviors. This regulation requires the chromatin modulatory protein Alhambra (Alh. The second mode relies on the signaling from the olfactory receptors through CamK and histone acetyl transferase p300/CBP to maintain ORN-specific fru expression. Our results highlight two feed-forward regulatory mechanisms with both developmentally hardwired and olfactory receptor activity-dependent components that establish and maintain fru expression in ORNs. Such a dual mechanism of fru regulation in ORNs might be a trait of neurons driving plastic aspects of sex-specific behaviors.

  6. mRNA expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes of computer game addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Eghbali, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Excessive playing of computer games like some other behaviors could lead to addiction. Addictive behaviors may induce their reinforcing effects through stimulation of the brain dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway. The status of dopamine receptors in the brain may be parallel to their homologous receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Here, we have investigated the mRNA expression of dopamine D3, D4 and D5 receptors in PBLs of computer game addicts (n = 20) in comparison to normal subjects (n = 20), using a real-time PCR method. The results showed that the expression level of D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts were not statistically different from the control group. However, the expression of the mRNA of D5 dopamine receptor was significantly down-regulated in PBLs of computer game addicts and reached 0.42 the amount of the control group. It is concluded that unlike with drug addiction, the expression levels of the D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts are not altered compared to the control group. However, reduced level of the D5 dopamine receptor in computer game addicts may serve as a peripheral marker in studies where the confounding effects of abused drugs are unwanted.

  7. Expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in the adult and developing mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Tuhina; Verma, Amrisha; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the retina and plays an important role in retinal neurovascular function. We have recently shown that increased expression of ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7) [Ang (1-7)], two components of the protective axis of the RAS, in the retina via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery, conferred protection against diabetes-induced retinopathy. We hypothesized that the protective molecular and cellular mechanisms of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its receptor, Mas, and the expression level and cellular localization dictate the response to Ang (1-7) and activation of subsequent protective signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by examining the expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in adult and developing mouse retinas. The cellular localization of the Mas receptor protein was determined with immunofluorescence of the eyes of adult and postnatal day 1 (P1), P5, P7, P15, and P21 mice using the Mas receptor-specific antibody, and mRNA was detected with in situ hybridization of paraffin-embedded sections. Western blotting and real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR analysis were performed to determine the relative levels of the Mas protein and mRNA in adult and developing retinas, as well as in cultured retinal Müller glial and RPE cells. In the adult eye, the Mas receptor protein was abundantly present in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and photoreceptor cells; a lower level of expression was observed in endothelial cells, Müller glial cells, and other neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina. In the developing retina, Mas receptor mRNA and protein expression was detected in the inner retina at P1, and the expression levels increased with age to reach the adult level and pattern by P15. In the adult mouse retina, Mas receptor mRNA was expressed at a much higher level when compared to angiotensin II (Ang II) type I (AT1R) and type II (AT2R) receptor m

  8. Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis and Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Express High Levels of Myostatin and Its Receptors Messenger RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrarelli, Patrizia; Funghi, Lucia; Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Centini, Gabriele; Reis, Fernando M; Dela Cruz, Cynthia; Mattei, Alberto; Vannuccini, Silvia; Petraglia, Felice

    2017-12-01

    Myostatin is a growth factor member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, which is known to play major roles in cell proliferation and differentiation. The present study investigated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of myostatin and myostatin receptors (activin receptor-like kinase 4 [ALK4], transforming growth factor (TGF)-β type I receptor kinase [ALK5] and activin receptor type IIB [ActRIIB]) in endometrium of healthy women during menstrual cycle as well as in benign (endometriosis, polyps) and malignant (endometrial adenocarcinoma) conditions. Endometrial specimens were collected by hysteroscopy, whereas endometriotic lesions were collected by laparoscopy, and adenocarcinomas were sampled after hysterectomy. Total RNA was extracted from tissue homogenates, and gene expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Myostatin and myostatin receptors mRNAs were expressed by healthy endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle, with no differences between the proliferative and secretory phase. The highest myostatin mRNA expression was found in patients with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) and in endometrial carcinoma; expression was also found in ovarian endometrioma (OMA ) and endometrial polyps. Myostatin receptors mRNA expression was higher in DIE and adenocarcinomas compared to control endometrium. The expression of ALK5 and ActRIIB in OMA was higher than in controls, whereas polyps had an increased expression of ALK5 mRNA. In conclusion, the present data showed for the first time the expression of myostatin in healthy endometrium and a higher expression in endometriosis and endometrial cancer, suggesting myostatin involvement in human endometrial physiology and related pathologies.

  9. Expression and function of CB1 receptor in the rat striatum: localization and effects on D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-mediated motor behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Ana Belén; Fernandez-Espejo, Emilio; Ferrer, Belén; Gorriti, Miguel Angel; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Navarro, Miguel; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Moratalla, Rosario

    2008-06-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors are densely expressed on striatal projection neurons expressing dopamine D1 or D2 receptors. However, the specific neuronal distribution of CB1 receptors within the striatum is not known. Previous research has established that the endocannabinoid system controls facilitation of behavior by dopamine D2 receptors, but it is not clear if endocannabinoids also modulate D1 receptor-mediated motor behavior. In the present study, we show that cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA is present in striatonigral neurons expressing substance P and dopamine D1 receptors, as well as in striatopallidal neurons expressing enkephalin and dopamine D2 receptors. We explored the functional relevance of the interaction between dopamine D1 and D2 receptors and cannabinoid CB1 receptors with behavioral pharmacology experiments. Potentiation of endogenous cannabinoid signaling by the uptake blocker AM404 blocked dopamine D1 receptor-mediated grooming and D2 receptor-mediated oral stereotypies. In addition, contralateral turning induced by unilateral intrastriatal infusion of D1 receptor agonists is counteracted by AM404 and potentiated by the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716A. These results indicate that the endocannabinoid system negatively modulates D1 receptor-mediated behaviors in addition to its previously described effect on dopamine D2 receptor-mediated behaviors. The effect of AM404 on grooming behavior was absent in dopamine D1 receptor knockout mice, demonstrating its dependence on D1 receptors. This study indicates that the endocannabinoid system is a relevant negative modulator of both dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-mediated behaviors, a finding that may contribute to our understanding of basal ganglia motor disorders.

  10. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  11. Expression of the growth hormone receptor gene in insulin producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays a dual role in glucose homeostasis. On the one hand, it exerts an insulin antagonistic effect on the peripheral tissue, on the other hand, it stimulates insulin biosynthesis and beta-cell proliferation. The expression of GH-receptors on the rat insulinoma cell line RIN-5AH......-T2-clone B was studied. The binding characteristics with regard to specificity for the native 22 kDa hGH, and the 20 kDa variant were similar to that reported on rat adipocytes. Normal rat islet cells showed a similar affinity for hGH. The RIN cells express GH receptors similar to the cloned liver...... receptor. It is hypothesized that defects in the receptor expression on the beta-cells may contribute to the susceptibility to develop diabetes....

  12. Original article Expression of Estrogen Alpha and Beta Receptors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    Receptors in Prostate Cancer and Hyperplasia: Immunohistochemical Analysis. J. A. Al-Maghrabi1, T. M. Hassan1, 2, T. A. Abdel-Meguid3, 4, H. A.. Mosli3. 1Departments of Pathology, and 3Urology, King Abdul-Aziz University. Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 2Department of Pathology, Beni-Suef. University, Egypt, and ...

  13. Immunohistochemical Expression of Vitamin-D Receptor in Oral and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: Nineteen formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) blocks of OSCC and 15 Skin SCC FFPE were prepared for Abcam Rabbit polyclonal Anti- Vitamin D Receptor antibody ChIP Grade (ab3508). Nuclear brown staining was considered as positive for VDR. The Sinicrope scoring method was used to evaluate the ...

  14. Expression of histamine receptors in the human endolymphatic sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M Nue; Kirkeby, S; Vikeså, J.

    2016-01-01

    in 2012. This leaves betahistine (Betaserc) as the only drug for potential prevention of the incapacitating attacks of dizziness, tinnitus and hearing loss. However, the histamine receptors targeted by betahistine have never been demonstrated in the human ES. Accordingly, this study aims to investigate...

  15. Ghrelin receptors are expressed by distal tubules of the mouse kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Gene; Hunne, Billie; Bron, Romke; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Brock, James A; Furness, John B

    2011-10-01

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone from the stomach, has been recently discovered to reduce sodium excretion from the kidney. Although the effects on the kidney suggest actions in the distal nephron, the sites of expression of ghrelin receptors have not been localised. In the present work we have used a mouse that expresses green fluorescent protein under the control of the ghrelin receptor promoter to locate sites of receptor expression in the kidney. Receptor expression was confined to the straight parts of the distal tubules and the thin limbs of the loops of Henle. No expression was detected in other structures, including the glomeruli, proximal tubules and collecting ducts. Ghrelin receptors were not found in extra-renal or intra-renal arteries, despite observations that ghrelin is a vasodilator. The distribution revealed by in situ hybridisation histochemistry was the same as that revealed by the reporter. In conclusion, ghrelin receptors have a restricted distribution in the kidney. The location in the straight parts of the distal tubules accords with observations that ghrelin promotes sodium retention.

  16. In-vitro study of gonadotrophin signaling pathways in human granulosa cells in relation to progesterone receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Soledad; Kohen, Paulina; Muñoz, Alex; Godoy, Ana; Orge, Felipe; Strauss, Jerome F; Devoto, Luigi

    2017-10-01

    In humans, data on gonadotrophin-activated (LH, HCG and FSH) progesterone receptor expression and signalling pathways involved in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) expression presumably linked to the follicle rupture, are limited. Our hypothesis is LH, HCG and FSH increase progesterone receptor expression in granulosa cells through different signalling pathways, leading to an increased expression of ADAMTS-1 and MMP3/10, which may mediate follicular rupture through the transcription factor, HIF1A. Human granulosa cells were isolated from follicular aspirates obtained from 22 healthy women participating in our IVF programme for male-factor infertility. Progesterone receptor and HIF1A expression was assessed by immunofluorescence, and PKA-PKC-PI3K- ERK1/2, ADAMTS-1 and MMP3/10 expression by Western blot in pre-ovulatory and in cultured granulosa cells. Results show that HCG, LH and FSH regulate progesterone receptor expression and activate PKA, PKC, PI3K and ERK1/2 signalling pathways in granulosa cells but progesterone receptor expression is only mediated by PKA, PKC and ERK pathways. HCG, FSH and LH regulated MMPs expression through progesterone receptors. Moreover, HCG-progesterone-receptor-dependent HIF1A expression stimulated MMP3/10 expression but not that of ADAMTS-1. These results suggest differential downstream progesterone receptor signalling, as progesterone receptor regulates MMP3/10 expression via HIF1A, which is not involved in ADAMTS-1 expression. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Muscarinic receptor expression and receptor-mediated detrusor contraction: comparison of juvenile and adult porcine tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuest, Melinda; Eichhorn, Birgit; Braeter, Manfred; Strugala, Gerhard; Michel, Martin C.; Ravens, Ursula

    2008-01-01

    Urinary bladder function is known to mature during fetal and postnatal development, including changes in neurotransmitter regulation of detrusor contraction. However, only few experimental data are available about muscarinic receptor antagonist function in the urinary bladder from young animals. In

  18. Expression of androgen receptor and its association with estrogen receptor and androgen receptor downstream proteins in normal/benign breast luminal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Yarid, Nicole; McMahon, Loralee; Yang, Qi; Hicks, David G

    2014-08-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is strongly expressed in the majority of breast carcinomas, but its role in breast hormonal carcinogenesis is not clear. We believe a better knowledge of the biology of normal/benign breast tissue will be the key to understanding this process. Using standard immunohistochemical staining on consecutive sections and dual immunohistochemical labeling, we studied the expression pattern of AR and estrogen receptor (ER) in normal/benign breast luminal epithelial cells. We found that most of the AR-positive cells are also ER positive, about 10% of the cells are AR-positive only, whereas ER-positive only cells are uncommon, a distribution pattern of hormone receptor expression similar to what was revealed in invasive breast carcinomas. Whereas the expression of AR downstream proteins, such as prostate-specific antigen and gross cystic disease fluid protein, was either negative or unrelated to the AR status. We conclude that AR and ER expression status in invasive breast carcinomas reflects that of their progenitor cells in terminal duct lobular units. Our study did not reveal the expression of AR downstream proteins in normal/benign luminal epithelial cells at the regular immunohistochemistry level.

  19. Notch receptor expression in neurogenic regions of the adult zebrafish brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Oliveira-Carlos

    Full Text Available The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 [Formula: see text] of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches.

  20. Increasing epidermal growth factor receptor expression in human melanocytic tumor progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, P. E.; Moretti, S.; Koenders, P. G.; Weterman, M. A.; van Muijen, G. N.; Gianotti, B.; Ruiter, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Different results have been reported on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human melanocytic lesions, which may be due to different methodologic approaches. Therefore, we compared EGFR expression in six human melanoma cell lines by utilizing the monoclonal antibodies 2E9,

  1. De novo expression of dopamine D2 receptors on microglia after stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huck, J.H.; Freyer, D.; Bottcher, C.; Mladinov, M.; Muselmann-Genschow, C.; Thielke, M.; Gladow, N.; Bloomquist, D.; Mergenthaler, P.; Priller, J.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine is the predominant catecholamine in the brain and functions as a neurotransmitter. Dopamine is also a potent immune modulator. In this study, we have characterized the expression of dopamine receptors on murine microglia. We found that cultured primary microglia express dopamine D1, D2, D3,

  2. Requirement for Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Expression on Vascular Cells To Induce Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Stoelcker, Benjamin; Hehlgans, Thomas; Weigl, Karin; Bluethmann, Horst; Grau, Georges E.; Männel, Daniela N.

    2002-01-01

    Using tumor necrosis factor receptor type 2 (TNFR2)-deficient mice and generating bone marrow chimeras which express TNFR2 on either hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic cells, we demonstrated the requirement for TNFR2 expression on tissue cells to induce lethal cerebral malaria. Thus, TNFR2 on the brain vasculature mediates tumor necrosis factor-induced neurovascular lesions in experimental cerebral malaria.

  3. The DAF-7 TGF-β signaling pathway regulates chemosensory receptor gene expression in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Katherine M.; Sarafi-Reinach, Trina R.; Horne, Jennifer G.; Saffer, Adam M.; Sengupta, Piali

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression in response to environmental or developmental cues provides a mechanism by which animals can alter their sensory responses. Here we demonstrate a role for the daf-7 TGF-β pathway in the regulation of expression of a subset of chemoreceptor genes in Caenorhabditis elegans. We describe a novel role of this pathway in maintaining receptor gene expression in the adult and show that the DAF-4 type II TGF-β receptor functions cell-autonomously to modulate...

  4. Expression and purification of functional human mu opioid receptor from E.coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbin Ma

    Full Text Available N-terminally his-tagged human mu opioid receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor was produced in E.coli employing synthetic codon-usage optimized constructs. The receptor was expressed in inclusion bodies and membrane-inserted in different E.coli strains. By optimizing the expression conditions the expression level for the membrane-integrated receptor was raised to 0.3-0.5 mg per liter of culture. Milligram quantities of receptor could be enriched by affinity chromatography from IPTG induced cultures grown at 18°C. By size exclusion chromatography the protein fraction with the fraction of alpha-helical secondary structure expected for a 7-TM receptor was isolated, by CD-spectroscopy an alpha-helical content of ca. 45% was found for protein solubilised in the detergent Fos-12. Receptor in Fos-12 micelles was shown to bind endomorphin-1 with a K(D of 61 nM. A final yield of 0.17 mg functional protein per liter of culture was obtained.

  5. Expression and purification of functional human mu opioid receptor from E.coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanbin; Kubicek, Jan; Labahn, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    N-terminally his-tagged human mu opioid receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor was produced in E.coli employing synthetic codon-usage optimized constructs. The receptor was expressed in inclusion bodies and membrane-inserted in different E.coli strains. By optimizing the expression conditions the expression level for the membrane-integrated receptor was raised to 0.3-0.5 mg per liter of culture. Milligram quantities of receptor could be enriched by affinity chromatography from IPTG induced cultures grown at 18°C. By size exclusion chromatography the protein fraction with the fraction of alpha-helical secondary structure expected for a 7-TM receptor was isolated, by CD-spectroscopy an alpha-helical content of ca. 45% was found for protein solubilised in the detergent Fos-12. Receptor in Fos-12 micelles was shown to bind endomorphin-1 with a K(D) of 61 nM. A final yield of 0.17 mg functional protein per liter of culture was obtained.

  6. Olfactory Plasticity: Variation in the Expression of Chemosensory Receptors in Bactrocera dorsalis in Different Physiological States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Jin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in physiological conditions could influence the perception of external odors, which is important for the reproduction and survival of insect. With the alteration of physiological conditions, such as, age, feeding state, circadian rhythm, and mating status, insect can modulate their olfactory systems accordingly. Ionotropic, gustatory, and odorant receptors (IR, GR, and ORs are important elements of the insect chemosensory system, which enable insects to detect various external stimuli. In this study, we investigated the changes in these receptors at the mRNA level in Bactrocera dorsalis in different physiological states. We performed transcriptome analysis to identify chemosensory receptors: 21 IRs, 12 GRs, and 43 ORs were identified from B. dorsalis antennae, including almost all previously known chemoreceptors in B. dorsalis and a few more. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the effects of feeding state, mating status and time of day on the expression of IR, GR, and OR genes. The results showed that expression of chemosensory receptors changed in response to different physiological states, and these changes were completely different for different types of receptors and between male and female flies. Our study suggests that the expressions of chemosensory receptors change to adapt to different physiological states, which may indicate the significant role of these receptors in such physiological processes.

  7. Finasteride treatment alters tissue specific androgen receptor expression in prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Johnson, Karen A; Pier, Thomas; Bruskewitz, Reginald C; Ricke, William A; Huang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Normal and pathologic growth of the prostate is dependent on the synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) from testosterone by 5α-reductase. Finasteride is a selective inhibitor of 5α-reductase 2, one isozyme of 5α-reductase found in abundance in the human prostate. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of finasteride on androgen receptor expression and tissue morphology in human benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. Patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate and either treated or not treated with finasteride between 2004 and 2010 at the University of Wisconsin-Hospital were retrospectively identified using an institutional database. Prostate specimens from each patient were triple-stained for androgen receptor, prostate-specific antigen, and basal marker cytokeratin 5. Morphometric analysis was performed using the multispectral imaging, and results were compared between groups of finasteride treated and non-treated patients. Epithelial androgen receptor but not stromal androgen receptor expression was significantly lower in patients treated with finasteride than in non-treated patients. Androgen receptor-regulated prostate-specific antigen was not significantly decreased in finasteride-treated patients. Significant luminal epithelial atrophy and basal cell hyperplasia were prevalent in finasteride treated patients. Epithelial androgen receptor expression was highly correlated to the level of luminal epithelial atrophy. In this study, finasteride decreased the expression of epithelial androgen receptor in a tissue specific manner. The correlation between epithelial androgen receptor and the extent of luminal epithelial atrophy suggests that epithelial androgen receptor may be directly regulating the atrophic effects observed with finasteride treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Activation and modulation of recombinantly expressed serotonin receptor type 3A by terpenes and pungent substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Paul M; Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Flegel, Caroline; Herbrechter, Robin; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-11-27

    Serotonin receptor type 3 (5-HT3 receptor) is a ligand-gated ion channel that is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The receptor plays an important role in regulating peristalsis of the gastrointestinal tract and in functions such as emesis, cognition and anxiety. Therefore, a variety of pharmacologically active substances target the 5-HT3 receptor to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The 5-HT3 receptors are activated, antagonized, or modulated by a wide range of chemically different substances, such as 2-methyl-serotonin, phenylbiguanide, setrones, or cannabinoids. Whereas the action of all of these substances is well described, less is known about the effect of terpenoids or fragrances on 5-HT3A receptors. In this study, we screened a large number of natural odorous and pungent substances for their pharmacological action on recombinantly expressed human 5-HT3A receptors. The receptors were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized by electrophysiological recordings using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. A screening of two odorous mixes containing a total of 200 substances revealed that the monoterpenes, thymol and carvacrol, act as both weak partial agonists and positive modulators on the 5-HT3A receptor. In contrast, the most effective blockers were the terpenes, citronellol and geraniol, as well as the pungent substances gingerol, capsaicin and polygodial. In our study, we identified new modulators of 5-HT3A receptors out of the classes of monoterpenes and vanilloid substances that frequently occur in various plants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Inhibitory effects of tramadol on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adrenal chromaffin cells and in Xenopus oocytes expressing α7 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Munehiro; Minami, Kouichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Shigematsu, Akio; Shibuya, Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Tramadol has been used clinically as an analgesic; however, the mechanism of its analgesic effects is still unknown.We used bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to investigate effects of tramadol on catecholamine secretion, nicotine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) increases and membrane current changes. We also investigated effects of tramadol on α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes.Tramadol concentration-dependently suppressed carbachol-induced catecholamine secretion to 60% and 27% of the control at the concentration of 10 and 100 μM, respectively, whereas it had little effect on veratridine- or high K+-induced catecholamine secretion.Tramadol also suppressed nicotine-induced ([Ca2+]i) increases in a concentration-dependent manner. Tramadol inhibited nicotine-induced inward currents, and the inhibition was unaffected by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone.Tramadol inhibited nicotinic currents carried by α7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.Tramadol inhibited both α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic currents in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.In conclusion, tramadol inhibits catecholamine secretion partly by inhibiting nicotinic AChR functions in a naloxone-insensitive manner and α7 receptors are one of those inhibited by tramadol. PMID:12010769

  10. β2-Adrenergic receptor-dependent chemokine receptor 2 expression regulates leukocyte recruitment to the heart following acute injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisanti, Laurel A; Traynham, Christopher J; Repas, Ashley A; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J; Tilley, Douglas G

    2016-12-27

    Following cardiac injury, early immune cell responses are essential for initiating cardiac remodeling and tissue repair. We previously demonstrated the importance of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) in the regulation of immune cell localization following acute cardiac injury, with deficient leukocyte infiltration into the damaged heart. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which immune cell-expressed β2ARs regulate leukocyte recruitment to the heart following acute cardiac injury. Chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression and responsiveness to C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2)-mediated migration were abolished in β2AR knockout (KO) bone marrow (BM), both of which were rescued by β2AR reexpression. Chimeric mice lacking immune cell-specific CCR2 expression, as well as wild-type mice administered a CCR2 antagonist, recapitulated the loss of monocyte/macrophage and neutrophil recruitment to the heart following myocardial infarction (MI) observed in mice with immune cell-specific β2AR deletion. Converse to β2AR ablation, β2AR stimulation increased CCR2 expression and migratory responsiveness to CCL2 in BM. Mechanistically, G protein-dependent β2AR signaling was dispensable for these effects, whereas β-arrestin2-biased β2AR signaling was required for the regulation of CCR2 expression. Additionally, activator protein 1 (AP-1) was shown to be essential in mediating CCR2 expression in response to β2AR stimulation in both murine BM and human monocytes. Finally, reconstitution of β2ARKO BM with rescued expression of a β-arrestin-biased β2AR in vivo restored BM CCR2 expression as well as cardiac leukocyte infiltration following MI. These results demonstrate the critical role of β-arrestin2/AP-1-dependent β2AR signaling in the regulation of CCR2 expression and recruitment of leukocytes to the heart following injury.

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptor interaction with SP1 generates a new response element for pathophysiologically relevant gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Sandra; Ruhs, Stefanie; Schumann, Katja; Strätz, Nicole; Trenkmann, Kay; Schreier, Barbara; Grosse, Ivo; Keilwagen, Jens; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2013-09-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-induced transcription factor belonging to the steroid receptor family and involved in water-electrolyte homeostasis, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and fibrosis in the renocardiovascular system. The MR shares a common hormone-response-element with the glucocorticoid receptor but nevertheless elicits MR-specific effects including enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression via unknown mechanisms. The EGFR is a receptor tyrosine kinase that leads to activation of MAP kinases, but that can also function as a signal transducer for other signaling pathways. In the present study, we mechanistically investigate the interaction between a newly discovered MR- but not glucocorticoid receptor- responsive-element (=MRE1) of the EGFR promoter, specificity protein 1 (SP1) and MR to gain general insights into MR-specificity. Biological relevance of the interaction for EGFR expression and consequently for different signaling pathways in general is demonstrated in human, rat and murine vascular smooth muscle cells and cells of EGFR knockout mice. A genome-wide promoter search for identical binding regions followed by quantitative PCR validation suggests that the identified MR-SP1-MRE1 interaction might be applicable to other genes. Overall, a novel principle of MR-specific gene expression is explored that applies to the pathophysiologically relevant expression of the EGFR and potentially also to other genes.

  12. Developmentally Regulated Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Receptor Gene in the Periphery and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, C. R.; Martinez, Humberto J.; Black, Ira B.; Chao, Moses V.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates development and maintenance of function of peripheral sympathetic and sensory neurons. A potential role for the trophic factor in brain has been detected only recently. The ability of a cell to respond to NGF is due, in part, to expression of specific receptors on the cell surface. To study tissue-specific expression of the NGF receptor gene, we have used sensitive cRNA probes for detection of NGF receptor mRNA. Our studies indicate that the receptor gene is selectively and specifically expressed in sympathetic (superior cervical) and sensory (dorsal root) ganglia in the periphery, and by the septum-basal forebrain centrally, in the neonatal rat in vivo. Moreover, examination of tissues from neonatal and adult rats reveals a marked reduction in steady-state NGF receptor mRNA levels in sensory ganglia. In contrast, a 2- to 4-fold increase was observed in the basal forebrain and in the sympathetic ganglia over the same time period. Our observations suggest that NGF receptor mRNA expression is developmentally regulated in specific areas of the nervous system in a differential fashion.

