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Sample records for russia plans nuclear

  1. THE NUCLEAR MATERIAL MEASUREMENT PROGRAM PLAN FOR GOSATOMNADZOR OF RUSSIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilites by testing the nuclear material inventory for accounting record accuracy. Currently, Gosatomnadzor is developing and implementing an approach to planning and conducting MC and A inspections using non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments that will provide for consistent application of MC and A measurement inspection objectives throughtout Russia. This Gosatomnadzor NDA Program Plan documents current NDA measurement capability in all regions of Gosatomnadzor; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This plan covers a three-year measurement program cycle, but will be reviewed and updated annually to ensure that adequate inspection resources are available to meet the demands of the inspection schedule. This paper presents the elements of this plan and describes the process by which Gosatomnadzor ensures that its NDA instruments are effectively utilized, procedures are developed and certified, and inspection personnel are properly trained to provide assurance that Russian nuclear facilities are in compliance with Russian MC and A regulations.

  2. Russia's nuclear elite on rampage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, L.

    1993-01-01

    In July 1992, the Russian Ministry of Nuclear Industry began pressing the Russian government to adopt a plan to build new nuclear power plants. In mid-January 1993 the government announced that it will build at least 30 new nuclear power plants, and that the second stage of the building program will include construction of three fast-breeder reactors. In this article, the author addresses the rationale behind this massive building program, despite the country's economic condition and public dread of another Chernobyl-type accident. The viewpoints of both the Russian Ministry of Nuclear Industry and opposing interests are discussed

  3. Nuclear power development status in Russia and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Taito

    2016-01-01

    Russia and China have clear policy for the export of nuclear reactors, and both countries conduct negotiations with the initiative of the government. In Russia, Atomenergoprom, which controls civilian nuclear power sector, is in charge, and in China, CNNC, CGN, and SPI are in charge. As for the development of new type reactors, Russian type VVER-1200 is led by NIAEP and Atomproekt, and China type CAP 1400 and Hualong-1 are led by CNNC, CGN, and SPI. The next reactor export is considered to be an improved type of the third generation. Furthermore, both countries are proceeding with the construction and planning of a variety of the fourth generation reactors. As for the power generation and construction costs of domestic nuclear reactors in each country, three countries such as South Korea, China, and Russia hold a dominant position, keeping the costs significantly lower than those in Japan, the United States, and France. In Russia and China, the governments approve government support loans of approximately 5 to 9 billion dollars per reactor for exporting reactors. For developing countries, where financial resources are limited, this system is considered to be a powerful incentive for importing nuclear reactors in combination with BOO contract system that covers from construction to operation. Japan's nuclear reactor exports are planned for the UK, Vietnam, and Turkey. In addition, a nuclear power agreement with India has been agreed in principle, and the order receipt of Japanese power plant manufacturers is expected. (A.O.)

  4. Implementation of the environmental management plan for the dismantling of nuclear powered submarines at Zvezdochka Shipyard, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washer, M.; Cull, M.; Crocker, C.; Ivanov, V.; Shepurev, A.; Khan, B.U.Z.; Lee, M.; Gerchikov, M.

    2007-01-01

    Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada is funding the dismantling of twelve nuclear powered submarines (NPS) from the Russian Federation's Northern Fleet as part of the Global Partnership Initiative against weapons and materials of mass destruction. In this paper, work performed by Nuclear Safety Solutions Ltd. and its collaborators in support of these activities is described. First, an environmental impact assessment of towing and dismantling NPS in the Kola Peninsula, and the Barents and White Seas was performed. The assessed activities included: towing of NPS from Naval Bases in Murmansk Region to the Zvezdochka shipyard (Severodvinsk); defuelling of onboard reactors; dismantling of NPS at Zvezdochka; and waste management. The assessment helped identify mitigation measures that could prevent the occurrence of adverse effects. Next, the project team defined and implemented an environmental management plan (EMP) based on the shipyard's existing environmental policy and the mitigating measures identified during the environmental assessment. Specific targets were defined to track the progress of the EMP implementation, and are described in this paper. During the study period, three Victor Class NPS were dismantled at Zvezdochka. The major benefits realized include: removal and spent nuclear fuel assemblies; treatment/decontamination of liquid and solid radioactive waste; and the cultivation of collaboration between Russian and Western expertise. (author)

  5. Implementation of the environmental management plan for the dismantling of nuclear powered submarines at Zvezdochka shipyard, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washer, M.; Cull, M.; Crocker, C.; Ivanov, V.; Shepurev, A.; Khan, B.U.Z.; Lee, M.; Gerchikov, M.

    2008-01-01

    Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada is funding the dismantling of twelve nuclear powered submarines (NPS) from the Russian Federation's Northern Fleet as part of the Global Partnership Initiative against weapons and materials of mass destruction. In this paper, work performed by Nuclear Safety Solutions Ltd. and its collaborators in support of these activities is described. First, an environmental impact assessment of towing and dismantling NPS in the Kola Peninsula, and the Barents and White Seas was performed. The assessed activities included: towing of NPS from Naval Bases in Murmansk Region to the Zvezdochka shipyard (Severodvinsk); defuelling of onboard reactors; dismantling of NPS at Zvezdochka; and waste management. The assessment helped identify mitigation measures that could prevent the occurrence of adverse effects. Next, the project team defined and implemented an environmental management plan (EMP) based on the shipyard's existing environmental policy and the mitigating measures identified during the environmental assessment. Specific targets were defined to track the progress of the EMP implementation, and are described in this paper. During the study period, three Victor Class NPS were dismantled at Zvezdochka. The major benefits realized include: removal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies; treatment/ decontamination of liquid and solid radioactive waste; and the cultivation of collaboration between Russian and Western expertise. (author)

  6. Russia's Nuclear Forces: Between Disarmament and Modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podvig, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear weapons have traditionally occupied an important place in Russia's national security strategy. This tradition goes back to the Soviet times, when the country invested considerable efforts into building its nuclear arsenal and achieving strategic parity with the United States. As Russia and the United States have been reducing their nuclear arsenals since the end of the Cold War, their relationship has undergone a complex transformation toward cooperation and partnership mixed with suspicion and rivalry. The focus of Russia's nuclear policy, however, has remained essentially unchanged - it still considers strategic balance with the United States to be an important element of national security and pays considerable attention to maintaining the deterrent potential of its strategic forces. Russia does recognize the emergence of new threats - it cannot ignore the threats related to regional instabilities and conflicts on its own territory and in bordering states, such as the tensions in the Caucasus or the war in Afghanistan, the terrorist activity that is associated with these conflicts, as well as the problems that stem from nuclear and missile proliferation. These, however, are not given a high priority in Russia's security policy. For example, the new military doctrine adopted in February 2010, opens the list of military threats with the expansion of geographical and political reach of NATO, which is followed by the threat to strategic stability and then by deployment of missile defense. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and destabilizing local conflicts are placed much further down the list. Even when it comes to confronting the issues of local instabilities and terrorism, Russia's leadership tends to see these issues through the prism of its strategic strength, alleging that terrorist attacks are a reaction to Russia's perceived weakness. This way of looking at the issues effectively redefines national security problems to conform to the traditional view

  7. Why Russia still wants nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, J.

    1993-01-01

    Despite a recent explosion at the Tomsk uranium reprocessing plant in Siberia, and the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, support for nuclear power is still firm in Russia. The Russian nuclear industry employs around two million people and their employment security is one of the chief factors in support of the nuclear power industry despite its safety record. The other major reason is energy shortages. Despite huge natural deposits of petroleum and gas, electric power shortages are widespread. Eighty per cent of Russia's electric power comes from oil-fired power stations, but oil supplies are unreliable. Production is dropping and, at the same time, an increasing proportion of the oil produced is exported to earn foreign currency. The concerns of environmental groups may have to be shelved, until Russia's infrastructure is efficient enough to maintain power supplies reliably. (UK)

  8. US-Russia team plans a package minireactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    A US-Russian joint venture has concluded design of what is called a low-cost, supersafe mini nuclear power reactor. They plan to begin construction of a 6-Mw unit in Russia in mid-1996 and to offer the standardized unit for sale in developing countries. Advanced Physics Corp., Irvine, CA, and five Russian nuclear and space industry centers plan to build the first unit in five years or less at a cost of about $150 million. The high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor will be fueled by uranium encased in graphite spheres that percolate through the core

  9. Developments of nuclear power in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konowalow, V.; Tytschkow, J.; Terentjew, W.

    1994-01-01

    Since the disintegration of the Soviet Union the economy, and thus also the nuclear industry in Russia, which is supervised by the Ministry for Atomic Energy, is in a process of structural change. The process is to result in a diversification of the products manufactured for use in the power industry and the nuclear fuel cycle, and also in enhanced productivity. Science and research, which enjoy a high reputation worldwide, must be preserved and expanded. Nuclear technology in Russia is to be developed further in three stages. In the renewal phase up until 2000, older nuclear power stations will be phased out and a new generation of reactors will be developed, which will be built and connected to the power grid in the second stage, which will extend until 2010. In the third phase, after 2010, the installed capacity of the nuclear generating units equipped with new reactors is to rise to 30 or 40 million kW. (orig.) [de

  10. Iran and Russia signed nuclear agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with signing of agreement between Russian Federation and Iran about nuclear fuel for nuclear power plant which is constructed. It was happened only three days after Bratislava Summit between presidents G. Bush and V. Putin. Supply of nuclear fuel should be started up to two months and the nuclear power plant with value eight hundred U. S. dollars should be commissioned next year. According to this agreement spent fuel will be sent back to Russia. After this manner it should be prevented the possibility that Iran will use spent fuel for producing of nuclear bomb

  11. Nuclear Weapons in Russia's approach to conflict

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dave

    2016-11-01

    President Putin has moved nuclear weapons to the foreground of the European security landscape. New risks and dangers arise from the apparent coupling of nuclear weapons capabilities with Moscow's revanchist and irredentist foreign and defence policies toward its neighbours. Nuclear weapons are the central feature and capstone capability in Russia's evolving concept of strategic deterrence and are important tools for achieving Russia's geopolitical aims. Russian thinking on the role and place of nuclear weapons in upholding national security and in achieving strategic aims is reflected in military policy, force structure and posture, and exercises and operations. Russia's political and military leaders are not only re-conceptualising the role of nuclear weapons. They are also building the military capabilities that can credibly threaten the calibrated employment of nuclear weapons for deterrence, de-escalation and war-fighting from the regional to large-scale and global levels of conflict. New and still developing concepts for the employment of conventional long-range precision weapons in tandem with nuclear weapons for regional deterrence and containment of local and regional conflicts add volatility to the regional tensions and uncertainties created by recent Russian aggression. Russia's reliance upon integrated conventional and nuclear capabilities in reasserting its influence in its perceived sphere of special interest, intended to contain conflicts at a manageable level, could actually increase the risk of the potential employment of nuclear weapons. NATO nations collectively, and the three NATO nuclear powers (Great Britain, France, and the United States) individually, have recognized this new reality and have begun to adapt to it. In that context, the aim of this paper is to elaborate a clearer understanding of the place and role of nuclear weapons in Russia's approach to conflict, based on nuclear-related policy statements and military-theoretical writing

  12. Defence nuclear waste disposal in Russia. International perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenhouse, M.J.; Kirko, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    Significant amounts of liquid and solid radioactive waste have been generated in Russia during the production of nuclear weapons, and there is an urgent need to find suitable ways to manage these wastes in a way that protects both the current population and future generations. This book contains contributions from pure and applied scientists and other representatives from Europe, North America, and Russia, who are, or have been, actively involved in the field of radioactive waste management and disposal. First-hand experience of specific problems associated with defence-related wastes in the USA and the Russian Federation is presented, and current plans are described for the disposal of solid wastes arising from civilian nuclear power production programmes in other countries, including Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Germany and the UK. The book provides a good insight into ongoing research at local and national level within Russia, devoted to the safe disposal of defence-related radioactive waste. It also demonstrates how existing expertise and technology from civilian nuclear waste management programmes can be applied to solving the problems created by nuclear defence programmes. Contributions address methods of immobilisation, site selection methodology, site characterisation techniques and data interpretation, the key elements of safety/performance assessments of planned deep (geological) repositories for radioactive waste, and radionuclide transport modelling. Concerns associated with certain specific nuclear waste disposal concepts and repository sites are also presented. refs

  13. Demands and conditions of nuclear power development in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    A reliable power supply is necessary for Russia to find its way out of the present crisis and to develop its economy. Although there are considerable fossil fuel resources in Russia, they are not sufficient to meet future power demands. Forecasts by specialists indicate that about 30% of the necessary increase in annual electricity production should be covered until the year 2010 by new nuclear power plants (NPPs). Also, by that time, all outdated nuclear power units should be replaced by new plants of more than 8 GW capacity. The total NPP capacity in Russia should be increased until 2010 by 50-70%, thus providing the basis for further development of nuclear power, with the aim of reaching 25% of the total electricity generation before 2015. Safety assurance of operational NPPs is a major prerequisite for nuclear power development, and measures for improving safety are being implemented. New designs of power units are being developed, in accordance with modern requirements and safety standards, and the start of construction of these units is planned for the end of this decade. The economic parameters of NPPs situated in the European part of Russia are better than those of coal and gas fuelled power plants. The improved safety of NPPs, the implementation of measures for processing and storage of radioactive wastes, and economic arguments are gradually changing the negative attitude of the population to nuclear power. Extended international co-operation is a further important factor, giving additional assurances of successful and safe nuclear power development in Russia. (author). 1 tab

  14. The regulatory system of nuclear safety in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    This article explains what type of mechanism the nuclear system has and how nuclear safety is regulated in Russia. There are two main organizations in this system : ROSATOM and ROSTEKHADZOR. ROSATOM, which was founded in 2007, incorporates all the nuclear industries in Russia, including civil nuclear companies as well as nuclear weapons complex facilities. ROSTEKHNADZOR is the federal body that secures and supervises the safety in using atomic energy. This article also reviews three laws on regulating nuclear safety. (author)

  15. Safeguarding nuclear weapon: Usable materials in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, T.

    1998-01-01

    Both the United States and Russia are retaining as strategic reserves more plutonium and HEU for potential reuse as weapons, than is legitimately needed. Both have engaged in discussions and have programs in various stages of development to dispose of excess plutonium and HEU. These fissile material disposition programs will take decades to complete. In the interim there will be, as there is now, hundreds of tons of separated weapon-usable fissile material stored in tens of thousands of transportable canisters, each containing from a few to several tons of kgs of weapon-usable fissile material. This material must be secured against theft and unauthorized use. To have high confidence that the material is secure, one must establish criteria against which the adequacy of the protective systems can be judged. For example, one finds such criteria in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) regulations for the protection of special nuclear materials

  16. Nuclear heat applications in Russia: Experience, status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitenkov, F.M.; Kusmartsev, E.V.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive experience gained with nuclear district heating in Russia is described. Most of the WWER reactors in Russia are cogeneration plants. Steam is extracted through LP turbine bleeders and condensed in intermediate heat exchangers to hot water which is then supplied to DH grids. Also some small dedicated nuclear heating plants are operated. (author)

  17. Situation and development trend of nuclear power and uranium industry in the united states and Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the situation, trend of nuclear electrical and uranium industry in the United States and Russia. The United States and Russia are the two biggest countries in the world which generated nuclear power earliest. After 40 years' development, nuclear power in the United States and Russia are approximately 20%, 11% respectively of the total generation capacity in 2001. In the United States, only 6% of the nuclear power consumed uranium resource is domestic, in Russia about half of its uranium production is for export. Due to the collision between the energy development and environment protection, nuclear power in USA is still strong, but the uranium industry declines. In the future, uranium production for nuclear power in the United States will depend on the international market and the uranium storage of different levels. On the basis of pacifying people and making the country prosper, Russia has established their great plans for nuclear power with their substantial uranium resources. The author considers the supply and demand of uranium industry will remain balanced in the future decade on the whole, despite the United States and Russia's trend of uranium industry could take a major effect on uranium industry to the world. (authors)

  18. The condition and prospects of nuclear industry development in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiricenko, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation author analyses perspectives of nuclear industry development in Russian Federation. State of NPPs in Russia on 2005 year is presented. NPP output, NPP capacity factor as well as NPP operation events in Russia in the period of 1992-2010 are analysed. The energy strategy of Russia and scenario for electricity production development as well as main challenges of 'Rosenergoatom' including life extension of NPP power units in Russian Federation are discussed

  19. Nuclear energy industry in Russia promoting global strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu

    2001-01-01

    Since former USSR disintegrated to birth new Russia on December, 1991, it already passed ten years. As Russian economic hardship affected its nuclear energy development, No.1 reactor of the Rostov nuclear power station (VVER-1000) established its full power operation on September, 2001 after passing eight years of pausing period as a Russian nuclear power station, at dull development of nuclear energy in the world. When beginning of its commercial operation, scale of nuclear power generation under operation in Russia will reach to the fourth one in the world by getting over the one in Germany. Russia also begins international business on reprocessing of spent fuel and intermittent storage. And, Russia positively develops export business of concentrated uranium and nuclear fuel, too. Furthermore, Russia shows some positive initiatives on export of nuclear power station to China, Iran and India, and development on advanced nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle forecast to future. Here was introduced on international developmental development of nuclear energy industry activated recently at delayed time for this ten years. (G.K.)

  20. Russia's nuclear doctrine: The end of the period of transition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokov, N.

    2000-01-01

    The Russian Federation issued a draft Military Doctrine in October 1999, widely circulating it for study and reactions. In January 2000, Russia published its 2000 National Security Concept and on 4 February, the Security Council approved its new military doctrine. Nuclear weapons are seen as the only reliable means to dissuade NATO from using force against Russia. There is a distinct focus in the new doctrine on the immediate military utility of nuclear weapons. Russia, like NATO, is continuing to reduce its nuclear weapons, though at a slower clip than foreseen by the START agreements. The doctrine reasserts the policy of first use of nuclear weapons in response to a conventional attack. Its policy provides for the use of nuclear weapons in response to an attack in which other weapons of mass destruction (chemical or biological) are used. (author)

  1. Russia, USA set to complete nuclear safety programme ahead of schedule

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The amount of work done by the United States and Russia on the implementation of the programme for security, account and control of nuclear materials has increased three-fold in 2003 as compared with the previous year. The two countries are going to complete it by 2008, two years earlier than initially planned" (2 paragraphs).

  2. Development of advanced nuclear reactors in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotoudeh, M.; Silakhori, K.; Sepanloo, K.; Jahanfarnia, G.; Moattar, F.

    2008-01-01

    Several advanced reactor designs have been so far developed in Russia. The AES-91 and AES-92 plants with the VVER-1000 reactors have been developed at the beginning of 1990. However, the former design has been built in China and the latest which is certified meeting European Utility Requirements is being built in India. Moreover, the model VVER-1500 reactor with 50-60 MWd/t burn-up and an enhanced safety was being developed by Gidropress about 2005, excepting to be completed in 2007. But, this schedule has slipped in favor of development of the AES-2006 power plant incorporating a third-generation standardized VVER-1200 reactor of 1170 MWe. This is an evolutionary development of the well-proven VVER-1000 reactor in the AES-92 plant, with longer life, greater power and efficiency and its lead units are being built at Novovoronezh II, to start operation in 2012-13. Based on Atomenergoproekt declaration, the AES-2006 conforms to both Russian standards and European Utility Requirements. The most important features of the AES-2006 design are mentioned as: a design based on the passive safety systems, double containment, longer plant service life of 50 years with a capacity factor of 92%, longer irreplaceable components service life of 60 years, a 28.6% lower amount of concrete and metal, shorter construction time of 54 months, a Core Damage Frequency of 1x10 -7 / year and lower liquid and solid wastes by 70% and 80% respectively. The presented paper includes a comparative analysis of technological and safety features, economic parameters and environmental impact of the AES-2006 design versus the other western advanced reactors. Since the Bushehr phase II NPP and several other NPPs are planning in Iran, such analysis would be of a great importance

  3. BUSINESS PLAN BLUEPRINT OF A CAFE IN RUSSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Geraskin, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    This thesis provides an insight into business plan core chapters from the viewpoint of a starting company in North-Western Russia. The aim of the thesis was to comprehend the main steps on the way to the successful business plan such as the marketing plan, risk management issues, human resource management features and to facet the business idea itself with the help of the project commissioner. Catering business, marketing, risk management and other special literature was used along with i...

  4. Russia's Nuclear Forces: Between Disarmament and Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podvig, Pavel

    2011-04-01

    Nuclear weapons have traditionally occupied an important place in Russia's national security strategy. This tradition goes back to the Soviet times, when the country invested considerable efforts into building its nuclear arsenal and achieving strategic parity with the United States. As Russia and the United States have been reducing their nuclear arsenals since the end of the Cold War, their relationship has undergone a complex transformation toward cooperation and partnership mixed with suspicion and rivalry. The focus of Russia's nuclear policy, however, has remained essentially unchanged - it still considers strategic balance with the United States to be an important element of national security and pays considerable attention to maintaining the deterrent potential of its strategic forces. Russia does recognize the emergence of new threats - it cannot ignore the threats related to regional instabilities and conflicts on its own territory and in bordering states, such as the tensions in the Caucasus or the war in Afghanistan, the terrorist activity that is associated with these conflicts, as well as the problems that stem from nuclear and missile proliferation. These, however, are not given a high priority in Russia's security policy. For example, the new military doctrine adopted in February 2010, opens the list of military threats with the expansion of geographical and political reach of NATO, which is followed by the threat to strategic stability and then by deployment of missile defense. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and destabilizing local conflicts are placed much further down the list. Even when it comes to confronting the issues of local instabilities and terrorism, Russia's leadership tends to see these issues through the prism of its strategic strength, alleging that terrorist attacks are a reaction to Russia's perceived weakness. This way of looking at the issues effectively redefines national security problems to conform

  5. Licensing of spent nuclear fuel dry storage in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislov, A.I.; Kolesnikov, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Federal nuclear and radiation safety authority of Russia (Gosatomnadzor) being the state regulation body, organizes and carries out the state regulation and supervision for safety at handling, transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel. In Russia, the use of dry storage in casks will be the primary spent nuclear fuel storage option for the next twenty years. The cask for spent nuclear fuel must be applied for licensing by Gosatomnadzor for both storage and transportation. There are a number of regulations for transportation and storage of spent nuclear fuel in Russia. Up to now, there are no special regulations for dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Such regulations will be prepared up to the end of 1998. Principally, it will be required that only type B(U)F, packages can be used for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel. Recently, there are two dual-purpose cask designs under consideration in Russia. One of them is the CONSTOR steel concrete cask, developed in Russia (NPO CKTI) under the leadership of GNB, Germany. The other cask design is the TUK-104 cask of KBSM, Russia. Both cask types were designed for spent nuclear RBMK fuel. The CONSTOR steel concrete cask was designed to be in full compliance with both Russian and IAEA regulations for transport of packages for radioactive material. The evaluation of the design criteria by Russian experts for the CONSTOR steel concrete cask project was performed at a first stage of licensing (1995 - 1997). The CONSTOR cask design has been assessed (strength analysis, thermal physics, nuclear physics and others) by different Russian experts. To show finally the compliance of the CONSTOR steel concrete cask with Russian and IAEA regulations, six drop tests have been performed with a 1:2 scale model manufactured in Russia. A test report was prepared. The test results have shown that the CONSTOR cask integrity is guaranteed under both transport and storage accident conditions. The final stage of the certification procedure

  6. Nuclear power development in Russia. Russia's energy industry preparing for the free market economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The energy industry in Eastern Europe is preparing for the free market economy. The ambitions goal is to get fit and prepared for joining the free market economy as a competitor, and within the shortest possible time at that, struggling against the sharp wind of change that will blow, and trying to make the best of actually very unfavourable economic and political conditions. Priority has been given to privatisation of power plants and electricity networks, and to a speedy connection to the Western grids. However, all parties concerned are well aware that this task cannot be accomplished out of Russia's own resources alone. Whether the economy in Russia can be put on a stable footing and develop stable structures will depend on the development and efficient use of nuclear power, as the most important resources of Russia's energy industry are concentrated in the eastern part of the country, while 70% of electricity generation and demand is concentrated in the European part. (orig.) [de

  7. Entrepreneurial proliferation: Russia`s nuclear industry suits the buyers market. Master`s thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, T.D.; Williams, A.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Soviet Union collapsed in December 1991, bringing an end to four decades of the Cold War. A system of tight centralized controls has given way to chaotic freedom and un-managed, entrepreneurial capitalism. Of immediate concern to most world leaders has been the control and safety of over 30,000 Soviet nuclear weapons. After 1991, the Soviet, centralized system of management lost one key structural element: a reliable `human factor` for nuclear material control. The Soviet systems for physical security and material control are still in place in the nuclear inheritor states - Russia, Ukraine, Khazakhnstan, and Belarus - but they do not restrain or regulate their nuclear industry. In the chaos created by the Soviet collapse, the nonproliferation regime may not adequately temper the supply of the nuclear materials of the new inheritor states. This could permit organizations or states seeking nuclear weapons easier access to fissile materials. New initiatives such as the United States Cooperative Threat Reduction program, which draws upon U.S. technology and expertise to help the NIS solve these complex problems, are short-tern tactics. At present there are no strategies which address the long-tern root problems caused by the Soviet collapse.This thesis demonstrates the extent of the nuclear control problems in Russia. Specifically, we examine physical security, material control and accounting regulation and enforcement, and criminal actions. It reveals that the current lack of internal controls make access to nuclear materials easier for aspiring nuclear weapons States.

  8. Nuclear education in Russia. Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification level. The specific features of PhD level (doctoral program) of education in Russia are discussed. The paper underlines particularly a special role of international collaboration in the field of nuclear education for further development of nuclear education all over the world. Some examples of international cooperation in the frames of new educational programs development are considered. (author)

  9. The nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuertes Menendez, M. J.; Gasco Leonarte, L.; Granada Ferrero, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Planning of the response to emergencies in nuclear plants is regulated by the Basic Nuclear Emergency Plan (PLABEN). This basic Plan is the guidelines for drawing up, implementing and maintaining the effectiveness of the nuclear power plant exterior nuclear emergency plans. The five exterior emergency plans approved as per PLABEN (PENGUA, PENCA, PENBU, PENTA and PENVA) place special emphasis on the preventive issues of emergency planning, such as implementation of advance information programs to the population, as well as on training exercises and drills. (Author)

  10. Russia's nuclear policy in the 21. century environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenin, D.

    2005-01-01

    While little noticed by the public, the nuclear standoff that had long been associated with the Soviet-U.S. confrontation continues to exist even a decade and a half after the official end of the Cold War. Nuclear weapons, developed and perfected in the environment of the U.S.-Soviet politico-military confrontation, which they soon came to epitomize, continue to play a prominent role in Washington's and Moscow's defense and security policies. Nuclear deterrence has not been abolished by official zero targeting of missiles and warheads. Even as arsenals are being reduced, modernization and research go ahead. Moreover, in the 21. century's strategic environment, whose principal features include the spread of weapons of mass destruction and catastrophic terrorism; the rise of China as America's future competitor, and the nuclearization of India; and, finally, a general politico-strategic uncertainty, the usability of nuclear weapons, both political and military, is being subtly reconsidered. In the opinion of some experts, a second nuclear age has come. This paper discusses the official nuclear policy of the Russian Federation and the evolution of Russian thinking on the role of nuclear weapons in the 21. century. It seeks to explain the importance of nuclear weapons for post-Soviet Russia; the post-Cold War deterrence strategy; the development of the nuclear forces structure and their missions; as well as Russia's approaches to nuclear arms control and nuclear proliferation. Finally, the paper examines the place and role of Russia in the multipolar nuclear constellation of this new century. (author)

  11. Nuclear liability legislation in Russia - current status and expected developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, A. E.; Borisov, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    Present report is provided by the experts of the Russian insurance business, a company member of the Russian Nuclear Pool, and not the experts of the Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation (RF Minatom). Considering the above, the following document will outline the current status of nuclear liability legislation and insurance in Russia from a viewpoint of the insurance companies and not RF Minatom. (author)

  12. The 'second nuclear era': A perspective from Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Orlov, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    As are many other countries, Russia is working on the development of new nuclear power plants that incorporate enhanced safety features. At the same time, it is realized that over the next 20 years the expansion of nuclear power can hardly be expected in a country suffering a deep crisis, with a low standard of living yet with per capita energy production higher than in Germany or France. Even doubling the nuclear capacity would influence less than 3% of Russia's fuel balance, making it incommensurate with the extent of problems now facing the country and its fuel and energy economy. The main goals of nuclear power and arguments in favour of its development in Russia as in most other countries with nuclear programmes - are lying ahead in the century to come. The objectives of the next stage - the 'second nuclear era' should be to provide a radical solution to the looming problems of environment, resources, and transportation, as well as social and international problems associated with the inevitable growth of energy demands

  13. Nuclear power in Russia: status, problems, prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoy, N.

    1992-01-01

    To solve the problem of atomic bomb, a powerful nuclear industrial complex has been established in the Soviet Union. This complex has developed a high scientific and engineering potential and enlisted the best science and engineering experts. Strict administration, rigid discipline in execution and operation, to secrecy limiting both internal and external interactions were typical of the complex which presented a state within the state with the inside divide by rigid barriers and protected from the outside by iron curtain. When the atomic bomb was designed and tested the search for a field of application for the nuclear potential available was started: nuclear power plants, nuclear power facilities for submarines and ships, nuclear aircraft and rocket engines, space nuclear facilities. Such were the conditions of forming the nuclear power in USSR. But this nuclear military complex has failed to prevent the Chelyabinsk accident which involved considerable radiological effects. The national industry could not adopt quickly the work style established in a nuclear complex and relative high technologies because of low educational and technical level and poor technological discipline. The results are known: the Chernobyl accident coincided in time with the beginning of the reconstruction of the System, the result of which was this accident. This paper describes the current status of the nuclear park, shows the problems of safety, maintenance, retrofitting, reconstruction or decommissioning. Statistical data on nuclear power in the power production program are also given

  14. Nuclear power and public opinion in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurov, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    The attitude of the Russian (Soviet) society towards nuclear power and nuclear technology has changed over the years, depending on political, social and economic processes. Three periods of the relationship between the Russian society and nuclear power can be distinguished. The first period began in the early 1940s and finished in April 1986, when the Chernobyl disaster occurred. It was the period of vigorous development of the nuclear industry in the USSR. During this period the population unconditionally supported the development of this branch of the industry. The second period lasted from 1986 to 1991. The paper analyses the attitude towards nuclear power of the Soviet society as a whole and of separate social groups during the period of 'glasnost' (openness) and during the disintegration period. It is pointed out that the Chernobyl syndrome and the consequent anti-nuclear trends were used in the struggle for power. The third period extends from 1991 to the present. The paper analyses the causes of the positive changes in the public towards nuclear power which have been evident from sociological surveys. (author)

  15. Russia's evolving nuclear doctrine and its implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, Elbridge

    2016-01-01

    A discontented Russia is putting significant thought into how it would employ its nuclear weapons in the event of a conflict with NATO. Policy-makers and those who influence them need to understand how Moscow sees its options for nuclear employment, particularly its so-called 'escalate to de-escalate' strategy. NATO should not be caught unawares by Russian emphasis on, let alone resort to, such an option. This paper is an attempt to provide a baseline of Russian thinking on how Moscow looks at these options. (author)

  16. Planning for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper aims to stimulate discussions between nuclear engineers and the radiological protection professions in order to facilitate planning for nuclear emergencies. A brief review is given of the response to nuclear accidents. Studying accidents can lead to prevention, but some effort must be put into emergency response. Such issues as decontamination and decommissioning, socio-economic consequences, education and training for nuclear personnel and exercises and drills, are raised. (UK)

  17. Nuclear education in Russia: Status, peculiarities, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykii, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For longer than 50-year period of nuclear industry development in the USSR, the specialists training system has been created to meet completely the industrial branch's demands for the specialists of all possible qualifications for research, engineering and production activities. This educational system does exist in Russia till now. In the presentation the following items will be addressed: Nuclear Engineering education in Russia: status and peculiarities; Demands of nuclear enterprises for the alumni. Role of the Universities in these problems solution; Nuclear engineering education problems in Russia; Master of science education in nuclear aria; Perspectives of nuclear education in Russia; Integration of nuclear education in Europe: perspectives and problems. The educational system in nuclear engineering, like an educational system in any other knowledge area in Russia, includes the training activities limited by Russian legislation only: academic training of the specialists with award of the State certificates (higher education, re-training, qualification upgrade); qualification upgrade of the specialists without award of the State certificates. The system of education represents a multi-level structure oriented at any possible needs of industrial branches. At present, more than 20 Russian higher education institutions train the specialists in nuclear engineering. The specialists training in nuclear engineering is being conducted in all these universities in full accordance with common educational curricula and standards which define some peculiarities of the specialists training in this area: 1) Combination of fundamental knowledge in physics and mathematics with profound engineering skills; 2) Large share of laboratory works; 3) Participation at the research work starting from the 4th year student; 4) Long education time (5-6 years) and period for thesis preparation (1/2 year - pre-diploma internship and 1/2 year of thesis preparation); 5) High

  18. Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolkov, Benjamin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Galya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-26

    In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options

  19. The Security of Russia's Nuclear Arsenal: The Human Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Assertions by the Russian military that all of their nuclear weapons are secure against theft and that nuclear units within the military are somehow insulated from the problems plaguing the Russian military should not be accepted uncritically. Accordingly, we should not give unwarranted credence to the pronouncements of military figures like Cal.-Gen. Igor Valynkin, Chief of the Defense Ministry's 12th Main Directorate, which oversees the country's nuclear arsenal. He contends that ''Russian nuclear weapons are under reliable supervision'' and that ''talk about the unreliability of our control over nuclear weapons has only one pragmatic goal--to convince international society that the country is incapable of maintaining nuclear safety and to introduce international oversight over those weapons, as it is done, for example, in Iraq.'' While the comparison to Iraq is preposterous, many analysts might agree with Valynkin's sanguine appraisal of the security of Russia's nuclear weapons. In contrast, I argue that the numerous difficulties confronting the military as a whole should cause concern in the West over the security of the Russian nuclear arsenal

  20. The future of U.S.-Russia nuclear arms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifer, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear arms control has long made contributions to U.S.-Soviet and U.S.-Russian security, but the current regime is at risk. The 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty may be headed for collapse. Both the United States and Russia are modernizing their strategic forces, and the fate of the 2010 New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty is unclear. In the unlikely case that the sides are prepared to go beyond New START, there are ways to address further reductions and related issues. A collapse of the arms control regime, on the other hand, would mean the end of constraints on U.S. and Russian nuclear forces, a significant loss of transparency, and potential costs to U.S. security.

  1. Nuclear development status in the world (4). Four new emerging countries (China, Russia, India, and South Korea) leading global nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu

    2017-01-01

    From the temporary stagnation immediately after the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, many countries are restarting nuclear development. The emerging 4 countries of China, Russia, India, and South Korea account for the majority number of the world's nuclear power plants under construction. The common feature is that the project promoter is a state-owned enterprise, and these countries are promoting nuclear development under the state's solid nuclear policies. The policies of the completion of nuclear fuel cycle and development fast reactors are also common. China is committed to major nuclear power route, domestically targeting 58 million kW in 2020, also focusing on the export of nuclear energy to Pakistan, Romania, Argentina, and the UK as already scheduled. China also actively develops fast reactors, high-temperature gas reactors, and small reactors. Based on the nuclear export from Russia, plants are operating or under construction in Iran, China, India, Vietnam, Turkey, Belarus, etc. Furthermore, Russia is actively pursuing fast reactors and nuclear fuel cycle policy from the beginning. In India, in addition to imported nuclear reactors, it also develops domestic reactors to solve power shortage, targeting 63 million kW in 2032. South Korea is concentrating on nuclear development in order to depart from energy imports. In 2035, it plans 38.3 million kW of nuclear power generation. (A.O.)

  2. Evaluation of possible means to stop production of nuclear power in northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaugen, Aud K.

    2007-08-01

    This note illuminates the status and some elements in the Russian efforts on use of nuclear power, with special emphasis on northwest Russia. In addition the report describes an evaluation of the possibilities of Norwegian influence on the nuclear power in northwest Russia and Kola Peninsula

  3. Problems on radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel management in the European Arctic Region of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krukov, Evgeny B.

    1999-01-01

    In the Arkhangelsk and Murmansk regions of Russia, radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel from the Northern Fleet and Mineconomiki, the technological repairing plant Atomflot and the Kola nuclear power plant and other activities is accumulating steadily and there is no adequate waste management system in the region. There is an action plan to remedy the situation, but it has been delayed because of insufficient funds. This presentation lists the volumes of liquid and solid radioactive wastes from these sources in 1996 and the expected volumes in 2020. It also lists the specific problems of the present waste management and main proposals of the action plan. In addition to federal funds, a number of projects are financed through international co-operation

  4. US Department of Energy (DOE)/Gosatomnadzor (GAN) of Russia project at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, I.A.; Konoplev, K.A.; Hauser, G.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of work accomplished within the scope of the DOE-Gosatomnadzor (GAN) Agreement to reduce vulnerability to theft of direct-use nuclear materials in Russia. The DOE-GAN agreement concerns the Russian Academy of Science B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), located 45 kilometers from St. Petersburg. The PNPI operates facilities to research basic nuclear physics. Current world conditions require particular attention to the issue of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC ampersand A) of nuclear materials. The long-term plan to increase security at the facility is outlined, including training, physical protection upgrades, and material control and accountability. 4 figs

  5. The Norwegian Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The Plan of Action underlies Norwegian activities in the field of international co-operation to enhance nuclear safety and prevent radioactive contamination from activities in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Geographically the highest priority has been given to support for safety measures in north-west Russia. This information brochure outlines the main content of the Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues and lists a number of associated measures and projects

  6. The Norwegian Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Plan of Action underlies Norwegian activities in the field of international co-operation to enhance nuclear safety and prevent radioactive contamination from activities in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Geographically the highest priority has been given to support for safety measures in north-west Russia. This information brochure outlines the main content of the Plan of Action for nuclear safety issues and lists a number of associated measures and projects.

  7. Russia`s atomic tsar: Viktor N. Mikhailov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reams, C.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for International Security Affairs

    1996-12-01

    Minatom (Ministry of Atomic Energy) was created to manage Russia`s nuclear weapons program in the age of disarmament. The ministry is responsible for the development, production, and maintenance of nuclear weapons, warhead dismantlement, the production of nuclear materials for weapons, the disposition of nuclear materials disassembled from warheads, the administration of Russia`s vast nuclear weapons complex, the development of policy for the future role of Russia`s nuclear complex and payment of employees entrusted with such tasks. Thus, Minatom is instrumental in the implementation of arms control, disarmament and nonproliferation agreements. The director of Minatom, Viktor N. Mikhailov, wields a great deal of power and influence over Russia`s nuclear infrastructure. He is an important player amidst efforts to reduce the threats posed by Russia`s decaying nuclear complex. There are certainly other personalities in the Russian government who influence Minatom; however, few affect the ministry as profoundly as Mikhailov. His ability to influence Russia`s nuclear complex has been clearly demonstrated by his policies in relation to the US purchase of Russian highly enriched uranium, the planned fissile material storage facility at Mayak, materials protection, control and accountability programs, and his unwavering determination to sell Iran commercial nuclear technology. Mikhailov has also been a key negotiator when dealing with the US on issues of transparency of weapons dismantlement and fissile material disposition, as well as the use of US threat reduction funds. His policies and concerns in these areas will affect the prospects for the successful negotiation and implementation of future nuclear threat reduction programs and agreements with Russia.

  8. New Initiatives for International Cooperation for Nuclear Education in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strikhanov, M.

    2014-01-01

    Final remarks: Planned activities under the IAEA/MePhI cooperation - Assistance in implementing the IAEA initiative on Virtual Nuclear Management University; • Collecting and preserving information on peaceful use of nuclear science and technology through the Russian International Nuclear Information System (INIS) Center; • Assistance in implementing the educational laboratories of Virtual Nuclear laboratories for CLP4NET and T urbine-installation of NPP with VVER-1000 reactor“ simulator; • Develop and implement the selected courses using the CLP4NET or other suitable platform (3 Master’s degree programs on Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation); • Assistance in implementing the IAEA/ICTP School of NKM, August 2014 ; • A set of regional workshops on “The role of computer-based educational laboratories in Nuclear Engineering University Programmes”. New possible activities under the IAEA umbrella - • Cooperation with regional networks; • Establish a new network for Nuclear Education (CIS, EvrAzES, …) and develop together with other countries curricula, training programs and training materials on nuclear power and non-power applications; • Build public awareness of the benefits of nuclear technology and its applications; Support the IAEA in implementation of the selected courses in Member States. • Cooperation with foreign nuclear universities and training organizations for development of master and bachelor programs and postgraduate training

  9. Youth and nuclear industry in Russia: Tasks and problem solving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippoff, S.; Soldatov, A.; Kovalevskiy, A.; Porokhina, E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper activities of the Youth Department of Russian Nuclear Society (YDRNS) department at Moscow State Engineering-Physical Institute (MEPhI) are reviewed. The purposes of growing organization were pointed at the international conference P olar Lights'99 . First of all, the revealing and all-level support of active youth, including speciality discussion among pupils. Secondly, propagating the concepts of modern power engineering and creating the positive image of nuclear field among public. And, thirdly, the development of international relationships. May 1999 started with foundation of the YDRNS department at MEPhI and the following scientific trends were announced: Arrangement and conducting of scientific conferences and seminars on the current problems in nuclear field; Assistance in publication of scientific works and articles in scientific editions; Arrangement of the period of trainee and acquaintance of youth with energy enterprises; Reflecting the YDRNS and talented youth activities in mass media; Cooperation with YDRNS departments in other regions of Russia and similar foreign organizations; Creation of data base of participants and their participation in YDRNS activities. This thesis formed the basis of YDRNS of MEPhI activities for year 1999. (authors)

  10. Upgrading nuclear material protection, control and accounting in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravelli, Jack; Behan, Chris; Fishbone, Les

    2001-01-01

    Full text: I. Program goal and organization - In this paper we review the Cooperative US-Russia Program of Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A), whose goal is to reduce the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation by strengthening systems of MPC and A; thereby the Program enhances US national security. Based on this goal, the technical objective is to enhance, through US technical cooperation, the effectiveness of MPC and A systems at Russian sites with weapons-usable nuclear material, i.e. plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The Program exists because the extensive social, political and economic changes in Russia arising from the dissolution of the Soviet Union have increased the risk that these materials would be subject to theft or other misuse, with potentially grave consequences. On the US side, the MPC and A Program is administered by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration through the DOE national laboratories and other contractors. On the Russian side, the Program is administered by the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom) through its nuclear sites, by the regulatory agency Gosatomnadzor, and by nuclear sites not under Minatom. To carry out the Program objective, the DOE national laboratories consummate contracts with the Russian sites to implement agreed MPC and A upgrades. Deciding on what upgrades to perform depends on a cooperative analysis of site characteristics, materials, and vulnerabilities by joint US and Russian teams. Once the upgrades are agreed, the DOE laboratories supply technical and financial support and equipment to the Russian sites. The staff of the Russian sites do the work, and the US team members monitor the work through some combination - according to contract - of direct observation and reports, photographs and videotape supplied by the staff of the Russian sites. II. MPC and A task areas - Information in this review covers a selection of topical areas, with a

  11. Koptev announces space plans for Russia in 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    Pieson, D

    2003-01-01

    According to the head of the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, Yuri Koptev, the major emphasis of Russia's space program in 2003 will be supporting the nation's telecommunication satellite program (1/2 page).

