WorldWideScience

Sample records for rutherford scattering cross

  1. A full-angle Monte-Carlo scattering technique including cumulative and single-event Rutherford scattering in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Drew P.

    2017-11-01

    We describe and justify a full-angle scattering (FAS) method to faithfully reproduce the accumulated differential angular Rutherford scattering probability distribution function (pdf) of particles in a plasma. The FAS method splits the scattering events into two regions. At small angles it is described by cumulative scattering events resulting, via the central limit theorem, in a Gaussian-like pdf; at larger angles it is described by single-event scatters and retains a pdf that follows the form of the Rutherford differential cross-section. The FAS method is verified using discrete Monte-Carlo scattering simulations run at small timesteps to include each individual scattering event. We identify the FAS regime of interest as where the ratio of temporal/spatial scale-of-interest to slowing-down time/length is from 10-3 to 0.3-0.7; the upper limit corresponds to Coulomb logarithm of 20-2, respectively. Two test problems, high-velocity interpenetrating plasma flows and keV-temperature ion equilibration, are used to highlight systems where including FAS is important to capture relevant physics.

  2. Non-Rutherford cross-sections for alpha elastic scattering off Z = 28-38 elements in the energy range up to 10 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbich, A. F.; Bokhovko, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    The alpha elastic scattering cross-sections for Ni, Cu, and Y were measured at the energies above the onset of the non-Rutherford scattering. The obtained experimental data along with data from literature were incorporated into the theoretical analysis in the framework of the optical model. The optimization of the model parameters provided a basis for the calculations of the differential cross-sections for Z = 28-38 elements in the energy range up to 10 MeV. The obtained cross sections were made available for common use through the SigmaCalc web site at http://sigmacalc.iate.obninsk.ru/.

  3. Photonic Rutherford scattering: A classical and quantum mechanical analogy in ray and wave optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmke, Markus; Cichos, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Using Fermat's least-optical-path principle, the family of ray trajectories through a special (but common) type of a gradient refractive index lens n(r)=n0+ΔnR /r is solved analytically. The solution gives a ray equation r(ϕ) that is closely related to Rutherford scattering trajectories; we therefore refer to this refraction process as "photonic Rutherford scattering." It is shown that not only do the classical limits correspond but also the wave-mechanical pictures coincide—the time-independent Schrödingier equation and the Helmholtz equation permit the same mapping between the scattering of massive particles and optical scalar waves. Scattering of narrow beams of light finally recovers the classical trajectories. The analysis suggests that photothermal single-particle microscopy measures photonic Rutherford scattering in specific limits and allows for an individual single-scatterer probing. A macroscopic experiment is demonstrated to directly measure the scattering angle to impact parameter relation, which is otherwise accessible only indirectly in Rutherford-scattering experiments.

  4. Computer simulation program for medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki

    2016-03-01

    A computer simulation program for ion scattering and its graphical user interface (MEISwin) has been developed. Using this program, researchers have analyzed medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at Ritsumeikan University since 1998, and at Rutgers University since 2007. The main features of the program are as follows: (1) stopping power can be chosen from five datasets spanning several decades (from 1977 to 2011), (2) straggling can be chosen from two datasets, (3) spectral shape can be selected as Gaussian or exponentially modified Gaussian, (4) scattering cross sections can be selected as Coulomb or screened, (5) simulations adopt the resonant elastic scattering cross section of 16O(4He, 4He)16O, (6) pileup simulation for RBS spectra is supported, (7) natural and specific isotope abundances are supported, and (8) the charge fraction can be chosen from three patterns (fixed, energy-dependent, and ion fraction with charge-exchange parameters for medium-energy ion scattering). This study demonstrates and discusses the simulations and their results.

  5. Computer simulation program for medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki, E-mail: t-nishi@hosei.ac.jp

    2016-03-15

    A computer simulation program for ion scattering and its graphical user interface (MEISwin) has been developed. Using this program, researchers have analyzed medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at Ritsumeikan University since 1998, and at Rutgers University since 2007. The main features of the program are as follows: (1) stopping power can be chosen from five datasets spanning several decades (from 1977 to 2011), (2) straggling can be chosen from two datasets, (3) spectral shape can be selected as Gaussian or exponentially modified Gaussian, (4) scattering cross sections can be selected as Coulomb or screened, (5) simulations adopt the resonant elastic scattering cross section of {sup 16}O({sup 4}He, {sup 4}He){sup 16}O, (6) pileup simulation for RBS spectra is supported, (7) natural and specific isotope abundances are supported, and (8) the charge fraction can be chosen from three patterns (fixed, energy-dependent, and ion fraction with charge-exchange parameters for medium-energy ion scattering). This study demonstrates and discusses the simulations and their results.

  6. Optimalization study for ion-temperature measurements by means of Rutherford scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, A.J.H.; Barbian, E.P.

    1986-03-01

    Small-angle Rutherford scattering of energetic neutrals by plasma ions is governed by energy and momentum conservation. The FWHM of the scattering distibution reveals the ion temperature of the plasma. A feasibility study is performed to optimize the parameters in case Rutherford-scattering technique is applied to a medium-sized tokamak experiment. Together with a time-of-flight analyser with a high energy resolution of about 100, a 20 keV helium probing beam with a neutral current density of 10 A/m 2 can provide a detailed spectrum within 3 ms, from which the ion temperature can be extracted with an accuracy of better than 10%. The influence of plasma impurities and resonant charge exchange on the scattering process is discussed in detail. The good spatial resolution makes the method very suitable to investigate energy deposition profiles in the case of ion-cyclotron radiation applied to the plasma for the purpose of plasma heating. (orig.)

  7. Experimenting from a Distance in the Case of Rutherford Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grober, S.; Vetter, M.; Eckert, B.; Jodl, H. -J.

    2010-01-01

    The Rutherford scattering experiment plays a central role in working out atomic models in physics and chemistry. Nevertheless, the experiment is rarely performed at school or in introductory physics courses at university. Therefore, we realized this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL), i.e. the experiment is set up in reality and…

  8. Note on some quasielastic neutron scattering analysis programs on the Rutherford Laboratory IBM 360/195

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, R.M.

    1979-12-01

    A suite of programs for analysing neutron scattering data from time-of-flight spectrometers has been implemented on the Rutherford Laboratory IBM 360/195 computer system. The programs are intended for near inelastic and quasielastic data and operate by convoluting the measured instrumental resolution function with a model scattering function before fitting to the measured sample scattering law. (author)

  9. A Rutherford Scattering Simulation with Microcomputer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Wright, Lavonia F.

    1989-01-01

    Lists a program for a simulation of Rutherford's gold foil experiment in BASIC for both Apple II and IBM compatible computers. Compares Rutherford's model of the atom with Thompson's plum pudding model of the atom. (MVL)

  10. Effective temperatures and scattering cross sections in water mixtures determined by Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawidowski, J.; Rodríguez Palomino, L.A.; Márquez Damián, J.I.; Blostein, J.J.; Cuello, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effective temperatures of atoms can be determined by the DINS technique. • This is the first time that such application of this experimental technique is made. • This technique is able to measure the known cross sections of the atoms. • No anomalous cross section was found, at variance with Dreissmann’s et al. claims. - Abstract: The present work shows a series of results of Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on light and heavy water mixtures performed at the spectrometer VESUVIO (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) employing an analysis method based on the information provided by individual detectors in forward and backward scattering positions. We investigated the effective temperatures of the different atoms composing the samples, a magnitude of considerable interest for Nuclear Engineering. The peak intensities and their relation with the bound-atom cross sections is analyzed, showing a good agreement with tabulated values which supports the use of this technique as non-destructive mass spectrometry. Previous results in the determination of scattering cross sections by this technique (known in the literature) that were at variance with the present findings are commented.

  11. Raman scattering and Rutherford backscattering studies on InN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yee Ling; Peng Xingyu; Liao, Ying Chieh; Yao Shude; Chen, Li Chyong; Chen, Kuei Hsien; Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2011-01-01

    A series of InN thin films was grown on sapphire substrates via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) with different nitrogen plasma power. Various characterization techniques, including Hall, photoluminescence, Raman scattering and Rutherford backscattering, have been employed to study these InN films. Good crystalline wurtzite structures have been identified for all PA-MBE grown InN films on sapphire substrate, which have narrower XRD wurtzite (0002) peaks, showed c-axis Raman scattering allowed longitudinal optical (LO) modes of A 1 and E 1 plus E 2 symmetry, and very weak backscattering forbidden transverse optical (TO) modes. The lower plasma power can lead to the lower carrier concentration, to have the InN film close to intrinsic material with the PL emission below 0.70 eV. With increasing the plasma power, high carrier concentration beyond 1 x 10 20 cm -3 can be obtained, keeping good crystalline perfection. Rutherford backscattering confirmed most of InN films keeping stoichiometrical In/N ratios and only with higher plasma power of 400 W leaded to obvious surface effect and interdiffusion between the substrate and InN film.

  12. Gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits for electrically charged bodies in heterotic string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, J. R.; Olivares, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Properties of the motion of electrically charged particles in the background of the Gibbons–Maeda–Garfinkle–Horowitz–Strominger black hole is presented in this paper. Radial and angular motions are studied analytically for different values of the fundamental parameter. Therefore, gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits are analyzed in detail. Finally, this paper complements previous work by Fernando for null geodesics (Phys Rev D 85:024033, 2012), Olivares and Villanueva (Eur Phys J C 73:2659, 2013) and Blaga (Automat Comp Appl Math 22:41–48, 2013; Serb Astron 190:41, 2015) for time-like geodesics

  13. Gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits for electrically charged bodies in heterotic string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva, J.R. [Universidad de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Valparaiso (Chile); Centro de Astrofisica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Olivares, Marco [Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejercito Libertador 441, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-11-15

    Properties of the motion of electrically charged particles in the background of the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole is presented in this paper. Radial and angular motions are studied analytically for different values of the fundamental parameter. Therefore, gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits are analyzed in detail. Finally, this paper complements previous work by Fernando for null geodesics (Phys Rev D 85:024033, 2012), Olivares and Villanueva (Eur Phys J C 73:2659, 2013) and Blaga (Automat Comp Appl Math 22:41-48, 2013; Serb Astron 190:41, 2015) for time-like geodesics. (orig.)

  14. Guide to the Durham-Rutherford high energy physics databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gault, F.D.; Lotts, A.P.; Read, B.J.; Crawford, R.L.; Roberts, R.G.

    1979-12-01

    New databases and graphics facilities are added in this edition of the guide. It explains, with examples, how to retrieve tabulated experimental scattering data from databases on the Rutherford Laboratory computer network. (author)

  15. Rutherford back-scattering and X-ray fluorescence for the study of corroded surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhri, M. Anwar

    2010-01-01

    A combination of Rutherford-Back-Scattering (RBS) and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRF) has been used to study the corroded inside surfaces of some tooth-paste tubes, which were causing a significant loss of the product. This greyish-brown, thin, corrosion layer on the inside of the tooth-paste tube is easily distinguishable from brand new, as well as from non-corroded used tubes, which are made of 99.7 % Al. The unused clean aluminium tube shows some copper traces (about 0.3 mg/cm 2 ) on the surface, which almost disappears from the surface of the non-corroded used tube but reappears, to a lesser extent, on the surface of the corroded tube. The corroded layer has been found to consist mainly of P and Ca (about 1 mg/cm 2 each) with smaller quantities of Na, Mg, Si, S and Cl. (authors)

  16. NESKA, Electron and Positron Scattering from Point Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Mott's differential cross section for the scattering of electrons and positrons by point nuclei without screening is calculated for any energy, atomic number and angle of scattering. 2 - Method of solution: We have summed the conditionally convergent series appearing in Mott's cross section using two consecutive transformations: the one of Yennie, Ravenhall and Wilson and that of Euler till we have seven times six significant figures repeated in the ratio of the Mott cross section to the classical Rutherford cross section. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Those appearing in the use of Mott's cross section for unscreened point nuclei

  17. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), described in this document, supports a wide variety of projects. Each year more than 1000 scientists and engineers visit RAL to use its world-class laser and neutron-scattering facilities. RAL staff design and build instruments which circle the Earth in satellites, increasing our understanding of ozone depletion and global warming, of the life cycles of stars and galaxies and, indeed, of the origin of the Universe itself. They work with their academic colleagues at international laboratories such as European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, where massive underground machines probe the microstructure of the atomic nucleus. Vastly complex calculations are carried out on the design of anti-cancer drugs, for example, using supercomputers at RAL. (author)

  18. Cross plane scattering correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, L.; Karp, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Most previous scattering correction techniques for PET are based on assumptions made for a single transaxial plane and are independent of axial variations. These techniques will incorrectly estimate the scattering fraction for volumetric PET imaging systems since they do not take the cross-plane scattering into account. In this paper, the authors propose a new point source scattering deconvolution method (2-D). The cross-plane scattering is incorporated into the algorithm by modeling a scattering point source function. In the model, the scattering dependence both on axial and transaxial directions is reflected in the exponential fitting parameters and these parameters are directly estimated from a limited number of measured point response functions. The authors' results comparing the standard in-plane point source deconvolution to the authors' cross-plane source deconvolution show that for a small source, the former technique overestimates the scatter fraction in the plane of the source and underestimate the scatter fraction in adjacent planes. In addition, the authors also propose a simple approximation technique for deconvolution

  19. Application of Rutherford backscattering and nuclear reaction analysis techniques for investigation of thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, A.Z.; Simon, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ditroi, F.; Meszaros, S.; Beke, D.L.; Langer, G.A.; Daroczy, L.

    2002-01-01

    A study of the intermixing of the elements in amorphous Si-Ge multilayers have been carried out using Rutherford backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) technique. Interdiffusion coefficient was determined by measuring the intensity of the first Ge peak (having best depth resolution) in the RBS spectrum as a function of annealing time. The oxygen content of the multilayer was measured by the resonance elastic scattering method in co-operation with Dubna. A cross comparison of multilayered films were performed between the laboratories in Debrecen, Dubna, Albany and Dhaka. An essay to determine the nitrogen content of CVD diamond by the deuteron induced gamma ray emission method has been done. (author)

  20. Inelastic scattering of fast electrons by crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.J.; Josefsson, T.W.

    1995-01-01

    Generalized fundamental equations for electron diffraction in crystals, which include the effect of inelastic scattering described by a nonlocal interaction, are derived. An expression is obtained for the cross section for any specific type of inelastic scattering (e.g. inner-shell ionization, Rutherford backscattering). This result takes into account all other (background) inelastic scattering in the crystal leading to absorption from the dynamical Bragg-reflected beams, in practice mainly due to thermal diffuse scattering. There is a contribution to the cross section from all absorbed electrons, which form a diffuse background, as well as from the dynamical electrons. The approximations involved, assuming that the interactions leading to inelastic scattering can be described by a local potential are discussed, together with the corresponding expression for the cross section. It is demonstrated by means of an example for K-shell electron energy loss spectroscopy that nonlocal effects can be significant. 47 refs., 4 figs

  1. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-10

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics `Rijnhuizen`, was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL).

  2. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-01

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics 'Rijnhuizen', was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL)

  3. Regularization of the Coulomb scattering problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshevskii, V.G.; Feranchuk, I.D.; Kats, P.B.

    2004-01-01

    The exact solution of the Schroedinger equation for the Coulomb potential is used within the scope of both stationary and time-dependent scattering theories in order to find the parameters which determine the regularization of the Rutherford cross section when the scattering angle tends to zero but the distance r from the center remains finite. The angular distribution of the particles scattered in the Coulomb field is studied on rather a large but finite distance r from the center. It is shown that the standard asymptotic representation of the wave functions is inapplicable in the case when small scattering angles are considered. The unitary property of the scattering matrix is analyzed and the 'optical' theorem for this case is discussed. The total and transport cross sections for scattering the particle by the Coulomb center proved to be finite values and are calculated in the analytical form. It is shown that the effects under consideration can be important for the observed characteristics of the transport processes in semiconductors which are determined by the electron and hole scattering by the field of charged impurity centers

  4. The analysis of Rutherford scattering-channelling measurements of disorder production and annealing in ion irradiated semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Elliman, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    Rutherford scattering and channelling of light probe ions (e.g. He + ) has been extensively used for studies of disorder production in ion implanted semiconductors. Various authors have analysed models of amorphousness accumulation and Carter and Webb have indicated the general difficulties in assessing disorder production models from RBS/channelling studies if the production modes are complex and the manner in which the technique responds to different defect structures is unspecified. For less complex disorder production modes and by making reasonable assumptions about the technique response however, some insight into the form of backscattering yield - ion implant fluence functions can be obtained as is discussed in the present communication. It thus becomes possible to infer the importance of different disorder generation processes from RBS/channelling - ion influence studies. It will also be shown how simple annealing processes modify disorder accumulation and thus again how the operation of such processes may be inferred from RBS/channelling - ion fluence measurements. (author)

  5. Rutherford scattering of neutral atoms: a technique for measuring plasma ion temperatures. An analysis of the applicability to the central cell plasma of TMX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granneman, E.H.A.

    1980-01-01

    Rutherford scattering of neutral particles by plasma ions is examined as a method for determining plasma ion in the central cell fo the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX). When a scattering configuration, consisting of a 20-keV-, 10-A-deuterium neutral beam and an energy analyzer with a 1% resolution, is arranged such that only neutral particles scattered by plasma ions over an angle of 10 0 are accepted, central-cell ion temperatures in the 30- to 1000-eV range can be measured. The count rate registered by the detector(s) is estimated to be 2000 counts/ms. Consequently, good statistical accuracy and time resolution are attainable simultaneously. The results of the calculation are presented such that the scaling of the count rates and the energy broadening with scattering angle, neutral-beam energy, ion temperature, and plasma density can easily be deduced. Neutral helium beams are also considered; they have some advantages over deuterium beams. The background signal, caused by neutral particles entering the detector after two successive charge-exchange collisions, is examined and ways to completely eliminate this background are indicated

  6. A didactic proposal about Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with theoretic, experimental, simulation and application activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corni, Federico; Michelini, Marisa

    2018-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry is a nuclear analysis technique widely used for materials science investigation. Despite the strict technical requirements to perform the data acquisition, the interpretation of a spectrum is within the reach of general physics students. The main phenomena occurring during a collision between helium ions—with energy of a few MeV—and matter are: elastic nuclear collision, elastic scattering, and, in the case of non-surface collision, ion stopping. To interpret these phenomena, we use classical physics models: material point elastic collision, unscreened Coulomb scattering, and inelastic energy loss of ions with electrons, respectively. We present the educational proposal for Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, within the framework of the model of educational reconstruction, following a rationale that links basic physics concepts with quantities for spectra analysis. This contribution offers the opportunity to design didactic specific interventions suitable for undergraduate and secondary school students.

  7. Working with Rutherford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliphant, M.

    1984-01-01

    The author describes what it was like to work with Rutherford at the Cavendish Laboratory in the early 1930's. The memories are detailed and the anecdotes recounted give a vivid account of Rutherford at that time. Some experiments on heavy water are described. In one, deuterium nuclei were fused to form a new isotope of hydrogen of atomic mass 3, tritium. An alternative reaction of two deuterons produced a neutron and a helium particle of mass 3, helium-3. (UK)

  8. A conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann equation with anisotropic scattering and the grazing collisions limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the formulation of a conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann collision operator with anisotropic scattering cross-sections. The method is an extension of the conservative spectral method of Gamba and Tharkabhushanam [17,18], which uses the weak form of the collision operator to represent the collisional term as a weighted convolution in Fourier space. The method is tested by computing the collision operator with a suitably cut-off angular cross section and comparing the results with the solution of the Landau equation. We analytically study the convergence rate of the Fourier transformed Boltzmann collision operator in the grazing collisions limit to the Fourier transformed Landau collision operator under the assumption of some regularity and decay conditions of the solution to the Boltzmann equation. Our results show that the angular singularity which corresponds to the Rutherford scattering cross section is the critical singularity for which a grazing collision limit exists for the Boltzmann operator. Additionally, we numerically study the differences between homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation with the Rutherford scattering cross section and an artificial cross section, which give convergence to solutions of the Landau equation at different asymptotic rates. We numerically show the rate of the approximation as well as the consequences for the rate of entropy decay for homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation and Landau equation

  9. "Rutherford's Experiment" on Alpha Particles Scattering: The Experiment That Never Was

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M.; Robotti, N.; Verna, G.

    2018-01-01

    The so-called "Rutherford's experiment," as it is outlined in many physics textbooks, is a case in point of the flaws around the history at the educational level of one of the decisive event of modern physics: the discovery that the atom has a nucleus. This paper shows that this alleged experiment is a very approximate and very partial…

  10. Scattering cross section for various potential systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myagmarjav Odsuren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the problems of scattering in this framework, and show that the applied method is very useful in the investigation of the effect of the resonance in the observed scattering cross sections. In this study, not only the scattering cross sections but also the decomposition of the scattering cross sections was computed for the α–α system. To obtain the decomposition of scattering cross sections into resonance and residual continuum terms, the complex scaled orthogonality condition model and the extended completeness relation are used. Applying the present method to the α–α and α–n systems, we obtained good reproduction of the observed phase shifts and cross sections. The decomposition into resonance and continuum terms makes clear that resonance contributions are dominant but continuum terms and their interference are not negligible. To understand the behavior of observed phase shifts and the shape of the cross sections, both resonance and continuum terms are calculated.

  11. Scattering cross section for various potential systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odsuren, Myagmarjav; Khuukhenkhuu, Gonchigdorj; Davaa, Suren [Nuclear Research Center, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Kato, Kiyoshi [Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    We discuss the problems of scattering in this framework, and show that the applied method is very useful in the investigation of the effect of the resonance in the observed scattering cross sections. In this study, not only the scattering cross sections but also the decomposition of the scattering cross sections was computed for the α–α system. To obtain the decomposition of scattering cross sections into resonance and residual continuum terms, the complex scaled orthogonality condition model and the extended completeness relation are used. Applying the present method to the α–α and α–n systems, we obtained good reproduction of the observed phase shifts and cross sections. The decomposition into resonance and continuum terms makes clear that resonance contributions are dominant but continuum terms and their interference are not negligible. To understand the behavior of observed phase shifts and the shape of the cross sections, both resonance and continuum terms are calculated.

  12. Total cross sections for electron scattering by He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Heer, F.J.; Jansen, R.H.J.

    1977-01-01

    A set of total cross sections for scattering of electrons by He has been evaluated over the energy range of zero to 3000 eV by means of the analysis of experiments and theories on total cross sections for elastic scattering, ionisation and excitation, and on differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering. Between 0 and 19.8 eV, where no inelastic processes occur, the total cross sections for scattering are equal to those for elastic scattering. Above 19.8 eV total cross sections for scattering of electrons have been evaluated by adding those for ionisation, excitation and elastic scattering. The total cross sections thus obtained are probably accurate to about 5% over a large part of the energy range. They appear to be in very good agreement with the recent experimental results of Blaauw et al. (J. Phys. B.; 10:L299 (1977)). The present results have already proved useful for application in the dispersion relation for forward scattering in electron-helium collisions. (author)

  13. Rutherford-Bohr atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, J. L.

    1981-03-01

    Bohr used to introduce his attempts to explain clearly the principles of the quantum theory of the atom with an historical sketch, beginning invariably with the nuclear model proposed by Rutherford. That was sound pedagogy but bad history. The Rutherford-Bohr atom stands in the middle of a line of work initiated by J.J. Thomson and concluded by the invention of quantum mechanics. Thompson's program derived its inspiration from the peculiar emphasis on models characteristic of British physics of the 19th century. Rutherford's atom was a late product of the goals and conceptions of Victorian science. Bohr's modifications, although ultimately fatal to Thomson's program, initially gave further impetus to it. In the early 1920s the most promising approach to an adequate theory of the atom appeared to be the literal and detailed elaboration of the classical mechanics of multiply periodic orbits. The approach succeeded, demonstrating in an unexpected way the force of an argument often advanced by Thomson: because a mechanical model is richer in implications than the considerations for which it was advanced, it can suggest new directions of research that may lead to important discoveries.

  14. Surface structure analysis by means of Rutherford scattering: methods to study surface relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkenburg, W.C.; Soszka, W.; Saris, F.W.; Kersten, H.H.; Colenbrander, B.G.

    1976-01-01

    The use of Rutherford backscattering for structural analysis of single crystal surfaces is reviewed, and a new method is introduced. With this method, which makes use of the channeling and blocking phenomenon of light ions of medium energy, surface atoms can be located with a precision of 0.02 A. This is demonstrated in a measurement of surface relaxation for the Cu(110) surface. (Auth.)

  15. On the representation of electron multiple elastic-scattering distributions for Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawrakow, I.; Bielajew, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    A new representation of elastic electron-nucleus (Coulomb) multiple-scattering distributions is developed. Using the screened Rutherford cross section with the Moliere screening parameter as an example, a simple analytic angular transformation of the Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple-scattering distribution accounts for most of the structure of the angular distribution leaving a residual 3-parameter (path-length, transformed angle and screening parameter) function that is reasonably slowly varying and suitable for rapid, accurate interpolation in a computer-intensive algorithm. The residual function is calculated numerically for a wide range of Moliere screening parameters and path-lengths suitable for use in a general-purpose condensed-history Monte Carlo code. Additionally, techniques are developed that allow the distributions to be scaled to account for energy loss. This new representation allows ''''on-the-fly'''' sampling of Goudsmit-Saunderson angular distributions in a screened Rutherford approximation suitable for class II condensed-history Monte Carlo codes. (orig.)

  16. Introductory theory of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.

    1986-12-01

    The paper comprises a set of six lecture notes which were delivered to the summer school on 'Neutron Scattering at a pulsed source', Rutherford Laboratory, United Kingdom, 1986. The lectures concern the physical principles of neutron scattering. The topics of the lectures include: diffraction, incoherent inelastic scattering, connection with the Schroedinger equation, magnetic scattering, coherent inelastic scattering, and surfaces and neutron optics. (UK)

  17. Analysis of Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford cable production and strand deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Peggiani, Sonia; Beghi, Marco

    The development of cutting-edge 11-12 T superconducting magnets made from Nb$_{3}$Sn technology is one of the major milestones for the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The upgrade, called High Luminosity LHC Project, was planned in order to reach higher luminosity and discover new particles. Replacing the NbTi superconductor with the Nb$_{3}$Sn makes it possible to reach a practical operating magnetic field limit of up to 16 T. The superconducting coils are formed by Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford cables with a trapezoidal cross section and composed of 40 strands. Since the superconducting phase of Nb$_{3}$Sn is very brittle and it is reached after a thermal cycle, the Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford cable needs to be wound in a coil before the thermal treatment. The cabling process is a delicate step in the production of high performing cables that need different systems to control their quality. This work aims to provide practical tools to analyze the Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford cable production and the strands defo...

  18. Rutherford, Radioactivity and the Origins of Nuclear Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J

    2012-01-01

    When Ernest Rutherford became Professor of Physics at Manchester University in 1907, he brought with him the research field in which he had played a leading role over the previous few years: radioactivity. Rutherford turned the Manchester physics lab over to studies of radioactivity and radiation, and through his own work and that of his many collaborators and students, established Manchester as a major international centre in atomic physics. It was out of this powerhouse that the nuclear theory of the atom emerged in 1911. In 1917, Rutherford 'disintegrated' the nitrogen nucleus using α-particles, opening up the possibility of nuclear structure. At Cambridge's Cavendish Laboratory from 1919, Rutherford and his co-workers began to explore the constitution of the nucleus. With Chadwick, Aston and others, Rutherford turned his research school to the emergent field of nuclear physics – a field he dominated (though not without controversy) until his death in 1937. Exploring the intellectual, material and institutional cultures of early twentieth century physics, this paper will outline the background to Rutherford's career and work, the experimental and theoretical origins of nuclear theory of the atom and the early development of nuclear physics. (rutherford centennial conference on nuclear physics university of manchester 8-12 august 2011)

  19. Theory of atom displacements induced by fast electron elastic scattering in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, C. M.; Pinera, I.; Abreu, Y.; Leyva, A.

    2006-01-01

    Present contribution deals with the theoretical description of the conditions favoring the occurrence of single fast electron elastic scattering in solids, leading to the displacement of atoms from their crystalline sites. Firstly, the Moliere-Bethe-Goudsmit-Saunderson theory of Multiple Electron Scattering is applied, determining the limiting angle θ l over which the single electron elastic scattering prevails over the multiple one, leading to the evaluation of the total macroscopic cross-section for single electron elastic scattering on the basis of the Mott-Rutherford differential cross-section. On the basis of single electron elastic scattering by atoms in the solid matrix, it was determined the relative number of Atom Displacements produced by the Gamma Radiation as a primary act, as well as the energy and linear momentum of the ejected atoms. The statistical distributions of single electron elastic scattering and of those inducing Atom Displacements at different electron initial energies in comparison with the others electron inelastic scattering channels are discussed, where the statistical sampling methods on the basis of the rejection one where applied simulating different practical situations. (Full text)

  20. Transport cross section for small-angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'yakonov, M.I.; Khaetskii, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    Classical mechanics is valid for describing potential scattering under the conditions (1) λ much-lt α and (2) U much-gt ℎυ/α, where λ is the de Broglie wavelength, α is the characteristic size of the scatterer, U is the characteristic value of the potential energy, and υ is the velocity of the scattered particle. The second of these conditions means that the typical value of the classical scattering angle is far larger than the diffraction angle λ/α. In this paper the authors show that this second condition need not hold in a derivation of the transport cross section. In other words, provided that the condition λ much-lt α holds, it is always possible to calculate the transport cross section from the expressions of classical mechanics, even in the region U approx-lt ℎυ/α, where the scattering is diffractive,and the differential cross section is greatly different from the classical cross section. The transport cross section is found from the classical expression even in the anticlassical case U much-lt ℎυ/α, where the Born approximation can be used

  1. Rutherford's war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John

    2016-02-01

    Seagulls, sea lions and the comic-book hero Professor Radium were all recruited to fight the threat of submarines during the First World War. But as John Campbell explains, it was Ernest Rutherford who led the way a century ago in using acoustics to deter these deadly craft.

  2. Ernest Rutherford: scientist supreme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.

    1998-01-01

    One hundred years ago this month, Ernest Rutherford a talented young New Zealander who had just spent three years as a postgraduate student in Britain left for Canada, where he was to do the work that won him a Nobel prize. All three countries can justifiably claim this great scientist as their own. Ernest Rutherford is one of the most illustrious scientists that the world has ever seen. He achieved enduring international fame because of an incredibly productive life, during which he altered our view of nature on three separate occasions. Combining brilliantly conceived experiments with much hard work and special insight, he explained the perplexing problem of naturally occurring radioactivity, determined the structure of the atom, and was the world's first successful alchemist, changing nitrogen into oxygen. Rutherford received a Nobel prize for the first discovery, but the other two would have been equally worthy candidates, had they been discovered by someone else. Indeed, any one of his other secondary achievements many of which are now almost forgotten would have been enough to bring fame to a lesser scientist. For example, he invented an electrical method for detecting individual ionizing radiations, he dated the age of the Earth, and briefly held the world record for the distance over which wireless waves could be detected. He predicted the existence of neutrons, he oversaw the development of large-scale particle accelerators, and, during the First World War, he led the allied research into the detection of submarines. In this article the author describes the life and times of Ernest Rutherford. (UK)

  3. Using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy to Characterize Targets for MTW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gunnar; Stockler, Barak; Ward, Ryan; Freeman, Charlie; Padalino, Stephen; Stillman, Collin; Ivancic, Steven; Reagan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2017-10-01

    A study is underway to determine the composition and thickness of targets used at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). In RBS, an ion beam is incident on a sample and the scattered ions are detected with a surface barrier detector. The resulting energy spectra of the scattered ions can be analyzed to determine important parameters of the target including elemental composition and thickness. Proton, helium and deuterium beams from the 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator at SUNY Geneseo have been used to characterize several different targets for MTW, including CH and aluminum foils of varying thickness. RBS spectra were also obtained for a cylindrical iron buried-layer target with aluminum dopant which was mounted on a silicon carbide stalk. The computer program SIMNRA is used to analyze the spectra. This work was funded in part by a Grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  4. Review and calculation of Mott scattering cross section by unscreened point nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new tabulation of the ratio of the ''exact'' Mott cross section for unscreened point nuclei to the classical Rutherford cross section for electrons and positions has been made. Because of the infinite slowly converging series appearing in this ratio we have made two series transformations. With this evaluation the ratio reached convergence within six significant figures after less than a hundred terms and very low computing time. So the ratios evaluated have less relative error than those in the literature and covers a greater range of energy and atomic number. (orig.)

  5. Neutron total scattering cross sections of elemental antimony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron total cross sections are measured from 0.8 to 4.5 MeV with broad resolutions. Differential-neutron-elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 50 to 200 keV and at scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees. Lumped-level neutron-inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured over the same angular and energy range. The exPerimental results are discussed in terms of an optical-statistical model and are compared with respective values given in ENDF/B-V.

  6. Neutron total scattering cross sections of elemental antimony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron total cross sections are measured from 0.8 to 4.5 MeV with broad resolutions. Differential-neutron-elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 50 to 200 keV and at scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees. Lumped-level neutron-inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured over the same angular and energy range. The exPerimental results are discussed in terms of an optical-statistical model and are compared with respective values given in ENDF/B-V

  7. Ideal gas scattering kernel for energy dependent cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenstein, W.; Dagan, R.

    1998-01-01

    A third, and final, paper on the calculation of the joint kernel for neutron scattering by an ideal gas in thermal agitation is presented, when the scattering cross-section is energy dependent. The kernel is a function of the neutron energy after scattering, and of the cosine of the scattering angle, as in the case of the ideal gas kernel for a constant bound atom scattering cross-section. The final expression is suitable for numerical calculations

  8. Beam-guiding system for Rutherford-scattering diagnostic at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosler, A; Bertschinger, G.; Kemmereit, E.; Ven, H.W. van der; Barbian, E.P.; Blokland, A.A.E. van

    1988-01-01

    A beam-guiding system for a neutral beam probe diagnostic has been developed for implementation at TEXTOR. Energetic helium atoms scattered on the plasma ions provide information about the local ion temperature. Time resolution is attained by sampling scattered particles measured individually by a time-of-flight analyser. The mechanical supports have been designed for lateral and angular movement of the beam-guiding system to be used for radial scanning of the torus and for optimization of the scattering angle. The parameters of the probing beam itself can be controlled jby a small beam profile diagnsotic. Provisions are made to observe separately the radial or axial component of the ion velocity distribution. (author). 10 refs.; 7 figs

  9. Scattering cross-section of an inhomogeneous plasma cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiaming Shi; Lijian Qiu; Ling, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of em waves by the plasma cylinder is of significance in radar target detection, plasma diagnosis, etc. This paper discusses the general method to calculate the scattering cross-section of em waves from a plasma cylinder which is radially inhomogeneous and infinitely long. Numerical results are also provided for several plasma density profiles. The effect of the electron density distribution on the scattering cross-section is investigated

  10. CERN celebrates the ‘Rutherford centenary’

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    CERN marked the centenary of the discovery of the atomic nucleus, as published in Ernest Rutherford’s famous paper of 1911, with its Rutherford Centennial Colloquium, held on 15 November in the presence of John Adank, New Zealand’s ambassador to the World Trade Organization in Geneva. After an introduction by CERN’s director-general, Rolf Heuer, the speakers covered topics ranging from Rutherford’s early life in New Zealand, presented by his great grand-daughter Mary Fowler, through to his role as an inspiration to young scientists in his homeland, as seen by New Zealander Mark Kruse, who is now at Duke University and a member of the ATLAS collaboration. Fellow New Zealander, John Campbell, spoke about Rutherford’s road to discovery of the nuclear atom. Rutherford’s scientific legacy in nuclear physics was covered by Sean Freeman, appropriately from Manchester University, where the famous scattering experiment took place. Jerome Friedman delved deeper into matter with his talk detailing the scatt...

  11. Lessons from two paradigmatic developments; Rutherford's nuclear atom and halo nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaagen, J S; Ershov, S N; Zhukov, M V

    2012-01-01

    In its initial 1911 version, underpinned by discoveries in alpha-scattering experiments, Rutherford's atom model made a gross separation of neutral matter; A veil of light negative matter surrounding a tiny impenetrable heavy positive core. The model had however little to say about the atomic (electronic) architecture and dynamics, hence did not make it straight to the catwalk of physics of those days. Three quarters of a century later, in 1985, new discoveries in collision experiments revealed existence of abnormally large light nuclei, but could say less about the nuclear architecture. History sometimes repeats itself: Like Bohr's ad hoc planetary model (1913) changed the fate of Rutherford's discovery, again Scandinavian inspired ideas on architecture, this time nuclear halos, changed our paradigm for the heart of matter. We comment on the need for a concerted Rutherfordian effort between theory and increasingly complete reaction experiments if further ground-breaking progress is going to be made in halo physics, and physics in vicinities of neutron and proton driplines, and generally in the more widely growing field of many-body open quantum systems, where structure and reactions come together.

  12. Self-scattering cross-section of molecules in a beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Y.S.

    1974-01-01

    Molecular collision cross-section has always been measured by the beam scattering method, or by the measurements of thermal conductivity and/or viscosity coefficient, etc. The cross-section thus obtained has been found to be different, qualitatively, from that of the self-scattering of the molecules moving within a molecular beam. By perturbing the zeroth order solution of the Boltzmann equation with a B-G-K kinetic model for the gas upstream to the orifice, and performing particle scattering calculation for molecules within the beam downstream to the orifice, such self-scattering collision cross-section can be determined from the experimental data of velocity distribution functions of molecules in the beam

  13. Rutherford and Bohr*

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    He was always concerned about hurting any person's feelings, and he found great ... classical picture might be modified by using Planck's quantum of action. A first manuscript .... problem soon was made academic by Rutherford moving to Cambridge. ..... I hope it will not have too much of a reaction on them'. And later: 'I am ...

  14. Classical scattering cross section in sputtering transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhulin

    2002-01-01

    For Lindhard scaling interaction potential scattering commonly used in sputtering theory, the authors analyzed the great difference between Sigmund's single power and the double power cross sections calculated. The double power cross sections can give a much better approximation to the Born-Mayer scattering in the low energy region (m∼0.1). In particular, to solve the transport equations by K r -C potential interaction given by Urbassek few years ago, only the double power cross sections (m∼0.1) can yield better approximate results for the number of recoils. Therefore, the Sigmund's single power cross section might be replaced by the double power cross sections in low energy collision cascade theory

  15. Positive Scattering Cross Sections using Constrained Least Squares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, J.A.; Ganapol, B.D.; Morel, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    A method which creates a positive Legendre expansion from truncated Legendre cross section libraries is presented. The cross section moments of order two and greater are modified by a constrained least squares algorithm, subject to the constraints that the zeroth and first moments remain constant, and that the standard discrete ordinate scattering matrix is positive. A method using the maximum entropy representation of the cross section which reduces the error of these modified moments is also presented. These methods are implemented in PARTISN, and numerical results from a transport calculation using highly anisotropic scattering cross sections with the exponential discontinuous spatial scheme is presented

  16. Nonelastic-scattering cross sections of elemental nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1980-06-01

    Neutron total cross sections of elemental nickel were measured from 1.3 to 4.5 MeV, at intervals of approx. 50 keV, with resolutions of 30 to 50 keV and to accuracies of 1 to 2.5%. Neutron differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from 1.45 to 3.8 MeV, at intervals and with resolutions comparable to those of the total cross sections, and to accuracies of 3 to 5%. The nonelastic-scattering cross section is derived from the measured values to accuracies of greater than or equal to 6%. The experimental results are compared with previously reported values as represented by ENDF/B-V, and areas of consistency and discrepancy, noted. The measured results are shown to be in good agreement with the predictions of a model previously reported by the authors. 4 figures, 1 table

  17. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    Neutron total cross sections of niobium were measured from approx. = 0.7 to 4.5 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV with broad resolution. Differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 0.1 to 0.2 MeV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 degrees. Inelastically-scattered neutrons, corresponding to the excitation of levels at: 788 +- 23, 982 +- 17, 1088 +- 27, 1335 +- 35, 1504 +- 30, 1697 +- 19, 1971 +- 22, 2176 +- 28, 2456 +- (.), and 2581 +- (.) keV, were observed. An optical-statistical model, giving a good description of the observables, was deduced from the measured differential-elastic-scattering cross sections. The experimental-results were compared with the respective evaluated quantities given in ENDF/B-V.

  18. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    Neutron total cross sections of niobium were measured from approx. = 0.7 to 4.5 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV with broad resolution. Differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 0.1 to 0.2 MeV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 degrees. Inelastically-scattered neutrons, corresponding to the excitation of levels at: 788 +- 23, 982 +- 17, 1088 +- 27, 1335 +- 35, 1504 +- 30, 1697 +- 19, 1971 +- 22, 2176 +- 28, 2456 +- (.), and 2581 +- (.) keV, were observed. An optical-statistical model, giving a good description of the observables, was deduced from the measured differential-elastic-scattering cross sections. The experimental-results were compared with the respective evaluated quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  19. Stochastic modelling of fusion-product transport and thermalization with nuclear elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveaux, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are developed to model fusion-product (fp) transport and thermalization with both Rutherford scattering and nuclear elastic scattering (NES) in high-temperature (T/sub i/, T/sub e-/ > 50 keV), advanced-fuel (e.g. Cat-D, D- 3 He) plasmas. A discrete-event model is used to superimpose NES collisions on a Rutherford scattering model that contains the Spitzer coefficients of drag, velocity diffusion (VD), and pith-angle scattering (PAS). The effects of NES on fp transport and thermalization are investigated for advanced-fuel, Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) plasmas that have a significant Hamiltonian-canonical angular momentum (H-Ptheta) space loss cone which scales with the characteristic size (S identical with R/sub HV//3p/sub i/) and applied vacuum magnetic field (B 0 )

  20. Scattering cross-sections of common calibration gases measured by IBBCEAS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Issac

    Full Text Available In this study, incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS was used to measure scattering cross-sections of a few common gases in the 650–670 nm spectral range relative to that of dry air. Precise measurements of scattering cross-sections of these calibration gases in the visible spectral range are important. The IBBCEAS system developed in the laboratory was calibrated with a low-loss optical window. The measurements made at 660 nm were compared with previously measured cross-section values and found to be in good agreement with the existing measurements. Keywords: IBBCEAS, Rayleigh scattering, Scattering cross section

  1. Measurement of proton inelastic scattering cross sections on fluorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiari, M., E-mail: chiari@fi.infn.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and INFN Florence, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Caciolli, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padua and INFN Padua, Padova (Italy); Calzolai, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and INFN Florence, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Climent-Font, A. [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and INFN Florence, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    Differential cross-sections for proton inelastic scattering on fluorine, {sup 19}F(p,p’){sup 19}F, from the first five excited levels of {sup 19}F at 110, 197, 1346, 1459 and 1554 keV were measured for beam energies from 3 to 7 MeV at a scattering angle of 150° using a LiF thin target (50 μg/cm{sup 2}) evaporated on a self-supporting C thin film (30 μg/cm{sup 2}). Absolute differential cross-sections were calculated with a method not dependent on the absolute values of collected beam charge and detector solid angle. The validity of the measured inelastic scattering cross sections was then tested by successfully reproducing EBS spectra collected from a thick Teflon (CF{sub 2}) target. As a practical application of these measured inelastic scattering cross sections in elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), the feasibility of quantitative light element (C, N and O) analysis in aerosol particulate matter samples collected on Teflon by EBS measurements and spectra simulation is demonstrated.

  2. Generation of neutron scattering cross sections for silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, R; Marquez Damian, J.I; Granada, J.R.; Cantargi, F

    2009-01-01

    A set of neutron scattering cross sections for silicon and oxygen bound in silicon dioxide were generated and validated. The cross sections were generated in the ACE format for MCNP using the nuclear data processing system NJOY, and the validation was done with published experimental data. This cross section library was applied to the calculation of five critical configurations published in the benchmark Critical Experiments with Heterogeneous Compositions of Highly Enriched Uranium, Silicon Dioxide and Polyethylene. The original calculations did not use the thermal scattering libraries generated in this work and presented significant differences with the experimental results. For this reason, the newly generated library was added to the input and the multiplication factor for each configuration was recomputed. The utilization of the thermal scattering libraries did not result in an improvement of the computational results. Based on this we conclude that integral experiments to validate this type of thermal cross sections need to be designed with a higher influence of thermal scattering in the measured result, and the experiments have to be performed under more controlled conditions. [es

  3. Rutherford Memorial Lecture, 1977. Some episodes of the α-particle story, 1903-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feather, N.

    1977-01-01

    In this lecture an episodic account of more than seventy years experimental and theoretical α -particle physics is given, largely centred on the work of Rutherford and his colleagues but also including recent advances in the subject. Amongst the episodes included are, the birth of α- radiation in the winter of 1902 -3 when α - radiation finally assumed the character of a stream of 'charged bodies projected with a great velocity', work on measuring the α - particle charge, the discovery of the nucleus, scattering experiments, work on long-range α - Particles, and lastly α - particles in fission. (U.K.)

  4. Cross sections measurements for the forward elastic scattering of 13 MeV 6,7 Li and 24 MeV 16 O by 9 Be, 12 C, 16 O and 28 Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liendo, J.A.; Gonzalez, A.C.; Fletcher, N.R.; Caussyn, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Absolute elastic cross sections have been measured for targets of 9 Be, 12 C 16 O, 28 Si and 197 Au being bombarded by beams of 13 MeV 6 7 Li and 24 MeV 16 O. The relevant yields were collected simultaneously at 12.450, 16.450, 20.450 and 280. The confidence of a forward elastic scattering method proposed previously to carry out multi-elemental analysis of evaporated liquid samples depends on the precision and accuracy of the cross sections reported in this work.The 24 MeV 16 0 + 197 Au reaction was used to determine the detector solid angles with uncertainties of approximately 3%. Some of the 16 O-beam reactions Some of the 16 O beam reactions have been shown to be consistent with the Rutherford formula predictions at several angles. This allowed us to obtain target thickness independent cross sections for the lithium beam initiated reactions with uncertainties close to 7%. In general, the 6 7 Li-beam reaction cross sections were found not to be consistent with the Coulomb scattering formula. In order to test the internal consistency of our measured cross sections, they were used to determine the elemental densities of several selected targets containing beryllium, carbon, oxygen and silicon. These targets were bombarded with the same beam types and energies used to measure the cross sections and, for every element of interest contained in each target, elemental density values were obtained at some of the scattering angles quoted above. Agreements between some of our results and those of a previous work support the validity of our measurements. (Author)

  5. Fast-neutron scattering cross sections of elemental silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-05-01

    Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of elemental silver are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 200 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 0 . Inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at; 328 +- 13, 419 +- 50, 748 +- 25, 908 +- 26, 1150 +- 38, 1286 +- 25, 1507 +- 20, 1623 +- 30, 1835 +- 20 and 1944 +- 26 keV. The experimental results are used to derive an optical-statistical model that provides a good description of the observed cross sections. The measured values are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  6. Double Bounce Component in Cross-Polarimetric SAR from a New Scattering Target Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sang-Hoon; Wdowinski, Shimon

    2013-08-01

    Common vegetation scattering theories assume that the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) cross-polarization (cross-pol) signal represents solely volume scattering. We found this assumption incorrect based on SAR phase measurements acquired over the south Florida Everglades wetlands indicating that the cross-pol radar signal often samples the water surface beneath the vegetation. Based on these new observations, we propose that the cross-pol measurement consists of both volume scattering and double bounce components. The simplest multi-bounce scattering mechanism that generates cross-pol signal occurs by rotated dihedrals. Thus, we use the rotated dihedral mechanism with probability density function to revise some of the vegetation scattering theories and develop a three- component decomposition algorithm with single bounce, double bounce from both co-pol and cross-pol, and volume scattering components. We applied the new decomposition analysis to both urban and rural environments using Radarsat-2 quad-pol datasets. The decomposition of the San Francisco's urban area shows higher double bounce scattering and reduced volume scattering compared to other common three-component decomposition. The decomposition of the rural Everglades area shows that the relations between volume and cross-pol double bounce depend on the vegetation density. The new decomposition can be useful to better understand vegetation scattering behavior over the various surfaces and the estimation of above ground biomass using SAR observations.

  7. Spin wave scattering and interference in ferromagnetic cross

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanayakkara, Kasuni; Kozhanov, Alexander [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Center for Nano Optics, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Jacob, Ajey P. [Exploratory Research Device and Integration, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Magnetostatic spin wave scattering and interference across a CoTaZr ferromagnetic spin wave waveguide cross junction were investigated experimentally and by micromagnetic simulations. It is observed that the phase of the scattered waves is dependent on the wavelength, geometry of the junction, and scattering direction. It is found that destructive and constructive interference of the spin waves generates switching characteristics modulated by the input phase of the spin waves. Micromagnetic simulations are used to analyze experimental data and simulate the spin wave scattering and interference.

  8. Selective Rutherford backscattering techniques in the study of transition-metal implanted YBa{sub 2}C{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.W.; Russell, G.J. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Cohen, D.D.; Evans, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Using a metal-vapor vacuum arc ion source, several as-grown, large single crystal YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 17} zinc, nickel and iron ions. After implantation the crystal was subjected to two anneal cycles that has allowed to examine crystal structure, superconducting transitions and composition, through X-ray diffraction, rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and AC susceptibility measurements respectively. Although RBS discriminates strongly against light elements, such as oxygen, the use of resonant reaction {sup 16}O ({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 16}O at 3.4 MeV was beneficial, as its cross section is nearly 23 times that of the rutherford cross section. 4 figs.

  9. Selective Rutherford backscattering techniques in the study of transition-metal implanted YBa{sub 2}C{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J W; Russell, G J [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Cohen, D D; Evans, P J [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Using a metal-vapor vacuum arc ion source, several as-grown, large single crystal YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 17} zinc, nickel and iron ions. After implantation the crystal was subjected to two anneal cycles that has allowed to examine crystal structure, superconducting transitions and composition, through X-ray diffraction, rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and AC susceptibility measurements respectively. Although RBS discriminates strongly against light elements, such as oxygen, the use of resonant reaction {sup 16}O ({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 16}O at 3.4 MeV was beneficial, as its cross section is nearly 23 times that of the rutherford cross section. 4 figs.