  13. Candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization by downregulating VEGF receptor-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shinsuke; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-06-15

    Several studies have examined the anti-angiogenic effects of angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonists; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unclear. In the present study, we examined the efficacy and the mechanism of candesartan, an AT(1) receptor antagonist, in suppressing pathological retinal neovascularization. We used an in vivo murine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model and also studied the in vitro proliferation and migration of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs) induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. The regulation of angiogenesis-associated genes such as hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α), VEGF-A, VEGF receptor-1, and VEGF receptor-2 was evaluated with real-time RT-PCR in the OIR model. In the OIR model, candesartan suppressed the pathological neovascularization in a dose-dependent manner, but did not prevent the physiological angiogenesis. However, candesartan did not inhibit VEGF-A-induced proliferation or migration in HRMECs in the in vitro study. When administered interperitoneally in the OIR model, candesartan reduced the upregulation of VEGF receptor-2 in the retina, but had no effects in the other angiogenesis-related genes, such as HIF-1α, VEGF-A, and VEGF receptor-1. These findings indicate that candesartan inhibited the retinal pathological neovascularization, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of VEGF receptor-2, independent of VEGF signaling cascade. Therefore, candesartan may be a useful therapeutic target for the inhibition of retinal neovascularization that has a low risk of serious side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased brain histamine H3 receptor expression during hibernation in golden-mantled ground squirrels

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    Anichtchik Oleg V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibernation is a state of extremely reduced physiological functions and a deep depression of CNS activity. We have previously shown that the histamine levels increase in the brain during hibernation, as does the ratio between histamine and its first metabolite, suggesting increased histamine turnover during this state. The inhibitory histamine H3 receptor has both auto- and heteroreceptor function, rendering it the most likely histamine receptor to be involved in regulating the activity of histamine as well as other neurotransmitters during hibernation. In view of accumulating evidence that there is a global depression of transcription and translation during hibernation, of all but a few proteins that are important for this physiological condition, we reasoned that an increase in histamine H3 receptor expression would clearly indicate an important hibernation-related function for the receptor. Results In this study we show, using in situ hybridization, that histamine H3 receptor mRNA increases in the cortex, caudate nucleus and putamen during hibernation, an increase that is accompanied by elevated receptor binding in the cerebral cortex, globus pallidus and substantia nigra. These results indicate that there is a hibernation-related increase in H3 receptor expression in cortical neurons and in striatopallidal and striatonigral GABAergic neurons. GTP-γ-S binding autoradiography shows that the H3 receptors in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra can be stimulated by histamine throughout the hibernation cycle, suggesting that they are functionally active during hibernation. Conclusions These results show that the histamine H3 receptor gene is one of the few with a transcript that increases during hibernation, indicating an important role for the receptor in regulating this state. Moreover, the receptor is functionally active in the basal ganglia, suggesting a function for it in regulating e.g. dopaminergic transmission

  15. Differential expression of estrogen receptors alpha and beta mRNA during differentiation of human osteoblast SV-HFO cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Arts (Janine); J.M.M.F. Janssen (Josine); J.A. Gustafsson (Jan-Ake); C.W.G.M. Löwik (Clemens); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractEstrogens have been shown to be essential for maintaining a sufficiently high bone mineral density and ER alpha expression has been demonstrated in bone cells. Recently, a novel estrogen receptor, estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) has been identified. Here

  16. Expression of GDNF and its receptors in developing tooth is developmentally regulated and suggests multiple roles in innervation and organogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luukko, K; Suvanto, P; Saarma, M; Thesleff, I

    1997-01-01

    .... To study the roles of GDNF in the regulation of tooth innervation and formation, we analyzed by in situ hybridization the expression patterns of GDNF and its receptors Ret, GDNF family receptor alpha-1 (GFRalpha-1...

  17. Hypoxia attenuates purinergic P2X receptor-induced inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia

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    Smith SMC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie MC Smith,1,2 Gordon S Mitchell,1,2 Scott A Friedle,3 Christine M Sibigtroth,1 Stéphane Vinit,1 Jyoti J Watters1–31Department of Comparative Biosciences, 2Comparative Biomedical Sciences Training Program, 3Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USAAbstract: Hypoxia and increased extracellular nucleotides are frequently coincident in the brainstem. Extracellular nucleotides are potent modulators of microglial inflammatory gene expression via P2X purinergic receptor activation. Although hypoxia is also known to modulate inflammatory gene expression, little is known about how hypoxia or P2X receptor activation alone affects inflammatory molecule production in brainstem microglia, nor how hypoxia and P2X receptor signaling interact when they occur together. In the study reported here, we investigated the ability of a brief episode of hypoxia (2 hours in the presence and absence of the nonselective P2X receptor agonist 2′(3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyladenosine-5′-triphosphate (BzATP to promote inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia in adult rats. We evaluated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, and interleukin (IL-6 messenger RNA levels in immunomagnetically isolated brainstem microglia. While iNOS and IL-6 gene expression increased with hypoxia and BzATP alone, TNFα expression was unaffected. Surprisingly, BzATP-induced inflammatory effects were lost after hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia impairs proinflammatory P2X-receptor signaling. We also evaluated the expression of key P2X receptors activated by BzATP, namely P2X1, P2X4, and P2X7. While hypoxia did not alter their expression, BzATP upregulated P2X4 and P2X7 mRNAs; these effects were ablated in hypoxia. Although both P2X4 and P2X7 receptor expression correlated with increased microglial iNOS and IL-6 levels in microglia from normoxic rats, in hypoxia, P2X7 only correlated with IL-6, and P2X

  18. Pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR expression is strongly induced in lesional atopic mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T C; Lauenstein, H-D; Serowka, F; Pilzner, C; Groneberg, D A; Welker, P

    2008-07-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor influence neuronal proliferation and differentiation via the low-affinity pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR that may play a pivotal role in linking the immune with the nervous system. Because the precise regulation of p75NTR gene transcription in mast cells under states of allergic inflammation has not been investigated in detail so far, the present studies assessed the gene regulation and expression of this receptor. Transcriptional expression of p75NTR in human skin was studied in isolated cutaneous cells by means of RT-PCR. In situ lesional mast cell p75NTR expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. The p75NTR mRNA expression was found in isolated human skin mast cells and keratinocytes. Lower mRNA levels were present in fibroblasts and melanocytes but no transcripts were found in endothelial cells. The p75NTR protein expression was found in situ in lesional and non-lesional mast cells. A significantly increased expression of p75NTR protein was found in atopic dermatitis lesional mast cells when compared with control mast cell expression (Pneurotrophin receptor sensitivity of mast cells under states of allergic inflammation. Topically administered neurotrophin receptor-modulating compounds may act as anti-inflammatory mediators in cutaneous allergic inflammation.

  19. Regulation of expression of citrate synthase by the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα.

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    Christine Crumbley

    Full Text Available The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays an important role in regulation of the circadian rhythm and metabolism. Mice lacking a functional RORα display a range of metabolic abnormalities including decreased serum cholesterol and plasma triglycerides. Citrate synthase (CS is a key enzyme of the citric acid cycle that provides energy for cellular function. Additionally, CS plays a critical role in providing citrate derived acetyl-CoA for lipogenesis and cholesterologenesis. Here, we identified a functional RORα response element (RORE in the promoter of the CS gene. ChIP analysis demonstrates RORα occupancy of the CS promoter and a putative RORE binds to RORα effectively in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and confers RORα responsiveness to a reporter gene in a cotransfection assay. We also observed a decrease in CS gene expression and CS enzymatic activity in the staggerer mouse, which has a mutation of in the Rora gene resulting in nonfunctional RORα protein. Furthermore, we found that SR1001 a RORα inverse agonist eliminated the circadian pattern of expression of CS mRNA in mice. These data suggest that CS is a direct RORα target gene and one mechanism by which RORα regulates lipid metabolism is via regulation of CS expression.

  20. Effect of Hyperoxia on Retinoid Metabolism and Retinoid Receptor Expression in the Lungs of Newborn Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsing-Jin; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2015-01-01

    Preterm newborns that receive oxygen therapy often develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is abnormal lung development characterized by impaired alveologenesis. Oxygen-mediated injury is thought to disrupt normal lung growth and development. However, the mechanism of hyperoxia-induced BPD has not been extensively investigated. We established a neonatal mouse model to investigate the effects of normobaric hyperoxia on retinoid metabolism and retinoid receptor expression. Newborn mice were exposed to hyperoxic or normoxic conditions for 15 days. The concentration of retinol and retinyl palmitate in the lung was measured by HPLC to gauge retinoid metabolism. Retinoid receptor mRNA levels were assessed by real-time PCR. Proliferation and retinoid receptor expression in A549 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of exogenous vitamin A. Hyperoxia significantly reduced the body and lung weight of neonatal mice. Hyperoxia also downregulated expression of RARα, RARγ, and RXRγ in the lungs of neonatal mice. In vitro, hyperoxia inhibited proliferation and expression of retinoid receptors in A549 cells. Hyperoxia disrupted retinoid receptor expression in neonatal mice.

  1. Expression and characterization of purinergic receptors in rat middle meningeal artery-potential role in migraine.

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    Kristian Agmund Haanes

    Full Text Available The dura mater and its vasculature have for decades been central in the hypothesis of migraine and headache pathophysiology. Although recent studies have questioned the role of the vasculature as the primary cause, dural vessel physiology is still relevant in understanding the complex pathophysiology of migraine. The aim of the present study was to isolate the middle meningeal artery (MMA from rodents and characterize their purinergic receptors using a sensitive wire myograph method and RT-PCR. The data presented herein suggest that blood flow through the MMA is, at least in part, regulated by purinergic receptors. P2X1 and P2Y6 receptors are the strongest contractile receptors and, surprisingly, ADPβS caused contraction most likely via P2Y1 or P2Y13 receptors, which is not observed in other arteries. Adenosine addition, however, caused relaxation of the MMA. The adenosine relaxation could be inhibited by SCH58261 (A2A receptor antagonist and caffeine (adenosine receptor antagonist. This gives one putative molecular mechanism for the effect of caffeine, often used as an adjuvant remedy of cranial pain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR expression data for the receptors correlate well with the functional findings. Together these observations could be used as targets for future understanding of the in vivo role of purinergic receptors in the MMA.

  2. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates Fas ligand expression via the EP1 receptor in colon cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Callaghan, G

    2012-02-03

    Fas ligand (FasL\\/CD95L) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily that triggers apoptosis following crosslinking of the Fas receptor. Despite studies strongly implicating tumour-expressed FasL as a major inhibitor of the anti-tumour immune response, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate FasL expression in tumours. In this study, we show that the cyclooxygenase (COX) signalling pathway, and in particular prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), plays a role in the upregulation of FasL expression in colon cancer. Suppression of either COX-2 or COX-1 by RNA interference in HCA-7 and HT29 colon tumour cells reduced FasL expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Conversely, stimulation with PGE(2) increased FasL expression and these cells showed increased cytotoxicity against Fas-sensitive Jurkat T cells. Prostaglandin E(2)-induced FasL expression was mediated by signalling via the EP1 receptor. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis using serial sections of human colon adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between COX-2 and FasL (r=0.722; P<0.0001) expression, and between EP1 receptor and FasL (r=0.740; P<0.0001) expression, in the tumour cells. Thus, these findings indicate that PGE(2) positively regulates FasL expression in colon tumour cells, adding another pro-neoplastic activity to PGE(2).

  3. Interleukin-1 Receptors Are Differentially Expressed in Normal and Psoriatic T Cells

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    Attila Bebes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1 in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4+CD25− effector and CD4+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2 was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1 mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2 upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  4. Prognostic Relevance of Cytokine Receptor Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Interleukin-2 Receptor α-Chain (CD25 Expression Predicts a Poor Prognosis.

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    Kazunori Nakase

    Full Text Available A variety of cytokine/cytokine receptor systems affect the biological behavior of acute leukemia cells. However, little is known about the clinical relevance of cytokine receptor expression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. We quantitatively examined the expression of interleukin-2 receptor α-chain (IL-2Rα, also known as CD25, IL-2Rβ, IL-3Rα, IL-4Rα, IL-5Rα, IL-6Rα, IL-7Rα, the common β-chain (βc, γc, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSFRα, G-CSFR, c-fms, c-mpl, c-kit, FLT3, and GP130 in leukemia cells from 767 adult patients with AML by flow cytometry and determined their prevalence and clinical significance. All cytokine receptors examined were expressed at varying levels, whereas the levels of IL-3Rα, GM-CSFRα, IL-2Rα, γc, c-kit, and G-CSFR exhibited a wide spectrum of ≥10,000 sites/cell. In terms of their French-American-British classification types, GM-CSFRα and c-fms were preferentially expressed in M4/M5 patients, G-CSF in M3 patients, and IL-2Rα in non-M3 patients. Elevated levels of IL-3Rα, GM-CSFRα, and IL-2Rα correlated with leukocytosis. In patients ≤60 years old, higher levels of these 3 receptors correlated with poor responses to conventional chemotherapy, but only IL-2Rα was associated with a shorter overall survival. By incorporating IL-2Rα status into cytogenetic risk stratification, we could sort out a significantly adverse-risk cohort from the cytogenetically intermediate-risk group. Analyses with various phenotypical risk markers revealed the expression of IL-2Rα as an independent prognostic indicator in patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics. These findings were not observed in patients >60 years old. Our results indicate that several cytokine receptors were associated with certain cellular and clinical features, but IL-2Rα alone had prognostic value that provides an additional marker to improve current risk evaluation in AML patients ≤60 years old.

  5. Consequences of loss of progesterone receptor expression in development of invasive endometrial cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hanekamp, Eline; Blok, Leen; Gielen, Susanne; Smid-Koopman, Ellen; Kühne, Liesbeth; Ruiter, Petra; Chadha-Ajwani, Savi; Brinkmann, Albert; Grootegoed, Anton; Burger, Curt; Huikeshoven, Frans

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: In endometrial cancer, loss of progesterone receptors (PR) is associated with more advanced disease. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of progesterone and the loss of its receptors (PRA and PRB) in development of endometrial cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A 9600-cDNA microarray analysis was performed to study regulation of gene expression in the human endometrial cancer subcell line Ishikawa PRAB-36 by the progestagen medroxy progesterone acetate (MPA)...

  6. Immunohistochemical Expression of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Epulis Fissuratum

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    Maryam Seyedmajidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epulis Fissuratum (Epulis Fissuratum (EF or Denture Epulis or inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is a common hyperplastic tumor-like lesion with reactive nature, related to loose and ill-fitting, full or partial removable dentures and it is more common in women than men. For this reason, hormonal influences may also play role in its creation. The effect of steroid hormones especially sex hormones (Estrogen and progesterone on oral mucosa is identified in some studies. In the present study, the distribution pattern and presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in epithelial, stromal, endothelial and inflammatory cells in Epulis Fissuratum was investigated. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 30 samples of paraffin blocks with Epulis Fissuratum diagnosis and 30 samples of normal mucosal tissues as a control group who have had surgery as a margin beside the above lesions and had been obtained from the oral and maxillofacial pathology departement of Babol Dental School since 2003 up to 2010. Intensity of staining and immunoreactivity were evaluated using subjective index and considering the positive control group (breast carcinoma.Results: Epithelial, stromal, endothelial and inflammatory cells didn’t show reaction with monoclonal antibodies against estrogen and progesterone in none of the samples. Conclusion: It seems that the hypothesis of the existence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in epulis fissuratum and normal oral mucosa is ruled out. The possibility of direct effect of estrogen and progesterone in occurring of epulis fissuratum is rejected.

  7. Reduced Insulin Receptor Expression Enhances Proximal Tubule Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Shankar, Kripa; Makhija, Ekta; Gaikwad, Anil; Ecelbarger, Carolyn; Mandhani, Anil; Srivastava, Aneesh; Tiwari, Swasti

    2017-02-01

    Reduced insulin receptor protein levels have been reported in the kidney cortex from diabetic humans and animals. We recently reported that, targeted deletion of insulin receptor (IR) from proximal tubules (PT) resulted in hyperglycemia in non-obese mice. To elucidate the mechanism, we examined human proximal tubule cells (hPTC) and C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD, 60% fat for 20 weeks). Immunoblotting revealed a significantly lower protein level of IR in HFD compare to normal chow diet (NCD). Furthermore, a blunted rise in p-AKT 308 levels in the kidney cortex of HFD mice was observed in response to acute insulin (0.75 IU/kg body weight, i.p) relative to NCD n = 8/group, P gluconeogenesis. Transcript levels of the gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK were significantly increased in cAMP/DEXA-stimulated hPTC cells (n = 3, P gluconeogenesis and PEPCK induction was significantly attenuated in IR (siRNA) silenced hPTC (n = 3, P gluconeogenesis. Thus reduced insulin signaling of the proximal tubule may contribute to hyperglycemia in the metabolic syndrome via elevated gluconeogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 276-285, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nogo-B receptor expression correlates negatively with malignancy grade and ki-67 antigen expression in invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pula, Bartosz; Olbromski, Mateusz; Owczarek, Tomasz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Ugorski, Maciej; Rys, Janusz; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena

    2014-09-01

    Nogo-B receptor (NgBR) has been shown to be involved in endothelial cell chemotaxis and morphogenesis. However, few studies analyzing its expression in cancer cells have been performed. We examined NgBR expression in 233 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC) and corresponding non-malignant breast tissues (NMBT) on mRNA (real-time polymerase chain reaction) and protein levels (immunohistochemistry; IHC and western-blot analysis). NgBR expression was found also analyzed in breast cancer cell lines of varying invasiveness. NgBR expression was increased in IDC compared to NMBT on the mRNA (p=0.0007) and protein level (p=0.018). NgBR expression decreased significantly with IDC malignancy grade and correlated negatively with the Ki-67 antigen expression (r=-0.18; p=0.0005). High NgBR mRNA expression was associated with estrogen receptor negativity (p=0.0023) and the triple-negative phenotype of the tumors (p=0.0129). NgBR may be involved in IDC development, however, its role in its progression requires further research. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative study of leptin and leptin receptor gene expression in different swine breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, S E; Manea, M A; Dinescu, S; Costache, M

    2014-02-14

    Leptin is an important regulator of appetite, energy metabolism, and reproduction and is mainly synthesized in the adipocytes and then secreted into the bloodstream. The leptin receptor was classified as type I cytokine receptor due to its structural homology with IL-6 receptors and the signaling pathways in which they are both involved. The aim of our study is to comparatively assess the gene expression levels of leptin (lep) and leptin receptor (lepr) in different swine breeds specialized either in meat production (Duroc, Belgian Landrace, Large White, Synthetic Lines LS-345, and LSP-2000) or fat production (Mangalitsa) in order to correlate them with morphological and productivity characteristics. Additionally, lepr pattern of expression was evaluated comparatively between different tissue types in the Mangalitsa breed. Our results revealed high expression of the lep gene in Mangalitsa compared to those of all the other breeds, while for the lepr gene, average/medium levels were registered in Mangalitsa and increased pattern of expression was found in the synthetic lines LS-345 and LSP-2000. Regarding the comparative analysis of lepr gene expression in various tissues in the Mangalitsa breed, elevated levels were found in the liver and kidney, while the lowest expression was identified in the brain and muscles. Our results suggest that the Mangalitsa population exhibits leptin resistance, which might be correlated with atypical morpho-productive characteristics for this breed, such as below-average prolificacy and a strong tendency to accumulate fat.

  10. Expression of oxytocin, progesterone, and estrogen receptors in the reproductive tract of bitches with pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapaiwan, N; Manee-In, S; Olanratmanee, E; Srisuwatanasagul, S

    2017-02-01

    Canine pyometra is considered a serious and life-threatening condition. Due to the relationship among sex steroid hormones, oxytocin receptor (OTR) expression, and canine pyometra pathogenesis, this study aimed to investigate the expression of oxytocin, progesterone, and estrogen receptors in the reproductive tissues of canines with pyometra by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. A total of 27 pyometra bitches were classified into open- and closed-cervix pyometra groups based on the presence of vaginal discharge. Moreover, 15 normal bitches in the luteal phase served as a control group. The results showed that OTR gene expression in the ovary of pyometra bitches was higher than that of normal bitches, whereas the level of OTR gene expression in the cervix of pyometra bitches was less than that of normal bitches (P pyometra bitches compared with normal bitches, whereas a higher percentage of OTR-positive immunostaining in uteri and cervices were found in pyometra bitches compared with normal bitches (P pyometra bitches were less than that of normal bitches (P pyometra bitches was not different. Our findings suggest that pyometra pathogenesis is associated with a change in expression of OTR and sex steroid receptors in the canine reproductive tract. However, cervical dilation in bitches with pyometra was not influenced by the expression of OTR and sex steroid receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of cell type and epitope tagging on heterologous expression of G protein-coupled receptor: a systematic study on angiotensin type II receptor.

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    Lili Jiang

    Full Text Available Despite heterologous expression of epitope-tagged GPCR is widely adopted for functional characterization, there is lacking of systematic analysis of the impact of expression host and epitope tag on GPCR expression. Angiotensin type II (AT2 receptor displays agonist-dependent and -independent activities, coupling to a spectrum of signaling molecules. However, consensus has not been reached on the subcellular distributions, signaling cascades and receptor-mediated actions. To examine the contributions of host cell and epitope tag on receptor expression and activity, epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were transiently or stably expressed in HEK293, CHO-K1 and PC12 cells. The epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were detected both on the cell membrane and in the perinuclear region. In transiently transfected HEK293 cells, Myc-AT2 existed predominantly as monomer. Additionally, a ladder of ubiquitinated AT2 receptor proteins was detected. By contrast, stably expressed epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants existed as both monomer and high molecular weight complexes, and the latter was enriched in cell surface. Glycosylation promoted cell surface expression of Myc-AT2 but had no effect on AT2-GFP in HEK293 cells. In cells that stably expressed Myc-AT2, serum starvation induced apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells but not in HEK293 or PC12 cells. Instead, HEK293 and PC12 cells stably expressing Myc-AT2 exhibited partial cell cycle arrest with cells accumulating at G1 and S phases, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that expression levels, subcellular distributions and ligand-independent constitutive activities of AT2 receptor were cell type-dependent while posttranslational processing of nascent AT2 receptor protein was modulated by epitope tag and mode of expression.

  12. Impact of cell type and epitope tagging on heterologous expression of G protein-coupled receptor: a systematic study on angiotensin type II receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Teng, Gladys M K; Chan, Elaine Y M; Au, Shannon W N; Wise, Helen; Lee, Susanna S T; Cheung, Wing-Tai

    2012-01-01

    Despite heterologous expression of epitope-tagged GPCR is widely adopted for functional characterization, there is lacking of systematic analysis of the impact of expression host and epitope tag on GPCR expression. Angiotensin type II (AT2) receptor displays agonist-dependent and -independent activities, coupling to a spectrum of signaling molecules. However, consensus has not been reached on the subcellular distributions, signaling cascades and receptor-mediated actions. To examine the contributions of host cell and epitope tag on receptor expression and activity, epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were transiently or stably expressed in HEK293, CHO-K1 and PC12 cells. The epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were detected both on the cell membrane and in the perinuclear region. In transiently transfected HEK293 cells, Myc-AT2 existed predominantly as monomer. Additionally, a ladder of ubiquitinated AT2 receptor proteins was detected. By contrast, stably expressed epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants existed as both monomer and high molecular weight complexes, and the latter was enriched in cell surface. Glycosylation promoted cell surface expression of Myc-AT2 but had no effect on AT2-GFP in HEK293 cells. In cells that stably expressed Myc-AT2, serum starvation induced apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells but not in HEK293 or PC12 cells. Instead, HEK293 and PC12 cells stably expressing Myc-AT2 exhibited partial cell cycle arrest with cells accumulating at G1 and S phases, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that expression levels, subcellular distributions and ligand-independent constitutive activities of AT2 receptor were cell type-dependent while posttranslational processing of nascent AT2 receptor protein was modulated by epitope tag and mode of expression.

  13. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its splice variant are expressed in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G; Aksoy, Mark O; Yang, Yi; Shahabuddin, Syed; Litvin, Judith; Safadi, Fayez; Rogers, Thomas J

    2004-09-01

    Activation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 by its cognate ligands induces several differentiated cellular responses important to the growth and migration of a variety of hematopoietic and structural cells. In the human respiratory tract, human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) release the CXCR3 ligands Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11. Simultaneous expression of CXCR3 by HAEC would have important implications for the processes of airway inflammation and repair. Accordingly, in the present study we sought to determine whether HAEC also express the classic CXCR3 chemokine receptor CXCR3-A and its splice variant CXCR3-B and hence may respond in autocrine fashion to its ligands. We found that cultured HAEC (16-HBE and tracheocytes) constitutively expressed CXCR3 mRNA and protein. CXCR3 mRNA levels assessed by expression array were approximately 35% of beta-actin expression. In contrast, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR8, and CX3CR1 were <5% beta-actin. Both CXCR3-A and -B were expressed. Furthermore, tracheocytes freshly harvested by bronchoscopy stained positively for CXCR3 by immunofluorescence microscopy, and 68% of cytokeratin-positive tracheocytes (i.e., the epithelial cell population) were positive for CXCR3 by flow cytometry. In 16-HBE cells, CXCR3 receptor density was approximately 78,000 receptors/cell when assessed by competitive displacement of 125I-labeled IP-10/CXCL10. Finally, CXCR3 ligands induced chemotactic responses and actin reorganization in 16-HBE cells. These findings indicate constitutive expression by HAEC of a functional CXC chemokine receptor, CXCR3. Our data suggest the possibility that autocrine activation of CXCR3 expressed by HAEC may contribute to airway inflammation and remodeling in obstructive lung disease by regulating HAEC migration.

  14. Surface expression of NMDA receptor changes during memory consolidation in the crab Neohelice granulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab Neohelice granulata. Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of N-methyl-D aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent changes in strength, a process that affects the abundance of other receptors at the synapse and underlies some forms of learning and memory. Here we propose a direct regulation of the NMDAR. Changes in NMDAR's functionality might be induced by the modification of the subunit's expression or cellular trafficking. This trafficking does not only include NMDAR's movement between synaptic and extra-synaptic localizations but also the cycling between intracellular compartments and the plasma membrane, a process called surface expression. Consolidation of contextual learning affects the surface expression of the receptor without affecting its general expression. The surface expression of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR is down-regulated immediately after training, up-regulated 3 h after training and returns to naïve and control levels 24 h after training. The changes in NMDAR surface expression observed in the central brain are not seen in the thoracic ganglion. A similar increment in surface expression of GluN1 in the central brain is observed 3 h after administration of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. These consolidation changes are part of a plasticity event that first, during the down-regulation, stabilizes the trace and later, at 3-h post-training, changes the threshold for synapse activation. PMID:27421895

  15. Serotonin receptor expression in human prefrontal cortex: balancing excitation and inhibition across postnatal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn K Lambe

    Full Text Available Serotonin and its receptors (HTRs play critical roles in brain development and in the regulation of cognition, mood, and anxiety. HTRs are highly expressed in human prefrontal cortex and exert control over prefrontal excitability. The serotonin system is a key treatment target for several psychiatric disorders; however, the effectiveness of these drugs varies according to age. Despite strong evidence for developmental changes in prefrontal Htrs of rodents, the developmental regulation of HTR expression in human prefrontal cortex has not been examined. Using postmortem human prefrontal brain tissue from across postnatal life, we investigated the expression of key serotonin receptors with distinct inhibitory (HTR1A, HTR5A and excitatory (HTR2A, HTR2C, HTR4, HTR6 effects on cortical neurons, including two receptors which appear to be expressed to a greater degree in inhibitory interneurons of cerebral cortex (HTR2C, HTR6. We found distinct developmental patterns of expression for each of these six HTRs, with profound changes in expression occurring early in postnatal development and also into adulthood. However, a collective look at these HTRs in terms of their likely neurophysiological effects and major cellular localization leads to a model that suggests developmental changes in expression of these individual HTRs may not perturb an overall balance between inhibitory and excitatory effects. Examining and understanding the healthy balance is critical to appreciate how abnormal expression of an individual HTR may create a window of vulnerability for the emergence of psychiatric illness.