  12. Nuclear power in Russia: Current status and prospective; Atomnaya ehnergetika Rossii: sostoyanie i perspektivy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, A K [Minatom, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation describes the following issues: mane factors determining the situation with power in Russian Federation; prospects of nuclear power in Russian Federation; modern demands on NPP safety in Russia.

  13. The use of IAEA-IRS information in Russia's nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The use of IAEA-IRS information in Russia's nuclear power industry is described, including the following issues: organizational aspects; organization of the information process; assessment of information uses; examples of using IAEA-IRS information. Figs

  14. Safety assurance in radioactive waste management at nuclear power plants of the Northwest region of Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonov, Igor

    1999-07-01

    This presentation describes the two large operating nuclear power plants (NPP) in Northwest Russia, the Kola NPP and the Leningrad NPP. The four units at Kola are tank-type pressurised water reactors of 440 MW (electric) while the four Leningrad reactors are 1000 MW (electric) of RBMK type. Gosatomnadzor of Russia regularly conducts so-called target inspections on safety assurance for radioactive waste management at NNP. Among the many items checked during such inspections are the existence and realisation of an action plan for waste reduction, the technical state of equipment and the compliance with previous directions. The management of liquid, solid and gaseous radioactive wastes is described in some detail, and so are the violations revealed at both sites. There is also some discussion of modernisation plans for waste management. It is stated that the ecological impact of the plants is negligible and there is no hazard to people or environment. The presentation concludes with some suggestions for improving the licensing requirements for waste management.

  15. Safety assurance in radioactive waste management at nuclear power plants of the Northwest region of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safonov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    This presentation describes the two large operating nuclear power plants (NPP) in Northwest Russia, the Kola NPP and the Leningrad NPP. The four units at Kola are tank-type pressurised water reactors of 440 MW (electric) while the four Leningrad reactors are 1000 MW (electric) of RBMK type. Gosatomnadzor of Russia regularly conducts so-called target inspections on safety assurance for radioactive waste management at NNP. Among the many items checked during such inspections are the existence and realisation of an action plan for waste reduction, the technical state of equipment and the compliance with previous directions. The management of liquid, solid and gaseous radioactive wastes is described in some detail, and so are the violations revealed at both sites. There is also some discussion of modernisation plans for waste management. It is stated that the ecological impact of the plants is negligible and there is no hazard to people or environment. The presentation concludes with some suggestions for improving the licensing requirements for waste management

  16. Integration of the military and civilian nuclear fuel cycles in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukharin, O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the close integration of the civil and military nuclear fuel cycles in Russia. Individual processing facilities, as well as the flow of nuclear material, are described as they existed in the 1980s and as they exist today. The end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union weakened the ties between the two nuclear fuel cycles, but did not separate them. Separation of the military and civilian nuclear fuel cycles would facilitate Russia's integration into the world's nuclear fuel cycle and its participation in international non-proliferation regimes

  17. Experience Transformed into Nuclear Regulatory Improvements in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapozhnikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    The third International Conference on Effective Nuclear Regulatory Systems (Canada, 2013) identified the main action items that should be addressed, implemented and followed up. The key technical and organizational areas important to strengthening reactor and spent fuel safety have been determined as following: • Regulatory lessons learned and actions taken (since the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP); • Waste management and spent fuel safety; • Emergency management; • Emerging programmes; • Human and organizational factors, safety and security culture. Over time many activities based on results of the IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service in the Russian Federation, 2019, and post-mission, 2013, have been implemented. At present there is progress for the national action plan on nuclear safety, preparation and conducting of long term spent fuel management, complementary reviews for nuclear facilities other than Nuclear Power Plants, emergency exercises with the regulatory body participation, improving communication, development of national regulations and improvement of regulatory system in the whole. The regulatory body ensures assistance in development of national regulatory infrastructure, safety culture to the countries planning to construct Russian design facilities (NPPs, RRs). The report outlines the results and future actions to improve nuclear regulation based on systematic approach to safety and particularly reflects the specificity of taking measures for the research reactors. (author)

  18. Economic Study of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage and Reprocessing Practices in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Miley, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a study of nuclear power economics in Russia. It addresses political and institutional background factors which constrain Russia's energy choices in the short and intermediate run. In the approach developed here, political and institutional factors might dominate short-term decisions, but the comparative costs of Russia's fuel-cycle options are likely to constrain her long-term energy strategy. To this end, the authors have also formulated a set of policy questions which should be addressed using a quantitative decision modeling which analyzes economic costs for all major components of different fuel cycle options, including the evolution of uranium prices

  19. Health, environmental risks and externalities of nuclear and other energy systems of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, A.P.; Demin, V.F.

    2000-01-01

    Due to different reasons the structure of electricity production systems of Russia should be reconsidered and changed. In this reconsideration the results of comparative risk assessment (CRA) and external cost assessment (ECA) are needed. CRA and ECA study has been carried out in the frame of the research program of International Center of Environmental Safety of Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russia. Main directions of this study are: 1) developing CRA and ECA methodology and data base ; 2) performing CRA and ECA for nuclear and other energy systems. Some tendencies in development of electricity production systems in Russia and preliminary results of CRA and ECA are described. (author)

  20. Economic Study of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage and Reprocessing Practices in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. E. Singer; G. H. Miley

    1997-10-01

    This report describes a study of nuclear power economics in Russia. It addresses political and institutional background factors which constrain Russia's energy choices in the short and intermediate run. In the approach developed here, political and institutional factors might dominate short-term decisions, but the comparative costs of Russia's fuel-cycle options are likely to constrain her long-term energy strategy. To this end, the authors have also formulated a set of policy questions which should be addressed using a quantitative decision modeling which analyzes economic costs for all major components of different fuel cycle options, including the evolution of uranium prices.

  1. Russia-U.S. joint program on the safe management of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witmer, F.E.; Krumpe, P.F.; Carlson, D.D.

    1998-06-01

    The Russia-US joint program on the safe management of nuclear materials was initiated to address common technical issues confronting the US and Russia in the management of excess weapons grade nuclear materials. The program was initiated after the 1993 Tomsk-7 accident. This paper provides an update on program activities since 1996. The Fourth US Russia Nuclear Materials Safety Management Workshop was conducted in March 1997. In addition, a number of contracts with Russian Institutes have been placed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These contracts support research related to the safe disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU). Topics investigated by Russian scientists under contracts with SNL and LLNL include accident consequence studies, the safety of anion exchange processes, underground isolation of nuclear materials, and the development of materials for the immobilization of excess weapons Pu

  2. HCTISN: no secret export of nuclear wastes to Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a controversy has broken out about the EDF's exports of depleted uranium to Russia. This depleted uranium comes from 2 sources: the tailings of uranium enrichment (from EURODIF plant) and the recycling of spent fuels (from La Hague plant). Depleted uranium is sent to Russia to be enriched by centrifugation process, this enrichment generates new depleted uranium that is kept by Russia, enriched uranium is sent back to France. As it is stipulated in all enrichment contracts the company that operates the enrichment keeps the depleted material, it is the case of Tenex the Russian company. This depleted uranium can not be considered as a waste because it is stored to be used as fuel for future fast reactors. (A.C.)

  3. The Apatity nuclear heating plant project: modern technical and economic issues of nuclear heat application in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Romenkov, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally Russia is a country with advanced structure of centralized heat supply. Many thermal plants and heating networks need technical upgrading to improve their technical and economic efficiency. Fossil fuelled heating capacities have a negative influence on ecology, which can be seen especially in the northern regions of Russia. Furthermore, fossil fuel prices are rising in Russia. The above factors tend to intensify the need for alternative heat sources being capable of solving the problem. Nuclear heat sources may be the alternative. In this paper, the main features of a proposed NHP in the Murmansk region are summarized. (author)

  4. Nuclear materials inventory plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, R.W.; Nichols, D.H.

    1982-03-01

    In any processing, manufacturing, or active storage facility it is impractical to assume that any physical security system can prevent the diversion of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). It is, therefore, the responsibility of any DOE Contractor, Licensee, or other holder of SNM to provide assurance that loss or diversion of a significant quantity of SNM is detectable. This ability to detect must be accomplishable within a reasonable time interval and can be accomplished only by taking physical inventories. The information gained and decisions resulting from these inventories can be no better than the SNM accounting system and the quality of measurements performed for each receipt, removal and inventory. Inventories interrupt processing or production operations, increase personnel exposures, and can add significantly to the cost of any operation. Therefore, realistic goals for the inventory must be defined and the relationship of the inherent parameters used in its validation be determined. Purpose of this document is to provide a statement of goals and a plan of action to achieve them

  5. Nuclear education in Russia : Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied

  6. Nuclear physics program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear physics program objectives, resources, applications and implications of scientific opportunities are presented. The scope of projected research is discussed in conjunction with accelerator facilities and manpower. 25 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Extrapolational Look at the Current State of Territorial Strategic Planning in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomolova Irina Viktorovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 90s, the ideas on territorial strategic planning have been progressively disseminated in Russia. A growing number of cities, regions and macroregions recognized the urgency of finding their individual path of development which would ensure the successful implementation of strategic plans. The author of the article distinguishes four stages of formation and development of territorial strategic planning in modern Russia on the basis of retrospective analysis. The special attention is paid to the contemporary period which started after the adoption of the Federal Law of June 28, 2014 no. 172 “On strategic planning in the Russian Federation” regulating the activity of federal, regional and municipal authorities in the field of strategic planning and management. For the first time in more than 20 years the common requirements to the system of strategic planning were established in Russia at the level of the legislative act. The strategic planning is officially recognized as the most important element in the system of strategic management contributing to the creation of conditions for sustainable territorial development. The author grounds the expediency and proves the necessity of legislative adoption of norms and principles of the strategic planning. The municipal level as an equal member of the strategic planning process is included in the system of strategic planning. In accordance with the adopted law, the strategies for socioeconomic development of the territory of the RF subject can be worked out in the region (for example, for several municipalities. It is necessary to develop specific goals, objectives and directions of development for each territory. This creates the conditions for planning the development of metropolitan areas as the territories of advanced development, as well as large intermunicipal investment projects and programs. On the basis of experience of strategic planning in Volgograd, the author makes constructive

  8. Nuclear education in Russia: Status, peculiarities, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykiy, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with the development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification levels. For the past several decades, nuclear education has lost its attractiveness to young people. The paper discusses the actions to be undertaken for reversing the situation. The paper underlines particularly the special role of international collaboration and all-European integration of nuclear educational programmes for further development of nuclear education all over the world. (author)

  9. Russia - a vision of our nuclear future (question mark)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepkowski, W.

    1979-01-01

    A tour of Soviet nuclear facilities by a group of American journalists is briefly reported. The differences between American and Soviet policies and attitudes toward nuclear energy are discussed. (N.D.H.)

  10. Looking at nuclear liability and insurance in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.

    1997-01-01

    A recent seminar in Moscow has addressed the issue of nuclear liability and insurance in the Russian nuclear industry since the breakup of the Soviet Union. The potential benefits of joining the international liability regime and adopting comprehensive nuclear liability legislation were discussed. The need to establish appropriate nuclear insurance structures and provide indemnity to cover the liability were also debated. Whether these changes can be put into action or not is less certain than the need for them. (UK)

  11. Features of the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebov, A.P.; Klushin, A.V.; Baranaev, Yu.D.

    2014-01-01

    The strategy for the development of nuclear energy and a closed fuel cycle (CFC) in such foreign countries as China, France, India, Japan, Korea, as well as the features of the development of nuclear energy and CFC in Russia is discussed. When using the BN and BREST reactors are not solved all the problems with CFC. The introduction of the WWER-SCP reactor will help solve problems with CFC. Improving the economy, the implementation of a deep burning of minor actinides, a significant reduction in nuclear hazardous work, the use of the produced during the processing of spent nuclear fuel (U+Pu) - prospects for using WWER-SCP [ru

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities

  13. COMPLETION OF THE FIRST INTEGRATED SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSSHIPMENT/INTERIM STORAGE FACILITY IN NW RUSSIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, R.S.; Barnes, E.; Snipes, R.L.; Hoeibraaten, S.; Gran, H.C.; Foshaug, E.; Godunov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Northwest and Far East Russia contain large quantities of unsecured spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from decommissioned submarines that potentially threaten the fragile environments of the surrounding Arctic and North Pacific regions. The majority of the SNF from the Russian Navy, including that from decommissioned nuclear submarines, is currently stored in on-shore and floating storage facilities. Some of the SNF is damaged and stored in an unstable condition. Existing Russian transport infrastructure and reprocessing facilities cannot meet the requirements for moving and reprocessing this amount of fuel. Additional interim storage capacity is required. Most of the existing storage facilities being used in Northwest Russia do not meet health and safety, and physical security requirements. The United States and Norway are currently providing assistance to the Russian Federation (RF) in developing systems for managing these wastes. If these wastes are not properly managed, they could release significant concentrations of radioactivity to these sensitive environments and could become serious global environmental and physical security issues. There are currently three closely-linked trilateral cooperative projects: development of a prototype dual-purpose transport and storage cask for SNF, a cask transshipment interim storage facility, and a fuel drying and cask de-watering system. The prototype cask has been fabricated, successfully tested, and certified. Serial production is now underway in Russia. In addition, the U.S. and Russia are working together to improve the management strategy for nuclear submarine reactor compartments after SNF removal

  14. Nuclear Station Facilities Improvement Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooks, R. W.; Lunardini, A. L.; Zaben, O.

    1991-01-01

    An effective facilities improvement program will include a plan for the temporary relocation of personnel during the construction of an adjoining service building addition. Since the smooth continuation of plant operation is of paramount importance, the phasing plan is established to minimize the disruptions in day-to-day station operation and administration. This plan should consider the final occupancy arrangements and the transition to the new structure; for example, computer hookup and phase-in should be considered. The nuclear industry is placing more emphasis on safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. In order to do this, more emphasis is placed on operations and maintenance. This results in increased size of managerial, technical and maintenance staffs. This in turn requires improved office and service facilities. The facilities that require improvement may include training areas, rad waste processing and storage facilities, and maintenance facilities. This paper discusses an approach for developing an effective program to plan and implement these projects. These improvement projects can range in magnitude from modifying a simple system to building a new structure to allocating space for a future project. This paper addresses the planning required for the new structures with emphasis on site location, space allocation, and internal layout. Since facility planning has recently been completed by Sargent and Leyden at six U. S. nuclear stations, specific examples from some of those plants are presented. Site planning and the establishment of long-range goals are of the utmost importance when undertaking a facilities improvement program for a nuclear station. A plan that considers the total site usage will enhance the value of both the new and existing facilities. Proper planning at the beginning of the program can minimize costs and maximize the benefits of the program

  15. Nuclear power in Russia: Status and developments trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grarinski, A. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    27 June 1954 saw the birth of nuclear power in the Soviet Union when a 5 MWe plant went into operation. The second reference point falls on 26 April 1986. Since then the fate of nuclear energy in the Soviet Union has been transformed once again: ft is now clear the Chernobyl did not entirely bury the notion of building nuclear p0wer stations. There are even signs that the leaders of the new states, as well as the general public, are beginning to see some of benefits of continuing with nuclear power programmes

  16. Nuclear emergency planning in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarli, J.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear emergency planning in Norway is forming a part of the Search and Rescue Service of the country. Due to the fact that Norway do not have any nucleat power reactor, the nuclear emergency planning has not been given high priority. The problems however are a part of the activity of the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, and the emergency preparedness is at the present time to a large extent based on the availability of professional health physicists and their knowledge, rather than established practices

  17. The Cossacks of the South of Russia in R.A. Fadeev’s geopolitical plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Oleg Viktorovich

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The political project of a conservative writer of political essays of the second half of the XIX c. R.A. Fadeev (1824–1883, in which a key part is assigned to the attraction of the Cossacks of Southern Russia to solving the pressing foreign policy issues, is analyzed. A conclusion that the Cossacks could be used as a militant vanguard, i.e. military force (infantry, cavalry, reconnaissance and an effective tool of the colonization of the suburbs of the Russian Empire – is drawn. The conditions under which R.A. Fadeev could implement his plans are revealed. The key condition is the preservation of the identity of the Cossacks as a class and as a sub-ethnos. The historical assessment of the R.A. Fadeev’s plans is given. According to the plans R.A. Fadeev, revived after the reforms of its military power, Russia should not only play a key role in international relations, but also strive for a first impact and then rule on its neighboring Asian and European territories. And in the perspective he saw the new world order, in which there would be two dominating superpowers, Russia and the United States. The Cossacks were assigned an important role in the implementation of these plans by the publicist.This geopolitical project, no matter how attractive it was not for the Russians at first glance, was a utopia. The publicist obviously overestimated the military and economic capabilities of contemporary Imperial Russia, the ability of the autocracy to the socio-economic and political renewal of the country corresponding to the demands of the times. Consequently, the Cossacks were not destined to play the role which was assigned to them by R.A. Fadeev. Althoughhe anticipated accurately the individual elements of the future world order established for several decades in the XX century.

  18. Russia's atomic tsar: Viktor N. Mikhailov

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reams, C.A.

    1996-12-01

    Minatom (Ministry of Atomic Energy) was created to manage Russia's nuclear weapons program in the age of disarmament. The ministry is responsible for the development, production, and maintenance of nuclear weapons, warhead dismantlement, the production of nuclear materials for weapons, the disposition of nuclear materials disassembled from warheads, the administration of Russia's vast nuclear weapons complex, the development of policy for the future role of Russia's nuclear complex and payment of employees entrusted with such tasks. Thus, Minatom is instrumental in the implementation of arms control, disarmament and nonproliferation agreements. The director of Minatom, Viktor N. Mikhailov, wields a great deal of power and influence over Russia's nuclear infrastructure. He is an important player amidst efforts to reduce the threats posed by Russia's decaying nuclear complex. There are certainly other personalities in the Russian government who influence Minatom; however, few affect the ministry as profoundly as Mikhailov. His ability to influence Russia's nuclear complex has been clearly demonstrated by his policies in relation to the US purchase of Russian highly enriched uranium, the planned fissile material storage facility at Mayak, materials protection, control and accountability programs, and his unwavering determination to sell Iran commercial nuclear technology. Mikhailov has also been a key negotiator when dealing with the US on issues of transparency of weapons dismantlement and fissile material disposition, as well as the use of US threat reduction funds. His policies and concerns in these areas will affect the prospects for the successful negotiation and implementation of future nuclear threat reduction programs and agreements with Russia

  19. U.S. second line of defense: preventing nuclear smuggling across Russia's borders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Preventing the theft of weapons-usable highly enriched uranium and plutonium in Russia is one of the central security concerns facing the US today. The dissolution of the highly centralized USSR and the resulting societal crisis has endangered Russia's ability to protect its more than 200 metric tons of plutonium and 1000 tons of highly enriched uranium (roughly 8 kg Pu or 25 kg HEU is sufficient to make a bomb). Producing this fissile material is the most difficult and expensive part of nuclear weapons production and the US must make every effort to ensure that fissile material (and nuclear-related technologies) does not reach the hands of terrorist groups, rogue states or other potential proliferators. In response to this concern, the US has undertaken a number of initiatives in partnership with Russia and other FSU states to prevent the theft of fissile material. The Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program (MPC and A) was begun in 1993 to prevent the theft of nuclear materials from Russian civilian complexes, that is facilities not under control of the Ministry of Defense, which is largely responsible for possession and oversight of nuclear weapons. The MPC and A program is considered the first line of defense against theft of nuclear material because its goal is to prevent theft of material at production and storage facilities. This year the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new program called the Second Line of Defense (SLD), the goal of which is to assist Russia in preventing the smuggling of nuclear material and weapons at its borders, either by land, sea or air. The SLD program represents an important phase in the overall effort to ensure the security of nuclear material and weapons in Russia. However, as the US engages Russian customs officials in this important project, Americans should keep in mind that providing equipment--even indigenous equipment--is insufficient by itself; material aid must be accompanied by rigorous inspection and

  20. Nuclear safety research master plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jae Joo; Yang, J. U.; Jun, Y. S. and others

    2001-06-01

    The SRMP (Safety Research Master Plan) is established to cope with the changes of nuclear industry environments. The tech. tree is developed according to the accident progress of the nuclear reactor. The 11 research fields are derived to cover the necessary technologies to ensure the safety of nuclear reactors. Based on the developed tech. tree, the following four main research fields are derived as the main safety research areas: 1. Integrated nuclear safety enhancement, 2. Thermal hydraulic experiment and assessment, 3. Severe accident management and experiment, and 4. The integrity of equipment and structure. The research frame and strategies are also recommended to enhance the efficiency of research activity, and to extend the applicability of research output.

  1. Nuclear power in Northern Russia: A case study on future energy security in the Murmansk region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnunen, Miia; Korppoo, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The economy of the Murmansk region in Russia is based on energy intensive industry, mainly metallurgies, and consequently, the region is highly dependant on the ageing Kola nuclear power plant. This interdependence together with other weaknesses in the regional energy system creates threats to the energy supply security of the region. This paper analyses the internal and external threats influencing the region and presents potential solutions. Scenarios further illustrate possible future paths these potential solutions could deliver by the year 2025

  2. Russia’s Conventional Military Weakness and Substrategic Nuclear Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    broader range of strategic issues.19 Untangling the Tactical Nuclear Web : Russian Military Doctrine and Strategic Uncertainty The lack of official...transition period will witness the introduction of the Sozvezdiye M2 automated tactical level joint command and control system (yedinaya sistema upravleniya v

  3. Governmental regulation of nuclear power in Russia: Status and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.; Vishnevskij, Yu.G.

    1995-01-01

    Gosatomnadzor is responsible for governmental supervision of nuclear and radiation safety. Its sphere of competence covers nuclear power, research reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle complex, among others. The paper discusses the situation regarding the adoption of the draft Law of the Russian Federation on the Use of Atomic Energy and its basic formulations. The draft Law is based on the principle that priority be given to safety and the protection of human health, the environment and property over any economic interests in the area of atomic energy utilization. The most important respect in which the activities of Gosatomnadzor differ from those of its predecessors is that it has been assigned the functions of the regulatory authority for safety in the utilization of atomic energy. The paper discusses the main functions of Gosatomnadzor. An important task is to set up operating organizations, preparing the requirements for these organizations and monitoring compliance with those requirements. Gosatomnadzor has adopted safety analysis reports as the basic form of documentation to demonstrate the safety of facilities involving nuclear and radiation hazards. Independent assessment of safety and preparation of reference documents for its regulatory activities are other tasks of Gosatomnadzor. (author)

  4. Nuclear Society of Russia: Ten years in the world nuclear community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Gagarinski, A.Yu.

    2000-07-01

    the analysis of nuclear energy production trends and--most importantly for relations with the mass media and the public--crisis information (latest examples: Tokaimura, the virtual Y2K crisis, etc.), have become important sources of information for the NSR. It should be emphasized that the financial participation of the Russian Minatom (maintained at the insistent request of the NSR) in the NucNet system provides sufficiently wide dissemination of operative nuclear information not only through the NSR headquarters but also via its regional branches and separate enterprises. From its side, NSR has assumed the responsibility for the adequate flow of information on Russian nuclear events to NucNet. As a living and developing organism, the NSR wants to respond to its time's challenges. Several prospective directions could be among the NSR information exchange plans: (1) Independent international analysis of the problems of the use of nuclear energy, which is presently in a stagnation period but with future large-scale development, is as possible today as it never had been before. (2) In the field of public relations, many achievements of Russian and US specialists (in the form of articles, analyzing nuclear energy on the popular and highly professional level) stay inaccessible to others because of the language barrier. A possible joint ANS/NSR project on selection, translation, and exchange of such materials, with their further wide publication, represents an obvious reserve in their societies' information activities. (3) The International Youth Nuclear Congress project (proposed by the Russian nuclear youth and supported by ANS and ENS), conceived as a bridge between generations and a forum for opinion exchange between young nuclear specialists from various countries, deserves further development and appropriation of permanent status in the activities of the world nuclear societies.

  5. Nuclear Society of Russia: Ten years in the world nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Gagarinski, A.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    nuclear energy production trends and--most importantly for relations with the mass media and the public--crisis information (latest examples: Tokaimura, the virtual Y2K crisis, etc.), have become important sources of information for the NSR. It should be emphasized that the financial participation of the Russian Minatom (maintained at the insistent request of the NSR) in the NucNet system provides sufficiently wide dissemination of operative nuclear information not only through the NSR headquarters but also via its regional branches and separate enterprises. From its side, NSR has assumed the responsibility for the adequate flow of information on Russian nuclear events to NucNet. As a living and developing organism, the NSR wants to respond to its time's challenges. Several prospective directions could be among the NSR information exchange plans: (1) Independent international analysis of the problems of the use of nuclear energy, which is presently in a stagnation period but with future large-scale development, is as possible today as it never had been before. (2) In the field of public relations, many achievements of Russian and US specialists (in the form of articles, analyzing nuclear energy on the popular and highly professional level) stay inaccessible to others because of the language barrier. A possible joint ANS/NSR project on selection, translation, and exchange of such materials, with their further wide publication, represents an obvious reserve in their societies' information activities. (3) The International Youth Nuclear Congress project (proposed by the Russian nuclear youth and supported by ANS and ENS), conceived as a bridge between generations and a forum for opinion exchange between young nuclear specialists from various countries, deserves further development and appropriation of permanent status in the activities of the world nuclear societies

  6. Nuclear facilities and activities in Russia - Yesterday, today,tomorrow. A seminar for journalists held in March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haury, H.J.; Schmid, B.; Wiedemann, M.

    1995-01-01

    The papers of this seminar were presented by Russian experts who discussed a number of selected topics from the Russian angle, as for instance: The Non-Proliferation Treaty; Illicit trafficking with uranium and plutonium; The future of the nuclear weapons industry and the people working in this sector; Psycho-social problems arising in the former secret science cities; The future of nuclear energy in Russia; Can radiological protection in Russia be compared with Western standards? The seminar was the first of its kind and was organised for Western journalists as a platform for first-hand, comprehensive information about the situation in Russia. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Efforts in strengthening accounting for and control of nuclear materials in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, A.; Volodin, Y.; Krupchatnikov, B.; Sanin, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Recent state orders, directives, regulations are reviewed as well as practical results of the state system for nuclear material accountancy and control (NMAC) development in the Russian Federation are addressed. Based on the Federal Laws and regulations responsibilities of different agencies related to the NMAC are discussed in view of transforming the existing nuclear material accountancy and control systems to a new system at the federal level. Governmental Orders of 10 July 1998 No.746 and of 15 December 2000 No. 962 assigned Minatom of Russia as the agency in charge of establishing and operating the NMAC at the federal level while Gosatomnadzor of Russia as the agency responsible for the enforcement of the MC and A regulation and for the NMAC oversight functions. Provisions of major regulatory documents that have been or are currently being developed defining requirements, procedures, conditions and agencies' responsibilities in the area of NM control and accounting are addressed. Trends in development of the domestic safeguards system are reported in light of strengthening regulation, inspection infrastructure and licensing of NM use. Incorporation of GAN and the agencies in charge of managing nuclear installations is discussed. Foreign support to the NMAC development in Russia is also reviewed. (author)

  8. Russia: New stage in nuclear policy and in the struggle for winning public trust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinski, Andrei; Kushnarev, Sergei

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In 1982 the highest authorities of the Soviet Union has adopted an impressive program of nuclear power development: in less than 20 years the country's total installed nuclear capacity had to grow from 15 to 195 GW by the year of 2000. The program was strategically based and had sufficient resources for realisation - 'oil dollars' (oil extraction in the country then had reached a peak of 550 million tons, with considerable amount of it going for export). Three crises - technogenic (Chernobyl accident), political (perestroika and the USSR collapse) and economic - have stopped this program at the level about 38 GW (total for all the former-USSR countries). Today the state of Russia's fuel and energy complex (the need to reduce the use of natural gas in electricity generating industry) objectively pushes the country to return to 'great expectations' of nuclear power. In the next few years the country - for the first time in many decades - will face the energy deficit. The forecasted energy consumption growth, which began in 1999 after 14 years of recession, according to experts, would make our country an 'energy-deficient' one and would also hamper the development of Russia's economy. The most large-scale and well-substantiated response to this challenge is represented by the new Minatom's program providing for the growth of nuclear power capacities up to 50 GW by 2020. The rate of this growth is expected to reach 4-5 GW/year, what, nevertheless, would only repeat the USSR's achievements of mid-80ies. This strategy of nuclear power development has already received official support of the Russian government. Initiative of Russian President V. Putin, put forward during the 'Millennium Summit' on energy support of sustainable development, was a clear demonstration of the Russian leaders' attitude towards the global perspectives of nuclear energy. The public opinion, which has somewhat lost interest towards nuclear in the period of its stagnation (the last

  9. Problems and experience of ensuring nuclear safety in NPP spent fuel storage facilities in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vnukov, Victor S.; Ryazanov, Boris G.

    2003-01-01

    The amount of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) spent fuel in special storage facilities of Russia runs to more than 15000 tons and the annual growth is equal to about 850 tons. The storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel from the main nuclear reactors of Russia (RBMK-1000, VVER-1000, BN-600, EGP-6) were designed in the 60s - 70s. In the last years when the concept of closed fuel cycle and safety requirements had changed, the need was generated to have the nuclear storage facilities more crowded. First of all it is due to the necessity to increase the storage capacity because the RBMK-1000, VVER-1000, EGP-6 fuel is not reprocessed. So there comes the need for the facilities of a bigger capacity which meet the current safety requirements. The paper presents the results of studies of the most important nuclear safety issues, in particular: development of regulatory requirements; analysis of design-basis and beyond-the design-basis accidents (DBA and BDBA); computation code development and verification; justification of nuclear safety when water density goes down; the use of burn-up fraction values; the necessity and possibility to experimentally study the storage facility subcriticality; development of storage norms and rules for new types of fuel assemblies with mixed fuel and burnable poison. (author)

  10. The Impact of Non-nuclear Factors on the Follow-up Nuclear Disarmament Negotiations between the U.S.and Russia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mou; Changlin

    2014-01-01

    <正>In April 2010,the United States and Russia officially signed the New START Treaty in Prague,the capital of Czech.According to the Treaty,both the United States and Russia should reduce their deployed strategic nuclear warheads to 1550 and reduce their strategic delivery vehicles to 800(among which the deployed strategic vehicles should be reduced to 700.).

  11. On the state of the radiation safety in the atomic energy and nuclear industry of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panfilov, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    The general aspects of the activity of organs of government in the field of human radiation protection and some other problems of nuclear industry connecting with the new economic and politic situation in Russia have been discussed. There are present information about the organs of government relating to the questions of radiation safety and the major directions of governmental policy in this fields. Some problems of the elimination of the consequences of the accidents in NPPs (Chernobyl, Chelyabinsk), the programs of the radiation safety improvement of population and the information about new normative nuclear safety documents have also been written in this report. (author)

  12. Current status of work on preservation of accumulated knowledge on fast reactors in Russia and plan of top-priority measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotchetkov, L.A.; Poplavsky, V.M.; Tsiboulya, A.M.; Ashurko, Yu.M.

    2005-01-01

    The future of nuclear power is associated with mastering of fast reactor technology. Experience gained in Russia by now in the development of sodium cooled fast reactors (FR) and reactor plants of various applications is one of the most extensive and successful all over the world. Since the late 1940-ies up to now, well-directed, rather intensive work has been carried out in the USSR (later in Russia) on all aspects of fast reactors. Institute for Physics and Power Engineering has been always leading organization in the USSR and in Russia in the area of fast reactors. Work on fast reactors in Russia was carried out by many institutions, namely: IPPE, VNIINM, OKBM, VNIPIET, OKB Gidropress, RIAR, SPbAEP, TsNII Prometey and teams of the BN-350 and the BN-600 plants working in close and fruitful cooperation. Successful operation of the power unit of Beloyarskaya NPP with the BN-600 fast reactor during 25 years is one of the good results of this vast expensive efforts. In view of delay in wide-scale deployment of fast neutron reactors and change of generations of specialists in the area of FR, a necessity has arisen in the preservation of knowledge and experience on FR gained in many countries including Russia. Certain measures in this area have been planned by the Russian organizations. However, the necessity has become imminent in a purposeful systematized approach to the preservation of knowledge in fast reactor area, which can be realized only within the framework of development of appropriate special work program. The basic work trends within the framework of this program have been stated. In view of urgency of some part of this work, it is necessary to prioritize the work contents. IAEA assistance (methodological, organizational and financial) in the implementation of some sections of the program would facilitate successful implementation of the work program on preservation of knowledge on FR in Russia. (author)

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  14. Nuclear power: A look at the future. International Conference on Fifty Years of Nuclear Power: The Next Fifty Years, 27 June 2004, Moscow, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    This statement touches on a few aspects of the evolving global scenario for nuclear power - briefly reviewing the current picture, outlining a number of key issues, and discussing what the International Atomic Energy Agency is doing to ensure that nuclear power remains a safe, secure and viable option for supplying energy needs. Of the 442 nuclear plants currently operating, fewer than 10% are located in developing countries. Many industrialized nations generate substantial portions of their electricity from nuclear fission: including: France, at 78%; Belgium, at 55%; Germany, at 28%; Japan, at 25%; the United States, at 20%; and Russia, at 17%. By contrast, for large developing countries such as Brazil, India and China, the percentages are only 3.7%, 3.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Current expansion and growth prospects for nuclear power are centred in Asia. Although the focus of this international effort was on improving safety, the secondary benefit was a steady increase in nuclear plant availability and productivity. In 1990, nuclear plants on average were generating electricity 71% of the time. As of 2003, that figure stood at 84% - an improvement in productivity equal to adding more than 34 new 1000 megawatt nuclear plants - all at relatively minimal cost. Overall, the current picture remains mixed, and projections for the future of nuclear power vary widely depending on what assumptions are made. The IAEA's current 'low' (or conservative) projection - which assumes that today's nuclear plants will retire on schedule, and assumes no new construction beyond what is already firmly planned - would envision the total amount of nuclear electricity generated dropping off after about 2020. The IAEA 'high' projection, which includes additional scenarios for new nuclear plant construction, would envision nuclear power generating 70% more electricity in 2030 than at present, but still tapering off in its global share of electricity, due to even more rapid expansion in

  15. Investigation and design concepts for a nuclear waste repository in the Kola Peninsula of Northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, N.N.; Sharp, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Murmansk and Archangelsk regions located in northwestern Russia have accumulated large quantities of radioactive waste products from nuclear power plants, military ships (submarines, aircraft carriers and cruisers), ice breakers and light ships of the Murmansk Merchant Marines. This nuclear waste and associated byproducts are temporarily stored in surface facilities which lack long-term safety and containment assurances. Due to the lack of temporary storage facilities, the Russian Navy accumulates nuclear waste on floating ships and continues to dump liquid wastes into the Arctic Sea. The extent and nature of the problem is presently unknown. Waste producing organizations have neither facilities for the treatment and disposal, nor the capital necessary to construct such facilities. If urgent measures are not taken soon, the increasing quantity of waste will create an even more serious danger not only to the local population but also to the neighboring countries. The problem is one of global concern. This paper describes work being done at the Kola Mining Institute to mitigate problems of the past and to assure the continued safe production of energy from nuclear resources. The Kola Peninsula provides a natural location for the storage of nuclear materials and as a site for the production of abundant, inexpensive nuclear power. Recent studies support the theory that Kola is an ideal location for both the production of nuclear power and as a site to store and recycle radioactive materials. However, there exists today in Russia several potential long-term, world-threatening environmental problems if they are not addressed and resolved within the next few years. The problem is not due to the lack of technical solutions, but rather a lack of political and capital commitment

  16. Preparation for the Recovery of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) at Andreeva Bay, North West Russia - 13309

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, D.; McAtamney, N.

    2013-01-01

    Andreeva Bay is located near Murmansk in the Russian Federation close to the Norwegian border. The ex-naval site was used to de-fuel nuclear-powered submarines and icebreakers during the Cold War. Approximately 22,000 fuel assemblies remain in three Dry Storage Units (DSUs) which means that Andreeva Bay has one of the largest stockpiles of highly enriched spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the world. The high contamination and deteriorating condition of the SNF canisters has made improvements to the management of the SNF a high priority for the international community for safety, security and environmental reasons. International Donors have, since 2002, provided support to projects at Andreeva concerned with improving the management of the SNF. This long-term programme of work has been coordinated between the International Donors and responsible bodies within the Russian Federation. Options for the safe and secure management of SNF at Andreeva Bay were considered in 2004 and developed by a number of Russian Institutes with international participation. This consisted of site investigations, surveys and studies to understand the technical challenges. A principal agreement was reached that the SNF would be removed from the site altogether and transported to Russia's reprocessing facility at Mayak in the Urals. The analytical studies provided the information necessary to develop the construction plan for the site. Following design and regulatory processes, stakeholders endorsed the technical solution in April 2007. This detailed the processes, facilities and equipment required to safely remove the SNF and identified other site services and support facilities required on the site. Implementation of this strategy is now well underway with the facilities in various states of construction. Physical works have been performed to address the most urgent tasks including weather protection over one of the DSUs, installation of shielding over the cells, provision of radiation

  17. Preparation for the Recovery of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) at Andreeva Bay, North West Russia - 13309

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, D.; McAtamney, N. [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Andreeva Bay is located near Murmansk in the Russian Federation close to the Norwegian border. The ex-naval site was used to de-fuel nuclear-powered submarines and icebreakers during the Cold War. Approximately 22,000 fuel assemblies remain in three Dry Storage Units (DSUs) which means that Andreeva Bay has one of the largest stockpiles of highly enriched spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the world. The high contamination and deteriorating condition of the SNF canisters has made improvements to the management of the SNF a high priority for the international community for safety, security and environmental reasons. International Donors have, since 2002, provided support to projects at Andreeva concerned with improving the management of the SNF. This long-term programme of work has been coordinated between the International Donors and responsible bodies within the Russian Federation. Options for the safe and secure management of SNF at Andreeva Bay were considered in 2004 and developed by a number of Russian Institutes with international participation. This consisted of site investigations, surveys and studies to understand the technical challenges. A principal agreement was reached that the SNF would be removed from the site altogether and transported to Russia's reprocessing facility at Mayak in the Urals. The analytical studies provided the information necessary to develop the construction plan for the site. Following design and regulatory processes, stakeholders endorsed the technical solution in April 2007. This detailed the processes, facilities and equipment required to safely remove the SNF and identified other site services and support facilities required on the site. Implementation of this strategy is now well underway with the facilities in various states of construction. Physical works have been performed to address the most urgent tasks including weather protection over one of the DSUs, installation of shielding over the cells, provision of radiation

  18. Practical application of the International Safety Regime in NW Russia: experience from the Norwegian plan of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, Malgorzata K.; Kiselev, Mikhail; Kochetkov, Oleg; Shandala, Natalya; Smith, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) and the Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA) of the Russian Federation have a collaboration programme which forms part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action to improve radiation and nuclear safety in Northwest Russia. The programme seeks to support an efficient and effective regulatory supervision process over the management of the nuclear legacy, taking account of the Russian regulatory framework but also taking advantage of recommendations and guidance from the evolving international safety regime. This paper will present the substantial advances made within that programme, describing on-going progress within specific projects and setting out the value arising from wider involvement in the programme of other organisations such as the IAEA and NATO, as well as the technical support derived from other national agencies and technical organisations. This has been the first opportunity for such international regulatory interaction at the operational level. Specific projects are concerned with the management of the nuclear legacy in Northwest Russia. These include the remediation of previous military facilities, and related spent fuel and radioactive waste management, at the Shore Technical Bases (now designated as Sites of Temporary Storage) at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha. New regulatory guidance documents have been developed, involving major technical inputs from the State Research Centre-Institute of Biophysics, as well as review and advice on relevant good practice in other countries provided by other technical support organisations. Current projects due to complete in 2007 and to be reported upon in the full paper involve development of new regulatory guidance on Very Low-Level Waste management, specifically for the licensing and operation of new VLLW disposal facilities; optimisation of operational radiation protection during remediation, particularly in areas of high ambient radiation dose

  19. Management of toxic waste resulting from decommissioning and environmental remediation of nuclear facilities in Northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysotskij, V.L.; Nikitin, V.S.; Kulikov, K.N.; Ivanov, S.A.; Bogdanova, G.S.; Zakharov, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Integrated information on toxic wastes formed during utilization and rehabilitation of shutdown naval nuclear object at Northwest Russia is performed. Dynamics of their accumulation to 2025 is estimated. Necessity of present waste management review and search of new methods with the view of decrease of environmental risks by means of systematic reprocessing or economic favorable destruction. Several strategies are treated. Advantages and imperfections of each of them are estimated by safety factors and economic costs, and the most acceptable strategy is selected. Functional model is found. Lists of projects, technical means are given, periods, costs for its realization are evaluated. Guidelines are provided [ru

  20. Radiation and environmental monitoring at the nuclear legacy sites in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shandala, N.; Kiselev, S.; Titov, A.; Seregin, V.; Akhromeev, S.; Aladova, R.; Isaev, D. [SRC Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center (Russian Federation); Sneve, M. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    In 1960's, in the Northwest and Far East regions of Russia the technical bases of the Navy Fleet were built to maintain nuclear submarines by performing reloading of nuclear fuel, receiving and storing radioactive waste (RW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). In 2000, SevRAO enterprise in the northwest of Russia and DalRAO enterprise in the Far East were set up for the purposes of environmental remediation of the nuclear legacy sites. Regulatory supervision for radiation protection and safety at the nuclear legacy sites in Russian Far east and Northwest regions is one of regulatory functions of the Federal medical biological agency (FMBA of Russia). Improvement of the normative and regulatory basis has significant impact on effectiveness and efficiency of industrial projects aimed at reduction of nuclear and radiation hazard risk at the sites for the SNF and RW temporary storage (STS).To get unbiased comprehensive information on the current radiation conditions at the STSs and provide the effective response to changing radiation situation, the environmental radiation monitoring of the SevRAO and DalRAO facilities has been carried out during 2005-2013. The nature and peculiarity of the STS area radioactive contamination on the Kola Peninsula and in the Far East are the following: 1) high levels of radioactive contamination on the industrial site; 2) non-uniformity of the contamination distribution; 3) spread of contamination in the area of health protection zone. The following environmental components are contaminated: soil, vegetation, bottom sediments and seaweeds at the offshore sea waters. The dominant radionuclides are cesium-137 and strontium-90. At the facilities under inspection for the purpose of the dynamic control of the radiation situation the radio-ecological monitoring system was arranged. It presupposes regular radiometry inspections in-situ, their analysis and assessment of the radiation situation forecast in the course of the STS remediation main

  1. Russia's nuclear industry - an overview; Russlands Kernenergiewirtschaft: Zustand, Probleme, Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tscherkassov, V. [Konzern ROSENERGOATOM, Moskau (Russian Federation)

    2000-04-01

    After the Chernobyl disaster, improvements in materials and in training were made everywhere. As a result, the quality of operation of Russian reactors now is in third place after Germany and Japan. At the present time, it is becoming more and more evident that Russia will have no future in the absence of a nuclear power industry. This is due not only to the country's geographic and socio-economic features, its large territory, and the mismatch between the major energy resources in Siberia and the centers of energy consumption in the European part of Russia, but also to the fact that there is no technology other than nuclear at present which would be able to generate the volume of electricity required after the end of the 'natural gas break'. The generation of electricity in nuclear power plants contributed from 1999 on amounted to a share of approx. 15 per cent in all of Russia; 30 per cent in the European part of Russia and in the central supply region; of this share, 60 per cent in the central Chernozem region; 41 per cent in the northwestern supply region; 70 per cent in the northwest of the autonomous Chukchen region; 40 per cent in the FOREM single electricity market. The same percentages apply to electricity exports. (orig.) [German] Nach der Katastrophe von Tschernobyl wurden ueberall Verbesserungen bei Material und Ausbildung umgesetzt. Die Folge ist, dass heute die Betriebsqualitaet der russischen Reaktoren direkt hinter Deutschland und Japan rangiert. Kernkraftwerke spielen in der Wirtschaft des Landes eine wesentliche Rolle. Rentabel wirtschaftende KKW grosser Leistung werden an den Knotenpunkten des Versorgungsnetzes im Grundlastbereich betrieben und sichern einen stabilen Betrieb des gesamten Energieverbundsystems Russlands. Aus diesem Grund ist Russland an einem stabilen und sicheren Betrieb seiner KKW interessiert. Gegenwaertig zeigt sich immer deutlicher, dass Russland ohne Kernenergiewirtschaft keine entsprechende Zukunft hat. Dies

  2. Iran plans world's fourth biggest nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Power requirements of projected power generation to 1992, and fuel reserves, in Iran are submitted. The current nuclear programme is outlined. 34000 MWe of nuclear power is planned for the end of the century. (U.K.)