  10. Neutron Scattering Differential Cross Sections for 12C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Stephen T.; Hicks, S. F.; Nickel, M. T.; Block, S. G.; Peters, E. E.; Ramirez, A. P. D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Because of the prevalence of its use in the nuclear energy industry and for our overall understanding of the interactions of neutrons with matter, accurately determining the effects of fast neutrons scattering from 12C is important. Previously measured 12C inelastic neutron scattering differential cross sections found in the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) show significant discrepancies (>30%). Seeking to resolve these discrepancies, neutron inelastic and elastic scattering differential cross sections for 12C were measured at the University of Kentucky Acceleratory Laboratory for incident neutron energies of 5.58, 5.83, and 6.04 MeV. Quasi mono-energetic neutrons were scattered off an enriched 12C target (>99.99%) and detected by a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector. Time-of-flight (TOF) techniques were used to determine scattered neutron energies and allowed for elastic/inelastic scattering distinction. Relative detector efficiencies were determined through direct measurements of neutrons produced by the 2H(d,n) and 3H(p,n) source reactions, and absolute normalization factors were found by comparing 1H scattering measurements to accepted NNDC values. This experimental procedure has been successfully used for prior neutron scattering measurements and seems well-suited to our current objective. Significant challenges were encountered, however, with measuring the neutron detector efficiency over the broad incident neutron energy range required for these measurements. Funding for this research was provided by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  11. Differential cross sections for neutrino scattering on 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbe, E.

    1996-01-01

    Differential cross sections for neutrino scattering on 12 C are calculated within the (continuum) random phase approximation model. The charged current (ν e ,e - ) and (ν μ ,μ - ) capture reactions on 12 C are measured by the LSND Collaboration at LAMPF. We investigate and discuss the merits of such studies, especially the information that can be extracted from data for differential neutrino scattering cross sections. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  12. Fast-neutron scattering cross sections of elemental zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-12-01

    Differential neturon-elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental zirconium are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 200 keV. Inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections corresponding to the excitation of levels at observed energies of: 914 +- 25, 1476 +- 37, 1787 +- 23, 2101 +- 26, 2221 +- 17, 2363 +- 14, 2791 +- 15 and 3101 +- 25 keV are determined. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the optical-statistical model and are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  13. Non-Rutherford backscattering microscopy using 25 MeV protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeper, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peeper@unibw.de [Universitaet der Bundeswehr, Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Moser, Marcus; Reichart, Patrick; Dollinger, Guenther [Universitaet der Bundeswehr, Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Protons at energies between 10 and 25 MeV are a very sensitive probe for hydrogen using coincident proton-proton scattering with the possibility for depth profiling samples up to several 100 {mu}m thickness. At the Munich microprobe SNAKE we have developed this method for sensitive 3D hydrogen microscopy . In parallel to sensitive 3D hydrogen microscopy by proton-proton scattering we introduce a non-Rutherford backscattering analysis utilizing 25 MeV protons in order to obtain 3D depth profiles of all major elements. We present energy spectra of backscattered protons at various thin and thick film samples of pure elements which we use as fingerprints to analyse more complex materials like minerals or metals. It is due to the low stopping power of the high energy protons that the depth profiles of several elements do not or do only partially overlap when analysing freestanding samples with thicknesses in the 100 {mu}m range. The merit of our method is that signals of the light elements may not be affected by heavier matrix elements. Analysing thin films smaller than 5 {mu}m we have achieved a mass resolution of {Delta}A/A{<=}1/28 for non-overlapping mass signals utilizing a 5 mm thick Si(Li)-detector.

  14. Traffic modifications on Routes Rutherford, Democrite and Fermi

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The GS Department would like to inform you that until the end of December, the construction of Building 245 will result in the following traffic modifications: Traffic on Route Rutherford will be partially restricted in front of the construction site, Traffic on Route Democrite will be one-way towards Route Rutherford. Also, please note that due to construction work in front of Building 377, Route Fermi will be closed from Wednesday, 10 June until Friday, 7 August. Thank you for your understanding.

  15. Traffic modifications on Routes Rutherford, Democrite and Fermi

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The GS Department would like to inform you that, until the end of December, the construction of Building 245 will result in the following traffic modifications: Traffic on Route Rutherford will be partially restricted in front of the construction site, Traffic on Route Democrite will be one-way towards Route Rutherford. Also, please note that due to construction work in front of Building 377, Route Fermi will be closed from Wednesday, 10 June until Friday, 7 August. Thank you for your understanding.

  16. Study of multiple scattering effects in heavy ion RBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z.; O`Connor, D.J. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Multiple scattering effect is normally neglected in conventional Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis. The backscattered particle yield normally agrees well with the theory based on the single scattering model. However, when heavy incident ions are used such as in heavy ion Rutherford backscattering (HIRBS), or the incident ion energy is reduced, multiple scattering effect starts to play a role in the analysis. In this paper, the experimental data of 6MeV C ions backscattered from a Au target are presented. In measured time of flight spectrum a small step in front of the Au high energy edge is observed. The high energy edge of the step is about 3.4 ns ahead of the Au signal which corresponds to an energy {approx} 300 keV higher than the 135 degree single scattering energy. This value coincides with the double scattering energy of C ion undergoes two consecutive 67.5 degree scattering. Efforts made to investigate the origin of the high energy step observed lead to an Monte Carlo simulation aimed to reproduce the experimental spectrum on computer. As a large angle scattering event is a rare event, two consecutive large angle scattering is extremely hard to reproduce in a random simulation process. Thus, the simulation has not found a particle scattering into 130-140 deg with an energy higher than the single scattering energy. Obviously faster algorithms and a better physical model are necessary for a successful simulation. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Study of multiple scattering effects in heavy ion RBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z; O` Connor, D J [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Multiple scattering effect is normally neglected in conventional Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis. The backscattered particle yield normally agrees well with the theory based on the single scattering model. However, when heavy incident ions are used such as in heavy ion Rutherford backscattering (HIRBS), or the incident ion energy is reduced, multiple scattering effect starts to play a role in the analysis. In this paper, the experimental data of 6MeV C ions backscattered from a Au target are presented. In measured time of flight spectrum a small step in front of the Au high energy edge is observed. The high energy edge of the step is about 3.4 ns ahead of the Au signal which corresponds to an energy {approx} 300 keV higher than the 135 degree single scattering energy. This value coincides with the double scattering energy of C ion undergoes two consecutive 67.5 degree scattering. Efforts made to investigate the origin of the high energy step observed lead to an Monte Carlo simulation aimed to reproduce the experimental spectrum on computer. As a large angle scattering event is a rare event, two consecutive large angle scattering is extremely hard to reproduce in a random simulation process. Thus, the simulation has not found a particle scattering into 130-140 deg with an energy higher than the single scattering energy. Obviously faster algorithms and a better physical model are necessary for a successful simulation. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Atomic form factors, incoherent scattering functions, and photon scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbell, J.H.; Veigele, W.J.; Briggs, E.A.; Brown, R.T.; Cromer, D.T.; Howerton, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Tabulations are presented of the atomic form factor, F (α,Z), and the incoherent scattering function, S (x,Z), for values of x (=sin theta/2)/lambda) from 0.005 A -1 to 10 9 A -1 , for all elements A=1 to 100. These tables are constructed from available state-of-the-art theoretical data, including the Pirenne formulas for Z=1, configuration-into action results by Brown using Brown-Fontana and Weiss correlated wavefunctions for Z=2 to 6 non-relativistic Hartree-Fock results by Cromer for Z=7 to 100 and a relativistic K-shell analytic expression for F (x,Z) by Bethe Levinger for x>10 A -1 for all elements Z=2 to 100. These tabulated values are graphically compared with available photon scattering angular distribution measurements. Tables of coherent (Rayleigh) and incoherent (Compton) total scattering cross sections obtained by nummerical integration over combinations of F 2 (x,Z) with the Thomson formula and S (x,Z) with the Klum-Nishina Formual, respectively, are presented for all elements Z=1 to 100, for photon energies 100 eV (lambda=124 A) to 100 MeV (0.000124 A). The incoherent scattering cross sections also include the radiative and double-Compton corrections as given by Mork. Similar tables are presented for the special cases of terminally-bonded hydrogen and for the H 2 molecule, interpolated and extrapolated from values calculated by Stewart et al., and by Bentley and Stewart using Kolos-Roothaan wavefunctions

  19. Scattering and absorption differential cross sections for double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The scattering and absorption differential cross sections for nonlinear QED process such as double photon Compton scattering have been measured as a function of independent final photon energy. The incident gamma photons are of 0.662 MeV in energy as produced by an 8 Ci137Cs radioactive source and thin ...

  20. Ab initio calculation of scattering length and cross sections at very low energies for electron-helium scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method for continuum wave functions has been used to calculate the scattering length and phase shifts over extremely low energies ranging from 0 to 1 eV very accurately for electron-helium scattering. The scattering length is calculated very accurately with wave functions computed exactly at zero energy, resulting in an upper bound of 1.1784. The electron correlation and polarization of the target by the scattering electron, which are very important in these calculations, have been taken into account in an accurate ab initio manner through the configuration-interaction procedure by optimizing both bound and continuum orbitals simultaneously at each kinetic energy of the scattered electron. Detailed results for scattering length, differential, total, and momentum-transfer cross sections obtained from the phase shifts are presented. The present scattering length is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental result of Andrick and Bitsch [J. Phys. B 8, 402 (1975)] and the theoretical result of O'Malley, Burke, and Berrington [J. Phys. B 12, 953 (1979)]. There is excellent agreement between the present total cross sections and the corresponding experimental measurements of Buckman and Lohmann [J. Phys. B 19, 2547 (1986)]. The present momentum-transfer cross sections also show remarkable agreement with the experimental results of Crompton, Elford, and Robertson [Aust. J. Phys. 23, 667 (1970)

  1. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    Just over one hundred years ago, Ernest Rutherford presented an interpretation of alpha-particle scattering experiments, performed a couple of years earlier by Geiger and Marsden, to the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society. The work was summarised shortly afterwards in a paper in the Philosophical Magazine. He postulated that a dense speck of matter must exist at the centre of an atom (later to become known as the nucleus) if the details of the experiments, particularly the yield of alpha particles scattered through large angles, were to be explained. The nuclear hypothesis, combined with the experimental work by Moseley on X-rays and Bohr's theoretical ideas, both also initiated at the Victoria University of Manchester, established our view of atomic structure and gave birth to the field of nuclear physics. The Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics was held at The University of Manchester in August 2011 to celebrate this anniversary by addressing the wide range of contemporary topics that characterise modern nuclear physics. This set of proceedings covers areas including nuclear structure and astrophysics, hadron structure and spectroscopy, fundamental interactions studied within the nucleus and results of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We would like to thank all those who presented their recent research results at the conference; the proceedings stand as a testament to the excitement and interest that still pervades the pursuit of this field of physics. We would also like to thank those who contributed in other ways to the conference. To colleagues at the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry for putting together an exhibition to coincide with the conference that included the manuscript of the 1911 paper, letters, notebooks and equipment used by Rutherford. These items were kindly loaned by Cambridge and Manchester Universities. Winton Capital generously supported this exhibition. We would also like to thank Professor Mary Fowler

  2. Quench tests and FEM analysis of Nb3Al Rutherford cables and small racetrack magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Chlachidze, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikin, V.V.; Kotelnikov, S.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.

    2008-01-01

    In collaboration between NIMS and Fermilab, we have made copper stabilized Nb 3 Al Rutherford cables, using Nb-matrixed and Ta-matrixed strands. First these cables were investigated at high current in low self field using a flux pump. Using these Rutherford cables, we built and tested small racetrack magnets. The magnet made with the Nb-matrixed strand showed the flux jump instability in low field. The small racetrack magnet wound with the Ta-matrixed Nb 3 Al Rutherford cable was very stable at 4.5 K operation without any instability, as well as at 2.2 K operation. With the successful operation of the small racetrack magnet up to its short sample data, the feasibility of the Nb 3 Al strand and its Rutherford cable for their application to high field magnets is established. The characteristics of Nb 3 Al Rutherford cable is compared with that of the Nb 3 Sn Rutherford cable and the advantages of Nb 3 Al Rutherford cable are discussed

  3. Direct measurement of the Rayleigh scattering cross section in various gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneep, Maarten; Ubachs, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Using the laser-based technique of cavity ring-down spectroscopy extinction measurements have been performed in various gases straightforwardly resulting in cross sections for Rayleigh scattering. For Ar and N 2 measurements are performed in the range 470-490nm, while for CO 2 cross sections are determined in the wider range 470-570nm. In addition to these gases also for N 2 O, CH 4 , CO, and SF 6 the scattering cross section is determined at 532nm, a wavelength of importance for lidar applications and combustion laser diagnostics. In O 2 the cross section at 532nm is found to depend on pressure due to collision-induced light absorption. The obtained cross sections validate the cross sections for Rayleigh scattering as derived from refractive indices and depolarization ratios through Rayleigh's theory at the few %-level, although somewhat larger discrepancies are found for CO, N 2 O and CH 4

  4. Thermal neutron scattering cross sections of beryllium and magnesium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qasir, Iyad; Jisrawi, Najeh; Gillette, Victor; Qteish, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutron thermalization in BeO and MgO was studied using Ab initio lattice dynamics. • The BeO phonon density of states used to generate the current ENDF library has issues. • The BeO cross sections can provide a more accurate ENDF library than the current one. • For MgO an ENDF library is lacking: a new accurate one can be built from our results. • BeO is a better filter than MgO, especially when cooled down to 77 K. - Abstract: Alkaline-earth beryllium and magnesium oxides are fundamental materials in nuclear industry and thermal neutron scattering applications. The calculation of the thermal neutron scattering cross sections requires a detailed knowledge of the lattice dynamics of the scattering medium. The vibrational properties of BeO and MgO are studied using first-principles calculations within the frame work of the density functional perturbation theory. Excellent agreement between the calculated phonon dispersion relations and the experimental data have been obtained. The phonon densities of states are utilized to calculate the scattering laws using the incoherent approximation. For BeO, there are concerns about the accuracy of the phonon density of states used to generate the current ENDF/B-VII.1 libraries. These concerns are identified, and their influences on the scattering law and inelastic scattering cross section are analyzed. For MgO, no up to date thermal neutron scattering cross section ENDF library is available, and our results represent a potential one for use in different applications. Moreover, the BeO and MgO efficiencies as neutron filters at different temperatures are investigated. BeO is found to be a better filter than MgO, especially when cooled down, and cooling MgO below 77 K does not significantly improve the filter’s efficiency.

  5. Determination of surface oxide compositions on Alloy 600 using Rutherford backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, A.L.; Kraner, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    The surface composition of oxides formed on Alloy 600 under conditions similar to those in the primary side of PWR heat exchangers has been studied as a function of potential using Rutherford backscattering and proton inelastic scattering. Electropolished samples of Alloy 600 were exposed at several potentials to a solution of 0.18M H 3 BO 3 (2000ppm B) with 0.21mM LiOH (1.5ppm Li) at 300 0 C for 450 hours. The potentials relative to an internal hydrogen electrode ranged from -.09 to 750 mV. RBS analysis showed little or no oxide formation on samples exposed at 0 mV. Above 0 mV oxide layers formed whose thicknesses increased with potential. In addition the RBS showed a significantly enhanced concentration of aluminum and silicon in oxide. Both the oxygen and the sum of the aluminum and silicon content appeared to maintain a fixed surface concentration independent of the oxide thickness. Boron and lithium concentrations were analyzed with proton inelastic scattering. No lithium was detected in any sample. The boron concentration was found to follow the thickness of the oxide

  6. Determination of surface oxide compositions on Alloy 600 using Rutherford backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, A.L.; Isaacs, H.S.; Kraner, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    The surface composition of oxides formed on Alloy 600 under conditions similar to those in the primary side of PWR heat exchangers has been studied as a function of potential using Rutherford backscattering and proton inelastic scattering. Electropolished samples of Alloy 600 were exposed at several potentials to a solution of 0.18M H 3 BO 3 (2000 ppM B) with 0.28M LiOH (1.4 ppM Li) at 300 0 C for 450 hours. The potentials relative to an internal hydrogen electrode ranged from -.09 to 750 mV. RBS analysis showed little or no oxide formation on samples exposed at 0 mV. Above 0 mV oxide layers formed whose thicknesses increased with potential. In addition the RBS showed a significantly enhanced concentration of aluminum and silicon in oxide. Both the oxygen and the sum of the aluminum and silicon content appeared to maintain a fixed surface concentration independent of the oxide thickness. Boron and lithium concentration were analyzed with proton inelastic scattering. No lithium was found in any sample. The boron concentration was found to follow the thickness of the oxide

  7. Update to the R33 cross section file format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickridge, I.C.

    2003-01-01

    In September 1991, in response to the workshop on cross sections for Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) held in Namur (July 1991, Nuclear Instruments and Methods B66(1992)), a simple ascii format was proposed to facilitate transfer and collation of nuclear reaction cross section data for Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) and especially for Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). Although intended only as a discussion document, the ascii format - referred to as the R33 (Report 33) format - has become a de facto standard. In the decade since this first proposal there have been spectacular advances in computing power and in software usability, however the cross-platform compatibility of the ascii character set has ensured that the need for an ascii format remains. Nuclear reaction cross section data for Nuclear Reaction analysis has been collected and archived on internet web sites over the last decade. This data has largely been entered in the R33 format, although there is a series of elastic cross sections that are expressed as the ratio to the corresponding Rutherford cross sections that have been entered in a format referred to as RTR (ratio to Rutherford). During this time the R33 format has been modified and added to - firstly to take into account angular distributions, which were not catered for in the first proposal, and more recently to cater for elastic cross sections expressed as the ratio-to- Rutherford, which it is useful to have for some elastic scattering programs. It is thus timely to formally update the R33 format. There also exists the large nuclear cross section data collections of the Nuclear Data Network - of which the core centres are the OECD NEA Nuclear Data Bank, the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, the Brookhaven National Laboratory National Nuclear Data Centre and CJD IPPE Obninsk, Russia. The R33 format is now proposed to become a legal computational format for the NDN. It is thus also necessary to provide an updated formal definition of the R33 format in order to provide

  8. Quench tests and FEM analysis of Nb3Al Rutherford cables and small racetrack magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Chlachidze, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikin, V.V.; Kotelnikov, S.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab /Tsukuba Magnet Lab. /KEK, Tsukuba

    2008-12-01

    In collaboration between NIMS and Fermilab, we have made copper stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables, using Nb-matrixed and Ta-matrixed strands. First these cables were investigated at high current in low self field using a flux pump. Using these Rutherford cables, we built and tested small racetrack magnets. The magnet made with the Nb-matrixed strand showed the flux jump instability in low field. The small racetrack magnet wound with the Ta-matrixed Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was very stable at 4.5 K operation without any instability, as well as at 2.2 K operation. With the successful operation of the small racetrack magnet up to its short sample data, the feasibility of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand and its Rutherford cable for their application to high field magnets is established. The characteristics of Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable is compared with that of the Nb{sub 3}Sn Rutherford cable and the advantages of Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable are discussed.

  9. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of 103Rh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    Fast-neutron total cross sections of 103 Rh are measured with 30 to 50 keV resolutions from 0.7 to 4.5 MeV. Differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.45 to 3.85 MeV. Scattered-neutron groups corresponding to excited levels at 334 +- 13, 536 +- 7, 648 +- 25, 796 +- 20, 864 +- 22, 1120 +- 22, 1279 +- 50, 1481 +- 27, 1683 +- 39, 1840 +- 79, 1991 +- 71 and 2050 (tentative) keV are observed. An optical-statistical model is derived from the elastic-scattering results. The experimental values are compared with comparable quantities given in the ENDF/B-V evaluation

  10. Effective response and scattering cross section of spherical inclusions in a medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexopoulos, A., E-mail: Aris.Alexopoulos@dsto.defence.gov.a [Electronic Warfare and Radar Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO), PO Box 1500, Edinburgh 5111 (Australia)

    2009-08-24

    The Maxwell-Garnett theory for a right-handed homogeneous system is extended in order to investigate the effective response of a medium consisting of low density distributed 3-dimensional inclusions. The polarisability factor is modified to account for inclusions with binary layered volumes and it is shown that such a configuration can yield doubly negative effective permittivity and permeability. Terms representing second-order scattering interactions between binary inclusions in the medium are derived and are used to reformulate conventional effective medium theory. In the appropriate limit, the one-body theory of Maxwell-Garnett is recovered. The scattering cross section of the spherical inclusions is determined and comparison is made to homogeneous dielectric scatterers in the Rayleigh limit. It is found that the scattering resonances can be manipulated using the inclusion parameters. Furthermore, the effect that two-interacting spherical inclusions in a medium have on the scattering cross section is investigated via higher order dipole moments while the issue of reducing the scattering cross section to zero is also examined.

  11. Important role of projectile excitation in 16O+60Ni and 16O+27Al scattering at intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, V. A. B.; Cappuzzello, F.; Lubian, J.; Cavallaro, M.; Linares, R.; Carbone, D.; Agodi, C.; Foti, A.; Tudisco, S.; Wang, J. S.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Hussein, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    The elastic scattering angular distribution of the 16O+60Ni system at 260 MeV was measured in the range of the Rutherford cross section down to seven orders of magnitude. The cross sections of the lowest 2+ and 3- inelastic states of the target were also measured over several orders of magnitude. Coupled-channel (CC) calculations were performed and are shown to be compatible with the whole set of data only when including the excitation of the projectile and when the deformations of the imaginary part of the nuclear optical potential are taken into account. Similar results were obtained when the procedure is applied to the existing data on 16O+27Al elastic and inelastic scattering at 100 and 280 MeV. An analysis in terms of dynamical polarization potentials (DPP) indicates the major role of coupled-channel effects in the overlapping surface region of the colliding nuclei.

  12. Ion-reversibility studies in amorphous solids using the two-atom scattering model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oen, O.S.

    1981-06-01

    An analytical two-atom scattering model has been developed to treat the recent discovery of the enhancement near 180 0 of Rutherford backscattering yields from disordered solids. In contrast to conventional calculations of Rutherford backscattering that treat scattering from a single atom only (the backscattering atom), the present model includes the interaction of a second atom lying between the target surface and the backscattering plane. The projectile ion makes a glancing collision with this second atom both before and after it is backscattered. The model predicts an enhancement effect whose physical origin arises from the tolerance of path for those ions whose inward and outward trajectories lie in the vicinity of the critical impact parameter. Results using Moliere scattering show how the yield enhancement depends on ion energy, backscattering depth, exit angle, scattering potential, atomic numbers of the projectile and target, and target density. In the model the critical impact parameter and critical angle play important roles. It is shown that these quantities depend on a single dimensionless parameter and analytical expressions for them are given which are accurate to better than 1%

  13. Earnest Rutherford, the solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you did not make it to the Science & Society talk by John Campbell last week and are still wondering about the spelling of "Earnest", here is the solution: Two months after the birth of his fourth child on 30 August 1871 in Spring Grove, New Zealand, James Rutherford registered his son, who was recorded as "Earnest" in the Birth Register. Presumably the Registrar wrote the name down as it sounded and the father failed to notice the mistake when signing the Register.

  14. New type of cross section singularity in backward scattering: the Coulomb glory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demkov, Y.N.; Ostrovskii, V.N.; Tel'nov, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    For classical scattering by a central potential that exhibits Coulomb behavior (i.e., that is attractive) at small distances, the scattering angle theta tends to π as the orbital angular momentum L decreases. The differential cross section for scattering through angles close to π can be characterized by the power series expansion of the difference theta(L)--π in small L, only odd powers of L being present in this expansion. Expressions are found for the coefficients in the linear (c 1 ) and cubic (c 3 ): in L: terms. It is shown that, for a broad class of screened Coulomb potentials, the coefficient c 1 vanishes at some value of the collision energy E 0 . At the energy E = E 0 the classical cross section diverges in the case of backward scattering (the Coulomb glory); in wave mechanics the cross section possesses a maximum. The behavior of the cross section for energies close to E 0 is computed. The application of the theory to electron scattering by atoms, in which the Coulomb interaction at small distances is determined by the interaction with the nucleus (charge Z) and E 0 = 0.0103Z 4 /sup // 3 keV, is discussed

  15. Collective scattering of electromagnetic waves and cross-B plasma diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gresillon, D.; Cabrit, B.; Truc, A.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetized plasmas occuring in nature as well as in fusion laboratories are oftenly irregularly shaked by magnetic field fluctuations. The so-called ''coherent scattering'' of electromagnetic wave from nonuniform, irregularly moving plasmas is investigated in the case where the scattering wavelength is large compared to the Debye length, but of the order of the irregularities correlation length. The scattered signal frequency spectrum is shown to be a transform of the plasma motion statistical characteristics. When the scattering wavelength is larger than the plasma motion correlation length, the frequency spectrum is shown to be of a lorentzian shape, with a frequency width that provides a direct measurement of the cross-B particle diffusion coefficient. This is illustrated by two series of recently obtained experimental results: radar coherent backscattering observations of the auroral plasma, and far infrared scattering from tokamak fusion plasma. Radar coherent backscattering shows the transition from Gauss to Lorentz scattered frequency spectra. In infrared Laser coherent scattering experiments from the Tore-Supra tokamak, a particular frequency line is observed to present a Lorentzian shape, that directly provides an electron cross-field diffusion coefficient. This diffusion coefficient agrees with the electron heat conductivity coefficient that is obtained from the observation of temperature profiles and energy balance. (Author)

  16. Bound coherent and incoherent thermal neutron scattering cross sections of the elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1982-12-01

    An up-to-date table of bound coherent and incoherent thermal neutron scattering cross sections of the elements is presented. Values from two different data sources are calculated and compared. These sources are: (1) the free-atom cross sections listed in the Σbarn bookΣ and (2) the Julich scattering length tables. We also call attention to, and clarify, the confusion that exists in the literature concerning the sign of the imaginary part of the complex scattering length

  17. The Glauber model and heavy ion reaction and elastic scattering cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehndiratta, Ajay [Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati (India); Shukla, Prashant, E-mail: pshukla@barc.gov.in [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2017-05-15

    We revisit the Glauber model to study the heavy ion reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions at low and intermediate energies. The Glauber model takes nucleon–nucleon cross sections and nuclear densities as inputs and has no free parameter and thus can predict the cross sections for unknown systems. The Glauber model works at low energies down to Coulomb barrier with very simple modifications. We present new parametrization of measured total cross sections as well as ratio of real to imaginary parts of the scattering amplitudes for pp and np collisions as a function of nucleon kinetic energy. The nuclear (charge) densities obtained by electron scattering form factors measured in large momentum transfer range are used in the calculations. The heavy ion reaction cross sections are calculated for light and heavy systems and are compared with available data measured over large energy range. The model gives excellent description of the data. The elastic scattering angular distributions are calculated for various systems at different energies. The model gives good description of the data at small momentum transfer but the calculations deviate from the data at large momentum transfer.

  18. Improvement of sensitivity in high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, H.; Nakajima, K.; Suzuki, M.; Kimura, K.; Sasakawa, K.

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity (limit of detection) of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) is mainly determined by the background noise of the spectrometer. There are two major origins of the background noise in HRBS, one is the stray ions scattered from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer and the other is the dark noise of the microchannel plate (MCP) detector which is commonly used as a focal plane detector of the spectrometer in HRBS. In order to reject the stray ions, several barriers are installed inside the spectrometer and a thin Mylar foil is mounted in front of the detector. The dark noise of the MCP detector is rejected by the coincidence measurement with the secondary electrons emitted from the Mylar foil upon the ion passage. After these improvements, the background noise is reduced by a factor of 200 at a maximum. The detection limit can be improved down to 10 ppm for As in Si at a measurement time of 1 h under ideal conditions.

  19. Absolute elastic cross sections for electron scattering from SF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulley, R.J.; Uhlmann, L.J.; Dedman, C.J.; Buckman, S.J.; Cho, H.; Trantham, K.W.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Absolute differential cross sections for vibrationally elastic scattering of electrons from sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) have been measured at fixed angles of 60 deg, 90 deg and 120 deg over the energy range of 5 to 15 eV, and also at 11 fixed energies between 2.7 and 75 eV for scattering angles between 10 deg and 180 deg. These measurements employ the magnetic angle-changing technique of Read and Channing in combination with the relative flow technique to obtain absolute elastic scattering cross sections at backward angles (135 deg to 180 deg) for incident energies below 15 eV. The results reveal some substantial differences with several previous determinations and a reasonably good level of agreement with a recent close coupling calculation

  20. SFERXS, Photoabsorption, Coherent, Incoherent Scattering Cross-Sections Function for Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Mtz de la Fuente, O.; Herranz, M.

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: The use of electromagnetic radiation cross-sections in radiation shielding calculations and more generally in transport theory applications actually requires an interpolation between values which are tabulated for certain values of the energy. In order to facilitate this process and to reduce the computer memory requirements, we have developed, by a least squares method, a set of functions which represents the cross-sections for the photoelectric absorption, the coherent (Rayleigh) and the incoherent (Compton) scattering (1). For this purpose we have accepted as true values the ones tabulated by Storm and Israel (2) for the photoeffect, by Hubbell et Al. (3) for the incoherent scattering and by Hubbell and Overbo (4) for the coherent scattering

  1. Material analysis with the aid of particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, E.

    1984-12-01

    Material analysis are discussed on the basis of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. Various problems including cross-section changes, energy changes, count rate and deadtime, background, escape peaks and perturbations and overlap are discussed in relation to PIXE, while the influence of the energy loss of the projectile, the mass of the projectile, the cinematic factor, projectile energy, the scattering angle and the solid angle are discussed in terms of Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. X-ray production theory and x-ray detectors are also briefly discussed. The effect of elastically scattered protons on the energy resolution of the x-ray detector is discussed. The application of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy to the analysis of air particle samples, and to the determination of the efficiency of the filters used for the collection of air-particle samples is also discussed

  2. Measurement of Scattering Cross Section with a Spectrophotometer with an Integrating Sphere Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaigalas, A K; Wang, Lili; Karpiak, V; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Choquette, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A commercial spectrometer with an integrating sphere (IS) detector was used to measure the scattering cross section of microspheres. Analysis of the measurement process showed that two measurements of the absorbance, one with the cuvette placed in the normal spectrometer position, and the second with the cuvette placed inside the IS, provided enough information to separate the contributions from scattering and molecular absorption. Measurements were carried out with microspheres with different diameters. The data was fitted with a model consisting of the difference of two terms. The first term was the Lorenz-Mie (L-M) cross section which modeled the total absorbance due to scattering. The second term was the integral of the L-M differential cross section over the detector acceptance angle. The second term estimated the amount of forward scattered light that entered the detector. A wavelength dependent index of refraction was used in the model. The agreement between the model and the data was good between 300 nm and 800 nm. The fits provided values for the microsphere diameter, the concentration, and the wavelength dependent index of refraction. For wavelengths less than 300 nm, the scattering cross section had significant spectral structure which was inversely related to the molecular absorption. This work addresses the measurement and interpretation of the scattering cross section for wavelengths between 300 nm and 800 nm.

  3. Calculation of total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by primary benzene compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suvam; Naghma, Rahla; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2016-07-01

    The total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by benzene, halobenzenes, toluene, aniline, and phenol are reported over a wide energy domain. The multi-scattering centre spherical complex optical potential method has been employed to find the total elastic and inelastic cross sections. The total ionization cross section is estimated from total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionization contribution method. In the present article, the first theoretical calculations for electron impact total and ionization cross section have been performed for most of the targets having numerous practical applications. A reasonable agreement is obtained compared to existing experimental observations for all the targets reported here, especially for the total cross section.

  4. Calculation of total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by primary benzene compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Suvam; Naghma, Rahla; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby, E-mail: bka.ism@gmail.com [Atomic and Molecular Physics Lab, Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India)

    2016-07-21

    The total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by benzene, halobenzenes, toluene, aniline, and phenol are reported over a wide energy domain. The multi-scattering centre spherical complex optical potential method has been employed to find the total elastic and inelastic cross sections. The total ionization cross section is estimated from total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionization contribution method. In the present article, the first theoretical calculations for electron impact total and ionization cross section have been performed for most of the targets having numerous practical applications. A reasonable agreement is obtained compared to existing experimental observations for all the targets reported here, especially for the total cross section.

  5. Calculated energy distributions for light 0.25--18-keV ions scattered from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.E.; Harms, A.A.; Karapetsas, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    Scattered energy distributions are calculated for light ions incident on Nb and Mo surfaces of interest for controlled nulcear fusion reactors. The scattered energy is found to vary as a function of the reflection coefficient between a multiple-collision limit at low energies and a single-collision Rutherford scattering limit at high energies. High-energy peaking of the scattered particle distributions is also found for low incident energies

  6. Scattering cross section of unequal length dipole arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a detailed and systematic analytical treatment of scattering by an arbitrary dipole array configuration with unequal-length dipoles, different inter-element spacing and load impedance. It provides a physical interpretation of the scattering phenomena within the phased array system. The antenna radar cross section (RCS) depends on the field scattered by the antenna towards the receiver. It has two components, viz. structural RCS and antenna mode RCS. The latter component dominates the former, especially if the antenna is mounted on a low observable platform. The reduction in the scattering due to the presence of antennas on the surface is one of the concerns towards stealth technology. In order to achieve this objective, a detailed and accurate analysis of antenna mode scattering is required. In practical phased array, one cannot ignore the finite dimensions of antenna elements, coupling effect and the role of feed network while estimating the antenna RCS. This book presents the RCS estimati...

  7. Elastic scattering and total cross section at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaldi, R.; Sanguinetti, G.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the field of elastic scattering and total cross section in this new energy domain. In Section 2 a survey of the experimental situation is outlined. The most significant data are presented, with emphasis on the interpretation, not the specific details or technicalities. This section is therefore intended to give a self-contained look at the field, especially for the nonspecialist. In Section 3, hadron scattering at high energy is described in an impact parameter picture, which provides a model-independent intuitive geometrical representation. The diffractive character of elastic scattering, seen as the shadow of inelastic absorption, is presented as a consequence of unitarity in the s-channel. Spins are neglected throughout this review, inasmuch as the asymptotic behavior in the very high-energy limit is the main concern here. In Section 4 some relevant theorems are recalled on the limiting behavior of hadron-scattering amplitudes at infinite energy. There is also a brief discussion on how asymptotically rising total cross sections imply scaling properties in the elastic differential cross sections. A quick survey of eikonal models is presented and their predictions are compared with ISR and SPS Collider data

  8. Heavy ion scattering: High energy limits of RBS and ERD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauhala, E.

    1994-01-01

    Elastic scattering of 7 Li ions by oxygen and 12 C, 14 N and 16 O ions by aluminum, silicon, titanium and sulfur have been studied below the Coulomb barrier energies 3-30 MeV in the angular range of 78 degrees - 170 degrees. By kinematically reversing the reactions, the recoiling of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen by 40-100 MeV 27 Al, 28 Si, 32S and 48 Ti ions into recoil angles of 20 degrees, 25 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees has also been investigated. Excitation functions and angular distributions are presented. Contrary to the case of light H and He ions, the heavy ion scattering cross sections fall off rapidly above the non-Rutherford threshold energy, rendering heavy ion RBS and ERD spectrometry worthless. Both classical and wave mechanical calculations have been attempted for predicting the RBS threshold energies. Simple calculations give moderate accuracy, while the more extensive nuclear potential perturbation approach relies on parameters fitted for the particular experiment. The authors present a general classical semi-empirical model for both direct scattering (RBS) and the kinematically reversed reactions (ERD), accurately reproducing the experimental data. The model is based on parameters fitted from the present scattering experiments and from an extensive literature survey

  9. Proton-Nucleus Elastic Cross Sections Using Two-Body In-Medium Scattering Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, a method was developed of extracting nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium NN cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. The ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium NN cross sections to calculate elastic proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  10. Collision, scattering and absorption differential cross-sections in double-photon Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewan, R.; Saddi, M.B.; Sandhu, B.S.; Singh, B.; Ghumman, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    The collision, scattering and absorption differential cross-sections of double-photon Compton scattering are measured experimentally for 0.662 MeV incident gamma photons. Two simultaneously emitted gamma quanta are investigated using a slow-fast coincidence technique having 25 ns resolving time. The coincidence spectra for different energy windows of one of the two final photons are recorded using HPGe detector. The experimental data do not suffer from inherent energy resolution of gamma detector and provide more faithful reproduction of the distribution under the full energy peak of recorded coincidence spectra. The present results are in agreement with the currently acceptable theory of this higher order process

  11. Exploring halo effects in the scattering of $^{11}$Be on heavy targets at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the scattering of $^{11}$Be on heavy targets at energies around the Coulomb barrier with the aim to study the effect of the neutron halo on the reaction mechanisms. We expect to see deviations of the elastic cross sections with respect to Rutherford, even at energies below the barrier, due to the effect of dipole polarizability. We also expect to observe the inelastic excitation from the 1/2$^{+}$ ground state to the 1/2$^{-}$ excited state. One neutron transfer, as well as break-up cross sections will be obtained from the analysis of the $^{10}$Be fragments produced in the collision. We expect to obtain information on the B(E1) distribution in the low energy continuum of $^{11}$Be. \\\\ \\\\In a previous experiment, $^{11}$Be was produced and accelerated at REX-ISOLDE with an intensity of 10$^{5}$ pps. This beam intensity would allow us to measure the scattered fragments, at forward and backward angles, with a detector array based on silicon strip detectors. We ask for a total of 27 shift...

  12. Differential cross sections for e-bar CO elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Deo; Meetu

    2005-01-01

    In a recent investigation, Raj and Kumar modified the absorption potential of Staszewska el at al in such a way that it yielded the best agreement between theory and experiment for elastic cross sections when applied to e-bar - O 2 scattering over a wide incident energy range. In the present investigation, the same modified absorption potential of Raj and Kumar has been employed to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (EDCS) for electron scattering by CO molecules at intermediate energies (100-800 eV). The independent atom model alongwith partial waves has been used for these calculations.The present results of EDCS are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  13. Fast-neutron total and elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Broad-resolution neutron total cross sections of elemental indium were measured from 0.8 to 4.5 MeV. Differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. = 1.5 to 3.8 MeV at intervals of approx. = 50 to 200 keV and at scattering angles in the range 20 to 160 degrees. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the optical-statistical model and are compared with respective values given in ENDF/B-V

  14. Progress on calculation of direct inelastic scattering cross section of neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhenpeng, Chen [Qinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Physics

    1996-06-01

    For n+ {sup 238}U inelastic scattering cross, there exist discrepancies among the available evaluations in various libraries. This is partly duo to the difference of direct inelastic scattering cross section calculated with coupled channel optical model (CCOM). The research on the level frame used in CCOM calculation, the research on used parameters of spherical optical model in CCOM calculation and the research on the amplitude of octupole phonon {beta}{sub 3} were presented. (2 figs.).

  15. Basis for calculating cross sections for nuclear magnetic resonance spin-modulated polarized neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlarchyk, Michael; Thurston, George M

    2016-12-28

    In this work we study the potential for utilizing the scattering of polarized neutrons from nuclei whose spin has been modulated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). From first principles, we present an in-depth development of the differential scattering cross sections that would arise in such measurements from a hypothetical target system containing nuclei with non-zero spins. In particular, we investigate the modulation of the polarized scattering cross sections following the application of radio frequency pulses that impart initial transverse rotations to selected sets of spin-1/2 nuclei. The long-term aim is to provide a foundational treatment of the scattering cross section associated with enhancing scattering signals from selected nuclei using NMR techniques, thus employing minimal chemical or isotopic alterations, so as to advance the knowledge of macromolecular or liquid structure.

  16. Scientific work as done at the Rutherford-Appleton laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulehla, I.

    1983-01-01

    The former Rutherford Laboratory founded in 1957 has undergone significant changes. In 1977 the Appleton Laboratory was added. The role of the laboratory in British research is brought out not only by the financial allocations but also by the equipment and staff which now number 1500. At the centre of scientific activity is the physics of elementary particles (high energy physics). In 1982 the laboratory conducted 57 experiments in cooperation with institutions of higher education and other institutions. The Rutherford Laboratory has gained an important position especially in the field of automatic processing of experimental data and in the control and self-control of experiments. (J.P.)

  17. Highly-resolving Rutherford-scattering spectroscopy with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.

    2003-10-01

    in the present thesis for the first time the Browne-Buechner spectrometer for the highly resolving ion-beam analysis in the ion beam center Rossendorf is completely presented. A main topic of this theis lied in the apparative construction and the taking-into-operation of the spectrometer and the scattering chamber including the facilities for the sample treatment and characterization. In the framework of this thesis for the chosen measurement arrangement the experimental conditions were elaborated, which allow the routine-like application of the spectrometer for analyses of thin-film systems. for C and Li ions as incident particles especially the straggling was more precisely determined in a large range of materials. By means of the spectrometer also the interaction of the ion with the solid respectively single atoms on its surface could be studied. For the first time the mean charge-state after the single collision on a gold atom was determined for differently heavy ions in a wide energy range

  18. Total cross sections for positron and electron scattering from pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecca, A; Chiari, L; Trainotti, E; GarcIa, G; Blanco, F; Brunger, M J

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report original measurements of total cross sections for positron scattering from the important biomolecule pyrimidine. The energy range of these measurements was 0.3-45 eV, while the energy resolution was ∼260 meV. In addition, we report theoretical results, calculated within the independent atom-screened additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) formalism, for the corresponding electron impact total cross sections. In that case the energy range is 1-10 000 eV. Total cross sections are very important input data for codes that seek to simulate charged-particle tracks in matter, as they define the mean-free path between collisions. As the present data and computations are to the best of our knowledge the first total cross sections to be reported for either positron or electron scattering from pyrimidine, they fill an important void in our available knowledge in the literature.

  19. Precise relative cross sections for np scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, J.; Brogli-Gysin, C.; Hammans, M.; Haffter, P.; Henneck, R.; Jourdan, J.; Masson, G.; Qin, L.M.; Robinson, S.; Sick, I.; Tuccillo, M.

    1994-01-01

    We present data on the differential cross section for neutron-proton scattering for an incident neutron energy of 67 MeV. These data allow a precise determination of the 1 P 1 phase which, in phase-shift analyses, is strongly correlated with the S-D amplitude which we are measuring via different observables. ((orig.))

  20. Low energy neutron scattering for energy dependent cross sections. General considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenstein, W; Dagan, R [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01

    We consider in this paper some aspects related to neutron scattering at low energies by nuclei which are subject to thermal agitation. The scattering is determined by a temperature dependent joint scattering kernel, or the corresponding joint probability density, which is a function of two variables, the neutron energy after scattering, and the cosine of the angle of scattering, for a specified energy and direction of motion of the neutron, before the interaction takes place. This joint probability density is easy to calculate, when the nucleus which causes the scattering of the neutron is at rest. It can be expressed by a delta function, since there is a one to one correspondence between the neutron energy change, and the cosine of the scattering angle. If the thermal motion of the target nucleus is taken into account, the calculation is rather more complicated. The delta function relation between the cosine of the angle of scattering and the neutron energy change is now averaged over the spectrum of velocities of the target nucleus, and becomes a joint kernel depending on both these variables. This function has a simple form, if the target nucleus behaves as an ideal gas, which has a scattering cross section independent of energy. An energy dependent scattering cross section complicates the treatment further. An analytic expression is no longer obtained for the ideal gas temperature dependent joint scattering kernel as a function of the neutron energy after the interaction and the cosine of the scattering angle. Instead the kernel is expressed by an inverse Fourier Transform of a complex integrand, which is averaged over the velocity spectrum of the target nucleus. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Lectures on neutron scattering techniques: 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.

    1988-08-01

    The lecture on the production of neutrons was presented at a Summer School on neutron scattering, Rome, 1986. A description is given of the production of neutrons by natural radioactive sources, fission, and particle accelerator sources. Modern neutron sources with high intensities are discussed including the ISIS pulsed neutron source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the High Flux Reactor at the Institut Laue Langevin. (U.K.)

  2. 7Li neutron-induced elastic scattering cross section measurement using a slowing-down spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heusch M.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A new integral measurement of the 7Li neutron induced elastic scattering cross section was determined in a wide neutron energy range. The measurement was performed on the LPSC-PEREN experimental facility using a heterogeneous graphite-LiF slowing-down time spectrometer coupled with an intense pulsed neutron generator (GENEPI-2. This method allows the measurement of the integral elastic scattering cross section in a slowing-down neutron spectrum. A Bayesian approach coupled to Monte Carlo calculations was applied to extract naturalC, 19F and 7Li elastic scattering cross sections.

  3. Ernest Rutherford, his genius shaped our modern world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor Douglas, I.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how Rutherford deduced the existence of a dense, highly charged nucleus at the heart of the atom and outlines the enormous impact his work has had on science and society. (author)

  4. Ernest Rutherford, his genius shaped our modern world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGregor Douglas, I.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes how Rutherford deduced the existence of a dense, highly charged nucleus at the heart of the atom and outlines the enormous impact his work has had on science and society. (author)

  5. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of elemental palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-06-01

    Neutron total cross sections of palladium are measured from approx. = 0.6 to 4.5 MeV with resolutions of approx. = 30 to 70 keV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV. Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.4 to 3.85 MeV at intervals of 50 to 100 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 0 . The experimental results are compared with respective quantities given in ENDF/B-V and used to deduce an optical potential that provides a good description of the measured values

  6. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of elemental palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-06-01

    Neutron total cross sections of palladium are measured from approx. = 0.6 to 4.5 MeV with resolutions of approx. = 30 to 70 keV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV. Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.4 to 3.85 MeV at intervals of 50 to 100 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160/sup 0/. The experimental results are compared with respective quantities given in ENDF/B-V and used to deduce an optical potential that provides a good description of the measured values.

  7. Rutherford, Maestro of the Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, John

    2003-01-01

    This talk will cover some of the lesser known aspects of Rutherford's work, including his early work in wireless signaling and his later encouragement of radio studies of the ionosphere, the development of what was later improved to be now called the Geiger-Muller tube, his acoustic work for submarine detection during the First World War, the development of particle accelerators and the race to splitting the atom, the first use of coincidence detectors, and why he received just one Nobel Prize.

  8. Program POD; A computer code to calculate nuclear elastic scattering cross sections with the optical model and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections by the distorted-wave born approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Akira; Kunieda, Satoshi; Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Shibata, Keiichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Fukahori, Tokio; Katakura, Jun-ichi

    2005-07-01

    The computer code, POD, was developed to calculate angle-differential cross sections and analyzing powers for shape-elastic scattering for collisions of neutron or light ions with target nucleus. The cross sections are computed with the optical model. Angle-differential cross sections for neutron inelastic scattering can also be calculated with the distorted-wave Born approximation. The optical model potential parameters are the most essential inputs for those model computations. In this program, the cross sections and analyzing powers are obtained by using the existing local or global parameters. The parameters can also be inputted by users. In this report, the theoretical formulas, the computational methods, and the input parameters are explained. The sample inputs and outputs are also presented. (author)

  9. Cross-channel coupling in positron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAlinden, M.T.; Kernoghan, A.A.; Walters, H.R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Coupled-state calculations including positronium channels are reported for positron scattering by atomic hydrogen, lithium and sodium. Integrated cross sections and total cross sections are presented for all three atoms. For lithium differential cross sections are also given. Throughout, comparison is made between results calculated with and without inclusion of the positronium channels. S-wave cross sections for positron scattering by atomic hydrogen in the Ps(1s, 2s, 2p) + H(1s, 2s, 2p) approximation show the high energy resonance first observed by Higgins and Burke in the coupled-static approximation. This resonance has now moved up to 51.05 eV and narrowed in width to 2.92 eV. Other pronounced structure is seen in the S-wave cross sections between 10 and 20 eV; it is tentatively suggested that this structure may be due to the formation of a temporary pseudo-molecular collision complex. Results calculated in the Ps(1s, 2s, anti 3 anti s, anti 4 anti s, 2p, anti 3 anti p, anti 4 anti p, anti 3 anti d, anti 4 anti d) + H(1s, 2s, anti 3 anti s, anti 4 anti s, 2p, anti 3 anti p, anti 4 anti p, anti 3 anti d, anti 4 anti d) approximation show convergence towards accurate values in the energy region below and in the Ore gap. Contrary to previous work on lithium using only an atomic basis, it is found that coupling to the 3d state of lithium is not so important when positronium channels are included; this is because a mixed basis of atom and positronium states gives a more rapidly convergent approximation than an expansion based on atom states alone. The threshold behaviour of the elastic cross section and the Ps(1s) formation cross section for lithium is investigated. Results in the Ps(1s, 2s, 2p) + Na(3s, 3p) approximation for sodium show good agreement with the total cross section measurements of Kwan et al. (orig.)

  10. Inclusive proton spectra and total reaction cross sections for proton-nucleus scattering at 800 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Current applications of multiple scattering theory to describe the elastic scattering of medium energy protons from nuclei have been shown to be quite successful in reproducing the experimental cross sections. These calculations use the impulse approximation, wherein the scattering from individual nucleons in the nucleus is described by the scattering amplitude for a free nucleon. Such an approximation restricts the inelastic channels to those initiated by nucleon-nucleon scattering. As a first step in determining the nature of p + nucleus scattering at 800 MeV, both total reaction cross sections and (p,p') inclusive cross sections were measured and compared to the free p + p cross sections for hydrogen, deuterium, calcium 40, carbon 12, and lead 208. It is concluded that as much as 85% of all reactions in a nucleus proceed from interactions with a single nucleon in the nucleus, and that the impulse approximation is a good starting point for a microscopic description of p + nucleus interactions at 800 MeV

  11. Some remarks on the neutron elastic- and enelastic-scattering cross sections of palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, S.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.B.