  16. Mouse neutrophils express functional umami taste receptor T1R1/T1R3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, NaHye; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Ha Young; Kang, NaNa; Park, Yoo Jung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bahk, Young Yil; Koo, JaeHyung; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2014-11-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in the initiation of innate immunity against infection and injury. Although many different types of G-protein coupled receptors are functionally expressed in neutrophils, no reports have demonstrated functional expression of umami taste receptor in these cells. We observed that mouse neutrophils express the umami taste receptor T1R1/T1R3 through RNA sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with L-alanine or L-serine, which are ligands for the umami taste receptor, elicited not only ERK or p38 MAPK phosphorylation but also chemotactic migration. Moreover, addition of L-alanine or L-serine markedly reduced the production of several cytokines including TNF-α induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through inhibition of NF-κB activity or STAT3 phosphorylation in neutrophils. Our findings demonstrate that neutrophils express the umami taste receptor, through which tastants stimulate neutrophils, resulting in chemotactic migration, and attenuation of LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  17. NRP-1 Receptor Expression Mismatch in Skin of Subjects with Experimental and Diabetic Small Fiber Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Acker, Nathalie; Ragé, Michael; Vermeirsch, Hilde; Schrijvers, Dorien; Nuydens, Rony; Byttebier, Geert; Timmers, Maarten; De Schepper, Stefanie; Streffer, Johannes; Andries, Luc; Plaghki, Léon; Cras, Patrick; Meert, Theo

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo cutaneous nerve regeneration model using capsaicin is applied extensively to study the regenerative mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy of disease modifying molecules for small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Since mismatches between functional and morphological nerve fiber recovery are described for this model, we aimed at determining the capability of the capsaicin model to truly mimic the morphological manifestations of SFN in diabetes. As nerve and blood vessel growth and regenerative capacities are defective in diabetes, we focused on studying the key regulator of these processes, the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1)/semaphorin pathway. This led us to the evaluation of NRP-1 receptor expression in epidermis and dermis of subjects presenting experimentally induced small fiber neuropathy, diabetic polyneuropathy and of diabetic subjects without clinical signs of small fiber neuropathy. The NRP-1 receptor was co-stained with CD31 vessel-marker using immunofluorescence and analyzed with Definiens® technology. This study indicates that capsaicin application results in significant loss of epidermal NRP-1 receptor expression, whereas diabetic subjects presenting small fiber neuropathy show full epidermal NRP-1 expression in contrast to the basal expression pattern seen in healthy controls. Capsaicin induced a decrease in dermal non-vascular NRP-1 receptor expression which did not appear in diabetic polyneuropathy. We can conclude that the capsaicin model does not mimic diabetic neuropathy related changes for cutaneous NRP-1 receptor expression. In addition, our data suggest that NRP-1 might play an important role in epidermal nerve fiber loss and/or defective regeneration and that NRP-1 receptor could change the epidermal environment to a nerve fiber repellant bed possibly through Sem3A in diabetes.

  18. Androgen receptor expression as a prognostic and predictive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatma Zakaria

    2015-10-30

    Oct 30, 2015 ... clinical and histo-morphological factors of all patients were assessed. The steroid hormones status including (ER, PR,. Her.2, AR and KI-67) was evaluated by immunohistochem- istry (IHC). The aim of this study focused on predictive and prognostic value of AR expression as a hormonal marker in TNBC.

  19. Androgen receptor expression as a prognostic and predictive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved survival with AR-positive expression group for 2-year and 3-year DFS was 85% and 78% respectively with (P=<0.001, Cl 95% 39.17– 51.39) and for OS ... Conclusions: Bicalumide is well tolerated in AR positive TNBC subtype patients and could offer an alternative to cytotoxic chemotherapy in those patients with ...

  20. Immunohistochemical Expression of Vitamin-D Receptor in Oral and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    concentrations due to higher levels of melanin, which reduces the amount of endogenously produced VD [5]. We aim to analyze the expression of VDR in skin and oral squamous cell carcinomas (skin SCC and. OSCC) from a black African sub-population to determine potential for active VD therapy in such patients.

  1. Expression of dopamine receptors in immune organs and circulating immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, A; Mariotta, S; Greco, S; Bisetti, A

    1997-01-01

    The existence of dopamine (DA) D1- and D2-like receptors in the rat and pigeon thymus and in human peripheral blood lymphocytes was investigated. The selective D1-like antagonist [3H]-SCH 23390 was used as a ligand of DA D1-like receptors (D1 and D5 sites). Pharmacological analysis suggests that binding of [3H]-SCH 23390 to sections of thymus and to human peripheral blood lymphocytes belongs mainly to the dopamine D5 receptor subtype. Light microscope autoradiography, performed in sections of rat and pigeon thymus, revealed that these receptors are located primarily in the cortical layer. DA D2-like receptors (D2, D3 and D4 sites) were studied in sections of rat thymus and in peripheral blood lymphocytes by using the putative DA D3 receptor agonist [3H]-7-OH-DPAT as a ligand. Both rat and pigeon thymus and human peripheral blood lymphocytes express a putative DA D3 receptor. These data are in agreement with recent molecular biology studies performed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The demonstration of different subtypes of DA receptors in a primary immune organ such as the thymus and in circulating immune cells supports the hypothesis of an involvement of DA in the control of immune function.

  2. The relationship of cerb B 2 expression with estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and prognostic parameters in endometrial carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandemir Nilufer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endometrial carcinoma (EC is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. Gene alterations and overexpression of various oncogenes are important in tumor development. The human HER 2 neu (c-erbB-2 gene product is a transmembrane receptor with an intracellular tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in coordinating the endometrial growth factor receptor signaling network. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of c-erbB-2 in endometrial cancer, to study its correlation to established prognostic parameters and estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR status. Methods Immunohistochemical (IHC analyses of ER, PR and c-erbB-2 were performed in 72 EC cases. Results We detected a positive staining with c erbB 2 in 18.1% of the cases and determined a statistically significant relation between c-erbB-2 and PR. We could not find a statistically significant relation between c-erbB-2 staining and ER. There was not a statistically significant difference between c-erbB-2 and histological grade. The highest level of c-erbB-2 was found in grade 2 cases. There was not any statistically significant relation between c-erbB-2 and menstrual status, myometrial invasion, lymph node status, stage and survival. Conclusions Although our study provides additional evidence of the potential prognostic role of c-erbB-2, further prospective and controlled studies are required to validate their clinical usefulness.

  3. Expansion of microsatellite in the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene linked to increased receptor expression and less aggressive thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onda, Masamitsu; Li, Daisy; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the length of the THRA1 microsatellite, which resides in a noncoding portion of the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene, affects receptor expression and is linked to clinicopathological parameters in thyroid cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN......: In 30 cases of surgically resected sporadic thyroid cancer, the length of the THRA1 microsatellite was determined by DNA sequence analysis, and expression of thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 was assessed immunohistochemically in thin sections cut from tumor blocks. The length of THRA1 and expression...... of thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 were also assessed in seven cancer cell lines. Regression analysis was used to gauge the correlation between the size of THRA1 and receptor expression. Multivariate analysis was used to test for links to the clinical parameters of gender, age, histology, stage, nodal...

  4. Farnesoid-X-receptor expression in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension and right heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Lusi [Department of Rheumatology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Department of Rheumatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325015 (China); Jiang, Ying [Department of Rheumatology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Zuo, Xiaoxia, E-mail: susanzuo@hotmail.com [Department of Rheumatology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China)

    2015-11-06

    Objective: The farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR) is a metabolic nuclear receptor superfamily member that is highly expressed in enterohepatic tissue and is also expressed in the cardiovascular system. Multiple nuclear receptors, including FXR, play a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an untreatable cardiovascular system disease that leads to right heart failure (RHF). However, the potential physiological/pathological roles of FXR in PAH and RHF are unknown. We therefore compared FXR expression in the cardiovascular system in PAH, RHF and a control. Methods and results: Hemodynamic parameters and morphology were assessed in blank solution-exposed control, monocrotaline (MCT)-exposed PAH (4 weeks) and RHF (7 weeks) Sprague–Dawley rats. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), Western blot (WB), immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) analysis were performed to assess FXR levels in the lung and heart tissues of MCT-induced PAH and RHF rats. In normal rats, low FXR levels were detected in the heart, and nearly no FXR was expressed in rat lungs. However, FXR expression was significantly elevated in PAH and RHF rat lungs but reduced in PAH and RHF rat right ventricular (RV) tissues. FXR expression was reduced only in RHF rat left ventricular (LV) tissues. Conclusions: The differential expression of FXR in MCT-induced PAH lungs and heart tissues in parallel with PAH pathophysiological processes suggests that FXR contributes to PAH. - Highlights: • FXR was expressed in rat lung and heart tissues. • FXR expression increased sharply in the lung tissues of PAH and RHF rats. • FXR expression was reduced in PAH and RHF rat RV tissue. • FXR expression was unaltered in PAH LV but reduced in RHF rat LV tissue. • FXR expression was prominent in the neovascularization region.

  5. Application of HaloTag technology to expression and purification of cannabinoid receptor CB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Sheen, Fangmin C; Zoubak, Lioudmila; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei A

    2013-05-01

    Expression of milligram quantities of functional, stable G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for high-resolution structural studies remains a challenging task. The goal of this work was to evaluate the usefulness of the HaloTag system (Promega) for expression and purification of the human cannabinoid receptor CB(2), an important target for development of drugs for treatment of immune disorders, inflammation, and pain. Here we investigated expression in Escherichia coli cells of the integral membrane receptor CB(2) as a fusion with the 34 kDa HaloTag at N- or C-terminal location, either in the presence or in the absence of the N-terminal maltose-binding protein (MBP). The CB(2) was flanked at both ends by the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease cleavage sites to allow for subsequent removal of expression partners. Expression by induction with either IPTG (in E. coli BL21(DE3) cell cultures) or by auto-induction (in E. coli KRX cells) were compared. While the N-terminal location of the HaloTag resulted in high levels of expression of the fusion CB(2), the recombinant receptor was not functional. However, when the HaloTag was placed in the C-terminal location, a fully active receptor was produced irrespective of induction method or bacterial strain used. For purification, the fusion protein was captured onto HaloLink resin in the presence of detergents. Treatment with specific TEV protease released the CB(2) upon washing. To our knowledge, this study represents the first example of expression, surface immobilization and purification of a functional GPCR using HaloTag technology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Prefrontal cortical–striatal dopamine receptor mRNA expression predicts distinct forms of impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nicholas W.; Beas, Blanca S.; Montgomery, Karienn S.; Haberman, Rebecca P.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Variation in dopamine receptor levels has been associated with different facets of impulsivity. To further delineate the neural substrates underlying impulsive action (inability to withhold a prepotent motor response) and impulsive choice (delay aversion), we characterised rats in the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Responding task and a delay discounting task. We also measured performance on an effort-based discounting task. We then assessed D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mRNA expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens using in situ hybridisation, and compared these data with behavioral performance. Expression of D1 and D2 receptor mRNA in distinct brain regions was predictive of impulsive action. A dissociation within the nucleus accumbens was observed between subregions and receptor subtypes; higher D1 mRNA expression in the shell predicted greater impulsive action, whereas lower D2 mRNA expression in the core predicted greater impulsive action. We also observed a negative correlation between impulsive action and D2 mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex. Interestingly, a similar relationship was present between impulsive choice and prelimbic cortex D2 mRNA, despite the fact that behavioral indices of impulsive action and impulsive choice were uncorrelated. Finally, we found that both high D1 mRNA expression in the insular cortex and low D2 mRNA expression in the infralimbic cortex were associated with willingness to exert effort for rewards. Notably, dopamine receptor mRNA in these regions was not associated with either facet of impulsivity. The data presented here provide novel molecular and neuroanatomical distinctions between different forms of impulsivity, as well as effort-based decision-making. PMID:23510331

  7. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence cytosensor for quantitative evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on cell surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanjuan; Zhang, Shaolian; Wen, Qingqing; Huang, Hongxing; Yang, Peihui, E-mail: typh@jnu.edu.cn

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • EGF-cytosensor was used for evaluating EGFR expression level on cell surfaces. • CdSQDs and EGF were coated on magnetic beads (MBs) for ECL-probe. • Good sensitivity was achieved due to the signal amplification of ECL-probe. - Abstract: A sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy for evaluating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression level on cell surfaces was designed by integrating the specific recognition of EGFR expressed on MCF-7 cell surfaces with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-funtionalized CdS quantum dots (CdSQDs)-capped magnetic bead (MB) probe. The high sensitivity of ECL probe of EGF-funtionalized CdSQD-capped-MB was used for competitive recognition with EGFR expressed on cell surfaces with recombinant EGFR protein. The changes of ECL intensity depended on both the cell number and the expression level of EGFR receptor on cell surfaces. A wide linear response to cells ranging from 80 to 4 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1} with a detection limit of 40 cells mL{sup −1} was obtained. The EGF-cytosensor was used to evaluate EGFR expression levels on MCF-7 cells, and the average number of EGFR receptor on single MCF-7 cells was 1.35 × 10{sup 5} with the relative standard deviation of 4.3%. This strategy was further used for in-situ and real-time evaluating EGFR receptor expressed on cell surfaces in response to drugs stimulation at different concentration and incubation time. The proposed method provided potential applications in the detection of receptors on cancer cells and anticancer drugs screening.

  8. Expression of Estrogen Alpha and Beta Receptors in Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was expressed in 33 cases (94.3%) of epithelial and stromal cells of BPH. Conclusion: The majority of PCa and BPH exhibited nuclear immunoreactivity for ER-β in both tumor and stromal cells and they are usually negative for ER-α. There is probably partial loss of ER-β in HGPIN. ER-β may have a role in the process of ...

  9. CB1 receptor inhibition leads to decreased vascular AT1 receptor expression, inhibition of oxidative stress and improved endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyerili, Vedat; Zimmer, Sebastian; Jung, Suzin; Wassmann, Kerstin; Naehle, Claas P; Lütjohann, Dieter; Zimmer, Andreas; Nickenig, Georg; Wassmann, Sven

    2010-07-01

    Inhibition of the cannabinoid receptor CB(1) (CB(1)-R) exerts numerous positive cardiovascular effects such as modulation of blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and serum lipid concentrations. However, direct vascular effects of CB(1)-R inhibition remain unclear. CB(1)-R expression was validated in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and aortic tissue of mice. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice were treated with cholesterol-rich diet and the selective CB(1)-R antagonist rimonabant or vehicle for 7 weeks. CB(1)-R inhibition had no effect on atherosclerotic plaque development, collagen content and macrophage infiltration but led to improved aortic endothelium-dependent vasodilation and decreased aortic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NADPH oxidase activity. Treatment of cultured VSMC with rimonabant resulted in reduced angiotensin II-mediated but not basal ROS production and NADPH oxidase activity. CB(1)-R inhibition with rimonabant and AM251 led to down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) expression, whereas stimulation with the CB(1)-R agonist CP 55,940 resulted in AT1-R up-regulation, indicating that AT1-R expression is directly regulated by the CB(1)-R. CB(2)-R inhibition had no impact on AT1-R expression in VSMC. Consistently, CB(1)-R inhibition decreased aortic AT1-R expression in vivo. CB(1)-R inhibition leads to decreased vascular AT1-R expression, NADPH oxidase activity and ROS production in vitro and in vivo. This antioxidative effect is associated with improved endothelial function in ApoE-/- mice, indicating beneficial direct vascular effects of CB(1)-R inhibition.

  10. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangkyu, E-mail: 49park@cku.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung 210-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoo Jeong [Division of Metabolic Disease, Center for Biomedical Sciences, National Institute of Health Korea, Osong 361-709 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Hee [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. - Highlights: • Refeeding increases the RXRγ expression level in mouse liver. • RXRγ expression is induced by high glucose condition in primary hepatocytes. • RXRγ and LXRα have synergistic effect on SREBP-1c promoter activity. • RXRγ binds to LXRE(-299/-280) located within SREBP-1c promoter region and interacts with LXRα.

  11. Prostate-specific antigen and hormone receptor expression in male and female breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Cynthia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate carcinoma is among the most common solid tumors to secondarily involve the male breast. Prostate specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP are expressed in benign and malignant prostatic tissue, and immunohistochemical staining for these markers is often used to confirm the prostatic origin of metastatic carcinoma. PSA expression has been reported in male and female breast carcinoma and in gynecomastia, raising concerns about the utility of PSA for differentiating prostate carcinoma metastasis to the male breast from primary breast carcinoma. This study examined the frequency of PSA, PSAP, and hormone receptor expression in male breast carcinoma (MBC, female breast carcinoma (FBC, and gynecomastia. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for PSA, PSAP, AR, ER, and PR was performed on tissue microarrays representing six cases of gynecomastia, thirty MBC, and fifty-six FBC. Results PSA was positive in two of fifty-six FBC (3.7%, focally positive in one of thirty MBC (3.3%, and negative in the five examined cases of gynecomastia. PSAP expression was absent in MBC, FBC, and gynecomastia. Hormone receptor expression was similar in males and females (AR 74.1% in MBC vs. 67.9% in FBC, p = 0.62; ER 85.2% vs. 68.5%, p = 0.18; and PR 51.9% vs. 48.2%, p = 0.82. Conclusions PSA and PSAP are useful markers to distinguish primary breast carcinoma from prostate carcinoma metastatic to the male breast. Although PSA expression appeared to correlate with hormone receptor expression, the incidence of PSA expression in our population was too low to draw significant conclusions about an association between PSA expression and hormone receptor status in breast lesions.

  12. Farnesoid-X-receptor expression in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension and right heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lusi; Jiang, Ying; Zuo, Xiaoxia

    2015-11-06

    The farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR) is a metabolic nuclear receptor superfamily member that is highly expressed in enterohepatic tissue and is also expressed in the cardiovascular system. Multiple nuclear receptors, including FXR, play a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an untreatable cardiovascular system disease that leads to right heart failure (RHF). However, the potential physiological/pathological roles of FXR in PAH and RHF are unknown. We therefore compared FXR expression in the cardiovascular system in PAH, RHF and a control. Hemodynamic parameters and morphology were assessed in blank solution-exposed control, monocrotaline (MCT)-exposed PAH (4 weeks) and RHF (7 weeks) Sprague-Dawley rats. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), Western blot (WB), immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) analysis were performed to assess FXR levels in the lung and heart tissues of MCT-induced PAH and RHF rats. In normal rats, low FXR levels were detected in the heart, and nearly no FXR was expressed in rat lungs. However, FXR expression was significantly elevated in PAH and RHF rat lungs but reduced in PAH and RHF rat right ventricular (RV) tissues. FXR expression was reduced only in RHF rat left ventricular (LV) tissues. The differential expression of FXR in MCT-induced PAH lungs and heart tissues in parallel with PAH pathophysiological processes suggests that FXR contributes to PAH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ is a key regulator of human fibrinogen gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lu, Yan; Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-min; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Yong Soo; Kim, Jina; Dewidar, Bedair; Jeong, Won-IL; Lee, In-Kyu; Cho, Sung Jin; Dooley, Steven; Lee, Chul-Ho; Li, Xiaoying

    2017-01-01

    Fibrinogen, 1 of 13 coagulation factors responsible for normal blood clotting, is synthesized by hepatocytes. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating fibrinogen gene expression have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we identified estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) as a novel transcriptional regulator of human fibrinogen gene expression. Overexpression of ERRγ specially increased fibrinogen expression in human hepatoma cell line. Cannabinoid receptor types 1(CB1R) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) up-regulated transcription of fibrinogen via induction of ERRγ, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated fibrinogen expression. Deletion analyses of the fibrinogen γ (FGG) gene promoter and ChIP assays revealed binding sites of ERRγ on human fibrinogen γ gene promoter. Moreover, overexpression of ERRγ was sufficient to increase fibrinogen gene expression, whereas treatment with GSK5182, a selective inverse agonist of ERRγ led to its attenuation in cell culture. Finally, fibrinogen and ERRγ gene expression were elevated in liver tissue of obese patients suggesting a conservation of this mechanism. Overall, this study elucidates a molecular mechanism linking CB1R signaling, ERRγ expression and fibrinogen gene transcription. GSK5182 may have therapeutic potential to treat hyperfibrinogenemia. PMID:28750085

  14. Use-dependence of ryanodine effects on postrest contraction in ferret cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecot, C O; Katzung, B G

    1987-04-01

    During an investigation of the effect of ryanodine on contractions in cardiac muscle, it was found that long rest periods removed all or most of the drug's effect. Therefore, we studied the kinetics of block development and recovery from block produced by low concentrations of ryanodine (1-100 pM) on the postrest contractions of ferret papillary muscle. At 100 pM, ryanodine depressed steady-state contraction amplitude slightly (4.2 +/- 1.1% mean +/- SEM, n = 10) but strongly inhibited (40-80%) the first contraction (postrest contraction) elicited on restimulation of the preparation after rest periods of 1 second to 5 minutes. Under control conditions, the nearly maximal potentiation of the twitch occurring after a standard test rest period (30 seconds of rest) was not affected by a preceding conditioning rest of up to 20 minutes. In the presence of 100 pM ryanodine, a conditioning rest increased the amplitude of the twitch elicited after a test rest, and the test rest contraction recovered toward control (drug-free) amplitude monoexponentially (time constant, 582 +/- 105 seconds). Block of postrest contraction could be reinduced by stimulation and occurred faster when higher rates were used (time constants, 758 seconds at 1 Hz and 107 +/- 26 seconds at 3 Hz). Since rest potentiation of twitch tension is believed to be mostly dependent on extra calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the results suggest that the ryanodine-induced blockade of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is use-dependent and recovers during diastole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Activation of dorsal horn cannabinoid CB2 receptor suppresses the expression of P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors in neuropathic pain rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Juan; Huang, Dujuan; Zhou, Rui; Yue, MingXia; Xu, Tao; Yang, Junna; He, Li; Tian, Hong; Liu, XiaoHong; Zeng, Junwei

    2017-09-12

    More evidence suggests that dorsal spinal cord microglia is an important site contributing to CB2 receptor-mediated analgesia. The upregulation of P2Y12 and P2Y13 purinoceptors in spinal dorsal horn microglia is involved in the development of pain behavior caused by peripheral nerve injury. However, it is not known whether the expression of P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors at spinal dorsal horn will be influenced after CB2 receptor activation in neuropathic pain rats. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) and intrathecal ADPbetaS injection were performed in rats to induce neuropathic pain. The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was used to evaluate thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats. The expression of P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors, p-p38MAPK, and NF-kappaBp65 was detected with RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. Treatment with AM1241 produces a pronounced inhibition of CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and significantly inhibited the increased expression of P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors at the mRNA and protein levels, which open up the possibility that P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptor expression are downregulated by CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 in CCI rats. Western blot analysis demonstrated that AM1241 reduced the elevated expression of p-p38MAPK and NF-κBp65 in the dorsal spinal cord induced by CCI. After administration with either SB203580 (p38MAPK inhibitor) or PDTC (NF-kappaB inhibitor), the levels of P2Y13 receptor expression in the dorsal spinal cord were lower than those in the CCI group. However, in CCI rats, the increased expression of P2Y12 receptor was prevented by intrathecal administration of PDTC but not by SB203580. In addition, minocycline significantly decreased the increased expression of P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. The similar results can be observed in ADPbetaS-treated rats. Intrathecal injection of ADPbataS causes thermal hyperalgesia and increased expression of P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors in the dorsal spinal cord of naive rats. Moreover, intrathecal injection of AM1241

  16. Cloning and Expression of Ecdysone Receptor and Retinoid X Receptor from Procambarus clarkii: Induction by Eyestalk Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Hao Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecdysone receptor and retinoid X receptor are key regulators in molting. Here, full length ecdysone receptor (PcEcR and retinoid X receptor (PcRXR cDNAs from Procambarus clarkii were cloned. Full length cDNA of PcEcR has 2500 bp, encoding 576 amino acid proteins, and full length cDNA of PcRXR has 2593 bp, in which a 15 bp and a 204 bp insert/deletion splice variant regions in DNA binding domain and hinge domain were identified. The two splice variant regions in PcRXR result four isoforms: PcRXR1-4, encoding 525, 520, 457 and 452 amino acids respectively. PcEcR was highly expressed in the hepatopancreas and eyestalk and PcRXR was highly expressed in the eyestalk among eight examined tissues. Both PcEcR and PcRXR had induced expression after eyestalk ablation (ESA in the three examined tissues. In muscle, PcEcR and PcRXR were upregulated after ESA, PcEcR reached the highest level on day 3 after ESA and increased 33.5-fold relative to day 0, and PcRXR reached highest the level on day 1 after ESA and increased 2.7-fold relative to day 0. In the hepatopancreas, PcEcR and PcRXR dEcReased continuously after ESA, and the expression levels of PcEcR and PcRXR were only 0.7% and 1.7% on day 7 after ESA relative to day 0, respectively. In the ovaries, PcEcR was upregulated after ESA, reached the highest level on day 3 after ESA, increased 3.0-fold relative to day 0, and the expression level of PcRXR changed insignificantly after ESA (p > 0.05. The different responses of PcEcR and PcRXR after ESA indicates that different tissues play different roles (and coordinates their functions in molting.

  17. Cellular expression of growth hormone and prolactin receptors in human breast disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertani, H C; Garcia-Caballero, T; Lambert, A; Gérard, F; Palayer, C; Boutin, J M; Vonderhaar, B K; Waters, M J; Lobie, P E; Morel, G

    1998-04-17

    Growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) exert their regulatory functions in the mammary gland by acting on specific receptors. Using isotopic in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we have localized the expression of hGH receptor (hGHR) and hPRL receptor (hPRLR) in a panel of human breast disorders. Surgical specimens from adult females included normal breast, inflammatory lesions (mastitis) benign proliferative breast disease (fibroadenoma, papilloma, adenosis, epitheliosis), intraductal carcinoma or lobular carcinoma in situ, and invasive ductal, lobular or medullary carcinoma. Cases of male breast enlargement (gynecomastia) were also studied. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated the co-expression of hGHR and hPRLR mRNA in all samples tested. Epithelial cells of both normal and tumor tissues were labelled. Quantitative estimation of receptor mRNA levels was regionally measured in areas corresponding to tumor cells and adipose cells from the same section. It demonstrated large individual variation and no correlation emerged according to the histological type of lesion. Receptor immunoreactivity was detected both in the cytoplasm and nuclei or in the cytoplasm alone. Scattered stromal cells were found positive in some cases, but the labeling intensity was always weaker than for neoplastic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the expression of the hGHR and hPRLR genes and their translation in epithelial cells of normal, proliferative and neoplastic lesions of the breast. They also demonstrate that stromal components express GHR and PRLR genes. Thus the putative role of hGH or hPRL in the progression of proliferative mammary disorders is not due to grossly altered levels of receptor expression.