  3. Nuclear power programme planning: An integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has published material on different policy considerations in the introduction of nuclear power, primarily addressed to top level decision makers in government and industry in Member States. Several Member States and experts recommended to the IAEA to address the aspects of an integrated approach to nuclear power programme planning and to serve as guidance to those countries wishing to embark on a nuclear power programme. As a follow-up, the present publication is primarily intended to serve as guidance for executives and managers in Member States in planning for possible introduction of nuclear power plants in their electricity generating systems. Nuclear power programme planning, as dealt with in this publication, includes all activities that need to be carried out up to a well-founded decision to proceed with a project feasibility study. Project implementation beyond this decision is not in the scope of this publication. Although it is possible to use nuclear energy as a heat source for industrial processes, desalination and other heat applications, it is assumed in this publication that the planning is aimed towards nuclear power for electricity generation. Much of the information given would, however, also be relevant for planning of nuclear reactors for heat production. The publication was prepared within the framework of the IAEA programme on nuclear power planning, implementation and performance as a joint activity of the Nuclear Power Engineering Section and the Planning and Economic Studies Section (Division of Nuclear Power)

  4. A plan for Soviet nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, R.

    1992-01-01

    If environmentalist forces are successful, the Russian government may soon establish the country's first comprehensive program for dealing with nuclear waste. Later this month the Russian parliament, back from its summer recess, is expected to begin considering a bill on this topic. A draft copy indicates that Russia is starting with the basics: It orders the government to develop a means of insulting waste from the environment, to form a national waste processing program, and to create a registry for tracking where spent atomic fuel is stored or buried. The bill comes on the heels of a November 1991 decree by Russian President Boris Yeltsin to step up efforts to deal with nuclear waste issues and to create a government registry of nuclear waste disposal sites by 1 January 1993. The former Soviet Union has come under fire from environmentalists for dumping low- and intermediate-level nuclear wastes in the Arctic Ocean and for improperly storing waste at sites in the southern Urals and Belarus. Adding to the bill's urgency is the fact that Russia is considering sites for underground repositories for high-level waste at Tomsk, Krasnoyarsk, Chelyabinsk, and on the Kola Peninsula

  5. Analysis of the Radio-Ecological State of Units and Installations Involved in Nuclear Submarine Decommissioning in the Northwest Region of Russia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarkissov, A

    2003-01-01

    .... in the first section of the report, all nuclear-powered units and installations involved in the process of nuclear submarine utilization in the northwest region of Russia are listed and considered in detail...

  6. Expert training on physical protection of nuclear materials at universities of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogozhin, N.S.; Bondarev, P.V.; Geraskin, N.I.; Kryuchkov, E.F.; Tolstoy, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The expert training on physical protection of nuclear materials in Russia is carry out by the universities on the following directions: 'Physical Protection, Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials (MPCA)' master educational program. 'Physical and technical problems of atomic engineering' master educational standard. 'Technical Physics' direction. Qualification - master of physics. Duration of training - two years. 'Physical protection of nuclear objects' specialization. 'Nuclear physics and technology' educational standard of a direction for professionally qualified expert training. 'Safety and nonproliferation of nuclear materials' specialty. Qualification - engineer-physician. Duration of training - five years. The Master educational program is intended for the expert training with fundamental knowledge. The masters are assigned to work at the establishments of the Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russia and at the state committee on nuclear supervision (Gosatomnaozor). Many graduates continue their education as post-graduate students. The program is designed for the experts having education of an engineer or a bachelor. The program concept consists in integration in a uniform educational process: profound scientific and technical knowledge; system approach to designing MPCA systems; knowledge of scientific and technical principles, means, devices; MPCA facilities and tools; legal, political and economic aspects of nuclear material management; modern computer and information technologies for MPCA systems; research work and practice of the students. The educational program for 'physical protection of nuclear objects' specialization is intended for the expert training of a practical orientation. Engineer-physicians are assigned as a rule to work at the nuclear objects and are intended for operation and servicing of the certain physical protection systems (PPS). The program concept consists in training not only fundamental aspects of an engineering

  7. Some social and economic problems, tasks and purposes of nuclear power in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Bryunin, S.V.; Orlov, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    The complicated economic situation in Russia in power generation is manifested in a low efficiency of power utilization and in reduction of its generation and mining of energy resources. Primary energy production per capita in Russia is approximately 50% higher than on the average for Western Europe and approximately the same amount of electric power is generated. But per unit value of gross domestic product (GDP) its consumption is 3.0 and 2.7 times higher, respectively. Amount of diverse pollutants release to the atmosphere per GDP unit value is about 3.0 times higher. Restructuring of Russian economy and modernization of its power generation, which is also a matter of international community concern, will improve these indices, though it will require a lot of time and expenses. A number of aspects should be emphasized: (1) energy policy is to be considered in the context of general economic situation, as well as a key element for solving long-term social problems and base of Russia integration into the world economy; (2) comparatively large resources of fossil fuel are to be considered as national wealth and, strategically, reduction of their consumption for energy generation and export purposes should be envisaged; (3) reactor technologies, that do not rule out potentiality of recurrence of the gravest accidents (reactivity type accidents and the ones involving loss of coolant), can not be put at the foundation of large-scale NP; (4) conditions of nonproliferation that are in use now failed to prevent nuclear weapons propagation to new states and should be replaced by more effective ones; (5) for a country, where NP share in fuel and energy balance is slightly above 3%, not solely evolutionary course of development is feasible; (6) expanding scale of high-level wastes disposal is unacceptable in principle; (7) radical solution of growing ecological problems all over the world, including global warming of climate, is unthinkable without NP development

  8. Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovsky, I.; Baklanov, A.; Jacovlev, V.; Prutskov, V.; Bergman, R.

    1999-05-01

    This Technical Report, being part of the INTAS project 96-1802, constitutes a comprehensive presentation - covering basic results from separate contributions as specified below - of work performed during the first period (February 1998- February 1999). The aim of the INTAS project 96-1802: 'Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia' is to assess the potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination from nuclear units in north-west Russia and resulting impacts on population and terrestrial ecosystems in the north. The work focuses mainly on airborne radioactive contamination, but some case studies also deal with accidental leakage from terrestrial nuclear sites to soil and coastal waters. The present material comprises in more detail the contributions from participants no.4 and no.5 based on the four internal reports referred to below: (1) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia: 'Determination of the list of typical sources of danger emergency radioactive releases in an environment in connection with military activity in the North of Russia.' Technical report no.1 of the team no.5. St.-Petersburg State Technical University, St.-Petersburg. July 1998. 43 p.; (2) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in North-west Russia: 'Analysis and description of source-term characteristics for accident linked with airborne radioactive releases from Kola Nuclear Power Plant. Establishing a network facility at INEP for communication among the INTAS Project participants.' Technical report no.1 of the team no.4. Kola Science Centre, Apatity. August 1998. 56 p.; (3) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in

  9. Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisovsky, I. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Baklanov, A. [Inst. of the Northern Ecology Problems (INEP) (Russian Federation); Jacovlev, V. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Prutskov, V. [Ministry of Defence (Russian Federation). First Central Research Inst. of Naval Shipbuilding; Tarasov, I. [Ministry of Defence (Russian Federation). 23 State Marine Project Inst.; Blecher, A. [State Unitary Enterprise (Russian Federation). Research Inst. of Industrial and Marine Medicine; Zvonariev, B.; Kuchin, N.; Rubanov, S.; Sergeiev, I. [State Scientific Centre (Russian Federation). Central Research Inst. of A. Krylov; Morozov, S.; Koshkin, V.; Fedorenko, Yu.; Rigina, O. [Inst. of the Northern Ecology Problems (INEP) (Russian Federation); Bergman, R. [ed.] [Defence Research Establishment, Umeaa (Sweden). Div. of NBC Defence

    1999-05-01

    This Technical Report, being part of the INTAS project 96-1802, constitutes a comprehensive presentation - covering basic results from separate contributions as specified below - of work performed during the first period (February 1998- February 1999). The aim of the INTAS project 96-1802: `Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia` is to assess the potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination from nuclear units in north-west Russia and resulting impacts on population and terrestrial ecosystems in the north. The work focuses mainly on airborne radioactive contamination, but some case studies also deal with accidental leakage from terrestrial nuclear sites to soil and coastal waters. The present material comprises in more detail the contributions from participants no.4 and no.5 based on the four internal reports referred to below: (1) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia: `Determination of the list of typical sources of danger emergency radioactive releases in an environment in connection with military activity in the North of Russia.` Technical report no.1 of the team no.5. St.-Petersburg State Technical University, St.-Petersburg. July 1998. 43 p.; (2) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in North-west Russia: `Analysis and description of source-term characteristics for accident linked with airborne radioactive releases from Kola Nuclear Power Plant. Establishing a network facility at INEP for communication among the INTAS Project participants.` Technical report no.1 of the team no.4. Kola Science Centre, Apatity. August 1998. 56 p.; (3) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in

  10. International nuclear planning and manpower requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries one of the most pressing needs is the manpower requirements for the planning, construction, and operation of the nuclear power systems. The indigenous human resources of the respective countries must be educated and trained to a level commensurate with the demands of such an advanced and challenging technology. The issues to be addressed when discussing international nuclear planning and manpower requirements are summarized

  11. The raw material and waste activity balance in the projected nuclear power of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Ganev, I.Kh.; Lopatkin, A.V.; Muratov, V.G.; Orlov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    Under discussion is the management of long-lived high-level wastes in the nuclear energy sector of Russia, the development of which on a large scale in the next century is motivated by the need for arresting the increasing consumption of fossil fuels. The prerequisites for the nuclear power growth consists in the design of naturally safe reactors and development of a transmutational nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) technology. The choice of operations in such a cycle and of their quantitative characteristics, is aimed at minimizing the wastes to approach the radiation balance with the natural uranium extracted and put to use. The paper discusses the way the approximation to the balance between the raw material and waste activity is influenced by introduction of the transmutational NFC (in case 2), inclusion of transmutation reactors into the energy mix (case 1), partial disposal of actinide wastes into outer space, and by recycling of protactinium (case 3). It is shown that such a balance can be sustained for a considerable time in cases 2 and 3 or throughout the operation stage of the future nuclear power (case 1). (orig.)

  12. Special nuclear material inventory sampling plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccaro, H.S.; Goldman, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents improved procedures for obtaining statistically valid sampling plans for nuclear facilities. The double sampling concept and methods for developing optimal double sampling plans are described. An algorithm is described that is satisfactory for finding optimal double sampling plans and choosing appropriate detection and false alarm probabilities

  13. Debt swapping as a tool for economic and social stabilization in Russia's closed nuclear cities (briefing paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JL Fuller; KM Leek

    2000-03-08

    The next great issue on the Russian landscape will be management of its foreign debt. In the near future the United States will be called upon to lead an international program of debt restructuring to assist Russia in overcoming the burden of its debt trap. With debt service obligations equal to 50{percent} of 1999 revenues, Russia has virtually no chance of sustaining a program of economic recovery without debt relief (Hardt, 1999). With some form of debt restructuring a foregone conclusion, Russia, the United States, and world community have a vital stake in searching for creative ways to transform the inevitability of debt restructuring into something of value and constructive to Russia and the problems it faces. This was the rationale behind debt-for-nature swaps which emerged in the early 1980s in Latin American and Eastern Europe as a means of relieving developing nations of their crippling foreign debt. Debt-for-nature swaps served both domestic and international needs by converting a portion of foreign debt, often at steep discounts, into local currency that was then used to fund programs to preserve the environment. The debt swap mechanism provides the prospect of getting something of real value where nothing is expected. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has proposed to use the same model to synergistically capitalize defense threat reduction activities and environmental remediation within Russia's closed nuclear cities. Preventing the emigration of nuclear technology, expertise, and hardware from these cities to subnational groups and countries of proliferation concern is one of the world's foremost pressing problems. It is in the best national security interest of the United states to assist Russia in overcoming the legacy of the Cold War by helping to address the catastrophic environmental and public health effects of nuclear production that negatively impact economic stabilization.

  14. Debt swapping as a tool for economic and social stabilization in Russia's closed nuclear cities (briefing paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JL Fuller; KM Leek

    2000-01-01

    The next great issue on the Russian landscape will be management of its foreign debt. In the near future the United States will be called upon to lead an international program of debt restructuring to assist Russia in overcoming the burden of its debt trap. With debt service obligations equal to 50% of 1999 revenues, Russia has virtually no chance of sustaining a program of economic recovery without debt relief (Hardt, 1999). With some form of debt restructuring a foregone conclusion, Russia, the United States, and world community have a vital stake in searching for creative ways to transform the inevitability of debt restructuring into something of value and constructive to Russia and the problems it faces. This was the rationale behind debt-for-nature swaps which emerged in the early 1980s in Latin American and Eastern Europe as a means of relieving developing nations of their crippling foreign debt. Debt-for-nature swaps served both domestic and international needs by converting a portion of foreign debt, often at steep discounts, into local currency that was then used to fund programs to preserve the environment. The debt swap mechanism provides the prospect of getting something of real value where nothing is expected. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has proposed to use the same model to synergistically capitalize defense threat reduction activities and environmental remediation within Russia's closed nuclear cities. Preventing the emigration of nuclear technology, expertise, and hardware from these cities to subnational groups and countries of proliferation concern is one of the world's foremost pressing problems. It is in the best national security interest of the United states to assist Russia in overcoming the legacy of the Cold War by helping to address the catastrophic environmental and public health effects of nuclear production that negatively impact economic stabilization

  15. Promoting Safe, Secure, and Peaceful Growth of Nuclear Energy: Next Steps for Russia and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Bunn, Matthew G.; Vyacheslav P. Kuznetzov

    2010-01-01

    Russia, the United States and other countries must cooperate to enable large-scale growth of nuclear energy around the world while achieving even higher standards of safety, security, and nonproliferation than are in place today. This will require building a new global framework for nuclear energy, including new or strengthened global institutions. The Belfer Center's Managing the Atom (MTA) Project and the Russian Research Center's Kurchatov Institute developed these and additional recommend...

  16. NASA program planning on nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.; Miller, T.J.

    1992-03-01

    As part of the focused technology planning for future NASA space science and exploration missions, NASA has initiated a focused technology program to develop the technologies for nuclear electric propulsion and nuclear thermal propulsion. Beginning in 1990, NASA began a series of interagency planning workshops and meetings to identify key technologies and program priorities for nuclear propulsion. The high-priority, near-term technologies that must be developed to make NEP operational for space exploration include scaling thrusters to higher power, developing high-temperature power processing units, and developing high power, low-mass, long-lived nuclear reactors. 28 refs

  17. Management plan for the Nuclear Standards Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    This Management Plan was prepared to describe the manner in which Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide technical management of the Nuclear Standards Program. The organizational structure that has been established within ORNL for this function is the Nuclear Standards Management Center, which includes the Nuclear Standards Office (NSO) already in existence at ORNL. This plan is intended to support the policies and practices for the development and application of technical standards in ETN projects, programs, and technology developments as set forth in a standards policy memorandum from the DOE Program Director for Nuclear Energy

  18. Russia energy survey 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Isabel

    2002-07-01

    Russia is a key oil and gas exporter. The chances for successful economic reform in Russia depend on the success of the energy sector. So does the stability of world energy markets. This survey, the first since 1995, describes the energy-security issues affecting Russian oil, gas, coal and nuclear power after decades of inadequate investment and maintenance. The study concentrates on Russia's still-incomplete implementation of energy-sector reform. It raises questions about the energy sector's ability to meet the country's increasing energy demand. Particular note is taken of the country's plans to increase the use of coal in order to reduce its dependence on natural gas. The International Energy Agency commends Russian efforts to increase energy efficiency. The IEA supports the Russian view that price reform and customer choice are the keys to increased efficiency. To raise the 550 to 700 billion dollars it will need to invest in energy infrastructure by the year 2020, the study suggests, Russia must create a much more stable and competitive investment environment. 36 figs., 2 apps.

  19. Russia energy survey 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Isabel

    2002-07-01

    Russia is a key oil and gas exporter. The chances for successful economic reform in Russia depend on the success of the energy sector. So does the stability of world energy markets. This survey, the first since 1995, describes the energy-security issues affecting Russian oil, gas, coal and nuclear power after decades of inadequate investment and maintenance. The study concentrates on Russia's still-incomplete implementation of energy-sector reform. It raises questions about the energy sector's ability to meet the country's increasing energy demand. Particular note is taken of the country's plans to increase the use of coal in order to reduce its dependence on natural gas. The International Energy Agency commends Russian efforts to increase energy efficiency. The IEA supports the Russian view that price reform and customer choice are the keys to increased efficiency. To raise the 550 to 700 billion dollars it will need to invest in energy infrastructure by the year 2020, the study suggests, Russia must create a much more stable and competitive investment environment. 36 figs., 2 apps.

  20. Planning and implementation of nuclear research programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The planning and implementation of nuclear research programmes in developed and developing countries is discussed. The main aspects of these programmes in USA, France, Japan, India and Brazil are reported. (M.W.O.) [pt

  1. Integrated Nuclear Security Support Plan (INSSP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Nuclear Security Support Plan (INSSP) purposes the framework for a comprehensive approach to addressing specific national security needs. It provides means for coordinating nuclear security assistance to member states. Identifies responsible parties for completion of nuclear security activities which are necessary to build sustainable nuclear security programs. International Atomic Energy Agency INSSP development process is based on findings and recommendations from a range of nuclear security missions and other information needs assessments. Takes into account of the ongoing work activities of other bilateral assistance.

  2. Nuclear program of Iran plans and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Described are the history of nuclear energy planning in Iran and the development of the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP-1) project and its impact on the competency building in national companies, nuclear safety infrastructure, training activities, public awareness and acceptance. The activities of Nuclear Engineering Department is also presented. In order to enhance technical support services to BNPP1 and also to use capabilities of other companies in the international arena and in line with safe and reliable operation of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant, NPPD/TAVANA Company has attempted to make contact with many companies outside the country

  3. Technical and economical problems of decommissioning nuclear power plants (NPP) in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaneev, M.

    2001-01-01

    The introduction per new century has brought to atomic Engineering many new problems. One of them, which has got a serious urgency, we now shall consider. It is a problem of decommissioning NPP in Russia. By 2014 all maintained nowadays NPP in Russian Federation will develop the regular service life. And all of them on idea should be removed from operation. But, as we understand, in today's difficult economic conditions, to it NPP the procedure of prolongation of service life will be applied, and where it is impossible by virtue of the various reasons, the procedure of translation NPP in nuclear - safe condition and in a mode of a long storage under supervision, before acceptance of the decision about a method and way of financing of a decommissioning will be applied. Possible the following variants will be: use platforms of the old NPP for construction new NPP, or using as burial place NPP. The variant of a decommissioning up to a condition 'green grass' is represented unprofitable because of its dearness. The similar decommissioning was carried out in Japan. Was removed from operation research reactor of a type WWR. The expenses for this method of a decommissioning considerably surpass expenses for a method of a burial place NPP basically because of high cost of dismantle and transportation in long-term storehouses of the 1 contour equipment. The most urgent problem of decommissioning NPP, which developed their regular service life - is financing this final stage of a exploitation cycle of the block. I shall remind, that the financing is carried out from uniform fund of decommissioning. The formation of this fund occurs by deduction 1.3 % of cost of the put electric power to the consumers by all maintained NPP of Russia. The expenditure of this fund is carried on time on some tens years. They are spent for 3 basic stages: preparation to decommissioning NPP, long endurance under supervision, dismantle and burial the NPP equipment. Nowadays on faculty NPP MPEI

  4. Reactivation of the Argentine nuclear plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Francisco C.

    2007-01-01

    The Argentine Government, in a ceremony held at the Government House and headed by the President of the Republic, announced on the 23th. of August, 2006 a new plan for the nuclear activity. The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission considers this plan as the relaunching of the nuclear activity in the country, made with a clear strategic vision and based on the same premises took into account fifty seven years ago when the Atomic Energy Commission was created. (author) [es

  5. The American and Russian plans of nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallois, P.

    2010-01-01

    This text was published in 1991, at the end of the Cold War. The author comments the intentions of the US and Russia leaders, Bush and Gorbachev, on nuclear disarmament and more specifically on limitations and reductions concerning the different nuclear weapons types and vectors (ballistic missiles, submarine launched missiles, Europe-based missiles, nuclear strategic warheads, nuclear weapon movements, short range missiles, cruise missiles). He also evokes the consequences for France of the American propositions

  6. Floating nuclear heat. And power station 'Pevec' with KLT-40S type reactor plant for remote regions of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veshnyakov, K.B.; Kiryushin, A.I.; Panov, Yu.K.; Polunichev, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    Floating small nuclear power plants power for local energy systems of littoral regions of Russia, located far from central energy system, open a new line in nuclear power development. Designing a floating power unit of a lead nuclear heat and power generating station for port Pevec at the Chuckchee national district is currently nearing completion. Most labor-intensive components are being manufactured. The co-generation NPP Pevec is to be created on the basis of a floating power unit with KLT-40S type reactor plant. KLT-40S reactor plant is based on similar propulsion plants, verified at operation of Russia's nuclear-powered civil ships, evolutionary improved by elimination of 'weak points' revealed during its prototypes operation or on the basis of safety analysis. KLT-40S reactor plant uses the most wide-spread and developed in the world practice PWR-type reactor. KLT-40S meets contemporary national and international requirements imposed to future reactor plants. The NHPS description, its main technical-economic data, environmental safety indices, basic characteristics of KLT-40S reactor plant are presented. Prospects of small NPPs utilization outside Russia, particularly as an energy source for sea water desalination, are considered. (author)

  7. Special nuclear material inventory sampling plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccaro, H.; Goldman, A.

    1987-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1942, sampling inspection procedures have been common quality assurance practice. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports such sampling of special nuclear materials inventories. The DOE Order 5630.7 states, Operations Offices may develop and use statistically valid sampling plans appropriate for their site-specific needs. The benefits for nuclear facilities operations include reduced worker exposure and reduced work load. Improved procedures have been developed for obtaining statistically valid sampling plans that maximize these benefits. The double sampling concept is described and the resulting sample sizes for double sample plans are compared with other plans. An algorithm is given for finding optimal double sampling plans that assist in choosing the appropriate detection and false alarm probabilities for various sampling plans

  8. Nuclear power infrastructure and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include feasibility studies; technology evaluation; request for proposals and proposal evaluation; project and contracts development and financing; supply, construction, and commissioning; and finally operation. The IAEA is developing guidance directed to provide criteria for assessing the minimum infrastructure necessary for: a) a host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, or b) a supplier country to consider when assessing that the recipient country would be in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of nuclear power. There are Member States that may be denied the benefits of nuclear energy if the infrastructure requirements are too large or onerous for the national economy. However if co-operation could be achieved, the infrastructure burden could be shared and economic benefits gained by several countries acting jointly. The IAEA is developing guidance on the potential for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure among countries adopting or extending nuclear power programme

  9. Workforce Planning for New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    An appropriate infrastructure is essential for the efficient, safe, reliable and sustainable use of nuclear power. The IAEA continues to be encouraged by its Member States to provide assistance to those considering the introduction of nuclear power. Its response has been to increase technical assistance, organize more missions and hold workshops, as well as to issue new and updated publications in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, an IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publication (NG-G-3.1), provides detailed guidance on a holistic approach to national nuclear infrastructure development involving three phases. Nineteen issues are identified in this guide, ranging from development of a government's national position on nuclear power to planning for procurement related to the first nuclear power plant. One of these 19 issues upon which each of the other 18 depend is suitable human resources development. As a growing number of Member States begin to consider the nuclear power option, they ask for guidance from the IAEA on how to develop the human resources necessary to launch a nuclear power programme. The nuclear power field, comprising industry, government authorities, regulators, R and D organizations and educational institutions, relies on a specialized, highly trained and motivated workforce for its sustainability and continued success, quite possibly more than any other industrial field. This report has been prepared to provide information on the use of integrated workforce planning as a tool to effectively develop these resources for the spectrum of organizations that have a stake in such nuclear power programmes. These include, during the initial stages, a nuclear energy programme implementing organization (NEPIO), as well as the future operating organization, nuclear regulatory body, government authorities and technical support organizations if a decision is made to initiate a nuclear power

  10. Planning developments in British Nuclear Fuels Ltd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roper, D A [British Nuclear Fuels Ltd., Risley

    1978-10-01

    The state of the corporate planning art in British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. was described by N.R.Geary (Long Range Planning, September (1973)) just 2 years after Company formation. This article discusses more recent planning developments over the period to date during which the Company adopted a Divisionalized structure (from October 1974) and has been required to submit an annual Company plan to the Department of Energy (from November 1975). Background information on the origin and nature of the BNFL and its business, and the particular features of the Company which reflect into the nature and method of its planning were given in the 1973 article and only a brief introductory updating of the Company position is included here. Subsequently the features and problems of BNFL's operating and development planning system are described. Finally, messages arising from BNFL's planning experience to date which may be of general application and therefore of value to other practitioners of planning are listed.

  11. Energies and media nr 32. Conditions for the nuclear sector. Uranium and its enrichment for EDF. The role of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    After some comments on recent events in the nuclear sector in different countries (international conference, agreement between Rosatom and the IAEA, energy policy and projects in India, Turkey, Vietnam, France, Finland, UK, Sweden, USA, Germany), this publication discusses the uranium enrichment issue for EDF and the role of Russia. It refers to a report by the French High committee for transparency and information on nuclear safety (HCTISN) and to a hearing by the French Parliament. Different aspects are discussed: the national and international legal contexts and their relationship, the EDF reactor supply (enriched uranium of MOX, fixed elements in enrichment contracts, supply security), enrichment processes and installations (in France, natural uranium enrichment, use of reprocessed or recycle uranium, use of depleted uranium as a by-product of enrichment), how EDF and AREVA are working with Russia (enrichment of recycled uranium, use of depleted uranium)

  12. Nontargeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis to detect hazardous substances including methanol in unrecorded alcohol from Novosibirsk, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Hausler, Thomas; Okaru,  Alex O.; Neufeld, Maria; Rehm, Jürgen; Kuballa, Thomas; Luy, Burkhard; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied to the analysis of alcoholic products in the context of health and safety control. A total of 86 samples of unrecorded alcohol were collected in Novosibirsk and nearby cities in Russia. Sampling was based on interviews with alcohol dependent patients, and unrecorded alcohol thus defined included illegally or informally produced alcoholic products (e.g., counterfeit or home-made alcoholic beverages) or surrogate alcohol in the form of c...

  13. USSR reins-in nuclear plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, Judith.

    1989-01-01

    The USSR had hoped to double its nuclear capacity by the year 2000 to provide 20 per cent of its electricity. But this may no longer be possible in the face of the growing anti-nuclear movement allowed by Glasnost and given a focus by Chernobyl. Local protest has forced Moscow to drop its plans to build one of the world's biggest nuclear power plants at Ignalina in Lithuania. Although two 1,500 MW units are operating, there is national opposition to two more being built there. A year ago the Government had to scrap plans to build a 1,000MW VVER (pressurised water reactor) at Krasnador near the Black Sea, because of high seismic activity in the area. In the Ukraine, building has also stopped at the Chigirin plant. Plans to build nuclear heat and power plants at Odessa and Kharkov were cancelled last July. Construction of a nuclear power and heat plant at Minsk has been suspended and the Byelorussian government has proposed to Moscow that it should be redesigned to run on gas. A planned nuclear power and heat plant in Gorky and a plant being built in the Crimea are in doubt. Armenia's two reactors in the Ararat valley are to be closed and converted to a thermal plant, following increased concern after the 1988 earthquake. The USSR are looking at other energy sources, geothermal, solar, wind and wave. (author)

  14. The American and Russian plans of nuclear disarmament; Les plans americain et sovietique de desarmement nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallois, P.

    2010-07-15

    This text was published in 1991, at the end of the Cold War. The author comments the intentions of the US and Russia leaders, Bush and Gorbachev, on nuclear disarmament and more specifically on limitations and reductions concerning the different nuclear weapons types and vectors (ballistic missiles, submarine launched missiles, Europe-based missiles, nuclear strategic warheads, nuclear weapon movements, short range missiles, cruise missiles). He also evokes the consequences for France of the American propositions

  15. Nuclear power and energy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.

    1990-11-01

    With the rapid depletion of conventional energy sources such as coal and oil and the growing world demand for energy the question of how to provide the extra energy needed in the future is addressed. Relevant facts and figures are presented. Coal and oil have disadvantages as their burning contributes to the greenhouse gases and they will become scarcer and more expensive. Renewable sources such as wind and wave power can supply some but not all future energy requirements. The case made for nuclear power is that it is the only source which offers the long term prospect of meeting the growing world energy demand whilst keeping energy costs close to present levels and which does not add to atmospheric pollution. Reassurance as to the safety of nuclear power plants and the safe disposal of radioactive wastes is given. (UK)

  16. WASP in Nuclear Power Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Chi; Vuong Minh Quang; Nguyen Tri Ho

    1993-03-01

    The main modules of WASP are presented in details in the introduction paragraph. The authors have emphasized on the probabilistic simulation used in WASP for evaluating different costs of the objective function and the Bellman principle for finding the optimal trajectory in dynamic programming. In the second paragraph the principal results obtained by the Nuclear Power Dept. of VINATOM are enumerated: a/the most cost-effective solution for Vietnam is to introduce a nuclear power capacity of 800-1200 MW by around the year 2010; b/ different types of reactors for the first NPP are ranked according to their economic criteria; c/ the sensitivity analysis is also carried out with respect to discount rates, LOLP (loss of load probability), ENS (energy non served), construction cost. (author). 4 figs, 7 tabs

  17. Fast reactor development program in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachkov, Valery

    2013-01-01

    The large-scale NP can be developed on the basis of new generation of CNFC and FR technologies being in compliance with “natural safety” criteria. Within the FTP we are planning to develop alternative technologies with the goal to select by 2020 the best technological option for the large-scale nuclear power development in Russia in 21 century

  18. Nuclear power planning study for Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The country's interest in and plans for nuclear power, as well as the organizational setup and involvement of the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission in the planning, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, are described. The report contains some data on population, general economics, gross national product, mineral resources and energy consumption. The electricity supply system, its development, generating and transmission facilities, costs of existing plants and plants under construction, various systems operation criteria, economic criteria and technical data on existing generating units are given. A number of appendixes have been included to provide additional and background information on the computer programs, methods of forecasting load, methodology and parameters used, fossil and nuclear fuel costs, general technical and economic data on thermal and nuclear plants, and other appropriate data

  19. Nuclear reactor built, being built, or planned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1990. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly

  20. Energy and nuclear power planning studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.; Molina, P.E.; Mueller, T.

    1990-01-01

    The article focuses on the procedures established by the IAEA for providing assistance to international Member States in conducting studies for the analysis of the economic viability of a nuclear power programme. This article specifically reviews energy and nuclear power planning (ENPP) studies in Algeria, Jordan, and Thailand. It highlights major accomplishments in the context of study objectives and organizations, and the principal lessons learned in the process. 4 figs, 1 tab

  1. National emergency plan for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The national emergency plan for nuclear accidents is a plan of action designed to provide a response to accidents involving the release or potential release of radioactive substances into the environment, which could give rise to radiation exposure to the public. The plan outlines the measures which are in place to assess and mitigate the effects of nuclear accidents which might pose a radiological hazard in ireland. It shows how accident management will operate, how technical information and monitoring data will be collected, how public information will be provided and what measures may be taken for the protection of the public in the short and long term. The plan can be integrated with the Department of Defence arrangements for wartime emergencies

  2. Ghana's Integrated Nuclear Security Support Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlstrom, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    At the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital outside Accra, Pearl Lovelyn Lawson checks the records of the next patient to undergo radiotherapy and adjusts the dose settings of the teletherapy machine. It is business as usual at the facility that treats over fifty patients each day. But Lawson's routine now includes additional procedures to ensure that the highly radioactive cobalt-60 source located inside the machine remains secure. Nuclear security devices and systems such as double locks, motion sensors, and cameras that transmit images to a central alarm system have been installed to ensure that the source cannot be stolen, the facility sabotaged, or unauthorized access gained. At Korle Bu physical protection measures were upgraded as part of Ghana's Integrated Nuclear Security Support Plan (INSSP). Preventing, detecting and responding to criminal acts like the theft or illegal transfer of a radioactive source, is an international priority that could be addressed through an INSSP. As one of its key nuclear security services, the IAEA assists Member States in drafting such plans. An INSSP is developed jointly with the Member State, using a holistic approach to nuclear security capacity building. It reinforces the primary objective of a State's nuclear security regime to protect people, society, and the environment from the harmful consequences of a nuclear security event. Addressing five components - the legal and regulatory framework, prevention, detection, and sustainability - the jointly developed plan identifies the needs, responsible entities and organizations within the State, as well as the timeframe for the implementation of agreed nuclear security related activities. Ghana's INSSP, tailored to its specific needs, is based on findings and recommendations from advisory service missions carried out in Ghana, including an International Nuclear Security Advisory Service mission and an International Physical Protection Advisory Service mission. Ghana's INSSP was

  3. Strategic planning approach to nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Detroit Edison Company's Nuclear Training group used an organizational planning process that yielded significant results in 1984. At the heart of the process was a concept called the Driving Force which served as the basis for the development of goals, objectives, and action plants. A key ingredient of the success of the planning process was the total, voluntary participation by all members of the organization

  4. Spent nuclear fuel project integrated schedule plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squires, K.G.

    1995-01-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Schedule Plan establishes the organizational responsibilities, rules for developing, maintain and status of the SNF integrated schedule, and an implementation plan for the integrated schedule. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel

  5. Spent nuclear fuel project integrated schedule plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, K.G.

    1995-03-06

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Schedule Plan establishes the organizational responsibilities, rules for developing, maintain and status of the SNF integrated schedule, and an implementation plan for the integrated schedule. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel.

  6. Maintenance planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattu, R.K.; Cooper, S.E.; Lauderdale, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Maintenance planning for nuclear power plants is similar to that in other industrial plants but it is heavily influenced by regulatory rules, with consequent costs of compliance. Steps by the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address that problem include development of guidelines for maintenance of risk-critical equipment, using PRA-based techniques to select a set of equipment that requires maintenance and reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) approaches for determining what maintenance is required. The result of the process is a program designed to ensure effective maintenance of the equipment most critical to plant safety. (author)

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  8. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The Province of Ontario Nuclear Emergency Plan has been developed pursuant to Section 8 of the Emergency Plans Act, 1983. This plan replaces the Province of Ontario Nuclear Contingency Off-Site Plan (June 1980) which is no longer applicable. The wastes plan includes planning, preparation, emergency organization and operational responsibilities and policy

  9. Training to the Nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Navascues, I.

    2003-01-01

    In 1994 the Civil Protection Directorate outlined a formation plan related to the Nuclear emergency plans with the purpose of guaranteeing for the communities involved in this material a basic and homogeneous formation. In the preparation of this Plan the following phases had been developed: 1. Study of formative needs of the different participant communities involved in nuclear plans. This has been done throw the information collected by: nuclear emergency plans and procedures that develop them, questionnaires, observation list, exercise, drills, etc. 2. With all the needs detected and in function of them was designed the objectives to teach in relation with the knowledge and the abilities that the formation can give to the participants. 3. Definition of thematic areas related with the different matters to teach, derived from the different objectives. 4. Organization: The development of the formative activities through a specific material with orientations for the professors (content of material to impart, didactic resources, etc.) and a short summary of the Didactic Units imparted to the students. The methodology is based in short theoretical classes and in the active implication through practice activities exercises and drills to train its functions and the coordination of the different implied organizations. 5. Evaluation: the implantation of the formation plan contributes new formative needs. (Author)

  10. Status and prospect of R and D aimed at application of nuclear reactors for seawater desalination in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zverev, K.V.; Baranaev, Y.D.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Polunichev, V.I.; Romenkov, A.A.; Shamanin, V.G.; Podberezny, V.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the document 'Strategy of Nuclear Power Development in Russia for the First Half of XXI Century', approved by the Government of the RF, seawater desalination is considered as a prospective area of application of the small-sized nuclear power plants (SNPP). Taking into account vast water resources of Russia evenly distributed over the territory of the country, seawater desalination is not a vital domestic demand for this country. Therefore, the R and D activities of the RF MINATOM institutions on nuclear desalination are aimed mainly at the assessment of implementation of the SNPP based nuclear desalination system in the developing countries suffering from the lack of fresh water supply. Within these activities, analysis of engineering and economical problems related to optimisation of the use of different type nuclear reactors as a source of electricity and heat for seawater desalination plants has been performed. The objective of the work is to develop scientific and technological basis for comprehensive design studies required for practical implementation of the projects. An important factor stimulating the R and D on nuclear desalination is rather active involvement of the MINATOM's institutions in the various activities in this field organised and coordinated by the IAEA. Since 1998, SRC RF-IPPE, OKBM, ENTEK, MALAYA ENERGETIKA, JSC, and VNIPI PROMTECHNOLOGIYI etc. have been participants of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on 'Optimization of Coupling of Nuclear Reactor and Desalination System'. This work is being carried out within the framework of special Russian Project: 'Use of Small Size Russian Nuclear Reactors as Power Source for Nuclear Desalination Complexes: Optimization of Coupling Schemes, Design and Economical Characteristics'. The small nuclear reactors KLT-40C, NIKA and RUTA are considered in the study. In 2002, IAEA initiates new CRP 'Economic Research on, and Assessment of, selected Nuclear Desalination Projects and Case Studies

  11. Planning and Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grance Torales, V.L.; Lira, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The present case aims to share the experience of the Intellectual Capital Section (ICS), part of Planning, Coordination and Control Department of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) in its search for a sustainable knowledge management. Among the strategic objectives included in CNEA’s Strategic Plan (SP), is the development, preservation and transference of knowledge and experience. Under this framework, the role initially assumed by the ICS, consisted on the observation and diagnosis of the situation of the Institutional Human Capital (HC), through the study of the main characteristics of the staff of CNEA. The second stage of SP (2015–2025), which consisted of updating the HC data, the incorporation of the concept of “knowledge management” was approved by the authorities of the Institution. Based on this background, in 2016 the objectives of the ICS are aimed at organizing and coordinating a network of knowledge management that involves the entire organization. This new phase implies, among other things, the proposal of a knowledge management policy, interaction with other sectors of CNEA for implementation, analysis of the tools to be used, in order to determine a way and work style that suits the culture and structure of the organization. (author

  12. Development of a system for academic training of the personnel engaged in nuclear material protection, control and accounting in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onykiy, B.N.; Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2005-01-01

    The main attention in the present paper is focused on discussing the educational problems in the area of nuclear materials physical protection, control and accountability (MPC and A) in Russia. Currently, only the Master of Science Graduate Program has been completely developed for students training. This is taking place at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University, MEPhI), where the sixth generation of Masters has graduated in May 2004. The MPC and A Engineer Degree Program, currently under development at MEPhI, is considered in the paper. This paper discusses specific features of the Engineer Degree training required by the Russian educational legislation and the Russian quality control system as applied to the training process. The paper summarises the main joint actions undertaken during the past three years by MEPhI in collaboration with the US Department of Energy and US National Laboratories for developing the MPC and A Engineer Degree Program in Russia. (author)

  13. The Life Plans of Rural School Students in Russia, China, and Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abankina, T. V.