    1989-05-01

    The cross sections for the elastic-scattering of 5.9, 7.1 and 8.0 MeV neutrons from elemental palladium were measured at forty scattering angles distributed between ∼15/degree/ and 160/degree/. The inelastic-scattering cross sections for the excitation of palladium levels at energies of 260 keV to 560 keV were measured with high resolution at the same energies, and at a scattering angle of 80/degree/. The experimental results were combined with lower-energy values previously obtained by this group to provide a comprehensive data base extending from near the inelastic-scattering threshold to 8 MeV. That data base was interpreted in terms of a coupled-channel model, including the inelastic excitation of one- and two-phonon vibrational levels of the even isotopes of palladium. It was concluded that the palladium inelastic-scattering cross section, at the low energies of interest in assessment of fast-fission-reactor performance, are large (∼50% greater than given in widely used evaluated fission-product data files). They primarily involve compound-nucleus processes, with only a small direct-reaction component attributable to the excitation of the one-phonon, 2 + , vibrational levels of the even isotopes of palladium. 24 refs., 6 figs

  12. A dedicated beam line for Rutherford backscattering analysis at IFIN-HH cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E. A.; Dudu, D.; Plostinaru, D.; Catana, D.; Vata, I.

    2003-01-01

    Rutherford back-scattering technique (RBS) is an analytical tool that uses elastic scattering of 1-5 MeV charged particles for analysis of the surface and the outer few micrometers of solids. IFIN-HH RBS system consists of the U-120 Cyclotron, a dedicated beam line and a scattering chamber with sample manipulators and particle detectors. In our RBS system the samples are bombarded with 2-5 alpha particles accelerated by U-120 Cyclotron (in 3-rd subharmonic regime) while the scattered particles are detected by a surface barrier detector. The signal from the detector is processed by common nuclear electronics and the particle energy spectra are stored in a computer based multichannel analyser. The data evaluation is accomplished using standard procedures and computer codes. The necessary vacuum inside chamber is obtained with an oil-free turbo pump. The beam spot dimension on the target is 1x1 mm. The standard measurement are done at Θ = 165 angle. The samples are electrically insulated and can be rotated around a vertical axis. The advantage of the RBS technique lies in the quantitative analysis of major and minor constituents lying in the first 0.5 to 2.0 micrometers of a material. Depending on the sample structure and composition, the detection limits vary from 10 11 to 10 15 at. cm -2 for heavy and light elements, respectively. The depth distribution of constituents can be reconstructed with a depth resolution of 10-20 nm. The RBS technique is non-destructive since the erosion and the radiation degradation of the sample material by the particle impact is negligible. The most extensive use of the RBS technique is in the field of electronic and optical materials, special coatings and in the study of various physico-chemical processes on the solid surfaces. (authors)

  13. Homogenization of linearly anisotropic scattering cross sections in a consistent B1 heterogeneous leakage model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marleau, G.; Debos, E.

    1998-01-01

    One of the main problems encountered in cell calculations is that of spatial homogenization where one associates to an heterogeneous cell an homogeneous set of cross sections. The homogenization process is in fact trivial when a totally reflected cell without leakage is fully homogenized since it involved only a flux-volume weighting of the isotropic cross sections. When anisotropic leakages models are considered, in addition to homogenizing isotropic cross sections, the anisotropic scattering cross section must also be considered. The simple option, which consists of using the same homogenization procedure for both the isotropic and anisotropic components of the scattering cross section, leads to inconsistencies between the homogeneous and homogenized transport equation. Here we will present a method for homogenizing the anisotropic scattering cross sections that will resolve these inconsistencies. (author)

  14. Electron scattering cross sections pertinent to electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, M.

    1978-01-01

    Some elements of the physics that determine cross sections are discussed, and various sources of data are indicated that should be useful for analytical microscopy. Atoms, molecules, and to some extent, solids are considered. Inelastic and elastic scattering of electrons and some solid-state effects are treated. 30 references

  15. 54Fe neutron elastic and inelastic scattering differential cross sections from 2-6 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Liu, S. H.; Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B. M.; Crider, B. P.; French, A. J.; Garza, E. A.; Harrison, T.; Henderson, S. L.; Howard, T. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Nigam, S.; Pecha, R. L.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ramirez, A. P. D.; Rice, B. G.; Ross, T. J.; Santonil, Z. C.; Sidwell, L. C.; Steves, J. L.; Thompson, B. K.; Yates, S. W.

    2018-04-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections from 54Fe were performed for nine incident neutron energies between 2 and 6 MeV. Measured differential scattering cross sections are compared to those from previous measurements and the ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF data evaluations. TALYS calculations were performed and modifications of the default parameters are found to better describe the experimental cross sections. A spherical optical model treatment is generally adequate to describe the cross sections in this energy region; however, in 54Fe the direct coupling is found to increase suddenly above 4 MeV and requires an increase in the DWBA deformation parameter by approximately 25%. This has little effect on the elastic scattering differential cross sections but makes a significant improvement in both the strength and shape of the inelastic scattering angular distribution, which are found to be very sensitive to the size and extent of the surface absorption region.

  16. Fast-neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.

    1982-07-01

    Broad-resolution neutron-elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental tin are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Incident-energy intervals are approx. 50 keV below 3.0 MeV and approx. 200 keV at higher energies. Ten to twenty scattering angles are used, distributed between approx. 20 and 160 0 . The experimental results are used to deduce the parameters of a spherical optical-statistical model and they are also compared with corresponding values given in ENDF/B-V

  17. Mixed Legendre moments and discrete scattering cross sections for anisotropy representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J. F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the resolution of the integro-differential form of the Boltzmann transport equation for neutron transport in nuclear reactors. In multigroup theory, deterministic codes use transfer cross sections which are expanded on Legendre polynomials. This modelling leads to negative values of the transfer cross section for certain scattering angles, and hence, the multigroup scattering source term is wrongly computed. The first part compares the convergence of 'Legendre-expanded' cross sections with respect to the order used with the method of characteristics (MOC) for Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) type cells. Furthermore, the cross section is developed using piecewise-constant functions, which better models the multigroup transfer cross section and prevents the occurrence of any negative value for it. The second part focuses on the method of solving the transport equation with the above-mentioned piecewise-constant cross sections for lattice calculations for PWR cells. This expansion thereby constitutes a 'reference' method to compare the conventional Legendre expansion to, and to determine its pertinence when applied to reactor physics calculations. (authors)

  18. Inelastic neutron scattering cross-section measurements on 7Li and 63,65Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Markus; Belloni, Francesca; Ichinkhorloo, Dagvadorj; Pirovano, Elisa; Plompen, Arjan; Rouki, Chariklia

    2017-09-01

    The γ-ray production cross section for the 477.6-keV transition in 7Li following inelastic neutron scattering has been measured from the reaction threshold up to 18 MeV. This cross section is interesting as a possible standard for other inelastic scattering measurements. The experiment was conducted at the Geel Electron LINear Accelerator (GELINA) pulsed white neutron source with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) spectrometer. Previous measurements of this cross section are reviewed and compared with our results. Recently, this cross section has also been calculated using the continuum discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) method. Experiments for studying neutrinoless double-β decay (2β0ν) or other very rare processes require greatly reducing the background radiation level (both intrinsic and external). Copper is a common shielding and structural material, used extensively in experiments such as COBRA, CUORE, EXO, GERDA, and MAJORANA. Understanding the background contribution arising from neutron interactions in Cu is important when searching for very weak experimental signals. Neutron inelastic scattering on natCu was investigated with GAINS. The results are compared with previous experimental data and evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  19. Inelastic neutron scattering cross-section measurements on 7Li and 63,65Cu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyman Markus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The γ-ray production cross section for the 477.6-keV transition in 7Li following inelastic neutron scattering has been measured from the reaction threshold up to 18 MeV. This cross section is interesting as a possible standard for other inelastic scattering measurements. The experiment was conducted at the Geel Electron LINear Accelerator (GELINA pulsed white neutron source with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS spectrometer. Previous measurements of this cross section are reviewed and compared with our results. Recently, this cross section has also been calculated using the continuum discretized coupled-channels (CDCC method. Experiments for studying neutrinoless double-β decay (2β0ν or other very rare processes require greatly reducing the background radiation level (both intrinsic and external. Copper is a common shielding and structural material, used extensively in experiments such as COBRA, CUORE, EXO, GERDA, and MAJORANA. Understanding the background contribution arising from neutron interactions in Cu is important when searching for very weak experimental signals. Neutron inelastic scattering on natCu was investigated with GAINS. The results are compared with previous experimental data and evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  20. Highly resolving Rutherford-scattering spectrometry for the study of ZrO2 layer growth in the beginning stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieluf, Maik

    2010-06-01

    By means of High Resolution Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (HR-RBS) the diffusion behaviour and layer growth of ZrO 2 on SiO 2 and TiN in the initial regime were investigated. The analysis of concentration profiles in ultrathin layers and interfaces was the focus of this work, made possible by the excellent depth resolution of less than 0.3 nm near the surface. For the first time a two-dimensional position sensitive semiconductor detector was implemented and characterized in the setup of the HR-RBS for the improvement of the quality of the measurement results. Furthermore, a measurement procedure was put into operation that allowed the reduction of ion induced damage. Through the optimization of the experimental conditions and the development of a program package for the support of the analyst, an efficient measurement procedure could be routinely ensured. At the time of a binary collision between the incident ion and the target element with a small impact factor, the charge state changes frequently, especially due to the abruptly decreasing ion velocity of the projectile and the overlapping of the electron clouds. For HR-RBS with an energy-separating dipole magnet, the charge state distribution of the scattered ions must be known for the interpretation of the measured spectra. For the first time a significant dependence of the charge state distribution of the scattered C ions on the layer thickness as well as atomic number of the detected target elements, here from the fourth subgroup, was demonstrated. This new knowledge allowed systematic investigations of the ZrO 2 layer growth in the initial regime. The ZrO 2 layers were produced by means of the atomic layer deposition (ALD). Based on the evidence for agglomeration of ZrO 2 on SiO 2 a method was introduced, which takes local thickness variations into account during the simulation of the HR-RBS spectra. An accurate statement about the ZrO 2 /SiO 2 interface was possible due to the extraction of the

  1. Total cross sections for electron scattering with halocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghma, Rahla; Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby, E-mail: bka.ism@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • A quantum mechanical model to find elastic, inelastic and total CS by e{sup −} impact. • Spherical complex optical potential formalism is used to find total CS. • Result shows consistency and good agreement with previous data wherever available. • Maiden attempt to find CS for CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3}, CBr{sub 4} and C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules. • Interesting correlation observed between total CS and polarizability of the molecule. - Abstract: A theoretical study on electron collision with chlorinated methanes: CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CHCl{sub 3}, brominated methanes: CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3} and CBr{sub 4} and some mono chloroalkanes: C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules in gaseous ground state is undertaken to report elastic, inelastic and total cross sections in the 20–5000 eV energy range. The target molecule is represented as a sum of various scattering centres, which are assumed to scatter electrons independently. The spherical complex optical potential (SCOP) is formulated to represent the interaction dynamics between the electron and the constituent scattering centres. Using SCOP, the quantum mechanical scattering problem is solved through partial wave analysis. The results obtained for CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CHCl{sub 3} are compared with the available experimental and theoretical values. The elastic cross section for CBr{sub 4} shows satisfactory agreement with the previous available data. The cross sections for CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3}, and C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules presented in this work are reported for the first time.

  2. Experimental and theoretical electron-scattering cross-section data for dichloromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, K.; Lange, E.; Blanco, F.; Barbosa, A. S.; Pastega, D. F.; Sanchez, S. d'A.; Bettega, M. H. F.; García, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Ferreira da Silva, F.

    2018-04-01

    We report on a combination of experimental and theoretical investigations into the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections for electron interactions with dichloromethane, C H2C l2 , in the incident electron energy over the 7.0-30 eV range. Elastic electron-scattering cross-section calculations have been performed within the framework of the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with pseudopotentials (SMCPP), and the independent-atom model with screening-corrected additivity rule including interference-effects correction (IAM-SCAR+I). The present elastic DCSs have been found to agree reasonably well with the results of IAM-SCAR+I calculations above 20 eV and also with the SMC calculations below 30 eV. Although some discrepancies were found for 7 eV, the agreement between the two theoretical methodologies is remarkable as the electron-impact energy increases. Calculated elastic DCSs are also reported up to 10000 eV for scattering angles from 0° to 180° together with total cross section within the IAM-SCAR+I framework.

  3. Scattering extraction of ions at CRYRING for SEU testing

    CERN Document Server

    Novák, D; Klamra, W; Norlin, L O; Bagge, L; Kaellberg, A; Paál, A; Rensfelt, K G; Molnár, J

    1999-01-01

    A measuring station has been built at the CRYRING heavy ion accelerator to test the Single Event Upset (SEU) phenomena in working Static RAM circuits. The setup extracts the beam using Rutherford scattering and the ions are monitored with a BaF sub 2 scintillator. SEU measurements have been performed for standard bulk CMOS memory circuits.

  4. RUTHERFORD APPLETON: What's in a name?!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The initials 'RAU are well known in the world of particle physics, but recently the official name of the Laboratory has undergone several transmogrifications. To further complicate matters, the funding body for Particle Physics within the UK has changed too! On 1 April 1994 the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory combined with the Daresbury Laboratory to become a combined laboratory known as the Daresbury and Rutherford Appleton Laboratories (DRAL). At the same time the old Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) was wound up, and funding was channelled through the newly formed Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC). Also, and just for an interim period, DRAL became part of the new Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). One year later a more profound change occurred when DRAL became a Research Council in its own right, and the legal entity created by Royal Charter was named The Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils', abbreviated to CCLRC. On 1 April 1995, DRAL became The Central Laboratory of the Research Councils', and the abbreviation CLRC may be used. In spite of the changes to the official name, the laboratory sited at Chilton, The DAPNIA (Saclay, France) and Argonne transportable polarized target used in 1989- 1990 for a Fermi lab experiment has been used in a new experiment at Dubna. Gilles Durand from DAPNIA (right) and Yuri Usov of Dubna's Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) were responsible for construction. Oxfordshire, will continue to be known as the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, or RAL

  5. Moments of the Bethe surface and total inelastic x-ray scattering cross sections for H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.S.; Thakkar, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Moments, S(j,K), of the generalized oscillator strength distribution are global properties of the Bethe surface. Apart from S(-1,K) which is related to the Waller-Hartree incoherent scattering factor, little is known about these moments for nonzero K. This paper describes high-accuracy calculations of S(1,K) and S(2,K) for molecular hydrogen. Comparison with experiment is made, and the utility of simple asymptotic approximations is confirmed. The moments are used to calculate differential cross sections for the inelastic scattering of x rays using the constant-momentum-transfer and constant-angle theories of Bonham. These cross sections differ from the Waller-Hartree cross sections at large angles thus demonstrating the importance of making corrections to the Waller-Hartree theory if the incoherent scattering factor S(K) is to be extracted from experimental inelastic cross sections. Total cross sections for scattering of 6- and 7-keV photons from H 2 are compared with synchrotron radiation scattering experiments. The calculations suggest that the Bonham constant-angle cross sections agree best with experiment. However, further experimental and theoretical work is needed to obtain firm conclusions about the limitations of Waller-Hartree theory

  6. Covariance Matrix of a Double-Differential Doppler-Broadened Elastic Scattering Cross Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbanas, G.; Becker, B.; Dagan, R.; Dunn, M. E.; Larson, N. M.; Leal, L. C.; Williams, M. L.

    2012-05-01

    Legendre moments of a double-differential Doppler-broadened elastic neutron scattering cross section on 238U are computed near the 6.67 eV resonance at temperature T = 103 K up to angular order 14. A covariance matrix of these Legendre moments is computed as a functional of the covariance matrix of the elastic scattering cross section. A variance of double-differential Doppler-broadened elastic scattering cross section is computed from the covariance of Legendre moments. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  7. Lectures on magnetism and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.

    1983-12-01

    The paper contains six lectures given to the Neutron Division of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory in 1983. The aim was to explain fundamental physics of neutron scattering and basic magnetism to the non-specialist scientist. The text includes: origin of neutron's magnetic moment and spin-dependent interactions with electrons and nuclei, why are solids magnetic, magnetic anistropy and domain structure, phenomenological spin waves, magnetic phase transitions and electronic excitations in magnets. (U.K.)

  8. TOTEM Results on Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Section

    CERN Document Server

    Kašpar, Jan

    2015-01-01

    TOTEM is an LHC experiment dedicated to forward hadronic physics. In this contribution, two main parts of its physics programme - proton-proton elastic scattering and total cross-section - are discussed. The analysis procedures are outlined and their status is reviewed.

  9. Neutron total and scattering cross sections of 6Li in the few MeV region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.; Guenther, P.; Whalen, J.

    1980-02-01

    Neutron total cross sections of 6 Li are measured from approx. 0.5 to approx. 4.8 MeV at intervals of approx. 10 scattering angles and at incident-neutron intervals of approx.< 100 keV. Neutron differential inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured in the incident-energy range 3.5 to 4.0 MeV. The experimental results are extended to lower energies using measured neutron total cross sections recently reported elsewhere by the authors. The composite experimental data (total cross sections from 0.1 to 4.8 MeV and scattering cross sections from 0.22 to 4.0 MeV) are interpreted in terms of a simple two-level R-matrix model which describes the observed cross sections and implies the reaction cross section in unobserved channels; notably the (n;α)t reaction (Q = 4.783 MeV). The experimental and calculational results are compared with previously reported results as summarized in the ENDF/B-V evaluated nuclear data file

  10. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  11. Medium modified two-body scattering amplitude from proton-nucleus total cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently (R.K. Tripathi, J.W. Wilson, F.A. Cucinotta, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 145 (1998) 277; R.K. Tripathi, F.A. Cucinotta, J.W. Wilson, NASA-TP-1998-208438), we have extracted nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross-sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross-sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Here, we investigate the ratio of real to imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross-sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross-sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross-sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Experiment to measure total cross sections, differential cross sections and polarization effects in pp elastic scattering at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guryn, W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are describing an experiment to study proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Using both polarized and unpolarized beams, the experiment will study pp elastic scattering from √s = 50 GeV to √s = 500 GeV in two kinematical regions. In the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region, 0.0005 2 , they will measure and study the s dependence of the total and elastic cross sections, σ tot and σ el ; the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, ρ; and the nuclear slope parameter of the pp elastic scattering, b. In the medium |t|-region, |t| 2 , they plan to study the evolution of the dip structure with s, as observed at ISR in the differential elastic cross section, dσ el /dt, and the s and |t| dependence of b. With the polarized beams the following can be measured: the difference in the total cross sections as function of initial transverse spin states Δσ T , the analyzing power, A N , and the transverse spin correlation parameter A NN . The behavior of the analyzing power A N at RHIC energies in the dip region of dσ el /dt, where a pronounced structure was found at fixed-target experiments will be studied. The relation of pp elastic scattering to the beam polarization measurement at RHIC is also discussed

  13. Resonance effects in elastic cross sections for electron scattering on pyrimidine: Experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for elastic (rotationally integrated) electron scattering on pyrimidine, both as a function of angle up to 180(∘) at electron energies of 1, 5, 10, and 20 eV and as a function of electron energy in the range 0.1-14 eV. The experimental results are compared to the results of the fixed-nuclei Schwinger variational and R-matrix theoretical methods, which reproduce satisfactorily the magnitudes and shapes of the experimental cross sections. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. Resonant structures are observed at 0.2, 0.7, and 4.35 eV and calculations for different symmetries confirm their assignment as the X̃(2)A2, Ã(2)B1, and B̃(2)B1 shape resonances. As a consequence of superposition of coherent resonant amplitudes with background scattering the B̃(2)B1 shape resonance appears as a peak, a dip, or a step function in the cross sections recorded as a function of energy at different scattering angles and this effect is satisfactorily reproduced by theory. The dip and peak contributions at different scattering angles partially compensate, making the resonance nearly invisible in the integral cross section. Vibrationally integrated cross sections were also measured at 1, 5, 10 and 20 eV and the question of whether the fixed-nuclei cross sections should be compared to vibrationally elastic or vibrationally integrated cross section is discussed.

  14. Inversion of the total cross sections for electron-molecule and electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lun, D.R.; Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Inverse scattering theory has been applied to construct the interaction potentials from total cross sections as a function of energy for electrons scattered off of atoms and molecules. The underlying potentials are assumed to be real and energy independent and are evaluated using the Eikonal approximation and with real phase shifts determined from the total cross sections. The inversion potentials have been determined using either a high energy limit approximation or by using a fixed energy inversion method at select energies. These procedures have been used to analyse e - - CH 4 , e - - SiH 4 , e - -Kr and e - -Xe scattering data in particular. 14 refs., 1 tabs., 3 figs

  15. Relativity, nuclear polarizability, and screening in sub-Coulomb elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Bhang, H.C.; Cramer, J.G.; Puigh, R.J.

    Elastic scattering of p-shell nuclear projectiles from 208 Pb has been examined for deviations from Rutherford scattering. Four effects can be important: atomic screening, vacuum polarization, nuclear polarizability and a relativistic effect of dynamical origin. The presence of atomic screening, nuclear polarizability and the relativistic effect was observed thus constituting the first measurement of this relativistic effect using complex nuclei and the first measurement of this relativistic effect using complex nuclei and the first measurement of nuclear polarizability in an external Coulomb field

  16. Highly resolving Rutherford-scattering spectrometry for the study of ZrO{sub 2} layer growth in the beginning stage; Hochaufloesende Rutherford-Streuspektrometrie zur Untersuchung von ZrO{sub 2}-Schichtwachstum im Anfangsstadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieluf, Maik

    2010-06-15

    By means of High Resolution Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (HR-RBS) the diffusion behaviour and layer growth of ZrO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} and TiN in the initial regime were investigated. The analysis of concentration profiles in ultrathin layers and interfaces was the focus of this work, made possible by the excellent depth resolution of less than 0.3 nm near the surface. For the first time a two-dimensional position sensitive semiconductor detector was implemented and characterized in the setup of the HR-RBS for the improvement of the quality of the measurement results. Furthermore, a measurement procedure was put into operation that allowed the reduction of ion induced damage. Through the optimization of the experimental conditions and the development of a program package for the support of the analyst, an efficient measurement procedure could be routinely ensured. At the time of a binary collision between the incident ion and the target element with a small impact factor, the charge state changes frequently, especially due to the abruptly decreasing ion velocity of the projectile and the overlapping of the electron clouds. For HR-RBS with an energy-separating dipole magnet, the charge state distribution of the scattered ions must be known for the interpretation of the measured spectra. For the first time a significant dependence of the charge state distribution of the scattered C ions on the layer thickness as well as atomic number of the detected target elements, here from the fourth subgroup, was demonstrated. This new knowledge allowed systematic investigations of the ZrO{sub 2} layer growth in the initial regime. The ZrO{sub 2} layers were produced by means of the atomic layer deposition (ALD). Based on the evidence for agglomeration of ZrO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} a method was introduced, which takes local thickness variations into account during the simulation of the HR-RBS spectra. An accurate statement about the ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interface was

  17. MUTIL, Asymmetry Factor of Mott Cross-Sections for Electron, Positron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The asymmetry factor S of Mott's differential cross section for the scattering of electrons and positrons by point nuclei without screening is calculated for any energy, atomic number and angle of scattering. 2 - Method of solution: We have summed the conditionally convergent series, F and G, appearing in the asymmetry factor using two consecutive transformations: The one of Yennie, Ravenhall and Wilson and that of Euler till we have seven times six significant figures repeated in the factor S. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Those appearing in the use of Mott's cross section for unscreened point nuclei

  18. Hydrogen scattering cross section, 1H(n,n)1H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.

    1979-07-01

    The status of the hydrogen scattering cross section is reviewed with particular emphasis on standards applications. The ENDF/B-V evaluation is described in detail and compared with experimental data. 58 references

  19. Depth distribution of damage obtained by Rutherford backscattering combined with channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, R.; Roth, J.

    1976-01-01

    The different approaches to determine depth distributions of damage in solids by Rutherford backscattering combined with channeling are reviewed. These methods are best applicable for damage introduced by ion bombardment. Most investigations up to now have been done at semiconductors where the ion damage seems to be more suited for analysis by this method than the ion damage in metals. The quantity used for getting depth profiles is mostly the increase in minimum yields in single alignment Rutherford backscattering, while only few measurements have been done at double alignment and at slight misalignment, i.e., the sides of the channeling dips

  20. Quantal inversion of cross-section for the elastic scattering of 200 MeV protons from 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.J.; Amos, K.; Dortmans, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fixed energy quantal inverse scattering theory has been used to analyse the differential cross-section from the elastic scattering of 200 MeV protons from 12 C. Ambiguities in obtaining the scattering function from the differential cross-section are discussed and by means of example it is illustrated that not all scattering functions lead to physically reasonable potentials. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  1. Cross-correlation time-of-flight analysis of molecular beam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowikow, C.V.; Grice, R.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of the cross-correlation method of time-of-flight analysis is presented in a form which highlights its formal similarity to the conventional method. A time-of-flight system for the analysis of crossed molecular beam scattering is described, which is based on a minicomputer interface and can operate in both the cross-correlation and conventional modes. The interface maintains the synchronisation of chopper disc rotation and channel advance indefinitely in the cross-correlation method and can acquire data in phase with the beam modulation in both methods. The shutter function of the cross-correlation method is determined and the deconvolution analysis of the data is discussed. (author)

  2. ZZ ELAST2, Database of Cross Sections for the Elastic Scattering of Electrons and Positrons by Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    1 - Historical background and information: This database is an extension of the earlier database, 'Elastic Scattering of Electrons and Positrons by Atoms: Database ELAST', Report NISTIR 5188, 1993. Cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons and positrons by atoms were calculated at energies from 1 KeV to 100 MeV. Up to 10 MeV the RELEL code of Riley was used. Above 10 MeV the ELSCAT code was used, which calculated the factored cross sections and evaluates the screening factor Kscr in WKB approximation. 2 - Application of the data: This database was developed to provide input for the transport codes, such as ETRAN, and includes differential cross sections, the total cross section, and the transport cross sections. In addition, a code TRANSX is provided that generates transport cross section of arbitrary order needed as input for the calculation of Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple-scattering angular distribution 3 - Source and scope of data: The database includes cross sections at 61 energies for electrons and 41 energies from positrons, covering the energy region from 1 KeV to 100 MeV. The number of deflection angles included in the database is 314 angles. Total and transport cross sections are also included in this package. The data files have an extension (jjj) that represents the atomic number of the target atom. The database includes auxiliary data files that enable the ELASTIC code to include the following optional modifications: (i) the inclusion of the exchange correction for electrons scattering; (ii) the conversion of the cross sections for scattering by free atoms to cross sections for scattering by atoms in solids; (iii) ti reduction of the cross sections at large angles and at high energies when the nucleus is treated as an extended rather than a point charge

  3. Investigation on LPCVD SiON films by means of Rutherford backscattering, FT-IR and UV-VIS Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudu, D.; Ivanov, E.; Bercu, B.N.; Bercu, M.; Modreanu, M.

    2003-01-01

    The SiON layers deposited by LPCVD (Low Vapour Chemical Deposition ) on Si (111) substrate has been investigated by complementary techniques as Rutherford backscattering and optical spectroscopy. We have determined the evolution of chemical content in respect with oxygen relative to nitrogen. The change in oxygen content versus time was produced by exposing the sample in wet oxygen at 1000 deg. C for different periods. The change in oxygen amount was determined by monitoring the Si-O-Si integral intensity of the absorption band at 1071cm -1 . Also the behavior of the refractive index versus time in an oxidative atmosphere gave a complementary information about the oxygen content. Alpha scattering spectra obtained by means of cyclotron facilities was used as another technique for oxygen to nitrogen ratio determination. Both visible spectra and RBS data were fitted by using the corresponding simulating approaches based on light propagation in non-homogeneous media and respectively on multiple scattering theory. The time evolution of O content indicated a diffused controlled process through the gas/solid interface. (authors)

  4. Intrinsic acoustical cross sections in the multiple scattering by a pair of rigid cylindrical particles in 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-08-01

    The multiple scattering effects occurring between two scatterers are described based upon the multipole expansion formalism as well as the addition theorem of cylindrical wave functions. An original approach is presented in which an effective incident acoustic field on a particular object, which includes both the primary and re-scattered waves from the other particle is determined first, and then used with the scattered field to derive closed-form analytical expressions for the inherent (i.e. intrinsic) cross-sections based on the far-field scattering. This method does not introduce any approximation in the calculation of the intrinsic cross-sections since the procedure is reduced to the one-body problem. The mathematical expressions for the intrinsic cross-sections are formulated in partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) in cylindrical coordinates involving the angle of incidence, the addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions, and the expansion coefficients of the scatterers. Numerical examples illustrate the analysis for two rigid circular cylindrical cross-sections with different radii immersed in a non-viscous fluid. Computations for the dimensionless extrinsic and intrinsic extinction cross-section factors are evaluated with particular emphasis on varying the angle of incidence, the interparticle distance, as well as the sizes of the particles. A symmetric behavior is observed for the dimensionless extrinsic extinction cross-section, while asymmetry arises for the intrinsic extinction cross-section of each particle with respect to the angle of incidence. The present analysis provides a complete analytical and computational method for the prediction of the intrinsic (local) scattering, absorption and extinction cross-sections in the multiple acoustic scatterings of plane progressive waves of arbitrary incidence by a pair of scatterers. The results and computational analyses can be used as a priori information for future applications to guide the

  5. Intrinsic acoustical cross sections in the multiple scattering by a pair of rigid cylindrical particles in 2D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F G

    2017-01-01

    The multiple scattering effects occurring between two scatterers are described based upon the multipole expansion formalism as well as the addition theorem of cylindrical wave functions. An original approach is presented in which an effective incident acoustic field on a particular object, which includes both the primary and re-scattered waves from the other particle is determined first, and then used with the scattered field to derive closed-form analytical expressions for the inherent (i.e. intrinsic) cross-sections based on the far-field scattering. This method does not introduce any approximation in the calculation of the intrinsic cross-sections since the procedure is reduced to the one-body problem. The mathematical expressions for the intrinsic cross-sections are formulated in partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) in cylindrical coordinates involving the angle of incidence, the addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions, and the expansion coefficients of the scatterers. Numerical examples illustrate the analysis for two rigid circular cylindrical cross-sections with different radii immersed in a non-viscous fluid. Computations for the dimensionless extrinsic and intrinsic extinction cross-section factors are evaluated with particular emphasis on varying the angle of incidence, the interparticle distance, as well as the sizes of the particles. A symmetric behavior is observed for the dimensionless extrinsic extinction cross-section, while asymmetry arises for the intrinsic extinction cross-section of each particle with respect to the angle of incidence. The present analysis provides a complete analytical and computational method for the prediction of the intrinsic (local) scattering, absorption and extinction cross-sections in the multiple acoustic scatterings of plane progressive waves of arbitrary incidence by a pair of scatterers. The results and computational analyses can be used as a priori information for future applications to guide the

  6. Experiment to measure total cross sections, differential cross sections and polarization effects in pp elastic scattering at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guryn, W.

    1995-01-01

    The author is describing an experiment to study proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Using both polarized and unpolarized beams, the experiment will study pp elastic scattering from √s = 60 GeV to √s = 500 GeV in two kinematical regions .In the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region, 0.0005 2 , we will measure and study the s dependence of the total and elastic cross sections, σ tot and σ el ; the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, ρ; and the nuclear slope parameter of the pp elastic scattering, b. In the medium |t|, |t| ≤ 1.5 (GeV/c) 2 , we plan to study the evolution of the dip structure with s, as observed at ISR in the differential elastic cross section, dσ el /dt, and the s and |t| dependence of b. With the polarized beams the following can be measured: the difference in the total cross sections as function of initial transverse spin stated Δσ T , the analyzing power, A N , and the transverse spin correlation parameter A NN . The behavior of the analyzing power A N at RHIC energies in the dip region of dσ el /dt, where a pronounced structure was found at fixed-target experiments will be studied

  7. Polarisation analysis of elastic neutron scattering using a filter spectrometer on a pulsed source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayers, J.; Williams, W.G.

    1981-05-01

    The experimental and theoretical aspects of the polarisation analysis technique in elastic neutron scattering are described. An outline design is presented for a filter polarisation analysis spectrometer on the Rutherford Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source and estimates made of its expected count rates and resolution. (author)

  8. Model of homogeneous nucleus. Total and inelastic cross sections of nucleon-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, L.A.; Smorodinskaya, N.Ya.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the nucleon-nuckleus scattering amplitude at high energy can be easily calculated by generalization of the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and satisfies a simple factorization relation. As distinct from the Glauber model, the suggested approach makes no use of the nucleonic structure of the nucleus and the hadron-nucleus scattering amplitude is not expressed in terms of hadron-nucleon scattering amplitudes. The energy dependence of total and inelastic cross sections is successfully described for a number of nuclei

  9. Scaling relations in elastic scattering cross sections between multiply charged ions and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, V.D.

    1991-01-01

    Differential elastic scattering cross sections of bare ions from hydrogen are calculated using the eikonal approximation. The results satisfy a scaling relation involving the scattering angle, the ion charge and a factor related to the ion mass. A semiclassical explanation in terms of a distant collision hypothesis for small scattering angle is proposed. A unified picture of related scaling rules found in direct processes is discussed. (author)

  10. Exotic behavior of elastic scattering differential cross-sections of weakly bound nucleus 17F at small angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jianlong; Hu Zhengguo; Zhang Xueyin; Yuan Xiaohua; Xu Huagen; Qi Huirong; Wang Yue; Jia Fei; Wu Lijie; Ding Xianli; Gao Qi; Gao Hui; Bai Zhen

    2006-01-01

    The differential cross-sections for elastic scattering of 17 F and 17 O on 208 Pb have been measured at Radioactive Ion Beam Line at Lanzhou (RIBLL). The variation of the logarithms of differential cross-sections with the square of scattering angles shows clearly that there exists a turning point in the range of small scattering angles (6 degree-20 degree) for 17 F having exotic structure, while no turning point was observed in the 17 O elastic scattering. The experimental results have been compared with previous data. Systematical analysis on the available data seems to conclude that there is an exotic behavior of elastic scattering differential cross-sections of weakly bound nuclei with halo or skin structure as compared with that of the ordinary nuclei near stable line. Therefore the fact that the turning point of the logarithms of differential cross-sections appears at small angle for weakly bound nuclei could be used as a new probe to investigate the halo and skin phenomenon. (authors)

  11. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons by helium, neon, argon and molecular nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, R.H.J.; De Heer, F.J.; Luyken, H.J.; Van Wingerden, B.

    1976-01-01

    An electron spectrometer has been constructed for the study of elastic and inelastic electron scattering processes. Up to now the apparatus has been used to measure differential cross sections of electrons elastically scattered by He, Ne, Ar and N 2 . Direct absolute cross section measurements were performed on N 2 at 500 eV impact energy and at scattering angles between 5 0 and 9 0 . Relative cross section measurements were done on He, Ne, Ar and N 2 at impact energies between 100 and 3000 eV and scattering angles between 5 0 and 55 0 . The relative cross sections were put on an absolute scale by means of the apparatus calibration factor derived from the absolute measurements on N 2 . The experimental apparatus and procedure are described in detail. The results are discussed and compared with those of other experimental and theoretical groups. Analysis of the exponential behaviour of the differential cross section as a function of momentum transfer yielded apparent polarizabilities of the target. (author)

  12. Study of scattering cross section of a plasma column using Green's function volume integral equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanmoradi, Elmira; Shokri, Babak

    2017-05-01

    In this article, the electromagnetic wave scattering from plasma columns with inhomogeneous electron density distribution is studied by the Green's function volume integral equation method. Due to the ready production of such plasmas in the laboratories and their practical application in various technological fields, this study tries to find the effects of plasma parameters such as the electron density, radius, and pressure on the scattering cross-section of a plasma column. Moreover, the incident wave frequency influence of the scattering pattern is demonstrated. Furthermore, the scattering cross-section of a plasma column with an inhomogeneous collision frequency profile is calculated and the effect of this inhomogeneity is discussed first in this article. These results are especially used to determine the appropriate conditions for radar cross-section reduction purposes. It is shown that the radar cross-section of a plasma column reduces more for a larger collision frequency, for a relatively lower plasma frequency, and also for a smaller radius. Furthermore, it is found that the effect of the electron density on the scattering cross-section is more obvious in comparison with the effect of other plasma parameters. Also, the plasma column with homogenous collision frequency can be used as a better shielding in contrast to its inhomogeneous counterpart.

  13. Low energy positron interactions with uracil—Total scattering, positronium formation, and differential elastic scattering cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E. K.; Boadle, R. A.; Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Sullivan, J. P. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Chiari, L. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, 5001 SA (Australia); Buckman, S. J., E-mail: Stephen.buckman@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Brunger, M. J. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, 5001 SA (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fısica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigationes Cientıficas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fısica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ingolfsson, O. [Department of Chemistry, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavík 107 (Iceland)

    2014-07-21

    Measurements of the grand total and total positronium formation cross sections for positron scattering from uracil have been performed for energies between 1 and 180 eV, using a trap-based beam apparatus. Angular, quasi-elastic differential cross section measurements at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 eV are also presented and discussed. These measurements are compared to existing experimental results and theoretical calculations, including our own calculations using a variant of the independent atom approach.

  14. Electron and positron atomic elastic scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanek, Jiri

    2003-01-01

    A method was developed to calculate the total and differential elastic-scattering cross sections for incident electrons and positrons in the energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 MeV for atoms of Z=1-100. For electrons, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, krypton, and xenon, and for positrons, helium, neon, and argon atoms were considered for comparison with experimental data. First, the variationally optimized atomic static potentials were calculated for each atom by solving the Dirac equations for bound electron states. Second, the Dirac equations for a free electron or positron are solved for an atom using the previously calculated static potential accomplished (in the case of electrons) by 'adjusted' Hara's exchange potential for a free-state particle. Additional to the exchange effects, the charge cloud polarization effects are considered applying the correlation-polarization potential of O'Connell and Lane (with correction of Padial and Norcross) for incident electrons, and of Jain for incident positrons. The total, cutoff and differential elastic-scattering cross sections are calculated for incident electrons and positrons with the help of the relativistic partial wave analysis. The solid state effects for scattering in solids are described by means of a muffin-tin model, i.e. the potentials of neighboring atoms are superpositioned in such a way that the resulting potential and its derivative are zero in the middle distance between the atoms. The potential of isolated atom is calculated up to the radius at which the long-range polarization potential becomes a value of -10 -8

  15. Shell-model computed cross sections for charged-current scattering of astrophysical neutrinos off 40Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostensalo, Joel; Suhonen, Jouni; Zuber, K.

    2018-03-01

    Charged-current (anti)neutrino-40Ar cross sections for astrophysical neutrinos have been calculated. The initial and final nuclear states were calculated using the nuclear shell model. The folded solar-neutrino scattering cross section was found to be 1.78 (23 ) ×10-42cm2 , which is higher than what the previous papers have reported. The contributions from the 1- and 2- multipoles were found to be significant at supernova-neutrino energies, confirming the random-phase approximation (RPA) result of a previous study. The effects of neutrino flavor conversions in dense stellar matter (matter oscillations) were found to enhance the neutrino-scattering cross sections significantly for both the normal and inverted mass hierarchies. For the antineutrino scattering, only a small difference between the nonoscillating and inverted-hierarchy cross sections was found, while the normal-hierarchy cross section was 2-3 times larger than that of the nonoscillating cross section, depending on the adopted parametrization of the Fermi-Dirac distribution. This property of the supernova-antineutrino signal could probably be used to distinguish between the two hierarchies in megaton LAr detectors.

  16. Accurate Calculations of Rotationally Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections Using Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-16

    For computational treatment of rotationally inelastic scattering of molecules, we propose to use the mixed quantum/classical theory, MQCT. The old idea of treating translational motion classically, while quantum mechanics is used for rotational degrees of freedom, is developed to the new level and is applied to Na + N2 collisions in a broad range of energies. Comparison with full-quantum calculations shows that MQCT accurately reproduces all, even minor, features of energy dependence of cross sections, except scattering resonances at very low energies. The remarkable success of MQCT opens up wide opportunities for computational predictions of inelastic scattering cross sections at higher temperatures and/or for polyatomic molecules and heavier quenchers, which is computationally close to impossible within the full-quantum framework.

  17. Positron total scattering cross-sections for alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Nidhi; Singh, Suvam; Antony, Bobby

    2018-01-01

    Positron-impact total scattering cross-sections for Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Fr atoms are calculated in the energy range from 5-5000 eV employing modified spherical complex optical potential formalism. The main aim of this work is to apply this formalism to the less studied positron-target collision systems. The results are compared with previous theoretical and experimental data, wherever available. In general, the present data show overall agreement and consistency with other results. Furthermore, we have done a comparative study of the results to investigate the effect of atomic size on the cross-sections as we descend through the group in the periodic table. We have also plotted a correlation graph of the present total cross-sections with polarizability and number of target electrons. The two correlation plots confirm the credibility and consistency of the present results. Besides, this is the first theoretical attempt to report positron-impact total cross-sections of alkali atoms over such a wide energy range.

  18. Internal magnetic turbulence measurement in plasma by cross polarization scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, X L; Colas, L; Paume, M; Chareau, J M; Laurent, L; Devynck, P; Gresillon, D

    1994-09-01

    For the first time, the internal magnetic turbulence is measured by a new cross polarization scattering diagnostic in Tore Supra tokamak. The principle of this experiment is presented. It is based on the polarization change or mode conversion of the e.m. wave scattering by magnetic fluctuations. The role of different physical processes on the signal formation are investigated. From the Observation, a rough estimate for the relative magnetic fluctuations of about 10{sup -4} is obtained. A strong correlation of the measured signal with additional heating is observed. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs.

  19. MEASUREMENTS OF THE ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE INTERACTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES WITH SUNSPOTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hui; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The solar acoustic waves are modified by the interaction with sunspots. The interaction can be treated as a scattering problem: an incident wave propagating toward a sunspot is scattered by the sunspot into different modes. The absorption cross section and scattering cross section are two important parameters in the scattering problem. In this study, we use the wavefunction of the scattered wave, measured with a deconvolution method, to compute the absorption cross section σ ab and the scattering cross section σ sc for the radial order n = 0–5 for two sunspots, NOAA 11084 and NOAA 11092. In the computation of the cross sections, the random noise and dissipation in the measured acoustic power are corrected. For both σ ab and σ sc , the value of NOAA 11092 is greater than that of NOAA 11084, but their overall n dependence is similar: decreasing with n . The ratio of σ ab of NOAA 11092 to that of NOAA 11084 approximately equals the ratio of sunspot radii for all n , while the ratio of σ sc of the two sunspots is greater than the ratio of sunspot radii and increases with n . This suggests that σ ab is approximately proportional to the sunspot radius, while the dependence of σ sc on radius is faster than the linear increase.

  20. MEASUREMENTS OF THE ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE INTERACTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES WITH SUNSPOTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hui [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 200012 (China); Chou, Dean-Yi, E-mail: chou@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Physics Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-01

    The solar acoustic waves are modified by the interaction with sunspots. The interaction can be treated as a scattering problem: an incident wave propagating toward a sunspot is scattered by the sunspot into different modes. The absorption cross section and scattering cross section are two important parameters in the scattering problem. In this study, we use the wavefunction of the scattered wave, measured with a deconvolution method, to compute the absorption cross section σ {sub ab} and the scattering cross section σ {sub sc} for the radial order n = 0–5 for two sunspots, NOAA 11084 and NOAA 11092. In the computation of the cross sections, the random noise and dissipation in the measured acoustic power are corrected. For both σ {sub ab} and σ {sub sc}, the value of NOAA 11092 is greater than that of NOAA 11084, but their overall n dependence is similar: decreasing with n . The ratio of σ {sub ab} of NOAA 11092 to that of NOAA 11084 approximately equals the ratio of sunspot radii for all n , while the ratio of σ {sub sc} of the two sunspots is greater than the ratio of sunspot radii and increases with n . This suggests that σ {sub ab} is approximately proportional to the sunspot radius, while the dependence of σ {sub sc} on radius is faster than the linear increase.

  1. Science & Society: The search for the real Earnest Rutherford*

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Every physicist knows the name Rutherford who radically altered our understanding of nature on three separate occasions. Through brilliantly conceived experiments, and with special insight, he explained the perplexing problem of radioactivity as the spontaneous disintegration of atoms (they were not necessarily stable entities as had been assumed since the time of the ancient Greeks), he determined the structure of the atom and he was the world's first successful alchemist (he converted nitrogen into oxygen). This talk given by John Campbell, however, will cover some of the lesser known aspects of Rutherford's work, including his early wireless signalling, development of what was later improved to be now called the Geiger-Muller tube, his acoustic work for submarine detection during the First World War, the development of particle accelerators and the race to use them, the first use of a coincidence detector, and why he received just one Nobel Prize. Dr Campbell, a condensed matter physicist at the Universi...

  2. Angular finite volume method for solving the multigroup transport equation with piecewise average scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J.F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the solving of the multigroup integro-differential form of the transport equation for fine energy group structure. In that case, multigroup transfer cross sections display strongly peaked shape for light scatterers and the current Legendre polynomial expansion is not well-suited to represent them. Furthermore, even if considering an exact scattering cross sections representation, the scattering source in the discrete ordinates method (also known as the Sn method) being calculated by sampling the angular flux at given directions, may be wrongly computed due to lack of angular support for the angular flux. Hence, following the work of Gerts and Matthews, an angular finite volume solver has been developed for 2D Cartesian geometries. It integrates the multigroup transport equation over discrete volume elements obtained by meshing the unit sphere with a product grid over the polar and azimuthal coordinates and by considering the integrated flux per solid angle element. The convergence of this method has been compared to the S_n method for a highly anisotropic benchmark. Besides, piecewise-average scattering cross sections have been produced for non-bound Hydrogen atoms using a free gas model for thermal neutrons. LWR lattice calculations comparing Legendre representations of the Hydrogen scattering multigroup cross section at various orders and piecewise-average cross sections for this same atom are carried out (while keeping a Legendre representation for all other isotopes). (author)

  3. Coherent photon scattering cross sections for helium near the delta resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delli Carpini, D.; Booth, E.C.; Miller, J.P.; Igarashi, R.; Bergstrom, J.; Caplan, H.; Doss, M.; Hallin, E.; Rangacharyulu, C.; Skopik, D.; Lucas, M.A.; Nathan, A.M.; Wells, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    The angular distributions for coherent photon scattering from 4 He were measured at average laboratory bremsstrahlung energies of 187, 235, and 280 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory using the new high duty factor electron beam. The scattered photons were observed with a high-resolution NaI(Tl) total absorption scintillation detector. These measurements are intended to investigate modification of the Δ properties inside the nuclear medium and the treatment of nonresonant contributions to the scattering cross sections. The results are compared to theoretical calculations in the isobar-hole model. Clear deviations from the theory are evident at all energies, especially at 187 MeV

  4. X-ray resonant Raman scattering cross sections of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Hector Jorge; Valentinuzzi, MarIa Cecilia; Perez, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectra present singular characteristics produced by the different scattering processes. When atoms are irradiated with incident energy lower and close to an absorption edge, scattering peaks appear due to an inelastic process known as resonant Raman scattering. It constitutes an important contribution to the background of the fluorescent line. The resonant Raman scattering must be taken into account in the determination of low concentration contaminants, especially when the elements have proximate atomic numbers. The values of the mass attenuation coefficients experimentally obtained when materials are analysed with monochromatic x-ray beams under resonant conditions differ from the theoretical values (between 5% and 10%). This difference is due, in part, to the resonant Raman scattering. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to study the Raman effect on pure samples of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Energy scans were carried out in different ranges of energy near the absorption edge of the target element. As the Raman peak has a non-symmetric shape, theoretical models for the differential cross section, convoluted with the instrument function, were used to determine the RRS cross section as a function of the incident energy

  5. 14N + 10B fusion and elastic scattering cross section measurements near the interaction barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.C.; Overley, J.C.; Barnes, C.A.; Switkowski, Z.E.

    1979-01-01

    The 14 N + 10 B fusion reactions were studied at c.m. energies between 2.9 and 7.5 MeV by measuring the yields of γ-rays from the residual nuclei formed by particle evaporation from the compound system. Cross sections for formation of the evaporation residues 16 O, 19 F, 19 Ne, 20 Ne, 21 Ne, 22 Ne, 22 Na, 23 Na and 23 Mg, as well as the total cross section, were deduced from these yields with the aid of statistical model calculations. 14 N + 10 B elastic scattering differential cross sections were measured from 4.3 to 9.1 MeV at THETA 74.4 degrees, and from 3.3 to 8.3 MeV at THETA = 90.0 degrees. The elastic scattering cross sections were analyzed within the framework of the incoming-wave boundary condition (IWBC) model. The fusion cross sections calculated for the real ion-ion potential deduced from the IWBC model fit to the elastic scattering are in good agreement with the measured values

  6. Characteristics of angular cross correlations studied by light scattering from two-dimensional microsphere films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, M. A.; Gutt, C.; Grübel, G.

    2014-07-01

    Recently the analysis of scattering patterns by angular cross-correlation analysis (CCA) was introduced to reveal the orientational order in disordered samples with special focus to future applications on x-ray free-electron laser facilities. We apply this CCA approach to ultra-small-angle light-scattering data obtained from two-dimensional monolayers of microspheres. The films were studied in addition by optical microscopy. This combined approach allows to calculate the cross-correlations of the scattering patterns, characterized by the orientational correlation function Ψl(q), as well as to obtain the real-space structure of the monolayers. We show that CCA is sensitive to the orientational order of monolayers formed by the microspheres which are not directly visible from the scattering patterns. By mixing microspheres of different radii the sizes of ordered monolayer domains is reduced. For these samples it is shown that Ψl(q) quantitatively describes the degree of hexagonal order of the two-dimensional films. The experimental CCA results are compared with calculations based on the microscopy images. Both techniques show qualitatively similar features. Differences can be attributed to the wave-front distortion of the laser beam in the experiment. This effect is discussed by investigating the effect of different wave fronts on the cross-correlation analysis results. The so-determined characteristics of the cross-correlation analysis will be also relevant for future x-ray-based studies.