  18. Ovarian steroids regulate tachykinin and tachykinin receptor gene expression in the mouse uterus

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    Patak Eva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mouse uterus, pregnancy is accompanied by changes in tachykinin and tachykinin receptor gene expression and in the uterotonic effects of endogenous tachykinins. In this study we have investigated whether changes in tachykinin expression and responses are a result of changes in ovarian steroid levels. Methods We quantified the mRNAs of tachykinins and tachykinin receptors in uteri from ovariectomized mice and studied their regulation in response to estrogen and progesterone using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Early (3 h and late (24 h responses to estrogen were evaluated and the participation of the estrogen receptors (ER, ERalpha and ERbeta, was analyzed by treating mice with propylpyrazole triol, a selective ERalpha agonist, or diarylpropionitrile, a selective agonist of ERbeta. Results All genes encoding tachykinins (Tac1, Tac2 and Tac4 and tachykinin receptors (Tacr1, Tacr2 and Tacr3 were expressed in uteri from ovariectomized mice. Estrogen increased Tac1 and Tacr1 mRNA after 3 h and decreased Tac1 and Tac4 expression after 24 h. Tac2 and Tacr3 mRNA levels were decreased by estrogen at both 3 and 24 h. Most effects of estrogen were also observed in animals treated with propylpyrazole triol. Progesterone treatment increased the levels of Tac2. Conclusion These results show that the expression of tachykinins and their receptors in the mouse uterus is tightly and differentially regulated by ovarian steroids. Estrogen effects are mainly mediated by ERalpha supporting an essential role for this estrogen receptor in the regulation of the tachykinergic system in the mouse uterus.

  19. Expression of Notch 1 receptor associated with tumor aggressiveness in papillary thyroid carcinoma

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    Fu H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hongliang Fu,1 Chao Ma,1 Wenbin Guan,2 Weiwei Cheng,1 Fang Feng,1 Hui Wang1 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, Xin Hua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Aim: The aim of this study was to assess if the expression of Notch 1 receptor is associated with tumor aggressiveness in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs.Patients and methods: By searching the electronic medical record system of Xin Hua Hospital, all cases of PTC patients who underwent thyroidectomy in the hospital between 2013 and 2014 were retrieved. Then, the cases of patients who had a history of any other malignancy or whose thyroid tumor specimen was not available for assay were rejected. Finally, 68 cases of PTC patients were obtained. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of these patients were studied by immunohistochemistry to learn the expression of Notch 1 receptor. Meanwhile, the clinical data of these patients including sex, age, size of the tumor, presence of node metastasis or distant metastasis, and presence of capsule invasion and tumor multicentricity were collected. Pearson’s chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test was used for measuring statistical differences in categorical variables. All the statistical tests were two-sided. A P-value <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant.Results: A total of 19 male and 49 female PTC patients with a mean age of 44.8±13.6 years (range 18–78 years were studied. Notch 1 receptor expression was found in 15/68 (22% samples of PTC. The expression of Notch 1 receptor was significantly associated with tumor size (P=0.021, distant metastasis (P=0.008, capsule invasion (P=0.001, tumor multicentricity (P=0.018, and age (P=0.033. However, the expression of Notch 1 receptor was not significantly correlated with node metastasis (P=0.096 and sex (P=0.901.Conclusion: The expression of Notch 1 receptor is associated with tumor

  20. Targeting Multiple Tumors Using T-Cells Engineered to Express a Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor 2-Based Chimeric Receptor

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    Vasyl Eisenberg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in cancer treatment are demonstrating the increasing and powerful potential of immunotherapeutic strategies. In this regard, the adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T-lymphocytes approaches can lead to tumor regression in cancer patients. More recently, the use of T-cells genetically engineered to express cancer-specific receptors such as the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR continues to show promise for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Still, there is a crucial need to develop efficient CAR-T cell approaches for the treatment of solid tumors. It has been shown that other lymphocytes such as natural killer (NK cells can demonstrate potent antitumor function—nonetheless, their use in immunotherapy is rather limited due to difficulties in expanding these cells to therapeutically relevant numbers and to suppression by endogenous inhibitory mechanisms. Cancer recognition by NK cells is partly mediated by molecules termed natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs. In the present study, we hypothesize that it is possible to endow T-cells with an NK recognition pattern, providing them with a mean to recognize tumor cells, in a non-MHC restricted way. To test this, we genetically modified human T-cells with different chimeric receptors based on the human NCR2 molecule and then assessed their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that expression in primary lymphocytes of an NCR2-derived CAR, termed s4428z, confers T-cells with the ability to specifically recognize heterogeneous tumors and to mediate tumor cytotoxicity in a mouse model. This study demonstrates the benefit of combining tumor recognition capability of NK cells with T cell effectiveness to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Expression and Functional Pathway Analysis of Nuclear Receptor NR2F2 in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Shannon M.; Loomans, Holli A.; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Ghosh-Choudhury, Triparna; Coffey, Donna; Xiao, Weimin; Liu, Zhandong; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh

    2013-01-01

    Context: Recent evidence implicates the orphan nuclear receptor, nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group F, member 2 (NR2F2; chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II) as both a master regulator of angiogenesis and an oncogene in prostate and other human cancers. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether NR2F2 plays a role in ovarian cancer and dissect its potential mechanisms of action. Design, Setting, and Patients: We examined NR2F2 expression in healthy ovary and ovarian cancers using quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. NR2F2 expression was targeted in established ovarian cancer cell lines to assess the impact of dysregulated NR2F2 expression in the epithelial compartment of ovarian cancers. Results: Our results indicate that NR2F2 is robustly expressed in the stroma of healthy ovary with little or no expression in epithelia lining the ovarian surface, clefts, or crypts. This pattern of NR2F2 expression was markedly disrupted in ovarian cancers, in which decreased levels of stromal expression and ectopic epithelial expression were frequently observed. Ovarian cancers with the most disrupted patterns of NR2F2 were associated with significantly shorter disease-free interval by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Targeting NR2F2 expression in established ovarian cancer cell lines enhanced apoptosis and increased proliferation. In addition, we found that NR2F2 regulates the expression of NEK2, RAI14, and multiple other genes involved in the cell cycle, suggesting potential pathways by which dysregulated expression of NR2F2 impacts ovarian cancer. Conclusions: These results uncover novel roles for NR2F2 in ovarian cancer and point to a unique scenario in which a single nuclear receptor plays potentially distinct roles in the stromal and epithelial compartments of the same tissue. PMID:23690307

  2. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated homocysteine levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared to control subjects. We further observed that administration of homocysteine or acetylcysteine significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared...

  3. Expression of the innate defense receptor S5D-SRCRB in the urogenital tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miro-Julia, C.; Escoda-Ferran, C.; Carrasco, E.

    2014-01-01

    S5D-SRCRB is a novel mouse secretory glycoprotein belonging to the ancient and highly conserved scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily of protein receptors. Available evidence indicates that S5D-SRCRB interacts with conserved microbial cell wall components, as well as with some endogenous...... proteins, and presents a restricted tissue expression pattern. This study further analyzes the expression of S5D-SRCRB along the mouse urogenital tract. Immunohistochemical staining for S5D-SRCRB was observed in spermatocytes from seminiferous tubules and in the epithelial surface from urethra and bladder......, as well as in kidney tubules, mainly from medulla and papilla. Double stainings showed that S5D-SRCRB is expressed in both principal (P) and intercalated (IC) cells from renal collecting ducts (CD). By using an in vitro cell model of IC cell differentiation, preferential expression of S5D...

  4. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on human B-lymphoma cells

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    Skok M. V.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To find a correlation between the level of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR expression and B lymphocyte differentiation or activation state. Methods. Expression of nAChRs in the REH, Ramos and Daudi cell lines was studied by flow cytometry using nAChR subunit-specific antibodies; cell proliferation was studied by MTT test. Results. It is shown that the level of 42/4 and 7 nAChRs expression increased along with B lymphocyte differentiation (Ramos > REH and activation (Daudi > > Ramos and depended on the antigen-specific receptor expression. The nAChR stimulation/blockade did not influence the intensity of cell proliferation.

  5. METHODS FOR RECOMBINANT EXPRESSION AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN CANNABINOID RECEPTOR CB2

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    Alexei A. Yeliseev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptor CB2 is a seven transmembrane-domain integral membrane protein that belongs to a large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. CB2 is a part of the endocannabinoid system that plays vital role in regulation of immune response, inflammation, pain sensitivity, obesity and other physiological responses. Information about the structure and mechanisms of functioning of this receptor in cell membranes is essential for the rational development of specific pharmaceuticals. Here we review the methodology for recombinant expression, purification, stabilization and biochemical characterization of CB2 suitable for preparation of multi-milligram quantities of functionally active receptor. The biotechnological protocols include expression of the recombinant CB2 in E. coli cells as a fusion with the maltose binding protein, stabilization with a high affinity ligand and a derivative of cholesterol in detergent micelles, efficient purification by tandem affinity chromatography, and reconstitution of the receptor into lipid bilayers. The purified recombinant CB2 receptor is amenable to functional and structural studies including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a wide range of biochemical and biophysical techniques.

  6. High-level expression of a full-length Eph receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavilainen, Sari; Grandy, David; Karelehto, Eveliina; Chang, Elizabeth; Susi, Petri; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Nikolov, Dimitar; Himanen, Juha

    2013-11-01

    Eph receptors are the largest family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases containing a single membrane-spanning segment. They are involved in a various developmental and cell-cell communication events. Although there is extensive structural information available on both the extra- and intracellular regions of Eph's in isolation, no structures are available for the entire receptor. To facilitate structural studies on functionally relevant Eph/ephrin complexes, we have developed an expression system for producing the full-length human EphA2 receptor. We successfully expressed milligram amounts of the receptor using baculovirus-based vector and insect cells. We were also able to extract the protein from the cell membranes and purify it to near homogeneity in two simple steps. The purified receptor was shown to retain its biological activity in terms of both binding to its functional ligands and being able to auto-phosphorylate the key tyrosine residues of the cytoplasmic kinase domain. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in the cervical spinal cord of wobbler mice

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    Corsi Massimiliano M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The localisation of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits was studied in a model of degeneration of cervical spinal motoneurons, the wobbler mouse. Cervical regions from early or late symptomatic wobbler mice (4 or 12 weeks of age were compared to lumbar tracts (unaffected and to those of healthy mice. Results No differences were found in the distribution of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits at both ages. Western blots analysis showed a trend of reduction in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits, mainly GluR1 and NR2A, exclusively in the cervical region of late symptomatic mice in the triton-insoluble post-synaptic fraction but not whole homogenates. Colocalisation experiments evidenced the expression of GluR1 and NR2A receptors in activated astrocytes from the cervical spinal cord of wobbler mice, GluR2 did not colocalise with GFAP positive cells. No differences were found in the expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in the lumbar tract of wobbler mice, where neither motoneuron loss nor reactive gliosis occurs. Conclusion In late symptomatic wobbler mice altered levels of GluR1 and NR2A receptor subunits may be a consequence of motoneuron loss rather than an early feature of motoneuron vulnerability.

  8. Kokumi substances, enhancers of basic tastes, induce responses in calcium-sensing receptor expressing taste cells.

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    Yutaka Maruyama

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is a receptor for kokumi substances, which enhance the intensities of salty, sweet and umami tastes. Furthermore, we found that several γ-glutamyl peptides, which are CaSR agonists, are kokumi substances. In this study, we elucidated the receptor cells for kokumi substances, and their physiological properties. For this purpose, we used Calcium Green-1 loaded mouse taste cells in lingual tissue slices and confocal microscopy. Kokumi substances, applied focally around taste pores, induced an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](i in a subset of taste cells. These responses were inhibited by pretreatment with the CaSR inhibitor, NPS2143. However, the kokumi substance-induced responses did not require extracellular Ca(2+. CaSR-expressing taste cells are a different subset of cells from the T1R3-expressing umami or sweet taste receptor cells. These observations indicate that CaSR-expressing taste cells are the primary detectors of kokumi substances, and that they are an independent population from the influenced basic taste receptor cells, at least in the case of sweet and umami.

  9. Calyx and dimorphic neurons of mouse Scarpa's ganglion express histamine H3 receptors

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    Zucca Gianpiero

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histamine-related drugs are commonly used in the treatment of vertigo and related vestibular disorders. The site of action of these drugs however has not been elucidated yet. Recent works on amphibians showed that histamine H3 receptor antagonists, e.g. betahistine, inhibit the afferent discharge recorded from the vestibular nerve. To assess the expression of H3 histamine receptors in vestibular neurons, we performed mRNA RT-PCR and immunofluorescence experiments in mouse Scarpa's ganglia. Results RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of H3 receptor mRNA in mouse ganglia tissue. H3 protein expression was found in vestibular neurons characterized by large and roundish soma, which labeled for calretinin and calbindin. Conclusion The present results are consistent with calyx and dimorphic, but not bouton, afferent vestibular neurons expressing H3 receptors. This study provides a molecular substrate for the effects of histamine-related antivertigo drugs acting on (or binding to H3 receptors, and suggest a potential target for the treatment of vestibular disorders of peripheral origin.

  10. Expression of cholecystokinin, gastrin, and their receptors in the mouse cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Coto, Ana F; Alonso-Ron, Carlos; Alcalde, Ignacio; Gallar, Juana; Meana, Álvaro; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Belmonte, Carlos

    2014-03-28

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide that has been identified in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Gastrin (GAST) is a related peptide never explored in the cornea. The presence and role of both gastrointestinal peptides in the cornea and corneal sensory neurons remain to be established. We explored here in mice whether CCK, GAST, and their receptors CCK1R and CCK2R are expressed in the corneal epithelium and trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the cornea. We used RT-PCR analysis to detect mRNAs of CCK, GAST, CCK1R, and CCK2R in mouse cornea epithelium, trigeminal ganglia, and primary cultured corneal epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to localize these peptides and their receptors in the cornea, cultured corneal epithelial cells, and corneal nerves, as well as in the cell bodies of corneal trigeminal ganglion neurons identified by retrograde labeling with Fast Blue. Mouse corneal epithelial cells in the cornea in situ and in cell cultures expressed CCK and GAST. Only the receptor CCK2R was found in the corneal epithelium. In addition, mouse corneal afferent sensory neurons expressed CCK and GAST, and the CCK1R receptors. The presence of CCK, GAST, and their receptors in the mouse corneal epithelium, and in trigeminal ganglion neurons supplying sensory innervation to the cornea, opens the possibility that these neuropeptides are involved in corneal neurogenic inflammation and in the modulation of repairing/remodeling processes following corneal injury.

  11. Uterine and placental expression of canine oxytocin receptor during pregnancy and normal and induced parturition.

    OpenAIRE

    Gram A Boos A Kowalewski MP.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Oxytocin (OT) plays an important role as an inducer of uterine contractility acting together with its receptor (OTR) to increase synthesis of prostaglandins. Although OT is commonly used in the treatment for dystocia and uterine inertia in the bitch little attention has been paid to the role of OT in mechanisms regulating parturition in the dog so that knowledge about the expression of OTR in the canine uterus and placenta is sparse. Consequently the expression and cellular localizat...

  12. Spatially restricted expression of candidate taste receptors in the Drosophila gustatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunipace, L; Meister, S; McNealy, C; Amrein, H

    2001-06-05

    Taste is an important sensory modality in most animals. In Drosophila, taste is perceived by gustatory neurons located in sensilla distributed on several different appendages throughout the body of the animal. Here we show that the gustatory receptors are encoded by a family of at least 54 genes (Gr genes), most of which are expressed exclusively in a small subset of taste sensilla located in narrowly defined regions of the fly's body. BLAST searches with the predicted amino acid sequences of 6 7-transmembrane-receptor genes of unknown function and 20 previously identified, putative gustatory receptor genes led to the identification of a large gene family comprising at least 54 genes. We investigated the expression of eight genes by using a Gal4 reporter gene assay and found that five of them were expressed in the gustatory system of the fly. Four genes were expressed in 1%-4% of taste sensilla, located in well-defined regions of the proboscis, the legs, or both. The fifth gene was expressed in about 20% of taste sensilla in all major gustatory organs, including the taste bristles on the anterior wing margin. Axon-tracing experiments demonstrated that neurons expressing a given Gr gene project their axons to a spatially restricted domain of the subesophageal ganglion in the fly brain. Our findings suggest that each taste sensillum represents a discrete, functional unit expressing at least one Gr receptor and that most Gr genes are expressed in spatially restricted domains of the gustatory system. These observations imply the potential for high taste discrimination of the Drosophila brain.

  13. Expression of neuropeptide receptor mRNA during osteoblastic differentiation of mouse iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Satomi; Goto, Tetsuya; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Joujima, Takaaki; Egusa, Hiroshi; Yatani, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Maki, Kenshi

    2014-12-01

    Various studies have shown a relationship between nerves and bones. Recent evidence suggests that both sensory and sympathetic nerves affect bone metabolism; however, little is known about how neuropeptides are involved in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into osteoblastic (OB) cells. To evaluate the putative effects of neuropeptides during the differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into calcified tissue-forming OB cells, we investigated the expression patterns of neuropeptide receptors at each differentiation stage. Mouse iPS cells were seeded onto feeder cells and then transferred to low-attachment culture dishes to form embryoid bodies (EBs). EBs were cultured for 4 weeks in osteoblastic differentiation medium. The expression of α1-adrenergic receptor (AR), α2-AR, β2-AR, neuropeptide Y1 receptor (NPY1-R), neuropeptide Y2 receptor (NPY2-R), calcitonin gene-related protein receptor (CGRP-R), and neurokinin 1-R (NK1-R) was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. Among these neuropeptide receptors, CGRP-R and β2-AR were expressed at all stages of cell differentiation, including the iPS cell stage, with peak expression occurring at the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. Another sensory nervous system receptor, NK1-R, was expressed mainly in the late osteoblastic differentiation stage. Furthermore, CGRP-R mRNA showed an additional small peak corresponding to EBs cultured for 3 days, suggesting that EBs may be affected by serum CGRP. These data suggest that the sensory nervous system receptor CGRP-R and the sympathetic nervous system receptor β2-AR may be involved in the differentiation of iPS cells into the osteoblastic lineage. It follows from these findings that CGRP and β2-AR may regulate cell differentiation in the iPS and EB stages, and that each neuropeptide has an optimal period of influence during the differentiation process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  14. Expression of taste receptors in Solitary Chemosensory Cells of rodent airways

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    Sbarbati Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical irritation of airway mucosa elicits a variety of reflex responses such as coughing, apnea, and laryngeal closure. Inhaled irritants can activate either chemosensitive free nerve endings, laryngeal taste buds or solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs. The SCC population lies in the nasal respiratory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, and larynx, as well as deeper in the airway. The objective of this study is to map the distribution of SCCs within the airways and to determine the elements of the chemosensory transduction cascade expressed in these SCCs. Methods We utilized a combination of immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques (rtPCR and in situ hybridization on rats and transgenic mice where the Tas1R3 or TRPM5 promoter drives expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP. Results Epithelial SCCs specialized for chemoreception are distributed throughout much of the respiratory tree of rodents. These cells express elements of the taste transduction cascade, including Tas1R and Tas2R receptor molecules, α-gustducin, PLCβ2 and TrpM5. The Tas2R bitter taste receptors are present throughout the entire respiratory tract. In contrast, the Tas1R sweet/umami taste receptors are expressed by numerous SCCs in the nasal cavity, but decrease in prevalence in the trachea, and are absent in the lower airways. Conclusions Elements of the taste transduction cascade including taste receptors are expressed by SCCs distributed throughout the airways. In the nasal cavity, SCCs, expressing Tas1R and Tas2R taste receptors, mediate detection of irritants and foreign substances which trigger trigeminally-mediated protective airway reflexes. Lower in the respiratory tract, similar chemosensory cells are not related to the trigeminal nerve but may still trigger local epithelial responses to irritants. In total, SCCs should be considered chemoreceptor cells that help in preventing damage to the respiratory tract caused by inhaled irritants and

  15. Characterization of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Longueville, Sophie; De Bundel, Dimitri; Perroy, Julie; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    The hippocampal formation is part of an anatomical system critically involved in learning and memory. Increasing evidence suggests that dopamine plays an important role in learning and memory as well as in several forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the precise identification of neuronal populations expressing D1 or D2 dopamine receptors within the hippocampus is still lacking. To clarify this issue, we used BAC transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the promoter of dopamine D1 or D2 receptors. In Drd1a-EGFP mice, sparse GFP-expressing neurons were detected among glutamatergic projecting neurons of the granular layer of the dentate gyrus and GABAergic interneurons located in the hilus. A dense immunofluorescence was observed in the outer and medial part of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus as well as in the inner part of the molecular layer of CA1 corresponding to the terminals of pyramidal neurons of the entorhinal cortex defining the perforant and the temporo-ammonic pathway respectively. Finally, scattered D1 receptor-expressing neurons were also identified as GABAergic interneurons in the CA3/CA1 fields of the hippocampus. In Drd2-EGFP transgenic mice, GFP was exclusively detected in the glutamatergic mossy cells located in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus. This pattern was confirmed in Drd2-Cre mice crossed with NLS-LacZ-Tau(mGFP) :LoxP and RCE:LoxP reporter lines. Our results demonstrate that D1 and D2 receptor-expressing neurons are strictly segregated in the mouse hippocampus. By clarifying the identity of D1 and D2 receptor-expressing neurons in the hippocampus, this study establishes a basis for future investigations aiming at elucidating their roles in the hippocampal network. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Captodiamine, a putative antidepressant, enhances hypothalamic BDNF expression in vivo by synergistic 5-HT2c receptor antagonism and sigma-1 receptor agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Rebecca M; Regan, Ciaran M

    2013-10-01

    The putative antidepressant captodiamine is a 5-HT2c receptor antagonist and agonist at sigma-1 and D3 dopamine receptors, exerts an anti-immobility action in the forced swim paradigm, and enhances dopamine turnover in the frontal cortex. Captodiamine has also been found to ameliorate stress-induced anhedonia, reduce the associated elevations of hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and restore the reductions in hypothalamic BDNF expression. Here we demonstrate chronic administration of captodiamine to have no significant effect on hypothalamic CRF expression through sigma-1 receptor agonism; however, both sigma-1 receptor agonism or 5-HT2c receptor antagonism were necessary to enhance BDNF expression. Regulation of BDNF expression by captodiamine was associated with increased phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB and mediated through sigma-1 receptor agonism but blocked by 5-HT2c receptor antagonism. The existence of two separate signalling pathways was confirmed by immunolocalisation of each receptor to distinct cell populations in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Increased BDNF induced by captodiamine was also associated with enhanced expression of synapsin, but not PSD-95, suggesting induction of long-term structural plasticity between hypothalamic synapses. These unique features of captodiamine may contribute to its ability to ameliorate stress-induced anhedonia as the hypothalamus plays a prominent role in regulating HPA axis activity.

  17. Expression of HIV receptors, alternate receptors and co-receptors on tonsillar epithelium: implications for HIV binding and primary oral infection

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    Maher Diane M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary HIV infection can develop from exposure to HIV in the oral cavity. In previous studies, we have documented rapid and extensive binding of HIV virions in seminal plasma to intact mucosal surfaces of the palatine tonsil and also found that virions readily penetrated beneath the tissue surfaces. As one approach to understand the molecular interactions that support HIV virion binding to human mucosal surfaces, we have examined the distribution of the primary HIV receptor CD4, the alternate HIV receptors heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HS and galactosyl ceramide (GalCer and the co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 in palatine tonsil. Results Only HS was widely expressed on the surface of stratified squamous epithelium. In contrast, HS, GalCer, CXCR4 and CCR5 were all expressed on the reticulated epithelium lining the tonsillar crypts. We have observed extensive variability, both across tissue sections from any tonsil and between tonsils, in the distribution of epithelial cells expressing either CXCR4 or CCR5 in the basal and suprabasal layers of stratified epithelium. The general expression patterns of CXCR4, CCR5 and HS were similar in palatine tonsil from children and adults (age range 3–20. We have also noted the presence of small clusters of lymphocytes, including CD4+ T cells within stratified epithelium and located precisely at the mucosal surfaces. CD4+ T cells in these locations would be immediately accessible to HIV virions. Conclusion In total, the likelihood of oral HIV transmission will be determined by macro and micro tissue architecture, cell surface expression patterns of key molecules that may bind HIV and the specific properties of the infectious inoculum.

  18. Dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors induces fos expression within restricted regions of the neonatal female rat brain.

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    Kristin M Olesen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Steroid receptor activation in the developing brain influences a variety of cellular processes that endure into adulthood, altering both behavior and physiology. Recent data suggests that dopamine can regulate expression of progestin receptors within restricted regions of the developing rat brain by activating estrogen receptors in a ligand-independent manner. It is unclear whether changes in neuronal activity induced by dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors are also region specific. To investigate this question, we examined where the dopamine D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 38393, altered Fos expression via estrogen receptor activation. We report that dopamine D1-like receptor agonist treatment increased Fos protein expression within many regions of the developing female rat brain. More importantly, prior treatment with an estrogen receptor antagonist partially reduced D1-like receptor agonist-induced Fos expression only within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the central amygdala. These data suggest that dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors alters neuronal activity within restricted regions of the developing rat brain. This implies that ligand-independent activation of estrogen receptors by dopamine might organize a unique set of behaviors during brain development in contrast to the more wide spread ligand activation of estrogen receptors by estrogen.

  19. Dopaminergic Activation of Estrogen Receptors Induces Fos Expression within Restricted Regions of the Neonatal Female Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Kristin M.; Auger, Anthony P.

    2008-01-01

    Steroid receptor activation in the developing brain influences a variety of cellular processes that endure into adulthood, altering both behavior and physiology. Recent data suggests that dopamine can regulate expression of progestin receptors within restricted regions of the developing rat brain by activating estrogen receptors in a ligand-independent manner. It is unclear whether changes in neuronal activity induced by dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors are also region specific. To investigate this question, we examined where the dopamine D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 38393, altered Fos expression via estrogen receptor activation. We report that dopamine D1-like receptor agonist treatment increased Fos protein expression within many regions of the developing female rat brain. More importantly, prior treatment with an estrogen receptor antagonist partially reduced D1-like receptor agonist-induced Fos expression only within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the central amygdala. These data suggest that dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors alters neuronal activity within restricted regions of the developing rat brain. This implies that ligand-independent activation of estrogen receptors by dopamine might organize a unique set of behaviors during brain development in contrast to the more wide spread ligand activation of estrogen receptors by estrogen. PMID:18478050

  20. Expression of the short chain fatty acid receptor GPR41/FFAR3 in autonomic and somatic sensory ganglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Mark Klitgaard; Egerod, K L; Christiansen, S H

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor 41 (GPR41) also called free fatty acid receptor 3 (FFAR3) is a Gαi-coupled receptor activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) mainly produced from dietary complex carbohydrate fibers in the large intestine as products of fermentation by microbiota. FFAR3 is expressed...

  1. Urantide mimics urotensin-II induced calcium release in cells expressing recombinant UT receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, Valeria; Song, Wei; Marzola, Erika; Spagnol, Martina; Guerrini, Remo; Salvadori, Severo; Regoli, Domenico; Thompson, Jonathan P; Rowbotham, David J; Behm, David J; Douglas, Stephen A; Calo', Girolamo; Lambert, David G

    2004-09-13

    Urotensin-II is the natural ligand of the UT receptor. This novel system is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular functions. Recently, a urotensin-II analog ([Pen5,DTrp7,Orn8]urotensin-II(4-11)) named urantide, has been proposed as a selective and potent UT receptor antagonist. In order to pharmacologically characterize this new compound, urantide was tested on the native UT receptors of the rat aorta and on the human recombinant receptors expressed in CHO cells (CHO(hUT)). Indeed, urantide behaves as a competitive, potent (pA2 8.24), and pure antagonist in the rat aorta bioassay, while as an agonist (pEC50 8.11) in a calcium mobilization assay performed in CHO(hUT) cells. Urantide should be considered a low efficacy partial agonist.