    2014-01-01

    Data from a comparative study of the educational, career, and migration strategies of rural school students in Russia, China, and Kazakhstan show high levels of educational aspiration. This is likely to increase the flow of population to urban areas, to increase the rate of urbanization, and to have demographic and economic consequences that will…

  14. Artificial radionuclides in oils from the underground nuclear test site (Perm region, Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, S.N.; Sapozhnikov, Yu.A.; Goloubov, B.N.

    1998-01-01

    Underground nuclear tests (UNT) are one of the possible sources of radioactive contamination of environment. About 2500 UNTs were carried out both for military and industrial (peaceful) purposes. In the former Soviet Union most of peaceful UNTs were oriented to the needs of the gas- and oil-extracting industry. Earlier it was considered that the holes of UNT are hermetic and the leakage of radionuclides is negligible. In this work nine oil samples from Gezh oil deposit in Perm region of Russia collected from different holes both where the explosion took part and from distant holes were analyzed for 3 H and 14 C and such fission products as 90 Sr and 134,137 Cs. For the determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides the gamma spectrometry with HPGe detector was used. For 90 Sr determination the measurements of Cherenkov radiation generated by daughter 90 Y were carried out with liquid scintillation equipment. It showed that even in the oil samples from the hole where the explosion took place no measurable 134,137 Cs and 90 Sr activities were detected. For 3 H and 14 C determination the oil samples were fractionated by distillation. For each sample 10-12 fractions were taken. Liquid scintillation spectrometry was used for 3 H and 14 C simultaneous determination. It was shown that in all samples the 3 H and 14 C concentrations are higher than the background level and for the hole where the explosion took place reached the value of about 1.3 x 10 5 Bq/L for low boiling fraction (40-750C). The 3 H and 14 C enrichment of oils from distant holes shows that UNT cavities are not hermetic and the radionuclide migration is not negligible. (author)

  15. Ontario Hydro's plan for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens-Guille, P.D.; Howes, H.A.; Freire-Canosa, J.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive plan for the management of used nuclear fuel has been published by Ontario Hydro. In this paper current practices are discussed and actions leading to disposal in a repository are outlined. Extended storage options are discussed should disposal be delayed

  16. Plan for national nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The responsibility for Denmark's preparedness for nuclear emergencies lies with the Ministry of the Interior and the Civil Defense administration. The latter is particularly responsible for the presented plan which clarifies the organization and the measures to be taken in order to protect the public where, in the event of such an emergency, it could be in danger of radiation from radioactive materials. The main specifications of the plan, the activation of which covers the whole country, are that daily monitoring should be carried out so that warnings of nuclear accidents can be immediately conveyed to the relevant parties and that immediate action can be taken. These actions should result in the best possible protection against nuclear radiation so that acute and chronic damage to the health of members of the public can be restricted. The public, and relevant authorities should be informed of the situation and it should be attempted to regulate the reactions of individuals and of the society in general in such a way that damage to health, or social and economical conditions, can be restricted as much as possible. Denmark has not itself any atomic power plants, but some are located in neighbour countries and there are other sources such as nuclear research reactors, passing nuclear-driven ships etc. The detailed plan also covers possible sources of radiation, the nature of related damage to health, international cooperation, legal aspects, and a very detailed description of the overall administration and of the responsibilities of the organizations involved. (AB)

  17. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In order to review the advances made over the past seven years in the area of emergency planning and preparedness supporting nuclear facilities and consider developments which are on the horizon, the IAEA at the invitation of the Government of Italy, organized this International Symposium in co-operation with the Italian Commission for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources, Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Health Protection (ENEA-DISP). There were over 250 designated participants and some 70 observers from 37 Member States and four international organizations in attendance at the Symposium. The Symposium presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: emergency planning (20 papers), accident assessment (30 papers), protective measures and recovery operations (10 papers) and emergency preparedness (16 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  18. Wishful thinking and real problems: Small modular reactors, planning constraints, and nuclear power in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ahmad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Jordan plans to import two conventional gigawatt scale nuclear reactors from Russia that are expensive and too large for Jordan's current electricity grid. Jordan efforts to establish nuclear power might become easier in some ways if the country were to construct Small Modular Reactors, which might be better suited to Jordan's financial capabilities and its smaller electrical grid capacity. But, the SMR option raises new problems, including locating sites for multiple reactors, finding water to cool these reactors, and the higher cost of electricity generation. Jordan's decision has important implications for its energy planning as well as for the market for SMRs. - Highlights: •Jordan is planning to purchase two large reactors from Russia. •Large reactors would be inappropriate to Jordan's small electricity grid. •Small modular reactors would be more appropriate to Jordan's grid, but have problems. •The market for small modular reactors will be smaller than often projected. •Jordan should consider the financial impact of building a large nuclear reactor.

  19. Nuclear power in Asia: Experience and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Chang Kun

    1999-01-01

    Asian countries have developed ambitious energy supply programs to expand their energy supply systems to meet the growing needs of their rapidly expanding economies. Most of their new electrical generation needs will be met by coal, oil and gas. However, the consideration of growing energy demand, energy security, environmental conservation, and technology enhancement is inducing more Asian countries toward the pursuit of nuclear power development. At present, nuclear power provides about 30% of electricity in Japan, and about 40% of electricity in Korea. These and other Asian countries are presumed to significantly increase their nuclear power generation capacities in coming years. Korea's nuclear power generation facilities are projected to grow from 12 gigawatt in 1998 to 16.7 gigawatt by 2004. On the other hand, China and India have now installed nuclear capacities of about 2 gigawatt, respectively, which will increase by a factor of two or more by 2004. The installed nuclear capacity in the Asian region totalled 67 gigawatt as of the end of 1997, representing about sixteen percent of the world capacity of 369 gigawatt. Looking to the year 2010, it is anticipated that most of the world's increase in nuclear capacity will come from Asia. It is further forecasted that Asian nations will continue to expand their nuclear capacity as they move into the 21st century. For example, China plans to develop additional 18 gigawatt of nuclear power plants by the year 2010. Nuclear power is also of particular interest to a number of emerging Asian countries in view of environmental conservation and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions in particular. Nuclear power appeals to some countries because of its high technology content. The strength in an advanced technology, such as the technological capability related to nuclear power, contributes to the overall development of the corresponding country's engineering base, enhancement of industrial infrastructure and expansion of

  20. Anti-smoking policy in Russia: Relevant factors and program planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossova, Tatiana; Kossova, Elena; Sheluntcova, Maria

    2018-08-01

    In this paper, we consider anti-smoking policy in Russia and the socioeconomic factors that influence an individual's decision to smoke. Among various factors, we investigate the individual time preferences of Russians. To estimate individual time preferences, we use an experiment in which survey respondents are given hypothetical money prizes. We find that being middle-aged, being unmarried and having parents who smoke are positively correlated with both men and women's likelihood of taking up smoking in Russia. We consider the possible endogeneity of an individual's health status and find a positive relationship between smoking and the time preferences of Russians. Our findings confirm that decisionmakers should devote their efforts primarily to developing restrictive anti-smoking policy. The choice of policy measures should be guided by the individual characteristics of target population groups. Social advertising, public lectures and preventive care should be actively engaged in forming public attitudes towards smoking. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of the Standards applied to Instrumentation and Control Systems for Nuclear Power Stations in Korea and Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Hwang, In Koo; Lee, Dong Young

    2005-04-01

    This report describes a comparison result of technical standards applied to instrumentation and control systems for nuclear power plants between in Korea and in Russia. Russia also has a state-run organization authorized to conduct approval, cancellation, and audit in use of nuclear facility or equipment. The Russian standards for nuclear instrumentation and control equipment are analogous with the Korean ones in the aspect of basic concepts and principles. However, there are some differences in document structure, design requirements, qualification test items, depth of contents between two standard systems. The biggest deviation exists in the standard documents for seismic qualification and electromagnetic interference qualification. Korean seismic qualification standard utilizing US approach, defines testing and qualification methods specifically and clearly. Russian standards however provide only conceptual definitions and requirements in the seismic related aspects. Therefore, it is conceived that any equipment or system qualified seismically in accordance with Korean standards should additionally provide technical evidence that it is satisfactory with Russian standards as well. In electromagnetic interference qualification, because Russian standard requires more testing items than the current Korean standard, the additional qualification tests are necessary to meet the Russian requirements. However, these additional test items are based on IEC(International Electrotechnical Commission), therefore it is not a problem to perform those tests in a Korean testing facility

  2. Monitoring human factor risk characteristics at nuclear legacy sites in northwest Russia in support of radiation safety regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheblanov, V Y; Sneve, M K; Bobrov, A F

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes research aimed at improving regulatory supervision of radiation safety during work associated with the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at legacy sites in northwest Russia through timely identification of employees presenting unfavourable human factor risk characteristics. The legacy sites of interest include sites of temporary storage now operated by SevRAO on behalf of Rosatom. The sites were previously operational bases for servicing nuclear powered submarines and are now subject to major remediation activities. These activities include hazardous operations for recovery of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from sub-optimal storage conditions. The paper describes the results of analysis of methods, procedures, techniques and informational issues leading to the development of an expert-diagnostic information system for monitoring of workers involved in carrying out the most hazardous operations. The system serves as a tool for human factor and professional reliability risk monitoring and has been tested in practical working environments and implemented as part of regulatory supervision. The work has been carried out by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center, within the framework of the regulatory cooperation programme between the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of Russia and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority.

  3. Comparison of the Standards applied to Instrumentation and Control Systems for Nuclear Power Stations in Korea and Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Hwang, In Koo; Lee, Dong Young

    2005-04-15

    This report describes a comparison result of technical standards applied to instrumentation and control systems for nuclear power plants between in Korea and in Russia. Russia also has a state-run organization authorized to conduct approval, cancellation, and audit in use of nuclear facility or equipment. The Russian standards for nuclear instrumentation and control equipment are analogous with the Korean ones in the aspect of basic concepts and principles. However, there are some differences in document structure, design requirements, qualification test items, depth of contents between two standard systems. The biggest deviation exists in the standard documents for seismic qualification and electromagnetic interference qualification. Korean seismic qualification standard utilizing US approach, defines testing and qualification methods specifically and clearly. Russian standards however provide only conceptual definitions and requirements in the seismic related aspects. Therefore, it is conceived that any equipment or system qualified seismically in accordance with Korean standards should additionally provide technical evidence that it is satisfactory with Russian standards as well. In electromagnetic interference qualification, because Russian standard requires more testing items than the current Korean standard, the additional qualification tests are necessary to meet the Russian requirements. However, these additional test items are based on IEC(International Electrotechnical Commission), therefore it is not a problem to perform those tests in a Korean testing facility.

  4. Monitoring human factor risk characteristics at nuclear legacy sites in northwest Russia in support of radiation safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheblanov, V Y; Bobrov, A F; Sneve, M K

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research aimed at improving regulatory supervision of radiation safety during work associated with the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at legacy sites in northwest Russia through timely identification of employees presenting unfavourable human factor risk characteristics. The legacy sites of interest include sites of temporary storage now operated by SevRAO on behalf of Rosatom. The sites were previously operational bases for servicing nuclear powered submarines and are now subject to major remediation activities. These activities include hazardous operations for recovery of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from sub-optimal storage conditions. The paper describes the results of analysis of methods, procedures, techniques and informational issues leading to the development of an expert-diagnostic information system for monitoring of workers involved in carrying out the most hazardous operations. The system serves as a tool for human factor and professional reliability risk monitoring and has been tested in practical working environments and implemented as part of regulatory supervision. The work has been carried out by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center, within the framework of the regulatory cooperation programme between the Federal Medical–Biological Agency of Russia and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. (paper)

  5. Planning a revolution in nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Approaching the marketing and deployment of small, inherently safe reactors from the standpoint of the legal and financial community, the author suggests various ideal planning criteria that should be adhered to by designers and suppliers in order for the new plants to achieve political and financial acceptability. Although new nuclear technology based on those criteria promise to rekindle the prospects for nuclear fission, neither governments nor suppliers are likely to undertake the requisite investments. Rather, the author proposes a private development initiative between the political community, private investors, and would-be suppliers. (author)

  6. Nuclear power planning and feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeton, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    This lecture will review the basic steps associated with planning the introduction of nuclear power. Areas covered will include power market surveys, energy resources evaluations, potential alternative strategies, organisational factors and implementational requirements. The lecture will then consider the implications and requirements associated with establishing the feasibility of a nuclear project. Among others, aspects of power systems integration, site selection reactor type evaluation, cost and economic analysis, influence of contracting strategies, comparison with alternative power generation solutions, financial impact, etc. will be discussed and reviewed. (HK) [de

  7. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear installations are designed, constructed and operated in such a way that the probability for an incident or accident is very low and the probability for a severe accident with catastrophic consequences is extremely small. These accidents represent the residual risk of the nuclear installation, and this residual risk can be decreased on one hand by a better design, construction and operation and on the other hand by planning and taking emergency measures inside the facility and in the environment of the facility. By way of introduction and definition it may be indicated to define some terms pertaining to the subject in order to make for more uniform understanding. (orig./DG)

  8. Minatom of Russia Situation and Crisis Center and the Automated Federal Information System for Nuclear Material Control and Accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchik, V.P.; Kasumova, L.A.; Babcock, R.A.; Heinberg, C.L.; Tynan, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Under the Situation and Crisis Center (SCC) management, the Information Analytical Center (IAC) of the Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom) of Russia was created to oversee the operation of the Federal Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Information System (FIS). During 2000, the FIS achieved an important milestone in its development: the basic functions of the information system were implemented. This includes placing into operation the collecting and processing of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A) information from the enterprises reporting to the FIS. The FIS began working with 14 Russian enterprises to develop and implement full-function reporting (i.e., reporting inventory and inventory changes including closeout and reconciliation between the FIS and enterprises). In 2001, the system will expand to include enterprise-level inventory information for all enterprises using nuclear materials in Russia. For this reason, at the end of 2000 through the beginning of 2001, five separate training sessions were held for over 100 enterprise personnel responsible for preparation and transfer of the reports to the FIS. Through the assistance of the Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) program, information systems for the accounting of nuclear materials are being installed at Russia enterprises. In creating the program for modernization of the Russian Federation State System of Accounting and Control (SSAC) of nuclear material, the SCC conducted a survey of the enterprises to determine the readiness of their internal MC and A systems for reporting to the FIS. Based on the information from the survey and the results of the projects on creation of local information systems at Russian enterprises, the analysis of information and the technical aspects of MC and A systems identified deficiencies that were analyzed and recommendations for eliminating these deficiencies were proposed. The concentration of analytical and administrative

  9. Dutch National Plan combat nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This document presents the Dutch National Plan combat nuclear accidents (NPK). Ch. 2 discusses some important starting points which are determining for the framework and the performance of the NPK, in particular the accident typology which underlies the plan. Also the new accident-classification system for the Dutch nuclear power plants, the standardization for the measures to be taken and the staging around nuclear power plants are pursued. In ch. 3 the legal framework of the combat nuclear accidents is described. In particular the Nuclear-power law, the Accident law and the Municipality law are pursued. Also the role of province and municipality are described. Ch. 4 deals with the role of the owner/licensee of the object where the accident occurs, in the combat of accident. In ch. 5 the structure of the nuclear-accident combat at national level is outlined, subdivided in alarm phase, combat phase and the winding-up phase. In ch.'s 6-12 these phases are elaborated more in detail. In ch.'s 10-13 the measures to be taken in nuclear accidents, are described. These measures are distinguished with regard to: protection of the population and medical aspects, water economy, drinking-water supply, agriculture and food supply. Ch. 14 describes the responsibility of the burgomaster. Ch.'s 15 and 16 present an overview of the personnel, material, procedural and juridical modifications and supplements of existing structures which are necessary with regard to the new and modified parts of the structure. Ch. 17 indicates how by means of the appropriate education and exercise it can be achieved that all personnel, services and institutes concerned possess the knowledge and experience necessary for the activities from the NKP to be executed as has been described. Ch. 18 contains a survey of activities to be performed and a proposal how these can be realized. (H.W.). figs.; tabs

  10. NATURAL SCIENCE AND GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES PLANNING AT THE TIME OF INTRODUCTON OF THE NEW FEDERAL EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsu Raufovna Kamaleeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an experience of educational courses planning and technologies of it realization considering level and type of training at the time of new educational standards introduction in Russia. The research was conducted on the basis of specially developed questionnaire, the experimental educational courses and programs observation, the study of existing teachers experience, that permitted to develop methodical recommendations, didactic and experimental supplies. It reveals that planning of educational course within the framework of educational module and student’s competence forming approaches in accordance with the requirements of The Federal State Educational Standards (FSES, is accompanied with the range of difficulties. They are: determination of the course related to the formation of certain required competences; defining the content of the modules; establishing of inter subject connections (preliminary, parallel, and subsequent; strengthening of student’s vocational determination (professional abilities development of the future employee.

  11. Effective nuclear and radiation emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes how to develop a balanced emergency plan, which realistically reflect the interfaces with various emergency organizations. The use of resources should be optimized with focusing on the most likely accidents. The pitfalls of writing an emergency plan without ''big picture'' in mind should be avoided. It is absolutely essential to have a clear definition of responsibilities and to have proper understanding of the tasks in between all counterparts in the emergency preparedness. Special attention should be paid to off-site part of the nuclear emergency preparedness, because the people involved in it usually receive less training than the on-site personnel and they are not specialized for nuclear emergencies but deal with all sorts of emergencies. (author)

  12. Missions and planning for nuclear space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1979-01-01

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on reactor components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current reactor concept, and the technology program plan are described

  13. National energy planning with nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y.; Hastowo, Hudi; Soentono, Soedyartomo

    2002-01-01

    National energy planning with nuclear option. Energy planning development is a part of the sustainable development that supports the attainment of national development goals. The objective of the study is to support the national planning and decision-making process in the energy and electric sector in Indonesia with nuclear option for period of 1998-2027. This study performs the provision of detailed economic sector and regional energy demand projection by MAED simulation model based on the economic and population scenarios. The optimization of the future energy supply such as electricity supply taking all known Indonesian energy sources and all relevant technologies into consideration by MARKAL Model. The results shows that Indonesia's need for final energy is forecasted to increase two times, from 4028,4 PJ at the beginning of study become 8145,6 PJ at the end of study. Performing the sensitivity study, it is predicted that nuclear energy could be introduced in the Java-Bali electricity grid about year 2016

  14. National nuclear plan - Present and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, Serban Constantin; Popescu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    The Romanian Research, Development and Innovation Plan (PNCDI) contains programmes aiming at: strengthening the national research and development capacity as well as enhancing the employment of scientific and technologic potential; obtaining national scientific excellency in the frame of globalization; achieving valuable results in specific objectives of importance for national economy and foreign policy; European integration of the national research potential. In the frame of PNCDI there are sub-programmes oriented toward nuclear field as follows: PC6 EURATIOM, with EU; Technical Cooperation projects with IAEA; basic and applied research projects with JINR, Dubna and CERN, Geneva as well with other international organizations. These sub-programs have also domestic-oriented objectives as for instance: boosting the reform in the nuclear sector; alignment the specific legislation with the European legislation; preserving the high-skilled human resources; strengthening the safety of nuclear facilities; strengthening the radiation protection of occupational personnel, population and environment; ensuring the management of radioactive waste with final disposal; enhancing the nuclear industry competitiveness; developing innovative concepts of new NPP types; formation and training of young specialists; ensuring the access on large scale to the European nuclear installations; organizing and intensifying the technology transport, as well as, simulation of small and average scale enterprises, boosting the cooperation between industrial and scientific organization enhancing the exchange the scientific information. All nuclear activities in Romania are peaceful and subject to a severe control of the state and of the habilitated international organisms. For Cernavoda NPP Romania chose the CANDU PHW project as a successful project developed in Canada and world wide. The performances concerning nuclear safety are highest while the costs of nuclear electricity is competitive with

  15. Development of the system for academic training of personnel engaged in nuclear material protection, control and accounting in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, E.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: National safeguards on nuclear materials (NM) non-proliferation in any country are provided by a system of special measures on NM management (legal regulation, organizing, scientific and technical measures and tools) as well as by a professional culture of people working with NM (non-proliferation culture). The fundamental attribute of any culture, and the non-proliferation culture also, is an availability of a system for reproduction of the specialists - carriers of this culture. Saying about national safeguards systems, one of the key components for existence and development of such a system in Russia is a creation and advancement of the system for specialists training in areas of NM non-proliferation and NM safe management. Unfortunately, when developing and improving the special measures of national safeguards, the specialists reproduction system is often forgotten. A lack of well-skilled specialists is retarding development of national safeguards now. Under today's conditions in Russia, this lack of specialists can become a serious obstacle for resolving the non-proliferation problem in the nearest future. Establishing the fact is a necessary and important step towards definition of long-term strategy for development of nuclear power industry in Russia. The specialists reproduction is a complex multi-level problem. Solution of the problem as applied to nuclear non-proliferation safeguards can be found through creating the academic system of training, re-training and qualification upgrade of appropriate specialists basing upon the training principles, traditions and approaches established in our country. Today we have only the first successful results in resolving aforementioned problems. The present paper is devoted to discussion of general problems for MPC and A specialists training in Russia as well as to discussion on development of the MPC and A Engineering Degree Program at MEPhI. Main attention in the present paper is focused at discussing the

  16. Practice and perspectives of nuclear power plants life management activities in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurakov, Y.; Yanko, L.

    1998-01-01

    Extension of safe operation of NPPs is of special importance for Russia for economical reasons. The principles of NPP life extension are the same as for issuing licences for operation by the Regulatory body. It is requested to prove that undertaken measures compensate effects of ageing of structural components. Special attention is foreseen for methods of modernization of power plants for their safe operation

  17. The Cossacks of the South of Russia in R.A. Fadeev’s geopolitical plans

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsov Oleg Viktorovich

    2013-01-01

    The political project of a conservative writer of political essays of the second half of the XIX c. R.A. Fadeev (1824–1883), in which a key part is assigned to the attraction of the Cossacks of Southern Russia to solving the pressing foreign policy issues, is analyzed. A conclusion that the Cossacks could be used as a militant vanguard, i.e. military force (infantry, cavalry, reconnaissance) and an effective tool of the colonization of the suburbs of the Russian Empire – is drawn. The conditi...

  18. Kyoto Protocol Objectives in Croatia Energy Planning: Nuclear Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duic, N.; Bogdan, Z.; Juretic, F.; Zeljko, M.

    2002-01-01

    Croatia as an Annex I country of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and a country that has pledged in the Annex B of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce its greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions by 5% from the pre-transition level by the budget period 2008-12, will have to envisage a new energy strategy. Compared to the energy consumption collapse in some transitional countries like Russia and Ukraine, Croatia has passed through a relatively limited long term reduction of GHG emissions since 1990 because of higher efficiency of its pre-transition economy. It is expected that in case of business as usual scenario it will breach the Kyoto target in 2003 since the demand for energy will be high, especially as the income continues to rise, particularly in domestic use for heating, for transport and for electricity generation. Several scenarios of developing energy system are compared from the point of view of GHG emissions. The energy sector that will most probably be the most influenced by the UNFCCC objectives is electricity generation. Several scenarios are compared. The cost-effective scenario expects a mixture of coal and gas fired power plants to be built to satisfy the new demand and to replace the old power plants that are being decommissioned. More Kyoto friendly scenario envisages the construction of mostly nuclear power plants in the future, while decommissioning the old ones as planned, and is compared to the others from the GHG emissions point of view. The conclusion is that by measures tackling only electricity generation it will not be possible to keep GHG emission under the Kyoto target level, but that choosing the nuclear option might reduce significantly the cost of compliance. (author)

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debban, B.L.

    1996-03-01

    Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project's current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M ampersand O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M ampersand O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins

  20. Root causes of the decreasing in numbers of the Saker Falcon and ways of its decision within the Saker Falcon Global Action Plan in Russia and Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira G. Nikolenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This report summarizes information on factors impacting on the decrease in numbers of the Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug in Russia and Kazakhstan and analyses conditions в of the Global Action Plan that are aimed at neutralization of these factors to increase in numbers and sustainable management of the Saker Falcon in the wild.

  1. CEGB nuclear power stations basic emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    The introduction states that this is a typical emergency plan for a nuclear power station employing about 500 people, having two reactors and a total electrical output of 500 Megawatts in an intensively farmed rural area. The document has the following headings: definitions ('site incident', etc); functions of the site emergency organization; conditions for taking emergency action; persons empowered to declare or cancel a site incident or an emergency; emergency actions by staff; control centres; communication; collaboration with other bodies; warnings; transport; house rules; public information centre. (U.K.)

  2. Planning and implementing nuclear emergency response facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    After Three Mile Island, Arkansas Nuclear One produced a planning document called TMI-2 Response Program. Phase I of the program defined action plans in nine areas: safety assessment, training, organization, public information, communication, security, fiscal-governmental, technical and logistical support. Under safety assessment, the staff was made even better prepared to handle radioactive material. Under training, on site simulators for each unit at ANO were installed. The other seven topics interface closely with each other. An emergency control center is diagrammed. A habitable technical support system was created. A media center, with a large media area, and an auditorium, was built. Electric door strike systems increased security. Phone networks independently run via microwave were installed. Until Three Mile Island, logistical problems were guesswork. That incident afforded an opportunity to better identify and prepare for these problems

  3. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Removal Campaign Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The overall operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project will include fuel removal, sludge removal, debris removal, and deactivation transition activities. Figure 1-1 provides an overview of the current baseline operating schedule for project sub-systems, indicating that a majority of fuel removal activities are performed over an approximately three-and-one-half year time period. The purpose of this document is to describe the strategy for operating the fuel removal process systems. The campaign plan scope includes: (1) identifying a fuel selection sequence during fuel removal activities, (2) identifying MCOs that are subjected to extra testing (process validation) and monitoring, and (3) discussion of initial MCO loading and monitoring in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The campaign plan is intended to integrate fuel selection requirements for handling special groups of fuel within the basin (e.g., single pass reactor fuel), process validation activities identified for process systems, and monitoring activities during storage

  4. Communication planning by the nuclear regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    , both routine and emergency, and, for example, following events that give rise to public interest. The range of subjects for such programmes includes: the safety of nuclear installations; radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources: the safe transport of radioactive materials; planning. preparedness and response to emergencies; and the safe management of radioactive waste. For the sake of simplicity, unless otherwise stated, the term 'nuclear safety' is used in this publication to include nuclear, radiation, radioactive waste and transport safety. Section 2 outlines the general aspects of a communication programme. Section 3 describes the elements of a structured programme, including guidance for its implementation and evaluation. Section 4 summarizes the activities of the regulatory body in relation to the programme

  5. Practice and prospects of creation of equipment for reprocessing and utilization of contaminated metal wastes of plants of nuclear industry in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Program of reprocessing and utilization of metallic radioactive wastes exists in Russia. In the framework of this program in nuclear industry it is accumulated forty years experience on taking-off-service, disassembly, decontamination and reprocessing of technological facilities. Some technical characteristics of the units used for these operations are represented [ru

  6. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CONFINEMENT LEAKTIGHTNESS AT THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREENE, G.A.; GUPPY, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ''Kola Confinement Leaktightness'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.1. This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians to reduce risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Units 1 and 2, through upgrades in the confinement performance to reduce the uncontrolled leakage rate. The major technical objective of this-project was to improve the leaktightness of the Kola NPP VVER confinement boundaries, through the application of a variety of sealants to penetrations, doors and hatches, seams and surfaces, to the extent that current technology permitted. A related objective was the transfer, through training of Russian staff, of the materials application procedures to the staff of the Kola NPP. This project was part of an overall approach to minimizing uncontrolled releases from the Kola NPP VVER440/230s in the event of a serious accident, and to thereby significantly mitigate the consequences of such an accident. The US provided materials, application technology, and applications equipment for application of sealant materials, surface coatings, potting materials and gaskets, to improve the confinement leaktightness of the Kola VVER-440/23Os. The US provided for training of Russian personnel in the applications technology

  7. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CONFINEMENT LEAKTIGHTNESS AT THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREENE,G.A.; GUPPY,J.G.

    1998-08-01

    This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ``Kola Confinement Leaktightness'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.1. This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians to reduce risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Units 1 and 2, through upgrades in the confinement performance to reduce the uncontrolled leakage rate. The major technical objective of this-project was to improve the leaktightness of the Kola NPP VVER confinement boundaries, through the application of a variety of sealants to penetrations, doors and hatches, seams and surfaces, to the extent that current technology permitted. A related objective was the transfer, through training of Russian staff, of the materials application procedures to the staff of the Kola NPP. This project was part of an overall approach to minimizing uncontrolled releases from the Kola NPP VVER440/230s in the event of a serious accident, and to thereby significantly mitigate the consequences of such an accident. The US provided materials, application technology, and applications equipment for application of sealant materials, surface coatings, potting materials and gaskets, to improve the confinement leaktightness of the Kola VVER-440/23Os. The US provided for training of Russian personnel in the applications technology.

  8. Nuclear power plant Severe Accident Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkins, J.T.; Cunningham, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Severe Accident Research Plan (SARP) will provide technical information necessary to support regulatory decisions in the severe accident area for existing or planned nuclear power plants, and covers research for the time period of January 1982 through January 1986. SARP will develop generic bases to determine how safe the plants are and where and how their level of safety ought to be improved. The analysis to address these issues will be performed using improved probabilistic risk assessment methodology, as benchmarked to more exact data and analysis. There are thirteen program elements in the plan and the work is phased in two parts, with the first phase being completed in early 1984, at which time an assessment will be made whether or not any major changes will be recommended to the Commission for operating plants to handle severe accidents. Additionally at this time, all of the thirteen program elements in Chapter 5 will be reviewed and assessed in terms of how much additional work is necessary and where major impacts in probabilistic risk assessment might be achieved. Confirmatory research will be carried out in phase II to provide additional assurance on the appropriateness of phase I decisions. Most of this work will be concluded by early 1986

  9. Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    A comprehensive Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program was implemented by the US NRC office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in 1985 to identify and resolve technical safety issues related to the aging of systems, structures, and components in operating nuclear power plants. This is Revision 2 to the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program Plant. This planes defines the goals of the program the current status of research, and summarizes utilization of the research results in the regulatory process. The plan also describes major milestones and schedules for coordinating research within the agency and with organizations and institutions outside the agency, both domestic and foreign. Currently the NPAR Program comprises seven major areas: (1) hardware-oriented engineering research involving components and structures; (2) system-oriented aging interaction studies; (3) development of technical bases for license renewal rulemaking; (4) determining risk significance of aging phenomena; (5) development of technical bases for resolving generic safety issues; (6) recommendations for field inspection and maintenance addressing aging concerns; (7) and residual lifetime evaluations of major LWR components and structures. The NPAR technical database comprises approximately 100 NUREG/CR reports by June 1991, plus numerous published papers and proceedings that offer regulators and industry important insights to aging characteristics and aging management of safety-related equipment. Regulatory applications include revisions to and development of regulatory guides and technical specifications; support to resolve generic safety issues; development of codes and standards; evaluation of diagnostic techniques; (e.g., for cables and valves); and technical support for development of the license renewal rule. 80 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs

  10. 76 FR 75771 - Emergency Planning Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Issuance of NUREG... Support of Nuclear Power Plants;'' NSIR/DPR-ISG-01, ``Interim Staff Guidance Emergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants;'' and NUREG/CR-7002, ``Criteria for Development of Evacuation Time Estimate Studies...

  11. Evolution in nuclear strategy in US and Russia and its implications in arms control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokov, N

    2003-07-01

    Today, there is a growing tendency in war-fighting scenarios to include limited use of nuclear weapons. New developments in nuclear policy could be attributed to changes in the international situation like the multiplication of low level conflicts and the threat of terrorism. This paper analyzes the evolution of the Russian nuclear doctrine, the transformation of the US nuclear policy and their consequences on arms control. (J.S.)

  12. Evolution in nuclear strategy in US and Russia and its implications in arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokov, N.

    2003-01-01

    Today, there is a growing tendency in war-fighting scenarios to include limited use of nuclear weapons. New developments in nuclear policy could be attributed to changes in the international situation like the multiplication of low level conflicts and the threat of terrorism. This paper analyzes the evolution of the Russian nuclear doctrine, the transformation of the US nuclear policy and their consequences on arms control. (J.S.)

  13. Exporting nuclear wastes to Russia: how Greenpeace contributed to make a traffic stop which has been lasting for nearly 40 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After having recalled how Greenpeace discovered the existence of contracts between the French CEA (and later AREVA) and Russia for the export of nuclear wastes to Russia, this document specifies which kinds of wastes are concerned: depleted uranium (from the EURODIF plant in Tricastin) and reprocessed uranium (from La Hague). It briefly reports the different actions performed by Greenpeace about this trade which occurred against the Russian law on the protection of the environment and against a European directive. It finally denounces the posture and statements of AREVA about a possible use of these wastes

  14. Characterization plan for Hanford spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrefah, J.; Thornton, T.A.; Thomas, L.E.; Berting, F.M.; Marschman, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) was terminated in 1972. Since that time a significant quantity of N Reactor and Single-Pass Reactor SNF has been stored in the 100 Area K-East (KE) and K-West (KW) reactor basins. Approximately 80% of all US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned SNF resides at Hanford, the largest portion of which is in the water-filled KE and KW reactor basins. The basins were not designed for long-term storage of the SNF and it has become a priority to move the SNF to a more suitable location. As part of the project plan, SNF inventories will be chemically and physically characterized to provide information that will be used to resolve safety and technical issues for development of an environmentally benign and efficient extended interim storage and final disposition strategy for this defense production-reactor SNF

  15. New Basic Nuclear Emergency Plan (Plaben)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin, M.; Gil, E.; Martin, M.; Ramon, J.; Serrano, I.

    2004-01-01

    Ever since Plaben came into force in 1989, the national civil protection system has experienced a large evolution among other reasons due to the Autonomous Community governments assuming authority in this matter. In parallel, the regulation and international practice in matters of planning and nuclear emergency response has evolved as a consequence of the lessons learned following the long-term Chernobyl accident. Both circumstance recommended that Plaben be revised in order to adopt it to this new environment. The New Plaben was approved in June of this year and from that moment implantation has begun. Described in the article is the New Plaben, the modifications that respect the former the role that the CSN played in is revision and the main activities required to put it into practice. (Author)

  16. Nordic Seminar on Waste Problems in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, Malgorzata Karpow

    1999-01-01

    This presentation describes a Nordic seminar held in 1998 that focused on radioactive waste disposal in Northwest Russia and that gave special attention to a repository which planned on Novaya Zemlya. The existing plans originated in a programme formulated by the Russian Federation for the period 1996-2005 and titled The Federal Programme: The Management of Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel - Treatment and Final Disposal. The sea around Novaya Zemlya is important to the fishery industry in both Norway and Russia. And there is great Norwegian concern about the vulnerable Arctic environment. Geological conditions are of course crucial to waste disposal, and according to Russian experts, the permafrost bedrock on Novaya Zemlya will provide added safety. Permafrost is a source of a major complex of uncertainties, but there is Western expertise available that might provide international assessment of the construction plans

  17. Compact nuclear simulator and its upgrade plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Park, Jae-Chang; Jung, Chul-Hwan; Lee, Jang-Soo; Kim, Jang-Yeol

    1997-01-01

    The Compact Nuclear Simulator (CNS) was installed at the nuclear training center of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in 1998. The CNS has been used for training non-operator personnel, such as NSSS design engineers, maintenance personnel, and inspectors of regulatory body, and for testing fuzzy control algorithm. The CNS mathematical modeling modeled a three loop Westinghouse Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR), 993 MWe, mostly referred to as the Kori Unit 3 and 4 in Korea. However, the main computer (Micro VAX II), an interface card between a main computer and operator panel, and a graphic display system are faced with frequent troubles due to obsolescence and a lack of spare parts. Accordingly, CNS hardware should be replaced by state of the art equipment. There are plans to replace the main computer with an HP workstation, the dedicated interface card with a PLC-based interface system, and the graphic interface system with a X-terminal based full graphics system. The full graphics user interface system supports an easy and friendly interface between the CNS and users. The software for the instructor console also will be modified from a text-based to a Motif-based user interface. The Motif-based user interface provides a more efficient and easy operation in an instructor console. The real-time executive software programmed under a Micro VMS operating system should also be replaced by software programmed under a HPUX operating system. (author)

  18. Safety Regulation Implemented by Gosatomnadzor of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsalov, A.T.; Bukrinsky, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The principles and approaches used by Gosatomnadzor of Russia in establishing safety goals are described. The link between safety goals and safety culture is demonstrated. Information on nuclear regulatory activities in Russia is also presented

  19. Taking the Lead: Russia, the United States, and Nuclear Nonproliferation after Bush

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    2002), especially chap. 5; Henry D. Sokolski, ed., Pakistan’s Nuclear Future: Worries beyond War ( Carl - isle: SSI, January 2008); Henry Sokolski and...Two sides of this issue are argued in Scott D. Sagan and Kenneth N. Waltz, The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate (New York: W. W. Norton, 995

  20. Implementing national nuclear safety plan at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yabin; Cui Shaozhang; Pan Fengguo; Zhang Lizhen; Shi Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    This study discusses the importance of nuclear power project design and engineering methods at the preliminary stage of its development on nuclear power plant's operational safety from the professional view. Specifically, we share our understanding of national nuclear safety plan's requirement on new reactor accident probability, technology, site selection, as well as building and improving nuclear safety culture and strengthening public participation, with a focus on plan's implications on preliminary stage of nuclear power project development. Last, we introduce China Huaneng Group's work on nuclear power project preliminary development and the experience accumulated during the process. By analyzing the siting philosophy of nuclear power plant and the necessity of building nuclear safety culture at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development, this study explicates how to fully implement the nuclear safety plan's requirements at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development. (authors)

  1. Innovation Priorities in Nuclear and Radiation Technologies in Russia. View from Skolkovo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertman, A.; Kovalevich, D.; Turtikov, V.; Zaytseva, N.

    2012-01-01

    The direction for the modernization and technological development of 'Nuclear Technologies' sector of the Russian economy comprises a group of scientific and engineering subjects (atomic engineering, technologies on the basis of radiation, change of properties of materials, radiation resistant microelectronics, etc.), and serves as the foundation of one of the most high-tech industries. The innovative development of nuclear technologies is an integral condition for the strengthening (and in some directions of conquering) a country's position as a global technological leader and preservation of defensive capability of the nation. For this reason, nuclear technologies became one of the priority areas for the activity of the Skolkovo Center. The wide opportunities offered by the application of nuclear technologies were already clear at the deployment stage of the 'Nuclear Project - 1'. In 1958, at the 2nd International conference on the peaceful use of nuclear energy in Geneva, the USSR presented more than 200 reports and communiques in all civil use of atomic energy directions.One of the major results of the development of the nuclear branch have become the developments in the sphere of control of radiation and magnetic fields (radiation technologies). This group of technologies have actively developed in collaboration with design and manufacturing of different types of equipment, including accelerators, neutron generators, lasers, HF-systems, detectors of particles and radiation, microscopes and telescopes, microwave microelectronics, etc. Today these technologies and equipment are used in a variety of other (non-power and not military) markets - and the list of these markets grows constantly. Among the fastest growing ones, we can list the markets of nuclear medicine, sterilization and disinfection, safety and non-destructive testing, ecology and water processing, extraction and the processing of minerals. Historically, the development of nuclear technologies

  2. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission human factors program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Human Factors Program Plan is to ensure that proper consideration is given to human factors in the design and operation of nuclear facilities. This revised plan addresses human factors issues related to the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The three issues of concern are (1) the activities planned to provide the technical bases to resolve the remaining tasks related to human factors as described in NUREG-0660, The NRC Action Plan Developed as a Result of the TMI-2 Accident, and NUREG-0737, Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements; (2) the need to address the additional human factors efforts that were identified during implementation of the Action Plan; and (3) the actual fulfillment of those developmental activities specified in Revision 1 of this plan. The plan represents a systematic approach for addressing high priority human factors concerns important to NPP safety in FY 1986 through 1987

  3. Planning for countering nuclear terrorism. Chapter 1. Motivation and redirection: rationale and achievements in the russian closed nuclear cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, G.