  7. Design, processing, and properties of Bi 2212\\/Ag Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Collings, E W; Scanlan, R M; Dietderich, D R; Motowidlo, L R; Sokolowski, R S; Aoki, Y; Hasegawa, T

    1999-01-01

    In a program intended to explore the use of high temperature superconducting (HTSC) cables in high field synchrotron dipole magnets model Bi:2212/Ag Rutherford cables were designed bearing in mind the needs for mechanical integrity, relatively high tensile strength, and low coupling losses. To satisfy these needs a core-type cable design was selected and a readily available heat-resistant core material acquired. Cables were wound for critical current- and AC loss measurement. Both winding-induced (mechanical) and core-induced (chemical) critical current degradation was examined. Interstrand coupling loss was measured calorimetrically on model cable samples with bare- and oxide-coated cores. From the results it was predicted that the losses of full-scale Bi:2212/Ag-wound LHC-type Rutherford cables would fall close to the acceptability range for the windings of high-field accelerator dipoles. (10 refs).

  8. Observational constraints on dark matter-dark energy scattering cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Suresh [BITS Pilani, Department of Mathematics, Rajasthan (India); Nunes, Rafael C. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Departamento de Fisica, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    In this letter, we report precise and robust observational constraints on the dark matter-dark energy scattering cross section, using the latest data from cosmic microwave background (CMB) Planck temperature and polarization, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) measurements and weak gravitational lensing data from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). The scattering scenario consists of a pure momentum exchange between the dark components, and we find σ{sub d} < 10{sup -29} cm{sup 2} (m{sub dm}c{sup 2}/GeV) at 95% CL from the joint analysis (CMB + BAO + CFHTLenS), where m{sub dm} is a typical dark matter particle mass. We notice that the scattering among the dark components may influence the growth of large scale structure in the Universe, leaving the background cosmology unaltered. (orig.)

  9. Anomalous diffraction approximation for light scattering cross section: Case of random clusters of non-absorbent spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquier, Sandra [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 F-St. Etienne (France); Gruy, Frederic [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 F-St. Etienne (France)], E-mail: fgruy@emse.fr

    2008-11-15

    We previously [Jacquier S, Gruy F. Approximation of the light scattering cross-section for aggregated spherical non-absorbent particles. JQSRT 2008;109:789-810] reformulated the anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation to calculate the light scattering cross section of aggregates by introducing their chord length distribution (CLD). It was applied to several ordered aggregates. This new method is entitled ADr, with the r for rapid because this one is at least 100 times faster than the standard AD method. In this article, we are searching for an approximated expression for CLD suitable all at once for ordered and disordered aggregates. The corresponding scattering cross-section values are compared to the ones coming from the standard AD approximation.

  10. Anomalous diffraction approximation for light scattering cross section: Case of random clusters of non-absorbent spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, Sandra; Gruy, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We previously [Jacquier S, Gruy F. Approximation of the light scattering cross-section for aggregated spherical non-absorbent particles. JQSRT 2008;109:789-810] reformulated the anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation to calculate the light scattering cross section of aggregates by introducing their chord length distribution (CLD). It was applied to several ordered aggregates. This new method is entitled ADr, with the r for rapid because this one is at least 100 times faster than the standard AD method. In this article, we are searching for an approximated expression for CLD suitable all at once for ordered and disordered aggregates. The corresponding scattering cross-section values are compared to the ones coming from the standard AD approximation

  11. Code implementation of partial-range angular scattering cross sections: GAMMER and MORSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.T. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A partial-range (finite-element) method has been previously developed for representing multigroup angular scattering in Monte Carlo photon transport. Computer application of the method, with preliminary quantitative results is discussed here. A multigroup photon cross section processing code, GAMMER, was written which utilized ENDF File 23 point data and the Klein--Nishina formula for Compton scattering. The cross section module of MORSE, along with several execution routines, were rewritten to permit use of the method with photon transport. Both conventional and partial-range techniques were applied for comparison to calculating angular and spectral penetration of 6-MeV photons through a six-inch iron slab. GAMMER was found to run 90% faster than SMUG, with further improvement evident for multiple-media situations; MORSE cross section storage was reduced by one-third; cross section processing, greatly simplified; and execution time, reduced by 15%. Particle penetration was clearly more forward peaked, as moment accuracy is retained to extremly high order. This method of cross section treatment offers potential savings in both storage and handling, as well as improved accuracy and running time in the actual execution phase. 3 figures, 4 tables

  12. The investigation of the elastic photon scattering cross sections by copper atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuplyauskene, A.B.

    1976-01-01

    The differential cross sections of coherent scattering of photons on a copper atom and ions Cu + and Cu 2+ and also on ions Zn + and Ga 2+ in their ground states have been studied theoretically. The energy of an incident photon has varied in the range from 0.5 keV to 200 keV, and the scattering cross sections are given for angles of 30 deg, 60 deg, 90 deg, 120 deg, 150 deg. The calculations are performed in the formfactor approximation with the use of generalized hydrogen-like analytical radial orbitals. To clarify the contribution from individual shells the cross sections of photon scattering on individual electron of shells are calculated. It follows from the calculations that when the energies of the incident photon are less than 4 keV, the main contribution into the differential cross section is made by external electrons. Then, alongside with the increase of the energy, the contribution of the electrons decreases, and the inner shells begin to play a more important role. Therefore the photon cross sections for the energies greater than 50 keV practically coincide for atoms and ions of copper. The general regularities of the cross section variation accompanying the increase of the photon energy are similar for all the elements under study. The angular dependences of cross sections are such that they decrease first and after reaching the minimum at angles of 90 deg - 120 deg increase again

  13. Angular finite volume method for solving the multigroup transport equation with piecewise average scattering cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J.F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G., E-mail: ansar.calloo@cea.fr, E-mail: jean-francois.vidal@cea.fr, E-mail: romain.le-tellier@cea.fr, E-mail: gerald.rimpault@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC/LEPh, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with the solving of the multigroup integro-differential form of the transport equation for fine energy group structure. In that case, multigroup transfer cross sections display strongly peaked shape for light scatterers and the current Legendre polynomial expansion is not well-suited to represent them. Furthermore, even if considering an exact scattering cross sections representation, the scattering source in the discrete ordinates method (also known as the Sn method) being calculated by sampling the angular flux at given directions, may be wrongly computed due to lack of angular support for the angular flux. Hence, following the work of Gerts and Matthews, an angular finite volume solver has been developed for 2D Cartesian geometries. It integrates the multigroup transport equation over discrete volume elements obtained by meshing the unit sphere with a product grid over the polar and azimuthal coordinates and by considering the integrated flux per solid angle element. The convergence of this method has been compared to the S{sub n} method for a highly anisotropic benchmark. Besides, piecewise-average scattering cross sections have been produced for non-bound Hydrogen atoms using a free gas model for thermal neutrons. LWR lattice calculations comparing Legendre representations of the Hydrogen scattering multigroup cross section at various orders and piecewise-average cross sections for this same atom are carried out (while keeping a Legendre representation for all other isotopes). (author)

  14. Neutron-scattering cross section of the S=1/2 Heisenberg triangular antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefmann, K.; Hedegård, P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we use a Schwinger-boson mean-field approach to calculate the neutron-scattering cross section from the S = 1/2 antiferromagnet with nearest-neighbor isotropic Heisenberg interaction on a two-dimensional triangular lattice. We investigate two solutions for T = 0: (i) a state with lo...... no elastic, but a set of broader dispersive spin excitations around kappa almost-equal-to (1/2, 0) and around kappa almost-equal-to (1/3, 1/3) for omega/E(g) = 2.5-4. It should thus be possible to distinguish these two states in a neutron-scattering experiment.......In this paper we use a Schwinger-boson mean-field approach to calculate the neutron-scattering cross section from the S = 1/2 antiferromagnet with nearest-neighbor isotropic Heisenberg interaction on a two-dimensional triangular lattice. We investigate two solutions for T = 0: (i) a state with long......-range order resembling the Neel state and (ii) a resonating valence bond or ''spin liquid'' state with an energy gap, E(g) almost-equal-to 0.17J, for the elementary excitations (spinons). For solution (ii) the neutron cross section shows Bragg rods at kappa = K = (1/3, 1/3), whereas solution (ii) shows...

  15. Beat-wave accelerator studies at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The study carried out in 1982-83 at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to examine how one might use the beat-wave principle to construct a useful high energy accelerator is reviewed, and comments are made on later developments. A number of problems are evident to which solutions cannot at present be foreseen. (author)

  16. Measurement of differential incoherent scattering cross-sections of 145 keV photons from K-shell electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, V B; Ghumman, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1980-06-01

    Differential cross-sections for incoherent scattering of 145 keV photons from K-shell electrons of tin, silver and molybdenum have been measured at 110deg to investigate the effect of electron binding on differential cross-sections in the low energy region. The incoherent scattered photons are selected in coincidence with X-rays which follow the vacancies caused by the ejection of the electrons. NaI(Tl) scintillators are used for the detection of scattered photons and emitted X-rays. The experimental results are compared with the available theoretical data.

  17. Measurement of Z dependence of elastic scattering cross-sections of 0. 145 MeV gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghumman, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1981-11-01

    The Z dependence of elastic scattering cross-sections of 0.145 MeV gamma rays is investigated at large scattering angles. Measurements are made with scatterers of Pb, W, Sn, Ag, Mo, Zn, Cu, Fe and Al at scattering angles from 75 deg to 150 deg. The experimental results are compared with the available theoretical and experimental data.

  18. State-to-state differential cross sections for rotationally inelastic scattering of Na2 by He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, K.; Hefter, U.; Witt, J.

    1980-01-01

    State-to-state differential cross sections for rotational transitions of Na 2 in collisions with He are measured in the electronic and vibrational ground state at thermal collision energies using a new laser technique. Single rotational levels j/sub i/ are labelled by modulation of their population via laser optical pumping using a dye laser. The modulation of the fluorescence induced by an Ar + laser tuned to the level j/sub f/=28 is proportional to the cross section for collisional transfer j/sub i/→j/sub f/ and is detected at the scattering angle theta. A single optical fiber and a fiber bundle provide a flexible connection between the detector and the laser and photomultiplier, respectively. Transitions as large as Δj=20 are observed. At small angles elastic scattering is dominant, but rotationally inelastic processes become increasingly important at larger scattering angles. Rotational rainbow structure causing a steep onset of the cross section with the scattering angle theta (at fixed Δj) or a sharp cutoff with Δj (at fixed theta) is found. Preliminary results on rotational energy transfer in v=1 indicates that vibrational motion of the molecule favors larger rotational quantum jumps. semiclassical picture for the scattering of a hard ellipsoid gives a

  19. Compton Scattering Cross Section on the Proton at High Momentum Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Danagoulian; V.H. Mamyan; M. Roedelbronn; K.A. Aniol; J.R.M. Annand; P.Y. Bertin; L. Bimbot; P. Bosted; J.R. Calarco; A. Camsonne; C.C. Chang; T.-H. Chang; J.-P. Chen; Seonho Choi; E. Chudakov; P. Degtyarenko; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; D. Dutta; K. Egiyan; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; J. Gomez; D.J. Hamilton; J.-O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D.W. Higinbotham; W. Hinton; T. Horn; C. Howell; T. Hunyady; C.E. Hyde-Wright; X. Jiang; M.K. Jones; M. Khandaker; A. Ketikyan; V. Koubarovski; K. Kramer; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissiere; J. LeRose; R.A. Lindgren; D.J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; P. Moussiegt; S. Nanda; A.M. Nathan; D.M. Nikolenko; V. Nelyubin; B.E. Norum; K. Paschke; L. Pentchev; C.F. Perdrisat; E. Piasetzky; R. Pomatsalyuk; V.A. Punjabi; I. Rachek; A. Radyushkin; B. Reitz; R. Roche; G. Ron; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; N. Savvinov; A. Shahinyan; Y. Shestakov; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; P. Stoler; S. Tajima; V. Sulkosky; L. Todor; B. Vlahovic; L.B. Weinstein; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; H. Voskanyan; H. Xiang; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Cross-section values for Compton scattering on the proton were measured at 25 kinematic settings over the range s = 5-11 and -t = 2-7 GeV2 with statistical accuracy of a few percent. The scaling power for the s-dependence of the cross section at fixed center of mass angle was found to be 8.0 +/- 0.2, strongly inconsistent with the prediction of perturbative QCD. The observed cross section values are in fair agreement with the calculations using the handbag mechanism, in which the external photons couple to a single quark

  20. Numerical computation of discrete differential scattering cross sections for Monte Carlo charged particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Palmer, Todd S.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Generation of discrete differential scattering angle and energy loss cross sections. • Gauss–Radau quadrature utilizing numerically computed cross section moments. • Development of a charged particle transport capability in the Milagro IMC code. • Integration of cross section generation and charged particle transport capabilities. - Abstract: We investigate a method for numerically generating discrete scattering cross sections for use in charged particle transport simulations. We describe the cross section generation procedure and compare it to existing methods used to obtain discrete cross sections. The numerical approach presented here is generalized to allow greater flexibility in choosing a cross section model from which to derive discrete values. Cross section data computed with this method compare favorably with discrete data generated with an existing method. Additionally, a charged particle transport capability is demonstrated in the time-dependent Implicit Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, Milagro. We verify the implementation of charged particle transport in Milagro with analytic test problems and we compare calculated electron depth–dose profiles with another particle transport code that has a validated electron transport capability. Finally, we investigate the integration of the new discrete cross section generation method with the charged particle transport capability in Milagro.

  1. Multiple scattering effects in depth resolution of elastic recoil detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Harding, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) is used to profile hydrogen and other low mass elements in thin films at surface and interfaces in a similar way that Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) is used to detect and profile heavy elements. It is often assumed that the depth resolutions of these two techniques are similar. However, in contrast to typical RBS, the depth resolution of ERD is limited substantially by multiple scattering. In experimental data analysis and/or spectra simulations of a typical RBS measurement multiple scattering effects are often ignored. Computer programs used in IBA, such as RUMP, HYPRA or RBX do not include multiple scattering effects at all. In this paper, using practical thin metal structures with films containing intentionally introduced hydrogen, we demonstrate experimental ERD depth resolution and sensitivity limitations. The effects of sample material and scattering angle are also discussed. (authors)

  2. Absolute cross sections from the ''boomerang model'' for resonant electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dube, L.; Herzenberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    The boomerang model is used to calculate absolute cross sections near the 2 Pi/sub g/ shape resonance in e-N 2 scattering. The calculated cross sections are shown to satisfy detailed balancing. The exchange of electrons is taken into account. A parametrized complex-potential curve for the intermediate N 2 /sup ts-/ ion is determined from a small part of the experimental data, and then used to calculate other properties. The calculations are in good agreement with the absolute cross sections for vibrational excitation from the ground state, the absolute cross section v = 1 → 2, and the absolute total cross section

  3. Atlas cross section for scattering of muonic hydrogen atoms on hydrogen isotope molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczak, A.; Faifman, M.P.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    The total cross sections of the elastic, spin-flip, and charge-exchange processes for the scattering of muonic hydrogen isotope atoms (pμ, dμ, tμ) in the ground state on the hydrogen isotope molecules (H 2 , D 2 , T 2 , HD, HT, DT) are calculated. The scattering cross sections of muonic hydrogen isotope atoms on hydrogen isotope nuclei obtained earlier in the multichannel adiabatic approach are used in the calculations. Molecular effects (electron screening, rotational and vibrational excitations of target molecules, etc.) are taken into account. The spin effects of the target molecules and of the incident muonic atoms are included. the cross sections are averaged over the Boltzmann distribution of the molecule rotational states and the Maxwellian distribution of the target molecule kinetic energies for temperatures 30, 100, 300, and 1000 K. The cross sections are given for kinetic energies of the incident muonic atoms ranging from 0.001 to 100 eV in the laboratory frame. 45 refs., 6 tabs

  4. Total cross sections for slow-electron (1--20 eV) scattering in solid H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical method is proposed to determine absolute total cross sections per scatterer and related mean free paths for low-energy electron scattering in disordered molecular solid films. The procedure is based on a two-stream multiple-scattering model of the thickness dependence of the film reflectivity for elastic electrons. The expected analytical behavior and accuracy are tested on a model sample whose scattering properties are generated by a Monte Carlo simulation from initially known parameters. The effects of multiple scattering inside the film and at its interfaces are taken into account and discussed. The thickness dependence of the elastic electron reflectivity of H 2 O film condensed at 14 K is reported between 1 and 20 eV incident energy with a spectrometer resolution of 10 MeV. The proposed method is applied to extract from these measurements the energy dependence of the total effective and total inelastic cross sections for electron scattering in amorphous ice

  5. Measurement of x-ray scattering cross sections of hydrogen and helium with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    Total x-ray scattering is a two-electron expectation value. The prominence of the electron correlation effect was demonstrated in recent theoretical work. Only one measurement of x-ray scattering from H 2 has been reported heretofore, nearly fifty years ago. New measurements were carried out using the virtually monochromatic, intense flux of synchrotron radiation in the SSRP EXAFS line. The targets, at 1 atm pressure, were UHP He and ultrapure H 2 that had been passed through a hot Pd--Ag alloy diffusion purifier. The scattered-photon spectra were measured with a Xe-filled proportional counter and fast multichannel analyzer. The incident flux was monitored with a parallel-plate ion chamber, calibrated by direct counting of the absorber-attenuated beam. Measurements were performed at 5, 6, and 7 keV photon energy, as a function of scattering angle (60, 90, and 135 deg) and azimuthal angle (i.e., polarization). The relative total differential photon scattering cross sections for H 2 over the range 3.0 less than or equal to x = 4πsin (theta/2)lambda less than or equal to 5.6 A -1 agree to within approx. 1% with the correlated calculations of Bentley and Stewart. The ratios of measured cross sections for H 2 to those for He at x = 3.0 and 5.6 A -1 agree to within 1% with the ratios of the Bentley--Stewart H 2 cross sections to the correlated wave-function calculations of Brown for He

  6. Optical model calculation of neutron-nucleus scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.E.; Camarda, H.S.

    1980-01-01

    A program to calculate the total, elastic, reaction, and differential cross section of a neutron interacting with a nucleus is described. The interaction between the neutron and the nucleus is represented by a spherically symmetric complex potential that includes spin-orbit coupling. This optical model problem is solved numerically, and is treated with the partial-wave formalism of scattering theory. The necessary scattering theory required to solve this problem is briefly stated. Then, the numerical methods used to integrate the Schroedinger equation, calculate derivatives, etc., are described, and the results of various programming tests performed are presented. Finally, the program is discussed from a user's point of view, and it is pointed out how and where the program (OPTICAL) can be changed to satisfy particular needs

  7. A new modelling of the multigroup scattering cross section in deterministic codes for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calloo, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    In reactor physics, calculation schemes with deterministic codes are validated with respect to a reference Monte Carlo code. The remaining biases are attributed to the approximations and models induced by the multigroup theory (self-shielding models and expansion of the scattering law using Legendre polynomials) to represent physical phenomena (resonant absorption and scattering anisotropy respectively). This work focuses on the relevance of a polynomial expansion to model the scattering law. Since the outset of reactor physics, the latter has been expanded on a truncated Legendre polynomial basis. However, the transfer cross sections are highly anisotropic, with non-zero values for a very small range of the cosine of the scattering angle. Besides, the finer the energy mesh and the lighter the scattering nucleus, the more exacerbated is the peaked shape of this cross section. As such, the Legendre expansion is less suited to represent the scattering law. Furthermore, this model induces negative values which are non-physical. In this work, various scattering laws are briefly described and the limitations of the existing model are pointed out. Hence, piecewise-constant functions have been used to represent the multigroup scattering cross section. This representation requires a different model for the diffusion source. The discrete ordinates method which is widely employed to solve the transport equation has been adapted. Thus, the finite volume method for angular discretization has been developed and implemented in Paris environment which hosts the S n solver, Snatch. The angular finite volume method has been compared to the collocation method with Legendre moments to ensure its proper performance. Moreover, unlike the latter, this method is adapted for both the Legendre moments and the piecewise-constant functions representations of the scattering cross section. This hybrid-source method has been validated for different cases: fuel cell in infinite lattice

  8. A semi-empirical formula for total cross sections of electron scattering from diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yufang; Sun Jinfeng; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang

    1996-01-01

    A fitting formula based on the Born approximation is used to fit the total cross sections for electron scattering by diatomic molecules (CO, N 2 , NO, O 2 and HCl) in the intermediate- and high-energy range. By analyzing the fitted parameters and the total cross sections, we found that the internuclear distance of the constituent atoms plays an important role in the e-diatomic molecule collision process. Thus a new semi-empirical formula has been obtained. There is no free parameter in the formula, and the dependence of the total cross sections on the internuclear distance has been reflected clearly. The total cross sections for electron scattering by CO, N 2 , NO, O 2 and HCl have been calculated over an incident energy range of 10-4000 eV. The results agree well with other available experimental and calculation data. (orig.)

  9. Validity of the independent-processes approximation for resonance structures in electron-ion scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badnell, N.R.; Pindzola, M.S.; Griffin, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The total inelastic cross section for electron-ion scattering may be found in the independent-processes approximation by adding the resonant cross section to the nonresonant background cross section. We study the validity of this approximation for electron excitation of multiply charged ions. The resonant-excitation cross section is calculated independently using distorted waves for various Li-like and Na-like ions using (N+1)-electron atomic-structure methods previously developed for the calculation of dielectronic-recombination cross sections. To check the effects of interference between the two scattering processes, we also carry out detailed close-coupling calculations for the same atomic ions using the R-matrix method. For low ionization stages, interference effects manifest themselves sometimes as strong window features in the close-coupling cross section, which are not present in the independent-processes cross section. For higher ionization stages, however, the resonance features found in the independent-processes approximation are found to be in good agreement with the close-coupling results

  10. Total scattering cross sections and interatomic potentials for neutral hydrogen and helium on some noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzic, D.N.; Cohen, S.A.

    1985-04-01

    Measurements of energy-dependent scattering cross sections for 30 to 1800 eV D incident on He, Ne, Ar, and Kr, and for 40 to 850 eV He incident on He, Ar, and Kr are presented. They are determined by using the charge-exchange efflux from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak as a source of D or He. These neutrals are passed through a gas-filled scattering cell and detected by a time-of-flight spectrometer. The cross section for scattering greater than the effective angle of the apparatus (approx. =20 mrad) is found by measuring the energy-dependent attenuation of D or He as a function of pressure in the scattering cell. The interatomic potential is extracted from the data

  11. Absolute total electronically elastic differential e--H2 scattering cross-section measurements from 1 to 19 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furst, J.; Mahgerefteh, M.; Golden, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Absolute e - -H 2 total electronically elastic differential scattering cross sections have been determined from relative scattered-electron angular distribution measurements in the energy range from 1 to 19 eV by comparison to absolute e - -He elastic differential scattering cross sections measured in the same apparatus. Integrated total cross sections have been determined as well. Absolute differences as large as 50% between the present results and some previous results have been found, although the agreement as to shape is quite good in many cases. The present results are generally in excellent agreement with recent full rovibrational laboratory-frame close-coupling calculations

  12. Quantitative considerations in medium energy ion scattering depth profiling analysis of nanolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalm, P.C.; Bailey, P. [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Reading, M.A. [Physics and Materials Research Centre, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Rossall, A.K. [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Berg, J.A. van den, E-mail: j.vandenberg@hud.ac.uk [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The high depth resolution capability of medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) is becoming increasingly relevant to the characterisation of nanolayers in e.g. microelectronics. In this paper we examine the attainable quantitative accuracy of MEIS depth profiling. Transparent but reliable analytical calculations are used to illustrate what can ultimately be achieved for dilute impurities in a silicon matrix and the significant element-dependence of the depth scale, for instance, is illustrated this way. Furthermore, the signal intensity-to-concentration conversion and its dependence on the depth of scattering is addressed. Notably, deviations from the Rutherford scattering cross section due to screening effects resulting in a non-coulombic interaction potential and the reduction of the yield owing to neutralization of the exiting, backscattered H{sup +} and He{sup +} projectiles are evaluated. The former mainly affects the scattering off heavy target atoms while the latter is most severe for scattering off light target atoms and can be less accurately predicted. However, a pragmatic approach employing an extensive data set of measured ion fractions for both H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions scattered off a range of surfaces, allows its parameterization. This has enabled the combination of both effects, which provides essential information regarding the yield dependence both on the projectile energy and the mass of the scattering atom. Although, absolute quantification, especially when using He{sup +}, may not always be achievable, relative quantification in which the sum of all species in a layer adds up to 100%, is generally possible. This conclusion is supported by the provision of some examples of MEIS derived depth profiles of nanolayers. Finally, the relative benefits of either using H{sup +} or He{sup +} ions are briefly considered.

  13. On the classical and quantum scattering cross-sections on the impenetrable sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasiev, G.N.; Dobromyslov, M.B.; Schpakov, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of the difference of particle scattering cross sections on the impenetrable sphere is considered in the frame of quantum mechanics and classical mechanics. Using plane waves for the incident particles and the solutions of the Schroedinger equation with the definite energy and momenta for the wave functions quantum and classical cross sections are compared. It is shown that these cross sections are the same if the incident flow is defined similarly in both cases and if the measuring apparatus is ideal

  14. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Chiba, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment)

    1991-07-01

    The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white-source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 MeV intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to 4.8 MeV. The measured results, combined with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels model using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results nd their interpretation are discussed in the contexts of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical, and coupled-channels models. 61 refs.

  15. Improved surface-roughness scattering and mobility models for multi-gate FETs with arbitrary cross-section and biasing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzit, D.; Badami, O.; Specogna, R.; Esseni, D.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new model for surface roughness (SR) scattering in n-type multi-gate FETs (MuGFETs) and gate-all-around nanowire FETs with fairly arbitrary cross-sections, its implementation in a complete device simulator, and the validation against experimental electron mobility data. The model describes the SR scattering matrix elements as non-linear transformations of interface fluctuations, which strongly influences the root mean square value of the roughness required to reproduce experimental mobility data. Mobility simulations are performed via the deterministic solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for a 1D-electron gas and including the most relevant scattering mechanisms for electronic transport, such as acoustic, polar, and non-polar optical phonon scattering, Coulomb scattering, and SR scattering. Simulation results show the importance of accounting for arbitrary cross-sections and biasing conditions when compared to experimental data. We also discuss how mobility is affected by the shape of the cross-section as well as by its area in gate-all-around and tri-gate MuGFETs.

  16. Measurement of angular differential cross sections at the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvale, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility (ASF) located at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center as well as some of the initial experiments to be performed with it, are covered. The goal is to develop an apparatus capable of measuring angular differential cross sections (ADCS) for the scattering of 2 to 14 eV atomic oxygen from various gaseous targets. At present little is known about atomic oxygen scattering with kinetic energies of a few eV. This apparatus is designed to increase the understanding of collisions in this energy region. Atomic oxygen scattering processes are of vital interest to NASA because the space shuttle as well as other low earth orbit satellites will be subjected to a flux of 5 eV atomic oxygen on the ram surfaces while in orbit. The primary experiments will involve the measurements of ADCS for atomic oxygen scattering from gaseous targets (in particular, molecular nitrogen). These, as well as the related initial experiments involving thermal He scattering from N2 and O2 targets will be described

  17. Thermal-neutron multiple scattering: critical double scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A quantum mechanical formulation for multiple scattering of thermal-neutrons from macroscopic targets is presented and applied to single and double scattering. Critical nuclear scattering from liquids and critical magnetic scattering from ferromagnets are treated in detail in the quasielastic approximation for target systems slightly above their critical points. Numerical estimates are made of the double scattering contribution to the critical magnetic cross section using relevant parameters from actual experiments performed on various ferromagnets. The effect is to alter the usual Lorentzian line shape dependence on neutron wave vector transfer. Comparison with corresponding deviations in line shape resulting from the use of Fisher's modified form of the Ornstein-Zernike spin correlations within the framework of single scattering theory leads to values for the critical exponent eta of the modified correlations which reproduce the effect of double scattering. In addition, it is shown that by restricting the range of applicability of the multiple scattering theory from the outset to critical scattering, Glauber's high energy approximation can be used to provide a much simpler and more powerful description of multiple scattering effects. When sufficiently close to the critical point, it provides a closed form expression for the differential cross section which includes all orders of scattering and has the same form as the single scattering cross section with a modified exponent for the wave vector transfer

  18. Positron induced scattering cross sections for hydrocarbons relevant to plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suvam; Antony, Bobby

    2018-05-01

    This article explores positron scattering cross sections by simple hydrocarbons such as ethane, ethene, ethyne, propane, and propyne. Chemical erosion processes occurring on the surface due to plasma-wall interactions are an abundant source of hydrocarbon molecules which contaminate the hydrogenic plasma. These hydrocarbons play an important role in the edge plasma region of Tokamak and ITER. In addition to this, they are also one of the major components in the planetary atmospheres and astrophysical mediums. The present work focuses on calculation of different positron impact interactions with simple hydrocarbons in terms of the total cross section (Qtot), elastic cross section (Qel), direct ionization cross section (Qion), positronium formation cross section (Qps), and total ionization cross section (Qtion). Knowing that the positron-plasma study is one of the trending fields, the calculated data have diverse plasma and astrophysical modeling applications. A comprehensive study of Qtot has been provided where the inelastic cross sections have been reported for the first time. Comparisons are made with those available from the literature, and a good agreement is obtained with the measurements.

  19. Neutron scattering in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  20. Neutron scattering in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains

  1. Program package for calculation of cross sections of neutron scattering on deformed nuclei by the coupled-channel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloss, Yu.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Program package and numerical solution of the problem for a system of coupled equations used in optical model to solve a problem on low and mean energy neutron scattering on deformed nuclei, is considered. With these programs differnet scattering cross sections depending on the incident neutron energy on even-even and even-odd nuclei were obtained. The programm permits to obtain different scattering cross sections (elastic, inelastic), excitation cross sections of the first three energy levels of rotational band depending on the energy, angular distributions and neutron polarizations including excited channels. In the program there is possibility for accounting even-even nuclei octupole deformation

  2. Multiple scattering effects in depth resolution of elastic recoil detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Harding, G.L. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Telecommunications and Industrial Physics; Szilagyi, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, (Hungary)

    1998-06-01

    Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) is used to profile hydrogen and other low mass elements in thin films at surface and interfaces in a similar way that Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) is used to detect and profile heavy elements. It is often assumed that the depth resolutions of these two techniques are similar. However, in contrast to typical RBS, the depth resolution of ERD is limited substantially by multiple scattering. In experimental data analysis and/or spectra simulations of a typical RBS measurement multiple scattering effects are often ignored. Computer programs used in IBA, such as RUMP, HYPRA or RBX do not include multiple scattering effects at all. In this paper, using practical thin metal structures with films containing intentionally introduced hydrogen, we demonstrate experimental ERD depth resolution and sensitivity limitations. The effects of sample material and scattering angle are also discussed. (authors). 19 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Observation of the antimatter partner of Rutherford's α-particle - 4He-bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Aihong

    2012-01-01

    The antimatter helium-4 nucleus ( 4 He-bar, or anti-α) has not been observed previously although the α-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford. High-energy nuclear collisions recreate energy densities similar to that of the universe microseconds after the Big Bang, and in both cases, matter and antimatter are created with comparable abundances. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions makes it possible for antimatter to decouple quickly from matter. This makes a high-energy accelerator facility the ideal environment for producing and studying antimatter. In this paper, we report 18 antihelium-4 nuclei discovered by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The measured invariant differential cross section is consistent with expectation from thermodynamics and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, which has implications for future production of even heavier antimatter nuclei, as well as for experimental searches for new phenomena in the cosmos. Future directions of rare and exotic matter searches from STAR will also be discussed.

  4. On calculating phase shifts and performing fits to scattering cross sections or transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepburn, J.W.; Roy, R.J. Le

    1978-01-01

    Improved methods of calculating quantum mechanical phase shifts and for performing least-squares fits to scattering cross sections or transport properties, are described. Their use in a five-parameter fit to experimental differential cross sections reduces the computer time by a factor of 4-7. (Auth.)

  5. Elastic and inelastic vibrational cross sections for positron scattering by carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenfen, W. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, 85770-000, Realeza, Paraná (Brazil); Arretche, F., E-mail: fartch@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Michelin, S.E.; Mazon, K.T. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    The vibrational cross sections of the CO molecule induced by positron impact is the focus of this work. The positron–molecule interaction is represented by the static potential plus a model potential designed to take into account the positron–target correlations. To calculate the vibrational cross sections, we applied the multichannel version of the continued fractions method in the close-coupling scheme. We present vibrational excitation cross sections and elastic ones, for the ground and excited vibrational states. The results are interpreted in terms of the vibrational coupling-scheme used in the scattering model.

  6. Laser resolution of unpolarized-electron scattering cross sections into spin-conserved and spin-flip components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, B.

    1981-01-01

    The theory is presented for one-photon free-free absorption by electrons scattering from high-Z atoms. The absorption cross section provides sufficient information to resolve the unpolarized-electron total cross section, Vertical Barf(theta)Vertical Bar 2 +Vertical Barg(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , into its individual components for spin-nonflip, Vertical Barf(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , and spin-flip, Vertical Barg(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , scattering. The observation of a spin-polarization effect for a spin-independent process (free-free absorption) is analogous to the Fano effect for bound-free absorption

  7. Modified automatic term selection v2: A faster algorithm to calculate inelastic scattering cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusz, Ján, E-mail: jan.rusz@fysik.uu.se

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • New algorithm for calculating double differential scattering cross-section. • Shown good convergence properties. • Outperforms older MATS algorithm, particularly in zone axis calculations. - Abstract: We present a new algorithm for calculating inelastic scattering cross-section for fast electrons. Compared to the previous Modified Automatic Term Selection (MATS) algorithm (Rusz et al. [18]), it has far better convergence properties in zone axis calculations and it allows to identify contributions of individual atoms. One can think of it as a blend of MATS algorithm and a method described by Weickenmeier and Kohl [10].

  8. Accurate calculation of the differential cross section of compton scattering with electron mixed chain propagator in SM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuewen; Fang Zhenyun; Shi Chengye

    2012-01-01

    By using the electroweak standard model (SM), we analyzed the framework of electron mixed chain propagator which composed of serious of different physical loops participating in electroweak interaction and completed the relevant analytical calculation. Then, we obtained the analytical result of electron mixed chain propagator. By applying our result to Compton scattering, the differential cross section of Compton scattering dσ SM (chain) /dcosθ is counted accurately. This result is compared with the lowest order differential cross section dσ (tree) /dcosθ and the electronic chain propagator Compton scattering differential cross section dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ in quantum electrodynamics (QED). It can be seen that dσ SM (chain ) /dcosθ can show the radiation correction more subtly than dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ. (authors)

  9. Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section for the 6He + 27Al system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamim, E.A.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Guimaraes, V.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Chamon, L.C.; Hussein, M.S.; Moro, A.M.; Arazi, A.; Padron, I.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Assuncao, M.; Barioni, A.; Camargo, O.; Denke, R.Z.; Faria, P.N. de; Pires, K.C.C.

    2007-01-01

    The elastic scattering of the radioactive halo nucleus 6 He on 27 Al target was measured at four energies close to the Coulomb barrier using the RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) facility. The Sao Paulo Potential (SPP) was used and its diffuseness and imaginary strength were adjusted to fit the elastic scattering angular distributions. Reaction cross-sections were extracted from the optical model fits. The reduced reaction cross-sections of 6 He on 27 Al are similar to those for stable, weakly bound projectiles as 6,7 Li, 9 Be and larger than stable, tightly bound projectile as 16 O on 27 Al

  10. Diffractive scattering on nuclei in multiple scattering theory with inelastic screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The cross sections for the diffractive scattering of hadrons on nuclei are calculated in the two-channel approximation of multiple scattering theory. In contrast to the standard Glauber approach, it is not assumed that the nucleon scattering profile is a Gaussian or that the Regge radius of the hadron is small compared to the nuclear radius. The AGK Reggeon diagrammatic technique is used to calculate the topological cross sections and the cross sections for coherent and incoherent diffractive dissociation and quasielastic scattering. The features of hadron-nucleus scattering at superhigh energies are discussed

  11. Effective inelastic scattering cross-sections for background analysis in HAXPES of deeply buried layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risterucci, P., E-mail: paul.risterucci@gmail.com [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Renault, O., E-mail: olivier.renault@cea.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Zborowski, C. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005, Paris (France); Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Bertrand, D.; Torres, A. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Rueff, J.-P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, BP 48 91192, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005, Paris (France); Ceolin, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, BP 48 91192, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Grenet, G. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Tougaard, S. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • An effective approach for quantitative background analysis in HAXPES spectra of buried layer underneath complex overlayer structures is proposed. • The approach relies on using a weighted sum of inelastic scattering cross section of the pure layers. • The method is validated by the study of an advanced power transistor stack after successive annealing steps. • The depth distribution of crucial elements (Ti, Ga) is determined reliably at depths up to nearly 50 nm. - Abstract: Inelastic background analysis of HAXPES spectra was recently introduced as a powerful method to get access to the elemental distribution in deeply buried layers or interfaces, at depth up to 60 nm below the surface. However the accuracy of the analysis highly relies on suitable scattering cross-sections able to describe effectively the transport of photoelectrons through overlayer structures consisting of individual layers with potentially very different scattering properties. Here, we show that within Tougaard’s practical framework as implemented in the Quases-Analyze software, the photoelectron transport through thick (25–40 nm) multi-layer structures with widely different cross-sections can be reliably described with an effective cross-section in the form of a weighted sum of the individual cross-section of each layer. The high-resolution core-level analysis partly provides a guide for determining the nature of the individual cross-sections to be used. We illustrate this novel approach with the practical case of a top Al/Ti bilayer structure in an AlGaN/GaN power transistor device stack before and after sucessive annealing treatments. The analysis provides reliable insights on the Ti and Ga depth distributions up to nearly 50 nm below the surface.

  12. Low coupling loss core-strengthened Bi 2212\\/Ag Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Collings, E W; Scanlan, R M; Dietderich, D R; Motowidlo, L R

    1999-01-01

    In a comprehensive "vertically integrated" program multifilamentary (MF) high temperature superconducting (HTSC) Bi:2212/Ag strand was fabricated using the powder-in-tube process and heat treated in oxygen by a modified standard $9 procedure. The reaction-heat-treatment (HT) was adjusted to maximize critical current (density), I/sub c/ (J /sub c/), as measured in various magnetic fields, B. A series of Rutherford cables was designed, each of which included a $9 metallic (Nichrome-80) core for strengthening and reduction of coupling loss. Prior to cable winding a series of tests examined the possibility of strand "poisoning" by the core during HT. Small model Rutherford cables were wound, $9 and after HT were prepared for I/sub c/(B) measurement and calorimetric measurement of AC loss and hence interstrand contact resistance I/sub c/(B). It was deduced that, if in direct contact with the strand during HT, the core $9 material can degrade the I/sub c/ of the cable; but steps can be taken to eliminate this probl...

  13. Measurements of Positronium Formation Cross Sections for Positron-Kr, Xe Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Li, H.; Stein, T. S.; Zhou, S.

    1997-04-01

    Our experimental approach(S. Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 236 (1994).) for measuring Ps formation cross sections (Q_Ps) involves passing a variable energy positron beam through a gas scattering cell and detecting the 511 keV annihilation gamma rays resulting from the decay of para-Ps and from the interaction of ortho-Ps with the walls of the scattering cell. It is found that the Q_Ps curves for both Kr and Xe rise rapidly from their formation threshold energies of 7.2 and 5.3 eV, reach maxima within about 10 eV of their thresholds and then decrease to become rather small (less than 10% of the peak heights) above 100 eV. At the maxima Q_Ps accounts for more than 50% of the total scattering cross sections. There is some evidence of possible small scale structure in the Q_Ps curves between 10 and 100 eV. The present results are consistent with the prior measurements of Diana et al.( L.M. Diana et al., in "Atomic Physics with Positrons", edited by J.W. Humberston and E.A.G. Armour (Plenum, New York and London, 1987), p. 55; and in "Positron Annihilation", edited by L. Dorikens-Vanpraet et al. (World Scientific, Singapore, 1989), p. 311.) from near threshold to 70 eV for Kr and from 15 to 100 eV for Xe.

  14. The effect of background absorption on the compound cross-section in resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenkel, A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of channel-channel correlations in the compound cross-section is studied in a model of a resonance above a compound background characterized by equal absorption in all open channels. A general rule which cannot be derived from unitarity alone is proved for the fluctuating cross-section. It provides new understanding of level-level correlations in scattering through compound nucleus states. (author)

  15. Crossing statistics of laser light scattered through a nanofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi Pirlar, M; Movahed, S M S; Razzaghi, D; Karimzadeh, R

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the crossing statistics of speckle patterns formed in the Fresnel diffraction region by a laser beam scattering through a nanofluid. We extend zero-crossing statistics to assess the dynamical properties of the nanofluid. According to the joint probability density function of laser beam fluctuation and its time derivative, the theoretical frameworks for Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes are revisited. We count the number of crossings not only at zero level but also for all available thresholds to determine the average speed of moving particles. Using a probabilistic framework in determining crossing statistics, a priori Gaussianity is not essentially considered; therefore, even in the presence of deviation from Gaussian fluctuation, this modified approach is capable of computing relevant quantities, such as mean value of speed, more precisely. Generalized total crossing, which represents the weighted summation of crossings for all thresholds to quantify small deviation from Gaussian statistics, is introduced. This criterion can also manipulate the contribution of noises and trends to infer reliable physical quantities. The characteristic time scale for having successive crossings at a given threshold is defined. In our experimental setup, we find that increasing sample temperature leads to more consistency between Gaussian and perturbative non-Gaussian predictions. The maximum number of crossings does not necessarily occur at mean level, indicating that we should take into account other levels in addition to zero level to achieve more accurate assessments.

  16. Difference in Stability Between Edge and Center in a Rutherford Cable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willering, G.P.; Verweij, A.P.; Scheuerlein, C.; den Ouden, A.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    Keystoned superconducting Rutherford cables are widely used in accelerator magnets like in the LHC at CERN. An essential requirement in the cable design is its stability against local heat releases in the magnet windings originating from for example, strand movement or beam loss. Beam loss is the

  17. Measurement of scattering cross sections of liquid and solid hydrogen, deuterium and deuterium hydride for thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiffert, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The scattering cross sections for liquid and solid normal hydrogen, para-hydrogen, deuterium and deuterium hydride were measured for thermal neutrons at various temperatures. Solid samples of para-hydrogen exhibit distinct Bragg scattering. Liquid samples of deuterium and para-hydrogen also exhibit distinct coherence phenomena, which is indicative of strong local ordering of the molecules. In para-hydrogen and deuterium hydride, the threshold for scattering with excitation of rotations is distinctly visible. The positions of the thresholds show that the molecules in liquid hydrogen are not unhindered in their movement. After the beginning of the rotational excitation the scattering cross sections of liquid and solid para-hydrogen have different shapes which is to be explained by the differences in the dynamics of the liquid and the solid specimen. 22 references

  18. Distribution of Off-Diagonal Cross Sections in Quantum Chaotic Scattering: Exact Results and Data Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Dietz, Barbara; Guhr, Thomas; Richter, Achim

    2017-12-15

    The recently derived distributions for the scattering-matrix elements in quantum chaotic systems are not accessible in the majority of experiments, whereas the cross sections are. We analytically compute distributions for the off-diagonal cross sections in the Heidelberg approach, which is applicable to a wide range of quantum chaotic systems. Thus, eventually, we fully solve a problem that already arose more than half a century ago in compound-nucleus scattering. We compare our results with data from microwave and compound-nucleus experiments, particularly addressing the transition from isolated resonances towards the Ericson regime of strongly overlapping ones.

  19. Neutron total, scattering and inelastic gamma-ray cross sections of yttrium at few MeV energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budtz-Joergensen, C.; Guenther, P.; Smith, A.; Whalen, J.; McMurray, W.R.; Renan, M.J.; Heerden, I.J. van

    1984-01-01

    Neutron total, scattering and (n; n', γ) cross sections of elemental yttrium ( 89 Y) were measured in the few-MeV region. The neutron total-cross-section measurements were made with broad resolutions from approx.=0.5 to 4.2 MeV in steps of < or approx.0.1 MeV. Neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx.=1.5 to 4.0 MeV, at incident-neutron energy intervals of approx.=50 keV and at ten or more scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees using neutron detection. Inelastic-scattering cross sections were also determined using the (n; n', γ) reaction at incident energies from 1.6 to 3.8 MeV at intervals of 0.1 MeV. Gamma-rays and/or inelastically-scattered neutrons were observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at: 909.0+-0.5, 1,507.4+-0.3, 1,744.5+-0.3, 2,222.6+-0.5, 2,530+-0.8, 2,566.4+-1.0, 2,622.5+-1.0, 2,871.9+-1.5, 2,880.6+-2.0, 3,067.0+-2.0, 3,107.0+-2.0, 3,140.0+-2.0, 3,410.0+-2.0, 3,450.0+-2.0, 3,504.0+-1.5, 3,514.0+-2.0, 3,556.0+-2.0, 3,619.0+-3.0, 3,629.0+-3.0 and 3,715.0+-3.0 keV. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the spherical-optical-statistical, coupled-channels, and core-coupling models, and in the context of previously reported excited-level structure. (orig.)

  20. Cooperative scattering of scalar waves by optimized configurations of point scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Frank; Eckert, Felix; Wellens, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We investigate multiple scattering of scalar waves by an ensemble of N resonant point scatterers in three dimensions. For up to N = 21 scatterers, we numerically optimize the positions of the individual scatterers, to maximize the total scattering cross section for an incoming plane wave, on the one hand, and to minimize the decay rate associated to a long-lived scattering resonance, on the other. In both cases, the optimum is achieved by configurations where all scatterers are placed on a line parallel to the direction of the incoming plane wave. The associated maximal scattering cross section increases quadratically with the number of scatterers for large N, whereas the minimal decay rate—which is realized by configurations that are not the same as those that maximize the scattering cross section—decreases exponentially as a function of N. Finally, we also analyze the stability of our optimized configurations with respect to small random displacements of the scatterers. These results demonstrate that optimized configurations of scatterers bear a considerable potential for applications such as quantum memories or mirrors consisting of only a few atoms.

  1. Total cross sections and elastic scattering at the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, K.J.

    1985-12-05

    The need is discussed of a special purpose detector for the measurement of elastic scattering at the SSC. The detector would cover as small a solid angle as is practical. Two techniques are described briefly to measure total cross sections at hadron storage rings. The direct method is to measure the interaction rate in an IR of known luminosity - a method that gets more difficult increasing energy. A second method is to use the optical theorem. 6 refs., 1 fig. (LEW)

  2. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  3. γ production and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for 76Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouki, C.; Domula, A. R.; Drohé, J. C.; Koning, A. J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Zuber, K.

    2013-11-01

    The 2040.7-keV γ ray from the 69th excited state of 76Ge was investigated in the interest of Ge-based double-β-decay experiments like the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment. The predicted transition could interfere with valid 0νββ events at 2039.0 keV, creating false signals in large-volume 76Ge enriched detectors. The measurement was performed with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator (GELINA) white neutron source, using the (n,n'γ) technique and focusing on the strongest γ rays originating from the level. Upper limits obtained for the production cross section of the 2040.7-keV γ ray showed no possible influence on GERDA data. Additional analysis of the data yielded high-resolution cross sections for the low-lying states of 76Ge and related γ rays, improving the accuracy and extending existing data for five transitions and five levels. The inelastic scattering cross section for 76Ge was determined for incident neutron energies up to 2.23 MeV, significantly increasing the energy range for which experimental data are available. Comparisons with model calculations using the talys code are presented indicating that accounting for the recently established asymmetric rotor structure should lead to an improved description of the data.

  4. The collected papers of Lord Rutherford of Nelson

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    1962-01-01

    This is the third of three volumes which together contain the complete range of Lord Rutherford's scientific papers, incorporating in addition addresses, general lectures, letters to editors, accounts of his scientific work and personal recollections by friends and colleagues. The final volume, first published in 1965, covers his period as Cavendish Professor from 1919 to 1937. Following on the immense fertility of his years in Manchester - only overshadowed towards the end by the war - we now turn to his last years as a world figure at the Cavendish Laboratory, where he continued his work on

  5. Neutron scattering cross sections of uranium-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beghian, L.E.; Kegel, G.H.R.; Marcella, T.V.; Barnes, B.K.; Couchell, G.P.; Egan, J.J.; Mittler, A.; Pullen, D.J.; Schier, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    The University of Lowell high-resolution time-of-flight spectrometer was used to measure angular distributions and 90-deg excitation functions for neutrons scattered from 238 U in the energy range from 0.9 to 3.1 MeV. This study was limited to the elastic and the first two inelastic groups, corresponding to states of 238 U at 45 keV (2 + ) and 148 keV (4 + ). Angular distributions were measured at primary neutron energies of 1.1, 1.9, 2.5, and 3.1 MeV for the same three neutron groups. Whereas the elastic data are in fair agreement with the evaluation in the ENDF/B-IV file, there is substantial disagreement between the inelastic measurements and the evaluated cross sections. 12 figures

  6. Database for 238U inelastic scattering cross section evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Yukinori; Fujikawa, Noboru; Kawano, Toshihiko

    1993-10-01

    There are discrepancies among evaluated neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for 238 U in the evaluated nuclear data files, JENDL-3, ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2, BROND-2 and CENDL-2. Re-evaluating them is internationally being discussed to obtain the best outcome which can be accepted in common at the present by experts in the world. This report has been compiled to review the discrepancies among the evaluations in the present data files and to provide a common database for the re-evaluation work (author)

  7. Small angle neutron scattering analysis programs on the Rutherford Laboratory IBM 360/195 computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, K.J.; Johnson, M.W.

    1980-06-01

    The implementation and operation of the suite of programs used for the analysis of small angle neutron scattering data originally written at the ILL (Grenoble) is described. The programs make use of a circulating data file which is also described and may be used by a variety of data analysis programs. (author)

  8. Study on interstrand coupling losses in Rutherford-type superconducting cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Y.Z.; Shintomi, T.; Terashima, A.; Hirabayashi, H.