  2. Concerted gene expression of hippocampal steroid receptors during spatial learning in male Wistar rats: a correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert eLubec

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal and gonadal steroid receptor activities are significantly involved and interact in the regulation of learning, memory and stress. Thus, a coordinated expression of steroid receptor genes during a learning task can be expected. Although coexpression of steroid receptors in response to behavioral tasks has been reported the correlative connection is unclear. According to the inverted U-shape model of the impact of stress upon learning and memory we hypothesized that glucocorticoid receptor expression should be correlated to corticosterone levels in a linear or higher order manner. Other cognition modulating steroid receptors like estrogen receptors should be correlated to glucocorticoid receptors in a quadratic manner, which describes a parabola and thus a U-shaped connection. Therefore, we performed a correlational meta-analyis of data of a previous study (Meyer and Korz, 2013a of steroid receptor gene expressions during spatial learning, which provides a sufficient data basis in order to perform such correlational connections. In that study male rats of different ages were trained in a spatial holeboard or remained untrained and the hippocampal gene expression of different steroid receptors as well as serum corticosterone levels were measured. Expressions of mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid (GR receptors were positively and linearly correlated with blood serum corticosterone levels in spatially trained but not in untrained animals. Training induced a cubic (best fit relationship between mRNA levels of estrogen receptor α (ERα and androgen receptor (AR with MR mRNA. GR gene expression was linearly correlated with MR expression under both conditions. ERα m RNA levels were negatively and linearily and MR and GR gene expressions were cubicely correlated with reference memory errors (RME. Due to only three age classes correlations with age could not be performed. The findings support the U-shape theory of steroid receptor

  3. Functional role of acetylcholine and the expression of cholinergic receptors and components in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Takahiro; Chida, Dai; Nakamoto, Norimichi; Hori, Naoko; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sakata, Yasuaki; Tomaru, Yasuhisa; Iwata, Takanori; Usui, Michihiko; Aiko, Katsuya; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2010-02-19

    Recent studies have indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) plays a vital role in various tissues, while the role of ACh in bone metabolism remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that ACh induced cell proliferation and reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity via nicotinic (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in osteoblasts. We detected mRNA expression of several nAChRs and mAChRs. Furthermore, we showed that cholinergic components were up-regulated and subunits/subtypes of acetylcholine receptors altered during osteoblast differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that osteoblasts express specific acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic components and that ACh plays a possible role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic T-lymphocyte chemokine receptor expression induced by interferon-beta therapy in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, M; Sorensen, P S; Khademi, M

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with interferon (IFN)-beta reduces clinical disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Using flow cytometry, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a real-time polymerase chain reaction, we studied in vivo IFN-beta-induced effects on CD4(+) T-lymphocyte chemokine receptor expression...... and immunoregulatory genes. In conclusion, IFN-beta treatment caused 'steady-state' increases of several chemokine receptors relevant for CD4(+) T-lymphocyte trafficking and function, possibly facilitating lymphocyte migration into the CNS. An important therapeutic effect of IFN-beta treatment may be the normalization...... as these influence central nervous system (CNS) transmigration and inflammation. At 'steady state' (>/=1 day after the most recent IFN-beta injection), IFN-beta treatment increased CD4(+) T-cell surface expression of CC chemokine receptor (CCR)4, CCR5 and CCR7 after 3 months of treatment, whereas that of CXC...

  5. Novel primary thymic defect with T lymphocytes expressing gamma delta T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Pallesen, G; Platz, P

    1989-01-01

    Flow cytometric analysis of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a six year old girl with a primary cellular immune deficiency showed a normal fraction of CD3 positive T cells. Most (70%) of the CD3 positive cells, however, expressed the gamma delta and not the alpha beta T cell receptor....... Immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that most of the gamma delta T cell receptors existed as disulphide-linked heterodimers. Proliferative responses to mitogens were severely reduced, but specific antibody responses after vaccination could be detected...... deficiency associated with a high proportion of T cells expressing the gamma delta T cell receptor has been described in nude mice, and it is suggested that the immune deficiency of this patient may represent a human analogue....

  6. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuch, Carlos; Carro, Eva

    2011-05-11

    The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR.

  7. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Results Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. Conclusions The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR. PMID:21569322

  8. Efficient silkworm expression of human GPCR (nociceptin receptor) by a Bombyx mori bacmid DNA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Kaori [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Wakimoto, Yoshitaro; Toyooka, Masaru [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa [National Institute of Genetics, 1111 Yata, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540 (Japan); Takeda, Shigeki [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Park, Enoch Y. [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Integrated Bioscience Section, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Oya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Maenaka, Katsumi, E-mail: kmaenaka-umin@umin.net [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-07-31

    Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently expressed by a baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). We recently established a novel BEVS using the bacmid system of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), which is directly applicable for protein expression in silkworms. Here, we report the first example of GPCR expression in silkworms by the simple injection of BmNPV bacmid DNA. Human nociceptin receptor, an inhibitory GPCR, and its fusion protein with inhibitory G protein alpha subunit (G{sub i}{alpha}) were both successfully expressed in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae as well as in the BmNPV viral fraction. Its yield was much higher than that from Sf9 cells. The microsomal fractions including the nociceptin receptor fusion, which are easily prepared by only centrifugation steps, exhibited [{sup 35}S]GTP{gamma}S-binding activity upon specific stimulation by nociceptin. Therefore, this rapid method is easy-to-use and has a high expression level, and thus will be an important tool for human GPCR production.

  9. Distribution and Expression of Non-Neuronal Transient Receptor Potential (TRPV) Ion Channels in Rosacea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulk, Mathias; Seeliger, Stephan; Aubert, Jerome; Schwab, Verena D.; Cevikbas, Ferda; Rivier, Michel; Nowak, Pawel; Voegel, Johannes J.; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Rosacea is a frequent chronic inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Because early rosacea reveals all characteristics of neurogenic inflammation, a central role of sensory nerves in its pathophysiology has been discussed. Neuroinflammatory mediators and their receptors involved in rosacea are poorly defined. Good candidates may be transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of vanilloid type (TRPV), which can be activated by many trigger factors of rosacea. Interestingly, TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4 are expressed by both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we analyzed the expression and distribution of TRPV receptors in the various subtypes of rosacea on non-neuronal cells using immunohistochemistry, morphometry, double immunoflourescence, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) as compared with healthy skin and lupus erythematosus. Our results show that dermal immunolabeling of TRPV2 and TRPV3 and gene expression of TRPV1 is significantly increased in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR). Papulopustular rosacea (PPR) displayed an enhanced immunoreactivity for TRPV2, TRPV4, and also of TRPV2 gene expression. In phymatous rosacea (PhR)-affected skin, dermal immunostaining of TRPV3 and TRPV4 and gene expression of TRPV1 and TRPV3 was enhanced, whereas epidermal TRPV2 staining was decreased. Thus, dysregulation of TRPV channels also expressed by non-neuronal cells may be critically involved in the initiation and/or development of rosacea. TRP ion channels may be targets for the treatment of rosacea. PMID:22189789

  10. TREM-2 Receptor Expression Increases with 25(OHD Vitamin Serum Levels in Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bucova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available TREM-1 and TREM-2 molecules are members of the TREM transmembrane glycoproteins. In our previous study we identified increased expressions of TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptors in pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS. Only a few studies concerning the association between vitamin D and TREM receptor expression can be found. The aim of our current study was to determine the association between the levels of an inactive form of 25(OHD vitamin and TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptor expressions. We have detected low levels of 25(OHD vitamin in 79% of PS patients. Only 21% of patients had normal serum level of 25(OHD vitamin with values clustered within the low-normal range. The most striking findings were the increased TREM-2 expressions on myeloid cells surfaces in BALF of PS patients with normal 25(OHD vitamin serum levels compared with those with its decreased levels. The total number of TREM-2 positive cells was 5.7 times higher and the percentage of TREM-2 positive cells was also significantly increased in BALF of PS patients with normal compared to PS patients with low 25(OHD vitamin serum levels. A significant correlation between total TREM-2 expression and vitamin D levels has been detected too. However, we have not detected similar differences in TREM-1expression and 25(OHD vitamin serum levels.

  11. Distribution and expression of non-neuronal transient receptor potential (TRPV) ion channels in rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulk, Mathias; Seeliger, Stephan; Aubert, Jerome; Schwab, Verena D; Cevikbas, Ferda; Rivier, Michel; Nowak, Pawel; Voegel, Johannes J; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Steinhoff, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Rosacea is a frequent chronic inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Because early rosacea reveals all characteristics of neurogenic inflammation, a central role of sensory nerves in its pathophysiology has been discussed. Neuroinflammatory mediators and their receptors involved in rosacea are poorly defined. Good candidates may be transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of vanilloid type (TRPV), which can be activated by many trigger factors of rosacea. Interestingly, TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4 are expressed by both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we analyzed the expression and distribution of TRPV receptors in the various subtypes of rosacea on non-neuronal cells using immunohistochemistry, morphometry, double immunoflourescence, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) as compared with healthy skin and lupus erythematosus. Our results show that dermal immunolabeling of TRPV2 and TRPV3 and gene expression of TRPV1 is significantly increased in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR). Papulopustular rosacea (PPR) displayed an enhanced immunoreactivity for TRPV2, TRPV4, and also of TRPV2 gene expression. In phymatous rosacea (PhR)-affected skin, dermal immunostaining of TRPV3 and TRPV4 and gene expression of TRPV1 and TRPV3 was enhanced, whereas epidermal TRPV2 staining was decreased. Thus, dysregulation of TRPV channels also expressed by non-neuronal cells may be critically involved in the initiation and/or development of rosacea. TRP ion channels may be targets for the treatment of rosacea.

  12. Altered GABAA Receptor Subunit Expression and Pharmacology in Human Angelman Syndrome Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, William H.; Peugh, Lindsey D.; Jansen, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome is most frequently caused by deletion of the maternally-derived chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which includes not only the causative UBE3A gene, but also the β3-α5-γ3 GABAA receptor subunit gene cluster. GABAergic dysfunction has been hypothesized to contribute to the occurrence of epilepsy and cognitive and behavioral impairments in this condition. In the present study, analysis of GABAA receptor subunit expression and pharmacology was performed in cerebral cortex from four subjects with Angelman syndrome and compared to that from control tissue. The membrane fraction of frozen postmortem neocortical tissue was isolated and subjected to quantitative Western blot analysis. The ratios of β3/β2 and α5/α1 subunit protein expression in Angelman syndrome cortex were significantly decreased when compared with controls. An additional membrane fraction was injected into Xenopus oocytes, resulting in incorporation of the brain membrane vesicles with their associated receptors into the oocyte cellular membrane. Two-electrode voltage clamp analysis of GABAA receptor currents was then performed. Studies of GABAA receptor pharmacology in Angelman syndrome cortex revealed increased current enhancement by the α1-selective benzodiazepine site agonist zolpidem and by the barbiturate phenobarbital, while sensitivity to current inhibition by zinc was decreased. GABAA receptor affinity and modulation by neurosteroids were unchanged. This shift in GABAA receptor subunit expression and pharmacology in Angelman syndrome is consistent with impaired extrasynaptic but intact to augmented synaptic cortical GABAergic inhibition, which could contribute to the epileptic, behavioral, and cognitive phenotypes of the disorder. PMID:20692323

  13. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callihan Phillip

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors.

  14. LH-Receptor Gene Expression in Human Granulosa and Cumulus Cells from Antral and Preovulatory Follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Janni Vikkelsø; Kristensen, Stine Gry; Nielsen, Maria Eilsø

    2012-01-01

    Context:Human granulosa cells (GC) acquire LH receptor (LHR) expression during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Currently, the precise follicular stage is unknown, and specific roles of LH in the follicular development are not fully understood.Objective:Our objective was to measure LH...

  15. A novel brain receptor is expressed in a distinct population of olfactory sensory neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conzelmann, S; Levai, O; Bode, B; Eisel, U; Raming, K; Breer, H; Strotmann, J

    2000-01-01

    Three novel G-protein-coupled receptor genes related to the previously described RA1c gene have been isolated from the mouse genome. Expression of these genes has been detected in distinct areas of the brain and also in the olfactory epithelium of the nose. Developmental studies revealed a

  16. Expression of CNTF receptor-alpha in chick violet-sensitive cones with unique morphologic properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seydewitz, V.; Rothermel, A.; Fuhrmann, S.; Schneider, A.J.; Grip, W.J. de; Layer, P.G.; Hofmann, H.D.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Application of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) can rescue mature photoreceptors from lesion-induced and hereditary degeneration. In the chick retina, expression of the CNTF receptor is present in a subpopulation of photoreceptor cells. The present study was undertaken to identify the

  17. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex...

  18. Fcγ receptor expression on splenic macrophages in adult immune thrombocytopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audia, S; Santegoets, K; Laarhoven, A G; Vidarsson, G; Facy, O; Ortega-Deballon, P; Samson, M; Janikashvili, N; Saas, P; Bonnotte, B; Radstake, T R

    2017-01-01

    Splenic macrophages play a key role in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) pathogenesis by clearing opsonized platelets. Fcγ receptors (FcγR) participate in this phenomenon, but their expression on splenic macrophages and their modulation by treatment have scarcely been studied in human ITP. We aimed to

  19. Surface Expression of NMDA Receptor Changes during Memory Consolidation in the Crab "Neohelice granulata"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin; Pedreira, Maria Eugenia; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab "Neohelice granulata". Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of…

  20. Androgen, estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in the human uterus during the menstrual cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, HJMM; Heineman, MJ; Theunissen, PHMH; de Jong, FH; Evers, JLH

    Cyclic changes in steroid receptor expression in endometrial cells are considered a reflection of its differential functions. Besides estrogen and progestogens, androgens have also been suggested to affect the biological function of the female reproductive tract. We investigated the distribution and

  1. INCREASED EXPRESSION OF RECEPTORS FOR OREXIGENIC FACTORS IN NODOSE GANGLION OF DIET-INDUCED OBESE RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vagal afferent pathway is important in short-term regulation of food intake and decreased activation of this neural pathway with long-term ingestion of a high fat diet may contribute to hyperphagic weight gain. We test the hypothesis that expression of genes encoding receptors for orexigenic fac...

  2. Pulsatile atheroprone shear stress affects the expression of transient receptor potential channels in human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Vorderwülbecke, Bernd J; Marki, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the study was to assess whether pulsatile atheroprone shear stress modulates the expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPM7, and TRPV1 mRNA, in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Exposure of cultured vascular endothelial cells to defined...

  3. [Learning and Memory Capacity and NMDA Receptor Expression in Shen Deficiency Constitution Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-ru; Sun, Yao-guang; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Xiao-di; Wang, Xing; Sun, Li-jun

    2016-05-01

    To explore material bases and neurobiological mechanisms of "Shen storing will" by observing learning and memory capacities and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor expressions in Shen deficiency constitution (SDC) rats. Totally 40 SD rats were randomly divided into the model group, the Zuogui Pill (ZP) group, the Yougui Pill (YP) group, the blank control group (consisting of normal pregnant rats), 10 in each group. SDC young rat model (inherent deficiency and postnatal malnutrition) was prepared by the classic way of "cat scaring rat". Medication started when they were scared by cat. Rats in the ZP group and the YP group were administered by gastrogavage with ZP suspension 0.1875 g/mL and YP suspension 0.0938 g/mL respectively. Equal volume of normal saline was administered to rats in the blank control group and the model group by gastrogavage. All medication was given once per day, 5 days in a week for 2 consecutive months. Learning and memory capacities were detected by Morris water maze test. Expressions of NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B in hippocamus were detected by immunohistochemical method. Compared with the blank control group, the latency period, total distance in Morris water maze test were longer in the model group (P learning and memory capacities and lowered NMDA receptor expressions. ZP and YP could up-regulate learning and memory capacities and NMDA receptor expressions, thereby improving deterioration of brain functions in SDC rats.

  4. Re-evaluation of the prolactin receptor expression in human breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun; Folkesson, Charlotta Grånäs

    2009-01-01

    The pituitary hormone PRL is involved in tumorigenesis in rodents and humans. PRL promotes proliferation, survival and migration of cancer cells acting via the PRL receptor (PRLR). Aiming to perform a large-scale immunohistochemical (IHC) screening of human mammary carcinomas for PRLR expression,...

  5. Studying NK cell lectin receptors and their interactions using HEK293T eukaryotic expression system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, O.; Celadová, P.; Kolenko, Petr; Dohnálek, Jan; Bezouška, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Suppl. 1 (2009), s. 170 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress "Life´s Molecular Interactions /34./. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : NK cell lectin receptors * HEK293T * eukaryotic expression system Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  6. Increased expression of endothelin B receptor in static stretch exposed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Gam; Zhao, J.; Yang, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical stretch on the expression of ET-1 and ETA- and ETB-receptors in porcine mitral valve leaflets. Leaflet segments from 10 porcine mitral valves were exposed to a static stretch load of 1.5 N for 3.5 h in buffer at 37oC together with mat...... of the pathogenesis of myxomatous mitral valve disease.......The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical stretch on the expression of ET-1 and ETA- and ETB-receptors in porcine mitral valve leaflets. Leaflet segments from 10 porcine mitral valves were exposed to a static stretch load of 1.5 N for 3.5 h in buffer at 37oC together...... 1.37 and 2.70) vs. median 1.56 (quartiles 1.38 and 2.17, P=0.03) whereas the mRNA expression of ETA-receptors (P=0.90) and ET-1 (P=0.51) remained unchanged. Stretch increased the expression of ETB-receptors in porcine mitral valve leaflets. The finding could lead to a better understanding...

  7. Expression of urokinase receptors by human trophoblast. A histochemical and ultrastructural analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Mazar, A; Cines, D B

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Through their ability to invade endometrium, remodel the uterine spiral arteries, and sustain placental blood fluidity, trophoblast cells play a central role in establishing and maintaining the integrity of the uteroplacental vasculature. The expression of urokinase receptors by troph...... a physiologic adaptation to diminish local fibrinolysis and limit hemorrhage at parturition....

  8. Kappa Opioid Receptors Mediate where Fear Is Expressed Following Extinction Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P.

    2011-01-01

    Six experiments used a within-subjects renewal design to examine the involvement of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in regulating the expression and recovery of extinguished fear. Rats were trained to fear a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) via pairings with foot shock in a distinctive context (A). This was followed by extinction training of the CS in…

  9. Differential expression of inhibitory and activating CD94/NKG2 receptors on NK cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostjan, Christine; Bellón, Teresa; Sobanov, Yuri; López-Botet, Miguel; Hofer, Erhard

    2002-06-01

    Natural killer cells are known to express a variety of surface receptors involved in HLA class I monitoring. It is thus of interest to investigate the clonal distribution and relative expression levels of activating versus inhibitory NK receptors. We have developed a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay designed to determine specific and absolute mRNA levels for NKG2-A/B, -C, -E, -F, -H and NKG2-D. When analyzing NK cell clones derived from a single donor we found differential expression of inhibitory (NKG2-A/B) versus triggering (NKG2-C and potentially -E, -F, -H) NK receptor chains. The generation of the splice variants NKG2-E and -H seemed to occur at a constant ratio. We further compared NKG2 transcript levels to surface receptor expression as monitored by flow cytometric analysis and to NK cell cytotoxicity as detected by reverse ADCC: a clear correlation was observed. Thus, the data obtained reveal a substantial variability in the NKG2 repertoire among NK cell subpopulations, which is likely to affect the sensitivity and reactivity towards the ligand HLA-E.

  10. Stilbenes inhibit androgen receptor expression in 22Rv1 castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Importantly, AR continues to be expressed in advanced stages of castrate-resistant PCa (CRPC), where it can have ligand- independent activity. Identification of naturally occurring s...

  11. Sheep oocyte expresses leptin and functional leptin receptor mRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Jalil Taheri

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The result of present study reveals that leptin and its functional receptor (Ob-Rb mRNA are expressed in sheep oocyte and further studies should investigate the role(s of leptin on sheep oocyte physiology and embryo development.

  12. Social information changes stress hormone receptor expression in the songbird brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Jamie M; Perreau, Gillian; Bishop, Valerie R; Krause, Jesse S; Smith, Rachael; Hahn, Thomas P; Meddle, Simone L

    2018-01-01

    Social information is used by many vertebrate taxa to inform decision-making, including resource-mediated movements, yet the mechanisms whereby social information is integrated physiologically to affect such decisions remain unknown. Social information is known to influence the physiological response to food reduction in captive songbirds. Red crossbills (Loxia curvirostra) that were food reduced for several days showed significant elevations in circulating corticosterone (a "stress" hormone often responsive to food limitation) only if their neighbors were similarly food restricted. Physiological responses to glucocorticoid hormones are enacted through two receptors that may be expressed differentially in target tissues. Therefore, we investigated the influence of social information on the expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA in captive red crossbill brains. Although the role of MR and GR in the response to social information may be highly complex, we specifically predicted social information from food-restricted individuals would reduce MR and GR expression in two brain regions known to regulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity - given that reduced receptor expression may lessen the efficacy of negative feedback and release inhibitory tone on the HPA. Our results support these predictions - offering one potential mechanism whereby social cues could increase or sustain HPA-activity during stress. The data further suggest different mechanisms by which metabolic stress versus social information influence HPA activity and behavioral outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High glucose-induced oxidative stress increases transient receptor potential channel expression in human monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wuensch, Tilo; Thilo, Florian; Krueger, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channel-induced cation influx activates human monocytes, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of high glucose-induced oxidative stress on TRP channel expression in human monocytes....

  14. Expression of Hormone Receptors and HER-2 in Benign and Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Nhu Thuy; Lingen, Mark W; Mashek, Heather; McElherne, James; Briese, Renee; Fitzpatrick, Carrie; van Zante, Annemieke; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2017-07-05

    With the advent of targeted therapies, expression of sex hormone receptors and HER-2 in salivary gland tumors (SGTs) is of clinical interest. Previous reports of estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor expression have varied. Androgen receptor (AR) and HER-2 overexpression are frequently reported in salivary duct carcinoma (SDC), but have not been studied systematically in other SGTs. This study examines ER, PR, AR, and HER-2 expression in SGTs. Immunohistochemistry for ER, PR, AR, and HER-2 was performed on 254 SGTs (134 malignant). ER, PR, and AR expression was scored using Allred system. HER-2 expression was scored using Dako HercepTest guidelines. FISH for HER-2 amplification was performed on select cases with HER-2 overexpression (2-3+). No SGT demonstrated strong expression of ER or PR. Combined strong AR and HER-2 expression was seen in 22 carcinomas: 14/25 SDC, 3/16 poorly differentiated, two oncocytic, and one each carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma, squamous cell, and intraductal carcinoma. Eighteen additional high grade carcinomas had HER-2 overexpression with absent, weak, or moderate AR expression; eight high grade carcinomas had isolated strong AR expression with 0-1+ HER-2 staining. Of 15 tested cases, six demonstrated HER-2 amplification by FISH, all of which had 3+ immunoreactivity. Neither benign nor malignant SGTs had strong expression of ER or PR. None of the benign SGTs overexpressed AR or HER-2. Coexpression of AR and HER-2 should not define SDC, but immunostaining should be considered in high grade salivary carcinomas, as some show overexpression and may benefit from targeted therapy.

  15. Peripheral Sensitization Increases Opioid Receptor Expression and Activation by Crotalphine in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids. PMID:24594607

  16. Lysergic acid diethylamide-induced Fos expression in rat brain: role of serotonin-2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresch, P J; Strickland, L V; Sanders-Bush, E

    2002-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) produces altered mood and hallucinations in humans and binds with high affinity to serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. Although LSD interacts with other receptors, the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors is thought to mediate the hallucinogenic properties of LSD. The goal of this study was to identify the brain sites activated by LSD and to determine the influence of 5-HT(2A) receptors in this activation. Rats were pretreated with the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist MDL 100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 min prior to LSD (500 microg/kg, i.p.) administration and killed 3 h later. Brain tissue was examined for Fos protein expression by immunohistochemistry. LSD administration produced a five- to eight-fold increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and central nucleus of amygdala. However, in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens no increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed. Pretreatment with MDL 100907 completely blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, but only partially blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in amygdala. Double-labeled immunohistochemistry revealed that LSD did not induce Fos-like immunoreactivity in cortical cells expressing 5-HT(2A) receptors, suggesting an indirect activation of cortical neurons. These results indicate that the LSD activation of medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex is mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors, whereas in amygdala 5-HT(2A) receptor activation is a component of the response. These findings support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and perhaps the amygdala, are important regions involved in the production of hallucinations. Copyright 2002 IBRO

  17. Expression and function of TNF and IL-1 receptors on human regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Mercer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress immune activation and are critical in preventing autoimmune diseases. While the ability of Tregs to inhibit proliferation of other T cells is well established, it is not yet clear whether Tregs also modulate inflammatory cytokines during an immune response. Here, we show that the expression of inflammatory cytokine receptors IL-1R1 and TNFR2 were higher on resting mature Tregs compared to naïve or memory T cells. While upon activation through the T cell receptor (TCR, expression of IL-1R1 and TNFR2 were upregulated on all T cell subsets, IL-1R1 maintained significantly higher expression on activated Tregs as compared to other T cell subsets. The decoy receptor for IL-1 (IL-1R2 was not expressed by any of the resting T cells but was rapidly upregulated and preferentially expressed upon TCR-stimulation on Tregs. In addition, we found that Tregs also expressed high levels of mRNA for IL-1 antagonist, IL-1RA. TCR-stimulation of naïve T cells in the presence of TGFbeta, which induces FOXP3 expression, however did not result in upregulation of IL-1R1 or IL-1R2. In addition, ectopic expression of FOXP3 in non-Tregs, while causing significant upregulation of IL-1R1 and IL-1R2, did not achieve the levels seen in bona fide Tregs. We also determined that resting human Tregs expressing IL-1R1 did not have higher suppressive capacity compared to IL-1R1- Tregs, suggesting that IL-1R1 does not discriminate suppressive resting Tregs in healthy individuals. Functionally, activated human Tregs displayed a capacity to neutralize IL-1beta, which suggests a physiological significance for the expression of IL-1 decoy receptor on Tregs. In conclusion, our findings that human Tregs preferentially express receptors for TNF and IL-1 suggest a potential function in sensing and dampening local inflammation.