    2006-01-01

    The non-proliferation rationale and achievements of the collaboration between the UK and Russia for a personnel redirection programme in the Closed Nuclear Cities is described. A framework for the interaction between demand and supply dimensions of proliferation threats is developed to show how redirection programmes to enable WMD (weapons of mass destruction) specialists move into civilian activities reduce these same threats. Early results from the UK-Russia Closed Nuclear Cities Partnership are presented and compared with the parallel US funded Nuclear Cities Initiative and similar local economic development measures

  4. The Nuclear Data Commission and the Radionuclide Data Centre in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The document includes two papers: 'The Work of the Nuclear Data Commission' and 'Radionuclide Data Centre', which describe the activities of these two organizations of the Russian Federation. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  5. IMPROVING THE STRATEGIC PLANNING OF THE DEFENSE-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX CORPORATIONS OF RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina B. Dobrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop proposals to improve the strategic planning of Russian corporations of the defense-industrial complex. The relevance of the study due to the fact that the methodology for the adaptation of the strategic management of the military-industrial enterprises with substantial scientifi c and technical potential, should take into account a number of features, such as the identifi cation of the features of competition in the future; understanding of the prospects and development opportunities in the medium and long term; assessment of resource potential; impact assessment and risk in the implementation of promising strategies. In the more precise understanding of the strategy as a pattern of behavior aimed at achieving these goals, a set of rules for search and opportunities; strategic plan is seen as a series of specifi c steps and actions that are integrated in space and time, which lead to the transformation of the current position to the desired. We consider the practice of corporate transformation strategies of the world defense industry using a system method. To improve the strategic planning of Russian defense industry corporations it is recommended to apply the strategy of adapting the defense industry companies and their diversifi cation with the civilian sectors. The key vectors of the development strategy of the defense-industrial complex of Russian corporations are defi ned: providing an acceptable investment climate in the sphere of military-technical cooperation; neutralization of threats by the activities of DIC TNCs; creation of their own TNK defense industry and others.

  6. Enhancement of Regulatory Supervision of the nuclear legacy in northwest Russia: involving the military authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roudak, S.F.; Sneve, M.K.; Bulatov, O.R.; Vasiliev, A.P.; Malinkin, V.M.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes work carried out within the cooperation programme between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Directorate of State Supervision for Nuclear and Radiation Safety of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation performed in 2008-2009. It focuses on development of improved regulatory documents and supervision procedures for handling spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at facilities that are no longer used by the Russian Federation Navy but that are still under military supervision and control. (Author)

  7. Enhancement of Regulatory Supervision of the nuclear legacy in northwest Russia: involving the military authorities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudak, S.F.; Sneve, M.K.; Bulatov, O.R.; Vasiliev, A.P.; Malinkin, V.M.

    2011-10-15

    This report describes work carried out within the cooperation programme between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Directorate of State Supervision for Nuclear and Radiation Safety of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation performed in 2008-2009. It focuses on development of improved regulatory documents and supervision procedures for handling spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at facilities that are no longer used by the Russian Federation Navy but that are still under military supervision and control. (Author)

  8. Major issues on establishing an emergency plan in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhu-zhou

    1988-03-01

    Several major issues on emergency planning and preparation in nuclear facilities were discussed -- such as the importance of emergency planning and preparation, basic principles of intervention and implementation of emergency plan and emergency training and drills to insure the effectiveness of the emergency plan. It is emphasized that the major key point of emergency planning and response is to avoid the occurrence of serious nonrandom effect. 12 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Pre-fire planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Regardless of the fire prevention measures which are taken, plant experience indicates that fires will occur in a nuclear power plant. When a fire occurs, the plant staff must handle the fire emergency. Pre-fire planning is a method of developing detailed fire attack plans and salvage operations to protect equipment from damage due to fire and fire fighting operations. This paper describes the purpose and use of a pre-fire plan to achieve these goals in nuclear power plants

  10. Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The nuclear plant aging research described in this plan is intended to resolve issues related to the aging and service wear of equipment and systems at commercial reactor facilities and their possible impact on plant safety. Emphasis has been placed on identification and characterization of the mechansims of material and component degradation during service and evaluation of methods of inspection, surveillance, condition monitoring and maintenance as means of mitigating such effects. Specifically the goals of the program are as follows: (1) to identify and characterize aging and service wear effects which, if unchecked, could cause degradation of structures, components, and systems and thereby impair plant safety; (2) to identify methods of inspection, surveillance and monitoring, or of evaluating residual life of structures, components, and systems, which will assure timely detection of significant aging effects prior to loss of safety function; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of storage, maintenance, repair and replacement practices in mitigating the rate and extent of degradation caused by aging and service wear

  11. Nuclear manpower planning and personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company has established a nuclear manpower program to identify human resources, selection and recruitment of entry level engineers and technicians of Nuclear Energy Group. The methodology to estimate the future nuclear manpower demand of Taipower has been clearly described in this article. Also, the manpower program is being used as the bases for nuclear training program development. For safe, reliable and efficient operation of nuclear power plants, Taipower has established a systematic training program for nuclear power stations and headquarter personnel. The training program has been implemented in three stages with different patterns of training program. The first stage of nuclear training before 1975 was completed successfully. The second stage of nuclear training currently conducted since 1975 enlarges domestic training capability. The third stage of nuclear training with a long term training program is now under a systematic and compositive development effort

  12. Nuclear forensics: a comprehensive model action plan for Nuclear Forensics Laboratory in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshmukh, A.V.; Nyati, S.; Fatangre, N.M.; Raghav, N.K.; Reddy, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear forensic is an emerging and highly specialized discipline which deals with nuclear investigation and analysis of nuclear or radiological/radioactive materials. Nuclear Forensic analysis includes various methodology and analytical methods along with morphology, physical, chemical, elemental and isotopic analysis to characterize and develop nuclear database for the identification of unknown nuclear or radiological/radioactive material. The origin, source history, pathway and attribution of unknown radioactive/nuclear material is possible with certainty through Nuclear Forensics. Establishment of Nuclear Forensic Laboratory and development of expertise for nuclear investigation under one roof by developing the nuclear data base and laboratory network is need of the hour to ably address the problems of all the law enforcement and nuclear agencies. The present study provides insight in Nuclear Forensics and focuses on an urgent need for a comprehensive plan to set up Nuclear Forensic Laboratory across India. (author)

  13. Model Action Plan for Nuclear Forensics and Nuclear Attribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudder, G B; Niemeyer, S; Smith, D K; Kristo, M J

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear forensics and nuclear attribution have become increasingly important tools in the fight against illegal trafficking in nuclear and radiological materials. This technical report documents the field of nuclear forensics and nuclear attribution in a comprehensive manner, summarizing tools and procedures that have heretofore been described independently in the scientific literature. This report also provides national policy-makers, decision-makers, and technical managers with guidance for responding to incidents involving the interdiction of nuclear and radiological materials. However, due to the significant capital costs of the equipment and the specialized expertise of the personnel, work in the field of nuclear forensics has been restricted so far to a handful of national and international laboratories. In fact, there are a limited number of specialists who have experience working with interdicted nuclear materials and affiliated evidence. Most of the laboratories that have the requisite equipment, personnel, and experience to perform nuclear forensic analysis are participants in the Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group or ITWG (see Section 1.8). Consequently, there is a need to disseminate information on an appropriate response to incidents of nuclear smuggling, including a comprehensive approach to gathering evidence that meets appropriate legal standards and to developing insights into the source and routes of nuclear and radiological contraband. Appendix A presents a ''Menu of Options'' for other Member States to request assistance from the ITWG Nuclear Forensics Laboratories (INFL) on nuclear forensic cases

  14. Preparedness and planning for nuclear accidents at national level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiukshta, A.

    1998-01-01

    National plan for the protection of population in the case in nuclear accident at Ignalina NPP is presented. The plan was elaborated and approved in 1995, tested in a number of training and practical operations and positively evaluated by experts. The plan provides for measures of protection, their scope, schedule, executive officers and organizations and procedure of implementation

  15. Atominform's activities as the information and analytical center of nuclear industry and power of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshetko, Y.V.

    1993-01-01

    The Central Research Institute of Management, Economics and Information, Atominform, is a division of information-analytical support of scientific, production and commercial efforts of the nuclear industry and is also involved in the most ''traditional'' information activity. These ''traditional'' lines of activity include: compilation and maintenance of all types of data bases and their reference facilities; library activities; information support; information flows both between the nuclear industry enterprises and through exchange with information bodies of the state system of scientific and technical information and other branches of the national economy; introduction of the state-of-the-art information technologies into the information practice. (orig.)

  16. Nuclear safety authority. Strategical planning 2005- 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear safety Authority (A.S.N.) provides, in the name of the state, the monitoring of nuclear safety and radiation protection to protect workers, patients, public and environment from the risks in relation with nuclear activities and more broadly with ionizing radiations, it contributes to citizens information in these areas. The ambition of A.S.N. is to carry out a successful, legitimate, credible nuclear monitoring, recognized by citizens and that constitutes an international reference. (N.C.)

  17. Activities planning of Nuclear Data Center - 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, R.P.K.

    1980-01-01

    The main process systems of nuclear data files and the actual nuclear data processing implantation in the Instituto de Estudos Avancados, are presented. The research activities of Nuclear Data Center during 1980 in relation to the implantation of file process systems for multigroup cross sections, and the calculations of integral reactor parameters, are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Results of Gamma-Ray Imaging with High-Energy Radiation Visualizer HERV at Nuclear Reactor in Russia and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, O.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Sudarkin, A.N.; Urutskoev, L.I.

    1999-01-01

    HER V-high energy radiation visualizer is a system for imaging in X-and gamma-ray regions developed by RECOM during recent years. Its later version provides the real industrial prototype that has been already tested under the complex gamma-field conditions of highly contaminated nuclear facilities in Russia and Germany. New special options for initial CCD camera frames processing (CCD camera operates in slow repetition mode) allow one to perform imaging without heavy shielding during a long exposure time. Image processing options allowing one to take into account background radiation, noise and drift of electronics are described. The contaminated pipelines and vessels HER V imagery results are presented. Background does rate in rooms with contaminated equipment appeared to be up to 1 R/hour and from 1m R/hour up to 50 m R/hour at detector's head location. The major contaminating nuclides proved to be Co-60 and Cs-137. Imaging time was chosen to be 0.2-1 hour. Data acquisition and processing procedures enabled to avoid the high background dose rate influence at the device measuring head location. Superposition of gamma images over optical images indicates that the major contaminated parts of the pipelines were their bends, places of their connection, and their valves

  19. The Vyborg bang 2. Study of a rumor in Vyborg, Russia about a nuclear accident in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saukko, P.

    1994-01-01

    The report is a case study on a rumor that spread in the town Vyborg in Russia in May 1994 about a nuclear accident in Finland. The rumor seems to have started when a small valve leakage at one of the NPP in Finland and an emergency exercise at the same plant got confused. For a few days the Vyborgians and the Vyborgian media were wondering what had happened in Finland. The aim of this study done in August 1994 was to trace the series of events in both Finland and in Vyborg that led the inception and persistence of the rumor. Using the tools provided by research on organizational and crisis communication, it also evaluates what went wrong and attempts to provide some ideas on how episodes like this could be avoided in the future. Another goal of the study was to map the social context that makes it intelligible why a rumor like this one found such a fertile soil in Vyborg and was not killed right away. The study is based on interviews with Finnish authorities, with the Vyborgian journalists, and with a couple of Russian authorities involved in the case. The Vyborgian and Finnish print and broadcast media's coverage of the rumor are also analyzed

  20. Development of a decommissioning plan for nuclear power plant 'Krsko'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankosic, Djurica; Fink, Kresimir

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant 'Krsko' (NEK), is the only nuclear power plant in Yugoslavia, is a two-loop, Westinghouse-design, pressurized water reactor rated at 632 MWe. When NEK applied for an operating license in 1981, it did not have to explain how the plant would be decommissioned and decommissioning provisions were not part of the licensing process. Faced with mounting opposition to nuclear power and a real threat that the plant would be shut down, the plant management developed a Mission Plan for resolving the decommissioning problem. The Mission Plan calls for a preliminary decommissioning plan to be prepared and submitted to the local regulatory body before the end of 1992

  1. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1989. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented in five parts, each of which is categorized by primary function or purpose: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly facilities

  2. Planning and preparedness for radiological emergencies at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, R.; Muzzarelli, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) Program was created after the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assists state and local governments in reviewing and evaluating state and local REP plans and preparedness for accidents at nuclear power plants, in partnership with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which evaluates safety and emergency preparedness at the power stations themselves. Argonne National Laboratory provides support and technical assistance to FEMA in evaluating nuclear power plant emergency response exercises, radiological emergency plans, and preparedness

  3. Workforce planning and knowledge management for new nuclear programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloj, B.; Mazur, T.; ); Kosilov, A.; Pastori, Z.; )

    2010-01-01

    The authors discusses the report Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power produced by the IAEA to provide guidance on the use of integrated workforce planning as a tool to effectively develop these resources. The report describes three distinct phases in the development of a national infrastructure. It shows how to elaborate a workforce plan for implementing a national nuclear power program. The authors emphasize that the nuclear power field, comprising industry, government authorities, regulators, R and D organizations and educational institutions, relies for its continued success on a specialized, highly trained and motivated workforce. The role of knowledge management in nuclear power is underlined [ru

  4. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1992. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented on five parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export and Critical Assembly

  5. Nuclear source of district heating in the north-east region of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    The operation of the Bilibin Nuclear Co-generation Plant (BNCP) as a local district heating source is reviewed in this paper. Specific features of the BNCP power unit are given with special emphases on the components of the technological scheme, which are involved in the heat production and supply to the consumers. The scheme of steam extraction from the turbine, the flow diagram of steam in the turbine, as well as the three circuit heat removal system are described. The numerical characteristics of the nuclear heat supply system in various operating modes are presented. The real information characterizing current radiological conditions in the vicinity of the heat generation and distribution equipment is also presented in the paper. The BNCP technical and economical characteristics are compared with those of conventional energy sources. Both advantages and some problems revealed during the twenty-year experience of the BNCP nuclear heat utilization are generally assessed. Safety and reliability characteristics of the reactor and the heat supply system are also described. (author)

  6. Interim report on long range plan for nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The interim report on the updated NSAC Long Range Plan for Nuclear Physics will be presented to the community for discussion and comment before submission to the funding agencies. The presentation will be coordinated by E. Moniz chair of NSAC

  7. Energy and nuclear power planning study for Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    The Energy and Nuclear Power Planning (ENPP) study for Armenia has been conducted under the technical cooperation programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The objective of the study was to analyze the electricity demand as part of the total final energy demand in various scenarios of Armenian socioeconomic and technological development, and to develop economically optimized electric generating system expansion plans for meeting the electric power demand, and to assess the role that nuclear energy could play within these optimal programs. The specific objectives of this study were: to define the role that nuclear power could play in the future electricity supply in Armenia, based on a least-cost expansion planning analysis of the country's power system; to analyze the environmental impacts of such a nuclear power development; to evaluate the financial viability of the envisaged nuclear power development program; to train a group of Armenian experts in the use of the IAEA's energy models

  8. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission human-factors program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of the NRC Human Factors Program Plan is to ensure that proper consideration is given to human factors in the design, operation, and maintenance of nuclear facilities. This initial plan addresses nuclear power plants (NPP) and describes (1) the technical assistance and research activities planned to provide the technical bases for the resolution of the remaining human factors related tasks described in NUREG-0660, The NRC Action Plan Developed as a Result of the TMI-2 Accident, and NUREG-0737, Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements, and (2) the additional human factors efforts identified during implementation of the Action Plan that should receive NRC attention. The plan represents a systematic and comprehensive approach for addressing human factors concerns important to NPP safety in the FY-83 through FY-85 time frame

  9. U.S.-Russia MPC and A upgrades at the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraev, O.; Haase, M.; Smarto, C.; Mikkelsen, K.; Heinberg, C.; Showalter, R.; Soo Hoo, M.; Hatcher, C.; Forehand, M.

    1998-01-01

    During the January 1996 meeting of the Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission, the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) was identified as one of the additional sites for cooperative projects on upgrading Materials Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A). Since June 1996, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have worked with BNPP to upgrade MPC and A at the facility. Some unique challenges were encountered because BNPP has an operating BN-600 600-Megawatt breeder reactor. SNL has been responsible for working with BNPP to implement physical protection upgrades to the Central Alarm Station, Fresh Fuel Storage building, Spent Fuel Storage Area, and Vehicle/Personnel Portal. In addition, improved communication equipment for the Ministry of the Interior (MVD) guards and training of personnel were provided. PNNL has been responsible for coordinating Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) upgrades at BNPP. PNNL, in conjunction with LANL, has implemented such MC and A upgrades as a computerized nuclear materials accounting system, training in MC and A elements, nondestructive assay instrumentation for fresh fuel, installation of a fork detector for measuring spent fuel, and installation of an underwater video camera for verification of spent fuel serial numbers

  10. Debt swapping as a tool for economic and social stabilization in Russia's closed nuclear cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JL Fuller; KM Leek

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude of Russian foreign debt, both official bilateral and commercial, compounded by collapse of the Russian economic system, is an obstacle in preventing the Russian Federation from effectively increasing the domestic priority of drawing down its nuclear weapons complex and providing a healthy, competitive environment to its nuclear cities. Debt-for-nature swaps, introduced in the early 1980s, provide debtor nations with a means of converting a portion of foreign debt into local currency, often at steep discounts, to use for purposes such as environmental protection that serve both a domestic and international need. This paper presents the debt-for-nature concept as a model for providing an infusion of funds to further U.S. and international nonproliferation objectives to help stabilize Russian closed city economic conditions through direct work on proliferation problems and remediation of the environment. A specific proposal is presented to demonstrate the utility and efficacy of the dept swap concept through initial collaboration with the city administration of Ozersk. The purpose of the proposal is to facilitate making Ozersk a safe, healthy competitive city, providing useful employment for its scientists and population and converting its superior infrastructure into productive activities

  11. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEROY, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEROY, P.G.

    2000-11-03

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

  13. Soviet civil defense plans make nuclear war winnable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goure, L.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the author expresses his opinion that the U.S. is naive and suicidal in its lack of civil defense preparation for nuclear war. The Soviets' extensive civil defense planning is evidence that they plan to use their nuclear weapons and survive a counterattack by the U.S. The author compares the two systems and explains why the Soviets' system is superior

  14. Brief on nuclear emergency planning and preparedness in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Ontario has an excellent conceptual plan to ensure the safety of its inhabitants in the event of a nuclear accident anywhere in the world. This plan still needs to be translated into tangible preparedness to deal with such an emergency. The province is confident that, with the assistance of Ontario Hydro, a high level of nuclear emergency preparedness will soon be established for the people of the province

  15. Nuclear power planning study for Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutbi, I.I.; Matin, Abdul.

    1984-05-01

    The prospects of application of nuclear energy for production of electricity and desalinated water in the Kingdom are evaluated. General economic development of the country and data on reserves, production and consumption of oil and natural gas are reviewed. Electrical power system is described with data on production and consumption. Estimates of future power demand are made using Aoki method. Costs of production of electricity from 600 MW, 900 MW and 1200 MW nuclear and oil-fired power plants are calculated along with the costs of production of desalinated water from dual purpose nuclear and oil-fired plants. The economic analysis indicates that the cost of production of electricity and desalinated water are in general cheaper from the nuclear power plants. Suggests consideration of the use of nuclear energy for production of both electricity and desalinated water from 1415 H. Further detailed studies and prepartory organizational steps in this direction are outlined. 38 Ref

  16. Russian Minatom nuclear safety research strategic plan. An international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1999-01-01

    An NEA study on safety research needs of Russian-designed reactors, carried out in 1996, strongly recommended that a strategic plan for safety research be developed with respect to Russian nuclear power plants. Such a plan was developed at the Russian International Nuclear Safety Centre (RINSC) of the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom). The Strategic Plan is designed to address high-priority safety-research needs, through a combination of domestic research, the application of appropriate foreign knowledge, and collaboration. It represents major progress toward developing a comprehensive and coherent safety-research programme for Russian nuclear power plants (NPPs). The NEA undertook its review of the Strategic Plan with the objective of providing independent verification on the scope, priority, and content of the research described in the Plan based upon the experience of the international group of experts. The principal conclusions of the review and the general comments of the NEA group are presented. (K.A.)

  17. Nuclear energy and global governance to 2030 : an action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frechette, L.; Findlay, T.; Brem, M.; Hanson, J.; Bunch, M.; McCausland, T.

    2010-01-01

    This document presented the key findings of the Nuclear Energy Futures project that was initiated in May 2006 to consider global governance of nuclear energy. The five-point action plan presented in this document included: (1) nuclear safety whereby all nuclear states are committed to and capable of implementing the highest nuclear safety standards, (2) nuclear security whereby all nuclear material and facilities are secure from unauthorized access or terrorist seizure or attack, (3) nuclear nonproliferation whereby a nuclear revival does not contribute to the proliferation of nuclear weapons, (4) the re-enforcement of the International Atomic Energy Agency's centrality through increased funding, modernization and reform, and (5) stakeholder involvement whereby all partners, especially industry, participate in judiciously managing a nuclear revival. This document suggested that despite some powerful drivers, the revival of nuclear energy faces too many barriers compared to other means of electricity production. These barriers include high costs; fewer subsidies; too slow for meeting the threat of climate change; inadequate power grids; unresolved nuclear waste issue; and fears about safety, security and nuclear weapons.

  18. Nuclear energy and global governance to 2030 : an action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frechette, L.; Findlay, T. (comps.); Brem, M.; Hanson, J.; Bunch, M.; McCausland, T. (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    This document presented the key findings of the Nuclear Energy Futures project that was initiated in May 2006 to consider global governance of nuclear energy. The five-point action plan presented in this document included: (1) nuclear safety whereby all nuclear states are committed to and capable of implementing the highest nuclear safety standards, (2) nuclear security whereby all nuclear material and facilities are secure from unauthorized access or terrorist seizure or attack, (3) nuclear nonproliferation whereby a nuclear revival does not contribute to the proliferation of nuclear weapons, (4) the re-enforcement of the International Atomic Energy Agency's centrality through increased funding, modernization and reform, and (5) stakeholder involvement whereby all partners, especially industry, participate in judiciously managing a nuclear revival. This document suggested that despite some powerful drivers, the revival of nuclear energy faces too many barriers compared to other means of electricity production. These barriers include high costs; fewer subsidies; too slow for meeting the threat of climate change; inadequate power grids; unresolved nuclear waste issue; and fears about safety, security and nuclear weapons.

  19. Nuclear power - strategic planning for the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    Regardless of the real or perceived causes of the nuclear power industry's current difficulties, a number of recent trends-increasing electricity demand, foreign oil dependency, and attention paid to acid rain and the greenhouse effect-taken together, point of the most favorable atmosphere in recent history for nuclear power. Already, serious public discussion of its advantages have begun anew. Thus, the time is ripe to consider the developmental structure of nuclear power's next generation. Although much uncertainty still surrounds the nuclear industry, valuable lessons have been learned, and the evolution of the industry from this point cannot be left to chance. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a framework for nuclear power strategic planning activities. The strategic planning objectives outlined in this paper span issues that affect virtually every aspect of the nuclear power industry. Piecemeal responses to the vagaries of random stimuli will not be adequate. A proactive, integrated, industry-wide initiative-an Institute of Nuclear Power Planning, actively supported by the members of the industry-should be undertaken immediately to fill the strategic planning role. In so doing, the industry will not only be acting in its own best interest but will also be helping the nation realize the real and important benefits of its nuclear power technology

  20. Status and future plan of nuclear data activities in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang Youxiang; Tang Hongqing [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1997-03-01

    The present status and future plan of nuclear data measurement and evaluation in China are presented, including the supplement, improvement on CENDL-2.1 and benchmark test of CENDL-2.1, the progress on nuclear data measurement and CENDL-3. (author)

  1. Computer Security Incident Response Planning at Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to assist Member States in developing comprehensive contingency plans for computer security incidents with the potential to impact nuclear security and/or nuclear safety. It provides an outline and recommendations for establishing a computer security incident response capability as part of a computer security programme, and considers the roles and responsibilities of the system owner, operator, competent authority, and national technical authority in responding to a computer security incident with possible nuclear security repercussions

  2. Nord stream: not just a pipeline. An analysis of the political debates in the Baltic Sea region regarding the planned gas pipeline from Russia to Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whist, Bendik Solum

    2008-11-15

    This report is an analysis of the planned gas pipeline from Russia to Germany through the Baltic Sea known as Nord Stream. Although not yet realised, the project has, since its birth, been the subject of harsh criticism and opposition by a significant number of states that consider themselves affected by the pipeline. Whereas the Baltic States and Poland have interpreted the pipeline as a politically motivated strategy that will increase Russia's leverage on them and threaten their energy security, the debate in Sweden was at first mostly concerned with the prospect of increased Russian military presence in the Swedish Exclusive Economic Zone. The potential environmental impact of the pipeline has been, and continues to be, an overarching concern shared by all the littoral states of the Baltic Sea. Proponents of Nord Stream, most notably Germany, Russia and the Nord Stream consortium, have largely dismissed the concerns as unwarranted and argue that the pipeline is a common European project that all EU-members should embrace, as it will provide much-needed gas to an increasingly energy-thirsty union. This report is an extensive study of the divergent attitudes and debates that have surged in the region regarding Nord Stream, and the aim is to provide plausible explanations as to why the interpretations of the project have been so different in the various states. The report is based on a variety of sources, including several first-hand interviews with researchers and government officials in the Baltic Sea region. (author). refs.,fig.,tabs

  3. Radioactive waste management and plutonium recovery within the context of the development of nuclear energy in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnikov, V. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-05-01

    The Russian strategy for radioactive waste and plutonium management is based on the concept of the closed fuel cycle that has been adopted in Russia, and, to a great degree, falls under the jurisdiction of the existing Russian nuclear energy structures. From its very beginning, Russian atomic energy policy was based on finding the most effective method of developing the new fuel direction with the maximum possible utilization of the energy potential from the fission of heavy atoms and the achievement of fuel self-sufficiency through the recycling of secondary fuel. Although there can be no doubt about the importance of economic considerations (for the future), concerns for the safety of the environment are currently of the utmost importance. In this context, spent NPP fuel can be viewed as a waste to be buried only if there is persuasive evidence that such an approach is both economically and environmentally sound. The production of I GW of energy per year is accompanied by the accumulation of up to 800-1000 kg of highly radioactive fission products and approximately 250 kg of plutonium. Currently, spent fuel from the VVER 100 and the RBNK reactors contains approximately 25 tons of plutonium. There is an additional 30 tons of fuel-grade plutonium in the form of purified oxide, separated from spent fuels used in VVER440 reactors and other power production facilities, as well as approximately 100 tons of weapons-grade plutonium from dismantled warheads. The spent fuel accumulates significant amounts of small actinoids - neptunium americium, and curium. Science and technology have not yet found technical solutions for safe and secure burial of non-reprocessed spent fuel with such a broad range of products, which are typically highly radioactive and will continue to pose a threat for hundreds of thousands of years.

  4. Overview of IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Action Plan represents a work programme to strengthen and improve nuclear safety world wide. The plan identifies actions for Member States and the IAEA. Success depends upon: • Cooperation between IAEA, Member States, and other stakeholders; • Availability of appropriate financial resources (MS voluntary contributions)

  5. Nuclear decommissioning planning, execution and international experience

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    A title that critically reviews the decommissioning and decontamination processes and technologies available for rehabilitating sites used for nuclear power generation and civilian nuclear facilities, from fundamental issues and best practices, to procedures and technology, and onto decommissioning and decontamination case studies.$bOnce a nuclear installation has reached the end of its safe and economical operational lifetime, the need for its decommissioning arises. Different strategies can be employed for nuclear decommissioning, based on the evaluation of particular hazards and their attendant risks, as well as on the analysis of costs of clean-up and waste management. This allows for decommissioning either soon after permanent shutdown, or perhaps a long time later, the latter course allowing for radioactivity levels to drop in any activated or contaminated components. It is crucial for clear processes and best practices to be applied in decommissioning such installations and sites, particular where any ...

  6. U.S., Russia join efforts to clean up nuclear sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Seltzer.

    1993-01-01

    U.S. and Russian scientists are stepping up their cooperative efforts to deal with a vexing and controversial problem in both nations--cleanup of radioactive wastes at former nuclear weapons production sites. Last month, a top-level delegation of Russian officials and scientists came to the U.S. for two weeks. They visited Washington, D.C., and the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site in Washington State, studying U.S. cleanup activities and providing information on Russian problems and efforts. The visit was part of a program of exchanges in the areas of environmental restoration and waste management called for by a 1990 memorandum of cooperation between DOE and the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy. The memo helps implement a U.S.-Russian collaborative agreement on peaceful uses of atomic energy. Currently, cooperation under the memo exists in four areas: vitrification, waste separation, contaminant transport modeling, and student-scientist exchanges. The paper summarizes the visit to the Hanford Reservation and describes the cleanup efforts there

  7. TEPCO plans to construct Higashidori Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, TEPCO submitted to the government plans for the construction of Higashidori Nuclear Power Station. The application was filed 41 years after the project approved by the Higashidori Village Assembly. This nuclear power station will be the first new nuclear power plant constructed by TEPCO since the construction of Units No.6 and 7 at the Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station 18 years ago. Higashidori Nuclear Power Station is to be constructed at a completely new site, which will become the fourth TEPCO nuclear power station. Higashidori Nuclear Power Station Unit No.1 will be TEPCO's 18th nuclear reactor. Unit No.1 will be an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR), a reactor-type with a proven track record. It will be TEPCO's third ABWR. Alongside incorporating the latest technology, in Higashidori Nuclear Power Station Unit No.1, the most important requirement is for TEPCO to reflect in the new unit information and experience acquired from the operation of other reactors (information and experience acquired through the experience of operating TEPCO's 17 units at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station and Kashiwazaki Kashiwa Nuclear Power Station in addition to information on non-conformities at nuclear power stations in Japan and around the world). Higashidori Nuclear Power Station is located in Higashidori-Village (Aomori Prefecture) and the selected site includes a rich natural environment. From an environmental perspective, we will implement the construction with due consideration for the land and sea environment, aiming to ensure that the plant can co-exist with its natural surroundings. The construction plans are currently being reviewed by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency. We are committed to making progress in the project for the start of construction and subsequent commercial operation. (author)

  8. Creation and Plan of an Underground Geologic Radioactive Waste Isolation Facility at the Nizhnekansky Rock Massif in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupalo, T A; Kudinov, K G; Jardine, L J; Williams, J

    2004-01-01

    This joint geologic repository project in Russia was initiated in May 2002 between the United States (U.S.) International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the Federal State Unitary Enterprise ''All-Russian Research and Design Institute of Production Engineering'' (VNIPIPT). The project (ISTC Partner Project 2377) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) for a period of 2-1/2 years. ISTC project activities were integrated into other ongoing geologic repository site characterization activities near the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC K-26) site. This allowed the more rapid development of a plan for an underground research laboratory, including underground design and layouts. It will not be possible to make a final choice between the extensively studied Verkhne-Itatski site or the Yeniseiski site for construction of the underground laboratory during the project time frame because additional data are needed. Several new sources of data will become available in the next few years to help select a final site. Studies will be conducted at the 1-km deep borehole at the Yeniseisky site where drilling started in 2004. And in 2007, after the scheduled shutdown of the last operating reactor at the MCC K-26 site, data will be collected from the rock massif as the gneiss rock cools, and the cool-down responses modeled. After the underground laboratory is constructed, the data collected and analyzed, this will provide the definitive evidence regarding the safety of the proposed geologic isolation facilities for radioactive wastes (RW). This data will be especially valuable because they will be collected at the same site where the wastes will be subsequently placed, rather than on hypothetical input data only. Including the operating costs for 10 to 15 years after construction, the cost estimate for the laboratory is $50M. With additional funding from non-ISTC sources, it will be possible to complete this

  9. Comparison of nuclear plant emergency plans of PBNCC members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, W.Y.; Hopwood, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSWG) of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee initiated cooperation among Pacific Basin areas based primarily around emergency planning. The NSWG conducted a review of the emergency response plans of members. This paper briefly reviews and makes a comparison of the emergency response plans, with particular attention on the response organization, the planning zone, and the protective action guidelines for emergencies. Although all areas have adopted the same basic elements of emergency planning and are similar, there are also variances due to different governmental structures, population densities, and available resources. It is found that the most significant difference is in the size of the emergency planning zone. The paper concludes with a discussion on possible future cooperative activities of the working group. (author)

  10. A long range plan for nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The report is in two parts. The first part reviews the current understanding of nuclear physics and indicates areas of significant interest for future work. It briefly discusses the special contributions of nuclear physics in other sciences. The second part considers new facilities which would be particularly relevant to the future development of nuclear physics in the UK. The present position of UK nuclear physics with respect to the wider nuclear community is considered. In conclusion the report establishes priorities for UK nuclear physics and makes recommendations for future action for the provision of facilities and also for future funding and manpower levels. The working party seeks to build on the valuable base provided by the NSF and Oxford accelerators. The principal recommendation of the Working Party is that a new 600MeV continuous beam electron accelerator should be built at the Daresbury Laboratory. For higher energy heavy ion beams the Working Party suggests these should be sought at overseas laboratories. (author)

  11. Planning for nuclear power in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    This article traces the events that led to nuclear power introduction in the Philippines starting from: the creation of National Science and Development Board and Philippine Atomic Energy Commission in 1958 under R.A. 2067; recruitment of young engineers, chemists and other scientists and their training here and abroad for the different specialized fields of nuclear energy; the creation of an inter-organizational Ad-Hoc Committee on Nuclear Power Study; initiation of a UNDP-IAEA supported Pre-Investment Study on Power Including Nuclear Power in Luzon in early 1964; enactment of R.A. 5207, the Philippine Nuclear Liability Act in 1968; second feasibility study in 1971; siting study by PAEC, NPC and MERALCO engineers; technical and economic study; organizational and financial study; and investment report. Upon receipt of the results of the feasibility studies on 31 July 1973, the President of the Philippines decided on the immediate implementation of the first nuclear plant project by the National Power Corporation (NPC). Licensing and regulation as well as manpower training with the aid of regional or international training agencies will be undertaken by PAEC

  12. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Kerkhoven, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    After Chernobyl an extensive project on nuclear emergency planning and response was started in the Netherlands. The objective of this project was to develop a (governmental) structure to cope with accidents with radioactive materials, that can threaten the Dutch community and neighbouring countries. The project has resulted in a new organizational structure for nuclear emergency response, that differs on major points from the existing plans and procedures. In this paper an outline of the new structure is given. Emphasis is placed on accidents with nuclear power plants

  13. Tenneessee Valley Authority office of nuclear power management development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority's Management Development Plan is discussed and consists of an analysis of each managerial position, an analysis of each individual manager's and potential manager's qualifications and training and a comparison of the two. From this comparison two products are derived: a management replacement plan and an individual development plan for each nuclear employee. The process of the program is described in detail

  14. Emergency planning and preparedness for a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahe, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Based on current regulations, FEMA approves each site-specific plan of state and local governments for each power reactor site after 1) formal review offsite preparedness, 2) holding a public meeting at which the preparedness status has been reviewed, and 3) a satisfactory joint exercise has been conducted with both utility and local participation. Annually, each state, within any position of the 10-mile emergency planning zone, must conduct a joint exercise with the utility to demonstrate its preparedness for a nuclear accident. While it is unlikely that these extreme measures will be needed as a result of an accident at a nuclear power station, the fact that these plans have been well thought out and implemented have already proven their benefit to society. The preparedness for a nuclear accident can be of great advantage in other types of emergencies. For example, on December 11, 1982, a non-nuclear chemical storage tank exploded at a Union Carbide plant in Louisiana shortly after midnight. More than 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes. They were evacuated under the emergency response plan formulated for use in the event of a nuclear accident at the nearby Waterford Nuclear plants. Clearly, this illustrates how a plan conceived for one purpose is appropriate to handle other types of accidents that occur in a modern industrial society

  15. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan part V - Chalk River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-10-01

    The aim of Part 5 of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Plan is to describe the measures that shall be undertaken to deal with a nuclear emergency caused by the Chalk River Laboratories. This plan deals mainly with actions at the Provincial level and shall by supplemented by the appropriate Municipal Plan. The Townships of Rolph, Buchanan, Wylie, and McKay, the Town of Deep River and the Village of Chalk River are the designated municipalities with respect to CRL. 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan part V - Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The aim of Part 5 of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Plan is to describe the measures that shall be undertaken to deal with a nuclear emergency caused by the Chalk River Laboratories. This plan deals mainly with actions at the Provincial level and shall by supplemented by the appropriate Municipal Plan. The Townships of Rolph, Buchanan, Wylie, and McKay, the Town of Deep River and the Village of Chalk River are the designated municipalities with respect to CRL. 2 tabs., 5 figs

  17. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1993. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly

  18. Nuclear science and technology plan (1989-1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear science and technology plan embodies the objectives strategies and activities of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI). It is an integral component of the national effort to make the Philippines a newly industrialized country (NIC) by the year 2000. The four major plans under the program are as follows: 1) Radiation protection and nuclear safety, 2) Radiation technology and engineering, 3) Radioisotopes and nuclear techniques application and 4) special projects. The cost of the plan is estimated to be two hundred ninety three million pesos (293, 000,000) for 1989-1993 covering personnel services (39.7%), maintenance and operating expenses (42.7%), equipment outlay (4.8%) and infrastructure (12.8%). The details of the different programs are given. (ELC). 7 figs.; 8 tabs

  19. Nuclear Waste Policy Act transportation planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The importance and magnitude of effort to put in place a safe, publicly acceptable transportation system for radioactive wastes are discussed. The importance of working openly, documenting efforts in a way that is objective and can be understood by the general public, and being particularly sensitive and responsive to public concerns is recognized. Key elements of current planning have been described, but numerous details remain to be worked out. These details will be worked out, proposed in programs plans, and made publicly available. The author looks forward to ideas and comments for improving these plans and their implementation

  20. Russian MINATOM nuclear safety research strategic plan. An international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The 'Safety Research Strategic Plan for Russian Nuclear Power Plants' was published in draft form at the Russian International Nuclear Safety Centre (RINSC) by a working group of fifteen senior Russian experts. The Plan consists of 12 chapters, each addressing a specific technical area and containing a number of proposed research programmes and projects to advance the state-of-knowledge in that area. In part because a strong Recommendation to undertake such a Plan was made by the 1998 OECD/NEA study, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency was asked by the Director of RINSC and the Director of USINSC to organize an international review of the Plan when the English-language version became available in October, 1998. This report represents the results of that review. (R.P.)

  1. Conflict management in the planning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Subsequent to the decision of the Bavarian Higher Administrative Court, which after judicial review declared the development plan for the Wackersdorf site and the reprocessing facility there to be void, the author analyses the situation with regard to the tasks to be accomplished by an installation-specific planning management for coping with arising conflicts - and nuclear hazards in particular -, and for coming to a reconciliation of interests. The author agrees with the decision of the Lueneburg Higher Administrative Court which stated that, in view of the subsequent licensing procedure provided by the law, the development plans need not specify any regulations concerning the specific nuclear hazards or radiological consequences of installations of this type, so that development plans within the meaning of sec. 1, sub-sec. (3) BauGB do not necessarily have to consider nuclear risks or dose limits. (orig./HP) [de

  2. The radiation legacy of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear weapons making and testing, operation of enterprises of the nuclear industry, of military and civilian nuclear fleet, as well as peaceful nuclear explosions -- all that led in the USSR to release of radioactive products into the environment. In some parts of the FSU radioactive contamination exceeded permissible levels. The necessity of remediation of such territories became evident. The most part of the contamination resulted from major radiation accidents in Kyshtym (19570 and Chernobyl (1986). Today those objects, as well as some sites of radwaste storage and disposal, written-off nuclear submarines with non-unloaded spent nuclear fuel, some floating and on-shore repositories of nuclear fleet's radwaste and spent nuclear fuel, pose a potential hazard to the biosphere. Appropriate measures aimed at decreasing their impact on the population and environment are needed. Such measures should include both restoration of contaminated lands and social support programs for the population affected by radiation. The main task of the rehabilitation is reduction of consequences of internal and external exposure of the people, creation of necessary conditions for efficient and safe economical activities. Concrete objectives should be determined, as well as principles and standards to ensure radiation safety when conducting remediation works, and also -- specifications for evaluation of the lands condition prior to their remediation, criteria of decision making, rehabilitation planning, techniques of the lands' restoration and recommendations for their future uses. The Russian Federal special program 'Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Materials Management, Utilization and Disposal for 1996-2005' envisages studies on Russia's radiation legacy's assessment on the basis of up-to-date information technologies of computer-based systems for data collection, storage and processing for accounting and analysis of information on availability, origin, physical and chemical

  3. Developments in emergency planning within Scottish nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Scottish Nuclear has recently completed a major program of improvements to its nuclear emergency facilities. The improvements include the construction of a purpose built Off-Site Emergency Centre for each of its two power stations and the development of a computer based information management system to facilitate the rapid distribution of information on an emergency to local, regional and national agencies. A computer code has also been developed to allow the rapid assessment of the effects of any accidental release on the local population. The improvements to the emergency facilities have been coupled with changes in local and national arrangements for dealing with a civil nuclear emergency. The use of airborne surveying techniques for rapidly determining levels of deposited activity following an accident is also being examined and preliminary airborne surveys have been carried out. (author)

  4. Research on evacuation planning as nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2007-10-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has introduced new concepts of precautionary action zone (PAZ) and urgent protective action planning zone (UPZ) in 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2 (2002)), in order to reduce substantially the risk of severe deterministic health effects. Open literature based research was made to reveal problems on evacuation planning and the preparedness for nuclear emergency arising from introduction of PAZ into Japan that has applied the emergency planning zone (EPZ) concept currently. In regard to application of PAZ, it should be noted that the requirements for preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency are not only dimensional but also timely. The principal issue is implementation of evacuation of precautionary decided area within several hours. The logic of evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency and the methods of advance public education and information in the U.S. is effective for even prompt evacuation to the outside of the EPZ. As concerns evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency in Japan, several important issues to be considered were found, that is, selection of public reception centers which are outside area of the EPZ, an unique reception center assigned to each emergency response planning area, public education and information of practical details about the evacuation plan in advance, and necessity of the evacuation time estimates. To establish a practical evacuation planning guide for nuclear emergencies, further researches on application of traffic simulation technology to evacuation time estimates and on knowledge of actual evacuation experience in natural disasters and chemical plant accidents are required. (author)

  5. Planning and developing the French nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.

    1983-01-01

    Since France has been compelled to free itself from the domination of oil, it has undertaken a nuclear programme capable of providing for nearly one third of its energy needs by 1990. Some years after the first oil crisis, a good part of the battle has already been won: 22 reactor units of 900 MW each have been connected to the grid and account for 40% of the electricity produced in France, while 12 other 900 MW units, together with the first 1300 MW units, are under construction. Nuclear power has thus become an industrial reality possessed of the tools appropriate for the whole fuel cycle, which has managed to cope with costs and meet deadlines, and has developed a safe and reliable product. With these positive results despite inevitable incidents the French nuclear industry has come of age. There are, however, handicaps which remain to be overcome: high investment costs, operating constraints and continuing doubt on the part of the public. The efforts deployed in these three spheres are beginning to bear fruit. As a result, implementation of the French nuclear programme is being continued, albeit at a slower rate, for the aim is no longer to replace oil by nuclear power as soon as possible, but rather to keep up with the rise in consumption. In pursuing its nuclear efforts, France will henceforth be stressing progress in terms of quality, which can still be achieved in terms of increased reliability (incorporation of feedback), better economic return (initiation of a new series known as ''N4''), easier operation (improvement of the man-machine interface) and also more independence. The ''frenchification'' of the light-water reactor has from the beginning been seen as one of the means of achieving this independence. This also applies to mastery of the whole fuel cycle. And finally, fast breeders represent the next stage

  6. Planning, design and technological criteria of conventional and nuclear shelters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoon, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    The thesis aims to establish a special criteria for building the shelters in two types. The conventional and nuclear, in respect to planning design and technological aspects, and finally establishing a special reference of planning, design and technology for Iraq which can be used when planning or designing a conventional or nuclear shelter. The thesis included four chapters, the first chapter included definition of shelters, and explanation of the effects of all types of weapons on buildings, and the second chapter included definition of planning and design concepts of shelters in its two types and analytical studies for international examples. The third chapter covered definition for technologies of structural, mechanical, electrical and sanitary systems. The fourth chapter included details of a case study in order to approach the results of research which included the conclusions, recommendations, criteria and prospects of planning design and technological aspects. 51 tabs.; 180 figs.; 32 refs.; 15 apps

  7. The challenges and directions for nuclear energy policy in Japan. Japan's nuclear energy national plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanase, Tadao

    2007-01-01

    According to the 'framework for nuclear energy policy' (October, 2005 adopted by cabinet), basic goals of nuclear policy are (1) for nuclear energy to continue to meet more than around 30-40% of electricity supply, and also (2) to further promote a fuel cycle steadily aiming at commercial introduction of a fast breeder by 2050. In order to realize an aim of this framework for nuclear energy policy', the nuclear energy subcommittee of the METI advisory committee deliberated concrete actions and the subcommittee recommendations were drawn up as 'Japan's nuclear energy national plan' in August, 2006 and incorporated as main part of the revised 'basic plan on energy' adopted by the cabinet in March 2007. Backgrounds and directions of future actions for nuclear energy policy were described. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Hill

    2007-07-01

    This plan describes the GNEP Technology Demonstration Program (GNEP-TDP). It has been prepared to guide the development of integrated plans and budgets for realizing the domestic portion of the GNEP vision as well as providing the basis for developing international cooperation. Beginning with the GNEP overall goals, it describes the basic technical objectives for each element of the program, summarizes the technology status and identifies the areas of greatest technical risk. On this basis a proposed technology demonstration program is described that can deliver the required information for a Secretarial decision in the summer of 2008 and support construction of facilities.