    1993-02-01

    Two sets of experimental apparatus for measuring the AC losses in superconducting strands and Rutherford-type cable conductors have been constructed. A few strand samples and a number of compacted cable samples with and without a CuMn matrix have been measured. The hysteresis loss, loss from coupling within strands and loss from coupling between strands in cables have been distinguished from each other. The results show that, even for Rutherford cables without any soldering and coating, their AC losses may be quite different from each other due to the variation of the interstrand coupling loss. For cables without a CuMn matrix, interstrand coupling loss increases nearly according to a geometrical series with an increase of curing temperature simulating coil fabrication. However, cables with the CuMn matrix show a relatively small curing temperature dependence. For most of the samples, losses do not show any evident dependence on the mechanical pressure. Interstrand resistances in one of these cables have also been measured; the results indicate that the tendency for a decrease in the interstrand resistances is consistent with the results of AC loss measurements. (author)

  9. Quantification of Material Fluorescence and Light Scattering Cross Sections Using Ratiometric Bandwidth-Varied Polarized Resonance Synchronous Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Joanna Xiuzhu; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Dongmao

    2018-05-25

    Presented herein is the ratiometric bandwidth-varied polarized resonance synchronous spectroscopy (BVPRS2) method for quantification of material optical activity spectra. These include the sample light absorption and scattering cross-section spectrum, the scattering depolarization spectrum, and the fluorescence emission cross-section and depolarization spectrum in the wavelength region where the sample both absorbs and emits. This ratiometric BVPRS2 spectroscopic method is a self-contained technique capable of quantitatively decoupling material fluorescence and light scattering signal contribution to its ratiometric BVPRS2 spectra through the linear curve-fitting of the ratiometric BVPRS2 signal as a function of the wavelength bandwidth used in the PRS2 measurements. Example applications of this new spectroscopic method are demonstrated with materials that can be approximated as pure scatterers, simultaneous photon absorbers/emitters, simultaneous photon absorbers/scatterers, and finally simultaneous photon absorbers/scatterers/emitters. Because the only instruments needed for this ratiometric BVPRS2 technique are the conventional UV-vis spectrophotometer and spectrofluorometer, this work should open doors for routine decomposition of material UV-vis extinction spectrum into its absorption and scattering component spectra. The methodology and insights provided in this work should be of broad significance to all chemical research that involves photon/matter interactions.

  10. Differential cross sections of proton Compton scattering at photon laboratory energies between 700 and 1000 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, M.; Kattein, J.; Kueck, H.; Leu, P.; Marne, K.D. de; Wedemeyer, R.; Wermes, N.

    1981-05-01

    Differential cross sections of proton Compton scattering have been measured at the Bonn 2.5 GeV synchrotron. 78 data points are presented as angular distributions at photon lab energies of 700, 750, 800, 850, 900, and 950 MeV. The c.m. scattering angle ranges from 40 0 to 130 0 , corresponding to a variation of the four momentum transfer squared between t = -0.10 to t = -0.96 GeV 2 at 700 and 950 MeV, respectively. Two additional differential cross sections have been measured at 1000 MeV, 35.6 0 and 47.4 0 . The angular distributions show forward peaks whose extrapolations to 0 0 are consistent with calculated forward cross sections taken from literature. The small angle data ( vertical stroke t vertical stroke approx. 2 ) together with the calculated cross sections at 0 0 are also consistent with the assumption of a slope parameter B of 5 GeV -2 . For the first time a re-rise of the angular distributions towards backward angles has been observed. It becomes less steep with increasing energy. The most interesting feature of the angular distributions is a sharp structure which appears between t = -0.55 GeV 2 at 700 MeV and t = -0.72 GeV 2 at 950 MeV. Such a rapid variation of the differential cross section with t has never been observed in elastic hadron-hadron scattering or photoproduction processes. It indicates the existence of a dynamical mechanism which could be a peculiarity of Compton scattering. (orig.)

  11. RUTHERFORD/APPELTON: ISIS intensity record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK is home to the world's most intense pulsed neutron source. The heart of ISIS is a 50 Hz proton synchrotron accelerating two bunches of protons from 70 to 800 MeV. After extraction the protons, occupying a total pulse length of less than 0.5 microseconds, strike a heavy metal target: the neutrons generated are moderated and directed through channels in the shielding to any of 14 instruments for condensed matter studies. As neutrinos and muons are copious byproducts, major investments have also been made for investigations in these fields. Efficient charge exchange injection into the synchrotron at 70 MeV is achieved using negative hydrogen ions and an aluminium oxide stripping foil. Some particles are lost during trapping and the early acceleration period, but they are captured by graphite-covered beam collectors to reduce machine activation. Later acceleration and fast-extraction are virtually without loss

  12. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O( 3 P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O( 1 D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O( 3 P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively

  13. PELINSCA, Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Sections and Polarization by Hauser-Feshbach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelbrecht, C.A.; Fiedeldey, H.; Tepel, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: Calculates differential and total Cross sections as well as polarization for nuclear elastic scattering of spin 0 or spin 1/2 particles. Calculates Cross sections (differential and total) and decay gamma ray angular correlation for inelastic processes by means of standard Hauser-Feshbach (HF) theory or with modified HF theory including width fluctuation corrections. In elastic scattering optical model parameters may be optimized in a least squares procedure involving experimental measurements. 2 - Method of solution: Schroedinger equation for complex potentials is solved according to Fox-Goodwin method of numerical integration. Coulomb wave functions are calculated by using recurrence relations depending on range of Coulomb and energy parameters. Least squares fits are made using parameter grid and direction of steepest descent. Statistical model calculations are made using closed mathematical expressions. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Elastic scattering calculations limited to spin 0 or spin 1/2 particles. Number of partial waves limited to 51. Statistical model calculations on targets with spin less or equal to 5 and with partial waves up to l=6. Not suitable for heavy-ion Hauser- Feshbach calculations without first removing dimensional limitations. Program handles up to 3 reaction types simultaneously, e.g. (p,p), (p,n) and (p,alpha), each reaction channel having up to 33 final nuclear states

  14. SCATLAW: a code of scattering law and cross sections calculation for liquids and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padureanu, I.; Rapeanu, S.; Rotarascu, G.; Craciun, C.

    1978-11-01

    A code for calculation of the scattering law S(Q,ω), differential and double differential cross sections and scattering kernels in the energy range E(0 - 683 meV) and wave-vector transfer Q(0 - 40 A -1 ) is presented. The code can be used both for solids and liquids which are coherent or incoherent scatterer. For liquids the calculations are based on the most recent theoretical models involving the correlation functions and generalized field approach. The phonon expansion model and the free gas model are also analysed in term of frequency spectra obtained from inelastic neutron scattering using time-of-flight technique. Several results on liquid sodium at T = 233 deg C and on liquid bismuth at T = 286 deg C and T = 402 deg C are presented. (author)

  15. Measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering and total cross section at a centre-of-mass energy of 546 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swol, R.W. van.

    1985-01-01

    The transformation of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) from a fixed target machine into a colliding beam facility allowed the study of antiproton-proton scattering at a centre-of-mass (CM) energy of 546 GeV. This thesis describes the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering and the antiproton-proton total cross section, sigmasub(tot)(anti pp), at the CERN anti pp Collider. The aim of the experiment is to establish the considerable rise with energy of the total cross section, which was predicted after the discovery of rising proton-proton total cross sections at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), covering an energy range of 20-60 GeV. The experimental method used for measuring sigmasub(tot)(anti pp) with an accuracy of 1-2% consists of the simultaneous measurement of both the elastic scattering event rate at small scattering angles and the inelastic interaction rate. Using the optical theorem, the total and the elastic cross sections can then be obtained without a determination of the machine luminosity. (Auth.)

  16. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  17. New relations between lN-scattering cross sections and neutral current parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednyakov, V.A.; Kovalenko, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    New relations which connect cross sections with neutral current parameters have been obtained in deep inelastic and (quasi-)elastic ν(ν-bar)N, e ± (μ ± )N scattering. The relations are independent of the structure functions and formfactors of the nucleon. A known example is the Paschos-Wolfenstein relation in ν(ν-bar)N scattering. The relations have been obtained with allowance for the contribution of the extra Z' bozon which makes it possible to use them both for extractions of the standard model parameters (ρ, sin 2 Θ W ) and for the search for some manifestations of new physics. 21 refs.; 1 tab

  18. Total and elastic electron scattering cross sections from Xe at intermediate and high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G; Pablos, J L de; Blanco, F; Williart, A

    2002-01-01

    Experimental total electron scattering cross sections from Xe in the energy range 300-5000 eV have been obtained with experimental errors of about 3%. The method was based on the measurement of the attenuation of a linear electron beam through a Xe gas cell in combination with an electron spectroscopy technique to analyse the energy of the transmitted electrons. Differential and integral elastic cross sections have been calculated using a scattering potential method which includes relativistic effects. The consistency of our theoretical and experimental results is also discussed in the paper. Finally, analytical formulae depending on two parameters, namely the number of target electrons and the atomic polarizability, are given to reproduce the experimental data for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe in the energy range 500-10 000 eV

  19. Topological cross sections in hadron-nucleus collisions and multiple scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, V.R.

    1987-01-01

    The multiple scattering theory supplemented with cutting rules of Abramovsky, V.A., Gribov, V.N., Kancheli, O.V. is applied to calculation of the hadron-nucleus interaction cross sections. In contrast to standard Glauber approach neither smalness of the interaction radius compared to the nuclear radii nor Gaussian form of the hN-interaction profile function are assumed. The theory of the supercritical pomeron are used. However all the results are more general and do not depend on the parametrization of the pomeron pole amplitude. The region of validity of the widely used approximate formulae for topological and total hA-interaction cross sections are discussed

  20. Theory of Thomson scattering in a strong magnetic field, 2. [Relativistic quantum theory, cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, T [Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-07-01

    A relativistic quantum theory is formulated for the Compton scattering by electrons in a strong magnetic field. It is shown that the relativistic quantum (Klein-Nishina) cross section in the center of drift system reduces exactly to the classical Thomson cross section in the limit h..omega../2..pi..<cross section is valid irrespective of the magnitudes of ..omega.. and ..omega..sub(c); the forward scattering in the direction of the magnetic field by an electron in the ground state.

  1. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of 58Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.B.; Whalen, J.F.

    1981-09-01

    Neutron total cross sections of 58 Ni were measured at 25 keV intervals from 0.9 to 4.5 MeV with 50 to 100 keV resolutions. Attention was given to self-shielding corrections to the observed total cross sections. Differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured at 50 keV intervals from 1.35 to 4.0 MeV with 50 to 100 keV resolutions. Inelastic excitation of levels at 1.458 +- 0.009, 2.462 +- 0.010, 2.791 +- 0.015, 2.927 +- 0.012 and 3.059 +- 0.025 MeV was observed. The experimental results were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels models. A spherical optical-statistical model was found generally descriptive of an energy-average of the experimental results. However, detailed considerations suggested significant contributions from direct-vibrational interactions, particularly associated with the excitation of the first 2+ level

  2. Cross sections and spin polarizations of electrons elastically scattered from oriented molecules (CH3I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, M.; Ross, A.W.; Fink, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and spin polarizations for electrons elastically scattered from CH 3 I are calculated using the independent atom model. Three molecular orientations with respect to the incident electron wavevector are considered - first, the molecule is oriented randomly, second, the electron wave front and molecular bond are parallel, and third, the wavefront and the bond axis are perpendicular. It will be seen to what extent orientational averaging weakens features of the cross section and spin polarization. The calculations show that cross section and spin polarization measurements are a possible tool for determining the degree of molecular orientation. There is no degeneracy between I-C and C-I in cross section and spin polarization measurements. The results presented here for 200 eV and 600 eV electrons scattered by CH 3 I should be considered as a case study and it should be possible to find molecules and electron energies for which even more dramatic differences between the various orientations between the molecules and the electrons can be expected. (orig.)

  3. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry of thin NiCr layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anklam, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The possibilities and problems of characterizing thin films of NiCr by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) are demonstrated. Thin resistor films of NiCr (10 to 30 nm thick) are deposited on SiO 2 by sputtering in air or oxygen. The electrical properties depend both on integral chemical composition of films and on local distribution of elements. The determination of composition (Ni-Cr ratio, oxygen content) and of depth profiles of elements by the aid of RBS is described. For solving special analytical problems different substrates as amorphous SiO 2 , Si monocrystals, and glassy carbon are used

  4. Neutron Elastic Scattering Cross Sections Experimental Data and Optical Model Cross Section Calculations. A Compilation of Neutron Data from the Studsvik Neutron Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmqvist, B; Wiedling, T

    1969-06-15

    Neutron elastic scattering cross section measurements have been going on for a long period at the Studsvik Van de Graaff laboratory. The cross sections of a range of elements have been investigated in the energy interval 1.5 to 8 MeV. The experimental data have been compared with cross sections calculated with the optical model when using a local nuclear potential.

  5. Study of the elastic scattering differential cross sections of a proton beam by a cesium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Maddarsi, Mohamed.

    1978-01-01

    The elastic differential cross section of H + on Cs is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experimental device is described, after which the differential cross-section values obtained as a function of the laboratory angle are given for four incident energies: 13.4 eV, 15.1 eV, 17.7 eV and 24.2 eV. By means of an interaction potential of the quasi-molecule H + Cs the differential cross sections are calculated for the same incident energies; this calculation uses the semi-classical method of stationary phases which shows clearly the limits of conventional description and the changes introduced by quantum effects. Very good agreement is obtained between theoretical and experimental results, which shows that elastic scattering is very little perturbed by inelastic channels in this energy range. The estimated inelastic cross section at 24 eV is about 1.9 10 -15 cm 2 , corresponding to 1.6% of the scattering process [fr

  6. Measurement of high-Q2 charged current cross sections in e+p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautenberg, J.

    2004-06-01

    Cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured in e + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the running periods 1999 and 2000 correspond to an integrated luminosity of 61 pb -1 . Single differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy have been measured for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 , as well as the double differential reduced cross section d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 in the kinematic range 280 GeV 2 2 2 and 0.008 - p charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections. The helicity structure is investigated in particular. The mass of the space-like W boson propagator has been determined from a fit to dσ/dQ 2 . (orig.)

  7. Current distribution inside Rutherford-type superconducting cables and impact on performance of LHC dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiner, T

    2002-01-01

    The windings of high--field superconducting accelerator magnets are usually made of Rutherford--type cables. The magnetic field distribution along the axis of such magnets exhibits a periodic modulation with a wavelength equal to the twist pitch length of the cable used in the winding. Such a Periodic Field Pattern (PFP) has already been observed in number of superconducting accelerator magnets. Additional unbalanced currents in individual strands of the cable appear to be causing this effect. The present thesis describes the investigation of the PFPs performed with a Hall probes array inserted inside the aperture of the LHC superconducting dipoles, both in the small--scale model magnets with a length of one meter and in full--scale prototypes and pre--series magnets with fifteen meters of length. The amplitude and the time dependence of this periodic field oscillation have been studied as a function of the magnet current history. One of the main parameters influencing the properties of the PFP is the cross--...

  8. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  9. Prediction of e± elastic scattering cross-section ratio based on phenomenological two-photon exchange corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qattan, I. A.

    2017-06-01

    I present a prediction of the e± elastic scattering cross-section ratio, Re+e-, as determined using a new parametrization of the two-photon exchange (TPE) corrections to electron-proton elastic scattering cross section σR. The extracted ratio is compared to several previous phenomenological extractions, TPE hadronic calculations, and direct measurements from the comparison of electron and positron scattering. The TPE corrections and the ratio Re+e- show a clear change of sign at low Q2, which is necessary to explain the high-Q2 form factors discrepancy while being consistent with the known Q2→0 limit. While my predictions are in generally good agreement with previous extractions, TPE hadronic calculations, and existing world data including the recent two measurements from the CLAS and VEPP-3 Novosibirsk experiments, they are larger than the new OLYMPUS measurements at larger Q2 values.

  10. Integral elastic, electronic-state, ionization, and total cross sections for electron scattering with furfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    We report absolute experimental integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of bands of electronic-states in furfural, for incident electron energies in the range 20-250 eV. Wherever possible, those results are compared to corresponding excitation cross sections in the structurally similar species furan, as previously reported by da Costa et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 062706 (2012)] and Regeta and Allan [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012707 (2015)]. Generally, very good agreement is found. In addition, ICSs calculated with our independent atom model (IAM) with screening corrected additivity rule (SCAR) formalism, extended to account for interference (I) terms that arise due to the multi-centre nature of the scattering problem, are also reported. The sum of those ICSs gives the IAM-SCAR+I total cross section for electron-furfural scattering. Where possible, those calculated IAM-SCAR+I ICS results are compared against corresponding results from the present measurements with an acceptable level of accord being obtained. Similarly, but only for the band I and band II excited electronic states, we also present results from our Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials calculations. Those results are found to be in good qualitative accord with the present experimental ICSs. Finally, with a view to assembling a complete cross section data base for furfural, some binary-encounter-Bethe-level total ionization cross sections for this collision system are presented.

  11. Integral elastic, electronic-state, ionization, and total cross sections for electron scattering with furfural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Costa, R. F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, 29075-910, Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-04-14

    We report absolute experimental integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of bands of electronic-states in furfural, for incident electron energies in the range 20–250 eV. Wherever possible, those results are compared to corresponding excitation cross sections in the structurally similar species furan, as previously reported by da Costa et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 062706 (2012)] and Regeta and Allan [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012707 (2015)]. Generally, very good agreement is found. In addition, ICSs calculated with our independent atom model (IAM) with screening corrected additivity rule (SCAR) formalism, extended to account for interference (I) terms that arise due to the multi-centre nature of the scattering problem, are also reported. The sum of those ICSs gives the IAM-SCAR+I total cross section for electron–furfural scattering. Where possible, those calculated IAM-SCAR+I ICS results are compared against corresponding results from the present measurements with an acceptable level of accord being obtained. Similarly, but only for the band I and band II excited electronic states, we also present results from our Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials calculations. Those results are found to be in good qualitative accord with the present experimental ICSs. Finally, with a view to assembling a complete cross section data base for furfural, some binary-encounter-Bethe-level total ionization cross sections for this collision system are presented.

  12. Integral elastic, electronic-state, ionization, and total cross sections for electron scattering with furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D. B.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report absolute experimental integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of bands of electronic-states in furfural, for incident electron energies in the range 20–250 eV. Wherever possible, those results are compared to corresponding excitation cross sections in the structurally similar species furan, as previously reported by da Costa et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 062706 (2012)] and Regeta and Allan [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012707 (2015)]. Generally, very good agreement is found. In addition, ICSs calculated with our independent atom model (IAM) with screening corrected additivity rule (SCAR) formalism, extended to account for interference (I) terms that arise due to the multi-centre nature of the scattering problem, are also reported. The sum of those ICSs gives the IAM-SCAR+I total cross section for electron–furfural scattering. Where possible, those calculated IAM-SCAR+I ICS results are compared against corresponding results from the present measurements with an acceptable level of accord being obtained. Similarly, but only for the band I and band II excited electronic states, we also present results from our Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials calculations. Those results are found to be in good qualitative accord with the present experimental ICSs. Finally, with a view to assembling a complete cross section data base for furfural, some binary-encounter-Bethe-level total ionization cross sections for this collision system are presented.

  13. Ions cross-B collisional diffusion and electromagnetic wave scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomchuk, B.P.; Gresillon, D.

    2000-01-01

    The calculation is presented of the averaged quadratic displacement of a collisional charged particle in a magnetic field. This calculation is used to obtain the statistical presentation of the electromagnetic field scattered by these particles. These results extend the previous calculations that were restricted to non-magnetized particles (Ornstein equation, Einstein diffusion, etc.). In addition this calculation foresees effects that are absent of the Ornstein equation: a modulation of the averaged quadratic displacement function at the cyclotron frequency and a maximum of the Cross-B diffusion coefficient when the cyclotron frequency is equal to the collision frequency (Bohm diffusion)

  14. The effect of the new nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering data in LAHET trademark Version 2.8 on neutron displacement cross section calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; Russell, G.J.; Prael, R.E.; Madland, D.G.; Court, J.D.; Daemen, L.L.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The latest release of the medium-energy Monte Carlo transport code LAHET includes a new nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering treatment based on a global medium-energy phenomenological optical-model potential. Implementation of this new model in LAHET allows nuclear elastic scattering for neutrons with energies greater than 15 MeV and for protons with energies greater than 50 MeV. Previous investigations on the impact of the new elastic scattering data revealed that the addition of the proton elastic scattering channel can lead to a significant increase in the calculated damage energy under certain conditions. The authors report here results on the impact of the new elastic scattering data on calculated displacement cross sections in various elements for neutrons with energies in the range 16 to 3,160 MeV. Calculated displacement cross sections at 20 MeV in low-mass materials are in better agreement with SPECTER-calculated cross sections

  15. Neutron scattering differential cross sections of carbon and bismuth at 37 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zuying; Tang Hongqing; Qi Bujia; Zhou Chenwei; Du Yanfeng; Xia Haihong; Walter, R.L.; Tornow, W.; Howell, C.; Braun, R.; Roper, C.; Chen Zemin; Chen Zhengpeng; Chen Yingtang

    1997-01-01

    Elastic differential cross sections of 37 MeV neutrons scattered from carbon and bismuth were measured in the angular range 11 to 160 degrees by means of the multi-detector TOF facility. The 37 MeV neutrons were produced via the T(d,n) 4 He reaction in a tritium gas target. The pulsed 20 MeV deuteron beam was provided by the HI-13 tandem accelerator. The angular distribution of scattered neutrons from carbon and bismuth were measured in the angular range 11 degree to 145 degree and 11 degree to 160 degree respectively in steps of about 3 degree

  16. submitter Optimization of Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford Cables Geometry for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fleiter, Jerome; Bonasia, Angelo; Bordini, Bernardo; Richter, David

    2017-01-01

    The quadrupole and dipole magnets for the LHC High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrade will be based on Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford cables that operate at 1.9 K and experience magnetic fields of up to about 12 T. An important step in the design of these magnets is the development of the high aspect ratio Nb$_{3}$Sn cables to achieve the nominal field with sufficient margin. The strong plastic deformation of unreacted $Nb_3Sn$ strands during the Rutherford cabling process may induce non negligible $I_c$ and RRR degradation. In this paper, the cabling degradation is investigated as a function of the cable geometry for both PIT and RRP conductors. Based on this analysis, new baseline geometries for both 11 T and QXF magnets of HL-LHC are proposed.

  17. submitter Optimization of Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford Cables Geometry for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fleiter, Jerome; Bonasia, Angelo; Bordini, Bernardo; Richter, David

    2017-01-01

    The quadrupole and dipole magnets for the LHC High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrade will be based on Nb3Sn Rutherford cables that operate at 1.9 K and experience magnetic fields of up to about 12 T. An important step in the design of these magnets is the development of the high aspect ratio Nb3Sn cables to achieve the nominal field with sufficient margin. The strong plastic deformation of unreacted $Nb_3Sn$ strands during the Rutherford cabling process may induce non negligible $I_c$ and RRR degradation. In this paper, the cabling degradation is investigated as a function of the cable geometry for both PIT and RRP conductors. Based on this analysis, new baseline geometries for both 11 T and QXF magnets of HL-LHC are proposed.

  18. SCATTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broome, J.

    1965-11-01

    The programme SCATTER is a KDF9 programme in the Egtran dialect of Fortran to generate normalized angular distributions for elastically scattered neutrons from data input as the coefficients of a Legendre polynomial series, or from differential cross-section data. Also, differential cross-section data may be analysed to produce Legendre polynomial coefficients. Output on cards punched in the format of the U.K. A. E. A. Nuclear Data Library is optional. (author)

  19. Cross Sections of Charged Current Neutrino Scattering off 132Xe for the Supernova Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Divari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The total cross sections as well as the neutrino event rates are calculated in the charged current neutrino and antineutrino scattering off 132Xe isotope at neutrino energies Ev<100 MeV. Transitions to excited nuclear states are calculated in the framework of quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The contributions from different multipoles are shown for various neutrino energies. Flux-averaged cross sections are obtained by convolving the cross sections with a two-parameter Fermi-Dirac distribution. The flux-averaged cross sections are also calculated using terrestrial neutrino sources based on conventional sources (muon decay at rest or on low-energy beta-beams.

  20. A Strange Box and a Stubborn Brit: Rutherford's Experiments with Alpha Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilov, M.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 5 innovative experiments conducted by Rutherford in early 1900s utilizing the 30 milligrams of radium salt he personally carried from Europe to Canada in 1903. Traces his work with alpha particles from his original results which determined their nature, charge, and mass, to his technique of backscattering which helped to advance…

  1. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia [Division of Mathematical Physics, LTH, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: cecilia.jarlskog@matfys.lth.se

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008.

  2. A New Scaling Law of Resonance in Total Scattering Cross Section in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2009-10-01

    Electrical discharges in gases continue to be an active area of research because of industrial applications such as power systems, environmental clean up, laser technology, semiconductor fabrication etc. A fundamental knowledge of electron-gas neutral interaction is indispensable and, the total scattering cross section is one of the quantities that have been measured extensively. The energy dependence of the total cross sections shows peaks or resonance processes that are operative in the collision process. These peaks and the energies at which they occur are shown to satisfy a broad relationship involving the polarizability and the dipole moment of the target particle. Data on 62 target particles belonging to the following species are analyzed. (Eq 1) Rare gas atoms (Eq 2) Di-atomic molecules with combinations of polar, non-polar, attaching, and non-attaching properties Poly-atomic molecules with combinations of polar, non-polar, attaching, and non-attaching properties. Methods of improving the newly identified scaling law and possible application have been identified. 1 INTRODUCTION: Data on electron-neutral interactions are one of the most fundamental in the study of gaseous electronics and an immense literature, both experimental and theoretical, has become available since about the year 1920. [1-5]. In view of the central role which these data play in all facets of gas discharges and plasma science, it is felt that a critical review of available data is timely, mainly for the community of high voltage engineers and industries connected with plasma science in general. The electron-neutral interaction, often referred to as scattering in the scientific literature, is quantified by using the quantity called the total scattering cross section (QT, m^2). In the literature on cross section, total cross section and total scattering cross section are terms used synonymously and we follow the same practice. A definition may be found in reference [1]. This paper concerns

  3. Measurement of Elastic Scattering and of Total Cross-Section at the CERN $\\bar{p}p$ Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure elastic scattering and the total cross-section at the $\\bar{p}p$ collider. \\\\ \\\\ Up to 1983 the experimental apparatus was composed of two parts : \\item 1) Telescopes of high accuracy drift and proportional chambers and counters inserted into vertically moveable sections of the vacuum chamber ('Roman pots'), detect elastic scattering in the angular region from .5 mrad up to about 3 mrad. \\item 2) The total inelastic rate is measured with a forward/backward system of drift chambers and counter hodoscopes and the UA2 central detector covering together @= 4@p solid angle. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ With these two set-ups, the measured value of the total cross-section confirms extrapolation with (ln s)|2 behaviour. Elastic scattering and diffraction dissociation were measured in the range .03~$<$~-t~$<$~1.6~GeV|2. \\\\ \\\\ From 1984 on, six horizontally moveable ``Roman Pots'' have been installed farther away from the intersection region (up to 100~m). Using an especially desi...

  4. Fast optics for the Rutherford laser compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micholas, D.J.

    1976-12-01

    The compression chamber optical system proposed for the Rutherford Laboratory Laser compression experiments is described. The system corrects for longitudinal spherical aberration giving a final spot size approximately 15 μm. This could theoretically be improved. The two laser beams are focused via a pair of F/1.2 aspheric lenses onto a double-pass 'clam shell' aspheric mirror system. An analysis of the lens and mirror system is given and compared with an alternative ellipsoidal system already developed. The problems of manufacturing aspheric lenses to operate at 1.06 μm are outlined and an alternative novel approach to this design given. (author)

  5. Very High Energy Neutron Scattering from Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, R A; Stock, C; Bennington, S M; Taylor, J; Gidopoulos, N I

    2010-01-01

    The neutron scattering from hydrogen in polythene has been measured with the direct time-of flight spectrometer, MARI, at the ISIS facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with incident neutron energies between 0.5 eV and 600 eV. The results of experiments using the spectrometer, VESUVIO, have given intensities from hydrogen containing materials that were about 60% of the intensity expected from hydrogen. Since VESUVIO is the only instrument in the world that routinely operates with incident neutron energies in the eV range we have chosen to measure the scattering from hydrogen at high incident neutron energies with a different type of instrument. The MARI, direct time-of-flight, instrument was chosen for the experiment and we have studied the scattering for several different incident neutron energies. We have learnt how to subtract the gamma ray background, how to calibrate the incident energy and how to convert the spectra to an energy plot . The intensity of the hydrogen scattering was independent of the scattering angle for scattering angles from about 5 degrees up to 70 degrees for at least 3 different incident neutron energies between 20 eV and 100 eV. When the data was put on an absolute scale, by measuring the scattering from 5 metal foils with known thicknesses under the same conditions we found that the absolute intensity of the scattering from the hydrogen was in agreement with that expected to an accuracy of ± 5.0% over a wide range of wave-vector transfers between 1 and 250 A -1 . These measurements show that it is possible to measure the neutron scattering with incident neutron energies up to at least 100 eV with a direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer and that the results are in agreement with conventional scattering theory.

  6. Analytical calculation of the average scattering cross sections using fourier series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Daniel A.P. [Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: dpalmaster@gmail.com; Goncalves, Alessandro C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: asilva@con.ufrj.br, e-mail: agoncalves@con.ufrj.br, e-mail: aquilino@lmp.ufrj.br, e-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    The precise determination of the Doppler broadening functions is very important in different applications of reactors physics, mainly in the processing of nuclear data. Analytical approximations are obtained in this paper for average scattering cross section using expansions in Fourier series, generating an approximation that is simple and precise. The results have shown to be satisfactory from the point-of-view of accuracy and do not depend on the type of resonance considered. (author)

  7. Analytical calculation of the average scattering cross sections using fourier series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, Daniel A.P.; Goncalves, Alessandro C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da

    2009-01-01

    The precise determination of the Doppler broadening functions is very important in different applications of reactors physics, mainly in the processing of nuclear data. Analytical approximations are obtained in this paper for average scattering cross section using expansions in Fourier series, generating an approximation that is simple and precise. The results have shown to be satisfactory from the point-of-view of accuracy and do not depend on the type of resonance considered. (author)

  8. Formation of CrSi2 studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobbeche, S.; Benazzouz, C.; Boussaa, N.; Zilabdi, M.; Benouatas, A.; Bouabellou, A.; Halimi, R.

    1994-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is used to study the growth of Cr silicides formed by thin film reactions. Thin films of Cr were deposited on phosphorus-implanted silicon and unimplanted silicon substrates. Thermal annealing was subsequently carried out. The analysis has shown a growth of a CrSi 2 phase and allowed the determination of formation kinetics. A retardation effect of the CrSi 2 growth is observed in the case of the phosphorus-implanted silicon substrate. (Author)

  9. Paramagnetic scattering cross-sections of Nd and Dy at neutron wavelength between 0.5 A0 - 4 A0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maayouf, R.M.A.; Abdelkawy, A.; Adib, M.; Hamouda, I.

    1984-01-01

    The paramagnetic scattering cross-sections of Nd and Dy are calculated, for neutron wavelengths between 0.5-4 A, theoretically and deduced from available experimental data. The theoretical calculations are carried out using magnetic form factors deduced from Hartree-Fock radial wave functions for the 4 f electrons. The resulting theoretical curves of the paragnetic scattering cross-sections are compared with those deduced from data obtained using the transmission measurements. Both theoretical and experimental values found to be consistant

  10. Scattering of light keV ions from amorphous and crystalline solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.E.; Kwok, K.K.; Thompson, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Total reflection coefficients (R), backscattered energy fractions (γ), and backscattered energy spectra are evaluated using a binary collision Monte Carlo technique for a variety of light ions (H, D, T, He) in the energy range 0.25-8 keV, incident on amorphous targets (C, Fe, Nb). The scattering is also evaluated for H on Nb for a range of incident angles and two electronic stopping values. The average scattered energy per reflected particle and the backscattered energy spectra are found to vary in a universal manner as a function of the reflection coefficient between the Rutherford high energy limit and a low energy multiple collision limit. Single crystal effects are also briefly discussed using a diffusional dechanneling model. (Auth.)

  11. Measurement of the Raman scattering cross section of the breathing mode in KDP and DKDP crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros G; Raman, Rajesh N; Yang, Steven T; Negres, Raluca A; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Henesian, Mark A

    2011-10-10

    The spontaneous Raman scattering cross sections of the main peaks (related to the A1 vibrational mode) in rapid and conventional grown potassium dihydrogen phosphate and deuterated crystals are measured at 532 nm, 355 nm, and 266 nm. The measurement involves the use of the Raman line of water centered at 3400 cm-1 as a reference to obtain relative values of the cross sections which are subsequently normalized against the known absolute value for water as a function of excitation wavelength. This measurement enables the estimation of the transverse stimulated Raman scattering gain of these nonlinear optical materials in various configurations suitable for frequency conversion and beam control in high-power, large-aperture laser systems.

  12. The calibration of elastic scattering angular distribution at low energies on HIRFL-RIBLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, G.X. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, G.L., E-mail: zgl@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lin, C.J., E-mail: cjlin@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Qu, W.W. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medical College of Soochow University, Soochow 215123 (China); Yang, L.; Ma, N.R. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Zheng, L. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Jia, H.M.; Sun, L.J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Liu, X.X.; Chu, X.T.; Yang, J.C. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, J.S.; Xu, S.W.; Ma, P.; Ma, J.B.; Jin, S.L.; Bai, Z.; Huang, M.R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zang, H.L. [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); and others

    2017-02-21

    The precise calibration of angular distribution of heavy-ion elastic scattering induced by Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) at energies around Coulomb barrier on the Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou (RIBLL) at the Heavy-Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) is presented. The beam profile and the scattering angles on the target are deduced by a measurement with two Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC), and four sets of detector telescopes (including Double-sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD) placed systematically along the beam line, incorporating with Monte Carlo simulation. The MWPCs were used to determine the beam trajectory before the target, and the energies and the positions of scattered particles on the detectors were measured by the DSSDs. Minor corrections on the beam spot and the detector position are performed by assuming the pure Rutherford scattering at angles which are smaller than the related grazing angle. This method is applied for the elastic scattering of {sup 17}F on {sup 89}Y target at E{sub lab}=59 MeV and 50 MeV.

  13. Characterization of nuclear physics targets using Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubehn, T.; Wozniak, G.J.; Phair, L.; Moretto, L.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission have been utilized to precisely characterize targets used in nuclear fission experiments. The method allows for a fast and non-destructive determination of target thickness, homogeneity and element composition. (orig.)

  14. STAX-2, Neutron Scattering Cross-Sections by Optical Model and Moldauer Theory with Hauser-Feshbach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y.

    1972-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The program calculates neutron scattering cross sections by means of the optical model and Moldauer's theory, and can search for potential parameters which reproduce measured cross sections. The Hauser-Feshbach calculation is also possible. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of levels is 25. The largest value of the orbital angular momentum is 10

  15. Forbidden Raman scattering processes. I. General considerations and E1--M1 scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    The generalized theory of forbidden Raman scattering processes is developed in terms of the multipole expansion of the electromagnetic interaction Hamiltonian. Using the general expressions, the theory of electric dipole--magnetic dipole (E1--M1) Raman scattering is derived in detail. The 1 S 0 → 3 P 1 E1--M1 Raman scattering cross section in atomic magnesium is calculated for two applicable laser wavelengths using published f-value data. Since resonantly enhanced cross sections larger than 10 -29 cm 2 /sr are predicted it should be possible to experimentally observe this scattering phenomenon. In addition, by measuring the frequency dependence of the cross section near resonance, it may be possible to directly determine the relative magnitudes of the Axp and AxA contributions to the scattering cross section. Finally, possible applications of the effect in atomic and molecular physics are discussed

  16. The measurement of neutron differential scattering cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O in the energy range 20-26 Mev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petler, J.S.; Finlay, R.W.; Meigooni, A.S.; Islam, M.S.; Rapaport, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Ohio University Beam Swinger provides a high resolution, low back-ground time-of-flight facility for the measurement of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering. It has been used to obtain a comprehensive set of differential scattering cross sections for 12 C, 14 N, 16 O and 40 Ca between 18 and 26 MeV. The elastic cross sections can be used directly to obtain partial kerma factors and, combined with the known total cross sections, provide accurate values for the reaction cross sections. Angular distributions have been measured for inelastic scattering from all the nuclear levels that cannot decay by particle emission thus providing (by subtraction) a limit on the sum of all charged-particle producing reactions. The integrated cross sections for inelastic scattering from some particle-unstable states in 12 C are in excellent agreement with the cross sections for three-body breakup obtained by Antolkovic et al. The differential data have been used, together with higher energy proton scattering data to produce energy-dependent optical model parameters for each of these nuclei in the energy range 20-60 MeV. It has been found that the elastic differential cross sections at theta > 100 0 for 12 C, 14 N and 16 O cannot be well described by a spherical optical model. Explicit consideration of coupled-channel effects, and in the case of 12 C, deformation of the ground state, improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. Heavy ion recoil kerma factors and reaction cross sections have been obtained for each element and compared with previous calculations and measurements

  17. Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons by atoms and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonski, A.; Salvat, F.; Powell, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for elastic scattering of electrons by neutral atoms are extensively used in studies of electron transport in solids and liquids. A new NIST database has recently been released with DCSs calculated from a relativistic Dirac partial-wave analysis in which the potentials were obtained from Dirac-Hartree-Fock electron densities computed self-consistently for free atoms. We have compared calculated DCSs with measured DCSs for argon for electron energies between 50 eV and 3 keV, and found good agreement for electron energies above about 1 keV but with increasing deviations as the energy is reduced. These deviations are due to the neglect of absorption and polarizability effects in the calculations. Nevertheless, DCSs for neutral atoms have been successfully used in simulations of elastic backscattering of electrons by solid surfaces with energies down to 300 eV as well as for many other applications. It is suggested that this success might be due at least partially to the smaller absorption correction for the DCSs in solids on account of the smaller total inelastic scattering cross sections than for the corresponding free atoms

  18. Nonlinear Plasma Response to Resonant Magnetic Perturbation in Rutherford Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Yan, Xingting; Huang, Wenlong

    2017-10-01

    Recently a common analytic relation for both the locked mode and the nonlinear plasma response in the Rutherford regime has been developed based on the steady-state solution to the coupled dynamic system of magnetic island evolution and torque balance equations. The analytic relation predicts the threshold and the island size for the full penetration of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). It also rigorously proves a screening effect of the equilibrium toroidal flow. In this work, we test the theory by solving for the nonlinear plasma response to a single-helicity RMP of a circular-shaped limiter tokamak equilibrium with a constant toroidal flow, using the initial-value, full MHD simulation code NIMROD. Time evolution of the parallel flow or ``slip frequency'' profile and its asymptotic approach to steady state obtained from the NIMROD simulations qualitatively agree with the theory predictions. Further comparisons are carried out for the saturated island size, the threshold for full mode penetration, as well as the screening effects of equilibrium toroidal flow in order to understand the physics of nonlinear plasma response in the Rutherford regime. Supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grants 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and U.S. Department of Energy Grants DE-FG02-86ER53218 and DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  19. Elastic differential cross sections for small-angle scattering of 25-, 40-, and 60-keV protons by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rille, E.; Peacher, J.L.; Redd, E.; Kvale, T.J.; Seely, D.G.; Blankenship, D.M.; Olson, R.E.; Park, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    Elastic angular differential cross sections for small-angle scattering of protons by atomic hydrogen have been measured. The technique utilized unambigously distinguishes the elastically and inelastically scattered ions. The cross sections fall monotonically by 3 orders of magnitude in the angular range from 0.5 to 3.0 mrad, in the center-of-mass system. The experimental data obtained are in very good agreement with a multistate calculation and in fair agreement with both our Glauber-approximation and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo results

  20. Integral cross sections for π+p scattering between 52 and 126 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, E.; Goldring, A.; Wagner, G.J.; Altman, A.; Johnson, R.R.; Meirav, O.; Hanna, M.; Jennings, B.K.

    1989-06-01

    Integral cross-sections for the elastic scattering of π + on p from 20 degrees and 30 degrees to 180 degrees were measured at seven energies between 52 and 126 MeV. These integrals are found to be in good agreement with predictions made with currently accepted phase-shifts. (Author) 15 refs., tab., 2 figs

  1. Neutron scattering cross sections for 204,206Pb and neutron and proton amplitudes of E2 and E3 excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, S.F.; Hanly, J.M.; Hicks, S.E.; Shen, G.R.; McEllistrem, M.T.

    1994-01-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections have been measured for neutrons incident on 204 Pb and 206 Pb at energies of 2.5, 4.6, and 8.0 MeV and total cross sections in 100-keV steps from 250 keV to 4.0 MeV. Both spherical and coupled-channels analyses have been used to interpret this large set of data, together with other cross sections extending to 8 MeV. Several purposes motivate this work. The first is to establish the dispersion-corrected mean field appropriate for these nuclei. A consistent description of the energy dependent neutron scattering potential includes a dispersion relation connecting the real and imaginary parts of the potential; the resultant potential relates the energy dependent scattering field to one representing bound single particle levels. Dispersion relations using both the single channel and coupled-channels models have been examined; both give very similar results. The second motivation is to deduce neutron and proton excitation strengths of the lowest-energy quadrupole and octupole excitations seen via neutron scattering, and to compare those strengths with similar values derived from electromagnetic exciton, heavy-ion and pion scattering. The role of target neutrons in both collective excitations was found to be enhanced compared to the proton role

  2. Multichannel analysis of He*(21S)+Ne elastic and inelastic scattering in crossed atomic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.W.; Fukuyama, T.; Siska, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    State-to-state elastic and inelastic angular distribution and time-of-flight measurements are reported for the scattering of He*(2 1 S) by Ne in crossed supersonic atom beams at four collision energies in the range 0.6--2.8 kcal/mol. The inelastic collision products He+Ne*(nl), where nl=3d', 4p, 4p', 5s, 5s', and 4d, are scattered predominantly forward with respect to the direction of incidence, except for endothermic states near threshold. The data are analyzed with a numerically exact multichannel curve-crossing model that yields good agreement with experimental cross section branching fractions and total quenching and state-to-state rate constants as well as the angular measurements. The model suggests the importance of intermediate ''chaperone'' states, in which the excited electron is temporarily trapped in a d or f Rydberg Ne orbital, in channeling flux into the 4s' and 5s' upper laser states of Ne by energy transfer from He*(2s 1,3 S)

  3. The LXCat project: Electron scattering cross sections and swarm parameters for low temperature plasma modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancheshnyi, S.; Biagi, S.; Bordage, M.C.; Hagelaar, G.J.M.; Morgan, W.L.; Phelps, A.V.; Pitchford, L.C.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: LXCat is an open-access website containing data needed for low temperature plasma modeling as well as on-line tools useful for their manipulation. Highlights: ► LXCat: an open-access website with data for low temperature plasma modeling. ► Contains compilations of electron scattering cross sections and transport data. ► Data from different contributors for many neutral, ground-state species. ► On-line tools for browsing, plotting, up/downloading data. ► On-line Boltzmann solver for calculating electron swarm parameters. - Abstract: LXCat is a dynamic, open-access, website for collecting, displaying, and downloading ELECtron SCATtering cross sections and swarm parameters (mobility, diffusion coefficient, reaction rates, etc.) required for modeling low temperature, non-equilibrium plasmas. Contributors set up individual databases, and the available databases, indicated by the contributor’s chosen title, include mainly complete sets of electron-neutral scattering cross sections, although the option for introducing partial sets of cross sections exists. A database for measured swarm parameters is also part of LXCat, and this is a growing activity. On-line tools include options for browsing, plotting, and downloading cross section data. The electron energy distribution functions (edfs) in low temperature plasmas are in general non-Maxwellian, and LXCat provides an option for execution of an on-line Boltzmann equation solver to calculate the edf in homogeneous electric fields. Thus, the user can obtain electron transport and rate coefficients (averages over the edfs) in pure gases or gas mixtures over a range of values of the reduced electric fields strength, E/N, the ratio of the electric field strength to the neutral density, using cross sections from the available databases. New contributors are welcome and anyone wishing to create a database and upload data can request a username and password. LXCat is part of a larger, community

  4. Development of a non-destructive micro-analytical method for stable carbon isotope analysis of transmission electron microscope (TEM) samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hode, Tomas [Department of Geology, Portland State University, Portland, P.O. Box 751, OR 97201 (United States)], E-mail: hode@pdx.edu; Kristiansson, Per; Elfman, Mikael [Division of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Hugo, Richard C.; Cady, Sherry L. [Department of Geology, Portland State University, Portland, P.O. Box 751, OR 97201 (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The biogenicity of ancient morphological microfossil-like objects can be established by linking morphological (e.g. cell remnants and extracellular polymeric matrix) and chemical (e.g. isotopes, biomarkers and biominerals) evidence indicative of microorganisms or microbial activity. We have developed a non-destructive micro-analytical ion beam system capable of measuring with high spatial resolution the stable carbon isotope ratios of thin samples used for transmission electron microscopy. The technique is based on elastic scattering of alpha particles with an energy of 2.751 MeV. At this energy the {sup 13}C cross section is enhanced relative to the pure Rutherford cross section for {sup 13}C, whereas the {sup 12}C cross section is reduced relative to its pure Rutherford cross section. Here we report the initial results of this experimental approach used to characterize ultramicrotomed sections of sulfur-embedded graphite and microbial cells.

  5. Measurement of the cross section for diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; List, B.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Radescu, V.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Stella, B.; Tsakov, I.

    2011-01-01

    The cross section for the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process ep→eXp is measured, with the leading final state proton detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The data sample covers the range x P 2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4 2 2 in photon virtuality. The cross section is measured four-fold differentially in t,x P ,Q 2 and β=x/x P , where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The t and x P dependences are interpreted in terms of an effective pomeron trajectory and a sub-leading exchange. The data are compared with perturbative QCD predictions at next-to-leading order based on diffractive parton distribution functions previously extracted from complementary measurements of inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The ratio of the diffractive to the inclusive ep cross section is studied as a function of Q 2 ,β and x P . (orig.)

  6. Total electron scattering cross section from pyridine molecules in the energy range 10-1000 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuis, A. Traoré; Costa, F.; da Silva, F. Ferreira; Limão-Vieira, P.; Oller, J. C.; Blanco, F.; García, G.

    2018-05-01

    We report on experimental total electron scattering cross-section (TCS) from pyridine (C5H5N) for incident electron energies between 10 and 1000 eV, with experimental uncertainties within 5-10%, as measured with a double electrostatic analyser apparatus. The experimental results are compared with our theoretical calculations performed within the independent atom model complemented with a screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) procedure which has been updated by including interference effects. A good level of agreement is found between both data sources within the experimental uncertainties. The present TCS results for electron impact energy under study contribute, together with other scattering data available in the literature, to achieve a consistent set of cross section data for modelling purposes.

  7. Differential elastic electron scattering cross sections for CCl4 by 1.5-100 eV energy electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Horie, M.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Buckman, S. J.; Tanaka, H.

    2011-12-01

    We report absolute elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections for electron interactions with CCl4. The incident electron energy range is 1.5-100 eV, and the scattered electron angular range for the differential measurements varies from 15°-130°. The absolute scale of the differential cross section was set using the relative flow technique with helium as the reference species. Comparison with previous total cross sections shows good agreement. Atomic-like behaviour in this scattering system is shown here for the first time, and is further investigated by comparing the CCl4 elastic cross sections to recent results on the halomethanes and atomic chlorine at higher impact energies [H. Kato, T. Asahina, H. Masui, M. Hoshino, H. Tanaka, H. Cho, O. Ingólfsson, F. Blanco, G. Garcia, S. J. Buckman, and M. J. Brunger, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074309 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3319761.

  8. Finite-difference time-domain analysis on radar cross section of conducting cube scatterer covered with plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shaobin; Zhang Guangfu; Yuan Naichang

    2004-01-01

    A PLJERC-FDTD algorithm is applied to the study of the scattering of perfectly conducting cube covered with homogeneous isotropic plasmas. The effects of plasma thickness, density and collision frequency on the radar cross section (RCS) of the conducting cube scatterer have been obtained. The results illustrate that the plasma cloaking can greatly reduce the RCS of radar targets, and the RCS of the perfectly conducting cube scatterer decreases with increasing plasma thickness when the plasma frequency is greatly less than the electromagnetic (EM) wave frequency; the RCS of the perfectly conducting cube scatterer decreases with increasing plasma thickness and plasma collision frequency when the plasma frequency is almost half as much as the EM wave frequency; the effects of plasma thickness and collision frequency on the RCS of the perfectly conducting cube scatterer is small when the plasma frequency is close to the EM wave frequency

  9. Differential cross sections of proton Compton scattering at photon laboratory energies between 1.2 and 1.7 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duda, J.; Hoefner, F.W.; Jung, M.; Kleissler, R.; Kueck, H.; Leu, P.; Marne, K.D. de; Munk, B.; Vogl, W.; Wedemeyer, R.

    1982-11-01

    Differential cross sections of proton Compton scattering have been measured at the Bonn 2.5 GeV synchrotron. The experiment covers photon laboratory energies between 1.2 GeV and 1.7 GeV and the square of the four-momentum transfer ranges from t = -0.17 GeV 2 to -0.98 GeV 2 corresponding to c.m. scattering angles between 35 0 and 80 0 . The cross sections exhibit a forward peak followed by a monotone fall-off up to the largest measured vertical stroketvertical stroke-values. Fits of the form dsigma/dt = A.exp(Bt) to the data points with vertical stroketvertical stroke 2 yield forward cross sections A, which are consistent with the 0 0 cross sections calculated from the measured total photon-proton cross section. The average slope is B = 5.6 +- 0.14 GeV 2 . (orig.)