  18. Indoxyl sulfate downregulates expression of Mas receptor via OAT3/AhR/Stat3 pathway in proximal tubular cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwee-Yeong Ng

    Full Text Available Renin-angiotensin system (RAS plays a pivotal role in chronic kidney disease (CKD. Angiotensin converting enzyme-related carboxypeptidase 2 (ACE2/angiotensin (Ang-(1-7/Mas receptor axis counteracts the deleterious actions of Ang II. ACE2 exerts its actions by cleaving Ang II into Ang-(1-7 which activates Mas receptor. This study aimed to determine if the expression of Mas receptor is altered in the kidneys of CKD rats, and if indoxyl sulfate (IS, a uremic toxin, affects the expression of Mas receptor in rat kidneys and cultured human proximal tubular cells (HK-2 cells. The expression of Mas receptor was examined in the kidneys of CKD and AST-120-treated CKD rats using immunohistochemistry. Further, the effects of IS on Mas receptor expression in the kidneys of normotensive and hypertensive rats were examined. The effects of IS on the expression of Mas receptor and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS in HK-2 cells were examined using immunoblotting. CKD rats showed reduced renal expression of Mas receptor, while AST-120 restored its expression. Administration of IS downregulated Mas receptor expression in the kidneys of normotensive and hypertensive rats. IS downregulated Mas receptor expression in HK-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 inhibited IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor and phosphorylated eNOS. N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, also inhibited IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor and phosphorylated eNOS. Ang-(1-7 attenuated IS-induced transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 expression.Mas receptor expression is reduced in the kidneys of CKD rats. IS downregulates renal expression of Mas receptor via OAT3/AhR/Stat3 pathway in proximal tubular cells. IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor might be involved in upregulation of TGF-β1 in proximal tubular

  19. Indoxyl sulfate downregulates expression of Mas receptor via OAT3/AhR/Stat3 pathway in proximal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Yisireyili, Maimaiti; Saito, Shinichi; Lee, Chien-Te; Adelibieke, Yelixiati; Nishijima, Fuyuhiko; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Angiotensin converting enzyme-related carboxypeptidase 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis counteracts the deleterious actions of Ang II. ACE2 exerts its actions by cleaving Ang II into Ang-(1-7) which activates Mas receptor. This study aimed to determine if the expression of Mas receptor is altered in the kidneys of CKD rats, and if indoxyl sulfate (IS), a uremic toxin, affects the expression of Mas receptor in rat kidneys and cultured human proximal tubular cells (HK-2 cells). The expression of Mas receptor was examined in the kidneys of CKD and AST-120-treated CKD rats using immunohistochemistry. Further, the effects of IS on Mas receptor expression in the kidneys of normotensive and hypertensive rats were examined. The effects of IS on the expression of Mas receptor and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in HK-2 cells were examined using immunoblotting. CKD rats showed reduced renal expression of Mas receptor, while AST-120 restored its expression. Administration of IS downregulated Mas receptor expression in the kidneys of normotensive and hypertensive rats. IS downregulated Mas receptor expression in HK-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) inhibited IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor and phosphorylated eNOS. N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, also inhibited IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor and phosphorylated eNOS. Ang-(1-7) attenuated IS-induced transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression. Mas receptor expression is reduced in the kidneys of CKD rats. IS downregulates renal expression of Mas receptor via OAT3/AhR/Stat3 pathway in proximal tubular cells. IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor might be involved in upregulation of TGF-β1 in proximal tubular

  20. Inhibitory effects of two G protein-coupled receptor kinases on the cell surface expression and signaling of the human adrenomedullin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwasako, Kenji, E-mail: kuwasako@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toshio [Noto Marine Laboratory, Division of Marine Environmental Studies, Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, 927-0553 (Japan); Nagata, Sayaka [Division of Circulatory and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Jiang, Danfeng; Hayashi, Hidetaka [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Murakami, Manabu [Department of Pharmacology, Hirosaki University, Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, 036-8562 (Japan); Hattori, Yuichi [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, 930-0194 (Japan); Kitamura, Kazuo [Division of Circulatory and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Kato, Johji [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan)

    2016-02-19

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, a family B GPCR) to form the type 1 adrenomedullin receptor (AM{sub 1} receptor). Here, we investigated the effects of the five non-visual GPCR kinases (GRKs 2 through 6) on the cell surface expression of the human (h)AM{sub 1} receptor by cotransfecting each of these GRKs into HEK-293 cells that stably expressed hRAMP2. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that when coexpressed with GRK4 or GRK5, the cell surface expression of the AM{sub 1} receptor was markedly decreased prior to stimulation with AM, thereby attenuating both the specific [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-induced cAMP production. These inhibitory effects of both GRKs were abolished by the replacement of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of CLR with that of the calcitonin receptor (a family B GPCR) or β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (a family A GPCR). Among the sequentially truncated CLR C-tail mutants, those lacking the five residues 449–453 (Ser-Phe-Ser-Asn-Ser) abolished the inhibition of the cell surface expression of CLR via the overexpression of GRK4 or GRK5. Thus, we provided new insight into the function of GRKs in agonist-unstimulated GPCR trafficking using a recombinant AM{sub 1} receptor and further determined the region of the CLR C-tail responsible for this GRK function. - Highlights: • We discovered a novel function of GRKs in GPCR trafficking using human CLR/RAMP2. • GRKs 4 and 5 markedly inhibited the cell surface expression of human CLR/RAMP2. • Both GRKs exhibited highly significant receptor signaling inhibition. • Five residues of the C-terminal tail of CLR govern this function of GRKs.

  1. Atropisomers of 2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) exhibit stereoselective effects on activation of nuclear receptors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Brenerová, Petra; Svržková, Lucie; Hrubá, Eva; Pálková, Lenka; Vondráček, Jan; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Machala, Miroslav

    2017-11-09

    PCB 136 is an environmentally relevant chiral PCB congener, which has been found in vivo to be present in form of rotational isomers (atropisomers). Its atropselective biotransformation or neurotoxic effects linked with sensitization of ryanodine receptor suggest that it might interact also with other intracellular receptors in a stereospecific manner. However, possible atropselective effects of PCB 136 on nuclear receptor transactivation remain unknown. Therefore, in this study, atropselective effects of PCB 136 on nuclear receptors controlling endocrine signaling and/or expression of xenobiotic and steroid hormone catabolism were investigated. PCB136 atropisomers were found to exert differential effects on estrogen receptor (ER) activation; (+)-PCB 136 was estrogenic, while (-)-PCB 136 was antiestrogenic. In contrast, inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) activity was not stereospecific. Both PCB136 stereoisomers induced the constitutive androgen receptor (CAR)-dependent gene expression; however, no significant stereospecificity of PCB 136 atropisomers was observed. PCB136 was a partial inducer of the pregnane X receptor (PXR)-dependent gene expression. Here, (-)-PCB 136 was a significantly more potent inducer of PXR activity than (+)-PCB 136. Taken together, the present results indicate that at least two nuclear receptors participating in endocrine regulation or metabolism, ER and PXR, could be regulated in an atropselective manner by chiral PCB 136. The enantioselective enrichment of PCB atropisomers in animal and human tissues may thus have significant consequences for endocrine-disrupting effects of chiral ortho-substituted PCB congeners.

  2. Indoxyl Sulfate Downregulates Mas Receptor via Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor/Nuclear Factor-kappa B, and Induces Cell Proliferation and Tissue Factor Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Bolati, Wulaer; Lee, Chien-Te; Chien, Yu-Shu; Yisireyili, Maimaiti; Saito, Shinichi; Pei, Sung-Nan; Nishijima, Fuyuhiko; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme-related carboxypeptidase 2/angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis is protective in the development of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. This study is aimed at investigating whether indoxyl sulfate (IS) affects Mas receptor expression, cell proliferation and tissue factor expression in vascular smooth muscle cells, and if Ang-(1-7), an activator of Mas receptor, counteracts the IS-induced effects. IS was administered to normotensive and hypertensive rats. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) were cultured with IS. IS reduced the expression of Mas receptor in the aorta of normotensive and hypertensive rats. IS downregulated the Mas receptor expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in HASMCs. Knockdown of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-x03BA;B) inhibited IS-induced downregulation of Mas receptor. Further, IS stimulated cell proliferation and tissue factor expression in HASMCs. Ang-(1-7) attenuated IS-induced cell proliferation and tissue factor expression in HASMCs. Ang-(1-7) suppressed phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and NF-x03BA;B in HASMCs. IS downregulated the expression of Mas receptor via AhR/NF-x03BA;B, and induced cell proliferation and tissue factor expression in HASMCs. Ang-(1-7) inhibited IS-induced cell proliferation and tissue factor expression by suppressing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and NF-x03BA;B p65. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Depression is associated with an increase in the expression of the platelet adhesion receptor glycoprotein Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Marie-Thérèse; Dinan, Timothy G; Condren, Rita M; Ryan, Martina; Kenny, Dermot

    2002-05-17

    There is a significant association between cardiovascular disease and depression. Previous studies have documented changes in platelets in depression. It is unknown if depression causes functional changes in platelet surface receptors. Therefore, we analyzed (1) the surface expression of glycoprotein (GP)Ib and the integrin receptor alpha(IIb)beta(IIIa), receptors involved in platelet adhesion and aggregation, (2) CD62 (P-selectin) and CD63, integral granule proteins translocated during platelet activation, (3) platelet aggregation in response to ADP and (4) plasma levels of glycocalicin and von Willebrand factor (vWF), in depressed patients compared to healthy volunteers. Fifteen depressed patients with a Hamilton depression score of at least 22 and fifteen control subjects were studied. Platelets were assessed for surface expression levels of GPIb, alpha(IIb)beta(IIIa), CD62 and CD63 by flow cytometry. Genomic DNA was isolated to investigate a recently described polymorphism in the 5' untranslated region of the GPIbalpha gene. The number of GPIb receptors was significantly increased on the surface of platelets from patients with depression compared to control subjects. Surface expression of CD62 was also significantly increased in the depressed patients versus control subjects. There was no significant difference between depressed patients and healthy volunteers in the surface expression of alpha(IIb)beta(IIIa) or CD63, or in glycocalicin or vWF plasma concentration, or ADP-induced aggregation. There was no difference in allele frequency of the Kozak region polymorphism of the GPIbalpha gene, which can affect GPIb expression. The results of this study demonstrate that the number of GPIb receptors on platelets are increased in depression and suggest a novel risk factor for thrombosis in patients with depression.

  4. Expression of ionotropic receptors in terrestrial hermit crab’s olfactory sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Christine Groh-Lunow

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Coenobitidae are one out of at least five crustacean lineages which independently succeeded in the transition from water to land. This change in lifestyle required adaptation of the peripheral olfactory organs, the antennules, in order to sense chemical cues in the new terrestrial habitat. Hermit crab olfactory aesthetascs are arranged in a field on the distal segment of the antennular flagellum. Aesthetascs house approximately 300 dendrites with their cell bodies arranged in spindle-like complexes of ca. 150 cell bodies each. While the aesthetascs of aquatic crustaceans have been shown to be the place of odor uptake and previous studies identified ionotropic receptors (IRs as the putative chemosensory receptors expressed in decapod antennules, the expression of IRs besides the IR co-receptors IR25a and IR93a in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs has not been documented yet. Our goal was to reveal the expression and distribution pattern of non-co-receptor IRs in OSNs of Coenobita clypeatus, a terrestrial hermit crab, with RNA in situ hybridization. We expanded our previously published RNAseq dataset, and revealed 22 novel IR candidates in the Coenobita antennules. We then used RNA probes directed against three different IRs to visualize their expression within the OSN cell body complexes. Furthermore we aimed to characterize ligand spectra of single aesthetascs by recording local field potentials and responses from individual dendrites. This also allowed comparison to functional data from insect OSNs expressing antennal IRs. We show that this orphan receptor subgroup with presumably non-olfactory function in insects is likely the basis of olfaction in terrestrial hermit crabs.

  5. Expression of vitamin D receptor and cathelicidin in human corneal epithelium cells during fusarium solani infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Xia, Yi-Ping; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Hu, Li-Ting; Qu, Jian-Qiu; Peng, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    To observe the expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human specimen and immortalized human corneal epithelium cells (HCEC) when challenged with fusarium solani. Moreover, we decided to discover the pathway of VDR expression. Also, we would like to detect the expression of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) in the downstream pathway of VDR. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the VDR expression in HCEC from healthy and fungal keratitis patients. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to observe the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) change of VDR when immortalized HCEC were challenged with fusarium solani for different hours. CAMP was detected at both mRNA and protein levels. We found out that the VDR expression in fusarium solani keratitis patients' specimen was much more than that in healthy people. The mRNA and protein expression of VDR increased when we stimulated HCEC with fusarium solani antigen (Pfusarium solani antigen stimulation (Pfusarium solani antigen.

  6. Inverse agonistic activity of antihistamines and suppression of histamine H1 receptor gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shohei; Hattori, Masashi; Fukui, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Histamine H(1) receptor (H1R) expression influences the severity of allergy symptoms. We examined the effect of inverse agonists on H1R gene expression. Two inverse agonists (carebastine and mepyramine), but not the neutral antagonist oxatomide, decreased inositol phosphate accumulation. The inverse agonists also decreased H1R gene expression and down-regulated H1R mRNA below basal expression, while basal H1R mRNA expression was maintained after oxatomide treatment. These results suggest that inverse agonists more potently alleviate allergy symptoms by not only inhibiting stimulus-induced up-regulation of H1R gene expression but also by suppressing basal histamine signaling through their inverse agonistic activity.

  7. Pattern recognition receptor genes expression profiling in indigenous chickens of India and White Leghorn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunshi, S; Burramsetty, Arun Kumar; Kannaki, T R; Ravindra, K S Raja; Chatterjee, R N

    2017-09-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRR) such as Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, RIG-I helicase receptors, and C-type lectin receptors play a critical role in innate immunity as a first line of defense against invading pathogens through recognition of pathogen and/or damage-associated molecular patterns. Genetic makeup of birds is known to play a role in resistance or susceptibility to various infectious diseases. Therefore, the present study was carried out to elucidate the differential expression of PRR and some of the cytokine genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of indigenous chicken breeds such as Ghagus and Nicobari and an exotic chicken breed, White Leghorn (WLH). The stability of expression of reference genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 3 breeds was first determined using NormFinder and BestKeeper programs. NormFinder determined B2M and G6PDH reference genes as the best combination with stability value of 0.38. Out of total 14 genes studied, expression of ten genes was found to be significantly different among 3 breeds after normalization with these reference genes. Ghagus breed showed higher level of expression of TLR1LB, TLR7, NOD1, NOD5, B-Lec, IFNβ, IL1β, and IL8 genes when compared to Nicobari breed. Further, Ghagus showed higher expression of TLR1LB, MDA5, LGP2, B-Lec, IL1β, and IL8 genes as compared to WLH breed. Higher expression of LGP2 and MDA5 genes was observed in Nicobari compared to the WLH breed while higher expression of TLR7, NOD1, NOD5, and IFNβ genes was observed in WLH as compared to Nicobari breed. No difference was observed in the expression of TLR1LA, TLR3, B-NK, and IFNα genes among 3 breeds. Study revealed significant breed effect in expression profile of PRR and some of the cytokine genes and Ghagus breed seems to have better expression profile of these genes linked to the innate immunity when compared to the WLH and Nicobar breeds. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Expression of thromboxane A2 receptor gene and thromboxane A2 synthase in bovine corpora lutea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Z M; Rao, C V; Chakraborty, C

    1992-08-01

    Studies were undertaken to investigate the expression of thromboxane (TXA2) receptor gene, from mRNA to functional receptor protein in terms of ligand binding, along with the cellular and subcellular distribution of the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the ligand for the receptors. Bovine corpora lutea contained a single TXA2 receptor mRNA transcript of 2.8 kb. All the cell types in bovine corpora lutea contained immunoreactive TXA2 synthase, TXB2, TXA2 receptor transcripts, and receptor protein that bound the TXA2 antagonist 9,11-dimethylmethano-11,12-methano-16 (3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-13-14-dihydro-13-aza-15 alpha beta-omega-tetranor TXA2. The large luteal cells (20-35 microns) contained more receptor transcripts, receptor protein, and immunoreactive TXA2 synthase than did the small luteal cells (12-19 microns), luteal blood vessels, and nonluteal cells (7-12 microns). After correction for the cellular area differences, small luteal cells were seen to contain more receptor protein than did large luteal cells and nonluteal cells. All the cells showed an increase of TXA2 receptors and catalytically active TXA2 synthase from mid-luteal phase to early pregnancy, suggesting the possibility that TXA2 could be a luteotropic eicosanoid. Bovine lung homogenates (a positive control), bovine luteal plasma membranes-mitochondria-lysosomes fraction, rough-smooth endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi fraction, and highly purified nuclei contained 65-kDa immunoreactive protein, presumably representing TXA2 synthase. In addition, the luteal fractions, but not bovine lung, contained other small and large molecular-size immunoreactive proteins. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that immunoreactive TXA2 synthase was present primarily in plasma membranes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, nuclear membranes, and chromatin; and immunoreactive TXB2 was present primarily in different-size vesicles and nuclear chromatin. In summary, the present studies demonstrate for the first time that

  9. Apelin receptor (APJ expression during cardiopulmonary bypass in children undergoing surgical repair.

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    Susan Walker

    Full Text Available In human adults, and animals, the Apelin-APJ ligand-receptor system is emerging as having a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular function and heart failure. The aim was to investigate expression, and regulation by oxygen, of the Apelin APJ receptor (APJ in myocardium obtained from children undergoing corrective surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass for repair of congenital heart defects.Western blotting and Real-time PCR were used to determine if APJ was expressed in the infant myocardium, if expression was influenced by the duration of myocardial ischemia and if any relationship existed between APJ expression and early post-operative outcome. The next aim was to determine if there was a difference in mRNA expression of APJ in myocardium from cyanotic patients compared with acyanotic patients and if re-perfusing myocardium in vitro with either hypoxic, normoxic or hyperoxic oxygen affected APJ mRNA expression.APJ was expressed in all myocardial samples and myocardium exposed to longer durations of ischemia and cardioplegia expressed higher levels of APJ (p<0.05. There was a significant correlation between APJ expression in myocardium resected after 10 min with both oxygen extraction ratio (p=0.021, rho= -0.523 and mixed venous oxygen saturation (p=0.028, rho 0.52. This association did not exist for myocardium collected before 10 min. There was no difference in APJ expression between cyanotic and acyanotic patients. No difference was found in APJ expression whether re-perfused with low, normal or high oxygen.Changes in APJ expression were observed during cardiopulmonary bypass in children and the reasons for this require further investigation.

  10. Characterisation of cannabinoid 1 receptor expression in the perikarya, and peripheral and spinal processes of primary sensory neurons

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    Veress, Gabor; Meszar, Zoltan; Muszil, Dora; Avelino, Antonio; Matesz, Klara; Mackie, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor is expressed by a sub-population of primary sensory neurons. However, data on the neurochemical identity of the CB1 receptor-expressing cells, and CB1 receptor expression by the peripheral and central terminals of these neurons are inconsistent and limited. We characterised CB1 receptor expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at the lumbar 4–5 level, as well as in the urinary bladder and glabrous skin of the hindpaw. About 1/3 of DRG neurons exhibited immunopositivity for the CB1 receptor, the majority of which showed positivity for the nociceptive markers calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or/and Griffonia (bandeiraea) simplicifolia IB4 isolectin-binding. Virtually all CB1 receptor-immunostained fibres showed immunopositivity for CGRP in the skin, while almost none did in the urinary bladder. No CB1 receptor-immunopositive nerve fibres were IB4 positive in either peripheral tissue. Spinal laminae I and II-outer showed the highest density of CB1 receptor-immunopositive punctae, the majority of which showed positivity for CGRP or/and IB4 binding. These data indicate that a major sub-population of nociceptive primary sensory neurons expresses CB1 receptors that are transported to both peripheral and central terminals of these cells. Therefore, the present data suggest that manipulation of endogenous CB1 receptor agonist levels in these areas may significantly reduce nociceptive input into the spinal cord. PMID:22618437

  11. Leptin induces IL-6 expression through OBRl receptor signaling pathway in human synovial fibroblasts.

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    Yang, Wei-Hung; Liu, Shan-Chi; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shoou-Jyi; Chang, Yung-Sen; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Leptin, an adipocyte-secreted hormone that centrally regulates weight control, may exert proinflammatory effects in the joint, depending on the immune response. Leptin is abundantly expressed in osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage and synovium. However, the relationship between leptin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) remains obscure. Stimulation of OASFs with leptin induced IL-6 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. OASFs expressed the long (OBRl) and short (OBRs) isoforms of the leptin receptor. However, OBRl, but not OBRs, antisense oligonucleotide (AS-ODN) abolished the leptin-mediated increase of IL-6 expression. Transfection with insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 siRNA decreased leptin-induced IL-6 production. In addition, pretreatment of cells with PI3K, Akt, or AP-1 inhibitor also inhibited the potentiating action of leptin. Leptin-induced AP-1 activation was inhibited by OBRl, IRS-1, PI3K, or Akt inhibitors and siRNAs. Our results showed that leptin activates the OBRl receptor, which in turn activates IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, and AP-1 pathway, leading to up-regulation of IL-6 expression.

  12. Leptin induces IL-6 expression through OBRl receptor signaling pathway in human synovial fibroblasts.

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    Wei-Hung Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptin, an adipocyte-secreted hormone that centrally regulates weight control, may exert proinflammatory effects in the joint, depending on the immune response. Leptin is abundantly expressed in osteoarthritis (OA cartilage and synovium. However, the relationship between leptin and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs remains obscure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Stimulation of OASFs with leptin induced IL-6 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. OASFs expressed the long (OBRl and short (OBRs isoforms of the leptin receptor. However, OBRl, but not OBRs, antisense oligonucleotide (AS-ODN abolished the leptin-mediated increase of IL-6 expression. Transfection with insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1 siRNA decreased leptin-induced IL-6 production. In addition, pretreatment of cells with PI3K, Akt, or AP-1 inhibitor also inhibited the potentiating action of leptin. Leptin-induced AP-1 activation was inhibited by OBRl, IRS-1, PI3K, or Akt inhibitors and siRNAs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that leptin activates the OBRl receptor, which in turn activates IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, and AP-1 pathway, leading to up-regulation of IL-6 expression.

  13. Identification of Type II Interferon Receptors in Geese: Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Expression Patterns

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    Hao Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 are two cell membrane molecules belonging to class II cytokines, which play important roles in the IFN-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. Here, goose IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were cloned and identified for the first time. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that relatively high levels of goose IFNγ mRNA transcripts were detected in immune tissues, including the harderian gland, cecal tonsil, cecum, and thymus. Relatively high expression levels of both IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were detected in the cecal tonsil, which implicated an important role of IFNγ in the secondary immune system of geese. No specific correlation between IFNγ, IFNGR1, and IFNGR2 expression levels was observed in the same tissues of healthy geese. IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed different expression profiles, although they appeared to maintain a relatively balanced state. Furthermore, the agonist R848 led to the upregulation of goose IFNγ but did not affect the expression of goose IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. In summary, trends in expression of goose IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed tissue specificity, as well as an age-related dependency. These findings may help us to better understand the age-related susceptibility to pathogens in birds.

  14. The role of palmitoylation in functional expression of nicotinic alpha7 receptors.

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    Drisdel, Renaldo C; Manzana, Ehrine; Green, William N

    2004-11-17

    Neuronal alpha-bungarotoxin receptors (BgtRs) are nicotinic receptors that require as yet unidentified post-translational modifications to achieve functional expression. In this study, we examined the role of protein palmitoylation in BgtR expression. BgtR alpha7 subunits are highly palmitoylated in neurons from brain and other cells capable of BgtR expression, such as pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. In PC12 cells, alpha7 subunits are palmitoylated with a stoichiometry of approximately one palmitate per subunit, and inhibition of palmitoylation blocks BgtR expression. In cells incapable of BgtR expression, such as human embryonic kidney cells, alpha7 subunits are not significantly palmitoylated. However, in these same cells, chimeric subunits with the N-terminal half of alpha7 fused to the C-terminal half of serotonin-3A receptor (alpha7/5-HT3A) subunits form functional BgtRs that are palmitoylated to an extent similar to that of BgtRalpha7 subunits in PC12 cells. Palmitoylation of PC12 and alpha7/5-HT3A BgtRs occurred during assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In conclusion, our data indicate a function for protein palmitoylation in which palmitoylation of assembling alpha7 subunits in the ER has a role in the formation of functional BgtRs.

  15. Marlin-1 is expressed in testis and associates to the cytoskeleton and GABAB receptors.

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    Vidal, René L; Ramírez, Alfredo; Castro, Maite; Concha, Ilona I; Couve, Andrés

    2008-02-15

    Marlin-1 is a GABA(B) receptor and Jak tyrosine kinase-binding protein that also associates with RNA and microtubules. In humans and rodents, expression of Marlin-1 is predominantly restricted to the brain, but expression in lymphoid cells has also been reported. Here, we have studied the distribution of Marlin-1 in testis and spermatozoa. Our results indicate that Marlin-1 is highly expressed in testis. The protein is abundant in spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatozoa, and Sertoli cells. We also have studied the subcellular distribution in spermatozoa. Marlin-1 is present in the tail and to a lesser degree in the head of the sperm cell. Finally, we have explored two protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that Marlin-1 associates with a microtubule fraction and with GABA(B) receptors in testis suggesting that the set of protein interactions of Marlin-1 are conserved in different tissues. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

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    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel kinin B₁ receptor splice variant and 5'UTR regulatory elements are responsible for cell specific B₁ receptor expression.

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    Faang Y Cheah

    Full Text Available The kinin B₁ receptor (B₁R is rapidly upregulated after tissue trauma or inflammation and is involved in cancer and inflammatory diseases such as asthma. However, the role of the: promoter; a postulated alternative promoter; and spliced variants in airway epithelial and other lung cells are poorly understood. We identified, in various lung cell lines and leucocytes, a novel, naturally occurring splice variant (SV of human B₁R gene with a shorter 5'untranslated region. This novel SV is ≈35% less stable than the wild-type (WT transcript in lung adenocarcinoma cells (H2126, but does not influence translation efficiency. Cell-specific differences in splice variant expression were observed post des[Arg10]-kallidin stimulation with delayed upregulation of SV compared to WT suggesting potentially different regulatory responses to inflammation. Although an alternative promoter was not identified in our cell-lines, several cell-specific regulatory elements within the postulated alternative promoter region (negative response element (NRE -1020 to -766 bp in H2126; positive response element (PRE -766 to -410 bp in 16HBE; -410 to +1 region acts as a PRE in H2126 and NRE in 16HBE cells were found. These findings reveal complex regulation of B₁R receptor expression in pulmonary cells which may allow future therapeutic manipulation in chronic pulmonary inflammation and cancer.