  9. Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes - Romanian experience: Master - Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.; Valeca, M.

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the Master Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan are: 1. To deliver higher education and training in the following specific domains, such as: Powders Technology and Ceramic Materials, Techniques of Structural Analysis, Composite Materials, Semiconductor Materials and Components, Metals and Metallic Alloys, Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Nuclear Materials, The Engineering of Special Nuclear Materials, 2. To train managers of the Nuclear Waste Products and Nuclear Safety, 3. To qualify in ICT Systems for Nuclear Process Guidance, 4. To qualify in Environmental Protection System at the Level of Nuclear Power Stations, 5. To train managers for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Energetic Processes, 6. To deliver higher education and training regarding the International Treatises, Conventions and Settlements in force in the field of nuclear related activities. (author)

  10. Nuclear waste management plan of the Finnish TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmenhaara, S.E.J. . Author

    2004-01-01

    The FiR 1 - reactor, a 250 kW Triga reactor, has been in operation since 1962. The main purpose to run the reactor is now the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The BNCT work dominates the current utilization of the reactor. The weekly schedule allows still one or two days for other purposes such as isotope production and neutron activation analysis. According to the Finnish legislation the research reactor must have a nuclear waste management plan. The plan describes the methods, the schedule and the cost estimate of the whole decommissioning waste and spent fuel management procedure starting from the removal of the spent fuel, the dismantling of the reactor and ending to the final disposal of the nuclear wastes. The cost estimate of the nuclear waste management plan has to be updated annually and every fifth year the plan will be updated completely. According to the current operating license of our reactor we have to achieve a binding agreement, in 2005 at the latest, between our Research Centre and the domestic nuclear power companies about the possibility to use the Olkiluoto final disposal facility for our spent fuel. There is also the possibility to make the agreement with USDOE about the return of our spent fuel back to USA. If we want, however, to continue the reactor operation beyond the year 2006, the domestic final disposal is the only possibility. In Finland the producer of nuclear waste is fully responsible for its nuclear waste management. The financial provisions for all nuclear waste management have been arranged through the State Nuclear Waste Management Fund. The main objective of the system is that at any time there shall be sufficient funds available to take care of the nuclear waste management measures caused by the waste produced up to that time. The system is applied also to the government institutions like FiR 1 research reactor. (author)

  11. Emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Rahmah Hidayati; Pande Made Udiyani

    2009-01-01

    All nuclear facilities in Indonesia are owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). The programs and activities of emergency planning and preparedness in Indonesia are based on the existing nuclear facilities, i.e. research reactors, research reactor fuel fabrication plant, radioactive waste treatment installation and radioisotopes production installation. The assessment is conducted to learn of status of emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia and to support the preparation of future Nuclear Power Plant. The assessment is conducted by comparing the emergency preparedness and response system in Indonesia to the system in other countries such as Japan and Republic of Korea, since the countries have many Nuclear Power Plants and other nuclear facilities. As a result, emergency preparedness response plan for existing nuclear facility in Indonesia has been implemented in many activities such as environmental monitoring program, facility monitoring equipment, and the continuous exercise of emergency preparedness and response. However, the implementation need law enforcement for imposing the responsibility of the coordinators in National Emergency Preparedness Plan. It also needs some additional technical support systems which refer to the system in Japan or Republic of Korea. The systems must be completed with some real time monitors which will support the emergency preparedness and response organization. The system should be built in NPP site before the first NPP will be operated. The system should be connected to an Off Site Emergency Center under coordination of BAPETEN as the regulatory body which has responsibility to control of nuclear energy in Indonesia. (Author)

  12. IAEA Sets Up Team to Drive Nuclear Safety Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency is setting up a Nuclear Safety Action Team to oversee prompt implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety and ensure proper coordination among all stakeholders. The 12-point Action Plan, drawn up in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 13 September and endorsed by all 151 Member States at its General Conference last week. The team will work within the Agency's Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, headed by Deputy Director General Denis Flory, and will coordinate closely with the Director General's Office for Policy. ''The Action Plan requires immediate follow-up,'' Director General Yukiya Amano said. ''This compact, dedicated team will assist Deputy Director General Flory in implementing the measures agreed in the Action Plan.'' Gustavo Caruso, Head of the Regulatory Activities Section in the IAEA's Division of Installation Safety, has been designated as the team's Special Coordinator for the implementation of the Action Plan. The IAEA has already started implementing its responsibilities under the Action Plan, including development of an IAEA methodology for stress tests for nuclear power plants. The methodology will be ready in October. (IAEA)

  13. Emergency plans for civil nuclear installations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    The operators of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom have plans to deal with accidents or emergencies at their nuclear sites. These plans provide for any necessary action, both on and off the nuclear site, to protect members of the public and are regularly exercised. The off-site actions involve the emergency services and other authorities which may be called upon to implement measures to protect the public in any civil emergency. In a recent review of these plans by Government Departments and agencies and the nuclear site operators, a number of possible improvements were identified. These improvements are concerned mainly with the provisions made for liaison with local and national authorities and for public information and have been incorporated into existing plans. An outline is given of the most likely consequences of an accidental release of radioactive material and the scope of emergency plans. Details are also provided on the responsibilities and functions of the operator and other organizations with duties under the plans and the arrangements made for public information. (author)

  14. Stress Tests Worldwide - IAEA Nuclear Safety Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA nuclear safety action plan relies on 11 important issues. 1) Safety assessments in light of the Fukushima accident: the IAEA secretariat will develop a methodology for stress tests against specific extreme natural hazards and will provide assistance for their implementation; 2) Strengthen existing IAEA peer reviews; 3) Emergency preparedness and response; 4) National Regulatory bodies in terms of independence and adequacy of human and financial resources; 5) The development of safety culture and scientific and technical capacity in Operating Organizations; 6) The upgrading of IAEA safety standards in a more efficient way; 7) A better implementation of relevant conventions concerning nuclear safety and nuclear accidents; 8) To provide a broad assistance on safety standard for countries embarking on a nuclear power program; 9) To facilitate the use of available information, expertise and techniques concerning radiation protection; 10) To enhance the transparency of nuclear industry; and 11) To promote the cooperation between member states in nuclear safety. (A.C.)

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel project interface control plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This implementation process philosophy is in keeping with the ongoing reengineering of the WHC Controlled Manuals to achieve interface control within the SNF Project. This plan applies to all SNF Project sub-project to sub-project, and sub-project to exteranl (both on and off the Hanford Site) interfaces

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Document Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, M.D.; Harizison, G.L.; Rice, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    The SNF Project Document Management Plan identifies and describes the currently available systems and processes for implementing and maintaining an effective document control and records management program. This program governs the methods by which documents are generated, released, distributed, maintained current, retired, and ultimately disposed

  17. Safety planning for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.

    1979-01-01

    The article shows that compared to the many industries and other human activities, nuclear power stations are among the safest. A short description of the measures taken to prevent accidents and of the additional safety means entering into action if an accident does occur is presented. It is shown that in nuclear plants the death frequency following malfunctioning is 1 death in 100.000 years whereas deaths following other human activities is 1 in 2 to 100 years and following natural calamities like earthquakes and floods is 1 in 10 years. As an example it is shown that for a population of 15.000.000 living in a radius of 40 km around 100 power stations the average number of deaths will be of 2 per year as compared to 4200 from road accidents with the corresponding number of injuries of 20 and 375.000 respectively. (B.G.)

  18. Nuclear power planning study for Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The optimum capacity for nuclear power plants that might be built in Venezuela in the period 1985-2000 and the best time for incorporating them into the electric system is defined. The most recent forecasts regarding growth of the population and demand, and of the economy in general, and the taking into account the costs for the fossil-fuel and hydroelectric resources known to exist in Venezuela, as compared with the costs of importing uranium, are discussed

  19. Planning and development of the Spanish nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, M.

    1983-01-01

    The paper analyses the Spanish nuclear power programme from its inception to the present time, doing so within the context of the country, characterized by the fairly rapid change from a basically agricultural economy to an economy in which industry and services play an important part and the transformation of which took place mainly during the decade prior to the energy crisis 1973. Reference is made to the early establishment of the Junta de Energia Nuclear (Nuclear Energy Board) (JEN), which was set up as a research body even before nuclear energy became competitive with other sources for the production of electric power and which, by adapting its structure and programmes to the different phases in the development and utilization of nuclear energy in the country, contributed the necessary scientific, technical and legal infrastructure. There is also an analysis of the most striking features of the Spanish energy system and an account of the planning and construction of the first three Spanish nuclear power stations. A further subject of discussion is the energy planning and development projects devised by the Government which gave rise to the second generation of nuclear power plants, some of which are already in operation and the remainder in an advanced state of construction. Emphasis is placed on the action taken by the Spanish Government to increase the participation of Spanish industry in the construction of nuclear power plants and in the supply of equipment and services required for their operation. Reference is made to the experimental changes which have been made in the institutional infrastructure in order to adapt it to the phase of development which has been reached and to the objectives subsequently laid down in the planning: establishment of ENUSA (the national uranium enterprise), the Equipos Nucleares corporation and the Nuclear Safety Council, and also the changes made in the JEN

  20. Contingency planning for nuclear emergencies in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M. C.

    2002-01-01

    Two nuclear power stations on the coast of southern China are situated some 50 kilometers to the northeast of Hong Kong. Although the stations are far away from Hong Kong, the construction and operation of the nuclear power stations have generated public anxiety locally, in particular, after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A comprehensive contingency plan which takes into account such concerns of the public has been implemented in Hong Kong. This plan not only aims to ensure a quick and timely response to mitigate the health impact of any accidental release but also targets to re-assure the public that the territory is not contaminated when appropriate. This paper describes the principal elements of the nuclear contingency plan in Hong Kong, namely, an extensive environmental radiation monitoring programme and a proactive public communication programme

  1. Nuclear disasters: current plans and future directions for oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    To show that there is a significant role for oncologists in the event of a terrorist nuclear disaster. Professionals need data on current political issues regarding a nuclear attack already put in place by the administration and the military. Review of what actually occurs during a fission bomb's explosion helps to point out what medical care will be most needed. The author contends that those trained in the oncologies could play a major part. Modern-day America. Potential civilian survivors. Large gaps noted in statewide disaster plans in the public domain. Oncologists must get involved now in disaster planning; statewide plans are necessary throughout the nation; the public needs to know the basics of what to do in the advent of a nuclear bomb explosion.

  2. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Human Factors Program Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    The purpose of the NRC Human Factors Program Plan (NUREG-0985) is to ensure that proper consideration is given to human factors in the design, operation, and maintenance of nuclear facilities. This revised plan addresses nuclear power plants (NPPs) and describes (1) the technical assistance and research activities planned to provide the technical bases for the resolution of the remaining human factors related tasks described in NUREG-0660, THE NRC Action Plan developed as a result of the TMI-2 Accident, and NUREG-0737, Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements; (2) the additional human factors efforts identified during implementation of the Action Plan that should receive NRC attention; (3) conduct of developmental activities specified in NUREG-0985 during FY-83; and (4) the impact of Section 306 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, PL 97-425. The plan represents a systematic and comprehensive approach for addressing human factors concerns important to NPP safety in the FY-84 through FY-86 time frame

  3. Integrated planning for nuclear siting - The South African experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, J C.A.; Heidstra, N; Graupner, O F [Eskom, Johannesburg (South Africa); Hambleton-Jones, B [Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Ltd., Pellindaba, Pretoria (South Africa)

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the process involved in the current national programme to identify potential sites for nuclear power development in South Africa. A description is given of the sensitivity studies - the evaluation of the potential perturbations to and opportunities for the biophysical and socioeconomic environments and the suitability studies - the evaluation of environmental influences on geotechnical, safety and financial considerations. This programme is divorced from any decision of whether or not to build further nuclear power station in South Africa. The programme described is a long range land-use planning exercise considered expedient in the face of competition for land that share similar requirements as those of nuclear power station sites. It is also designed to streamline nuclear power station lead times and to make national and regional planners aware of Eskom's requirements in the drafting of their policies and plans. (author)

  4. Integrated planning for nuclear siting - The South African experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, J.C.A.; Heidstra, N.; Graupner, O.F.; Hambleton-Jones, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the process involved in the current national programme to identify potential sites for nuclear power development in South Africa. A description is given of the sensitivity studies - the evaluation of the potential perturbations to and opportunities for the biophysical and socioeconomic environments and the suitability studies - the evaluation of environmental influences on geotechnical, safety and financial considerations. This programme is divorced from any decision of whether or not to build further nuclear power station in South Africa. The programme described is a long range land-use planning exercise considered expedient in the face of competition for land that share similar requirements as those of nuclear power station sites. It is also designed to streamline nuclear power station lead times and to make national and regional planners aware of Eskom's requirements in the drafting of their policies and plans. (author)

  5. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1987. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually for Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear regulatory Commission; from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The major change in this revision involves the data related to shutdown and dismantled facilities. Because this information serves substantially different purposes, it has been accumulated in a separate section, ''Reactors and Facilities Shutdown or Dismantled.'' Cancelled reactors or reactors whose progress has been terminated at some stage before operation are included in this section

  6. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1988. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington Headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables. Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned. Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled

  7. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, E.P.

    1987-03-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1986, which are capable of sustaining a nuclear chain reaction. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commisssion; from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; and from US embassies of foreign countries. Information is presented in five parts, each of which is categorized by primary function or purpose: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly facilities

  8. ASME nuclear codes and standards risk management strategic planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Ralph S. III; Balkey, Kenneth R.; Erler, Bryan A.; Wesley Rowley, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is prepared in honor and in memory of the late Professor Emeritus Yasuhide Asada to recognize his contributions to ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards initiatives, particularly those related to risk-informed technology and System Based Code developments. For nearly two decades, numerous risk-informed initiatives have been completed or are under development within the ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards organization. In order to properly manage the numerous initiatives currently underway or planned for the future, the ASME Board on Nuclear Codes and Standards (BNCS) has an established Risk Management Strategic Plan (Plan) that is maintained and updated by the ASME BNCS Risk Management Task Group. This paper presents the latest approved version of the plan beginning with a background of applications completed to date, including the recent probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) standards developments for nuclear power plant applications. The paper discusses planned applications within ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards that will require expansion of the ASME PRA Standard to support new advanced light water reactor and next generation reactor developments, such as for high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Emerging regulatory developments related to risk-informed, performance- based approaches are summarized. A long-term vision for the potential development and evolution to a nuclear systems code that adopts a risk-informed approach across a facility life-cycle (design, construction, operation, maintenance, and closure) is also summarized. Finally, near term and long term actions are defined across the ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards organizations related to risk management, including related U.S. regulatory activities. (author)

  9. Nuclear Energy in Western Europe: At the End of its Business Cycle? A review of policies in selected West European countries and Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangen, Kristian

    1997-12-31

    A series of seminars were held in Norway in 1995-97 focusing on nuclear energy policies, mainly in Europe. The key questions were: (1) What are the major driving forces behind the development of the nuclear industry?, and (2) Are we seeing the end of the nuclear energy era, or will we actually discover that the nuclear energy is moving towards its second blossom? This report summarizes the discussions at the seminars and discusses the above questions. The nature of the driving forces depends on the country in question. In France and Russia the nuclear sectors are large and prestigious and the course is difficult to change. In Germany and Sweden, political parties have adopted an anti-nuclear attitude and the issue is controversial, involving arguments both pro and con. The British nuclear sector has come to the end of the road. The main driving force has been the deregulation of the electricity market. In all countries, climate issues, independence from energy import, prestige and low costs have been arguments against close-downs. Massive expansion of nuclear power in Europe is unlikely. However, new plants might appear in Finland, Turkey or France. It is likely that technological development of the nuclear power sector, if any, will come in Asia. It is unclear whether this sector will benefit from climate issues. Renewable energy could become an important competitor if enough electricity could be produced. A state has been reached in which nuclear energy is both difficult to expand and to phase out. The nuclear energy issues are unlikely to affect the European gas market significantly. 53 refs., 10 refs., 13 tabs.

  10. Nuclear Energy in Western Europe: At the End of its Business Cycle? A review of policies in selected West European countries and Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangen, Kristian

    1998-12-31

    A series of seminars were held in Norway in 1995-97 focusing on nuclear energy policies, mainly in Europe. The key questions were: (1) What are the major driving forces behind the development of the nuclear industry?, and (2) Are we seeing the end of the nuclear energy era, or will we actually discover that the nuclear energy is moving towards its second blossom? This report summarizes the discussions at the seminars and discusses the above questions. The nature of the driving forces depends on the country in question. In France and Russia the nuclear sectors are large and prestigious and the course is difficult to change. In Germany and Sweden, political parties have adopted an anti-nuclear attitude and the issue is controversial, involving arguments both pro and con. The British nuclear sector has come to the end of the road. The main driving force has been the deregulation of the electricity market. In all countries, climate issues, independence from energy import, prestige and low costs have been arguments against close-downs. Massive expansion of nuclear power in Europe is unlikely. However, new plants might appear in Finland, Turkey or France. It is likely that technological development of the nuclear power sector, if any, will come in Asia. It is unclear whether this sector will benefit from climate issues. Renewable energy could become an important competitor if enough electricity could be produced. A state has been reached in which nuclear energy is both difficult to expand and to phase out. The nuclear energy issues are unlikely to affect the European gas market significantly. 53 refs., 10 refs., 13 tabs.

  11. Importance of Advanced Planning of Manufacturing for Nuclear Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shykinov Nick

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of energy demands by growing economies, climate changes, fossil fuel pricing volatility, and improved safety and performance of nuclear power plants, many countries express interest in expanding or acquiring nuclear power capacity. In the light of the increased interest in expanding nuclear power the supply chain for nuclear power projects has received more attention in recent years. The importance of the advanced planning of procurement and manufacturing of components of nuclear facilities is critical for these projects. Many of these components are often referred to as long-lead items. They may be equipment, products and systems that are identified to have a delivery time long enough to affect directly the overall timing of a project. In order to avoid negatively affecting the project schedule, these items may need to be sourced out or manufactured years before the beginning of the project. For nuclear facilities, long-lead items include physical components such as large pressure vessels, instrumentation and controls. They may also mean programs and management systems important to the safety of the facility. Authorized nuclear operator training, site evaluation programs, and procurement are some of the examples. The nuclear power industry must often meet very demanding construction and commissioning timelines, and proper advanced planning of the long-lead items helps manage risks to project completion time. For nuclear components there are regulatory and licensing considerations that need to be considered. A national nuclear regulator must be involved early to ensure the components will meet the national legal regulatory requirements. This paper will discuss timing considerations to address the regulatory compliance of nuclear long-lead items.

  12. Standard Guide for Preparing Characterization Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This standard guide applies to developing nuclear facility characterization plans to define the type, magnitude, location, and extent of radiological and chemical contamination within the facility to allow decommissioning planning. This guide amplifies guidance regarding facility characterization indicated in ASTM Standard E 1281 on Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Plans. This guide does not address the methodology necessary to release a facility or site for unconditional use. This guide specifically addresses: 1.1.1 the data quality objective for characterization as an initial step in decommissioning planning. 1.1.2 sampling methods, 1.1.3 the logic involved (statistical design) to ensure adequate characterization for decommissioning purposes; and 1.1.4 essential documentation of the characterization information. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate saf...

  13. Public education programme for nuclear contingency planning in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M. C.; Li, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    Two nuclear power stations on the coast of southern China are situated some 50 kilometers to the northeast of Hong Kong. Although the stations are far away from Hong Kong, the construction and operation of the nuclear power stations have generated public anxiety locally, in particular, after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A comprehensive contingency plan which takes into account such concerns of the public has been implemented in Hong Kong. Cooperation by the public is vital to the effective implementation of any contingency plan. Understanding of the basics of radiation protection as well as the contingency plan will help the public to appreciate the situation and react in a rational manner. A public education program to promote awareness of the contingency plan has been implemented in Hong Kong. In particular, a Virtual Exhibition Hall on radiation has been developed and launched in February 2002 for access by the public via Internet. A video and a set of web pages will be launched in the later part of 2002 to inform and educate the public on matters related to nuclear accident response in Hong Kong. This paper describes the public education programme in Hong Kong to promote public awareness and understanding of the nuclear contingency plan

  14. Developing and assessing accident management plans for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Johnson, S.P.; Blackman, H.S.; Stewart, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    This document is the second of a two-volume NUREG/CR that discusses development of accident management plans for nuclear power plants. The first volume (a) describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria that could be used for assessing the adequacy of accident management plans, (b) identifies the general attributes of accident management plans (Phase 1), (c) presents a prototype process for developing and implementing severe accident management plans (Phase 2), and (d) presents criteria that can be used to assess the adequacy of accident management plans. This volume (a) describes results from an evaluation of the capabilities of the prototype process to produce an accident management plan (Phase 3) and (b), based on these results and preliminary criteria included in NUREG/CR-5543, presents modifications to the criteria where appropriate

  15. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A. [DOE/NNSA

    2004-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (NEM R&E) Program is dedicated to providing knowledge, technical expertise, and products to US agencies responsible for monitoring nuclear explosions in all environments and is successful in turning scientific breakthroughs into tools for use by operational monitoring agencies. To effectively address the rapidly evolving state of affairs, the NNSA NEM R&E program is structured around three program elements described within this strategic plan: Integration of New Monitoring Assets, Advanced Event Characterization, and Next-Generation Monitoring Systems. How the Program fits into the National effort and historical accomplishments are also addressed.

  16. Nuclear emergency plans in France. Strengths and weaknesses. Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, David; Josset, Mylene

    2016-01-01

    This report first presents nuclear emergency plans in France (specific intervention plans, action at the municipal level, creation of a national plan, planning of the post-accidental phase, integration of the international and cross-border dimension. Then, it analyses strengths and weaknesses of these plans. It outlines the necessity to take the most severe accident scenarios into account (issue of selection of reference accidents, necessity of reviewing emergency planning areas, and assessment of the number of inhabitants about French nuclear installations). It proposes a review of measures of protection of populations (information, sheltering, iodine-based prophylaxis, evacuation, food control and restrictions, protection of human resources, cross-border problems). It discusses how to put an end to the emergency situation, and the assessment and collaboration on emergency plans. The next part proposes an analysis of noticed strengths and weaknesses in some PPIs (specific intervention plans) in terms of text accessibility, of description of the site and of its environment, of intervention area, of operational measures, and of preparation to the post-accidental phase

  17. Case study of nuclear power planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covarrubias, A.J.; Lane, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved version of the computer programme WASP (Wien Automatic System Planning) is described by the example of a case study. The aim of an optimal power plant development within the economic development is reached over several steps the most important parameters of which are explained in detail. To use the method it is necessary to know and to describe the energy and electricity supply situation of the country referred to. The programme development described has proved to be good in use in an international frame. The IAEA offers its help to all prospected customers in their initial period with the programme WASP. (UA) [de

  18. Enviromental Development Plan: special nuclear materials production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This Environmental Development Plan includes the process steps and facilities necessary for the production of plutonium and tritium for Government needs and the production of some other radioactive materials that will be used for heat and radiation sources by domestic and international customers. The production reactors and the spent fuel processing plants and their effluents are discussed, but the defense wastes from them are treated in a separate EDP. The scope does not include transportation, decontamination and decommissioning, safeguards and security, or use of the SNM products

  19. Rethinking Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Paulauskas, Kęstutis

    2005-01-01

    The article argues that the period of “high” politics in the ever-problematic relations between Lithuania and Russia is over. At the same time, it is agued that tensions remain at the level of “low” politics, when the agenda of bilateral relations is dominated by the security interests related to Kaliningrad Oblast and Russia’s energy policy. The author claims that Lithuania should take a more pragmatic approach in her day-to-day relations with Russia and follow a more flexible policy towards...

  20. Russia report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Along with cementing the joint Shuttle-Mir Program in late June with a $400 million contract, the U.S. and Russia signed a deal to team up on global environmental issues. Under the agreement, U.S. and Russian scientists will establish modern facilities for petroleum research, including advanced geographic systems technology, petroleum geochemistry, and seismic processing to help Russia transition to a “market” economy, Interior Secreary Bruce Babbitt reports. The program, to be funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, will produce maps, technical reports, and other data for investment decisions.

  1. The preliminary planning for decommissioning nuclear facilities in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.K.

    1993-01-01

    During the congressional hearing in 1992 for a $7 billion project for approval of the fourth nuclear power plant, the public was concerned about the decommissioning of the operating plants. In order to facilitate the public acceptance of nuclear energy and to secure the local capability for appropriate nuclear backend management, both technologically and financially, it is important to have preliminary planning for decommissioning the nuclear facilities. This paper attempted to investigate the possible scope of decommissioning activities and addressed the important regulatory, financial, and technological aspects. More research and development works regarding the issue of decommissioning are needed to carry out the government's will of decent management of nuclear energy from the cradle to the grave

  2. Nord stream: not just a pipeline. An analysis of the political debates in the Baltic Sea region regarding the planned gas pipeline from Russia to Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whist, Bendik Solum

    2008-11-15

    This report is an analysis of the planned gas pipeline from Russia to Germany through the Baltic Sea known as Nord Stream. Although not yet realised, the project has, since its birth, been the subject of harsh criticism and opposition by a significant number of states that consider themselves affected by the pipeline. Whereas the Baltic States and Poland have interpreted the pipeline as a politically motivated strategy that will increase Russia's leverage on them and threaten their energy security, the debate in Sweden was at first mostly concerned with the prospect of increased Russian military presence in the Swedish Exclusive Economic Zone. The potential environmental impact of the pipeline has been, and continues to be, an overarching concern shared by all the littoral states of the Baltic Sea. Proponents of Nord Stream, most notably Germany, Russia and the Nord Stream consortium, have largely dismissed the concerns as unwarranted and argue that the pipeline is a common European project that all EU-members should embrace, as it will provide much-needed gas to an increasingly energy-thirsty union. This report is an extensive study of the divergent attitudes and debates that have surged in the region regarding Nord Stream, and the aim is to provide plausible explanations as to why the interpretations of the project have been so different in the various states. The report is based on a variety of sources, including several first-hand interviews with researchers and government officials in the Baltic Sea region. (author). refs.,fig.,tabs

  3. ERC Maintenance Implementation Plan for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franquero, R.C.

    1997-05-01

    The inactive and surplus facilities assigned to the Environmental Restoration Contractor are shut down and have no operating production processes or production materials except for residual contamination. There is a minimal number of operating systems to support surveillance and maintenance or decontamination and decommissioning activities (D ampersand D). These systems may include heating and ventilation, air conditioning, lighting, and other electrical systems. Inactive and surplus facilities will be subject to periodic long-term surveillance to ensure the integrity of structures until D ampersand D. D ampersand D projects are of relatively short duration and end with all systems deactivated. Therefore, a rigorous in-depth maintenance program such as that required for producing nuclear facilities is not required or cost effective

  4. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by

  5. Russian Federation’s plans to deploy nuclear weapons in Crimea: the possible consequences for Ukraine and European security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Vonsovych

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the possible consequences for Ukraine and European security in case of deploying by Russian Federation nuclear weapons in Crimea. It was determined that under current conditions of confrontation between Ukraine and Russia such actions could further complicate the process of resolving the situation in the east of our country and threaten the implementation of peace initiatives regarding the resumption of constructive dialogue. It was found that the reluctance to disclose or hide the real intentions of Russia produces around Ukraine’s borders space of uncertainty and danger. This directly threatens the national security of our state and continue to make use of the power factor in relations with the Russian Federation. It is proved that Ukraine needs to do more emphasis on their own national identity and opportunities to prove its independence with regard to solving such questions. Substantiated the thesis that the European community should now take the necessary measures to prevent the development of the Russian Federation’s plans regarding the deployment of nuclear weapons in Crimea. This will give the opportunity to avoid misunderstandings and create a ground to prevent the destabilization of the European security system.

  6. India's baseline plan for nuclear energy self-sufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    India's nuclear energy strategy has traditionally strived for energy self-sufficiency, driven largely by necessity following trade restrictions imposed by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) following India's 'peaceful nuclear explosion' of 1974. On September 6, 2008, the NSG agreed to create an exception opening nuclear trade with India, which may create opportunities for India to modify its baseline strategy. The purpose of this document is to describe India's 'baseline plan,' which was developed under constrained trade conditions, as a basis for understanding changes in India's path as a result of the opening of nuclear commerce. Note that this treatise is based upon publicly available information. No attempt is made to judge whether India can meet specified goals either in scope or schedule. In fact, the reader is warned a priori that India's delivery of stated goals has often fallen short or taken a significantly longer period to accomplish. It has been evident since the early days of nuclear power that India's natural resources would determine the direction of its civil nuclear power program. It's modest uranium but vast thorium reserves dictated that the country's primary objective would be thorium utilization. Estimates of India's natural deposits vary appreciably, but its uranium reserves are known to be extremely limited, totaling approximately 80,000 tons, on the order of 1% of the world's deposits; and nominally one-third of this ore is of very low uranium concentration. However, India's roughly 300,000 tons of thorium reserves account for approximately 30% of the world's total. Confronted with this reality, the future of India's nuclear power industry is strongly dependent on the development of a thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle as the only way to insure a stable, sustainable, and autonomous program. The path to India's nuclear energy self-sufficiency was first outlined in a seminal paper by Drs. H. J. Bhabha and N. B. Prasad presented at the Second

  7. Nuclear power plant thermal-hydraulic performance research program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to present a more detailed description of the thermal-hydraulic research program than that provided in the NRC Five-Year Plan so that the research plan and objectives can be better understood and evaluated by the offices concerned. The plan is prepared by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) with input from the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and updated periodically. The plan covers the research sponsored by the Reactor and Plant Systems Branch and defines the major issues (related to thermal-hydraulic behavior in nuclear power plants) the NRC is seeking to resolve and provides plans for their resolution; relates the proposed research to these issues; defines the products needed to resolve these issues; provides a context that shows both the historical perspective and the relationship of individual projects to the overall objectives; and defines major interfaces with other disciplines (e.g., structural, risk, human factors, accident management, severe accident) needed for total resolution of some issues. This plan addresses the types of thermal-hydraulic transients that are normally considered in the regulatory process of licensing the current generation of light water reactors. This process is influenced by the regulatory requirements imposed by NRC and the consequent need for technical information that is supplied by RES through its contractors. Thus, most contractor programmatic work is administered by RES. Regulatory requirements involve the normal review of industry analyses of design basis accidents, as well as the understanding of abnormal occurrences in operating reactors. Since such transients often involve complex thermal-hydraulic interactions, a well-planned thermal-hydraulic research plan is needed

  8. Decommissioning planning of Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedin, Gunnar; Bergh, Niklas [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Vaesteraes (Sweden)

    2013-07-01

    The technologies required for the decommissioning work are for the most part readily proven. Taken into account that there will be many more years before the studied reactor units will undergo decommissioning, the techniques could even be called conventional at that time. This will help bring the decommissioning projects to a successful closure. A national waste fund is already established in Sweden to finance amongst others all dismantling and decommissioning work. This will assure that funding for the decommissioning projects is at hand when needed. All necessary plant data are readily available and this will, combined with a reliable management system, expedite the decommissioning projects considerably. Final repositories for both long- and short-lived LILW respectively is planned and will be constructed and dimensioned to receive the decommissioning waste from the Swedish NPP:s. Since the strategy is set and well thought-through, this will help facilitate a smooth disposal of the radioactive decommissioning waste. (orig.)

  9. DOE not planning to accept spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Samuel K. Skinner, president of Commonwealth Edison Co. (ComEd), said open-quotes The federal government has a clear responsibility to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1988,close quotes citing the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Based in Chicago, ComEd operates 12 nuclear units, making it the nation's largest nuclear utility. open-quotes Since 1983, the consumers who use electricity produced at all nuclear power plants have been paying to fund federal management of spent nuclear fuel. Consumer payments and obligations, with interest, now total more than $10 billion. Electricity consumers have held up their side of the deal. The federal government must do the same,close quotes Skinner added. Skinner represented the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) before the committee. NEI is the Washington-based trade association of the nuclear energy industries. For more than 12 years, utility customers have been paying one-tenth of a cent per kWhr to fund a federal spent fuel management program under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Under this act, the federal government assumed responsibility for management of spent fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned to manage the storage and disposal program. DOE committed to begin accepting spent fuel from nuclear power plants by January 31, 1988. DOE has spent almost $5 million studying a site in Nevada, but is about 12 years behind schedule and does not plan to accept spent fuel beginning in 1998. DOE has said a permanent storage site will not be ready until 2010. This poses a major problem for many of the nation's nuclear power plants which supply about 20% of the electricity in the US

  10. Planning construction of integrative schedule management for nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Zhenglin; Wang Wenying; Peng Fei

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the planning construction of integrative schedule management for Nuclear Power Project. It details schedule management system and the requirement of schedulers and the mode of three schedule management flats. And analysis it combing with the implementation of construction water and all special schedules before FCD to further propose the improving and researching direction for the integrative schedule management. (authors)

  11. A nuclear power plant certification test plan and checklist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Regulations within the nuclear industry are requiring that all reference plant simulators be certified prior to or during 1991. A certification test plan is essential to ensure that this goal is met. A description of each step in the certification process is provided in this paper, along with a checklist to help ensure completion of each item

  12. The Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories contingency plan -a brief description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief description of the contingency plan which deals with both the on-site and off-site consequences of a serious nuclear accident is given. The off-site consequences of different size releases and the subsequent action taken by employees, radiation protection experts, municipal, Provincial and Federal authorities is described and the interaction of the various groups is discussed. (author)

  13. The decommissioning plan of the Nuclear Ship MUTSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, M.; Matsuo, R.; Fujikawa, S.; Nomura, T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the review about the decommissioning plan and present state of the Nuclear Ship Mutsu. The decommissioning of the Mutsu is carried out by Removal and Isolation method. The procedure of the decommissioning works is presented in this paper. The decommissioning works started in April, 1992 and it takes about four years after her last experimental voyage. (author)

  14. Critical examination of emergency plans for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catsaros, Nicolas.

    1986-08-01

    An analysis of emergency plans of various countries for nuclear installations on- and off-site emergency preparedness is presented. The analysis is focused on the off-site organization and countermeasures to protect public health and safety. A critical examination of the different approaches is performed and recommendations for effectiveness improvement and optimization are formulated. (author)

  15. Particular intervention plan of The Bugey Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Particular intervention plan (PPI in French) is an emergency plan which foresees the measures and means to be implemented to address the potential risks of the presence and operation of a nuclear facility. This plan is implemented and developed by the Prefect in case of nuclear accident (or incident leading to a potential accident), the impact of which extending beyond the facility perimeter. It represents a special section of the organisation plan for civil protection response (ORSEC plan). The PPI foresees the necessary measures and means for crisis management during the first hours following the accident and is triggered by the Department Prefect according to the information provided by the facility operator. Its aim is to protect the populations leaving within 10 km of the facility against a potential radiological hazard. The PPI describes: the facility, the intervention area, the protection measures for the population, the conditions of emergency plan triggering, the crisis organisation, the action forms of the different services, and the post-accident stage. This document is the public version of the Particular intervention plan of the Bugey NPP (Ain, France)

  16. Particular intervention plan of the Flamanville Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Particular intervention plan (PPI in French) is an emergency plan which foresees the measures and means to be implemented to address the potential risks of the presence and operation of a nuclear facility. This plan is implemented and developed by the Prefect in case of nuclear accident (or incident leading to a potential accident), the impact of which extending beyond the facility perimeter. It represents a special section of the organisation plan for civil protection response (ORSEC plan). The PPI foresees the necessary measures and means for crisis management during the first hours following the accident and is triggered by the Department Prefect according to the information provided by the facility operator. Its aim is to protect the populations leaving within 10 km of the facility against a potential radiological hazard. The PPI describes: the facility, the intervention area, the protection measures for the population, the conditions of emergency plan triggering, the crisis organisation, the action forms of the different services, and the post-accident stage. This document is the public version of the Particular intervention plan of the Flamanville NPP (Manche, France)

  17. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled

  18. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

  19. Role of nuclear safety research and future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. S.; Lee, J. I.; Kang, S. C.; Park, Y. W.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. W.; Lee, C. J.; Park, Y. I.

    2000-01-01

    For promoting and improving nuclear safety research activities, this report gives an insight on the scope of safety research and its role in the safety management of nuclear installations, and suggests measures to adequately utilize the research results through taking an optimized role share among research organizations. Several measures such as cooperative planning of common research areas and proper role assignment, improvement of the interfaces among researchers, and reflection of end-users' opinion in the course of planning and conducting research to promote application of research results are identified. It is expected that the identified measures will contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safety research, if they are implemented after deliberating with the government and safety research organizations

  20. Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility

  1. ASME nuclear codes and standards risk management strategic plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkey, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, several risk-informed initiatives have been completed or are under development within the ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards organization. In order to better manage the numerous initiatives in the future, the ASME Board on Nuclear Codes and Standards has recently developed and approved a Risk Management Strategic Plan. This paper presents the latest approved version of the plan beginning with a background of applications completed to date, including the recent issuance of the ASME Standard for Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Nuclear Power Plant Applications. The paper discusses potential applications within ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards that may require expansion of the PRA Standard, such as for new generation reactors, or the development of new PRA Standards. A long-term vision for the potential development and evolution to a nuclear systems code that adopts a risk-informed approach across a facility life-cycle (design, construction, operation, maintenance, and closure) is summarized. Finally, near term and long term actions are defined across the ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards organizations related to risk management, and related U.S. regulatory activities are also summarized. (author)

  2. Lessons learned in planning the Canadian Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, M.; Brooks, S.; Miller, J.; Neal, P.; Mason, R.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) began implementing a $7B CDN, 70-year Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) to deal with legacy decommissioning and environmental issues at AECL nuclear sites. The objective of the NLLP is to safely and cost-effectively reduce the nuclear legacy liabilities and associated risks based on sound waste management and environmental principles in the best interest of Canadians. The NLLP comprises a number of interlinked decommissioning, waste management and environmental restoration activities that are being executed at different sites by various technical groups. Many lessons about planning and executing such a large, diverse Program have been learned in planning the initial five-year 'start-up' phase (concluded 2011 March), in planning the three-year second phase (currently being commenced), and in planning individual and interacting activities within the Program. The activities to be undertaken in the start-up phase were planned by a small group of AECL technical experts using the currently available information on the liabilities. Several internal and external reviews of the Program during the start-up phase examined progress and identified several improvements to planning. These improvements included strengthening communications among the groups within the Program, conducting more detailed advance planning of the interlinked activities, and being cautious about making detailed commitments for activities for which major decisions had yet to be made. The second phase was planned by a dedicated core team. More and earlier input was solicited from the suppliers than in the planning for the first phase. This was to ensure that the proposed program of work was feasible, and to be able to specify in more detail the resources that would be required to carry it out. The NLLP has developed several processes to assist in the detailed planning of the numerous projects and

  3. Nuclear emergency planning in Spain. The PLABEN review project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo Lentijo, J. C.; Vila Pena, M.