  10. Monte Carlo Calculation of Thermal Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Section Uncertainties by Sampling Perturbed Phonon Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jesse Curtis

    Nuclear data libraries provide fundamental reaction information required by nuclear system simulation codes. The inclusion of data covariances in these libraries allows the user to assess uncertainties in system response parameters as a function of uncertainties in the nuclear data. Formats and procedures are currently established for representing covariances for various types of reaction data in ENDF libraries. This covariance data is typically generated utilizing experimental measurements and empirical models, consistent with the method of parent data production. However, ENDF File 7 thermal neutron scattering library data is, by convention, produced theoretically through fundamental scattering physics model calculations. Currently, there is no published covariance data for ENDF File 7 thermal libraries. Furthermore, no accepted methodology exists for quantifying or representing uncertainty information associated with this thermal library data. The quality of thermal neutron inelastic scattering cross section data can be of high importance in reactor analysis and criticality safety applications. These cross sections depend on the material's structure and dynamics. The double-differential scattering law, S(alpha, beta), tabulated in ENDF File 7 libraries contains this information. For crystalline solids, S(alpha, beta) is primarily a function of the material's phonon density of states (DOS). Published ENDF File 7 libraries are commonly produced by calculation and processing codes, such as the LEAPR module of NJOY, which utilize the phonon DOS as the fundamental input for inelastic scattering calculations to directly output an S(alpha, beta) matrix. To determine covariances for the S(alpha, beta) data generated by this process, information about uncertainties in the DOS is required. The phonon DOS may be viewed as a probability density function of atomic vibrational energy states that exist in a material. Probable variation in the shape of this spectrum may be

  11. Potentials and scattering cross sections for collisions of He atoms with adsorbed CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.K.; Gumhalter, B.

    1986-05-01

    Ab initio calculations of the total scattering cross section for the collision system He → CO/Pt(111) within the renormalized distorted wave Born approximation are reported. The interaction potential for this atom-adsorbate system consists of the usual two-body gas phase-like potential as well as two additional substrate mediated van de Waals contributions, all with similar long range behaviour. Comparison of the calculated cross sections for various incident velocities and angles with available experimental data is made without using any adjustable parameters to fit the data, and the importance of including the substrate-mediated forces is emphasized. (author)

  12. ‘Rutherford’s experiment’ on alpha particles scattering: the experiment that never was

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M.; Robotti, N.; Verna, G.

    2018-05-01

    The so-called Rutherford’s experiment, as it is outlined in many physics textbooks, is a case in point of the flaws around the history at the educational level of one of the decisive event of modern physics: the discovery that the atom has a nucleus. This paper shows that this alleged experiment is a very approximate and very partial synthesis of a series of different particle scattering experiments, starting with that carried out by Rutherford in 1906 and ending with Geiger and Marsden’s 1913 experiments.

  13. Re-evaluation of the neutron scattering dynamics in heavy water, generation of multigroup cross sections for THERM-126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinert, J.

    1982-06-01

    In providing THERM-126 with cross section matrices for deuterium bound in heavy water the IKE phonon spectrum was reevaluated. The changes are modifications in the acoustic part and in the frequency of the second oscillator. Contrary to the phonon spectrum model for D in D 2 O in ENDF/B-IV the broad band of hindered rotations is assumed to be temperature dependent taking into account the diffusive motion of the molecule. With the new model scattering law data S (α, β) are generated in the temperature range 293.6 K-673.6 K. The THERM-126 scattering cross section matrices are calculated up to P 3 . As a validity check a lot of differential and integral cross sections are compared to experiments and benchmarks are recalculated. (orig.) [de

  14. Determination of the potential and coherent scattering cross-sections of the elements Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, Zn, Zr, Sb and Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Hamouda, I.

    1976-01-01

    The potential scattering cross-sections for slow neutrons have been measured for Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, Zn, Zr, Sb and Ta in order to determine the nuclear potential radius and to investigate the prediction of nuclear optical model. The coherent scattering cross-sections for these elements have been measured from the obtained values of the Bragg cut-offs observed in the behaviour of the total cross-sections at cold neutron energies. The measurements were based on the total neutron cross-sections resulting from transmission experiments performed with the neutron chopper at ET-RR-1 reactor

  15. Measure of back angle cross sections of antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering at 48 and 180 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrada, M.

    1986-04-01

    Antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering was studied in the LEAR ring at CERN. The scattering cross section at back angles (θ LAB = 142 to 164 deg inclusive) was measured using plastic scintillation detectors. Analysis of experimental data at 47 MeV for a CH target and at 182 MeV for CH, C12, 016, and 018 targets produces differential cross sections for back angles less than or equal to a few dozen microbarns. These results agree with theoretical microscopic predictions. The analysis improves understanding of antiproton-nucleus interaction and introduces a constraint on the construction of optical potentials. The antiproton-nucleus potential is shown to be highly absorbing, thereby excluding S type potentials, and removing the ambiguity arising from the analysis of antiprotonic atoms. The results also show that there is no attractive pocket in the real potential likely to lead to an increase of the back angle cross sections [fr

  16. High-frequency limit of the transport cross section in scattering by an obstacle with impedance boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksenko, A I; Cruz, J P; Lakshtanov, E L [Department of Mathematics, Aveiro University, Aveiro 3810 (Portugal)], E-mail: lakshtanov@rambler.ru

    2008-06-27

    The scalar scattering of a plane wave by a strictly convex obstacle with impedance boundary conditions is considered. A uniform bound of the total cross section for all values of the frequency is presented. The high-frequency limit of the transport cross section is calculated and presented as a classical functional of the variational calculus.

  17. High-frequency limit of the transport cross section in scattering by an obstacle with impedance boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksenko, A I; Cruz, J P; Lakshtanov, E L

    2008-01-01

    The scalar scattering of a plane wave by a strictly convex obstacle with impedance boundary conditions is considered. A uniform bound of the total cross section for all values of the frequency is presented. The high-frequency limit of the transport cross section is calculated and presented as a classical functional of the variational calculus

  18. Combination and QCD analysis of charm production cross section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] [and others; Collaboration: H1 and ZEUS Collaboration

    2012-10-15

    Measurements of open charm production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are combined. Reduced cross sections {sigma}{sup c} {sup anti} {sup c}{sub red} for charm production are obtained in the kinematic range of photon virtuality 2.5 {<=} Q{sup 2} {<=} 2000 GeV{sup 2} and Bjorken scaling variable 3.10{sup -5}{<=}x{<=}5.10{sup -2}. The combination method accounts for the correlations of the systematic uncertainties among the different data sets. The combined charm data together with the combined inclusive deepinelastic scattering cross sections from HERA are used as input for a detailed NLO QCD analysis to study the influence of different heavy flavour schemes on the parton distribution functions. The optimal values of the charm mass as a parameter in these different schemes are obtained. The implications on the NLO predictions for W{sup {+-}} and Z production cross sections at the LHC are investigated. Using the fixed flavour number scheme, the running mass of the charm quark is determined.

  19. Delbrueck scattering of monoenergetic photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahane, S.

    1978-05-01

    The Delbrueck effect was experimentally investigated in high Z nuclei with monoenergetic photons in the range 6.8-11.4 MeV. Two different methods were used for measurements of the differential scattering cross-section, in the 25-140 deg range and in the forward direction (theta = 1.5 deg), respectively. The known Compton scattering cross-section was used in a new and unique way for the determination of the elastic scattering cross-section. Isolation of the contribution of the real Delbrueck amplitudes to the cross-section was crried out successfully. Experimental confirmation of the theoretical calculations of Papatzacos and Mork and measurement, for the first time, of the Rayleigh scattering in the 10 MeV region are also reported. One of the most interesting findings is the presence of Coulomb corrections in Delbrueck scattering at these energies. More theoretical effort is needed in this last direction. (author)

  20. Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at Low Q^2 and x at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 12 GeV^2, and low Bjorken x, 5x10^-6 < x < 0.02. The result is based on two data sets collected in dedicated runs by the H1 Collaboration at HERA at beam energies of 27.6 GeV and 920 GeV for positrons and protons, respectively. A combination with data previously published by H1 leads to a cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q^2 and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering.

  1. Multi-jet cross sections in charged current e{sup {+-}}p scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Jet cross sections were measured in charged current deep inelastic e{sup {+-}}p scattering at high boson virtualities Q{sup 2} with the ZEUS detector at HERA II using an integrated luminosity of 0.36 fb{sup -1}. Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive-jet production as functions of Q{sup 2}, Bjorken x and the jet transverse energy and pseudorapidity. The dijet invariant mass cross section is also presented. Observation of three- and four-jet events in charged-current e{sup {+-}}p processes is reported for the first time. The predictions of next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD calculations are compared to the measurements. The measured inclusive-jet cross sections are well described in shape and normalization by the NLO predictions. The data have the potential to constrain the u and d valence quark distributions in the proton if included as input to global fits. (orig.)

  2. Multi-jet cross sections in charged current e±p scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-02-01

    Jet cross sections were measured in charged current deep inelastic e ± p scattering at high boson virtualities Q 2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA II using an integrated luminosity of 0.36 fb -1 . Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive-jet production as functions of Q 2 , Bjorken x and the jet transverse energy and pseudorapidity. The dijet invariant mass cross section is also presented. Observation of three- and four-jet events in charged-current e ± p processes is reported for the first time. The predictions of next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD calculations are compared to the measurements. The measured inclusive-jet cross sections are well described in shape and normalization by the NLO predictions. The data have the potential to constrain the u and d valence quark distributions in the proton if included as input to global fits. (orig.)

  3. Determination of the potential scattering parameter and parameterization of neutron cross-sections in the low-energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novoselov, G.M.; Litvinskij, L.L

    2001-01-01

    Different cross-section parameterization methods in the low-energy region are considered. It is shown that the potential scattering parameter value derived from analysis of experimental cross-section data is dependent essentially on the method used to take account of the nearest resonances. A formula describing this dependence is obtained. The results are verified by numerical model calculations. (author)

  4. Combination of Differential D^{*\\pm} Cross-Section Measurements in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E.G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N.H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P.J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C.D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J.G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R.K.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L.K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N.Z.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kotz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Idris, F.Mohamad; Morozov, A.; Nasir, N.Muhammad; Muller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R.J.; Olsson, J.E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D.H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W.B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Slominski, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P.D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wunsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zacek, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Zhmak, N.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D^{*\\pm}-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q2 > 5 GeV2, electron inelasticity 0.02 1.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta(D^*)| 1.5 GeV2. Perturbative next-to-leadingorder QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  5. Dispersion corrections to the forward Rayleigh scattering amplitudes of tantalum, mercury and lead derived using photon interaction cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appaji Gowda, S.B. [Department of Studies in Physics, Manasagangothri, University of Mysore, Mysore 570006 (India); Umesh, T.K. [Department of Studies in Physics, Manasagangothri, University of Mysore, Mysore 570006 (India)]. E-mail: tku@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in

    2006-01-15

    Dispersion corrections to the forward Rayleigh scattering amplitudes of tantalum, mercury and lead in the photon energy range 24-136 keV have been determined by a numerical evaluation of the dispersion integral that relates them through optical theorem to the photo effect cross sections. The photo effect cross sections have been extracted by subtracting the coherent and incoherent scattering contribution from the measured total attenuation cross section, using high-resolution high-purity germanium detector in a narrow beam good geometry set up. The real part of the dispersion correction to which the relativistic corrections calculated by Kissel and Pratt (S-matrix approach) or Creagh and McAuley (multipole corrections) have been included are in better agreement with the available theoretical values.

  6. Time-Dependent Wave Packet Dynamics Calculations of Cross Sections for Ultracold Scattering of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiayu; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.; Krems, Roman V.

    2018-04-01

    Because the de Broglie wavelength of ultracold molecules is very large, the cross sections for collisions of molecules at ultracold temperatures are always computed by the time-independent quantum scattering approach. Here, we report the first accurate time-dependent wave packet dynamics calculation for reactive scattering of ultracold molecules. Wave packet dynamics calculations can be applied to molecular systems with more dimensions and provide real-time information on the process of bond rearrangement and/or energy exchange in molecular collisions. Our work thus makes possible the extension of rigorous quantum calculations of ultracold reaction properties to polyatomic molecules and adds a new powerful tool for the study of ultracold chemistry.

  7. Measurement of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering cross section with a leading proton at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2010-06-15

    The cross section for the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process ep{yields}eXp is measured, with the leading final state proton detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The data sample covers the range x{sub P} < 0.1 in fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss, 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4cross section is measured four-fold differentially in t, x{sub P},Q{sup 2} and {beta}=x/x{sub P}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The t and x{sub P} dependences are interpreted in terms of an effective pomeron trajectory and a sub-leading exchange. The data are compared to perturbative QCD predictions at next-to-leading order based on diffractive parton distribution functions previously extracted from complementary measurements of inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The ratio of the diffractive to the inclusive ep cross section is studied as a function of Q{sup 2}, {beta} and x{sub P}. (orig.)

  8. Toward a new polyethylene scattering law determined using inelastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavelle, C.M.; Liu, C.-Y.; Stone, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S(Q,E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for ambient temperatures (∼300K), and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 294 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, describe the experimental methods, and compare computations using these models to the measured S(Q,E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the one phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work. -- Highlights: ► Polyethylene at 5 K and 300 K is measured using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). ► Measurements conducted at the Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS. ► Several models for Polyethylene are compared to measurements. ► Improvements to existing models for the polyethylene scattering law are suggested. ► INS is shown to be highly valuable tool for scattering law development

  9. Interstrand contact resistances of Bi-2212 Rutherford cables for SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawagoe, A.; Kawabata, Y.; Sumiyoshi, F.; Nagaya, S.; Hirano, N.

    2006-01-01

    Interstrand contact resistances of Bi-2212 Rutherford cables for SMES coils were evaluated from a comparison between measured data and 2D-FEM analyses on interstrand coupling losses in these cables. The cables were composed of 30 non-twisted Bi-2212 strands with a diameter of 0.81 mm and a cable twist pitch of 90 mm. Three samples were measured; one of them had NiCr cores and the others had no cores. One of the latter two samples repeatedly experienced bending. The interstrand coupling losses were measured in liquid helium for the straight samples under transverse ac ripple magnetic fields superposed on dc bias magnetic fields. The transverse magnetic field was applied to the samples in directions both perpendicular and parallel to the flat face of the cable. The effect of the bending on the interstrand coupling losses could be neglected for the non-cored samples. The interstrand coupling losses of NiCr cored sample decreased by about 30% compared with the non-cored samples, in case the direction of the transverse magnetic fields applied to the cable is perpendicular to the flat face of the cable. Using these results and 2D-FEM analyses, taking into account that interstrand contact conditions vary from the center to the edge in the cross-section of cables, gave us the conclusion that the between side-by-side strands contact with metallurgical bond only in both edges of the cables

  10. Interstrand contact resistances of Bi-2212 Rutherford cables for SMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, A.; Kawabata, Y.; Sumiyoshi, F.; Nagaya, S.; Hirano, N.

    2006-10-01

    Interstrand contact resistances of Bi-2212 Rutherford cables for SMES coils were evaluated from a comparison between measured data and 2D-FEM analyses on interstrand coupling losses in these cables. The cables were composed of 30 non-twisted Bi-2212 strands with a diameter of 0.81 mm and a cable twist pitch of 90 mm. Three samples were measured; one of them had NiCr cores and the others had no cores. One of the latter two samples repeatedly experienced bending. The interstrand coupling losses were measured in liquid helium for the straight samples under transverse ac ripple magnetic fields superposed on dc bias magnetic fields. The transverse magnetic field was applied to the samples in directions both perpendicular and parallel to the flat face of the cable. The effect of the bending on the interstrand coupling losses could be neglected for the non-cored samples. The interstrand coupling losses of NiCr cored sample decreased by about 30% compared with the non-cored samples, in case the direction of the transverse magnetic fields applied to the cable is perpendicular to the flat face of the cable. Using these results and 2D-FEM analyses, taking into account that interstrand contact conditions vary from the center to the edge in the cross-section of cables, gave us the conclusion that the between side-by-side strands contact with metallurgical bond only in both edges of the cables.

  11. Some Notes on Neutron Up-Scattering and the Doppler-Broadening of High-Z Scattering Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Donald Kent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    When neutrons are scattered by target nuclei at elevated temperatures, it is entirely possible that the neutron will actually gain energy (i.e., up-scatter) from the interaction. This phenomenon is in addition to the more usual case of the neutron losing energy (i.e., down-scatter). Furthermore, the motion of the target nuclei can also cause extended neutron down-scattering, i.e., the neutrons can and do scatter to energies lower than predicted by the simple asymptotic models. In recent years, more attention has been given to temperature-dependent scattering cross sections for materials in neutron multiplying systems. This has led to the inclusion of neutron up-scatter in deterministic codes like Partisn and to free gas scattering models for material temperature effects in Monte Carlo codes like MCNP and cross section processing codes like NJOY. The free gas scattering models have the effect of Doppler Broadening the scattering cross section output spectra in energy and angle. The current state of Doppler-Broadening numerical techniques used at Los Alamos for scattering resonances will be reviewed, and suggestions will be made for further developments. The focus will be on the free gas scattering models currently in use and the development of new models to include high-Z resonance scattering effects. These models change the neutron up-scattering behavior.

  12. High energy backscattering analysis using RUMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    A backscattering analysis program such as RUMP fundamentally requires two reference sets of data in order to accomplish anything useful: stopping powers and scattering cross sections. Users of original versions of RUMP had to be satisfied with polynomial stopping powers geared for 1 to 3 MeV, and purely Rutherford scattering cross sections. As people increasingly turn to high beam energies to solve difficult materials analysis problems, RUMP has evolved greater flexibility for its reference data. It now allows data files to be loaded describing different stopping powers and arbitrary scattering cross sections. Auxiliary programs have been written to generate the reference data files, either from a theory or from measured reference data. Descriptions are given of both the underlying physics and the operational details of the software

  13. Cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons by atoms: selected topics related to electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, M.; Manson, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    We begin with a resume of the Bethe theory, which provides a general framework for discussing the inelastic scattering of fast electrons and leads to powerful criteria for judging the reliability of cross-section data. The central notion of the theory is the generalized oscillator strength as a function of both the energy transfer and the momentum transfer, and is the only non-trivial factor in the inelastic-scattering cross section. Although the Bethe theory was initially conceived for free atoms, its basic ideas apply to solids, with suitable generalizations; in this respect, the notion of the dielectric response function is the most fundamental. Topics selected for discussion include the generalized oscillator strengths for the K-shell and L-shell ionization for all atoms with Z less than or equal to 30, evaluated by use of the Hartree-Slater potential. As a function of the energy transfer, the generalized oscillator strength most often shows a non-monotonic structure near the K-shell and L-shell thresholds, which has been interpreted as manifestations of electron-wave propagation through atomic fields. For molecules and solids, there are additional structures due to the scattering of ejected electrons by the fields of other atoms

  14. Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R.; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, A.; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab; Takeuchi, T.; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab; Verweij, A.P.; /CERN; Wake, M.; Willering, G; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

  15. RBS cross-section of MeV ions channeling in crystals from quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Spizzirri, P.G.; Allen, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    We present an alternative approach to describing Rutherford Backscattered (RBS) angular yield scans. The Bloch wave method to formulate the cross-section is a fundamental approach originating from Schrodinger's equation. This quantum formulation is often used when describing various aspects of electron diffraction including Backscattering, EDX and TEM but has seen little application to the very short wavelength regime of MeV ions. It offers several significant advantages. Great freedom is given to crystal properties and structure in the theory allowing a fundamental insight into the channeling phenomena and hence the crystal itself. We have calculated both planar and axial channeling scans and these maps are shown to be in good agreement to their experimental counterparts. There is excellent correlation between the theoretical and experimental results for both χ min and Ψ 1/2 . Further investigation is required into the area of absorption or dechanneling. This phenomenon requires different mechanisms for electron and ion scattering differ greatly

  16. Measurement of charged and neutral current e-p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.; Katz, U.F.; Mari, S.M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, C.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Llewellyn, T.J.; Morgado, C.J.S.; Norman, D.J.P.; O'Mara, J.A.; Tapper, R.J.; Wilson, S.S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R.R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J.A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P.B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jelen, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kotanski, A.; Przybycien, M.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J.K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasinski, M.; Gilkinson, D.J.; Glasman, C.; Goettlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Koepke, L.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Loehr, B.; Loewe, M.; Lueke, D.; Manczak, O.; Ng, J.S.T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.

    1995-01-01

    Deep inelastic e - p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared Q 2 above 400GeV 2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 are presented. From the Q 2 dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be M W =76±16±13 GeV

  17. Differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of intermediate energy electrons from sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teubner, P.J.O.; Buckner, S.J.; Noble, C.J.

    1977-11-01

    Differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons from sodium have been measured with high angular resolution for incident energies of 54.4, 75, 100 and 150 eV and over an angular range of 12 0 to 140 0 . The experimental data are compared with calculations based on the First Born approximation, the Glauber approximation and a close coupling impact parameter calculation. Calculations have been carried out for an optical model using the prescription of Vanderpoorten for localizing the absorptive part of the potential. Of the theoretical calculations the optical model is found to best reproduce the general features of the cross section at all energies. (Author)

  18. Measurement of jet production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Cvach, Jaroslav; Ferencei, Jozef; Hladký, Jan; Reimer, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-41, č. článku 215. ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : jet cross sections * neutral current deep-inelastic scattering * perturbative QCD Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  19. Simulation study on cross polarization scattering of ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuragawa, Naoki; Hojo, Hitoshi; Mase, Atushi

    1996-11-01

    Simulation study on cross polarization scattering of ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic waves due to magnetic fluctuations is presented. One-dimensional coupled wave equations for the ordinary and extraordinary modes are solved for incident unipolar sub-cycle pulses in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. It is shown that the peak frequencies in the frequency-spectral signals of the mode-converted reflected waves are determined from the Bragg resonance condition in the wave numbers of the ordinary mode, the extraordinary mode and the magnetic fluctuations for relatively short-wavelength localized magnetic fluctuations. (author)

  20. Inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Adamczyk, L.

    2010-10-01

    Single- and double-differential inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 374 pb -1 . The measurement was performed at large values of the photon virtuality, Q 2 , between 125 and 20 000 GeV 2 . The jets were reconstructed with the k T cluster algorithm in the Breit reference frame and selected by requiring their transverse energies in the Breit frame, E jet T,B , to be larger than 8 GeV. In addition, the invariant mass of the dijet system, M jj , was required to be greater than 20 GeV. The cross sections are described by the predictions of next-to-leading-order QCD. (orig.)

  1. Total electron scattering cross sections for methanol and ethanol at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D G M; Tejo, T; Lopes, M C A; Muse, J; Romero, D; Khakoo, M A

    2010-01-01

    Absolute total cross section (TCS) measurements of electron scattering from gaseous methanol and ethanol molecules are reported for impact energies from 60 to 500 eV, using the linear transmission method. The attenuation of intensity of a collimated electron beam through the target volume is used to determine the absolute TCS for a given impact energy, using the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Besides these experimental measurements, we have also determined TCS using the additivity rule.

  2. Measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section at low Q2 and x at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Preda, T.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Roeck, A. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Janssen, M.E.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; List, J.; Marti, L.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Asmone, A.; Stella, B.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Gouzevitch, M.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Del Degan, M.; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Dodonov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Povh, B.; Eckstein, D.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lobodzinska, E.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Habib, S.; Jemanov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Naroska, B.; Hansson, M.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Meier, K.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Schmitz, C.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Schoening, A.; Tsakov, I.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤12 GeV 2 , and low Bjorken x, 5.10 -6 ≤x≤0.02. The result is based on two data sets collected in dedicated runs by the H1 Collaboration at HERA at beam energies of 27.6 GeV and 920 GeV for positrons and protons, respectively. A combination with data previously published by H1 leads to a cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q 2 and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  3. Formation of CrSi[sub 2] studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobbeche, S.; Benazzouz, C.; Boussaa, N.; Zilabdi, M. (Centre de Developpement des Techniques Nucleaires (CDTN), Algiers (Algeria)); Benouatas, A.; Bouabellou, A.; Halimi, R. (Constantine Univ. (Algeria))

    1994-04-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is used to study the growth of Cr silicides formed by thin film reactions. Thin films of Cr were deposited on phosphorus-implanted silicon and unimplanted silicon substrates. Thermal annealing was subsequently carried out. The analysis has shown a growth of a CrSi[sub 2] phase and allowed the determination of formation kinetics. A retardation effect of the CrSi[sub 2] growth is observed in the case of the phosphorus-implanted silicon substrate. (Author).

  4. Measurement of Jet Production Cross Sections in Deep-inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Vladimir; Begzsuren, Khurelbaatar; Belousov, Anatoli; Bolz, Arthur; Boudry, Vincent; Brandt, Gerhard; Brisson, Violette; Britzger, Daniel; Buniatyan, Armen; Bylinkin, Alexander; Bystritskaya, Lena; Campbell, Alan; Cantun Avila, Karla Beatriz; Cerny, Karel; Chekelian, Vladimir; Contreras, Guillermo; Cvach, Jaroslav; Dainton, John; Daum, Karin; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dobre, Monica; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Eckerlin, Guenter; Egli, Stephan; Elsen, Eckhard; Favart, Laurent; Fedotov, Alexandre; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, Jozef; Fleischer, Manfred; Fomenko, Alexander; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gayler, Joerg; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, Lidia; Gogitidze, Nelly; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grab, Christoph; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, Dieter; Henderson, Rob~CW; Hladky, Jan; Hoffmann, Dirk; Horisberger, Roland; Hreus, Tomas; Huber, Florian; Jacquet, Marie; Janssen, Xavier; Jung, Hannes; Kapichine, Mikhail; Katzy, Judith; Kiesling, Christian; Klein, Max; Kleinwort, Claus; Kogler, Roman; Kostka, Peter; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kruecker, Dirk; Krueger, Katja; Landon, Murrough; Lange, Wolfgang; Laycock, Paul; Lebedev, Andrei; Levonian, Sergey; Lipka, Katerina; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Malinovski, Evgenij; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maxfield, Steve~J; Mehta, Andrew; Meyer, Andreas; Meyer, Hinrich; Meyer, Joachim; Mikocki, Stanislav; Morozov, Anatoly; Mueller, Katharina; Naumann, Thomas; Newman, Paul~R; Niebuhr, Carsten; Nowak, Grazyna; Olsson, Jan~Erik; Ozerov, Dmitri; Pascaud, Christian; Patel, Girish; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrukhin, Alexey; Picuric, Ivana; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Polifka, Richard; Radescu, Voica; Raicevic, Natasa; Ravdandorj, Togoo; Reimer, Petr; Rizvi, Eram; Robmann, Peter; Roosen, Robert; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Rotaru, Marina; Salek, David; Sankey, Dave~PC; Sauter, Michel; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Stefan; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Soloviev, Yuri; Sopicki, Pawel; South, David; Spaskov, Vladimir; Specka, Arnd; Steder, Michael; Stella, Bruno; Straumann, Ulrich; Sykora, Tomas; Thompson, Paul; Traynor, Daniel; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, Ivan; Tseepeldorj, Baatar; Valkarova, Alice; Vallee, Claude; VanMechelen, Pierre; Vazdik, Iakov; Wegener, Dietrich; Wuensch, Eberhard; Zacek, Jozef; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zlebcik, Radek; Zohrabyan, Hamlet

    2017-04-04

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities $5.5cross sections are measured simultaneously and are presented as a function of jet transverse momentum observables and as a function of $Q^2$. Jet cross sections normalised to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section in the respective $Q^2$-interval are also determined. Previous results of inclusive jet cross sections in the range $150

  5. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-01

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g (r ) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section d/σ d Ω from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. We describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  6. Absolute values of inelastic neutron scattering cross-sections calculated with account taken of the pre-equilibrium mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute values of secondary energy-dependent inelastic neutron scattering cross sections can be calculated either with the master equation pre-equilibrium formalism of Cline and Blann or with Blann's more recent geometry-dependent hybrid model. The master equation formalism was used at Dubna and Dresden to reproduce experimental results for 14 MeV incident energy. The geometry-dependent hybrid model was used at Karlsruhe to cover for a number of materials the whole range from 5 to 14 MeV incident energy and to reproduce smoothed experimental spectra at 7.45 and 14 MeV. Only the geometry-dependent hybrid model accounts for scattering in the diffuse nuclear surface and thus for a certain average over the direct interaction. It is also free of any fit parameters other than those of the usual optical model. The master equation calculations, on the other hand, are based on nucleon-nucleon scattering cross sections inserted into the high-energy approximation of Kikuchi and Kawai for the intranuclear transition rate. Other approaches require either mass- or energy-dependent or more global fit parameters for a satisfactory reproduction of experimental results, but a genuine prediction of the incident-energy dependence of the inelastic neutron cross section, especially below 14 MeV, is needed for transport and shielding calculations for instance in connection with fusion reactor design studies. (author)

  7. Complementary scattered and recoiled ion data from TOF-E heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.N.; El Bouanani, M.; Stannard, W.B.; Bubb, I.F.; Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N.; Siegele, R.

    1998-01-01

    The advantage of Time of Flight and Energy (ToF-E) Heavy Ion Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HIERDA) over Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis is its mass and energy dispersive capabilities. The mass resolution of ToF-E HIERDA deteriorates for very heavy elements. The limitation is related to the poor energy resolution of Si detectors for heavy ions. While the energy spectra from ToF-E HIERDA data are normally used to extract depth profiles, this work discusses the benefits of using the time spectra of both the recoiled and the scattered ions for depth profiling. The simulation of the complementary scattered and recoiled ion time spectra improves depth profiling and reduced current limitations when dealing with very heavy ions, such as Pt, Bi, Ta. (authors)

  8. Elastic scattering of. pi. /sup -/ mesons on protons in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region at 33-60 GeV/c. [Total and differential cross sections,scattering amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apokin, V D; Vasiliev, A N; Derevshchikov, A A; Matulenko, Yu A; Meschanin, A P; Mysnik, A I; Nurushev, S B; Saraykin, A I; Siksin, V V; Smirnov, E V [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov. Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij

    1976-04-19

    Differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of negative pions on protons, as well as total cross sections have been measured for the incident momentum range from 33 up to 60 GeV/c. The values for four-momentum transfer were within the limits of -(10/sup -3/-8x10/sup -2/) (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The energy dependence of the ratio rho(0) of the real part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude to the imaginary part has been determined from the experimental data. The magnitude rho(0) smoothly increases from (-10.9+-1.2)% at momenta 33.52 GeV/c up to (-1.8+-1.8)% at 59.4 GeV/c. The results obtained are compared with the predictions of theoretical models.

  9. Space plasma physics at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.A.; Bingham, R.; Edwards, T.; Hall, D.S.; Ward, A.K.

    1984-03-01

    The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) is contributing instruments and a spacecraft to several imminent and excitingly new explorations of the plasma phenomena arising from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth, and the solar wind and a comet. The projects in which the Laboratory is engaged, in collaboration with university and other research groups in the UK and abroad, include the AMPTE mission, which will trace the flow of particles injected into the solar wind, the GIOTTO encounter with comet Halley, the VIKING exploration of the generation of the aurora, and the CRRES and ISTP missions to clarify the structure and dynamics of the Earth's magnetosphere. These projects are outlined, together with the results of recent studies of particle acceleration and pulsations in the aurora. (author)

  10. Simple systematization of vibrational excitation cross-section calculations for resonant electron-molecule scattering in the boomerang and impulse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Manabendra; Adhikari, S; Mishra, Manoj K

    2007-01-28

    Vibrational excitation (nu(f), where psi(nu(i))(R,t) approximately =e(-iH(A(2))-(R)t/h phi(nu(i))(R) with time evolution under the influence of the resonance anionic Hamiltonian H(A(2) (-))(A(2) (-)=N(2)(-)/H(2) (-)) implemented using Lanczos and fast Fourier transforms. The target (A(2)) vibrational eigenfunctions phi(nu(i))(R) and phi(nu(f))(R) are calculated using Fourier grid Hamiltonian method applied to potential energy (PE) curves of the neutral target. Application of this simple systematization to calculate vibrational structure in e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering cross-sections provides mechanistic insights into features underlying presence/absence of structure in e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering cross-sections. The results obtained with approximate PE curves are in reasonable agreement with experimental/calculated cross-section profiles, and cross correlation functions provide a simple demarcation between the boomerang and impulse models.

  11. Signatures of projectile-nucleus scattering in three-dimensional (e,2e) cross sections for argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Xueguang; Senftleben, Arne; Pflueger, Thomas; Dorn, Alexander; Ullrich, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bartschat, Klaus, E-mail: Xueguang.Ren@mpi-hd.mpg.d, E-mail: Alexander.Dorn@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States)

    2010-02-14

    Electron impact ionization (E{sub 0} = 195 eV) of the 3p-orbital in argon is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The triple-differential cross sections (TDCS) obtained using a multi-particle momentum spectrometer (reaction microscope) cover more than 80% of the full solid angle for the slow emitted electron up to an energy of 25 eV and a range of projectile scattering angles from -5 deg. to -15 deg. Inside the projectile scattering plane the TDCS shape is in rather good agreement with a hybrid distorted-wave plus R-matrix (DWBA-RM) calculation. Outside the scattering plane relatively strong electron emission is observed which is reproduced by theory in magnitude but not in shape. A systematic study of the TDCS behaviour and structure in this region indicates that its origin lies in high-order projectile-target interaction.

  12. Scatter and cross-talk correction for one-day acquisition of 123I-BMIPP and 99mtc-tetrofosmin myocardial SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, Tomohiro; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Maruoka, Shin; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shoki; Yamada, Shogo

    2004-12-01

    123I-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and 99mTc-tetrofosmin (TET) are widely used for evaluation of myocardial fatty acid metabolism and perfusion, respectively. ECG-gated TET SPECT is also used for evaluation of myocardial wall motion. These tests are often performed on the same day to minimize both the time required and inconvenience to patients and medical staff. However, as 123I and 99mTc have similar emission energies (159 keV and 140 keV, respectively), it is necessary to consider not only scattered photons, but also primary photons of each radionuclide detected in the wrong window (cross-talk). In this study, we developed and evaluated the effectiveness of a new scatter and cross-talk correction imaging protocol. Fourteen patients with ischemic heart disease or heart failure (8 men and 6 women with a mean age of 69.4 yr, ranging from 45 to 94 yr) were enrolled in this study. In the routine one-day acquisition protocol, BMIPP SPECT was performed in the morning, with TET SPECT performed 4 h later. An additional SPECT was performed just before injection of TET with the energy window for 99mTc. These data correspond to the scatter and cross-talk factor of the next TET SPECT. The correction was performed by subtraction of the scatter and cross-talk factor from TET SPECT. Data are presented as means +/- S.E. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon's matched-pairs signed-ranks test, and p corrected total count was 26.0 +/- 5.3%. EDV and ESV after correction were significantly greater than those before correction (p = 0.019 and 0.016, respectively). After correction, EF was smaller than that before correction, but the difference was not significant. Perfusion scores (17 segments per heart) were significantly lower after as compared with those before correction (p correction revealed significant differences in EDV, ESV, and perfusion scores. These observations indicate that scatter and cross-talk correction is required for one

  13. Jet cross sections in γ*γ-scattering at e+e- colliders in NLO QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter, B.

    1999-01-01

    Recent results from NLO QCD calculations for inclusive jet cross sections in γ*γ-scattering at e + e - colliders, especially for LEP, are reported. The virtuality Q 2 of the virtual photon is non-zero and can be unlimited large. The virtuality of the second photon is zero and the spectrum is calculated with the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation. Four components of the cross sections have to be distinguished, involving direct and resolved real and virtual photon contributions. Since Q 2 is non-zero, the virtual photon structure function is needed to calculate the contributions involving a resolved virtual photon

  14. The effect of electromagnetic structure of heavy ions below the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, V.J.; Maheshwari, C.

    1978-02-01

    The scattering of two charged bodies (such as heavy ions)at energies below the Coulomb barrier is considered. By solving the radial Schroedinger equation in a simple model it is found that the phase shifts are indeed close to those due to point charges, and the cross-section is very well reproduced by the Rutherford formula. The first-order Born approximation, however, differs violently from the corresponding Born amplitude due to point charges, and achievement of the Rutherford limit in the momentum space is a difficult task. A method of summing up the Born series is indicated and its evaluation in the semiclassical limit is suggested

  15. Investigation of iron film-substrate interfaces using Rutherford backscattering and channeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maheswaran, S.; Thevuthasan, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thin films of α-Fe 2 O 3 (0001) (hematite) were epitaxially grown on Al 2 O 3 (0001) substrates using the new molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). We have investigated the interface between the hematite films and sapphire substrates using Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and channeling experiments. Theoretical simulations were performed using VEGAS code to investigate the surface and interface structural properties of the films

  16. The effective cross section for double parton scattering within a holographic AdS/QCD approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traini, Marco, E-mail: marcoclaudio.traini@unitn.it [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INFN - TIFPA, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Rinaldi, Matteo [Departament de Fisica Teòrica, Universitat de València and Institut de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain); Scopetta, Sergio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Vento, Vicente [Departament de Fisica Teòrica, Universitat de València and Institut de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain)

    2017-05-10

    A first attempt to apply the AdS/QCD framework for a bottom–up approach to the evaluation of the effective cross section for double parton scattering in proton–proton collisions is presented. The main goal is the analytic evaluation of the dependence of the effective cross section on the longitudinal momenta of the involved partons, obtained within the holographic Soft-Wall model. If measured in high-energy processes at hadron colliders, this momentum dependence could open a new window on 2-parton correlations in a proton.

  17. How do we know what is ‘inside the atom’?—Simulating scattering experiments in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    The idea of the indivisible atom, held since the time of the ancient Greeks, was smashed just over 100 years ago. Ernest Rutherford and his team of scientists in the UK used scattering experiments to discover that atoms have a very dense and extremely small central nucleus that contains more than 99.9% of the mass of an atom and is ten thousand times smaller than an atom. Then just over 50 years ago three physicists in America: Jerome Friedman, Henry Kendall and Richard Taylor carried out scattering experiments in California, that revealed the internal structure of nucleons—later called quarks. This workshop, developed by the Public Engagement team at the Science and Technology Facilities Council, takes secondary school students through these historic discoveries and the present day scattering experiments still changing the world of science.

  18. Algorithms for the rapid simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, L.R.

    1985-06-01

    A computer program which simulates Rutherford backscattering spectra is currently in use at Cornell University and other institutions. Straggling and detector resolution are among the effects included. Samples are considered to be made up of a finite number of layers, each with uniform composition. The emphasis in the mathematics is on accuracy beyond that of iterated surface approximation methods. Thicker layers can thus be analyzed without a net loss in accuracy. The mathematical description of the sample can then have fewer layers, and fewer calculations are required. This paper provides estimates of the number of arithmetic operations used by the program for any simulation to demonstrate the tradeoffs between accuracy, computation time, and algorithm sophistication.

  19. Algorithms for the rapid simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program which simulates Rutherford backscattering spectra is currently in use at Cornell University and other institutions. Straggling and detector resolution are among the effects included. Samples are considered to be made up of a finite number of layers, each with uniform composition. The emphasis in the mathematics is on accuracy beyond that of iterated surface approximation methods. Thicker layers can thus be analyzed without a net loss in accuracy. The mathematical description of the sample can then have fewer layers, and fewer calculations are required. This paper provides estimates of the number of arithmetic operations used by the program for any simulation to demonstrate the tradeoffs between accuracy, computation time, and algorithm sophistication. (orig.)

  20. Experimental verification of Rutherford's transversal section of energies between 200 and 700 Kev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara E, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The objective was to try to verify the validity of Rutherford's transversal section, for the interval of energies between 200 and 700 Kev. It was decided to carry out this work in order to underline the fact that a great part of experiments such as: a) the use of thin films to make mirrors or produce condensers, b) the study of the composition of dielectric layers and the formation of metallic contacts with semiconductors, c) the mapping of the mass distribution at depths varying between hundreds and thousands of angstroms, d) the detection of low mass impurities on the crystal surface, e) the implantation of ions are based on the validity of Rutherford's dispersion theory, while this doesn't succeed with high energies due to the appearance of nuclear resonances, or with low energies due to the appearance of atomic effects which distort the results. The results show a standard error of approxiamately 7% with respect to the average. In conclusion, some limitations are noted in relation to the nuclei and the interval of energy; these limitations should be taken into consideration and recommendations are made about how to obtain more reliable results. (author)

  1. Measurement of proton-proton inelastic scattering cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}$= 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bozzo, M.; Brogi, P.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.S.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Covault, C.; Csanad, M.; Csörgö, T.; Deile, M.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Intonti, R.A.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajicek, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Mäki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Prochazka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Wyszkowski, P.

    2013-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has measured the inelastic proton-proton cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV in a β* = 90 m run with low inelastic pile-up. The measurement was based on events with at least one charged particle in the T2 telescope acceptance of 5.3 < |η| < 6.5 in pseudorapidity. Combined with data from the T1 telescope, covering 3.1 < |η| < 4.7, the cross-section for inelastic events with at least one |η| < 6.5 final state particle was determined to be 70.5 2.9 mb. Based on models for low mass diffraction, the total inelastic cross-section was deduced to be 73.7 3.4 mb. An upper limit of 6.31 mb at 95 % confidence level on the cross-section for events with diffractive masses below 3.4 GeV was obtained from the difference between the overall inelastic cross-section obtained by TOTEM using elastic scattering and the cross-section for inelastic events with at least one |η| < 6.5 final state particle.

  2. Measurement and QCD analysis of diffractive jet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozer, M.U.

    2006-07-24

    Differential cross sections for the production of two jets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at HERA are presented. The process studied is of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the central hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated from the system Y by a gap in rapidity. The forward system Y consists of an elastically scattered proton or a low mass dissociation system. The data were taken with the H1 detector during the years of 1999 and 2000 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 51.5 pb{sup -1}. The measured cross sections are compared to fixed order NLO QCD predictions, that use diffractive parton densities which have previously been determined by a NLO QCD analysis of inclusive diffractive DIS at H1. The prediction and the data show significant differences. However, the dijet cross section is dominated by the diffractive gluon density, which can be extracted by the above mentioned analysis only with considerable uncertainty. Hence a combined QCD analysis of the previously published inclusive diffractive data and the dijet data is performed. This combined fit analysis allows the determination of diffractive quark and gluon densities with comparable precision. The common description of inclusive diffractive data and the dijet data confirms QCD factorization. (orig.)

  3. Cross section measurements of the elastic electron - deuteron scattering at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, Yvonne [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of light nuclei provide a sensitive test of our understanding of nuclei. Because the deuteron has spin one, three form factors are needed to fully describe the electromagnetic structure of the deuteron. Especially the deuteron charge radius is a favourite observable to compare experiment and calculation. Recently, an extensive measurement campaign has been performed at MAMI (Mainzer Microtron) to determine the deuteron charge radius using elastic electron scattering - with the aim to halve the error compared to previous such experiments. The experiment took place at the 3-spectrometer facility of the A1-collaboration. Cross section measurements of the elastic electron-deuteron scattering have been performed for 180 different kinematic settings in the low momentum transfer region. From these, the charge form factor can precisely be determined. Fitting the form factor with an appropiate fit function, the radius can then be determined from the slope at zero momentum transfer. The determined radius could then be used as a counterweight to the value obtained from the advanced atomic Lamb shift measurements, thus providing additional insight to the proton radius puzzle.

  4. Characterization of solar cell materials by Proton Back Scattering Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joynal Abedin, M.; Fazlul Hoque, A.K.M.; Firoz Hasan, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    The need for accurate chemical characterization of samples specially related to electronic and solar cell materials has assumed increasing importance in recent years. The importance of the study of the surfaces of materials of different origin also increased in recent years to a great extent. This need has created a worldwide spurt to develop rapid, accurate and sensitive tools for the characterization of materials. In recent years the proton backscattering spectrometry (PBS) method has been recognized as one of the useful analytical tool in several applications of material analysis and technology. The lack of information of the relevant scattering cross sections as a function of proton energy and the problems arising in conventional data analysis have so far rendered proton backscattering analysis of multielemental samples difficult at low energies. On the other hand advances in the computer evaluation of experimental data have, however, made it possible to utilize low-MeV protons as a sensitive probe for light elements in the μm range. The benefits of the method in comparison to alpha particle backscattering include the relatively higher non-Rutherford scattering cross sections of the light elements and to the lower proton stopping in the target material. These lead to higher sensitivity in detecting and profiling light elements in heavy targets and to significantly larger accessible depths and smaller straggling than with alpha particles. Research works on the development of methodologies of Proton Backscattering Spectrometry (PBS) for the analysis of thin films and surfaces has been in progress in the 3 MeV Van de Graaff Accelerator facilities of Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka for some years. The PBS system comprises a target chamber with appropriate sample holders and a Surface Barrier Detector (SBD) with the associated electronics for data acquisition and reduction. For the evaluation of the PBS data RBS Universal Master Package, RUMP has been installed in the

  5. Inclusive-jet and dijet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2006-08-15

    Inclusive-jet and dijet differential cross sections have been measured in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering for exchanged boson virtualities Q{sup 2}>125 GeV{sup 2} with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb{sup -1}. Jets were identified in the Breit frame using the k{sub T} cluster algorithm. Jet cross sections are presented as functions of several kinematic and jet variables. The results are also presented in different regions of Q{sup 2}. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations describe the measurements well. Regions of phase space where the theoretical uncertainties are small have been identified. Measurements in these regions have the potential to constrain the gluon density in the proton when used as inputs to global fits of the proton parton distribution functions. (orig.)

  6. Inclusive-jet and dijet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2006-08-01

    Inclusive-jet and dijet differential cross sections have been measured in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering for exchanged boson virtualities Q 2 >125 GeV 2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb -1 . Jets were identified in the Breit frame using the k T cluster algorithm. Jet cross sections are presented as functions of several kinematic and jet variables. The results are also presented in different regions of Q 2 . Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations describe the measurements well. Regions of phase space where the theoretical uncertainties are small have been identified. Measurements in these regions have the potential to constrain the gluon density in the proton when used as inputs to global fits of the proton parton distribution functions. (orig.)

  7. Inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences; Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Cracow Univ. of Technology (Poland). Faculty of Physics, Mathematics and Applied Computer Science; Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-10-15

    Single- and double-differential inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 374 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed at large values of the photon virtuality, Q{sup 2}, between 125 and 20 000 GeV{sup 2}. The jets were reconstructed with the k{sub T} cluster algorithm in the Breit reference frame and selected by requiring their transverse energies in the Breit frame, E{sup jet}{sub T,B}, to be larger than 8 GeV. In addition, the invariant mass of the dijet system, M{sub jj}, was required to be greater than 20 GeV. The cross sections are described by the predictions of next-to-leading-order QCD. (orig.)

  8. Electron scattering from tetrahydrofuran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M C; Sanz, A G; García, G; Muñoz, A; Oller, J C; Blanco, F; Do, T P T; Brunger, M J; Almeida, D; Limão-Vieira, P

    2012-01-01

    Electron scattering from Tetrahydrofuran (C 4 H 8 O) was investigated over a wide range of energies. Following a mixed experimental and theoretical approach, total scattering, elastic scattering and ionization cross sections as well as electron energy loss distributions were obtained.

  9. Pion deuteron scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.M.

    1978-09-01

    A comparison is made of results of calculations of πd elastic scattering cross section using multiple scattering and three-body equations, in relation to their ability to reproduce the experimental data at intermediate energies. It is shown that the two methods of theoretical calculation give quite similar curves for the elastic differential cross sections, and that both fail in reproducing backward scattering data above 200MeV. The new accurate experimental data on πd total cross section as a function of the energy are confronted with the theoretical values obtained from the multiple scattering calculation through the optical theorem. Comparison is made between the values of the real part of the forward amplitude evaluated using dispersion relations and using the multiple scattering method [pt

  10. Experimental study of the fusion dynamics of 32,34S + 197Au with quasi-elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, T.J.; Dasgupta, M.; Timmers, H.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The fusion dynamics of heavy systems, such as 64 Ni + 208 Pb, leading to the synthesis of super-heavy elements is presently not fully understood. Typical beam energies in such reactions are of the order or smaller than the Coulomb barrier height to minimize the excitation energy of the compound system and increase the survival probability of evaporation residues. It is known that at such energies the relative motion of projectile and target couples to internal degrees of freedom of the system, such as collective motion and particle transfer. This can give rise to a distribution of fusion barriers, which generally leads to an enhancement of the fusion cross-section below the Coulomb barrier. The important role of the individual degrees of freedom can be identified by extracting representations of the barrier distribution from fusion excitation functions. Complementary representations can be obtained from measurements of the quasi-elastic or elastic scattering excitation functions at backward angles. The sensitivity of the representations from scattering is limited to the lower energy part of the barrier distribution, which, however, may contain important signatures of positive Q-value neutron transfer channels. Neutron transfer may be a precursor of neutron flow and neck-formation, which are considered in macroscopic models of the fusion of heavy systems. In order to study the influence of neutron transfer in heavy fusion reactions, quasielastic scattering has been measured for 32 , 34 S + 197 Au at energies spanning the Coulomb barrier. The quasi-elastic yield, including inelastic and transfer reactions, was detected at 165 deg with a Si-surface barrier detector. The excitation functions have been normalized to Rutherford scattering, detected at 30 deg using an existing gas ionisation detector. Representations of the barrier distributions have been extracted and are compared with earlier measurements for 32 S + 208 Pb

  11. Scattering Properties of Ground-State 23Na Vapor Using Generalized Scattering Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harazneh, A. A.; Sandouqa, A. S.; Joudeh, B. R.; Ghassib, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    The scattering properties of ground-state 23Na vapor are investigated within the framework of the Galitskii-Migdal-Feynman formalism. Viewed as a generalized scattering theory, this formalism is used to calculate the medium phase shifts. The scattering properties of the system—the total, viscosity, spin-exchange, and average cross sections—are then computed using these phase shifts according to standard recipes. The total cross section is found to exhibit the Ramsauer-Townsend effect as well as resonance peaks. These peaks are caused by the large difference between the potentials for electronic spin-singlet and spin-triplet states. They represent quasi-bound states in the system. The results obtained for the complex spin-exchange cross sections are particularly highlighted because of their importance in the spectroscopy of the Na2 dimer. So are the results for the scattering lengths pertaining to both singlet and triplet states. Wherever possible, comparison is made with other published results.