  18. Expression of neurokinin B/NK3 receptor and kisspeptin/KISS1 receptor in human granulosa cells.

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    García-Ortega, J; Pinto, F M; Fernández-Sánchez, M; Prados, N; Cejudo-Román, A; Almeida, T A; Hernández, M; Romero, M; Tena-Sempere, M; Candenas, L

    2014-12-01

    Are neurokinin B (NKB), NK3 receptor (NK3R), kisspeptin (KISS1) and kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) expressed in human ovarian granulosa cells? The NKB/NK3R and kisspeptin/KISS1R systems are co-expressed and functionally active in ovarian granulosa cells. The NKB/NK3R and KISS1/KISS1R systems are essential for reproduction. In addition to their well-recognized role in hypothalamic neurons, these peptide systems may contribute to the control of fertility by acting directly on the gonads, but such a direct gonadal role remains largely unknown. This study analyzed matched mural granulosa cells (MGCs) and cumulus cells (CCs) collected from preovulatory follicles of oocyte donors at the time of oocyte retrieval. The samples were provided by 56 oocyte donor women undergoing ovarian stimulation treatment. Follicular fluid samples containing MGCs and cumulus-oocyte complexes were collected after transvaginal ultrasound-guided oocyte retrieval. RT-PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot were used to investigate the pattern of expression of the NKB/NK3R and KISS/KISS1R systems in MGCs and CCs. Intracellular free Ca(2+) levels, [Ca(2+)]i, in MGCs after exposure to NKB or KISS1, in the presence or not of tachykinin receptor antagonists, were also measured. NKB/NK3R and KISS1/KISS1R systems were expressed, at the mRNA and protein levels, in MGCs and CCs, with significantly higher expression in CCs. Kisspeptin increased the [Ca(2+)]i in the cytosol of human MGCs while exposure to NKB failed to induce any change in [Ca(2+)]i. However, the [Ca(2+)]i response to kisspeptin was reduced in the presence of NKB. The inhibitory effect of NKB was only partially mimicked by the NK3R agonist, senktide and marginally suppressed by the NK3R-selective antagonist SB 222200. Yet, a cocktail of antagonists selective for the NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptors blocked the effect of NKB. The granulosa and cumulus cells were obtained from oocyte donors undergoing ovarian

  19. Expression of LDL receptor-related proteins (LRPs in common solid malignancies correlates with patient survival.

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    Steven L Gonias

    Full Text Available LDL receptor-related proteins (LRPs are transmembrane receptors involved in endocytosis, cell-signaling, and trafficking of other cellular proteins. Considerable work has focused on LRPs in the fields of vascular biology and neurobiology. How these receptors affect cancer progression in humans remains largely unknown. Herein, we mined provisional databases in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to compare expression of thirteen LRPs in ten common solid malignancies in patients. Our first goal was to determine the abundance of LRP mRNAs in each type of cancer. Our second goal was to determine whether expression of LRPs is associated with improved or worsened patient survival. In total, data from 4,629 patients were mined. In nine of ten cancers studied, the most abundantly expressed LRP was LRP1; however, a correlation between LRP1 mRNA expression and patient survival was observed only in bladder urothelial carcinoma. In this malignancy, high levels of LRP1 mRNA were associated with worsened patient survival. High levels of LDL receptor (LDLR mRNA were associated with decreased patient survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. High levels of LRP10 mRNA were associated with decreased patient survival in hepatocellular carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. LRP2 was the only LRP for which high levels of mRNA expression correlated with improved patient survival. This correlation was observed in renal clear cell carcinoma. Insights into LRP gene expression in human cancers and their effects on patient survival should guide future research.

  20. Nuclear receptors RXRα:RARα are repressors for human MRP3 expression

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    Chen, Wensheng; Cai, Shi-Ying; Xu, Shuhua; Denson, Lee A.; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein MRP3/Mrp3 (ABCC3) is upregulated in cholestasis, an adaptive response that may protect the liver from accumulation of toxic compounds, such as bile salts and bilirubin conjugates. However, the mechanism of this upregulation is poorly understood. We and others have previously reported that fetoprotein transcription factor/liver receptor homolog-1 is an activator of MRP3/Mrp3 expression. In searching for additional regulatory elements in the human MRP3 promoter, we have now identified nuclear receptor retinoic X receptor-α:retinoic acid receptor-α (RXRα:RARα) as a repressor of MRP3 activation by transcription factor Sp1. A luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that cotransfection of transcription factor Sp1 stimulates the MRP3 promoter activity and that additions of RXRα:RARα abrogated this activation in a dose-dependent manner. Site mutations and gel shift assays have identified a Sp1 binding GC box motif at −113 to −108 nts upstream from the MRP3 translation start site, where RXRα:RARα specifically reduced Sp1 binding to this site. Mutation of the GC box also reduced MRP3 promoter activity. The functional role of RXRα:RARα as a repressor of MRP3 expression was further confirmed by RARα small-interfering RNA knock-down in HepG2 cells, which upregulated endogenous MRP3 expression. In summary, our results indicate that activator Sp1 and repressor RXRα:RARα act in concert to regulate MRP3 expression. Since RXRα:RARα expression is diminished by cholestatic liver injury, loss of RXRα:RARα may lead to upregulation of MRP3/Mrp3 expression in these disorders. PMID:17272513

  1. Cloning, ligand-binding, and temporal expression of ecdysteroid receptors in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella

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    Tang Baozhen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae, is a devastating pest of cruciferous crops worldwide, and has developed resistance to a wide range of insecticides, including diacylhydrazine-based ecdysone agonists, a highly selective group of molt-accelerating biopesticides targeting the ecdysone receptors. Result In this study, we cloned and characterized the ecdysone receptors from P. xylostella, including the two isoforms of EcR and a USP. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed striking conservations among insect ecdysone receptors, especially between P. xylostella and other lepidopterans. The binding affinity of ecdysteroids to in vitro-translated receptor proteins indicated that PxEcRB isoform bound specifically to ponasterone A, and the binding affinity was enhanced by co-incubation with PxUSP (Kd =3.0±1.7 nM. In contrast, PxEcRA did not bind to ponasterone A, even in the presence of PxUSP. The expression of PxEcRB were consistently higher than that of PxEcRA across each and every developmental stage, while the pattern of PxUSP expression is more or less ubiquitous. Conclusions Target site insensitivity, in which the altered binding of insecticides (ecdysone agonists to their targets (ecdysone receptors leads to an adaptive response (resistance, is one of the underlying mechanisms of diacylhydrazine resistance. Given the distinct differences at expression level and the ligand-binding capacity, we hypothesis that PxEcRB is the ecdysone receptor that controls the remodeling events during metamorphosis. More importantly, PxEcRB is the potential target site which is modified in the ecdysone agonist-resistant P. xylostella.

  2. Dopamine, vesicular transporters, and dopamine receptor expression in rat major salivary glands.

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    Tomassoni, Daniele; Traini, Enea; Mancini, Manuele; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Amenta, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The localization of dopamine stores and the expression and localization of dopamine (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT) type-1 and -2 and of dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor subtypes were investigated in rat submandibular, sublingual, and parotid salivary glands by HPLC with electrochemical detection, as well as immunochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Male Wistar rats of 2 mo of age were used. The highest dopamine levels were measured in the parotid gland, followed by the submandibular and sublingual glands. Western blot analysis revealed DAT, VMAT-1, VMAT-2, and dopamine receptors immunoreactivity in membrane preparations obtained from the three glands investigated. Immunostaining for dopamine and transporters was developed within striated ducts. Salivary glands processed for dopamine receptors immunohistochemistry developed an immunoreaction primarily in striated and excretory ducts. In the submandibular gland, acinar cells displayed strong immunoreactivity for the D2 receptor, while cells of the convoluted granular tubules were negative for both D1-like and D2-like receptors. Parotid glands acinar cells displayed the highest immunoreactivity for both D1 and D2 receptors compared with other salivary glands. The above localization of dopamine and dopaminergic markers investigated did not correspond closely with neuron-specific enolase (NSE) localization. This indicates that at least in part, catecholamine stores and dopaminergic markers are independent from glandular innervation. These findings suggest that rat major salivary glands express a dopaminergic system probably involved in salivary secretion. The stronger immunoreactivity for dopamine transporters and receptors in striated duct cells suggests that the dopaminergic system could regulate not only quality, but also volume and ionic concentration of saliva. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. DC-SCRIPT regulates glucocorticoid receptor function and expression of its target GILZ in dendritic cells.

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    Hontelez, Saartje; Karthaus, Nina; Looman, Maaike W; Ansems, Marleen; Adema, Gosse J

    2013-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the immune system; they can induce immunity or tolerance depending on diverse factors in the DC environment. Pathogens, but also tissue damage, hormones, and vitamins, affect DC activation and maturation. In particular, glucocorticoids (GCs) are known for their immunosuppressive effect on DCs, creating tolerogenic DCs. GCs activate the type I nuclear receptor (NR) glucocorticoid receptor (GR), followed by induced expression of the transcription factor glucocorticoid-inducible leucine zipper (GILZ). GILZ has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for GC-induced tolerogenic DC generation. Recently, we have identified the DC-specific transcript (DC-SCRIPT) as an NR coregulator, suppressing type I steroid NRs estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor. In this study, we analyzed the effect of DC-SCRIPT on GR activity. We demonstrate that DC-SCRIPT coexists with GR in protein complexes and functions as a corepressor of GR-mediated transcription. Coexpression of DC-SCRIPT and GR is shown in human monocyte-derived DCs, and DC-SCRIPT knockdown enhances GR-dependent upregulation of GILZ mRNA expression in DCs. This demonstrates that DC-SCRIPT serves an important role in regulating GR function in DCs, corepressing GR-dependent upregulation of the tolerance-inducing transcription factor GILZ. These data imply that by controlling GR function and GILZ expression DC-SCRIPT is potentially involved in the balance between tolerance and immunity.

  4. Expression of urocortin and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors in the horse thyroid gland.

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    Squillacioti, Caterina; De Luca, Adriana; Alì, Sabrina; Paino, Salvatore; Liguori, Giovanna; Mirabella, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Urocortin (UCN) is a 40-amino-acid peptide and a member of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) family, which includes CRH, urotensin I, sauvagine, UCN2 and UCN3. The biological actions of CRH family peptides are mediated via two types of G-protein-coupled receptors, namely CRH type 1 receptor (CRHR1) and CRH type 2 receptor (CRHR2). The biological effects of these peptides are mediated and modulated not only by CRH receptors but also via a highly conserved CRH-binding protein (CRHBP). Our aim was to investigate the expression of UCN, CRHR1, CRHR2 and CRHBP by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the horse thyroid gland. The results showed that UCN, CRHR1 and CRHR2 were expressed in the thyroid gland, whereas CRHBP was not expressed. Specifically, UCN immunoreactivity (-IR) was found in the thyroid follicular cells, CRHR2-IR in the C-cells and CRHR1-IR in blood vessels. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR experiments confirmed the immunohistochemical data. These results suggest that a regulatory system exists in the mammalian thyroid gland based on UCN, CRHR1 and CRHR2 and that UCN plays a role in the regulation of thyroid physiological functions through a paracrine mechanism.

  5. Attenuated AMPA receptor expression allows glioblastoma cell survival in glutamate-rich environment.

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    Dannis G van Vuurden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cells secrete large amounts of glutamate that can trigger AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs. This commonly results in Na(+ and Ca(2+-permeability and thereby in excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding neurons. Here we investigated how the GBM cells themselves survive in a glutamate-rich environment. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In silico analysis of published reports shows down-regulation of all ionotropic glutamate receptors in GBM as compared to normal brain. In vitro, in all GBM samples tested, mRNA expression of AMPAR subunit GluR1, 2 and 4 was relatively low compared to adult and fetal total brain mRNA and adult cerebellum mRNA. These findings were in line with primary GBM samples, in which protein expression patterns were down-regulated as compared to the normal tissue. Furthermore, mislocalized expression of these receptors was found. Sequence analysis of GluR2 RNA in primary and established GBM cell lines showed that the GluR2 subunit was found to be partly unedited. CONCLUSIONS: Together with the lack of functional effect of AMPAR inhibition by NBQX our results suggest that down-regulation and afunctionality of AMPARs, enable GBM cells to survive in a high glutamate environment without going into excitotoxic cell death themselves. It can be speculated that specific AMPA receptor inhibitors may protect normal neurons against the high glutamate microenvironment of GBM tumors.

  6. Selective loss of chemokine receptor expression on leukocytes after cell isolation.

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    Juan C Nieto

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors are distinctively exposed on cells to characterize their migration pattern. However, little is known about factors that may regulate their expression. To determine the optimal conditions for an accurate analysis of chemokine receptors, we compared the expression of CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CXCR3 and CXCR4 on different leukocyte subsets using whole blood (WB plus erythrocyte lysis and density gradient isolation (Ficoll. Most WB monocytes were CCR2+ (93.5 ± 2.9% whereas 32.8 ± 6.0% of monocytes from Ficoll-PBMC expressed CCR2 (p<0.001. Significant reductions of CCR6 and CXCR3 on monocytes were also observed after Ficoll isolation (WB: 46.4 ± 7.5% and 57.1 ± 5.5%; Ficoll: 29.5 ± 2.2% and 5.4 ± 4.3% respectively (p<0.01. Although comparable percentages of WB and Ficoll-PBMC monocytes expressed CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR4, Ficoll isolation significantly reduced the levels of CXCR4 (WB: MFI 5 ± 0.4 and Ficoll: MFI 3.3 ± 0.1 (p<0.05. Similarly to monocytes, CCR2, CXCR3 and CXCR4 were also reduced on lymphocytes. In addition, Ficoll isolation significantly reduced the percentage of CCR4 positive lymphocytes (WB: 90.2 ± 4.5% and Ficoll: 55 ± 4.1% (p<0.01. The loss of expression of chemokine receptors after isolation of monocytes was not dependent on either the anticoagulant or the density gradient method. It was irreversible and could not be restored by LPS activation or in vitro macrophage differentiation. Experiments tagged with anti-CCR2 antibodies prior to density gradient isolation demonstrated that Ficoll internalized chemokine receptors. The method for cell isolation may alter not only the expression of certain chemokine receptors but also the respective functional migration assay. The final choice to analyze their expression should therefore depend on the receptor to be measured.

  7. Characterization of a single-chain T-cell receptor expressed in Escherichia coli.

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    Hoo, W F; Lacy, M J; Denzin, L K; Voss, E W; Hardman, K D; Kranz, D M

    1992-05-15

    Despite progress in defining the nature of major histocompatibility complex products that are recognized by the T-cell antigen receptor, the binding properties and structure of the receptor have not been solved. The primary problem has been the difficulty in obtaining sufficient quantities of active receptor. In this report we show that a single-chain T-cell receptor gene can be expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein consists of the variable (V) regions of the alpha and beta chains (V alpha and V beta) encoded by the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clone 2C (a H-2b anti-H-2d alloreactive cell line) linked by a 25-amino acid flexible peptide. Solubilized extracts that contain the 27-kDa V alpha 3V beta 8 protein are positive in solid-phase immunoassays with the anti-V beta 8 antibody KJ16 and the anti-clonotypic antibody 1B2. Approximately 1% of the protein can be specifically purified on a 1B2-conjugated column. These results indicate that a fraction of the protein is able to fold into a native conformation and that single-chain proteins should be useful not only as immunogens for eliciting anti-T-cell receptor antibodies but in the study of T-cell receptor structure and function.

  8. Physiological impact of CB1 receptor expression by hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

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    Albayram, Önder; Passlick, Stefan; Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras; Zimmer, Andreas; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A subset of hippocampal GABAergic neurons, which are cholecystokinin-positive, highly express cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors. Activation of these receptors inhibits GABA release and thereby limits inhibitory control. While genetic deletion of CB1 receptors from GABAergic neurons led to behavioural alterations and neuroinflammatory reactions, it remained unclear whether these changes in the knockout animals were a direct consequence of the enhanced transmitter release or reflected developmental deficits. The hippocampus is vital for the generation of spatial, declarative and working memory. Here, we addressed the question how CB1 receptors in GABAergic neurons influence hippocampal function. Patch clamp and field potential recordings in mice devoid of CB1 receptors in GABAergic neurons revealed an enhanced frequency and faster kinetics of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons while tonic inhibition, paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus were not affected. Evaluation of cognitive functions demonstrated impaired acquisition of spatial memory and deficits in novel object recognition and partner recognition in the knockout mice, while working memory and spatial memory remained intact. The density of GABAergic neurons was also similar in knockout mice and their littermates, which argues against global deficits in hippocampal development. Together, these results suggest that CB1 receptors in GABAergic neurons influence specific aspects of neuronal excitability and hippocampal learning.

  9. Androgen receptor is overexpressed in boys with severe hypospadias, and ZEB1 regulates androgen receptor expression in human foreskin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Tasian, Gregory E.; Zhang, Haiyang; Cao, Mei; Ferretti, Max; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ZEB1 is overexpressed in patients with severe hypospadias. We examined the interaction between ZeB1 and the androgen receptor (AR) in vitro and the expression of AR in boys with hypospadias. RESULTS ZEB1 and AR colocalize to the nucleus. Estrogen upregulated ZEB1 and AR expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that ZEB1 binds to an E-box sequence in the AR gene promoter. AR expression is higher in subjects with severe hypospadias than those with mild hypospadias and control subjects (P hypospadias. Environmental estrogenic compounds may increase the risk of hypospadias by facilitating the interaction between ZEB1 and AR. METHODS Hs68 cells, a fibroblast cell line derived from neonatal human foreskin, were exposed to 0, 10, and 100 nmol/l of estrogen, after which the cellular localization of ZEB1 and AR was assessed using immunocytochemistry. To determine if ZEB1 interacted with the AR gene, ChIP was performed using ZEB1 antibody and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for AR. Second, AR expression was quantified using real-time PcR and western blot in normal subjects (n = 32), and subjects with mild (n = 16) and severe hypospadia (n = 16). PMID:22391641

  10. Chemokine receptors expression on CD3+ blood cells in bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, Joanna; Rymarczyk, Barbara; Rogala, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Chemokines and their receptors participate in pathomechanism of bronchial asthma. The aim of the study was to analyze the pattern of chemokine receptor expression on T cells in severe asthmatics and to compare to mild-to-moderate patients and controls. Flow cytometric analysis of CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR3, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 expression on CD3(+)CD8(-) and CD3(+)CD8(+) cells was performed in patients with different severity of chronic asthma and in controls. Percentages of CD3(+)CD8(+) cells expressing CXCR1 were significantly lower in severe asthmatic than in mild-to-moderate asthmatics and in controls. Percentages of CD3(+)CD8(+) cells expressing CCR7 were significantly lower in the severe asthma group than in control group. Percentages of CD3(+)CD8(-) cells expressing CXCR1, CXCR2 and CCR8 were significantly lower in the severe asthma group than in mild-to-moderate asthmatics and in controls. The number of cells CD3(+)CD8(-) and CD3(+)CD8(+) expressing of CXCR1 was significantly lower in the group of patients using more than 800μg of budesonide daily than in the group of patients using less than 400μg of budesonide. Percentages of CD3(+)CD8(-) cells expressing CXCR3, CCR4 and CCR5 were visibly higher (not significantly) in chronic mild-to-moderate asthma than in healthy controls and severe asthmatics. These results may indicate impairment of some chemokine expression on T cells in severe asthma patients. Moreover participation of both chemokine receptors related to Th1 and Th2 responses in mild-to-moderate asthma and attenuation of these responses in severe asthma has been suggested. Copyright © 2015 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel expression in hypertrophic heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Schulz, Nico

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels in hypertrophic hearts from transgenic mice showing overexpression of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein phosphatase 2A alpha (PP2Ac alpha) with wild-type mice and with TRPV1......-/- mice. Transcripts of TRPV1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), discoidin domain receptor family, member 2 (DDR-2), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), GATA 4, and regulatory microRNA (miR-21) were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Ventricle-to-body-weight-ratio was significantly higher in PP2Ac...

  12. Expression of CSF-1 and its receptor CSF-1R in non-hematopoietic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascinski, Barry

    2002-01-01

    CSF-1 and its receptor appear to be important in the physiology of several different neoplasms including those of the breast and female reproductive tract. Levels of CSF-1 and CSF-1R expression appear to correlate with tumor cell invasiveness and an adverse clinical prognosis and may be modulated by hormones involved in normal lactogenic differentiation. Also, it appears that CSF-1R activates several different signal transduction pathways but only some of these appear to have direct bearing on tumor cell phenotypes and the activation of pathways in specific cell types may depend on factors above and beyond the receptor itself.

  13. Biological effects of insulin and its analogs on cancer cells with different insulin family receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacca, Laura; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Genua, Marco; Vigneri, Paolo; Giovanna Pennisi, Maria; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Pezzino, Vincenzo; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is a likely cause of the increased cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients, but its role is difficult to define in vivo. Previous in vitro studies testing the mitogenic potential of insulin and its analogs provided incomplete and sometimes contradictory results. To better evaluate cancer cell responsiveness to insulin, to its analogs and to IGF-I, we measured under identical experimental conditions cell proliferation, invasiveness, and foci formation in six cancer cell lines with different insulin receptor family expression levels. The cancer cells studied have a different expression of insulin receptor (IR), its isoforms (IR-A and IR-B), and of the IGF-I receptor. The data indicate that insulin stimulates proliferation in all cancer cell lines, invasiveness in some, and foci formation in none. Cancer cell responses to insulin (and IGF-I) are not related to receptor expression levels; moreover, hormone-stimulated proliferation and invasiveness are not correlated. IGF-I is a more potent stimulator than insulin in most but not all cancer cell lines. Insulin analogs including M1 and M2 Glargine metabolites stimulate cancer cells similar to insulin. However, exceptions occur for specific analogs in particular cancer cells. In conclusion, in vitro insulin is an effective growth factor for all cancer cells but the biological response to insulin cannot be predicted on the basis of receptor expression levels. In the clinical setting, these observations should be taken in account when deciding treatment for diabetic patients who are at risk of undiscovered cancer or survivors of oncological diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Suppression of Idol expression is an additional mechanism underlying statin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LDL receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bin; Wu, Minhao; Cao, Aiqin; Li, Hai; Liu, Jingwen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and Idol as negative regulators of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein stability. While the induction of PCSK9 transcription has been recognized as a limitation to the statin cholesterol-lowering efficacy at higher doses, it is unknown whether Idol is involved in the statin-mediated up-regulation of the hepatic LDLR. Here we report that statins exert opposite effects on PCSK9 and Idol gene expression in human hepatoma-derived cell lines and primary hepatocytes isolated from hamsters and rats. While PCSK9 expression was induced, the level of Idol mRNA rapidly declined in statin-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. This differs from the effect of the liver X receptor ligand, GW3965, which increased the expression of both PCSK9 and Idol. We further show that cellular depletion of Idol by siRNA transfection did not change PCSK9 expression levels in control and statin-treated cells; however, the basal level of LDLR protein increased by 60% in Idol siRNA transfected HepG2 cells. More importantly, the increase in LDLR protein abundance by rosuvastatin and atorvastatin treatment was compromised by Idol siRNA transfection. Collectively, our present findings suggest that the suppression of Idol gene expression in liver cells is an additional mechanism underlying the statin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LDLR expression. This may contribute to the hypocholesterolemic effects of statins observed in clinical settings.

  15. Crosstalk between thyroid hormone receptor and liver X receptor in the regulation of selective Alzheimer's disease indicator-1 gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Ishida

    Full Text Available Selective Alzheimer's disease (AD indicator 1 (Seladin-1 has been identified as a gene down-regulated in the degenerated lesions of AD brain. Up-regulation of Seladin-1 reduces the accumulation of β-amyloid and neuronal death. Thyroid hormone (TH exerts an important effect on the development and maintenance of central nervous systems. In the current study, we demonstrated that Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the forebrain was increased in thyrotoxic mice compared with that of euthyroid mice. However, unexpectedly, no significant decrease in the gene and protein expression was observed in hypothyroid mice. Interestingly, an agonist of liver X receptor (LXR, TO901317 (TO administration in vivo increased Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the mouse forebrain only in a hypothyroid state and in the presence of mutant TR-β, suggesting that LXR-α would compensate for TR-β function to maintain Seladin-1 gene expression in hypothyroidism and resistance to TH. TH activated the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter (-1936/+21 bp and site 2 including canonical TH response element (TRE half-site in the region between -159 and -154 bp is responsible for the positive regulation. RXR-α/TR-β heterodimerization was identified on site 2 by gel-shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed the recruitment of TR-β to site 2 and the recruitment was increased upon TH administration. On the other hand, LXR-α utilizes a distinct region from site 2 (-120 to -102 bp to activate the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter. Taking these findings together, we concluded that TH up-regulates Seladin-1 gene expression at the transcriptional level and LXR-α maintains the gene expression.

  16. Expression of transforming growth factor-alpha and epidermal growth factor receptor in gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y C; Jiang, Z; Vittimberga, F; Xu, X; Savas, L; Woda, B; Callery, M; Banner, B

    1999-08-01

    Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with cell growth and transformation. Both transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) and epidermal growth factor bind to and activate EGFR. We studied the expression of TGF-alpha and two EGFRs (HER-1 and HER-2) in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) of the stomach (n = 9) and small intestine (n = 6) using standard immunostaining techniques in paraffin-embedded sections. Most GISTs expressed TGF-alpha, and a few expressed HER-1. All HER-1-positive tumours expressed TGF-alpha. These results suggest that a TGF-alpha/EGFR autocrine loop is present in GIST and that TGF-alpha promotes proliferation of GIST tumour cells through its interaction with HER-1 in at least some GISTs. This is the first description of an autocrine loop in GIST. In contrast, HER-2 is not expressed in any GIST.

  17. In vitro expression and analysis of the 826 human G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuechen Lv

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are involved in all human physiological systems where they are responsible for transducing extracellular signals into cells. GPCRs signal in response to a diverse array of stimuli including light, hormones, and lipids, where these signals affect downstream cascades to impact both health and disease states. Yet, despite their importance as therapeutic targets, detailed molecular structures of only 30 GPCRs have been determined to date. A key challenge to their structure determination is adequate protein expression. Here we report the quantification of protein expression in an insect cell expression system for all 826 human GPCRs using two different fusion constructs. Expression characteristics are analyzed in aggregate and among each of the five distinct subfamilies. These data can be used to identify trends related to GPCR expression between different fusion constructs and between different GPCR families, and to prioritize lead candidates for future structure determination feasibility.