    2002-01-01

    The international rules and recommendations for nuclear emergency planning and the Spanish experience gained in the management of event with radiological risk have noticed that is necessary to review the planning radiological bases for emergencies in nuclear power plants and to define the planning radiological bases for radiological emergencies that could happen in radioactive facilities or in activities out of the regulatory framework. The paper focuses on CSN actions concerning the Plaben review project related to define the new radiological principles taking into account the current international recommendations for interventions, make a proposal about the organisation and operation of the provincial radiological action group and the national support level for radiological emergency response. (Author) 7 refs

  4. The ORSEC arrangement and the 'nuclear' intervention specific plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenon, C.

    2010-01-01

    In order to take the specific character of a nuclear emergency situation into account, France has developed planning tools within the so-called Crisis National Organisation (ONC, organisation nationale de crise). This organisation involves public bodies, agencies and companies. Thus, intervention specific plans (PPI, plans particuliers d'intervention) are included in the ORSEC general arrangement. The assessment of geographical and chronological consequences of a nuclear accident has lead to the definition of two main categories of measures, depending on the fact they are immediately or progressively applied. They involve the intervention of specialised means. This report also indicates how new measures have been introduced in the ORSEC arrangement to manage the post-accident phase. The author also outlines that crisis communication must also be prepared and tested

  5. Preparation of site emergency preparedness plans for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Safety of public, occupational workers and the protection of environment should be assured while activities for economic and social progress are pursued. These activities include the establishment and utilisation of nuclear facilities and use of radioactive sources. This safety guidelines is issued as a lead document to facilitate preparation of specific site manuals by the responsible organisation for emergency response plans at each site to ensure their preparedness to meet any eventuality due to site emergency in order to mitigate its consequences on the health and safety of site personnel. It takes cognizance of an earlier AERB publications on the subject: Safety manual on site emergency plan on nuclear installations. AERB/SM/NISD-1, 1986 and also takes into consideration the urgent need for promoting public awareness and drawing up revised emergency response plans, which has come about in a significant manner after the accidents at Chernobyl and Bhopal

  6. Russia-India: New Horizons For Historical Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Ivashentsov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Russia’s relations with India have been close to those of an alliance. However the changes that have taken place in Russia and in the general global situation as well as India’s mighty economic upswing and the rise of its geopolitical ambitions on that basis have introduced new accents and nuances to these relations. With the coming to power in 2014 of Bharatiya Janata or Indian People’s Party whose ideology is Hindutwa, the nationalism, based on Hindu religious traditions, India’s foreign policy has acquired a new assertiveness. The present Prime Minister N.Modi has declared his plan to make India a leading power on the international arena. An important feature of India’s foreign policy of recent years is its active building bridges with the US which it view first of all as a potential counterweight to China. The Indian diaspora in the US of 3Million has played its role in that process. However New Delhi maintains the line of the privileged strategic partnership with Russia. India’s global and regional interests coincide more often with those of Russia than witch othegreat powers. As for Russia, it never had any conflict with India in the past. Three main pillars of our partnership beyond the foreign affairs framework are those of cooperation in energy, including nuclear power, military technologies and space exploration. Russia-India partnership has proved its viability and efficiency. It helps to promote global peace and security.

  7. Recent Movement, Issues and Some Counter plans in Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. K.; Lee, J. K.; Cho, C. S.; Lee, C. C.; Park, C. O.

    2007-01-01

    There is no doubt 'Nuclear Energy' is the only source that can ensure the world's steady development in the foreseeable future. Nowadays is definitely what is called 'renaissance of nuclear.' As energy demand and economy increase, and global climate warms, the trend of nuclear dependency will be accelerated further. With 30 reactors being built around the world today, another 35 or more planned to come online during the next 10 years, and over two hundred further back in the pipeline, the global nuclear industry is clearly going forward strongly. Countries are seeking to replace old reactors as well as expand capacity, and an additional 25 countries are either considering or have already decided to make nuclear energy part of their power generation capacity. On the other hand, as current movement of world nuclear field, Korea has faced to one of the most important times since introducing nuclear power. Twenty nuclear power plants are run in Korea i.e. sixteen PWRs and four PHWRs now, and the capability of nuclear power production has been ranked world number six. In spite of this grand appearance, however, the influencing power on world nuclear society is not well matched to its status since it does not have a special hidden card which can appeal and impact on international community. In the era of nuclear renaissance, paradoxically, Korea is not in the situations of optimistic or pessimistic view. Now let's As energy demand and economy increase, and global climate warms, the trend of nuclear dependency will be accelerated further. With 30 reactors being built around the world today, another 35 or more planned to come online during the next 10 years, and over two hundred further back in the pipeline, the global nuclear industry is clearly going forward strongly. Countries are seeking to replace old reactors as well as expand capacity, and an additional 25 countries are either considering or have already decided to make nuclear energy part of their power generation

  8. Assessment of population radiation exposure after a nuclear reactor accident. Field studies in Russia and Sweden after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallstroem, E.

    1998-10-01

    Since May 1986 a number of studies connecting to the Chernobyl accident have been performed in Western Sweden and in the Brjansk region in Russia. The total deposition of 137 Cs in the investigated area in Sweden was 0.001 - 0.002 MBq/m 2 , mainly deposited as wet deposition on May 8, and in the Brjansk region 0.9 - 2.7 MBq/m 2 . In Sweden, studies of the transfer of 134 Cs, 137 Cs and 131 I in soil, grass, cow's milk, cow and man are presented for 1986-1987. Whole-body measurements of 134 Cs and 137 Cs in 1986-1989 as well as measurements of 131 I in thyroids have been made with stationary whole-body counters. External exposure of persons in villages in the Brjansk region are given for the years 1990 - 1994. The method of estimating the body burden of 137 Cs from individual urine samples taken in the Brjansk region 1991-1997 has been investigated from samples and whole-body measurements performed by 'lap-geometry'. In the investigated farms in Western Sweden the transfer values of 131 l and 134 Cs, 137 Cs from grass to cow's milk in 1986 were similar to values found in the period of deposition from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests in the 1960s. In 1987 the values of transfer of 134 Cs and 137 Cs were more similar to studies with artificially added cesium in the form of e.g. CsCI. Whole-body measurements in Goeteborg and Malmoe showed an increase of the whole-body content of 134 Cs and 137 Cs up to one year after the accident followed by a slow decrease. Maximum mean value of 137 Cs was 400 - 450 Bq or around 6 Bq/kg in adults. The content of 131 I in the thyroids showed already before the wet main deposition measurable values which decreased fast. The internal contamination of 131 I was due to inhalation, but also to ingestion. The total effective dose was estimated, based on calculations and measurements, to be 37 μSv to 13 μSv year one to four after the accident. The external exposure in villages in the Brjansk region was estimated by measurements of

  9. Preliminary plan for decommissioning - repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallberg, Bengt; Tiberg, Liselotte

    2010-06-01

    The final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel is part of the KBS-3 system, which also consists of a central facility for interim storage and encapsulation of the spent nuclear fuel and a transport system. The nuclear fuel repository will be a nuclear facility. Regulation SSMFS 2008:1 (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority's regulations on safety of nuclear facilities) requires that the licensee must have a current decommissioning plan throughout the facility lifecycle. Before the facility is constructed, a preliminary decommissioning plan should be reported to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority. This document is a preliminary decommissioning plan, and submitted as an attachment to SKB's application for a license under the Nuclear Activities Act to construct, own and operate the facility. The final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel consists of an above ground part and a below ground part and will be built near Forsmark and the final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR. The parts above and below ground are connected by a ramp and several shafts, e.g. for ventilation. The below ground part consists of a central area, and several landfill sites. The latter form the repository area. The sealed below ground part constitutes the final repository. The decommissioning is taking place after the main operation has ended, that is, when all spent nuclear fuel has been deposited and the deposition tunnels have been backfilled and plugged. The decommissioning involves sealing of the remaining parts of the below ground part and demolition of above ground part. When decommissioning begins, there will be no contamination in the facility. The demolition is therefore performed as for a conventional plant. Demolition waste is sorted and recycled whenever possible or placed in landfill. Hazardous waste is managed in accordance with current regulations. A ground investigation is performed and is the basis for after-treatment of the site. The timetable for the

  10. Nuclear-piping-repair planning today needs skill, organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Keefe, W.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear power plant piping continues to experience failures and imminent threat of failure, despite a high level of care in design, analysis, fabrication, or installation. Continual inspection and surveillance and letter-by-letter following of procedures are not completely effective remedies, either. Both short-time-frame accidents and slowly progressing insidious complaints have caused loss of capacity, availability, and even confidence that the unit will work at close-to-expected performance. The fixes for nuclear-piping complaints cover a wide span, from mere carrying out of well-known repair procedures on either small scale or large, all the way to highly engineered solutions to a problem, with months of study and analysis followed by weighing of alternative methods. With some of the problems, little special planning is necessary. The repair is understood, and the time it needs is well within the envelope of a scheduled outage. Radiation exposure of personnel will not exceed expected moderate limits. And if the repair is a repeat performance of a recent similar one, little can go wrong. The planning for many other repairs, however, is so essential that even a minor failing in it will bring a debacle, with over-run, losses in revenue, and senseless expenditure of man-rems. Look at two types of planning for nuclear piping repair, as revealed at a recent American Welding Society conference on maintenance welding in nuclear power plants

  11. The Frontiers of Nuclear Science: A Long-Range Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-12-01

    In a letter dated July 17, 2006, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science for Nuclear Physics and the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Mathematical and Physical Sciences Directorate charged the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) to “conduct a study of the opportunities and priorities for U.S. nuclear physics research and recommend a long range plan that will provide a framework for coordinated advancement of the nation’s nuclear science research programs over the next decade.” This request set in motion a bottom-up review and forward look by the nuclear science community. With input from this community-wide process, a 59 member working group, which included the present NSAC members, gathered at the beginning of May, 2007, to develop guidance on how to optimize the future research directions for the field based on the projected resources outlined in the charge letter from DOE and NSF. A new long range plan—The Frontiers of Nuclear Science—grew out of this meeting. For the last decade, the top priority for nuclear science has been to utilize the flagship facilities that were built with investments by the nation in the 1980s and 1990s. Research with these facilities has led to many significant new discoveries that have changed our understanding of the world in which we live. But new discoveries demand new facilities, and the successes cannot continue indefinitely without new investment.

  12. Nuclear energy national plan. The directions for nuclear energy policy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    Nuclear energy is a key attaining an integrated solution for energy security and global warming issues. Under the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy Japan aims to (1) maintain the 30 to 40% or more share of nuclear energy on electricity generation up to 2030 and afterwards, (2) promote the nuclear fuel cycle and (3) commercialize the fast-breeder reactors. As for policies to realize the basic targets, the 'Nuclear Energy National Plan' was compiled in August 2006 as follows: (1) Investment to construct new nuclear power plants and replace existing reactors in an era of electric power liberalization, 2) Appropriate use of existing nuclear power plants with assuring safety as a key prerequisite, (3) Steady advancement of the nuclear fuel cycle and strategic reinforcement of nuclear fuel cycle industries, (4) Strategy to secure uranium supplied, (5) Early commercialization of the fast breeder reactor cycle, (6) Achieving and developing advanced, technologies, industries and personnel, (7) Assisting the Japanese nuclear industry in promoting the international development, (8) Involved in and/or creating international frameworks to uphold both nonproliferation and expansion of nuclear power generation, (9) Fostering trust between the sates and communities where plants are located by making public hearings and public relations highly detailed and (10) Steady promotion of measures for disposal of radioactive wastes. Implementation policies were presented in details in this book with relevant data and documents. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Planning of emergency medical treatment in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko

    1989-01-01

    Medical staffs and health physicists have shown deep concerning at the emergency plans of nuclear power plants after the TMI nuclear accident. The most important and basic countermeasure for accidents was preparing appropriate and concrete organization and plans for treatment. We have planed emergency medical treatment for radiation workers in a nuclear power plant institute. The emergency medical treatment at institute consisted of two stages, that is on-site emergency treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and analyzed all possible accidents in the institute and discussed on practical treatments for some possible accidents. The manuals of concrete procedure of emergency treatment for some accidents were prepared following discussion and facilities and equipment for medical treatment and decontamination were provided. All workers in the institute had periodical training and drilling of on-site emergency treatment and mastered technique of first aid. Decontamination and operation rooms were provided in the facillity medical service. The main functions at the facility medical service have been carried out by industrial nurses. Industrial nurses have been in close co-operation with radiation safety officers and medical doctors in regional hospital. (author)

  14. The Preliminary Decommissioning Plan of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Pham Van; Vien, Luong Ba; Vinh, Le Vinh; Nghiem, Huynh Ton; Tuan, Nguyen Minh; Phuong, Pham Hoai [Nuclear Research Institute, Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    2013-08-15

    Recently, after 25 years of operation, a preliminary decommissioning plan for the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) has been produced but as yet it has not been implemented due to the continued operations of the reactor. However, from the early phases of facility design and construction and during operation, the aspects that facilitate decommissioning process have been considered. This paper outlines the DNRR general description, the organization that manages the facility, the decommissioning strategy and associated project management, and the expected decommissioning activities. The paper also considers associated cost and funding, safety and environmental issues and waste management aspects amongst other considerations associated with decommissioning a nuclear research reactor. (author)

  15. Dynamics of 137Cs concentration in agricultural products in areas of Russia contaminated as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenko, S.V.; Alexakhin, R.M.; Spiridonov, S.I.; Sanzharova, N.I.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of 137 Cs concentration in the main types of agricultural products obtained in regions of Russia contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in 1986, have been analysed. The rate of decline of 137 Cs contamination in agricultural products during the period under study (1987-1992) was not uniform. Reductions of the 137 Cs content of produce was most rapid during the early years after the accident, as a consequence of the intensive application of countermeasures at that time. Half-life periods for 137 Cs content in milk (the basic dose-forming product) and the decrease in products for areas in Russia subjected to the most intensive contamination amounted to 1.6 to 4.8 years, depending on the scale of countermeasures carried out. Half-life periods of decrease of 137 Cs content in other types of agricultural products (grain, potato) were within the range of 2 to 7 years. Based on the comparison of the dynamics of 137 Cs levels in agricultural products of the regions where the countermeasures scales differed, the contribution of countermeasures and of natural biogeochemical processes to the decrease of 137 Cs contamination levels of the main types of agricultural products that determine the dose from internal irradiation of local population has been estimated. (author)

  16. Analysis of scenarios of the inclusion of fast reactors in the nuclear power of Russia in the context of sustainable development with the use of the INPRO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usanov, V.I.; Kagramanyan, V.S.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Korobeinikov, V.V.; Korobitsyn, V.E.; Moseyev, A.L.; Poplavskaya, E.V.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • The two-component NES of VVER and BN reactors can meet some critical challenges of the present nuclear industry and provide a substantial contribution to enhancing sustainability of a national NP: – basically to solve up to 2050 the problem of the VVER SNF accumulation by using Pu from VVER in MOX fuel for BN reactors; – to ensure management of Pu from VVER to reduce it by 2070 to operational reserve and thus to enhance the NES proliferation resistance; – to save natural U and SWU and thus to facilitate U supply and enrichment capacities for planed deployment of VVERs in Russia and abroad. • Implementation of these opportunities might be a substance of the first phase of the NFC closure • While some INPRO indicators have shown remarkable advantages of the NES with BNs comparing to the present system, some issues in economics and NFC technologies have not got convincing answers. • These challenges along with a crucial safety issues are addressed in the Federal target programmes on transition to a CNFC with advanced FRs which are currently run in Russia

  17. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assay of water sampled from the underground nuclear explosion site in the north of the Perm region (Russia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evseeva, Tatiana I. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 167982, Syktyvkar, Kommunisticheskaya 28 (Russian Federation); Geras' kin, Stanislav A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology RAAS, 249020 Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: stgeraskin@list.ru; Shuktomova, Ida I. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 167982, Syktyvkar, Kommunisticheskaya 28 (Russian Federation); Taskaev, Anatoliy I. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 167982, Syktyvkar, Kommunisticheskaya 28 (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    The results of our study revealed a local biologically relevant surface water contamination in the radionuclide anomaly in the north of Russia (Perm region) by means of Allium schoenoprasum L. anaphase-telophase chromosome aberration assay. This radionuclide anomaly was formed in 1971 as a result of an underground nuclear explosion with soil excavation. Specific activities of main dose-forming radionuclides in all examined reservoirs are below intervention levels officially adopted in Russia for drinking water. We found that {sup 90}Sr significantly contributes to induction of cytogenetic disturbances. Our previous data and the data described here suggest that metal and radionuclide combined exposure (with the dose below permissible exposure limits for human) may cause substantial biological effects. These effects are in part due to synergic response. The findings described here indicated that development of a new concept of radiation protection for humans and biota should be based on the clear understanding of biological effects of low doses of radiation in chronic exposure to multi-pollutant mixtures.

  18. Securing of the spent nuclear fuel stored on Gremikha site - the former Soviet submarine base in north-west of Russia - 59371

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatchev, Alexandre; Pillette-Cousin, Lucien; Stepennov, Boris; Eremenko, Valery; Zakharchev, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In the framework of the G8 Global Partnership the French Commission on Atomic Energy (CEA) is in charge of the French funded projects aimed to secure the materials susceptible to be a subject of the proliferation or a malicious use. The securing of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the former soviet submarines is of a special importance for CEA and the Russian Rosatom. Our main bilateral project has focused on two kinds of the SNF (alpha cores and VVR assemblies) stored at Gremikha, the former submarine base in the North-West of Russia. As of 2011 a significant results have been achieved: 2/3 of VVR type assemblies have been removed from Gremikha and reprocessed at PO Mayak. Nine alpha cores are unloaded and stored on at Gremikha. The main task now is to prepare the removal from Gremikha of all the remaining SNF and also to set up the needed infrastructure at the sites where this SNF will be moved. Substantial funding and technical assistance both from France and Russia will be required for that. Beyond the operator of the Gremikha site (SevRAO), the CEA and Rosatom involve many expert organizations from both countries such as AREVA, Kurchatov Institute and many others. Their contribution is one of the key elements of the success. (authors)

  19. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5)

  20. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  1. Nuclear weapons modernization: Plans, programs, and issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Amy F.

    2017-11-01

    The United States is currently recapitalizing each delivery system in its "nuclear triad" and refurbishing many of the warheads carried by those systems. The plans for these modernization programs have raised a number of questions, both within Congress and among analysts in the nuclear weapons and arms control communities, about the costs associated with the programs and the need to recapitalize each leg of the triad at the same time. This paper covers four distinct issues. It begins with a brief review of the planned modernization programs, then addresses questions about why the United States is pursuing all of these modernization programs at this time. It then reviews the debate about how much these modernization programs are likely to cost in the next decade and considers possible changes that might reduce the cost. It concludes with some comments about congressional views on the modernization programs and prospects for continuing congressional support in the coming years.

  2. A fugitive illusion. anti-nuclear 'barbarism'. Nuclear policies: France hums and haws, England dashes, Germany sinks, Northern America strengthens, Japan gets ready, Russia and China move forward, and the rest of the world emerges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2014-04-01

    This document proposes three articles by the same author. In the first one, he presents wind energy and photovoltaic as a complete economic failure (and even disaster), a sector in which huge investments have been lost with dramatic human consequences. In the second one, he comments and criticizes the statements contained in an anti-nuclear publication entitled Antinuclear barbarism (in French: Barbarie antinucleaire) which denounces various aspects of the nuclear industry notably in Japan and in Fukushima, but also regarding the Chernobyl accident and its health consequences, or the French nuclear policy (ASTRID project) and energy policies of various countries. The third article proposes an overview of nuclear policies in France (no important nuclear project until 2007, difficulties with the EPR, new perspectives in China and in the UK), in England (project of construction of 10 EPRs), in Germany (dramatic consequences of the decision to phase out nuclear), in Eastern European countries (new reactor projects), in Scandinavia (Finland and Sweden may extend their nuclear fleet), in the USA (a 20 year extension of reactor life) and in Canada, in Russia (nuclear revival with remarkable improvements on the existing reactors, project of development of fast breeder reactors, development of the VVER fleet, good prospects for exports), in Asia (Japan, South Korea, China)

  3. Fast reactors in Russia: State of the art and trends of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavsky, V.M.; Ashurko, Yu.M.; Zverev, K.V.; Oshkanov, N.N.; Korol'kov, A.S.; Filin, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    This status report contains the following: facts on nuclear power in Russia from 2001-2002; plans for further development of nuclear power; state of the art on operation of fast reactors in 2002, namely BN-600, experimental reactors BOR-60 and BR-10; construction of NPP BN-800; participation in activities on BN-350 reactor decommissioning; description of trends of design studies in the field of fast reactors and accelerator driven systems

  4. Planning and architectural safety considerations in designing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konsowa, Ahmed A.

    2009-01-01

    To achieve optimum safety and to avoid possible hazards in nuclear power plants, considering architectural design fundamentals and all operating precautions is mandatory. There are some planning and architectural precautions should be considered to achieve a high quality design and construction of nuclear power plant with optimum safety. This paper highlights predicted hazards like fire, terrorism, aircraft crash attacks, adversaries, intruders, and earthquakes, proposing protective actions against these hazards that vary from preventing danger to evacuating and sheltering people in-place. For instance; using safeguards program to protect against sabotage, theft, and diversion. Also, site and building well design focusing on escape pathways, emergency exits, and evacuation zones, and the safety procedures such as; evacuation exercises and sheltering processes according to different emergency classifications. In addition, this paper mentions some important codes and regulations that control nuclear power plants design, and assessment methods that evaluate probable risks. (author)

  5. Legacy of Cold War still plagues Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, L. [Socio-Ecological Union`s Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-07-01

    Seventy years of communist rule and a half-century of nuclear-arms development have left Russia the world`s most polluted country, reports Lydia Popova, director of the Center for Nuclear Ecology and Energy Policy in Moscow. {open_quotes}Russia`s communist government invested enormous sums of money in the military but paid scant attention to environmental protection,{close_quotes} Popova writes. Most of Russia`s radioactive pollution has resulted from poor reprocessing technology, inadequate waste management, nuclear testing, and accidents in the nuclear-power sector. Though the end of the Cold War has been accompanied by disarmament programs, Popova insists that these initiatives will create an additional burden on the environment of the former Soviet Union in the form of nuclear waste products.

  6. Engineering and planning for decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, G.M. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    With the publication of NUREG-0586, ''Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities'' in January, 1981 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has put the industry on notice that the termination of operating licenses and the final disposal of physical facilities will require the early consideration of several options and approaches and the preparation of comprehensive engineering and planning documents for the selected option at the end of useful life. This paper opens with a discussion of the options available and the principal aspects of decommissioning. The major emphasis of the composition is the nature of documents, the general approach to be followed, and special considerations to be taken into account when performing the detailed engineering and planning for decommissioning, as the end of life approaches and actual physical disposal is imminent. The author's main point of reference is on-going work by Burns and Roe, with Nuclear Energy Services, under contract to the Department of Energy's Richland Office, to perform the engineering and planning for the decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Pennsylvania

  7. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5)

  8. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  9. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  10. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5)

  11. Strategic planning of the National Direction of Nuclear Technology: period 2002-2005 last report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The final report of strategic planning describes the uses and applications of the Nuclear Technology, situation, tendencies so much at international level as national, institutional organization of the Nuclear Sector in the Uruguay, assignment of the DNTN, nuclear politics of the Uruguay, development of the Net or Nuclear Sector and model proposed for Uruguay, general conclusions and Strategic Plan

  12. Energy and nuclear power planning study for Algeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This study, conducted jointly by a team of engineers and economists from the Sonelgaz company and the IAEA, had three objectives: (1) To perform a preliminary economic study aimed at initiating thinking on the role that nuclear power could play in Algeria's long-term energy structure and to suggest reasonable hypotheses on what share of the energy market nuclear power might supply. (2) To train a team of Algerian engineers and economists in long-term economic planning techniques. Once the team has gained a basic knowledge through this preliminary study, it will be in a position to continue the process, to perform other, more detailed independent analyses and to review the entire process should economic conditions change. (3) To introduce in Algeria the computer techniques and facilities needed to carry out such energy investment planning studies for electricity production. The main aim throughout the studies was to train a team of Algerian engineers in energy planning rather than to come to definitive conclusions on the problem of introducing nuclear power in Algeria. Two successive analyses were performed. The first consisted in evaluating the final energy requirements which will result in the medium and long term (by 2015) from the implementation of the economic development policies in the Five Year Plan (up to 1984) and in the proposals for the next decade (up to 1990) being studied by the Algerian Ministry of Planning. The second part is concerned only with the results regarding future electricity requirements, which are used as input data in studying the optimization of Algeria's future electricity generating system. Various methods of generation are analysed and included in an econometric model in order to make a sequential determination of the most economic composition of power generating capacity

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Human Factors Program Plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This document is the Second Annual Revision to the NRC Human Factors Program Plan. The first edition was published in August 1983. Revision 1 was published in July of 1984. Purpose of the NRC Human Factors Program is to ensure that proper consideration is given to human factors in the design and operation of nuclear power plants. This document describes the plans of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation to address high priority human factors concerns of importance to reactor safety in FY 1986 and FY 1987. Revision 2 of the plan incorporates recent Commission decisions and policies bearing on the human factors aspects of reactor safety regulation. With a few exceptions, the principal changes from prior editions reflect a shift from developing new requirements to staff evaluation of industry progress in resolving human factors issues. The plan addresses seven major program elements: (1) Training, (2) Licensing Examinations, (3) Procedures, (4) Man-Machine Interface, (5) Staffing and Qualifications, (6) Management and Organization, and (7) Human Performance

  14. Computerized planning system for nuclear power plant evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonczek, R.H.; Holsapple, C.W.; Whinston, A.B.

    1976-01-01

    A computerized system is described for information storage and query processing adapted to complex socio-technological issues. The system is referred to as GPLAN (Generalized Planning System) and can accommodate both qualitative (verbal) and quantitative data. The issue illustrated is the construction of a nuclear power plant, and involves interdisciplinary research and planning. The system's outstanding features are the use of the network variety of data base, the selective retrieval of any configuration of data from a particular network structure, automatic execution of any desired application program from a standard or special library of applications, user interface with a data base and applications by submitting English-like, non-procedural queries, and generality which allows tailoring to specific applications and provides a basis for integration of planning and research activities. The system is general and can be used for a wide variety of socio-technological issues which involve complex data relationships

  15. Guidance for emergency planning in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, Tommy; Ekdahl, Maria

    2008-06-01

    Ringhals has been a model for this study, but the purpose has been to make the report applicable at all nuclear power plants in Sweden. The work has been done in close co-operation with the Swedish nuclear power plants and Rescue Services in the nuclear power municipalities Oesthammar, Oskarshamn, and Varberg. The internal fire brigade at the nuclear power plants has also been involved. A document will also be published as a further guidance at efforts of the type fires, which are mentioned in the enclosed document. After a fire in a switchgear room in 2005 the need of making the existing effort planning more effective at nuclear power plants was observed. The idea with the planning is to plan the effort in order to give the operational and emergency staff a good and actual support to come to a decision and to start the mission without delay. The risk information is showed by planning layouts, symbols and drawings as basis, give risk information and effort information. The effort information shows outer arrangements, manual action points, fire installations, passive fire safety etc. The risk information is shown by risk symbols. Their purpose is to give a fast overview of the existing risks. Reactor safety effects is the ruling influence if an effort has to be done in order to secure safety for a third person. In order to make an effort in an area personal risks for rescue staff, such as electricity risks, radiological risks, chemicals and gas bottles with compressed gases, has to be eliminated. For complicated missions detailed instructions are needed in order to handle specific risks. In a group discussion different people with pertinent knowledge has to value which problematic efforts need detailed instruction. Missions that have to be analyzed in a work group as above are: fire may affect the reactor safety, fire that may threaten the structural integrity, chemical discharge with big consequence on environment/third person and handling of gas system (compressed

  16. Plans of reorganization of USA nuclear military complex and provision of military program by special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenovskaya, I.V.

    1996-01-01

    Consideration is given to plans and implementation of the program of reorganization of USA nuclear military complex, related with conducted reduction of nuclear arsenal after concluding the Strategic Nuclear Armament Reduction Treaty. Particular attention is paid to problems of satisfying short-term and long-term requirements in special nuclear materials and in tritium in particular

  17. Fujian electric system analysis and nuclear power planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jianwen; Fu Qiang; Cheng Ping

    1994-11-01

    The objective of the study is to conduct a long term electric expansion planning and nuclear power planning for Fujian Province. The Wien Automatic System Planning Package (WASP-III) is used to optimize the electric system. Probabilistic Simulation is one of the most favorite techniques for middle and long term generation and production cost planning of electric power system. The load duration curve is obtained by recording the load data of a time interval into a monotone non-increasing sense. Polynomial function is used to describe the load duration curve (LDC), and this LDC is prepared for probabilistic simulation in WASP-III. WASP-III is a dynamic optimizing module in the area of supply modelling. It could find out the economically optimal expansion plan for a power generating system over a period of up to thirty years, with the constraints given by the planners. The optimum is evaluated in terms of minimum discounted total costs. Generating costs, amount of energy not served and reliability of the system are analyzed in the system expansion planning by using the probabilistic simulation method. The following conclusions can be drawn from this study. Hydro electricity is the cheapest one of all available technologies and resources. After the large hydro station is committed at the end of 1995, more base load power plants are needed in the system. Coal-fired power plants with capacity of 600 MWe will be the most competitive power plants in the future of the system. At the end of the studying period, about half of the stalled capacity will be composed of these power plants. Nuclear power plants with capacity of 600 MWe are suitable for the system after the base load increases to a certain level. Oil combustion units will decrease the costs of the system. (12 tabs., 6 figs.)

  18. 77 FR 15142 - Updated Nuclear Regulatory Commission Fiscal Years 2008-2013 Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... 2008-2013 Strategic Plan AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Strategic plan. SUMMARY: The U...-1614, Volume 5, ``U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Fiscal Years [FY] 2008-2013 Strategic Plan,'' dated February 2012. The updated FY 2008-2013 strategic plan describes the agency's mission and...

  19. The nuclear industry's plan to achieve new nuclear power plant orders in the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, P.

    1993-01-01

    Since the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973, there has been a direct relationship between the growth in the Gross Domestic Product and the growth in the use of electricity in the United States. That close relationship between economic growth and electricity will continue. If that is true, the United States Department of Energy says this country will need between 190,000 to 275,000 megawatts of new generating capacity in the next 20 years. Electricity is one of the cleanest and most efficient uses of energy. Of all the ways to generate electricity, nuclear power plants are the cleanest, producing no air pollution and no greenhouse gases. To help supply the needed increase in electricity generating capacity, the US nuclear power industry has developed a Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Power Plants. The plan identified fourteen issues which must be dealt with to create the conditions under which utilities could place orders for new nuclear plants by the mid-1990's. The plan was published in November of 1990 and significant progress has been made on most of the fourteen issues. The plan and progress made are reviewed in depth

  20. Planning and management of outages in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sica, G.F.; Fusari, W.; Reginelli, A.

    1984-01-01

    At present the Ente Nazionale per l'Energia Elettrica (ENEL) operates three nuclear power plants, only one of which belongs to the new generation, i.e. the Caorso Nuclear Power Plant which has been in commercial operation since December 1981. Outage planning, implementation and analysis are very important in order to minimize the shutdown time and thus improve plant availability, which is of particular importance for a large nuclear power plant. Such activities are very complicated because of the large number of jobs that have to be performed in accordance with detailed written procedures and which have to be properly documented and controlled. Large off-site resources are required which have to be accurately interfaced with on-site staff. The ENEL is making a great effort to define both the administrative and technical aspects of refuelling outages. As outage planning requires the availability and handling of a large amount of data and information, a maintenance information system that has been widely used in conventional plants was applied, with some modifications made especially for the Caorso Nuclear Power Plant. After two years the following results have been achieved: a large number of raw and processed data are now available, the first refuelling outage was carried out with few problems and according to schedule, and the second refuelling outage, based on the experience of the first, required somewhat less preparation and is developing well even though many special activities have had to be scheduled. The ENEL believes that the efforts made in the planning and management areas will pay off in terms of the short duration, smoothness and economy of further outages, both for Caorso and for future plants. (author)

  1. The nuclear medicine department in the emergency management plan: a referent structure for the nuclear and radiological risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, J.L.; Ducassou, D.; Lesgourgues, P.; Zamaron, S.; Boulard, G.

    2006-01-01

    Each french public or private hospital has to establish guidelines for an immediate response to mass casualties (Emergency Management Plan or 'White' Plan). For a nuclear accident or terrorist attack, the staff of the Nuclear Medicine Department may be adequately prepared and equipped. This paper presents the nuclear and radiological risks section of the final draft of the White Plan developed at Bordeaux University Hospital. (author)

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Preliminary Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis J. Harrell

    2006-01-01

    This draft preliminary project management plan presents the conceptual framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, consistent with the authorization in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. In developing this plan, the Idaho National Laboratory has considered three fundamental project planning options that are summarized in the following section. Each of these planning options is literally compliant with the Energy Policy Act of 2005, but each emphasizes different approaches to technology development risks, design, licensing and construction risks, and to the extent of commercialization support provided to the industry. The primary focus of this draft preliminary project management plan is to identify those activities important to Critical Decision-1, at which point a decision on proceeding with the NGNP Project can be made. The conceptual project framework described herein is necessary to establish the scope and priorities for the technology development activities. The framework includes: A reference NGNP prototype concept based on what is judged to be the lowest risk technology development that would achieve the needed commercial functional requirements to provide an economically competitive nuclear heat source and hydrogen production capability. A high-level schedule logic for design, construction, licensing, and acceptance testing. This schedule logic also includes an operational shakedown period that provides proof-of-principle to establish the basis for commercialization decisions by end-users. An assessment of current technology development plans to support Critical Decision-1 and overall project progress. The most important technical and programmatic uncertainties (risks) are evaluated, and potential mitigation strategies are identified so that the technology development plans may be modified as required to support ongoing project development. A rough-order-of-magnitude cost evaluation that provides an initial basis for budget planning. This

  3. The planning of decommissioning activities within nuclear facilities - Generating a Baseline Decommissioning Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meek, N.C.; Ingram, S.; Page, J.

    2003-01-01

    BNFL Environmental Services has developed planning tools to meet the emerging need for nuclear liabilities management and decommissioning engineering both in the UK and globally. It can provide a comprehensive baseline planning service primarily aimed at nuclear power stations and nuclear plant. The paper develops the following issues: Decommissioning planning; The baseline decommissioning plan;The process; Work package; Compiling the information; Deliverables summary; Customer Benefits; - Planning tool for nuclear liability life-cycle management; - Robust and reliable plans based upon 'real' experience; - Advanced financial planning; - Ascertaining risk; - Strategy and business planning. The following Deliverables are mentioned:1. Site Work Breakdown Structure; 2. Development of site implementation strategy from the high level decommissioning strategy; 3. An end point definition for the site; 4. Buildings, operational systems and plant surveys; 5. A schedule of condition for the site; 6. Development of technical approach for decommissioning for each work package; 7. Cost estimate to WBS level 5 for each work package; 8. Estimate of decommissioning waste arisings for each work package; 9. Preparation of complete decommissioning programme in planning software to suit client; 10. Risk modelling of work package and overall project levels; 11. Roll up of costs into an overall cost model; 12. Cash flow, waste profiling and resource profiling against the decommissioning programme; 13. Preparation and issue of Final Report. Finally The BDP process is represented by a flowchart listing the following stages: [Power Station project assigned] → [Review project and conduct Characterisation review of power station] → [Identify work packages] → [Set up WBS to level 3] → [Assign work packages] → [Update WBS to level 4] →[Develop cost model] → [Develop logic network] → [Develop risk management procedure] ] → [Develop project strategy document]→ [Work package

  4. Institutional plan -- Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The US nuclear electric utility industry established the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in 1979 to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability -- to promote excellence -- in the operation of its nuclear plants. After its formation, the Institute grew from a handful of on-loan personnel in late 1979 to an established work force of more than 400 permanent and on-loan personnel. INPO's early years were marked by growth and evolution of its programs and organization. The Institute now focuses primarily on the effectiveness and enhancement of established programs and activities. For INPO to carry out its role, it must have the support of its members and participants and a cooperative but independent relationship with the NRC. A basis for that support and cooperation is an understanding of INPO's role. This Institutional Plan is intended to provide that understanding by defining the Institute's role and its major programs. This plan considers the existing and projected needs of the industry and the overall environment in which INPO and its members and participants operate

  5. Russia ends pact to curb uranium use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The Russian government has terminated an agreement between the country's nuclear body, Rosatom, and the US Department of Energy (DOE) into the feasibility of converting research reactors in Russia to low-enriched uranium (LEU).

  6. Incorporation of IAEA recommendations in the Spanish nuclear emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, D.; Diaz de la Cruz, F.; Murtra, J.; Ruiz del Arbol, E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the way in which the Spanish authorities have incorporated the IAEA recommendations on the planning of action to be taken in the event of a nuclear accident, taking into account the national organization's own approach to the problem of dealing with a radiation emergency. First, the criteria and principles applied in devising the emergency plans are described. The criteria are concerned with the radiation problem as such and the principles take into account the sum total of problems associated with an emergency. Organizational and operational aspects of the plan are then discussed. The extent to which these arrangements are brought into play is determined by the type of abnormal event which occurs in the facility; since the evolution of this event cannot be exactly predicted, there must be enough flexibility in the operational plan so that it can be adapted rapidly and effectively to the circumstances. Another section deals with protection measures as a function of intervention (or reference) levels. Although non-radiological considerations may affect the measures adopted, a knowledge of the risks associated with the various intervention levels gives the authority a better understanding of the situation. The Nuclear Safety Board has had to inform the civil protection authorities of the distances at which specific protection measures should be taken. Considerations and hypotheses are described which, when applied, lead to general evacuation for distances of up to 3 km from the plant, partial evacuation for up to 5 km, containment and prophylactic measures up to 10 km and water and food monitoring up to 30 km. Finally, details are given of the Training and Information Plan which is being applied at present in Spain. (author)

  7. The planning of areas near nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    During the past five years national physical planning has been initiated by the Swedish Parliament. Guidelines have been given to the communities how to consider national interests when drawing up local planning and how to produce maps and descriptions of the planning. For the planning of the areas near the nuclear power stations the municipalities have certain guidelines from The Nuclear Power Inspectorate and The National Institute of Radiation Protection. It is advised to keep a low population density near the power plants, to avoid the type of harbour or industry which could have disturbing effects on the power plant and also to avoid to concentrate people, who are difficult to move from the area in case of an accident (i.e., homes for old people, maternity homes and prisons). The plants on the East Coast, Forsmark and Oskarshamn, are located in wooded areas with a very low population density. On the West Coast, near Ringhals and Barsebaeck, the population density is higher, and there is one village with about 2,000 inhabitants, situated at a distance of two (2) km from the Ringhals power plant. The Control Boards are now reluctant to concentrate more people in this village, where schools and shops were earlier planned for 3,000 inhabitants. The building activity near power plants is regulated by law. New buildings are prohibited within a distance of two (2) km from the plants. Some exeptions can be granted by the County Administrative Board after guidance from the Central Board. In a zone reaching 10 kilometers from the power plants there are no regulations by law about new buildings, except the earlier mentioned guidelines from the Central Boards to maintain a low population. (L.E.)

  8. Indicators for management of planned outages in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    The outages considered within the scope of this publication are planned refuelling outages (PWR and BWR nuclear power plants) and planned outages associated with major maintenance, tests and inspections (PHWR and LWGR nuclear power plants). The IAEA has published some valuable reports providing guidance and assistance to operating organizations on outage management. This TECDOC outlines main issues to be considered in outage performance monitoring and provides guidance to operating organizations for the development and implementation of outage programmes which could enhance plant safety, reliability and economics. It also complements the series of reports published by the IAEA on outage management and on previous work related to performance indicators developed for monitoring different areas of plant operation, such as safety, production, reliability and economics. This publication is based upon the information presented at a technical meeting to develop a standardized set of outage indicators for outage optimization, which was organised in Vienna, 6-9 October 2003. At this meeting, case studies and good practices relating to performance indicator utilization in the process of planned outage management were presented and discussed

  9. The Strategic Plan of the Nuclear Energy Agency, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The OECD has been engaged in the past few years in a process of reform to take account of the impact of globalization on its Members' economies, and to allow for proper refocusing of its work, notably on the subject of sustainable development. These developments are having an impact on the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The group on the future role of the NEA delivered its report at the end of January 1998 and one key recommendation is the elaboration of a strategic plan for the Agency. The recommendations made in the report served to stimulate a review of NEA goals, priorities, methods of work and products. This review has taken account of the recommendations in the report. The review served as the basis for this Strategic Plan for the NEA, which has been developed to provide guidance to the Agency in planning its activities and implementing its programmes over a five-year period. The report contains detailed description of the following topics:Mission of NEA: Strategic arenas of work, including sectorial arenas, Data bank, Information and communication; Interactions; Relations with non-member countries; Role of the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy; Working methods; Resources. (R.P.)