  12. Measurement of the cross section for diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Yerevan (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    The cross section for the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process ep{yields}eXp is measured, with the leading final state proton detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The data sample covers the range x{sub P}<0.1 in fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss, 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4cross section is measured four-fold differentially in t,x{sub P},Q {sup 2} and {beta}=x/x{sub P}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The t and x{sub P} dependences are interpreted in terms of an effective pomeron trajectory and a sub-leading exchange. The data are compared with perturbative QCD predictions at next-to-leading order based on diffractive parton distribution functions previously extracted from complementary measurements of inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The ratio of the diffractive to the inclusive ep cross section is studied as a function of Q{sup 2},{beta} and x{sub P}. (orig.)

  13. How strong is the strong interaction? The πNN coupling constant and the shape and normalization of np scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.; Olsson, N.; Rahm, J.

    2000-01-01

    The world data base on np scattering differential cross section data from 100 to 1000 MeV incident neutron energy has been reviewed. In addition, the status of the np total cross section and the pp → dπ + total cross section is discussed, as these have frequently been used to normalize np scattering data. It appears that the shapes of the largest np data sets tend to fall into two groups, with different steepness at backward angles. Also, it seems as the two major techniques for normalizing data yield incompatible results. Both these effects have consequences when using np data to determine the pion-nucleon coupling constant, g 2 πNN , which is currently under debate. (orig.)

  14. Hybrid pulse pile-up rejection system as applied to Rutherford backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boie, R.A.; Wildnauer, K.R.

    1977-01-01

    The problems of pulse on pulse pile-up and noise limited pile-up rejectors are considered in detail for Rutherford backscattering spectra. The forms of these spectra allow the distortions from pile-up and the residual pile-up after rejection to be understood via a simple model. Extended calculations allow us to predict the effects quite accurately. A new pile-up rejection system is described. The ''linear'' rejection method is implemented with peak stretchers and advantageously combined with an event counting rejector to provide a versatile high performance system

  15. Scattering kernels and cross sections working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.; MacFarlane, B.; Brun, T.

    1998-01-01

    Topics addressed by this working group are: (1) immediate needs of the cold-moderator community and how to fill them; (2) synthetic scattering kernels; (3) very simple synthetic scattering functions; (4) measurements of interest; and (5) general issues. Brief summaries are given for each of these topics

  16. FAIR-DDX, Double Diffusion Cross-Sections Scattering Matrix Generated from ENDF/B-4 or JENDL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Kazuyoshi; Yamano, Naoki

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: FAIR-DDX produces double differential (energy and angle) cross sections (DDX) in the form of group-to-group scattering matrices using the evaluated nuclear data libraries JENDL-2 or ENDF/B-IV. The DDX form is useful for verification of the evaluated data, such as the inelastic scattering, through comparison with the experimental DDX values. 2 - Method of solution: DDX uses the file 4 data (angular distribution of secondary neutrons) and the energy and momentum conservation laws. For continuum region reactions, file 5 (energy spectrum of secondary neutrons) is used. To express the angular distribution of secondary neutrons in group-to-group scattering matrices FAIR-DDX adopts a direct angular representation method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of energy groups is 200

  17. Multiphoton effects in electron-ion scattering: A limitation of the cross-section treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Silva, H.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Braga, L.C.

    1991-07-01

    The differential cross-section for inelastic scattering in the presence of an intense laser field, when applied to the calculation of energy balance and heating by multiphoton process, is a problem which is not completely solved yet. One of the main difficulties is the calculation of the absorption coefficients α-bar for a monoenergetic beam of electrons scattered by a static potential. There are contradictory results shown by different authors. Here we have derived α-bar starting under the framework of quantum mechanics and then making the classical correspondence (h/2π → 0) according to the kinetic theory, and show that the absorption coefficient is always positive for all values of the particle incoming velocity, v-vector i . Furthermore, we show that in the calculation of α-bar we recover the Coulomb logarithm term. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Rutherford X-ray spectrometer readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.

    1978-07-01

    Rutherford electronic X-ray spectrometer readout is based on the combination of two established techniques (a) the detection and location of soft X-rays by means of multichannel electron multiplier arrays (MCP's), and (b) the electronic readout of charge distributions (generally in multi-wire proportional counters) by means of the delay line techniques. In order for the latter device to function well a charge signal of approximately 10 6 electrons must be available to the delay line wand. This is achieved in the present device by means of two cascaded MCP's which can produce electron gains up to approximately 10 8 , and so operate the delay line from the single electron pulses generated at the front face of an MCP by a soft X-ray. The delay line readout technique was chosen because of its simplicity (both in terms of the necessary hardware and the associated electronics), robustness, and ease of implementation. In order to achieve the target spatial resolution of 50 μm (fwhm) or 20 μm (standard deviation) it was necessary to adapt the charge collection system so that the readout takes place from a length of delay line 200 mm long. The general layout of the system and the functions of the electronic circuits are described. Performance testing, setting up procedures and trouble shooting of the system are discussed. (U.K.)

  19. Measurement of the inelastic neutron scattering cross section of 56Fe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolte R.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available At the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf the neutron time-of-flight facility nELBE has become operational. Fast neutrons in the energy range from 200 keV to 10 MeV are produced by the pulsed electron beam from ELBE impinging on a liquid lead circuit as a radiator. The short beam pulses of 10 ps provide the basis for an excellent time resolution for neutron time-of-flight experiments, giving an energy resolution of about <1% at 1 MeV with a short flight path of 5 m. By means of a “double-time-of-flight” setup the (n,nâγ cross section to the first excited state of 56Fe has been measured over the whole energy range without knowledge about cross sections of higher-lying levels. Plastic scintillators were used to detect the inelastically scattered neutron and BaF2 detectors to detect the correlated γ-ray.

  20. Rosetta Mission: Electron Scattering Cross Sections—Data Needs and Coverage in BEAMDB Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratislav P. Marinković

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The emission of [O I] lines in the coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta mission have been explained by electron impact dissociation of water rather than the process of photodissociation. This is the direct evidence for the role of electron induced processing has been seen on such a body. Analysis of other emission features is handicapped by a lack of detailed knowledge of electron impact cross sections which highlights the need for a broad range of electron scattering data from the molecular systems detected on the comet. In this paper, we present an overview of the needs for electron scattering data relevant for the understanding of observations in coma, the tenuous atmosphere and on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta mission. The relevant observations for elucidating the role of electrons come from optical spectra, particle analysis using the ion and electron sensors and mass spectrometry measurements. To model these processes electron impact data should be collated and reviewed in an electron scattering database and an example is given in the BEAMD, which is a part of a larger consortium of Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre—VAMDC.

  1. Measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section at low Q{sup 2} and x at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev (P.N.) Physical Inst., Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2009-02-15

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV{sup 2}{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}12 GeV{sup 2}, and low Bjorken x, 5.10{sup -6}cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q{sup 2} and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  2. Methodology for obtaining a solution for the three-dimensional Boltzmann transport equation and an expression for the calculation of the total doses considering Compton scattering simulated by Klein-Nishina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Barbara A.; Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio

    2005-01-01

    In this work we would like to obtain a formulation of an analytic method for the solution of the three dimensional transport equation considering Compton scattering and an expression for total doses due to gamma radiation, where the deposited energy by the free electron will be considered. For that, we will work with two equations: the first one for the photon transport, considering the Klein-Nishina kernel and energy multigroup model, and the second one considering the free electron with the screened Rutherford scattering. (author)

  3. Conversion and improvement of the Rutherford Laboratory's magnetostatic computer code GFUN3D to the NMFECC CDC 7600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, T.C.

    1980-06-01

    The implementation of a version of the Rutherford Laboratory's magnetostatic computer code GFUN3D on the CDC 7600 at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center is reported. A new iteration technique that greatly increases the probability of convergence and reduces computation time by about 30% for calculations with nonlinear, ferromagnetic materials is included. The use of GFUN3D on the NMFE network is discussed, and suggestions for future work are presented. Appendix A consists of revisions to the GFUN3D User Guide (published by Rutherford Laboratory( that are necessary to use this version. Appendix B contains input and output for some sample calculations. Appendix C is a detailed discussion of the old and new iteration techniques

  4. Strand critical current degradation in $Nb_{3}$ Sn Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Barzi, E; Higley, H C; Scanlan, R M; Yamada, R; Zlobin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Fermilab is developing 11 Tesla superconducting accelerator magnets based on Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor. Multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn strands produced using the modified jelly roll, internal tin, and powder-in-tube technologies were used for the development and test of the prototype cable. To optimize the cable geometry with respect to the critical current, short samples of Rutherford cable with packing factors in the 85 to 95% range were fabricated and studied. In this paper, the results of measurements of critical current, n-value and RRR made on the round virgin strands and on the strands extracted from the cable samples are presented. (5 refs).

  5. Differential and integral electron scattering cross sections from tetrahydrofuran (THF) over a wide energy range: 1-10.000 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Sanz, A.G.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M.J.; Garcia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahydrofuran (THF, C 4 H 8 O) has a molecular structure that is similar to the ribose in the DNA backbone and is used as a surrogate of ribose to get electron scattering cross sections. Total, integral inelastic and integral and differential elastic cross sections have been calculated with the screening-corrected additivity rule (SCAR) method based on the independent atom model (IAM) for electron scattering from THF. Since the permanent dipole moment of THF enhances rotational excitation particularly at low energies and for small angles, an estimate of the rotational excitation cross section was also computed by assuming the interaction with a free electric dipole as an independent, additional process. Our theoretical results compare very favourably to the existing experimental data. Finally, a self-consistent set of integral and differential interaction cross-sections for the incident energy range 1 eV - 10 keV is established for use in our low energy particle track simulation (LEPTS). All cross section data are supplied numerically in tabulated form. (authors)

  6. The importance of fast neutron scattering cross sections for neutron dosimetry in soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahr, R.; Brede, H.J.

    1979-05-01

    Tissue equivalent plastic materials are used for the construction of accurate neutron dosemeters. As compared to real tissue, in materials most of the oxygen content is replaced by carbon. In order to determine the dose to human tissue a kerma correction factor has to be used. It is shown that the uncertainty (corresponding to 1 delta) of the correction factor at E = 14.5 MeV amounts to at least 5.2%. An important contribution to the uncertainties results from the lack of experimental data of the 12 C(n, n' 3α), 16 O(n,n'p) and 16 O(n,n'α)-cross-sections. These data are to be calculated by subtracting all other cross sections from the total cross section of ( 16 O + n) and ( 12 C + n). It is shown that the uncertainties of the kerma correction factor can be considerably reduced by an accurate measurement of the scattering cross sections of carbon and oxygen. (orig.) [de

  7. Hauser-Feshbach cross-section calculations for elastic and inelastic scattering of alpha particles-program CORA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, A.; Siemaszko, M.; Zipper, W.

    1975-01-01

    The program CORA was prepared on the basis of Hauser and Feshbach compound reaction formalism. It allows the differential cross-section distributions for the elastic and inelastic scattering of alpha particles (via compound nucleus state) to be calculated. The transmission coefficients are calculated on the basis of a four parameter optical model. The search procedure is also included. (author)

  8. Silicon-depth profiling with Rutherford backscattering in photoresist layers; a study on the effects of degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzendoorn, van L.J.; Schellekens, J.P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of a silicon-containing vapor with a photoresist layer, as used in some dry developable lithographic processes, was studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Degradation of the polymer layer under ion beam irradiation was observed, but it was found that this had no influence

  9. Low-energy scattering data for oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, S.; Plompen, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    A survey of literature data of the scattering lengths of oxygen is performed, and these values are compared to low-energy precise total cross-section data. To check the quality of the data and the correctness of the relation between coherent scattering lengths and low-energy total cross-sections the situation is examined first for carbon. A value and uncertainty for the coherent scattering length of oxygen is recommended for use in future evaluations of 16 O. This coherent scattering length is fully consistent with the high-precision, low-energy total cross-section data. The consistency requires the use of a larger uncertainty than claimed in the most accurate cross-section papers. This larger uncertainty is nevertheless very small and well within the requirements of applications of this cross-section. The recommended value is b c ( 16 O) = 5.816±0.015 fm and the associated total cross-section for the neutron-energy range 0.5 to 2 000 eV is 3.765±0.025 b. The stated uncertainties are one standard deviation total uncertainty. (authors)

  10. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} charged current cross sections in e{sup +}p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautenberg, J

    2004-06-01

    Cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured in e{sup +}p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the running periods 1999 and 2000 correspond to an integrated luminosity of 61 pb{sup -1}. Single differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy have been measured for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}, as well as the double differential reduced cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} in the kinematic range 280 GeV{sup 2}scattering cross sections. The helicity structure is investigated in particular. The mass of the space-like W boson propagator has been determined from a fit to d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}. (orig.)

  11. Inelastic magnon scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert de Mello Koch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the worldsheet S-matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS5×S5. The D-brane is either a giant graviton or a dual giant graviton. In the gauge theory, the operators we consider belong to the su(2|3 sector of the theory. Magnon excitations of open strings can exhibit both elastic (when magnons in the bulk of the string scatter and inelastic (when magnons at the endpoint of an open string participate scattering. Both of these S-matrices are determined (up to an overall phase by the su(2|22 global symmetry of the theory. In this note we study the S-matrix for inelastic scattering. We show that it exhibits poles corresponding to boundstates of bulk and boundary magnons. A crossing equation is derived for the overall phase. It reproduces the crossing equation for maximal giant gravitons, in the appropriate limit. Finally, scattering in the su(2 sector is computed to two loops. This two loop result, which determines the overall phase to two loops, will be useful when a unique solution to the crossing equation is to be selected.

  12. Electron scattering cross sections for SF6 and SF5CF3 at intermediate and high energies (100-10000 eV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limao-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; Oller, J.C.; Munoz, A.; Perez, J.M.; Vinodkumar, M.; Garcia, G.; Mason, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    A modified experimental apparatus with improved angular resolution and stability has been used to measure the total electron scattering cross sections for SF 6 and SF 5 CF 3 in the energy range of 100-5000 eV. A detailed analysis of the experimental error sources is provided. The experimental results are compared with integral elastic and inelastic cross sections calculated using the independent atom model approximation and a modified single-center additivity rule for electron energies ranging from 1 to 10,000 eV. The accuracy of these approximations method is discussed through a comparison with the experimental results. Previous cross-sectional data for SF 6 are compared with the present theoretical and experimental results. For SF 5 CF 3 , we present the first electron scattering cross-sectional data for the 100-10,000 eV energy range, as well as the first empirical determination of the molecular polarizability

  13. Magnetization anomaly of Nb3Al strands and instability of Nb3Al Rutherford cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Ryuji; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Wake, Masayoshi

    2006-01-01

    Using a Cu stabilized Nb 3 Al strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb 3 Al Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb 3 Al strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large magnetization behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B c2 ∼ 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the magnetization data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this magnetization anomaly, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb 3 Al Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect

  14. Differential cross section for neutron scattering from 209Bi at 37 MeV and the weak particle-core coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zuying; Ruan Xichao; Du Yanfeng; Qi Bujia; Tang Hongqing; Xia Haihong; Walter, R. L.; Braun, R. T.; Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W.; Weisel, G. J.; Dupuis, M.; Delaroche, J. P.; Chen Zemin; Chen Zhenpeng; Chen Yingtang

    2010-01-01

    Differential scattering cross-section data have been measured at 43 angles from 11 deg. to 160 deg. for 37-MeV neutrons incident on 209 Bi. The primary motivation for the measurements is to address the scarcity of neutron scattering data above 30 MeV and to improve the accuracy of optical-model predictions at medium neutron energies. The high-statistics measurements were conducted at the China Institute of Atomic Energy using the 3 H(d,n) 4 He reaction as the neutron source, a pulsed deuteron beam, and time-of-flight (TOF) techniques. Within the resolution of the TOF spectrometer, the measurements included inelastic scattering components. The sum of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections was computed in joint optical-model and distorted-wave Born approximation calculations under the assumption of the weak particle-core coupling. The results challenge predictions from well-established spherical optical potentials. Good agreement between data and calculations is achieved at 37 MeV provided that the balance between surface and volume absorption in a recent successful model [A. J. Koning and J. P. Delaroche, Nucl. Phys. A 713, 231 (2003)] is modified, thus suggesting the need for global optical-model improvements at medium neutron energies.

  15. Using 3.05 MeV resonance for determination of oxygen impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkova, I.E.; Polyanskij, V.N.; Yatis, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The method of determining oxygen impurities behind thin films using the isolated resonance in the 16 O(α, α) 16 O reaction at E=3.048 MeV with the width GITA approximately 20 keV, is considered. Cross section in resonance is σsUb(R) = 0.95 b apd it increases cross section of Rutherford scattering by the factor of 25. The conclusion is made on the possibility of using 3.048 MeV resonance when investigating Me-Si film structures

  16. Measurement of jet production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Vazdik, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Bolz, A.; Huber, F.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Boudry, V.; Specka, A.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Haidt, D.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Buniatyan, A.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Avila, K.B.C.; Contreras, J.G.; Cerny, K.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R.; Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lobodzinski, B.; Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M.; Egli, S.; Horisberger, R.; Ozerov, D.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van; Feltesse, J.; Schoeffel, L.; Ferencei, J.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Petrukhin, A.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Spaskov, V.; Kogler, R.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Perez, E.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Wegener, D.

    2017-01-01

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities 5.5 < Q"2 < 80 GeV"2 and inelasticities 0.2 < y < 0.6 is presented, using data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 290 pb"-"1. Double-differential inclusive jet, dijet and trijet cross sections are measured simultaneously and are presented as a function of jet transverse momentum observables and as a function of Q"2. Jet cross sections normalised to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section in the respective Q"2-interval are also determined. Previous results of inclusive jet cross sections in the range 150 < Q"2 < 15,000 GeV"2 are extended to low transverse jet momenta 5 < P_T"j"e"t < 7 GeV. The data are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling, in approximate next-to-next-to-leading order and in full next-to-next-to-leading order. Using also the recently published H1 jet data at high values of Q"2, the strong coupling constant α_s(M_Z) is determined in next-to-leading order. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of jet production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bolz, A.; Huber, F.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Brandt, G. [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Haidt, D.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Buniatyan, A.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bylinkin, A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Avila, K.B.C.; Contreras, J.G. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Cerny, K.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lobodzinski, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Fachbereich C, Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Vallee, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (France); Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Egli, S.; Horisberger, R.; Ozerov, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); Feltesse, J.; Schoeffel, L. [Irfu/SPP, CE Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the CAS, Rez (Czech Republic); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Gouzevitch, M.; Petrukhin, A. [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Grab, C. [Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Jung, H. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kogler, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, London (United Kingdom); Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Perez, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Polifka, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Toronto, ON (CA); Radescu, V. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (GB); Rostovtsev, A. [Institute for Information Transmission Problems RAS, Moscow (RU); Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire (GB); Sauvan, E. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (FR); Universite de Savoie, LAPP, Annecy-le-Vieux (FR); Shushkevich, S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (RU); Soloviev, Y. [DESY, Hamburg (DE); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU); Stella, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre (IT); INFN Roma 3, Rome (IT); Sykora, T. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (BE); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (CZ); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (BG); Tseepeldorj, B. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (MN); Ulaanbaatar University, Ulaanbaatar (MN); Wegener, D. [Institut fuer Physik, TU Dortmund, Dortmund (DE); Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2017-04-15

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities 5.5 < Q{sup 2} < 80 GeV{sup 2} and inelasticities 0.2 < y < 0.6 is presented, using data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 290 pb{sup -1}. Double-differential inclusive jet, dijet and trijet cross sections are measured simultaneously and are presented as a function of jet transverse momentum observables and as a function of Q{sup 2}. Jet cross sections normalised to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section in the respective Q{sup 2}-interval are also determined. Previous results of inclusive jet cross sections in the range 150 < Q{sup 2} < 15,000 GeV{sup 2} are extended to low transverse jet momenta 5 < P{sub T}{sup jet} < 7 GeV. The data are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling, in approximate next-to-next-to-leading order and in full next-to-next-to-leading order. Using also the recently published H1 jet data at high values of Q{sup 2}, the strong coupling constant α{sub s}(M{sub Z}) is determined in next-to-leading order. (orig.)

  18. Revision of the inelastic scattering cross section evaluation of 238U for CENDL-2.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Guoyou; Zhang Guohui; Shi Zhaomin; Chen Jinxiang

    1995-11-01

    Revised evaluated data for the inelastic neutron scattering cross-section and the secondary neutron spectrum are presented for U-238 in graphical form, compared with the earlier data that exist in the evaluated nuclear data libraries ENDF/B-6 and JENDL-3. The new data will be included in the Chinese evaluated nuclear data library CENDL-2.1. (author). 14 refs, 9 figs

  19. Comparison of inelastic electron and positron scattering cross sections on 12C and 27Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, S.; Heimlich, F.H.; Huber, G.; Roessle, E.; Koebberling, M.; Moritz, J.; Schmidt, K.H.; Wegener, D.; Zeller, D.; Bleckwenn, J.

    1977-06-01

    The +/- ratio R of the cross sections for inelastic positron and electron scattering on 12 C and 27 Al has been measured for four momentum transfers (0.08 - 0.45) GeV 2 /c 2 of the virtual photon and invariant masses 0.95 GeV +- 0.0007), no q 2 respectively W dependence of the ratio is observed. (orig.) [de

  20. Inclusive diffractive cross sections in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sola, Valentina

    2012-04-01

    Diffractive deep-inelastic scattering events in ep collisions at HERA are the subject of this thesis. The cross sections for inclusive diffraction, ep → eXp, measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations were combined, providing a model-independent check of the data consistency and a cross calibration between the two experiments, and resulting in single data sets with improved accuracy and precision. Two sets of combined results were obtained. The cross sections measured using the proton-spectrometer data were combined, both in the range of t, the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex, common to the two experiments (0.09 2 ) and in the extended t-range vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 . The resulting cross sections cover the region 2.5≤ Q 2 ≤200 GeV 2 in photon virtualities, 0.0003≤x P ≤0.09 in the proton fractional momentum losses and 0.0018≤ β ≤0.816 in β=x/x P , where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The cross sections obtained from data with the large rapidity gap signature were also combined in the kinematic range 2.5≤ Q 2 ≤1600 GeV 2 , 0.0003≤x P ≤0.03 and 0.0017≤ β ≤0.8, for masses of the hadronic final state M X >4 GeV. The inclusive diffractive reduced cross section σ r D(3) was measured with data collected by the ZEUS detector, at two different centre-of-mass energies, 318 and 225 GeV. The diffractive data were selected with the large rapidity gap method in the kinematic region 20 2 2 , 0.05 P or similar 0.55), the inelasticity of the interaction.

  1. Measurement of the diffractive cross section in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-02-01

    Diffractive scattering of γ*p→X+N, where N is either a proton or a nucleonic system with M N X of the system X up to 15 GeV at average Q 2 values of 14 and 31 GeV 2 . The diffractive cross section dσ diff /dM X is, within errors, found to rise linearly with W. Parameterizing the W dependence by the form dσ diff /dM X ∝(W 2 )sup((2 anti α IP -2)) the DIS data yield for the pomeron trajectory anti α IP =1.23±0.02(stat)±0.04(syst) averaged over t in the measured kinematic range assuming the longitudinal photon contribution to be zero. This value for the pomeron trajectory is substantially larger than anti α IP extracted from soft interactions. The value of anti α IP measured in this analysis suggests that a substantial part of the diffractive DIS cross section originates form processes which can be described by perturbative QCD. From the measured diffractive cross sections the diffractive structure function of the proton F 2 D(3) (β, Q 2 , x IP ) has been determined, where β is the momentum fraction of the struck quark in the pomeron. The form F 2 D(3) =constant. (1/x IP ) a gives a good fit to the data in all β and Q 2 intervals with a=1.46±0.04(stat)±0.08(syst). (orig.)

  2. Rutherford backscattering investigation of the corrosion of borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.; Naramoto, H.; White, C.W.

    1981-10-01

    The RBS spectra from Frit 21 borosilicate glasses doped with 5 wt % UO 2 , SrO, or Cs 2 O show that: during the initial stages of leaching (0 to 3 h) there is a substantial (300 to 500%) enhancement in the concentration of U, Sr, Ca, and Ti in the outer surface layer and that this enhancement is accompanied by a large depletion of Na, Si, and Cs; and upon further leaching under static conditions (24 h) the leached surface layer composition is indistinguishable from the unleached surface. Other borosilicate glasses such as PNL 76-68 may eventually show the same behavior if the final equilibrium pH value is greater than 9. The technique of Rutherford backscattering depth profile analysis can be a powerful tool for investigating the initial stages of glass corrosion

  3. Scattering of polarized electrons from polarized targets: Coincidence reactions and prescriptions for polarized half-off-shell single-nucleon cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, J.A.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Donnelly, T.W.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Poulis, G.I.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA

    1993-01-01

    Coincidence reactions of the type vector A( vector e, e'N)B involving the scattering of polarized electrons from polarized targets are discussed within the context of the plane-wave impulse approximation. Prescriptions are developed for polarized half-off single-nucleon cross sections; the different prescriptions are compared for typical quasi-free kinematics. Illustrative results are presented for coincidence polarized electron scattering from typical polarized nuclei. (orig.)

  4. Elastic scattering of protons at the nucleus 6He in the Glauber multiple scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prmantayeva, B.A.; Temerbayev, A.A.; Tleulessova, I.K.; Ibrayeva, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    Calculation is submitted for the differential cross sections of elastic p 6 He-scattering at energies of 70 and 700 MeV/nucleon within the framework of the Glauber theory of multiple diffraction scattering. We used the three-particle wave functions: α-n-n with realistic intercluster potentials. The sensitivity of elastic scattering to the proton-nuclear interaction and the structure of nuclei had been investigated. It is shown that the contribution of small components of the wave function as well as the multiplicity of the scattering operator Ω should be considered to describe a cross-section in broad angular range . A comparison with available experimental data was made. (author)

  5. Cross section of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2005-01-01

    The pictures show a cross section of the CMS solenoid. One can see four layers of the superconducting coil, each of which contains the superconductor (central part, copper coloured - niobium-titanium strands in a copper coating, made into a "Rutherford cable"), surrounded by an ultra-pure aluminium as a magnetic stabilizer, then an aluminium alloy as a mechanical stabilizer. Besides the four layers there is an aluminium mechanical piece that includes pipes that transport the liquid helium.

  6. Photon scattering by the giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, T.J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; McKeown, R.D.; Specht, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although many features of the giant dipole resonance are well known, the coupling between the basic dipole oscillation and other nuclear collective degrees of freedom such as surface vibrations and rotations is poorly understood. This aspect was investigated by elastic and inelastic bremsstrahlung scattering of tagged photons over the energy range 15 to 22 MeV. Target nuclei were 60 Ni, 52 Cr, 56 Fe, 92 Mo, and 96 Mo. Scattering and absorption cross sections are tabulated, along with parameters obtained from a two-Lorentzian analysis of the scattering cross sections; measured spectra are shown. It was necessary to remove Thomson scattering from the experimental results. It was found that coupling to surface vibrations in the giant dipole resonance is much weaker than the dynamic collective model suggests. The elastic scattering cross section for all targets but 60 Ni showed structure that is not evident in the absorption cross section measurement. 12 figures, 2 tables

  7. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e - p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb -1 collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy are presented for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 . The double-differential cross-section d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 is presented in the kinematic range 280 2 and 0.015< x<0.65. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  8. Scattering of acoustic waves by small crustaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, I. B.; Tarasov, L. L.

    2003-03-01

    Features of underwater sound scattering by small crustaceans are considered. The scattering data are obtained with the use of unique instrumentation that allows one to measure quantitative scattering characteristics (backscattering cross sections and angular scattering patterns) for crustaceans of different sizes, at different frequencies (20 200 kHz) and different insonification aspects. A computational model of crustaceans is considered with allowance for both the soft tissues of the main massive part of the animal's body and the stiff armour. The model proves to be advantageous for explaining some scattering features observed in the experiments. The scattering cross sections of crustaceans measured by other researchers are presented in a unified form appropriate for comparison. Based on such a quantitative comparison, relatively simple approximate empirical formulas are proposed for estimating the backscattering cross sections of small (within several centimeters) marine crustaceans in a broad frequency range.

  9. A model and computer code for the Monte Carlo simulation of relativistic electron and positron penetration through matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Liljequist, D.

    1986-10-01

    In the present model, the treatment of elastic scattering is based on the similarity of multiple scattering processes with equal transport mean free path /LAMBDA/sub(tr). Elastic scattering events are separated by an artificially enlarged mean free path. In such events, scattering is optionally performed either by means of a single, energy-dependent scattering angle, or by means of a scattering angle distribution of the same form as the screened Rutherford cross section, but with an artificial screening factor. The physically correct /LAMBDA/sub(tr) value is obtained by appropriate choice of scattering angle or screening factor, respectively. We find good agreement with experimental transmission and with energy loss distributions. The Rutherford-like model gives good agreement with experimental angular distribution even for the penetration of very thin layers. Treatment of electron energy loss is based on the partial CSDA method: energy losses W WMINSE are treated as discrete electron-electron or positron-electron scattering events. Similarly, for bremsstrahlung photon energies W WMINR are treated at discrete events. The sensitivity of the model to the parameters WMINSE and WMINR is studied. WMINR can, in practise, be made negligibly small, and WMINSE can without any excessive computer time be made as small as to give results in good agreement with experiment and with computations based on Landau theory of straggling. Using this model, we study some of the characteristic features of relativistic electron transmission, energy loss distributions, straggling, angular distributions and trajectories. (authors)

  10. Results in pion proton scattering near the higher resonances (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk-Vairant, P.; Valladas, G.

    1961-01-01

    We present briefly the available Information on the total cross sections for pion proton scattering in the energy region from 400 MeV to 1.5 GeV. We also have collected all results on total cross sections for particular channels like elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and charge exchange. Using new results on the total cross section for neutral events, we have plotted separately the cross section for elastic and for inelastic scattering in the T = 1/2 state. (authors) [fr

  11. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by a traversable wormhole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nasr Esfahani

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   Replacing the wormhole geometry with an equivalent medium using the perturbation theory of scattering and the Born approximation, we have calculated the differential scattering cross section of electromagnetic waves by a traversable wormhole. It is shown that scattering at long wavelenghts can essentially distinguish wormhole from ordinary scattering object. Some of the zeros of the scattering cross section are determined which can be used for estimating the radius of the throat of wormholes. The known result that in this kind of scattering the linear polarization remains unchanged is verified here.

  12. Simulation of the cabling process for Rutherford cables: An advanced finite element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, J.; Garlasche, M.; Bordini, B.; Dallocchio, A.

    2016-12-01

    In all existing large particle accelerators (Tevatron, HERA, RHIC, LHC) the main superconducting magnets are based on Rutherford cables, which are characterized by having: strands fully transposed with respect to the magnetic field, a significant compaction that assures a large engineering critical current density and a geometry that allows efficient winding of the coils. The Nb3Sn magnets developed in the framework of the HL-LHC project for improving the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are also based on Rutherford cables. Due to the characteristics of Nb3Sn wires, the cabling process has become a crucial step in the magnet manufacturing. During cabling the wires experience large plastic deformations that strongly modify the geometrical dimensions of the sub-elements constituting the superconducting strand. These deformations are particularly severe on the cable edges and can result in a significant reduction of the cable critical current as well as of the Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of the stabilizing copper. In order to understand the main parameters that rule the cabling process and their impact on the cable performance, CERN has developed a 3D Finite Element (FE) model based on the LS-Dyna® software that simulates the whole cabling process. In the paper the model is presented together with a comparison between experimental and numerical results for a copper cable produced at CERN.

  13. The establishment of the Blacknest seismological database on the Rutherford Laboratory system 360/195 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blamey, C.

    1977-01-01

    In order to assess the problems which might arise from monitoring a comprehensive test ban treaty by seismological methods, an experimental monitoring operation is being conducted. This work has involved the establishment of a database on the Rutherford Laboratory 360/195 system computer. The database can be accessed in the UK over the public telephone network and in the USA via ARPANET. (author)

  14. On measurement of cross sections for scattering of pμ - and d μ -atoms in hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    The paper is a brief review of all experiments on measurement of cross sections for scattering of pμ - atoms in hydrogen and dμ - atoms in hydrogen and deuterium. The experimental results are analysed and compared both with one another and with calculated results. A program for further investigation of scattering of muonic atoms of hydrogen isotopes is proposed in order to clarify the nature of discrepancies between some experimental results and to get more precise information about the above processes. (author.). 24 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. Scattering of thermal He beams by crossed atomic and molecular beams. I. Sensitivity of the elastic differential cross section to the interatomic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, M.; Kuppermann, A.

    1978-01-01

    The ability of diffraction oscillations in atomic beam scattering experiments to uniquely determine interatomic potentials for highly quantal systems is examined. Assumed but realistic potentials are used to generate, by scattering calculations and incorporation of random errors, differential cross sections which are then treated as if they were ''experimental'' data. From these, attempts are made to recover the initial potential by varying the parameters of assumed mathematical forms different from the original one, until a best fit to the ''experimental'' results is obtained. It is found that the region of the interaction potential around the van der Waals minimum is accurately determined by the ''measured'' differential cross sections over a range of interatomic separations significantly wider than would be expected classically. It is also found, for collision energies at which the weakly repulsive wall is appreciably sampled, that the SPF--Dunham and double Morse--van der Waals types of potentials lead to accurate determinations of the interatomic potential, whereas many other mathematical forms do not. Analytical parameterizations most appropriate for obtaining accurate interatomic potentials from thermal DCS experiments, for a given highly quantal system, may depend on the collision energy used

  16. Measurement of the cross-section of electron-positron scattering at high energy and quantum electrodynamics testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalanne, D.

    1970-01-01

    The experiment we have performed on the ACO (Orsay Collider Ring) is one of the most accurate tests of quantum electrodynamics over very short interaction distances (10 -14 cm). We have studied the electron-positron elastic scattering at very wide angle. This work is divided into 4 parts. The first part reviews recent tests of quantum electrodynamics and presents the electron-positron elastic scattering. The second part describes the measurement of brightness: the experimental device, data analysis and accuracy. The measurement of brightness has been performed by detecting the photons emitted in the double Bremsstrahlung reaction: e + e - → e + e - γγ. The third part deals with the measurement of the number of Bhabha events. The last part compares the experimental value of the Bhabha scattering with the theoretically expected value. We have got the following results: the number of Bhabha events: 757 events, the experimental value for Bhabha scattering cross-section: [1.97 ± 0.09 (stat.) ± 0.10 (syst.)]*10 -31 cm 2 . The comparison of this experimental value with the expected value has allowed us to set the lower limit of the cutting parameter Λ: Λ > 2 GeV

  17. Total cross sections for electron scattering by CO2 molecules in the energy range 400 endash 5000 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.; Manero, F.

    1996-01-01

    Total cross sections for electron scattering by CO 2 molecules in the energy range 400 endash 5000 eV have been measured with experimental errors of ∼3%. The present results have been compared with available experimental and theoretical data. The dependence of the total cross sections on electron energy shows an asymptotic behavior with increasing energies, in agreement with the Born-Bethe approximation. In addition, an analytical formula is provided to extrapolate total cross sections to higher energies. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory's Mark I Multiwire Proportional Counter positron camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.; Tappern, G.J.; Flesher, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    A small model of a proposed large aperture positron camera has been developed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Based on Multiwire Proportional Counter technology it uses lead foil cathodes which function simultaneously as converters for the 511 keV gamma rays and readout electrodes for a delay line readout system. The detectors have been built up into a portable imaging system complete with a dedicated computer for data taking, processing and display. A complete hardware system and sufficient software was provided to permit hospital based colleagues to generate useful images easily. A complete description of the system is given with performance figures and some of the images obtained are presented. (author)

  19. Differential and integral cross sections for the rotationally inelastic scattering of methyl radicals with H2 and D2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkáč, Ondřej; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Rusher, Cassandra A.; Greaves, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Comparisons are presented of experimental and theoretical studies of the rotationally inelastic scattering of CD 3 radicals with H 2 and D 2 collision partners at respective collision energies of 680 ± 75 and 640 ± 60 cm −1 . Close-coupling quantum-mechanical calculations performed using a newly constructed ab initio potential energy surface (PES) provide initial-to-final CD 3 rotational level (n, k → n′, k′) integral and differential cross sections (ICSs and DCSs). The DCSs are compared with crossed molecular beam and velocity map imaging measurements of angular scattering distributions, which serve as a critical test of the accuracy of the new PES. In general, there is very good agreement between the experimental measurements and the calculations. The DCSs for CD 3 scattering from both H 2 and D 2 peak in the forward hemisphere for n′ = 2–4 and shift more to sideways and backward scattering for n′ = 5. For n′ = 6–8, the DCSs are dominated by backward scattering. DCSs for a particular CD 3 n → n′ transition have a similar angular dependence with either D 2 or H 2 as collision partner. Any differences between DCSs or ICSs can be attributed to mass effects because the PES is unchanged for CD 3 −H 2 and CD 3 –D 2 collisions. Further comparisons are drawn between the CD 3 –D 2 scattering and results for CD 3 –He presented in our recent paper [O. Tkáč, A. G. Sage, S. J. Greaves, A. J. Orr-Ewing, P. J. Dagdigian, Q. Ma, and M. H. Alexander, Chem. Sci. 4, 4199 (2013)]. These systems have the same reduced mass, but are governed by different PESs

  20. Evaluation of scattering laws and cross sections for calculation of production and transport of cold and ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernnat, W.; Keinert, J.; Mattes, M.

    2004-01-01

    For the calculation of neutron spectra in cold and super thermal sources scattering laws for a variety of liquid and solid cyrogenic materials were evaluated and prepared for use in deterministic and Monte Carlo transport calculations. For moderator materials like liquid and solid H 2 O, liquid He, liquid D 2 O, liquid and solid H 2 and D 2 , solid CH 4 and structure materials such as Al, Bi, Pb, ZrHx, and graphite scattering law data and cross sections are available. The evaluated data were validated by comparison with measured cross sections and comparison of measured and calculated neutron spectra as far as available. Further applications are the calculation of production and transport and storing of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) in different UCN sources. The data structures of the evaluated data are prepared for the common S N -transport codes and the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of charged and neutral current e-p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-03-01

    Deep inelastic e - p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared, Q 2 , between 400 GeV 2 and the kinematic limit of 87500 GeV 2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections, dσ/dQ 2 , are presented. For Q 2 ∝M W 2 , where M W is the mass of the W boson, the CC and NC cross sections have comparable magnitudes, demonstrating the equal strengths of the weak and electromagnetic interactions at high Q 2 . The Q 2 dependence of the CC cross section determines the mass term in the CC propagator to be M W =76±16±13 GeV. (orig.)

  2. Combination of differential D*± cross-section measurements in deep-inelastc ep scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2015-03-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D *± -meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q 2 >5 GeV 2 , electron inelasticity 0.021.5 GeV and pseudorapidity vertical stroke η(D * ) vertical stroke <1.5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d 2 σ/dQ 2 dy are combined with earlier D *± data, extending the kinematic range down to Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 . Perturbative next-to-leadingorder QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  3. Complex Correlation Kohn-T Method of Calculating Total and Elastic Cross Sections. Part 1; Electron-Hydrogen Elastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on the first part of a study of electron-hydrogen scattering, using a method which allows for the ab initio calculation of total and elastic cross sections at higher energies. In its general form the method uses complex 'radial' correlation functions, in a (Kohn) T-matrix formalism. The titled method, abbreviated Complex Correlation Kohn T (CCKT) method, is reviewed, in the context of electron-hydrogen scattering, including the derivation of the equation for the (complex) scattering function, and the extraction of the scattering information from the latter. The calculation reported here is restricted to S-waves in the elastic region, where the correlation functions can be taken, without loss of generality, to be real. Phase shifts are calculated using Hylleraas-type correlation functions with up to 95 terms. Results are rigorous lower bounds; they are in general agreement with those of Schwartz, but they are more accurate and outside his error bounds at a couple of energies,

  4. Differential cross sections for carbon neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from 8.0 to 14.5 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haouat, G.; Lachkar, J.; Patin, Y.; Sigaud, J.; Cocu, F.

    1975-06-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic cross sections for fast neutrons scattered by carbon have been measured between 8.0 and 14.5 MeV. No experimental results on {sup 12}C seem to have been reported, at this time, between 9 and 14 MeV. A complete and consistent set of data on carbon, including total, elastic and inelastic, (n,α) and (n,n'3α) cross sections, is now available for energies below 14.5MeV.

  5. A critical comparison of electron scattering cross sections measured by single collision and swarm techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.J.; Brunger, M.J.

    1996-07-01

    Electron scattering cross sections (elastic, rotational and vibrational excitation) for a number of atomic and (relatively) single molecular systems are examined. Particular reference is made to the level of agreement which is obtained from the application of the completely different measurement philosophies embodied in 'beam' and 'swarm' techniques. The range of energies considered is generally restricted to the region below 5 eV. 142 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  6. Flares: solar and stellar. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory workshop on astronomy and astrophysics, Abingdon, 19-21 May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, P.M.

    1986-05-01

    The paper concerns solar and stellar flare phenomena reported at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Workshop on Astronomy and Astrophysics, May 1986. Eleven papers were presented at the Workshop on: the solar-stellar connection, observational evidence for solar and stellar flares, and flare models; and all are indexed separately. (UK)

  7. Analyticity and unitarity as constraints to obtain scattering phase shifts and applications to e-He scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.; Lun, D.R.; Allen, L.J.; Amos, K.

    1997-01-01

    The requirements that the scattering functions for quantal scattering at energies below the first inelastic threshold be unitary and analytic have been used to establish a process that gives the complex scattering amplitudes from differential cross sections. From those amplitudes scattering phase shifts have been deduced by Legendre integration. The effects of the natural ambiguity of the phase of the scattering phase shifts have been deduced by Legendre integration. The effects of the natural ambiguity of the phase of the scattering amplitude, under conditions for which uniqueness and (numerical) stability of solutions are not assured, also have been developed to specify the scattering phase shifts can give stable nonspurious results. The scattering of electrons from He atoms for incident energies ranging from 1.5 to 19 eV are considered as an example of the procedure. Phase shift analyses of that data have been made with a variety of other techniques to allow a comparative study of these results and of sets with which are associated fits to cross sections that are statistically significant. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  8. On the application of the theory of the translational Brownian movement to the calculation of the differential cross-sections for the incoherent scattering of slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, W.T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown how three models (based on the theory of the Brownian movement) for the translational motion of an atom in a fluid may be used to calculate explicitly the intermediate scattering functions and differential cross-sections for the incoherent scattering of slow neutrons. In the first model the translational motion of the atom is represented by the motion of a particle in space subjected to no forces other than those arising from the thermal motion of its surroundings. The differential scattering cross-section for this model is then obtained as a continued fraction similar to that given by Sack (Proc. Phys. Soc.; B70:402 and 414 (1957)) for the electric polarisability in his investigation of the role of inertial effects in dielectric relaxation. The second model is a corrected version of the itinerant oscillator model of Sears (Proc. Phys. Soc.; 86:953 (1965)). Here the differential cross-section is obtained in the form of a series and a closed-form expression is found for the intermediate scattering function. The last model to be considered is the harmonically bound particle where again a closed form expression is obtained for the intermediate scattering function. In each case the intermediate scattering function has a mathematical form which is similar to the after-effect function describing the decay of electric polarisation for the rotational versions of the models. (author)

  9. Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by Drift Vortex in Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dong; Chen Yinhua; Wang Ge

    2008-01-01

    In a quasi-two-dimensional model, the scattering of incident ordinary electromagnetic waves by a dipole-electrostatic drift vortex is studied with first-order Born approximation. The distribution of the scattering cross-section and total cross-section are evaluated analytically in different approximate conditions, and the physical interpretations are discussed. When the wavelength of incident wave is much longer than the vortex radius (k i a || 1), it is found that the angle at which the scattering cross-section reaches its maxim depends significantly on the approximation of the parameters of the vortex used. It is also found that the total scattering cross-section has an affinitive relation with the parameters of the plasma, while it is irrelevant to the frequency of the incident wave in a wide range of parameters of the vortex. In a totally different range of parameters when incident wave is in the radar-frequency range (then k i a || 1, the wavelength of incident wave is much shorter than the vortex radius), the numerical procedure is conducted with computer in order to obtain the distribution and the total expression of the scattering cross-section. Then it is found that the total scattering cross-section in the low frequency range is much larger than that in high frequency range, so the scattering is more effective in the low frequency range than in high frequency range.

  10. Forward elastic scattering and total cross-section at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaldi, R.

    1985-01-01

    The successful cooling technique of antiproton beams at CERN has recently allowed the acceleration of proton and antiproton bunches simultaneously circulating in opposite directions in the SPS. Hadron-hadron collisions could so be produced at a centre-of-mass energy one order of magnitude higher than previously available, thus opening a new wide range of energies to experimentation. This technique also made it possible to replace one of the two proton beams in the ISR by a beam of antiprotons, allowing a direct precise comparison, by the same detectors, of pp and anti pp processes at the same energies. The recent results are summarized of the forward elastic scattering and total cross-section in this new energy domain. (Mori, K.)

  11. Tibiopedal Access for Crossing of Infrainguinal Artery Occlusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Craig M.; Mustapha, Jihad; Zeller, Thomas; Schmidt, Andrej; Montero-Baker, Miguel; Nanjundappa, Aravinda; Manzi, Marco; Palena, Luis Mariano; Bernardo, Nelson; Khatib, Yazan; Beasley, Robert; Leon, Luis; Saab, Fadi A.; Shields, Adam R.; Adams, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a prospective, multicenter, observational study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01609621) of the safety and effectiveness of tibiopedal access and retrograde crossing in the treatment of infrainguinal chronic total occlusions (CTOs). Methods: Twelve sites around the world prospectively enrolled 197 patients (mean age 71±11 years, range 41-93; 129 men) from May 2012 to July 2013 who met the inclusion criterion of at least one CTO for which a retrograde crossing procedure was planned or became necessary. The population consisted of 64 (32.5%) claudicants (Rutherford categories 2/3) and 133 (67.5%) patients with critical limb ischemia (Rutherford category ≥4). A primary antegrade attempt to cross had been made prior to the tibiopedal attempt in 132 (67.0%) cases. Techniques used for access, retrograde lesion crossing, and treatment were at the operator’s discretion. Follow-up data were obtained 30 days after the procedure. Results: Technical tibiopedal access success was achieved in 184 (93.4%) of 197 patients and technical occlusion crossing success in 157 (85.3%) of the 184 successful tibial accesses. Failed access attempts were more common in women (9 of 13 failures). The rate of successful crossing was roughly equivalent between sexes [84.7% (50/59) women compared to 85.6% (107/125) men]. Technical success did not differ significantly based on a prior failed antegrade attempt: the access success rate was 92.4% (122/132) after a failed antegrade access vs 95.4% (62/65) in those with a primary tibiopedal attempt (p=0.55). Similarly, crossing success was achieved in 82.8% (101/122) after a failed antegrade access vs 90.3% (56/62) for patients with no prior antegrade attempt (p=0.19). Minor complications related to the access site occurred in 11 (5.6%) cases; no patient had access vessel thrombosis, compartment syndrome, or surgical revascularization. Conclusion: Tibiopedal access appears to be safe and can be used effectively for the

  12. Inclusive diffractive cross sections in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sola, Valentina

    2012-04-15

    Diffractive deep-inelastic scattering events in ep collisions at HERA are the subject of this thesis. The cross sections for inclusive diffraction, ep {yields} eXp, measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations were combined, providing a model-independent check of the data consistency and a cross calibration between the two experiments, and resulting in single data sets with improved accuracy and precision. Two sets of combined results were obtained. The cross sections measured using the proton-spectrometer data were combined, both in the range of t, the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex, common to the two experiments (0.09< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.55 GeV{sup 2}) and in the extended t-range vertical stroke t vertical stroke <1 GeV{sup 2}. The resulting cross sections cover the region 2.5{<=} Q{sup 2} {<=}200 GeV{sup 2} in photon virtualities, 0.0003{<=}x{sub P}{<=}0.09 in the proton fractional momentum losses and 0.0018{<=} {beta} {<=}0.816 in {beta}=x/x{sub P}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The cross sections obtained from data with the large rapidity gap signature were also combined in the kinematic range 2.5{<=} Q{sup 2} {<=}1600 GeV{sup 2}, 0.0003{<=}x{sub P}{<=}0.03 and 0.0017{<=} {beta} {<=}0.8, for masses of the hadronic final state M{sub X}>4 GeV. The inclusive diffractive reduced cross section {sigma}{sub r}{sup D(3)} was measured with data collected by the ZEUS detector, at two different centre-of-mass energies, 318 and 225 GeV. The diffractive data were selected with the large rapidity gap method in the kinematic region 20< Q{sup 2} <130 GeV{sup 2}, 0.05< {beta} <0.85 and 0.00063or similar 0.55), the inelasticity of the interaction.

  13. Angular distribution for the elastic scattering of electrons from Ar+(3s23p52P) above the first inelastic threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotton, S.J.; McKenna, P.; Gribakin, G.; Williams, I.D.

    2002-01-01

    The measured angular differential cross section (DCS) for the elastic scattering of electrons from Ar + (3s 2 3p 5 2 P) at the collision energy of 16 eV is presented. By solving the Hartree-Fock equations, we calculate the corresponding theoretical DCS including the coupling between the orbital angular momenta and spin of the incident electron and those of the target ion and also relaxation effects. Since the collision energy is above one inelastic threshold for the transition 3s 2 3p 5 2 P-3s3p 6 2 S, we consider the effects on the DCS of inelastic absorption processes and elastic resonances. The measurements deviate significantly from the Rutherford cross section over the full angular range observed, especially in the region of a deep minimum centered at approximately 75 deg. Our theory and an uncoupled, unrelaxed method using a local, spherically symmetric potential by Manson [Phys. Rev. 182, 97 (1969)] both reproduce the overall shape of the measured DCS, although the coupled Hartree-Fock approach describes the depth of the minimum more accurately. The minimum is shallower in the present theory owing to our lower average value for the d-wave non-Coulomb phase shift σ 2 , which is due to the high sensitivity of σ 2 to the different scattering potentials used in the two models. The present measurements and calculations therefore show the importance of including coupling and relaxation effects when accurately modeling electron-ion collisions. The phase shifts obtained by fitting to the measurements are compared with the values of Manson and the present method

  14. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The double-differential cross-section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} is presented in the kinematic range 280cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of scattering laws and cross sections for calculation of production and transport of cold and ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernnat, W.; Keinert, J.; Mattes, M. [Inst. for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems, Univ. of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    For the calculation of neutron spectra in cold and super thermal sources scattering laws for a variety of liquid and solid cyrogenic materials were evaluated and prepared for use in deterministic and Monte Carlo transport calculations. For moderator materials like liquid and solid H{sub 2}O, liquid He, liquid D{sub 2}O, liquid and solid H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}, solid CH{sub 4} and structure materials such as Al, Bi, Pb, ZrHx, and graphite scattering law data and cross sections are available. The evaluated data were validated by comparison with measured cross sections and comparison of measured and calculated neutron spectra as far as available. Further applications are the calculation of production and transport and storing of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) in different UCN sources. The data structures of the evaluated data are prepared for the common S{sub N}-transport codes and the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. (orig.)