  18. Expression map of a complete set of gustatory receptor genes in chemosensory organs of Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huizhen; Cheng, Tingcai; Chen, Zhiwei; Jiang, Liang; Guo, Youbing; Liu, Jianqiu; Li, Shenglong; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Wu, Jiaqi; Kishino, Hirohisa; Zhang, Huijie; Seth, Rakesh K; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Montagné, Nicolas; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2017-03-01

    Most lepidopteran species are herbivores, and interaction with host plants affects their gene expression and behavior as well as their genome evolution. Gustatory receptors (Grs) are expected to mediate host plant selection, feeding, oviposition and courtship behavior. However, due to their high diversity, sequence divergence and extremely low level of expression it has been difficult to identify precisely a complete set of Grs in Lepidoptera. By manual annotation and BAC sequencing, we improved annotation of 43 gene sequences compared with previously reported Grs in the most studied lepidopteran model, the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and identified 7 new tandem copies of BmGr30 on chromosome 7, bringing the total number of BmGrs to 76. Among these, we mapped 68 genes to chromosomes in a newly constructed chromosome distribution map and 8 genes to scaffolds; we also found new evidence for large clusters of BmGrs, especially from the bitter receptor family. RNA-seq analysis of diverse BmGr expression patterns in chemosensory organs of larvae and adults enabled us to draw a precise organ specific map of BmGr expression. Interestingly, most of the clustered genes were expressed in the same tissues and more than half of the genes were expressed in larval maxillae, larval thoracic legs and adult legs. For example, BmGr63 showed high expression levels in all organs in both larval and adult stages. By contrast, some genes showed expression limited to specific developmental stages or organs and tissues. BmGr19 was highly expressed in larval chemosensory organs (especially antennae and thoracic legs), the single exon genes BmGr53 and BmGr67 were expressed exclusively in larval tissues, the BmGr27-BmGr31 gene cluster on chr7 displayed a high expression level limited to adult legs and the candidate CO2 receptor BmGr2 was highly expressed in adult antennae, where few other Grs were expressed. Transcriptional analysis of the Grs in B. mori provides a valuable new reference for

  19. PDF receptor expression reveals direct interactions between circadian oscillators in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Seol Hee; Taghert, Paul H

    2010-06-01

    Daily rhythms of behavior are controlled by a circuit of circadian pacemaking neurons. In Drosophila, 150 pacemakers participate in this network, and recent observations suggest that the network is divisible into M and E oscillators, which normally interact and synchronize. Sixteen oscillator neurons (the small and large lateral neurons [LNvs]) express a neuropeptide called pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) whose signaling is often equated with M oscillator output. Given the significance of PDF signaling to numerous aspects of behavioral and molecular rhythms, determining precisely where and how signaling via the PDF receptor (PDFR) occurs is now a central question in the field. Here we show that GAL4-mediated rescue of pdfr phenotypes using a UAS-PDFR transgene is insufficient to provide complete behavioral rescue. In contrast, we describe a approximately 70-kB PDF receptor (pdfr) transgene that does rescue the entire pdfr circadian behavioral phenotype. The transgene is widely but heterogeneously expressed among pacemakers, and also among a limited number of non-pacemakers. Our results support an important hypothesis: the small LNv cells directly target a subset of the other crucial pacemaker neurons cells. Furthermore, expression of the transgene confirms an autocrine feedback signaling by PDF back to PDF-expressing cells. Finally, the results present an unexpected PDF receptor site: the large LNv cells appear to target a population of non-neuronal cells that resides at the base of the eye. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Expression of steroid and xenobiotic receptor in uterine carcinosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and endometrial stromal sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiaoni; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Akahira, Jun-Ichi; Suzuki, Fumihiko; Ito, Kiyoshi; Nagase, Satoru; Sasano, Hironobu; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2013-03-01

    We analyzed the expression of the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) in human uterine sarcomas and evaluated its clinical significance. Forty-seven cases with archival specimens were examined for SXR expression using immunohistochemistry. All cases were scored using a semi-quantitative histological scoring (HSCORE) method. Specimens with a HSCORE >40 were regarded as SXR-positive. Various clinicopathological variables, including the expression status of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, progesterone receptor (PR) and Ki67 (MIB-1) were examined. The mean SXR HSCOREs of carcinosarcoma (CS) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS) were 9.13 and 23.6, respectively, and SXR-positive rates were 3 out of 24 (12.5%) and 4 out of 17 (23.5%), respectively. SXR was not detected in endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS). In CS cases, significant differences were detected between the expression of SXR and age and disease stages. There was no significant correlation between SXR-positive status and either disease-free survival or overall survival. Our results support an association between SXR and malignant behavior. Our results show that overexpression of SXR may represent a useful marker to identify patients with advanced-stage CS. In addition, our results showed that SXR may aid in the diagnosis of uterine sarcomas.

  1. AII amacrine cells express the MT1 melatonin receptor in human and macaque retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Judite; Wankiewicz, Ellen; Brown, Gregory M; Fujieda, Hiroki

    2003-09-01

    AII amacrine cells are critical interneurons in the rod pathway of mammalian retina, active primarily in dim lighting conditions. Melatonin, a neuromodulator produced at night in the retina, is believed to induce retinal adaptation to dim lighting conditions in most vertebrate species examined to date, including humans. We hypothesized that melatonin may influence retinal light adaptation by acting on AII cells directly and thus investigated whether melatonin receptors were expressed in AII neurons. Postmortem nonpathological eyes from four human donors as well as two eyes from two Macaque Fasicularis monkeys were analyzed. Double immunocytochemistry was performed using an anti-MT(1) antibody and an antibody to calretinin, an AII marker. Analysis utilized confocal microscopy. A polyclonal anti-calretinin antibody labelled amacrine cells exhibiting the distinct AII morphology, in both human and macaque retina. MT(1) immunoreactivity in macaque retina was similar to human staining, in that horizontal, amacrine and ganglion cell bodies were stained, as were inner segments of photoreceptors. In human retina 86% of calretinin positive cells expressed the MT(1) receptor peripherally, whereas centrally, 78% colocalization was observed. In the macaque retina, 100% of AII amacrine cells expressed MT(1) immunoreactivity both centrally and peripherally. That virtually all AII neurons express the MT(1) receptor in both human and macaque retina, may provide the first evidence demonstrating a role for melatonin in AII regulation, furthering the hypothesis of melatonin function in retinal light adaptation.

  2. Quantification of expression of netrins, slits and their receptors in human prostate tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latil, Alain; Chêne, Laurent; Cochant-Priollet, Béatrix; Mangin, Philippe; Fournier, Georges; Berthon, Philippe; Cussenot, Olivier

    2003-01-20

    Recently, DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer) protein has been forwarded as a receptor for netrin. The Netrin/DCC complex is critical for axon guidance and cell migration. In the developing nervous system, netrin protein secreted by midline cells attracts commissural axons by activating the DCC receptor on growth cones. This attraction can be switched to repulsion or silenced completely, depending on the DCC binding partner. The potential suppressor function of DCC in prostate tumorigenesis, through a still unknown mechanism, prompted us to quantify the expression of several genes involved in this axon guidance pathway. The relative expression levels of DCC, NEO1, NTN1, NTN2L, NTN4, UNC5C, Slit1, Slit2, Slit3, Robo1 and Robo2 were simultaneous quantified in 48 tumors and 7 normal prostate tissues by using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A reduction in DCC, NEO1, NTN1 and NTN4 expression was observed in prostate tumors, while many of the same prostate tumors over-expressed either Slit genes or their receptors, Robo. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Opioid receptor gene expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells following tapentadol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Carretta, Donatella; Tzschentke, Thomas M; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies showed that combination of mu opioid receptor (MOP) agonism and monoamine reuptake inhibition may improve the therapeutic effect of opioids by reducing requirement for MOP activation. Tapentadol, showing such a combined mechanism of action, exhibits delayed analgesic tolerance development compared to pure MOP agonists. Here we investigated how opioid receptors are regulated following different schedules (two ranges of concentrations for 24 and 48 h) of tapentadol exposure in vitro in SH-SY5Y cells. MOP and nociceptin/orphaninFQ (NOP) receptor gene expressions were quantified using qReal-Time PCR. Moreover, studies were performed in U2 cells to assess tapentadol effect on MOP internalization compared with morphine and DAMGO. Ten and 100 nM tapentadol for 48 h induced a significant increase of MOP gene expression; cells exposed to 100 μM tapentadol for 24 and 48 h showed a significant increase of MOP mRNA levels. NOP gene expression showed a significant decrease following tapentadol at all low concentrations used after 24 h and at high concentrations (45 and 60 μM) after 24 h and (60 μM) after 48 h. Differently from DAMGO, tapentadol or morphine showed no effects on MOP internalization. This study suggests that tapentadol affects MOP and NOP gene expression and MOP internalization showing a pattern distinct from classical MOP agonists. Whether these differences can explain the improved therapeutic profile of tapentadol remains to be investigated.

  4. Expression of prosaposin and its receptors in the rat cerebellum after kainic acid injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Prosaposin (PSAP, a highly conserved glycoprotein, is a precursor of saposins A–D. Accumulating evidence suggests that PSAP is a neurotrophic factor that induces differentiation and prevents death in a variety of neuronal cells through the active region within the saposin C domain both in vivo and in vitro. Recently, GPR37 and GPR37L1 were recognized as PSAP receptors. In this study, we examined the alteration in expression of PSAP and its receptors in the cerebellum using rats injected with kainic acid (KA. The results show that PSAP was strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of Purkinje cells and interneurons in the molecular layer, and that PSAP expression in both types of neurons was markedly enhanced following KA treatment. Immunoblotting revealed that the expression of GPR37 was diminished significantly three days after KA injection compared with control rats; however, no changes were observed through immunostaining. No discernable changes were found in GPR37L1. These findings may help us to understand the role of PSAP and the GPR37 and GPR37L1 receptors in alleviating the neural damage caused by KA.

  5. TLR4 and CD14 receptors expressed in rat pineal gland trigger NFKB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia Emanuele; Tamura, Eduardo Koji; Pinato, Luciana; Cecon, Erika; Fernandes, Pedro Augusto Carlos Magno; de Avellar, Maria Christina Werneck; Ferreira, Zulma Silva; Markus, Regina Pekelmann

    2010-09-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFKB), a pivotal player in inflammatory responses, is constitutively expressed in the pineal gland. Corticosterone inhibits pineal NFKB leading to an enhancement of melatonin production, while tumor necrosis factor (TNF) leads to inhibition of Aa-nat transcription and the production of N-acetylserotonin in cultured glands. The reduction in nocturnal melatonin surge favors the mounting of the inflammatory response. Despite these data, there is no clear evidence of the ability of the pineal gland to recognize molecules that signal infection. This study investigated whether the rat pineal gland expresses receptors for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the endotoxin from the membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, and to establish the mechanism of action of LPS. Here, we show that pineal glands possess both CD14 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), membrane proteins that bind LPS and trigger the NFKB pathway. LPS induced the nuclear translocation of p50/p50 and p50/RELA dimers and the synthesis of TNF. The maximal expression of TNF in cultured glands coincides with an increase in the expression of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) in isolated pinealocytes. In addition, LPS inhibited the synthesis of N-acetylserotonin and melatonin. Therefore, the pineal gland transduces Gram-negative endotoxin stimulation by producing TNF and inhibiting melatonin synthesis. Here, we provide evidence to reinforce the idea of an immune-pineal axis, showing that the pineal gland is a constitutive player in the innate immune response.

  6. Estrogen receptor (ER) beta regulates ERalpha expression in stromal cells derived from ovarian endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukhacheva, Elena; Lin, Zhihong; Reierstad, Scott; Cheng, You-Hong; Milad, Magdy; Bulun, Serdar E

    2009-02-01

    Estradiol and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ERbeta, play critical roles in endometrium and endometriosis. Levels of ERbeta, due to pathological hypomethylation of its promoter, are significantly higher in endometriotic vs. endometrial tissue and stromal cells, whereas ERalpha levels are lower in endometriosis. Estradiol regulates ERalpha gene expression via its alternatively used promoters A, B, and C. The aim of the study was to determine whether high levels of ERbeta in endometriotic stromal cells from ovarian endometriomas regulate ERalpha gene expression. ERbeta knockdown significantly increased ERalpha mRNA and protein levels in endometriotic stromal cells. Conversely, ERbeta overexpression in endometrial stromal cells decreased ERalpha mRNA and protein levels. ERbeta knockdown significantly decreased proliferation of endometriotic stromal cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that estradiol enhanced ERbeta binding to nonclassical activator protein 1 and specificity protein 1 motifs in the ERalpha gene promoters A and C and a classic estrogen response element in promoter B in endometriotic stromal cells. High levels of ERbeta suppress ERalpha expression and response to estradiol in endometrial and endometriotic stromal cells via binding to classic and nonclassic DNA motifs in alternatively used ERalpha promoters. ERbeta also regulates cell cycle progression and might contribute to proliferation of endometriotic stromal cells. We speculate that a significantly increased ratio of ERbeta:ERalpha in endometriotic tissues may also suppress progesterone receptor expression and contribute to progesterone resistance. Thus, ERbeta may serve as a significant therapeutic target for endometriosis.

  7. mRNA expression pattern of gonadotropin receptors in bovine follicular cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Belkis E; Diaz, Pablo U; Salvetti, Natalia R; Rey, Florencia; Ortega, Hugo H

    2014-12-01

    Follicular growth and steroidogenesis are dependent on gonadotropin binding to their receptors in granulosa and theca cells of ovarian follicles. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression patterns of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) in ovarian follicular structures from cows with cystic ovarian disease (COD) as compared with those of regularly cycling cows. Relative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of FSHR mRNA in granulosa cells was highest in small antral follicles, then decreased significantly as follicles increased in size, and was lowest in cysts. FSHR mRNA was not detected in the theca cells of any follicular category, including cysts. LHCGR mRNA expression in granulosa cells was significantly higher in large antral follicles than in cysts, and not detected in granulosa cells of small and medium antral follicles. In theca cells, the expression level of LHCGR mRNA in medium antral follicles was higher than in small and large antral follicles, whereas that in follicular cysts it was similar to those in small and medium antral follicles, but higher than that in large antral follicles. Our findings provide evidence that there is an altered gonadotropin receptor expression in bovine cystic follicles, and suggest that in conditions characterized by altered ovulation, such as COD, changes in the signaling system of gonadotropins may play a fundamental role in their pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 and 2 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchankova, Magda; Bucova, Maria; Tibenska, Elena; Tedlova, Eva; Demian, Juraj; Majer, Ivan; Novosadova, Helena; Tedla, Miroslav; Paulovicova, Ema; Kantarova, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    Pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS) is characterized by the formation of granulomas in the lungs and has been associated with infection by microorganisms. Triggering receptor expressed on the surface of myeloid cells (TREM)-1 is overexpressed in response to infection while TREM-2 is involved in granuloma formation. We hypothesized that these receptors are overexpressed in PS and might be useful for diagnostic testing. Cell surface TREM-1 and TREM-2 expression in cells obtained at bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was measured in individuals with sarcoidosis (n = 26) and compared with that seen in individuals with other interstitial lung diseases (ILD) (n = 27). TREM-1 and TREM-2 expression was significantly increased in sarcoidosis compared with other ILD: total number of TREM-1, P = 0.0039 (23.81 vs 13.50 cells/μl), TREM-2, P < 0.0001 (32.81 vs 7.76 cells/μl); percentage of TREM-1: P = 0.0002 (41.30% vs 15.70%), TREM-2: P < 0.0001 (34% vs 9.60%); and mean fluorescence of TREM-1: P = 0.0005 (5.43 vs 1.96), TREM-2: P = 0.0011 (6.85 vs 2.77). Increase in both of these receptors seems to be typical for PS. In discriminating sarcoidosis from other ILD, the specificity (96%) and sensitivity (72%) of the combination of TREM-1 and TREM-2 was high. Increased TREM-1 and TREM-2 cell surface expression is observed in sarcoidosis. Evaluation of BAL cell expression of both of these receptors may serve as a diagnostic marker for sarcoidosis. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  9. Human Interleukine-1 receptor antagonist:Cloning, Expression and Optimization in E.coli Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Barati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA is a powerful anti-inflammatory cytokine which limits the biological effects of IL-1. Due to structural similarity between IL-1 and its antagonist, IL-1RA competitively binds to IL-1 receptor which leads to no signal transduction. Therefore , it is applied in the treatment of patients with inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis. The aim of this study is cloning, expression and op-timization of IL-1RA in E. coli. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study synthetically prepared cDNA was amplified by PCR. After double digestion with NdeI and XhoI restriction enzymes, this gene was cloned in pET28a expression vector. Expression of desired gene was analyzed at RNA level by RT-PCR and at protein level by SDS-PAGE and followed by western blot to confirm SDS-PAGE results. Optimization of recombinant protein expression was performed in dif-ferent IPTG concentrations and harvesting times after induction. Results: The presence of gene in pET28a was determined by colony-PCR and confirmed by restriction digestion. Transcription of cloned gene and expression of high yield recombinant protein were shown by RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE, respectively. The result of SDS-PAGE was confirmed by western blot. Expression was optimized in different induction time and IPTG concentrations Conclusion: The result of this study demonstrated expression of this recombinant protein at high level in E.coli system by pET28a expression vector. This study also showed a direct as-sociation between the increased level of expression and time of induction . Therefore, an overnight induction time with 0.1 mM IPTG concentration is recommended for a high level expression. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:145-151

  10. Decreased Hypothalamic Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Expression in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Balesar, Rawien; IJzerman, Richard G; Swaab, Dick F; Diamant, Michaela; la Fleur, Susanne E; Alkemade, Anneke

    2016-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) reduce blood glucose and food intake. It has been suggested that these effects are partly mediated through central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs). The rodent and nonhuman primate hypothalamus show clear GLP-1R expression. However, a detailed description of GLP-1R expression in the human hypothalamus is lacking, and it is unknown whether this expression is altered in T2DM patients. The objective of the study was to investigate the GLP-1R distribution in the human postmortem hypothalamus and to determine whether hypothalamic GLP-1R expression is altered in T2DM patients. We investigated the distribution of GLP-1R expression throughout the human hypothalamus by means of in situ hybridization. We also performed quantifications of GLP-1R mRNA expression in two hypothalamic nuclei (ie, the paraventricular nucleus [PVN] and infundibular nucleus [IFN]), comparing patients with T2DM and control subjects. We found that GLP-1R mRNA was expressed in a number of hypothalamic nuclei including the PVN and the IFN, both involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. We observed sporadic colocalization of the GLP-1R in the IFN with the orgexigenic neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, or proopiomelanocortin transcripts. Comparison of GLP-1R mRNA in the PVN and IFN between T2DM patients and control subjects revealed a decreased expression in T2DM patients. Our studies show that GLP-1R is widely expressed throughout the human hypothalamus. The decreased expression of GLP-1R in the PVN and IFN of T2DM patients may be related to the dysregulation of feeding behavior and glucose homeostasis in T2DM.

  11. Influence of Androgen Receptor Expression on the Survival Outcomes in Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonseok; Jae, Eunae; Yoon, Myunghee

    2015-06-01

    Despite the fact that the androgen receptor (AR) is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, its prognostic effect remains controversial. In this meta-analysis, we explored AR expression and its impact on survival outcomes in breast cancer. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, and Ovid databases and references of articles to identify studies reporting data until December 2013. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by extracting the number of patients with recurrence and survival according to AR expression. There were 16 articles that met the criteria for inclusion in our meta-analysis. DFS and OS were significantly longer in patients with AR expression compared with patients without AR expression (odds ratio [OR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.90; OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.73, respectively). In addition, hormone receptor (HR) positive patients had a longer DFS when AR was also expressed (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41-0.98). For patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), AR expression was also associated with longer DFS and OS (OR, 0.44, 95% CI, 0.26-0.75; OR, 0.26, 95% CI, 0.12-0.55, respectively). Furthermore, AR expression was associated with a longer DFS and OS in women (OR, 0.42, 95% CI, 0.27-0.64; OR, 0.47, 95% CI, 0.38-0.59, respectively). However, in men, AR expression was associated with a worse DFS (OR, 6.00; 95% CI, 1.46-24.73). Expression of AR in breast cancer might be associated with better survival outcomes, especially in patients with HR-positive tumors and TNBC, and women. Based on this meta-analysis, we propose that AR expression might be related to prognostic features and contribute to clinical outcomes.

  12. Effects of dexamethasone on purinergic signaling in murine mast cells: Selective suppression of P2X7 receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Ito, Masaaki; Hoshino, Yui; Matsuoka, Isao

    2017-12-02

    Mast cells express many different purinergic receptors, including ionotropic P2X4 and P2X7, which recognize the accumulation of extracellular ATP released from activated and/or damaged cells. This results in the stimulation of mast cell functions. In this study, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid widely used for the treatment of allergic disease, on purinergic receptor expression in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Treatment of BMMCs with Dex decreased P2X7 receptor mRNA levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner without affecting the expression of other purinergic receptor subtypes. Accordingly, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that Dex treatment also decreased P2X7 receptor protein levels. This effect was mimicked by prednisolone, another anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, and was inhibited by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Functionally, treatment of BMMCs with Dex impaired the P2X7-mediated rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, degranulation, and ethidium uptake, a response relevant to receptor-pore formation. Finally, oral administration of Dex to C57BL/6 mice in vivo resulted in a significant decrease in P2X7 receptor expression in peritoneal mast cells. These results suggest that reduction of P2X7 receptor expression in mast cells might be one of the anti-allergic mechanisms of Dex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduced retinoids and retinoid receptors' expression in pancreatic cancer: A link to patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleul, Tim; Rühl, Ralph; Bulashevska, Svetlana; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents one of the deadliest cancers in the world. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is the major physiologically active form of vitamin A, regulating expression of many genes. Disturbances of vitamin A metabolism are prevalent in some cancer cells. The main aim of this work was to investigate deeply the components of retinoid signaling in PDAC compared to in the normal pancreas and to prove the clinical importance of retinoid receptor expression. For the study, human tumor tissues obtained from PDAC patients and murine tumors from the orthotopic Panc02 model were used for the analysis of retinoids, using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and real-time RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Survival probabilities in univariate analysis were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis. In this work, we showed for the first time that the ATRA and all-trans retinol concentration is reduced in PDAC tissue compared to their normal counterparts. The expression of RARα and β as well as RXRα and β are down-regulated in PDAC tissue. This reduced expression of retinoid receptors correlates with the expression of some markers of differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as of cancer stem cell markers. Importantly, the expression of RARα and RXRβ is associated with better overall survival of PDAC patients. Thus, reduction of retinoids and their receptors is an important feature of PDAC and is associated with worse patient survival outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Hypoglycemia induced changes in cholinergic receptor expression in the cerebellum of diabetic rats

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    Anju TR

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose homeostasis in humans is an important factor for the functioning of nervous system. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia is found to be associated with central and peripheral nerve system dysfunction. Changes in acetylcholine receptors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. In the present study we showed the effects of insulin induced hypoglycemia and streptozotocin induced diabetes on the cerebellar cholinergic receptors, GLUT3 and muscle cholinergic activity. Results showed enhanced binding parameters and gene expression of Muscarinic M1, M3 receptor subtypes in cerebellum of diabetic (D and hypoglycemic group (D + IIH and C + IIH. α7nAchR gene expression showed a significant upregulation in diabetic group and showed further upregulated expression in both D + IIH and C + IIH group. AchE expression significantly upregulated in hypoglycemic and diabetic group. ChAT showed downregulation and GLUT3 expression showed a significant upregulation in D + IIH and C + IIH and diabetic group. AchE activity enhanced in the muscle of hypoglycemic and diabetic rats. Our studies demonstrated a functional disturbance in the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 in the cerebellum during insulin induced hypoglycemia in diabetic rats. Altered expression of muscarinic M1, M3 and α7nAchR and increased muscle AchE activity in hypoglycemic rats in cerebellum is suggested to cause cognitive and motor dysfunction. Hypoglycemia induced changes in ChAT and AchE gene expression is suggested to cause impaired acetycholine metabolism in the cerebellum. Cerebellar dysfunction is associated with seizure generation, motor deficits and memory impairment. The results shows that cerebellar cholinergic neurotransmission is impaired during hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia and the hypoglycemia is causing more prominent imbalance in cholinergic neurotransmission which is suggested to be a cause of cerebellar

  15. Effect of ryanodine on sinus node recovery time determined in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassani J.W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has indicated that the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR might be involved in the generation of spontaneous electrical activity in atrial pacemaker cells. We report the effect of disabling the SR with ryanodine (0.1 µM on the sinus node recovery time (SNRT measured in isolated right atria from 4-6-month-old male Wistar rats. Electrogram and isometric force were recorded at 36.5oC. Two methods for sinus node resetting were used: a pulse: a single stimulus pulse interpolated at coupling intervals of 50, 65 or 80% of the regular spontaneous cycle length (RCL, and b train: a 2-min train of pulses at intervals of 50, 65 or 80% of RCL. Corrected SNRT (cSNRT was calculated as the difference between SNRT (first spontaneous cycle length after stimulation interruption and RCL. Ryanodine only slightly increased RCL (<10%, but decreased developed force by 90%. When the pulse method was used, cSNRT (~40 ms, which represents intranodal/atrial conduction time, was independent of the coupling interval and unaffected by ryanodine. However, cSNRT obtained by the train method was significantly higher for shorter intervals between pulses, indicating the occurrence of overdrive suppression. In this case, ryanodine prolonged cSNRT in a rate-dependent fashion, with a greater effect at shorter intervals. These results indicate that: a a functional SR, albeit important for force development, does not seem to play a major role in atrial automaticity in the rat; b disruption of cell Ca2+ homeostasis by inhibition of SR function does not appear to affect conduction; however, it enhances overdrive-induced depression of sinusal automaticity.

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor expression and role of HGF during embryonic mouse testis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Catizone, A; Innocenzi, A; Galdieri, M

    1999-12-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor, c-met, transduces the HGF multiple biological activities. During embryonic development the system HGF/c-met regulates the morphogenesis of different organs and tissues. In this study we examined c-met gene expression during mouse testis development and, by means of Northern blot and in situ hybridization, we report the receptor expression pattern. C-met expression is not detectable in male genital ridges isolated from embryos at 11.5 days postcoitum (dpc). In testes isolated from 12.5 and 13.5 dpc, c-met expression is detectable and essentially localized in the developing cords. Male genital ducts do not express c-met at the reported ages, whereas female ducts appear c-met positive. Moreover, we report that HGF is able to induce testicular morphogenesis in vitro. Male genital ridges isolated from embryos at 11.5 dpc are morphologically nonorganized. Culturing 11.5 dpc urogenital ridges in the presence of HGF we obtained testis organization and testicular cord formation. Our data demonstrate that c-met is expressed during the beginning period of testis differentiation and that HGF is able to support testicular differentiation in vitro. All these data indicate that this growth factor, besides its role as mitogenic factor, plays a fundamental role during testicular cord formation probably inducing cell migration and/or cell differentiation. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are expressed in developing mouse pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eyll, Jonathan M; Passante, Lara; Pierreux, Christophe E; Lemaigre, Frédéric P; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Rousseau, Guy G

    2006-04-01

    Pancreas development involves branching morphogenesis concomitantly to differentiation of endocrine, exocrine and ductal cell types from a single population of pancreatic precursors. These processes depend on many signals and factors that also control development of the central nervous system. In the latter, Eph receptors and their class-A (GPI-anchored) and class-B (transmembrane) ephrin ligands control cell migration and axon-pathfinding, help establish regional patterns and act as labels for cell positioning. This raised the question as to whether and where Ephs and ephrins are expressed during pancreas development. Here we have identified the Eph and ephrin genes that are expressed in mouse embryonic pancreas, as detected by RT-PCR analysis. In situ hybridization experiments showed that Ephs and ephrins are mainly expressed in the burgeoning structures of the epithelium which differentiate into exocrine acini. Binding experiments on whole pancreas demonstrated the presence of functional Eph receptors. They showed that EphBs are expressed by the pancreatic epithelium at embryonic day (e) 12.5 and that, from e14.5 on, Ephs of both classes are expressed by the pancreatic epithelium and then become restricted to developing acini. We conclude that specific members of the Eph/ephrin family are expressed in embryonic pancreas according to a dynamic temporal and regional pattern.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Receptor Expression In Vivo by Near-Infrared Optical Ima