  16. Possible role of double scattering in electron-atom scattering in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabadan, I.; Mendez, L.; Dickinson, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    By considering observations of double-scattering effects in the excitation of the 2 1 P level of He, gas density values estimated for the laser-assisted elastic scattering experiments of Wallbank and Holmes (1993, 1994a,b) for which the Kroll-Watson approximation appears to fail. Using comparable densities for He and lower densities for Ar, and assuming the Kroll-Watson approximation for single-scattering events, differential cross sections are calculated including double scattering for laser-assisted scattering for a range of energies and scattering angles. Comparison with the observed values shows that double-scattering effects can give a semi-quantitative explanation of the apparent breakdown of the Kroll-Watson approximation in both He and Ar. (author)

  17. Scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons in ultrathin crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shul' ga, N.F., E-mail: shulga@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology”, 1, Akademichna str., Kharkiv, 61108 (Ukraine); Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4, Svobody sq., Kharkiv, 61000 (Ukraine); Shulga, S.N. [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology”, 1, Akademichna str., Kharkiv, 61108 (Ukraine); Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4, Svobody sq., Kharkiv, 61000 (Ukraine)

    2017-06-10

    Quantum theory is proposed of high energy electrons scattering in ultrathin crystals. This theory is based upon a special representation of the scattering amplitude in the form of an integral over the surface surrounding the crystal, and on the spectral method of determination of the wave function. The comparison is performed of quantum and classical differential scattering cross-sections in the transitional range of crystal thicknesses, from those at which the channeling phenomenon is not developed up to those at which it is established. It is shown that in this thickness range the quantum scattering cross-section, unlike the classical one, contains sharp peaks corresponding to some specific scattering angles, that is connected with the diffraction of the incident plane wave onto the periodically distributed crystal atomic strings. It is shown that the value of the scattering cross-section in the peaks varies periodically with the change of the target thickness. We note that this must lead to a new interference effect in radiation that is connected with the rearrangement of incident wave packet in transitional area of crystal thicknesses.

  18. Scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons in ultrathin crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Shul'ga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantum theory is proposed of high energy electrons scattering in ultrathin crystals. This theory is based upon a special representation of the scattering amplitude in the form of an integral over the surface surrounding the crystal, and on the spectral method of determination of the wave function. The comparison is performed of quantum and classical differential scattering cross-sections in the transitional range of crystal thicknesses, from those at which the channeling phenomenon is not developed up to those at which it is established. It is shown that in this thickness range the quantum scattering cross-section, unlike the classical one, contains sharp peaks corresponding to some specific scattering angles, that is connected with the diffraction of the incident plane wave onto the periodically distributed crystal atomic strings. It is shown that the value of the scattering cross-section in the peaks varies periodically with the change of the target thickness. We note that this must lead to a new interference effect in radiation that is connected with the rearrangement of incident wave packet in transitional area of crystal thicknesses.

  19. Fast Neutron Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmqvist, B; Johansson, S G; Lodin, G; Wiedling, T

    1969-11-15

    Fast neutron scattering interactions with vanadium were studied using time-of-flight techniques at several energies in the interval 1.5 to 8.1 MeV. The experimental differential elastic scattering cross sections have been fitted to optical model calculations and the inelastic scattering cross sections have been compared with Hauser-Feshbach calculations, corrected for the fluctuation of compound-nuclear level widths.

  20. Diffraction scattering of strongly bound system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmichev, V.E.

    1982-04-01

    The scattering of a hadron on a strongly bound system of two hadrons (dihadron) is considered in the high-energy limit for the relative hadron-dihadron motion. The dihadron scatterer motion and the internal interaction are included in our consideration. It is shown that only small values of the internal transfer momentum of dihadron particles bring the principal contribution to the three-particle propagator in eikonal approximation. On the basis of the exact analytical solution of the integral equation for the total Green function the scattering amplitude is derived. It is shown that the scattering amplitude contains only single, double, and triple scattering terms. The three new terms to the Glauber formula for the total cross section are obtained. These terms decrease both the true total hadron-hadron cross section and the screening correction. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of the cross section for forward Compton scattering by /sup 4//sub 2/ He nuclei at energies E/sub. gamma. / = 1. 8--3. 8 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksanyan, A.S.; Babayan, G.E.; Voskanyan, A.V.; Gasparyan, A.D.; Gevorkyan, S.R.; Karapetyan, S.N.; Ketikyan, A.Z.; Megrabyan, G.K.; Movsisyan, K.A.; Oganesyan, G.A.; and others

    1987-04-01

    The differential cross sections for Compton scattering by nuclei of /sup 4//sub 2/ He have been measured at the momentum transfers 0.02less than or equal tochemically bondtchemically bond<0.14 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ in the energy region E/sub ..gamma../ = 1.8--3.8 GeV. On the basis of the diffraction theory of multiple scattering the values of the differential cross sections at t = 0, of the slope parameters of the diffraction cone, and of the /sup 4//sub 2/ He nucleus radius have been determined. Experimental values are given for the phase of the scattering amplitude by nucleons, ..cap alpha..( f/sup 0//sub i/) = Re f/sup 0//sub i// Im f/sup 0//sub i/. On the basis of the differential cross sections at t = 0 the total photoabsorption cross section and the photon screening coefficient are determined for the /sup 4//sub 2/ He nucleus.

  2. Incoherent scattering of gamma rays by K-shell electrons. [Differential cross sections, 145 to 662 KeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitale, G.C.; Bloom, S.D.

    1976-05-12

    Differential cross sections for incoherent scattering by K-shell electrons were measured, using coincidence techniques, for incident photons having energies of 662 keV, 320 keV, and 145 keV. The spectral distributions of the scattered photons emerging at scattering angles from 20/sup 0/ to about 140/sup 0/ are reported. Target materials were iron, tin, holmium, and gold at 320 keV; tin and gold at 662 keV; and iron and tin at 145 keV. A typical energy spectrum consists of a scattered peak that is much narrower than would be expected from the bound state electron motion. The peak also, typically, reaches a broad maximum width for scattering angles between 45/sup 0/ and 60/sup 0/. Rather than monotonically increasing with atomic number the peak width reaches a broad maximum, generally, between Z = 50 and Z = 67, and then decreases with increasing atomic number. No Compton defect appears in any of the peaks to within +- 20 keV. A discussion of the expected magnitude of the Compton defect is included. The peak is superimposed on a continuum that diverges at the low end of the scattered photon spectrum for the following cases: gold, holmium, and tin targets for 320-keV incident photons; gold and possibly tin targets for 662-keV photons incident. This infrared divergence is expected on theoretical grounds and has been predicted. It is very nearly isotropic.

  3. Scattering-angle dependence of doubly differential cross sections for fragmentation of H2 by proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egodapitiya, K. N.; Sharma, S.; Laforge, A. C.; Schulz, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have measured double differential cross sections (DDCS) for proton fragment formation for fixed projectile energy losses as a function of projectile scattering angle in 75 keV p + H 2 collisions. An oscillating pattern was observed in the angular dependence of the DDCS with a frequency about twice as large as what we found earlier for nondissociative ionization. Possible origins for this frequency doubling are discussed.

  4. Constraints on the double-parton scattering cross section from same-sign W boson pair production in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, N.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Croce, D.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; Deroover, K.; Flouris, G.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Beghin, D.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dorney, B.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Roskas, C.; Salva, S.; Tytgat, M.; Verbeke, W.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caputo, C.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Coelho, E.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Melo De Almeida, M.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Misheva, M.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Sultanov, G.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Gao, X.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liao, H.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Yazgan, E.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Courbon, B.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Starodumov, A.; Susa, T.; Ather, M. W.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Assran, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Mahrous, A.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Kadastik, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Negro, G.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Titov, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Amendola, C.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Charlot, C.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Lobanov, A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Stahl Leiton, A. G.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Zghiche, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Jansová, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Tonon, N.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Finco, L.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Feld, L.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Zhukov, V.; Albert, A.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Flügge, G.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Müller, T.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arndt, T.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bermúdez Martínez, A.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Botta, V.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Grohsjean, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Guthoff, M.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Lenz, T.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Savitskyi, M.; Saxena, P.; Shevchenko, R.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wen, Y.; Wichmann, K.; Wissing, C.; Zenaiev, O.; Bein, S.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Karavdina, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kurz, S.; Lapsien, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baur, S.; Butz, E.; Caspart, R.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Freund, B.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Kassel, F.; Kudella, S.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Karathanasis, G.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Kousouris, K.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Mallios, S.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Triantis, F. A.; Csanad, M.; Filipovic, N.; Pasztor, G.; Veres, G. I.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Hunyadi, Á.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Bahinipati, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Dhingra, N.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Kumari, P.; Mehta, A.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, A.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Bhardwaj, R.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhawandeep, U.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Das, P.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Errico, F.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lezki, S.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Chatterjee, K.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; Brianza, L.; Brivio, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pauwels, K.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Fienga, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Khan, W. A.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Benettoni, M.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lujan, P.; Margoni, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Rossin, R.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Ressegotti, M.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Cecchi, C.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Manoni, E.; Mantovani, G.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Rossi, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiga, D.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fedi, G.; Giannini, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Manca, E.; Mandorli, G.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; Daci, N.; Del Re, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Monteno, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Moon, C. S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Kim, H.; Moon, D. H.; Oh, G.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Goh, J.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.; Nam, K.; Oh, S. B.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Choi, Y.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Reyes-Almanza, R.; Ramirez-Sanchez, G.; Duran-Osuna, M. C.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Rabadan-Trejo, R. I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Saddique, A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Pyskir, A.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Galinhas, B.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Seixas, J.; Strong, G.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Baginyan, A.; Golunov, A.; Golutvin, I.; Karjavin, V.; Korenkov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Yuldashev, B. 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D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Higginbotham, S.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Das, S.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Peng, C. C.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2018-02-01

    A first search for same-sign WW production via double-parton scattering is performed based on proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using dimuon and electron-muon final states. The search is based on the analysis of data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. No significant excess of events is observed above the expected single-parton scattering yields. A 95% confidence level upper limit of 0.32 pb is set on the inclusive cross section for same-sign WW production via the double-parton scattering process. This upper limit is used to place a 95% confidence level lower limit of 12.2 mb on the effective double-parton cross section parameter, closely related to the transverse distribution of partons in the proton. This limit on the effective cross section is consistent with previous measurements as well as with Monte Carlo event generator predictions.

  5. Intermolecular potential for Ar + D2O from differential scattering cross sections, and its implications for the water pair potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, R.; Porter, R.A.R.; Kalos, F.; Grosser, A.E.

    1975-01-01

    A velocity selected molecular beam of D 2 O was crossed with a nozzle beam of Ar and the angular distribution of the scattered D 2 O was measured mass spectrometrically. By varying the velocity of the D 2 O beam, the differential cross section was measured at two collision energies. The experimental results were compared with synthetic differential cross sections calculated from Lennard-Jones and Kihara-Stockmayer trial potentials to determine potential parameters. Implications for the H 2 O pair potential are discussed

  6. Scattering of fast neutrons from elemental molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-11-01

    Differential broad-resolution neutron-scattering cross sections of elemental molybdenum were measured at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees and at incident-neutron energy intervals of approx. = 50 to 200 keV from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Elastically-scattered neutrons were fully resolved from inelastic events. Lumped-level inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections were determined corresponding to observed excitation energies of; 789 +- 23, 195 +- 23, 1500 +- 34, 1617 +- 12, 1787, 1874, 1991, 2063 +- 24, 2296, 2569 and 2802 keV. An optical-statistical model was deduced from the measured elastic-scattering results. The experimental values were compared with the respective quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  7. Improving the resolution of beta scattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiktas, C.; Selvi, S.; Yegin, G.

    2004-01-01

    We have examined the performance of a modified beta-ray spectrometer using a pulse shape analyzer/timing single channel analyzer and related electronics, thereby preserving the low energy electron tail in measurement of the scattered electron spectra from an n-type Si wafer target. Comparison of measurements with the scattering spectra calculated by the Monte Carlo program EGS4 indicates good agreement across a significant part of the spectrum, an exception being for the energy region 30-100 keV. Re-evaluation of existing scattering cross-sections would be useful, as would possible geometrical effects of the scattering arrangement used herein. Present efforts seek to contribute to the evaluation of electron scattering cross-sections and improvement in theoretical models

  8. Peculiarities of light ion-nucleus scattering in medium-energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhnoj, Yu.A.; Pilipenko, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    Differential cross-sections of 3 He and 4 He nuclei elastic scattering at E > or approximately 10 MeV/nucleon are analyzed in the quasi-classical approximation. At energies E > or approximately 25 MeV/nucleon in differential cross sections of 3 He and 4 He nuclei elastic scattering by atomic nuclei in the field of scattering angles THETA > or approximately 35 deg diffraction minima start to appear. ScuiSuch effect of Fraunhofer cross section oscillations is eluciiated on the basis of diffraction theory by means of modelfree determination of nuclear scattering phase and quantum deviation function. It is shown that the elastic scattering cross section in the field of energies under consideration represents a typical quasiclassical picture of ''iridescent'' scattering at strong absorption. The theoretical analysis performed permits to correctly describe the experimentally measured differential cross sections of 3 He nuclei elastic scattering at 109.2 MeV by 40 Ca, 58 Ni nuclei and at 118.5 NeV by 58 Ni nuclei as well as 4 He at 166 MeV by 24 Mg, 32 S and at 141.7 MeV by 40 Ca nuclei

  9. Proton non-Rutherford backscattering study of oxidation kinetics in Cu and Fe sulphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiari, M.; Giuntini, L.; Pratesi, G.; Santo, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Non-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (NBS) with 2.4 MeV protons was performed for depth profiling of oxygen in three species of copper and iron sulphides - pyrite, chalcopyrite and bornite - on both altered and fresh surfaces. The tarnished surfaces were obtained by bathing samples in H 2 O 2 (35% vol.) for 100 and 1000 s. The spectra collected were compared to simulations to extract quantitative data on oxygen depth distributions for the different bathing times. The measurements have shown that the kinetics of oxidation has completely different patterns in the three investigated minerals. (orig.)

  10. Description of nuclear structure and cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering on the basis of effective Skyrme forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprikov, V. I.; Pilipenko, V. V.; Soznik, A. P.; Tarasov, V. N.; Shlyakhov, N. A.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of constructing such new versions of effective nucleon-nucleon forces that would make it possible to describe simultaneously the cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering and quantities characterizing nuclear matter and the structure of finite even-even nuclei is investigated on the basis of a microscopic nucleon-nucleus optical potential that is calculated by using effective Skyrme interaction. A procedure for optimizing the parameters of Skyrme forces by employing fits to specific angular distributions for neutron-nucleus scattering and by simultaneously testing the features of nuclear matter, the binding energy of the target nucleus, and its proton root-mean-square radius is proposed. A number of versions of modified Skyrme forces that ensure a reasonable description of both nucleon-nucleus scattering and the properties of nuclear structure are found on the basis of this procedure.

  11. Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Kooijman, P.

    2006-01-01

    The cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam have been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 23.8 pb−1 at , are given for both

  12. Scattering of Non-Relativistic Charged Particles by Electromagnetic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, M.

    2017-11-01

    The cross-section is computed for non-relativistic charged particles (like electrons and ions) scattered by electromagnetic radiation confined to a finite region (like the focal region of optical laser beams). The cross-section exhibits maxima at scattering angles given by the energy and momentum conservation in multi-photon absorption or emission processes. For convenience, a potential scattering is included and a comparison is made with the well-known Kroll-Watson scattering formula. The scattering process addressed in this paper is distinct from the process dealt with in previous studies, where the scattering is immersed in the radiation field.

  13. Neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections of 232Th, 233U, 235U, 238U, 239Pu and 240Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    Differential-neutron-emission cross sections of 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and 240 Pu are measured between approx. = 1.0 and 3.5 MeV with the angle and magnitude detail needed to provide angle-integrated emission cross sections to approx. 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U and 238 U inelastic-scattering values, poor agreement is observed for 240 Pu, and a serious discrepancy exists in the case of 239 Pu

  14. PHYS 801 course notes. Introduction to nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buskulic, Damir

    2013-01-01

    This document gathers notes taken during a course of nuclear physics given by Daniel Decamp in 2013. It addresses the nucleus general characteristics (nucleons), the issues of nucleus mass and of bound energy, the liquid drop model, and applications. The next part addresses the dimension of nuclei and nuclear density: Rutherford scattering (scattering of a charged particle by a nucleus, particle deflection angle), notion of cross section (probability of scattering at a given angle, experimental verifications, generalisation of the notion of cross section), and charge distribution within the nucleus (density of final states, differential cross section of elastic scattering, experimental results, nuclear density). The next part addresses radioactivity: generalities, energetic conditions, mass parabola, law of radioactivity (fundamental law, half-life, line width, decay products, natural radioactivity and radioactive families). The next parts address applications of radioactivity: carbon-14 dating, dating of rocks and meteorites), artificial radioactivity (notion of cross section, production of radioactive nuclei), the theoretical approach to radioactivity (semi-conventional BKW approach, other calculation method, Gramow's theory of radioactivity, Fermi's theory of radioactivity), and nuclear models with models based on independent particles (Fermi model, layer model and its applications) and collective models (rotational and vibrational models)

  15. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorman, Mark Edward [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  16. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorman, Mark Edward

    2008-01-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented

  17. Neutron scattering lengths of 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfimenkov, V.P.; Akopian, G.G.; Wierzbicki, J.; Govorov, A.M.; Pikelner, L.B.; Sharapov, E.I.

    1976-01-01

    The total neutron scattering cross-section of 3 He has been measured in the neutron energy range from 20 meV to 2 eV. Together with the known value of coherent scattering amplitude it leads to the two sts of n 3 He scattering lengths

  18. Inelastic Light Scattering Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Daniel G.; Chang, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    Five different inelastic light scattering processes will be denoted by, ordinary Raman scattering (ORS), resonance Raman scattering (RRS), off-resonance fluorescence (ORF), resonance fluorescence (RF), and broad fluorescence (BF). A distinction between fluorescence (including ORF and RF) and Raman scattering (including ORS and RRS) will be made in terms of the number of intermediate molecular states which contribute significantly to the scattered amplitude, and not in terms of excited state lifetimes or virtual versus real processes. The theory of these processes will be reviewed, including the effects of pressure, laser wavelength, and laser spectral distribution on the scattered intensity. The application of these processes to the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants will be discussed briefly. It will be pointed out that the poor sensitivity of the ORS technique cannot be increased by going toward resonance without also compromising the advantages it has over the RF technique. Experimental results on inelastic light scattering from I(sub 2) vapor will be presented. As a single longitudinal mode 5145 A argon-ion laser line was tuned away from an I(sub 2) absorption line, the scattering was observed to change from RF to ORF. The basis, of the distinction is the different pressure dependence of the scattered intensity. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattered intensity was measured in going from ORF to RF. Forty-seven overtones were observed and their relative intensities measured. The ORF cross section of I(sub 2) compared to the ORS cross section of N2 was found to be 3 x 10(exp 6), with I(sub 2) at its room temperature vapor pressure.

  19. Chronic Total Occlusion Crossing Approach Based on Plaque Cap Morphology: The CTOP Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Fadi; Jaff, Michael R; Diaz-Sandoval, Larry J; Engen, Gwennan D; McGoff, Theresa N; Adams, George; Al-Dadah, Ashraf; Goodney, Philip P; Khawaja, Farhan; Mustapha, Jihad A

    2018-02-01

    To present the chronic total occlusion (CTO) crossing approach based on plaque cap morphology (CTOP) classification system and assess its ability to predict successful lesion crossing. A retrospective analysis was conducted of imaging and procedure data from 114 consecutive symptomatic patients (mean age 69±11 years; 84 men) with claudication (Rutherford category 3) or critical limb ischemia (Rutherford category 4-6) who underwent endovascular interventions for 142 CTOs. CTO cap morphology was determined from a review pf angiography and duplex ultrasonography and classified into 4 types (I, II, III, or IV) based on the concave or convex shape of the proximal and distal caps. Statistically significant differences among groups were found in patients with rest pain, lesion length, and severe calcification. CTOP type II CTOs were most common and type III lesions the least common. Type I CTOs were most likely to be crossed antegrade and had a lower incidence of severe calcification. Type IV lesions were more likely to be crossed retrograde from a tibiopedal approach. CTOP type IV was least likely to be crossed in an antegrade fashion. Access conversion, or need for an alternate access, was commonly seen in types II, III, and IV lesions. Distinctive predictors of access conversion were CTO types II and III, lesion length, and severe calcification. CTOP type I lesions were easiest to cross in antegrade fashion and type IV the most difficult. Lesion length >10 cm, severe calcification, and CTO types II, III, and IV benefited from the addition of retrograde tibiopedal access.

  20. Mean free paths and in-medium scattering cross sections of energetic nucleons in neutron-rich nucleonic matter within the relativistic impulse approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weizhou; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2007-01-01

    The mean free paths and in-medium scattering cross sections of energetic nucleons in neutron-rich nucleonic matter are investigated using the nucleon optical potential obtained within the relativistic impulse approximation with the empirical nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitudes and the nuclear densities obtained in the relativistic mean-field model. It is found that the isospin-splitting of nucleon mean free paths, sensitive to the imaginary part of the symmetry potential, changes its sign at certain high kinetic energy. The in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections are analytically and numerically demonstrated to be essentially independent of the isospin asymmetry of the medium and increase linearly with density in the high-energy region where the relativistic impulse approximation is applicable

  1. Anomalous neutron Compton scattering cross section in zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Redah, T.; Krzystyniak, M.; Mayers, J.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years we observed a shortfall of intensity of neutrons scattered from protons in various materials including metal hydrogen systems using neutron Compton scattering (NCS) on the VESUVIO instrument (ISIS, UK). This anomaly has been attributed to the existence of short-lived quantum entangled states of protons in these materials. Here we report on results of very recent NCS measurements on ZrH 2 at room temperature. Also here an anomalous shortfall of scattering intensity due to protons is observed. In contrast to previous experiments on NbH 0.8 , the anomalies found in ZrH 2 are independent of the scattering angle (or momentum transfer). These different results are discussed in the light of recent criticisms and experimental tests related to the data analysis procedure on VESUVIO

  2. Determination of integral K-shell Compton scattering cross-sections in elements 41>=Z>=51 for 1250 keV photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, S L; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1978-04-01

    Integral K-shell Compton scattering cross-sections in elements Nb, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn and Sb have been determined for 1250 keV photons. The results when compared with theory suggest that K-shell electrons in the elements under investigation behave as free electrons.

  3. Neutron scattering and magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Those properties of the neutron which make it a unique tool for the study of magnetism are described. The scattering of neutrons by magnetic solids is briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the information on the magnetic structure and dynamics which is inherent in the scattering cross-section. The contribution of neutron scattering to our understanding of magnetic ordering, excitations and phase transitions is illustrated by experimental results on a variety of magnetic crystals. (author)

  4. Calculation of total cross sections for electron and positron scattering on sodium and potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.; Ratnavelu, K.; Zhou, Y.

    1993-02-01

    Total cross sections for electron and positron scattering on sodium and potassium are calculated at various energies and compared with experiment. The method use is the coupled-channels-optical method with the equivalent-local polarisation potential, which takes all channels into account. For electrons the calculations are checked by comparison with coupled-channels-optical calculations using a detailed polarisation potential that makes only one approximation, that of weak coupling in the ionisation space. The polarisation potential for positrons includes effects of ionisation and positronium formation. 13 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Rayleigh theory of ultrasound scattering applied to liquid-filled contrast nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegg, M B; Poole, C M; Whittaker, A K; Keen, I; Langton, C M

    2010-06-07

    We present a novel modified theory based upon Rayleigh scattering of ultrasound from composite nanoparticles with a liquid core and solid shell. We derive closed form solutions to the scattering cross-section and have applied this model to an ultrasound contrast agent consisting of a liquid-filled core (perfluorooctyl bromide, PFOB) encapsulated by a polymer shell (poly-caprolactone, PCL). Sensitivity analysis was performed to predict the dependence of the scattering cross-section upon material and dimensional parameters. A rapid increase in the scattering cross-section was achieved by increasing the compressibility of the core, validating the incorporation of high compressibility PFOB; the compressibility of the shell had little impact on the overall scattering cross-section although a more compressible shell is desirable. Changes in the density of the shell and the core result in predicted local minima in the scattering cross-section, approximately corresponding to the PFOB-PCL contrast agent considered; hence, incorporation of a lower shell density could potentially significantly improve the scattering cross-section. A 50% reduction in shell thickness relative to external radius increased the predicted scattering cross-section by 50%. Although it has often been considered that the shell has a negative effect on the echogeneity due to its low compressibility, we have shown that it can potentially play an important role in the echogeneity of the contrast agent. The challenge for the future is to identify suitable shell and core materials that meet the predicted characteristics in order to achieve optimal echogenity.

  6. Scattering of high energy electrons on deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossetete, B.

    1964-12-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain information on the neutron form factor from the study of the scattering of electrons on deuterium. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical study of the elastic and inelastic scattering. We introduce different form factors: Sachs form factor, the Pauli and Dirac form factors, they appear in the analytic expression of the scattering cross-section. We show how the deuteron form factors can be deduced from neutron's and proton's form factors. In the case of the inelastic scattering we show how the cross section can be broken into components associated to partial waves and we obtain different formulas for the inelastic cross-section based on the Breit formula or the Durand formalism. The second part is dedicated to the experiment setting of electron scattering on deuterium. The elastic scattering experiment has been made on solid or liquid CD 2 targets while inelastic scattering has been studied on a liquid target. We have used an electron beam produced by the Orsay linear accelerator and the scattered electrons have been analysed by a magnetic spectrometer and a Cerenkov detector. The results give a very low value (slightly positive)for the charge form factor of the neutron and a magnetic form factor for the neutron slightly below that of the proton [fr

  7. Maxima of the scattering cross section, the wave vector being quasi orthogonal to the confining magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.-L.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the scattering cross section maximas of an electromagnetic wave by a magnetoplasma, the angle between the wave vector and the confining magnetic field approaching π/2 were computed. It is shown that the maximas are shifted toward the roots of the electrostatic dispersion relation in perpendicular propagation. These roots are not exactly the electron cyclotron harmonics [fr

  8. Helium Atom Scattering from C2H6, F2HCCH3, F3CCH2F and C2F6 in Crossed Molecular Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Markus; Seidel, Wolfhart

    1997-10-01

    Rotationally unresolved differential cross sections were measured in crossed molecular beam experiments by scattering Helium atoms from Ethane, 1,1-Difluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane and Hexafluoroethane. The damping of observed diffraction oscillations was used to extract anisotropic interaction potentials for these scattering systems applying the infinite order sudden approximation (IOSA). Binary macroscopic parameters such as second heterogeneous virial coefficients and the coefficients of diffusion and viscosity were computed from these potentials and compared to results from macroscopic experiments.

  9. Direct measurement of the cross section of neutron-neutron scattering at the YAGUAR reactor. Substantiation of the experiment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernukhin, Yu.G.; Kandiev, Ya.Z.; Lartsev, V.D.; Levakov, B.G.; Modestov, D.G.; Simonenko, V.A.; Streltsov, S.I.; Khmel'nitskij, D.V.

    2006-01-01

    The main stage of experiment for direct measurement of cross section of neutron-neutron scattering σ nn at low energies (E nn determination. It was shown, that for achieving the criterion ε ∼ 4% it will be necessary to have 40-50 pulses of a reactor [ru

  10. Basic scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queen, N.M.

    1978-01-01

    This series of lectures on basic scattering theory were given as part of a course for postgraduate high energy physicists and were designed to acquaint the student with some of the basic language and formalism used for the phenomenological description of nuclear reactions and decay processes used for the study of elementary particle interactions. Well established and model independent aspects of scattering theory, which are the basis of S-matrix theory, are considered. The subject is considered under the following headings; the S-matrix, cross sections and decay rates, phase space, relativistic kinematics, the Mandelstam variables, the flux factor, two-body phase space, Dalitz plots, other kinematic plots, two-particle reactions, unitarity, the partial-wave expansion, resonances (single-channel case), multi-channel resonances, analyticity and crossing, dispersion relations, the one-particle exchange model, the density matrix, mathematical properties of the density matrix, the density matrix in scattering processes, the density matrix in decay processes, and the helicity formalism. Some exercises for the students are included. (U.K.)

  11. Epitaxial growth of thin single-crystals and their quality study by Rutherford scattering in channeling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, Robert.

    1975-01-01

    Some aspects of thin crystalline layers are reminded: vacuum deposition, epitaxial growth, annealing and interdiffusion ion channeling and scattering of 1-2MeV helium ions are used to study the crystalline quality, the annealing effects and in some cases the interdiffusion in epitaxial multilayers of silver, copper gold and nickel. Thin single-crystals of gold and nickel oriented (III) plan parallel to the surface were obtained by successive epitaxial growth from muscovite mica clivages. The mounting techniques of single crystalline, self-supporting, 300 to 1200 Angstroems thick, gold and nickel targets of 3mm diameter are described. The gold single-crystals have dislocation densities of 10 8 cm -2 and the various epitaxial layers are obtained without twinning [fr

  12. Jet-radius dependence of inclusive-jet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2006-12-01

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured for different jet radii in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering for boson virtualities Q 2 >125 GeV 2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 81.7 pb -1 . Jets were identified in the Breit frame using the k T cluster algorithm in the longitudinally inclusive mode for different values of the jet radius R. Differential cross sections are presented as functions of Q 2 and the jet transverse energy, E T,B jet . The dependence on R of the inclusive-jet cross section has been measured for Q 2 > 125 and 500 GeV 2 and found to be linear with R in the range studied. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements for 0.5 s (M Z ) has been extracted from the measurements of the inclusive-jet cross-section dσ/dQ 2 with R=1 for Q 2 > 500 GeV 2 : α s (M Z )=0.1207±0.0014(stat.) -0.0028 +0.0030 (exp.) -0.0 023 +0.0022 (th.). The variation of α s with E T,B jet is in good agreement with the running of α s as predicted by QCD. (orig.)

  13. Electron-helium scattering in Debye plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Janev, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Electron-helium scattering in weakly coupled hot-dense (Debye) plasma has been investigated using the convergent close-coupling method. The Yukawa-type Debye-Hueckel potential has been used to describe plasma Coulomb screening effects. Benchmark results are presented for momentum transfer cross sections, excitation, ionization, and total cross sections for scattering from the ground and metastable states of helium. Calculations cover the entire energy range up to 1000 eV for the no screening case and various Debye lengths (5-100 a 0 ). We find that as the screening interaction increases, the excitation and total cross sections decrease, while the total ionization cross sections increase.

  14. Measurements of differential cross sections with electrons of intermediate energy (300-1000 eV) scattered by atom and molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Differential Elastic Cross Sections for electrons scattered by osub(2) and Ar in the angular range 5 sup(0)- 140 sup(0) were measured in the energy range between 300 and 1000 eV. The Relative Flow Technique proposed by SRIVASTAVA et alii (1975) was used. Absolute Differential Elastic Cross Section data from DuBOIS and RUDD (1976) for Nsub(2) were stablished as a secondary standard. Our obtained results for Ar at 400, 800 and 1000 eV were compared against experimental and theoretical results available in the literature. For molecular Oxygen at 300, 400, 800 and 1000 eV our experimental data were compared with values from other authors and also theoretical values from Independent Atom Model including Multiple Intramolecular Scattering. Results for Ar at 1000 eV in the angular range between 60 sup(0) and 140 sup(0) and for osub(2) at 800 and 100 eV, between 5 sup(0) and 120 sup(0), were reported for the first time. (author)

  15. Applications of computer simulation, nuclear reactions and elastic scattering to surface analysis of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco de Carvalho, J. A.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article involves computer simulation and surface analysis by nuclear techniques, which are non-destructive. Both the “energy method of analysis” for nuclear reactions and elastic scattering are used. Energy spectra are computer simulated and compared with experimental data, giving target composition and concentration profile information. The method is successfully applied to thick flat targets of graphite, quartz and sapphire and targets containing thin films of aluminium oxide. Depth profiles of 12C and 16O nuclei are determined using (d,p and (d,α deuteron induced reactions. Rutherford and resonance elastic scattering of (4He+ ions are also used.

    Este artículo trata de simulación por ordenador y del análisis de superficies mediante técnicas nucleares, que son no destructivas. Se usa el “método de análisis en energia” para reacciones nucleares, así como el de difusión elástica. Se simulan en ordenador espectros en energía que se comparan com datos experimentales, de lo que resulta la obención de información sobre la composición y los perfiles de concentración de la muestra. Este método se aplica con éxito em muestras espesas y planas de grafito, cuarzo y zafiro y muestras conteniendo películas finas de óxido de aluminio. Se calculan perfiles en profundidad de núcleos de 12C y de 16O a través de reacciones (d,p y (d,α inducidas por deuterones. Se utiliza también la difusión elástica de iones (4He+, tanto a Rutherford como resonante.

  16. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiari, L; Brunger, M J; Zecca, A; Blanco, F; García, G

    2014-01-01

    Using a Beer–Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C 4 H 6 O 2 ) in the incident positron energy range 0.15–50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1–1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ∼2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect. (paper)

  17. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program uses ab-initio and multiple scattering to study surface dynamical processes; high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy is used in particular. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50--300 eV). The analyses have been extended to surfaces of ordered alloys. Phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross section calculations. Work on low-energy electron and positron holography is mentioned

  18. Alignment creation by elastic electron scattering. A quantum treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csanak, G.; Kilcrease, D.P.; Fursa, D.V.; Bray, I.

    2004-01-01

    Alignment creation by elastic heavy particle scattering has been studied by many authors. A formula for the alignment creation cross section by elastic scattering is obtained by quantum-mechanical methods. The formula obtained differs from the analogous formula relevant for inelastic electron scattering. In the case of a J=1 to J=1 transition according to the inelastic formula, the alignment created is proportional to the quantity σ (1) - σ (0) where σ (M) is the excitation cross section of the M magnetic sublevel and thus σ (1) = (σ 1-1 + σ 10 + σ 11 )/3 and σ (0) = (σ 0-1 +σ 00 + σ 01 )/3 where σ MM' refers to the cross section of the electron impact induced M' to M transition. In the elastic scattering alignment creation formula obtained in the case of a J=1 to J=1 elastic scattering, the alignment created is proportional to the quantity q(1) - q(0) where q(1) σ (1) - σ 11 /3 and q(0) = σ 00 /3. Thus in obtaining q(M), the elastic scattering cross section by the M magnetic sublevel, σ MM' , is subtracted. This derivation considered only direct scattering, i.e. the incident electron was considered distinguishable from the target electrons. (Y.Kazumata)

  19. Inelastic neutron scattering from superconducting rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agafonov, A.I.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time the differential cross section for the inelastic magnetic neutron scattering by superconducting rings is derived taking account of the interaction of the neutron magnetic moment with the magnetic field generated by the superconducting current. Calculations of the scattering cross section are carried out for cold neutrons and thin film rings from type-II superconductors with the magnetic fields not exceeding the first critical field.

  20. Diffraction in nuclear scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, H.

    1986-01-01

    The elastic scattering amplitudes for charged and neutral particles have been decomposed into diffractive and refractive parts by splitting the nuclear elastic scattering matrix elements into components responsible for these effects. It has been shown that the pure geometrical diffractive effect which carries no information about the nuclear interaction is always predominant at forward angle of elastic angular distributions. This fact suggests that for strongly absorbed particles only elastic cross section at backward angles, i.e. the refractive cross section, can give us basic information about the central nuclear potential. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  1. Combination of differential D{sup *±} cross-section measurements in deep-inelastc ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science; Collaboration: The H1 and ZEUS Collaborations; and others

    2015-03-15

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D{sup *±}-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q{sup 2}>5 GeV{sup 2}, electron inelasticity 0.021.5 GeV and pseudorapidity vertical stroke η(D{sup *}) vertical stroke <1.5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d{sup 2}σ/dQ{sup 2}dy are combined with earlier D{sup *±} data, extending the kinematic range down to Q{sup 2}>1.5 GeV{sup 2}. Perturbative next-to-leadingorder QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  2. A hybrid Scatter/Transform cloaking model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gad Licht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Scatter/Transform cloak is developed that combines the light bending of refraction characteristic of a Transform cloak with the scatter cancellation characteristic of a Scatter cloak. The hybrid cloak incorporates both Transform’s variable index of refraction with modified linear intrusions to maximize the Scatter cloak effect. Scatter/Transform improved the scattering cross-section of cloaking in a 2-dimensional space to 51.7% compared to only 39.6% or 45.1% respectively with either Scatter or Transform alone. Metamaterials developed with characteristics based on the new ST hybrid cloak will exhibit superior cloaking capabilities.

  3. Calculation of the flux attenuation and multiple scattering correction factors in time of flight technique for double differential cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Coca, M.; Capote, R.

    1996-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo method technique , a computer code which simulates the time of flight experiment to measure double differential cross section was developed. The correction factor for flux attenuation and multiple scattering, that make a deformation to the measured spectrum, were calculated. The energy dependence of the correction factor was determined and a comparison with other works is shown. Calculations for Fe 56 at two different scattering angles were made. We also reproduce the experiment performed at the Nuclear Analysis Laboratory for C 12 at 25 celsius degree and the calculated correction factor for the is measured is shown. We found a linear relation between the scatter size and the correction factor for flux attenuation

  4. Study on the scattering law and scattering kernel of hydrogen in zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xinbiao; Chen Wei; Chen Da; Yin Banghua; Xie Zhongsheng

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear analytical model of calculating scattering law and scattering kernel for the uranium zirconium hybrid reactor is described. In the light of the acoustic and optic model of zirconium hydride, its frequency distribution function f(ω) is given and the scattering law of hydrogen in zirconium hydride is obtained by GASKET. The scattering kernel σ l (E 0 →E) of hydrogen bound in zirconium hydride is provided by the SMP code in the standard WIMS cross section library. Along with this library, WIMS is used to calculate the thermal neutron energy spectrum of fuel cell. The results are satisfied

  5. Thermal Neutron Capture and Thermal Neutron Burn-up of K isomeric state of 177mLu: a way to the Neutron Super-Elastic Scattering cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roig, O.; Belier, G.; Meot, V.; Daugas, J.-M.; Romain, P.; Aupiais, J.; Jutier, Ch.; Le Petit, G.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.; Veyssiere, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal neutron radiative capture and burn-up measurements of the K isomeric state in 177Lu form part of an original method to indirectly obtain the neutron super-elastic scattering cross section at thermal energy. Neutron super-elastic scattering, also called neutron inelastic acceleration, occurs during the neutron collisions with an excited nuclear level. In this reaction, the nucleus could partly transfer its excitation energy to the scattered neutron

  6. Determination of the total cross section in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at √(s) = 8 TeV from elastic scattering using the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, Christian; Dueren, Michael; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Stenzel, Hasko [JLU Giessen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The ALFA (Absolute Luminosity for ATLAS) Roman Pot detector system is part of the forward instrumentation of ATLAS located about 240 m away from the interaction point in the LHC tunnel. ALFA consists of a scintillating fibre tracker housed in vertical Roman Pots which enables the measurement of elastic proton-proton scattering at small scattering angles. In 2012 data were recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV during a fill with special beam optics of the LHC with β* = 90 m and parallel-to-point focusing. The four-momentum transfer t is measured for elastically scattered protons and the differential elastic cross section is measured. In this talk a preliminary determination of the total cross section and of the slope of the elastic cross section at small vertical stroke t vertical stroke obtained from a fit to the differential cross section using the optical theorem is reported.

  7. Inelastic pion scattering from 3H and 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, B.L.; Anderson, G.C.; Briscoe, W.J.; Mokhtari, A.; Petrov, A.M.; Sadler, M.E.; Barlow, D.B.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Pillai, C.

    1995-01-01

    Cross sections have been measured for the inelastic scattering of π + and π - mesons from 3 H and 3 He in the 10-MeV interval just above the breakup thresholds, for incident pion energies of 142, 180, and 220 MeV and scattering angles of 40 degree, 60 degree, 80 degree, 90 degree, and 110 degree. No significant departure from unity is observed for the ratios of charge-symmetric cross sections. Comparisons are made with elastic pion-scattering and inelastic electron-scattering data

  8. Measurement of dijet cross sections in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theedt, Thorben

    2009-11-15

    Dijet cross sections have been measured in deep inelastic neutral current electron-proton scattering at HERA. Cross sections have been measured differentially as functions of the photon virtuality, Q{sup 2}, the scaling variable, Bjorken x, the mean transverse jet energy, E{sub T}, the invariant dijet mass, M{sub jj}, the difference in jet pseudorapidity, {eta}'= vertical stroke {eta}{sup jet{sub 1}}-{eta}{sup jet{sub 2}} vertical stroke and the momentum fraction, {xi}. Cross sections as function of {xi} have also been measured in different regions of the photon virtuality. The analysed data were recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV with the ZEUS detector in the years 1998, 1999, and 2000 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 81.74 pb{sup -1}. The phase space of the analysis is defined by 125

  9. Semiempirical potentials for positron scattering by atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Walters, H. R. J.; Arretche, Felipe; Dutra, Adriano; Mohallem, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, 89223-100, Joinville, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, PO Box 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    We report calculations of differential and integral cross sections for positron scattering by noble gas and alkaline-earth atoms within the same methodology. The scattering potentials are constructed by scaling adiabatic potentials so that their minima coincide with the covalent radii of the target atoms. Elastic differential and integral cross sections are calculated for Ne, Ar, Be, and Mg, and the results are very close to experimental and best theoretical data. Particularly, elastic differential cross sections for Be and Mg at low energies are reported.

  10. The hydrogen anomaly problem in neutron Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik B.

    2018-03-01

    Neutron Compton scattering (also called ‘deep inelastic scattering of neutrons’, DINS) is a method used to study momentum distributions of light atoms in solids and liquids. It has been employed extensively since the start-up of intense pulsed neutron sources about 25 years ago. The information lies primarily in the width and shape of the Compton profile and not in the absolute intensity of the Compton peaks. It was therefore not immediately recognized that the relative intensities of Compton peaks arising from scattering on different isotopes did not always agree with values expected from standard neutron cross-section tables. The discrepancies were particularly large for scattering on protons, a phenomenon that became known as ‘the hydrogen anomaly problem’. The present paper is a review of the discovery, experimental tests to prove or disprove the existence of the hydrogen anomaly and discussions concerning its origin. It covers a twenty-year-long history of experimentation, theoretical treatments and discussions. The problem is of fundamental interest, since it involves quantum phenomena on the subfemtosecond time scale, which are not visible in conventional thermal neutron scattering but are important in Compton scattering where neutrons have two orders of magnitude times higher energy. Different H-containing systems show different cross-section deficiencies and when the scattering processes are followed on the femtosecond time scale the cross-section losses disappear on different characteristic time scales for each H-environment. The last section of this review reproduces results from published papers based on quantum interference in scattering on identical particles (proton or deuteron pairs or clusters), which have given a quantitative theoretical explanation both regarding the H-cross-section reduction and its time dependence. Some new explanations are added and the concluding chapter summarizes the conditions for observing the specific quantum

  11. Inclusive measurements of pion double charge exchange and inelastic scattering on 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuly, M.E.

    1993-06-01

    A measurement was made at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) of the doubly differential cross sections for three inclusive pion reactions on 3 He: π - double charge exchange (DCX), and π + and π - inelastic scattering. The cross sections for DCX were measured at incident energies of 120, 180, 210, and 240 MeV, and at angles of 25, 50, 80, 105, and 130 degrees, while inelastic scattering cross sections were measured at 120, 180, and 240 MeV and scattering angles of 50, 80, 105, and 130 degrees. The final pion energy spectrum was measured from 10 MeV up to the kinematic limit. In the Δ resonance region, where the isospin T = 3/2 channel dominates, the inelastic π - scattering should be almost entirely from the lone neutron in 3 He. The π + inelastic scattering was expected to have significant contributions from both single and double scattering, because the T = 3/2 channel favors π + -p scattering from the two protons in 3 He. The 3 He DCX spectra are similar to those observed for DCX in 4 He. The forward angle double peaks can be understood as a consequence of sequential single charge exchange (SSCX). Calculations using the SSCX model are in rough agreement with the measured shape of the 3 He DCX spectra. The doubly differential cross sections measured for the inelastic scattering reactions exhibit a strong enhancement near the kinematics for free π - -p scattering. The ratios of π + to π - scattering cross sections may indicate multiple scattering, as well as the agreement of the low outgoing energy part of the π + inelastic scattering spectra with the corresponding properly scaled DCX spectra. A distorted-wave impulse-approximation (DWIA) calculation of the quasielastic cross sections has been performed and a comparison made with the measured inelastic cross sections

  12. Asymptotic angular dependences of exclusive hadron large-angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goloskokov, S.V.; Kudinov, A.V.; Kuleshov, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    Asymptotic approach to the description of the large-angle scattering amplitudes of the meson-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering is studied. The paper is based on the Mandelstam representation and quark counting rules. The crossing summetry, SU-3 symmetry and spin effects are taken into account. Formulae obtained are used for the description of the differential cross sections of πsup(+-)p, pp and pn scattering. The predictions about ksup(+-)p and p anti p scattering are made. It is shown that formulae provide quantitative description of experimental data for the considered reactions

  13. Application of Van Hove theory to fast neutron inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanicicj, V.

    1974-11-01

    The Vane Hove general theory of the double differential scattering cross section has been used to derive the particular expressions of the inelastic fast neutrons scattering kernel and scattering cross section. Since the considered energies of incoming neutrons being less than 10 MeV, it enables to use the Fermi gas model of nucleons. In this case it was easy to derive an analytical expression for the time-dependent correlation function of the nucleus. Further, by using an impulse approximation and a short-collision time approach, it was possible to derive the analytical expression of the scattering kernel and scattering cross section for the fast neutron inelastic scattering. The obtained expressions have been used for Fe nucleus. It has been shown a surprising agreement with the experiments. The main advantage of this theory is in its simplicity for some practical calculations and for some theoretical investigations of nuclear processes

  14. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Limão-Vieira, P. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Duflot, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  15. Investigation by the Rutherford backscattering method of impurity deposited on the T-3M tokamak diaphragm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danelyan, L.S.; Egorova, I.M.; Kulikauskas, V.S.; Baratov, D.G.; Belykh, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Rutherford backscattering of helium-4 ions was used for investigation of impurity deposited on the annular graphite diaphragm as a result of the interaction between hydrogen plasma and liquid-metal spray limiter. The experimental RBS spectra distributions of the impurity elements surface densities along the direction from plasma to the chamber wall are presented as depth of the elements. The erosion coefficient of the main liquid-metal limiter element has been estimated

  16. New prospects of VESUVIO applied to measurements in water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Palomino, L. A.; Dawidowski, J.; Blostein, J. J.; Cuello, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present new measurements on mixtures of light and heavy water in the spectrometer VESUVIO (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK), and analyze them from the perspective of different kind of applications. We perform a single detector analysis and show the multiple scattering and attenuation corrections with the aim to employ them in mass- spectrometry. We also show the capabilities to perform transmission measurements to determine total cross sections of an acceptable quality by means of its transmission monitor.

  17. New prospects of VESUVIO applied to measurements in water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomino, L A Rodríguez; Dawidowski, J; Blostein, J J; Cuello, G J

    2014-01-01

    We present new measurements on mixtures of light and heavy water in the spectrometer VESUVIO (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK), and analyze them from the perspective of different kind of applications. We perform a single detector analysis and show the multiple scattering and attenuation corrections with the aim to employ them in mass- spectrometry. We also show the capabilities to perform transmission measurements to determine total cross sections of an acceptable quality by means of its transmission monitor

  18. Anisotropic scattering in three dimensional differential approximation of radiation heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condiff, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The differential approximation is extended to account for anisotropic scattering in invariant three dimensional form. A moment method using polyadic Legendre functions establishes that pressure cross sections should take precedence over extinction cross sections for treating radiation heat transfer in an absorbing, emitting, and scattering medium, and that use of these cross sections accounts for the extent of preferred forward or backwards scattering. The procedure and principle is extended to polyadic P-N approximations

  19. Measurements of prompt fission neutron spectra and double-differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections for 238U and 232Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Mamoru; Itoh, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuto; Hirakawa, Naohiro; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka.

    1989-10-01

    This report presents the summary of experimental studies of prompt fission neutron spectra and double-differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections of 238 U and 232 Th. The experiments were performed at Tohoku University Fast Neutron Laboratory employing a time-of-flight technique and Dynamitron accelerator as the pulsed neutron generator. From the experiments, we obtained the following data for both nuclei; 1. prompt fission neutron spectrum for 2 MeV neutrons, 2. double-differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections for 1.2, 2.0, 4.2, 6.1 and 14.1 MeV incident neutrons. Both in experiments and data processing, cares were taken to obtain reliable data by avoiding systematic uncertainty. The experimental data were compared with those by other experiments, evaluations and model calculations. Through the data comparison, some fundamental problems were found in the experiments by previous authors and the evaluations. The present data will provide useful data base for refinement of the evaluated data and theoretical models. (author)

  20. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville 4810 (Australia); McEachran, R. P. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.