  10. Emergency planning and preparedness of the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, B.V.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of measures taken in case of accident or emergency to protect the site personnel, the general public and the environment will depend heavily on the adequacy of the emergency plan prepared in advance. For this reason, an emergency plan of the operating organization shall cover all activities planned to be carried out in the event of an emergency, allow for determining the level of the emergency and corresponding level of response according to the severity of the accident condition, and be based on the accidents analysed in the SAR as well as those additionally postulated for emergency planning purposes. The purpose of this paper is to present the practice of the emergency planning and preparedness in the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI) for responding to accidents/incidents that may occur at the DNRI. The DNRI emergency plan and emergency procedures developed by the DNRI will be discussed. The information in the DNRI emergency plan such as the emergency organization, classification and identification of emergencies; intervention measures; the co-ordination with off-site organizations; and emergency training and drills will be described in detail. The emergency procedures in the form of documents and instructions for responding to accidents/incidents such as accidents in the reactor, accidents out of the reactor but with significant radioactive contamination, and fire and explosion accidents will be mentioned briefly. As analysed in the Safety Analysis Report for the DNRI, only the in-site actions are presented in the paper and no off-site emergency measures are required. (author)

  11. A Study on the Research and Development planning of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Byung Chool; Song, S. H.; Kim, I. C.; Cheong, C. E.; Kim, H. J.; Paek, C. E.; Juh, S. J.

    2006-06-01

    This study conducted project planning to set new R and D paradigm regime. And the eight R and D fields are derived as follows: - Development of Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Commodity for Export - Development of Nuclear Hydrogen Production System - Development of Innovative Nuclear System - Establishment of Nuclear Safety System - Establishment of Nuclear Environment Management System - Development of Radiation Technology with High Added Value - Development of Neutron Science Technology - Development of Nuclear Fundamental and Common Technology

  12. National response plan - Major nuclear or radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    France has been implementing stringent radiation protection and nuclear safety and security measures for many years. However, this does not mean that the country is exempt from having to be prepared to deal with an emergency. Changes in France, Europe and other parts of the globe have made it necessary for France to reconsider how it responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies. As the potential impact of a nuclear or radiological accident can affect a wide range of activities, the plan described herein is based on a cross-sector and inter-ministerial approach to emergency response. The Chernobyl and Fukushima-Daiichi disasters are proof that the consequences of a major nuclear or radiological accident can affect all levels of society. These challenges are substantial and relate to: public health: An uncontrolled nuclear accident can have immediate consequences (death, injury, irradiation) as well as long-term consequences that can lead to increased risk of developing radiation-induced diseases (such as certain types of cancer); environmental quality: Radiation contamination can last for several decades and, in some cases, can result in an area being closed off permanently to the public; economic and social continuity: Nuclear accidents bring human activity to a halt in contaminated areas, disrupting the economic and social order of the entire country. It may therefore be necessary to adapt economic and social systems and carry out clean-up operations if people and businesses have been displaced; quality of international relations: Related to fulfillment of obligations to alert and inform European and international partners. This international dimension also covers the protection of French nationals present in countries stricken by a nuclear accident. This national plan provides reference information on how to prepare for a nuclear or radiological emergency and make the appropriate decisions in the event of an emergency. It covers the emergency phase (including

  13. Russia wants to supply gas to both East and West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    Russia's plans of distributing gas to both Europe and Asia are analysed. In Russia the main oil and gas assets have been put back under state control, and there is a fear that Russia will use its massive oil and gas reserves as a political tool to strengthen its national security interests

  14. U.S. nuclear decommission trust planning: Romancing a millstone?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrbach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear utilities face unknown financial liabilities for plant decommissioning that exceed the value of present trust fund collections. The situation is a strong bet to get worse than better. Will cost escalation experienced in construction recur in decomissioning? If so, then many Nuclear Decommissioning Trusts (NDTs) are underfunded in real terms. The full consequence of an unfunded liability recognized in the later years of operation will be a ratcheting of collection rates to catch up to the revised decommission estimate. NDT planning should incorporate a conservative set of assumptions based on US experience. An NDT should be treated as a trust fund and not a pay-more-as-you-go fund. Levelization of payments will provide some added earnings and more cash in the NDT fund should a reactor not reach its expected life of 40 years. Facing up to the problem and potential remedial action now is imperative

  15. Change in perception of people towards a nuclear emergency plan for a nuclear power station after being presented

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzen, Hideharu

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a group interview survey for 24 persons living in urban areas of the Kansai region to understand the change in their perception of information about nuclear emergency plans for nuclear power stations. The participants were given descriptions about a nuclear emergency plan based on plans that had been prepared by the national government and local government. Before hearing the explanation about the nuclear emergency plan, we found that only a few participants were concerned about it, but no one knew the detailed contents. For the question 'Do you think the nuclear emergency plan is being improved after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident?', we found 6 persons among the 24 held opinions saying that the plan was 'improved' or 'somewhat improved'. However, after hearing the explanation and a brief Q and A session about it, 18 persons held opinions saying the plan was 'improved' or 'somewhat improved'. As the reason for such answers, the most common opinion shared by 13 persons was that 'a nuclear emergency plan is being made'. There is a possibility that urban residents had not known the facts about specific disaster prevention plans for each nuclear power station that have been formulated. (author)

  16. Heritage tourism development in rural Russia: A case study in collaborative tourism planning in an international setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Ramthun; Susan Williams; Vladimir Shalaev; Svetlana Guseva; Irina Polinkova; Sofia Chervakova; Svetlana Ivanova; Anna Pahkmutova; Anastasia Shalaev

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, advisers from such organizations as universities and extension services often assist rural communities with community planning and development efforts. These outside groups typically facilitate communication and discussion among stakeholders and help to lay out a process by which the community may proceed towards its shared goals. Faculty members...

  17. Lessons learned in planning the Canadian Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Michael E.; Brooks, Sheila M.; Miller, Joan M.; Mason, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) began implementing a $7B CDN, 70-year Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) to deal with legacy decommissioning and environmental issues at AECL nuclear sites. The objective of the NLLP is to safely and cost-effectively reduce the nuclear legacy liabilities and associated risks based on sound waste management and environmental principles in the best interest of Canadians. The liabilities include shutdown research and prototype power reactors, fuel handling facilities, radiochemical laboratories, support buildings, radioactive waste storage facilities, and contaminated lands at several sites located across eastern Canada from Quebec to Manitoba. The largest site, Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in Ontario, will continue as an operational nuclear site for the foreseeable future. Planning and delivery of the Program is managed by the Liability Management Unit (LMU), a group that was formed within AECL for the purpose. The composition and progress of the NLLP has been reported in recent conferences. The NLLP comprises a number of interlinked decommissioning, waste management and environmental restoration activities that are being executed at different sites, and by various technical groups as suppliers to the LMU. Many lessons about planning and executing such a large, diverse Program have been learned in planning the initial five-year 'start-up' phase (which will conclude 2011 March), in planning the five-year second phase (which is currently being finalized), and in planning individual and interacting activities within the Program. The activities to be undertaken in the start-up phase were planned by a small group of AECL technical experts using the currently available information on the liabilities. Progress in executing the Program was slower than anticipated due to less than ideal alignment between some planned technical solutions and the actual requirements, as well as the

  18. Radiological planning and implementation for nuclear-facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The need and scope of radiological planning required to support nuclear facility decommissioning are issues addressed in this paper. The role of radiation protection engineering and monitoring professionals during project implementation and closeout is also addressed. Most of the discussion focuses on worker protection considerations; however, project support, environmental protection and site release certification considerations are also covered. One objective is to identify radiological safety issues that must be addressed. The importance of the issues will vary depending on the type of facility being decommissioned; however, by giving appropriate attention to these issues difficult decommissioning projects can be accomplished in a safer manner with workers and the public receiving minimal radiation exposures

  19. Nuclear waste management in Switzerland - concept and plan of realisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This reports begins by discussing some basic principles of the nuclear waste management concept, the boundary conditions imposed by social considerations, and technical, economic and organisational parameters. The overall concept will then be presented as it applies to the two disposal strategies for short-lived wastes and for high-level and long-lived intermediate-level wastes and spent fuel. The current status of project work is discussed and future plans, objectives and time schedules are presented. (author) figs., tabs., 20 refs

  20. ANSTO's future plans for nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburne, I.

    2003-01-01

    There are four key themes in ANSTO's future plans for nuclear science and technology: 1) ANSTO plans for the future - within its established 'core business areas', following a rigorous process, and incorporating extensive interaction with organisations around Australia and overseas. 2) The replacement research reactor (RRR) - a Major National Research Facility and the cornerstone of ANSTO's future activities. 3) A number of business development initiatives that have been launched by ANSTO over the past year, under the banner of Good science is good business at ANSTO. 4) ANSTO involvement in the national research priorities that the Prime Minister announced last December, in particular, by pursuing new research in the security and forensics area; its contribution to the 'Safeguarding Australia' national research priority. The Replacement Research Reactor now under construction will make an enormous difference to the work that ANSTO can undertake, and that others can perform using ANSTO's facilities

  1. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel strategic plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for safely and efficiently managing DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and SNF returned to the US from foreign research reactors (FRR). The fuel will be treated where necessary, packaged suitable for repository disposal where practicable, and placed in interim dry storage. These actions will remove remaining vulnerabilities, make as much spent fuel as possible ready for ultimate disposition, and substantially reduce the cost of continued storage. The goal is to complete these actions in 10 years. This SNF Strategic Plan updates the mission, vision, objectives, and strategies for the management of DOE-owned SNF articulated by the SNF Strategic Plan issued in December 1994. The plan describes the remaining issues facing the EM SNF Program, lays out strategies for addressing these issues, and identifies success criteria by which program progress is measured. The objectives and strategies in this plan are consistent with the following Em principles described by the Assistance Secretary in his June 1996 initiative to establish a 10-year time horizon for achieving most program objectives: eliminate and manage the most serious risks; reduce mortgage and support costs to free up funds for further risk reduction; protect worker health and safety; reduce generation of wastes; create a collaborative relationship between DOE and its regulators and stakeholders; focus technology development on cost and risk reduction; and strengthen management and financial control

  2. Russia and the BRICS:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skak, Mette

    Russia's role as driver behind the BRICS is critically examined via the original RIC concept of Primakov. Today, there are mixed feelings about the BRICS in Russia.......Russia's role as driver behind the BRICS is critically examined via the original RIC concept of Primakov. Today, there are mixed feelings about the BRICS in Russia....

  3. Sites and projects for the disposal of radioactive waste and repositories in Russia and other states of the former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, L.; Herzog, C.

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear industry in Russia and other states of the former USSR contents the whole nuclear fuel cycle - Uranium mining, fuel element production, nuclear power and research reactors, nuclear powered ships and reprocessing of nuclear fuel. High amounts of radioactive waste are already disposed at the sites of these industrial centers and further radioactive waste is arising in production, reprocessing and decommissioning processes. Spent fuel elements are reprocessed or stored onsite. Solid and liquid wastes are disposed near surface at the sites of nuclear power plants, radiochemical plants, 'Radon'- and other sites. High volumes of high-, medium- and low-level liquid waste with high radioactivity has been injected into deep geologic formations at the sites of radiochemical plants. In Russia perspective all spent fuel elements shall be reprocessed and dry storage facilities are planned for long term storage until reprocessing. Repositories for solid waste are foreseen in deep geological formations (e.g. salt, granite) at several sites. (author)

  4. The power industry of the Magadan oblast: part of the Leninist GOELRO (State Commission for the Electrification of Russia) plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozdnyak, I.G.; Anishchenko, Ye.B.

    1981-01-01

    A brief history is given of the development of the Magadan oblast's power industry, which is inseparably connected with development of the very rich raw material resources and fast development of the mining industry. In 1985 completion of construction of the Kolyma GES is planned; with the end of its construction will begin preparatory work one Ust'-Srednekansk GES: the second GES of the Kalyma falls. Work has begun since 1981 to expand the third phase of the Magadan heat and electric power plant. In 1982 completion of installation of power equipment at the Arkagalinsk State regional power plant is planned. In the 11th five-year plan construction of the system of 220 kV power lines will be finished, and 110 and 35 kV power distribution lines will be built. A special place belongs to construction of the Lankovskaya thermal power plant, which will aid in creating a stable fuel-energy base with a positive future. Chukotka power will be further developed. By 1990, 18 more state farms should be connected to the state power system. Completing the power basis in the Magadan oblast will enable an acceleration in its development, and a rise in the material and cultural standard of living of the people of the Far Northeast.

  5. Security of fissile materials in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukharin, O.

    1996-01-01

    The problem of security of huge stocks of weapons-usable highly enriched uranium and plutonium in Russia against theft or diversion remains a serious nonproliferation concern. During the Cold War, the security of Soviet nuclear materials was based on centralization and discipline, protection by the military, and intrusive political oversight of the people. The recent fundamental societal changes have rendered these arrangements inadequate, and the security of nuclear materials has decreased. Safeguarding nuclear materials in Russia is particularly difficult because of their very large inventories and the size and complexity of the nation's nuclear infrastructure. Russia needs a reliable and more objective technology-based system of nuclear safeguards designed to control nuclear materials. The Russian government and the international community are working towards this goal

  6. Energy and nuclear power planning in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In this publication of the IAEA, after the introduction, four substantive parts follow. Part I, Energy demand and rational energy supply, deals with the needs for energy, primary energy resources and reserves, energy transport, storage, distribution and conservation, including the environmental effects on energy development. Part II, Economic aspects of energy development, presents an integrated view of the basic concepts of energy economics, evaluation of alternative energy projects with an in-depth comparison of electricity generation costs of nuclear and fossil-fuelled power plants. Part III, World energy development status and trends, begins with an overview of the world energy status and trends and continues with a presentation of the energy situation in industrialized countries and in developing countries. Part IV, Energy planning, deals with the optimization techniques, energy planning concepts and computerized models. The launching conditions and implementation of a nuclear power programme are described in detail. 582 references are given in the text and a bibliographical list of 356 titles has been added

  7. Decommissioning plan of the nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu' is to be decommissioned at Sekinehama Port immediately after finishing the experimental voyage based on the 'Fundamental plan on the research required for the development of nuclear ships in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute' decided in March, 1985. The decommissioning plan which determines the methods of the works regarding the decommissioning and others is as follows. In order to utilize the ship hull of Mutsu, the reactor room including the reactor and shielding is removed in a lump, and the removal and isolation method of preserving it as it is on land is adopted. The measures for environment preservation and ensuring the safety of residents are taken, and the sufficient work control is carried out for preventing accidents and reducing the radiation exposure of workers. The ship is used as the ship with ordinary propulsion system for ocean research and the research and development of marine reactors. The utilization of Sekinehama and Ominato facilities is investigated. The reactor room removed from Mutsu is exhibited to public, being preserved safely in a building. (K.I.)

  8. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies: Current Challenges and Future Plans - 12558

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Andrew [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies office (FCT program) is to provide options for possible future changes in national nuclear energy programs. While the recent draft report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future stressed the need for organization changes, interim waste storage and the establishment of a permanent repository for nuclear waste management, it also recognized the potential value of alternate fuel cycles and recommended continued research and development in that area. With constrained budgets and great expectations, the current challenges are significant. The FCT program now performs R and D covering the entire fuel cycle. This broad R and D scope is a result of the assignment of new research and development (R and D) responsibilities to the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), as well as reorganization within NE. This scope includes uranium extraction from seawater and uranium enrichment R and D, used nuclear fuel recycling technology, advanced fuel development, and a fresh look at a range of disposal geologies. Additionally, the FCT program performs the necessary systems analysis and screening of fuel cycle alternatives that will identify the most promising approaches and areas of technology gaps. Finally, the FCT program is responsible for a focused effort to consider features of fuel cycle technology in a way that promotes nonproliferation and security, such as Safeguards and Security by Design, and advanced monitoring and predictive modeling capabilities. This paper and presentation will provide an overview of the FCT program R and D scope and discuss plans to analyze fuel cycle options and support identified R and D priorities into the future. The FCT program is making progress in implanting a science based, engineering driven research and development program that is evaluating options for a sustainable fuel cycle in the U.S. Responding to the BRC recommendations, any resulting legislative

  9. 76 FR 61402 - Draft Nuclear Regulatory Commission Fiscal Year 2012-2016 Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ...-2016 Strategic Plan AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft NUREG; request for comment... comment on draft NUREG-1614, Volume 5. ``U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, FY 2012-2016 Strategic Plan,'' dated September 2011. The NRC's draft FY 2012-2016 strategic plan describes the agency's mission and...

  10. Basic plans of nuclear energy development and utilization for fiscal 1982 (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A report by the Nuclear Safety Commission to the Prime Minister, concerning the basic plans of nuclear energy development and utilization for fiscal 1982, was presented; the NSC has decided on the plans drawn up by the Prime Minister. Nuclear power generation as the nucleus of petroleum substitutes must be developed steadily. For the purpose, nuclear fuel cycle should be established, including the securing of uranium resources, uranium enrichment, fuel reprocessing, and waste management. The contents are as follows: the strengthening of nuclear safety measures, the promotion of nuclear power generation, the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle, the development of advanced types of reactors, the research on nuclear fusion, the research and development of nuclear powered ships, the promotion of radiation utilization, the strengthening of basis for nuclear energy development and utilization, the promotion of international cooperation, the strengthening of safeguard and nuclear material protection measures, fiscal 1982 budgets related to nuclear energy. (Mori, K.)

  11. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  12. The management plan preparation activities nuclear power plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utomo

    2011-01-01

    A feasibility Study that has been updated show that two nuclear power units with each unit of power up to 1000 MWe can represent decently an economical alternative energy supply. It added that the available time schedule was quite tight so that the preparation for the development must be starting first. This paper will discuss the preparation of plans of the first nuclear power plant which includes program activities, the structure of contracts, schedules of activities and funding. From the information obtained to date that in addition to a candidate site that is ready to be built in Muria peninsula is still required another potential alternative site besides to search other complete data information. This site investigation activities completed within the time schedule was passed ''critical path'', so that these activities should be carried out intensively and obey the time. This paper describes the steps that need to be prepared to welcome the first nuclear power plant, after reviewing the various input above and apply the reality in Indonesia as the initial conditions. (author)

  13. Estimation and improvement of the RF government plan for providing the sustainable social-economic development of Russia in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy V. Manushin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to assess the anticrisis plan of the RF Government of January 27 2015 to project them onto the anticrisis plan of the RF Government dated March 1 2016 to identify its problems and suggest measures for their solution. Methods abstractlogical. Results the modern Russian economy is facing severe challenges posed by the crisis in the economy Western sanctions and foreign policy of the country. The government aware of these problems for the second year in a row adopts and implements a program of anticrisis measures. Analysis of scientific literature reports of the government and supervisory bodies allowed to formulate conclusions on the low efficiency of the anticrisis plan of 27 January 2015. Most of the indicators have not been achieved in many areas the objectives and their implementation have been haphazard with immeasurable results and lack of accountability for results. Analysis of the structure of anticrisis measures of the Russian government for 2016 demonstrated the persistence of old problems and the emergence of new ones. The number of indicators increased while simultaneously funding reduced as well as the number of specialists engaged in substantive anticrisis measures. Inefficient structure of the anticrisis measures is identified where priority is given to inappropriate support of the regions and the domestic auto industry to the detriment of the social component as well as other problems. As a result the measures are proposed to address the identified problems in the anticrisis plans of the Russian Government dated 27.01.2015 and 01.03.2016. Scientific novelty the following basic steps are formulated to address the identified challenges to modernize the work of the crisis staff to specify the anticrisis measures developing a detailed mechanism for their implementation and indicators for assessing the effectiveness to increase the motivation of civil servants to increase the minimum wage to the subsistence minimum to grant

  14. Nuclear weapons complex. Weaknesses in DOE's nonnuclear consolidation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, James E. Jr.; Fenzel, William F.; Schulze, John R.; Gaffigan, Mark E.

    1992-11-01

    Nuclear weapons contain a wide variety of nonnuclear components - items that are not made from nuclear materials. These components comprise the majority of parts in nuclear weapons, including the ones needed to guide weapons to their targets, initiate the nuclear explosion, increase the weapons' explosive yield, and ensure the weapons' safety and security. DOE has three facilities, the Kansas City Plant in Missouri, the Mound Plant in Ohio, and the Pinellas Plant in Florida, that are dedicated primarily to nonnuclear activities and have unique manufacturing responsibilities. Some additional nonnuclear manufacturing activities are performed at the Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado, the Y-12 Plant in Tennessee, and the Pantex Plant in Texas. Descriptions of each plant and the activities they conduct are contained in appendix I of this report. In 1991, DOE began planning to reconfigure the nuclear weapons complex into one that is smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operate. More specifically, DOE issued a reconfiguration study in January 1991 that set forth a detailed framework for making the complex smaller and more efficient. The study will lead to a complex-wide Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) on how best to reconfigure the complex. This statement is planned to be completed in late 1993. As part of the effort to analyze the reconfiguration, DOE's Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs directed the Albuquerque Operations Office in April 1991 to develop a nonnuclear consolidation plan to serve as input to the PEIS. There are a number of weaknesses in DOE's NCP. First, because the NCP's scope was limited to examining single-site consolidation alternatives, the decision to select Kansas City as the preferred option was made without analyzing other nonnuclear options. These options included down sizing and modernizing all facilities in place or maximizing consolidation by eliminating all nonnuclear sites and relocating their functions to a

  15. Nuclear criticality project plan for the Hanford Site tank farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratzel, D.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    The mission of this project is to provide a defensible technical basis report in support of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This technical basis report will also be used to resolve technical issues associated with the nuclear criticality safety issue. The strategy presented in this project plan includes an integrated programmatic and organizational approach. The scope of this project plan includes the provision of a criticality technical basis supporting document (CTBSD) to support the FSAR as well as for resolution of the nuclear criticality safety issue. Specifically, the CTBSD provides the requisite technical analysis to support the FSAR hazard and accident analysis as well as for the determination of the required FSAR limits and controls. The scope of The CTBSD will provide a baseline for understanding waste partitioning and distribution phenomena and mechanistics for current operational activities inclusive of single-shell tanks, double-shell tanks, double-contained receiver tanks, and miscellaneous underground storage tanks.. Although the FSAR does not include future operational activities, the waste partitioning and distribution phenomena and mechanistics work scope identified in this project plan provide a sound technical basis as a point of departure to support independent safety analyses for future activities. The CTBSD also provides the technical basis for resolution of the technical issues associated with the nuclear criticality safety issue. In addition to the CTBSD, additional documentation will be required to fully resolve U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters administrative and programmatic issues. The strategy and activities defined in this project plan provide a CTBSD for the FSAR and for accelerated resolution of the safety issue in FY 1996. On April 30, 1992, a plant review committee reviewed the Final Safety Analysis Reports for the single-shell, double-shell, and aging waste tanks in light of the conclusions of the inadequate waste

  16. Scenarios for Russia's natural gas exports to 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paltsev, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds the world's largest natural gas reserves and it is the world's largest exporter of natural gas. Despite a recent reduction in Russia's exports to Europe, it plans to build new pipelines. We explore the long-term (up to 2050) scenarios of Russian natural gas exports to Europe and Asia using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. We found that over the next 20–40 years natural gas can still play a substantial role in Russian exports and there are substantial reserves to support a development of the gas-oriented energy system both in Russia and in its current and potential gas importers. Based on the considered scenarios, Russia does not need any new pipeline capacity to the EU unless it wants to diversify its export routes to supply the EU without any gas transit via Ukraine and Belarus. Asian markets are attractive to Russian gas and substantial volumes may be exported there. Relatively cheap shale gas in China may sufficiently alter the prospects of Russian gas, especially in Asian markets. In the Reference scenario, exports of natural gas grow from Russia's current 7 Tcf to 11–12 Tcf in 2030 and 13–14 Tcf in 2050. Alternative scenarios provide a wider range of projections, with a share of Russian gas exports shipped to Asian markets rising to more than 30% by 2030 and almost 50% in 2050. Europe's reliance on LNG imports increases, while it still maintains sizable imports from Russia. - Highlights: • In the Reference scenario exports of natural gas grow from Russia’s current 7 Tcf to 11–12 Tcf in 2030 and 13–14 Tcf in 2050. • In alternative scenarios a share of Russian exports to Asian markets is rising to about 30% by 2030 and 50 % in 2050. • Cheap shale gas in China can sufficiently alter Russian natural gas export. • Reduction in nuclear generation in Europe can lead to increased exports of natural gas from

  17. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has produced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for many years as part of its various missions and programs. The historical process for managing this SNF was to reprocess it whereby valuable material such as uranium or plutonium was chemically separated from the wastes. These fuels were not intended for long-term storage. As the need for uranium and plutonium decreased, it became necessary to store the SNF for extended lengths of time. This necessity resulted from a 1992 DOE decision to discontinue reprocessing SNF to recover strategic materials (although limited processing of SNF to meet repository acceptance criteria remains under consideration, no plutonium or uranium extraction for other uses is planned). Both the facilities used for storage, and the fuel itself, began experiencing aging from this extended storage. New efforts are now necessary to assure suitable fuel and facility management until long-term decisions for spent fuel disposition are made and implemented. The Program Plan consists of 14 sections as follows: Sections 2--6 describe objectives, management, the work plan, the work breakdown structure, and the responsibility assignment matrix. Sections 7--9 describe the program summary schedules, site logic diagram, SNF Program resource and support requirements. Sections 10--14 present various supplemental management requirements and quality assurance guidelines

  18. Planning for decommissioning of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant Unit-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskas, P.; Poskas, R.; Zujus, R.

    2002-01-01

    In accordance to Ignalina NPP Unit 1 Closure Law, the Government of Lithuania approved the Ignalina NPP Unit 1 Decommissioning Program until 2005. For enforcement of this program, the plan of measures for implementation of the program was prepared and approved by the Minister of Economy. The plan consists of two parts, namely technical- environmental and social-economic. Technical-environmental measures are mostly oriented to the safe management of spent nuclear fuel and operational radioactive waste stored at the plant and preparation of licensing documents for Unit 1 decommissioning. Social-economic measures are oriented to mitigate the negative social and economic impact on Lithuania, inhabitants of the region, and, particularly, on the staff of Ignalina NPP by means of creating favorable conditions for a balanced social and economic development of the region. In this paper analysis of planned radioactive waste management technologies, licensing documents for decommissioning, other technical-environmental and also social-economic measures is presented. Specific conditions in Lithuania important for defining the decommissioning strategy are highlighted. (author)

  19. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has produced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for many years as part of its various missions and programs. The historical process for managing this SNF was to reprocess it whereby valuable material such as uranium or plutonium was chemically separated from the wastes. These fuels were not intended for long-term storage. As the need for uranium and plutonium decreased, it became necessary to store the SNF for extended lengths of time. This necessity resulted from a 1992 DOE decision to discontinue reprocessing SNF to recover strategic materials (although limited processing of SNF to meet repository acceptance criteria remains under consideration, no plutonium or uranium extraction for other uses is planned). Both the facilities used for storage, and the fuel itself, began experiencing aging from this extended storage. New efforts are now necessary to assure suitable fuel and facility management until long-term decisions for spent fuel disposition are made and implemented. The Program Plan consists of 14 sections as follows: Sections 2--6 describe objectives, management, the work plan, the work breakdown structure, and the responsibility assignment matrix. Sections 7--9 describe the program summary schedules, site logic diagram, SNF Program resource and support requirements. Sections 10--14 present various supplemental management requirements and quality assurance guidelines.

  20. Planning the nuclear contribution to the Brazilian power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbalho, A. Rodrigues; Alves, R. Nazare; Pinto, C. Syllus M.; Souza Santos, T.D. de; Abrao, A.

    1977-01-01

    The thermo-electric power in Brazil accounts for less than 20% of the total generating capacity. Brazil's power is essentially generated hydraulically, which grants the growing development. The electric energy consumption keeps growing, with the annual average rate of 13%/year in the last five years. The present installed capacity is 20 000 MWe and the projections are: 35 000MWe, in 1980; 50 000 MWe in 1985; 75 000 MWe, in 1990 and 150 000 MWe, in 2 000. Most of the hydraulic resources are located in remote areas of the country, very far from the consumption centers. Under the agreement between the Federal Republic of Germany and Brazil (signed in June 1975), besides the nuclear power station, American made, under construction in Agra dos Reis, with a power capacity of 626 MWe, two more units, each one with 1 300 MWe capacity are to be erected at the same site, and planned to be in operation in 1982 and 1983. Several joint German-Brazilian companies will be established for reactor and fuel manufacture, in the country. The Brazilian state holding nuclear company, Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S/A., NUCLEBRAS, will participate in the formation of all joint companies with at least 51% of capital investments. The Brazilian Government will spend 10 billion dollars (U.S.), during the agreement's duration, to make its industry stronger, to develop its technology and to reduce its dependence on energy imports. Brazil's target: full independence in nuclear technology (including reactor manufacture and complete fuel cycle) in about 15 years [es

  1. Restless Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Wilson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to investigate how and why after a twelve-years period of stability Putinist social contract seemingly broke down and Russia stepped into a new period of uncertainty and crisis. The author underlines that, unwillingly, Medvedev’s presidency paved the way for the protests from the winter of 2011-2012 and fostered the regime’s crisis of legitimacy. Specifically, Medvedev’s relatively liberal rhetoric led to rising expectations among the ‘winners’ of first Putin-Medvedev era and to a growing gap between rhetoric and delivery. Moreover, the ‘Putin consensus’ was also fraying from below during the 2000s, given the population’s fading memory about the 1990s, flourishing of corruption, and migration becoming a hot issue in a booming economy and collapsing native demographics of Russian society. Finally, Putin made several crucial tactical mistakes in the run-up to the Duma elections of the 2011, failing to provide a coherent narrative for the elections, loosing some leading manipulators of the political system, and ousting some powerful regional bosses that ran powerful local machines which traditionally delivered the vote.

  2. Communication dated 12 March 2009 received from the Permanent Missions of China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States of America regarding a joint statement on Iran's nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 12 March 2009 from the Permanent Missions of China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, transmitting to the attention of all Member States of the IAEA a joint statement on Iran's nuclear programme, delivered at the March Board of Governors meeting. As requested in that communication, the attached statement is herewith circulated for the information of all Member States

  3. Use of natural materials from Northern Russia for the isolation of radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komlev, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The application of natural materials to the isolation of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel is being assessed, together with possible isolation technologies. The operational requirements for such materials are identified and a proposal for an inter-regional ecological and technological project is discussed. 39 refs

  4. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. FY 1979 project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    This document presents the management and cost for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (disposal of high-level wastes at Nevada Test Site) and provides a complete description of the overall project, management structure, technical approach, and work breakdown structure. The document is organized into five major sections. Section I summarizes the history of the project and indicates a potential future course of action. FY 1979 project work is briefly described in Section II. Section III outlines the delegated responsibilities of all project management functions. A list of critical questions that guide the technical approach of the project are presented in Section IV. Section V contains subtask work plans which outline the work in detail for this fiscal year

  5. Nuclear material control and accountancy planning and performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Enhinger; Dennis Wilkey; Rod Martin; Ken Byers; Brian Smith

    1999-01-01

    An overview of performance testing as used at U.S. Department of Energy facilities is provided. Performance tests are performed on specific aspects of the regulations or site policy. The key issues in establishing a performance testing program are: identifying what needs to be tested; determining how to test; establishing criteria to evaluate test results. The program elements of performance testing program consist of: planning; coordination; conduct; evaluation. A performance test may be conducted of personnel or equipment. The DOE orders for nuclear material control and accountancy are divided into three functional areas: program administration, material accounting, and material control. Examples performance tests may be conducted on program administration, accounting, measurement and measurement control, inventory, and containment [ru

  6. Energy and Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbeau, A.S.; Noel, P.; Finon, D.; Baudrand, D.; Zaki, M.; Chevallier, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Five issues are addressed concerning energy and Russia: energy perspectives in Russia (according to world energy outlook for 2011 and to Russia energy outlook), notably in terms of energy mix by 2035; the relationship between geopolitics and the gas market in Russia and for the European Union; the possibility of a European common foreign policy in front of a supposed Russian risk (involved actors, the issue of corridors); the refining industry in Russia (key figures, obstacles to its competitiveness improvement); and Total as a major company operating in Russia (context, projects). Questions concerning these issues are briefly answered

  7. Outage planning in nuclear power plants. A paradigm shift from an external towards an integrated project planning tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemann, Andreas [Gesellschaft fuer integrierte Systemplanung (GIS) mbH, Weinheim (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Latest demands on nuclear plant inspections are the ongoing actualisation of the outage plan on the basis of the current work progress and current events as well as the permanent access to the current planning status and work process of all people involved in the outage. Modern EAM systems (EAM: Enterprise Application Management) made up ground on established project planning tools with regard to functionalities for scheduling work orders. A shift towards an integrated planning in the EAM system increases the efficiency in the outage planning and improves the communication of current states of planning. (orig.)

  8. Outage planning in nuclear power plants. A paradigm shift from an external towards an integrated project planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Latest demands on nuclear plant inspections are the ongoing actualisation of the outage plan on the basis of the current work progress and current events as well as the permanent access to the current planning status and work process of all people involved in the outage. Modern EAM systems (EAM: Enterprise Application Management) made up ground on established project planning tools with regard to functionalities for scheduling work orders. A shift towards an integrated planning in the EAM system increases the efficiency in the outage planning and improves the communication of current states of planning. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear emergency response planning based on participatory decision analytic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.

    2004-10-01

    This work was undertaken in order to develop methods and techniques for evaluating systematically and comprehensively protective action strategies in the case of a nuclear or radiation emergency. This was done in a way that the concerns and issues of all key players related to decisions on protective actions could be aggregated into decision- making transparently and in an equal manner. An approach called facilitated workshop, based on the theory of Decision Analysis, was tailored and tested in the planning of actions to be taken. The work builds on case studies in which it was assumed that a hypothetical accident in a nuclear power plant had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore different types of protective actions should be considered. Altogether six workshops were organised in which all key players were represented, i.e., the authorities, expert organisations, industry and agricultural producers. The participants were those responsible for preparing advice or presenting matters for those responsible for the formal decision-making. Many preparatory meetings were held with various experts to prepare information for the workshops. It was considered essential that the set-up strictly follow the decision- making process to which the key players are accustomed. Key players or stakeholders comprise responsible administrators and organisations, politicians as well as representatives of the citizens affected and other persons who will and are likely to take part in decision-making in nuclear emergencies. The realistic nature and the disciplined process of a facilitated workshop and commitment to decision-making yielded up insight in many radiation protection issues. The objectives and attributes which are considered in a decision on protective actions were discussed in many occasions and were defined for different accident scenario to come. In the workshops intervention levels were derived according justification and optimisation

  10. Reducing radiation exposures at nuclear power plants using virtual job planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verzilov, Y.; Husain, A.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Dose Exposure Planning Tool (ADEPT) is an innovative solution for assisting nuclear station staff to effectively minimize worker dose during inspection and maintenance activities and to improve ALARA job planning. ADEPT combines visualization and simulation of the radioactive environment at a nuclear station to estimate worker dose. It allows users to walk through a virtual job plan and receive a live radiation dose estimate for the planned work. (author)

  11. Radionuclide therapy in Russia: Experience, problems, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyb, A.F.; Drozdovsky, B. Ya.; Garbuzov, P.I.

    2004-01-01

    effective, accessible and safe in future. At present the main work is to create tungsten-rhenium stationary generator of high activity, which can be used in large medical centers or other institutions to prepare and transport radiopharmaceuticals to radiological clinics. Russia has big stores of alpha-radioactive isotopes and the technology of isolating thorium-229 from uranium-233 is being worked out. The construction of 229Th/225Ac industrial generator and 225Ac/213Bi medical generator is under process. Biological and clinical trials of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with alpha-radioactive radionuclides are planned. Subsequent development in nuclear medicine in Russia is not only the research and introduction of new effective radiopharmaceuticals in clinical practice but also to improve the radio diagnostic equipment used in medical institutions and participation in international clinical/research trials. (author)

  12. Consultation and cooperation in NATO: nuclear planning, 1975-1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernoff, F.B.

    1987-01-01

    This study looks at three types of explanation of international cooperation, which deal in different ways with communication and consultation. Themost-general theoretical explanation contrasts recent realist theories, like those of Waltz and Gilpin, with Keohane's functional theory of regimes. Secondly, the study looks at theories of information flow and processing (an element of consultation) within the alliance, like those of Deutsch and Steinbruner. Such theories explain governmental behavior using concepts like equilibrium of systems and feedback loop. Third, the study considers hypotheses that deal specifically with NATO and military alliances. The hypotheses relate alliance consultation processes to the cooperativeness of the cases' outcomes. Evidence is drawn from case studies of NATO decision-making. The cases include politically sensitive deployment issues, like the enhanced radiation warhead controversy in 1977-78 and the intermediate-range nuclear force deployment decision in 1979, and important, but less politically volatile arms-control decisions, including the 1975 option three proposal, the French plan for a conference on disarmament in Europe, approved in 1980, and the 1987 American zero-zero proposal on short- and intermediate-range nuclear forces in Europe.

  13. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Quality Assurance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) were established by DOE/NV to evaluate the geohydrologic setting and underground rock masses of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and contiguous areas to determine whether a suitable site exists for constructing a repository for isolating highly radioactive solid wastes. Since the results of these evaluations will impact possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance program which conforms to the criteria given in the Code of Federal Regulations is needed to control the quality aspects of the work. This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) describes the general quality assurance program for the overall NNWSI project under which the quality assurance programs of the individual participating organizations and support contractors are to operate. The details of how each of these groups will meet the criteria will differ among participating organizations and support contractors, and those details are given in the QAPP's listed in Appendix A. It is the purpose of this plan to show the commonality of quality assurance programs in effect within the project and to define how each element fits into the entire picture to give total quality assurance coverage for the NNWSI Project

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  15. Teaching - learning plan on nuclear energy for elementary school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-03-01

    This is for teaching - learning curriculum about nuclear energy for elementary school students. It consist of four titles, which are I saved this much, learning energy through quiz, I work for nuclear power plant and would mayor build a nuclear power plant in our town? It was written to teach nuclear power plant and nuclear energy to elementary school students in easy way.

  16. Debt swapping as a tool for economic and social stabilization in Russia's closed nuclear cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JL Fuller; KM Leek

    2000-03-08

    The magnitude of Russian foreign debt, both official bilateral and commercial, compounded by collapse of the Russian economic system, is an obstacle in preventing the Russian Federation from effectively increasing the domestic priority of drawing down its nuclear weapons complex and providing a healthy, competitive environment to its nuclear cities. Debt-for-nature swaps, introduced in the early 1980s, provide debtor nations with a means of converting a portion of foreign debt into local currency, often at steep discounts, to use for purposes such as environmental protection that serve both a domestic and international need. This paper presents the debt-for-nature concept as a model for providing an infusion of funds to further U.S. and international nonproliferation objectives to help stabilize Russian closed city economic conditions through direct work on proliferation problems and remediation of the environment. A specific proposal is presented to demonstrate the utility and efficacy of the dept swap concept through initial collaboration with the city administration of Ozersk. The purpose of the proposal is to facilitate making Ozersk a safe, healthy competitive city, providing useful employment for its scientists and population and converting its superior infrastructure into productive activities.

  17. Focus on Russia. Russia versus Gazprom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdiyeva, N.

    2008-01-01

    Rising domestic demand and the depletion of traditional natural gas fields mean that Russia will have to make choices as to where to send its gas. But the priorities of Gazprom and the Russian government often conflict, a trend likely exacerbated by the deteriorating relationship between Russia and the West

  18. Sustainable land use planning at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.; Ridgway, R.B.; Baumann, P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The UK Department for International Development (DFID) has recently agreed to support a project to develop a participatory sustainable land use plan for areas affected by nuclear weapons testing at Semipalatinsk. This three year project is expected to be initiated in April 2001 and will form one component of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Semipalatinsk Rehabilitation Programme. The project will be undertaken by a combination of Kazakh organizations working with UK consultants and will meet its overall aim through the following main activities: Development of institutional capacity in data management and analysis; Provision of information and education on environmental contamination, hazards and risks; Development of a participatory land use planning process and piloting of the process in specific areas and communities around the test site; Integration of mineral resource extraction in the land planning process with a focus- on water resource and environmental protection and participatory approaches to resolving land use conflicts; Development of legislative tools to permit the implementation of environmental management of resource exploitation. The project will make use of both modern satellite-based imagery and more traditional methods to determine the potential for different land uses within the test site. The results obtained will be incorporated with additional information on land use. radiological and hydrological conditions at the test site through a geographical information system (GIS) provided by the project. The GIS will form the core component for collation and distribution of information on options available for use of different areas of the test site and its vicinity. A participatory rural appraisal, using tried and tested techniques, will identify local interest groups in land use planning and identify the details of their stake in the process. The groups will include owners-herders, employee-herders, and subsistence

  19. New aspects in the radiological emergency plan outside the Nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alva L, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Mexican government through the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards has imposed to the Federal Commission of Electricity to fulfill the requirement of having a functional Emergency Plan and under the limits that the regulator organisms in the world have proposed. The PERE (Plan of External Radiological Emergency) it has been created for the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde, Mexico

  20. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned in the Unites States as of June 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulden, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of June 30, 1981, which are capable of sustaining a nuclear chain reaction. Information is presented in five parts, each of which is categorized by primary function or pupose: civilian, military, production, export, and critical assembly facilities

  1. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned in the United States as of December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1980, which are capable of sustaining a nuclear chain reaction. Information is presented in five parts, each of which is categorized by primary function or purpose: civilian, military, production, export, and critical assembly facilities

  2. FY 1998 basic survey to promote the joint execution, etc. Overall repair plan of thermal power plants in Maritime Province of Russia; 1998 nendo kyodo jisshi nado suishin kiso chosa. Roshia Enkaishu ni okeru karyoku hatsudensho sogo kaishu keikaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For thermal power plants in Maritime Province of Russia, a repair plan for effective reduction of emission of greenhouse effect gas was worked out as a draft plan for the joint execution. The project is to be implemented for the additional installation/replacement of boilers at Vladivostok No. 2 power plant, construction of a power plant as a substitute for Partizansk power plant, and new construction of Ussuriisk power plant. The draft plan includes the new installation of two gas-fired boilers/replacement of existing boilers at Vladivostok No. 2 power plant, construction of 200MW cogeneration facility at Partizansk power plant, construction of 180MW cogeneration facility at Ussuriisk power plant, abolition of small-sized boiler station, etc. The reduction amount of the greenhouse effect gas emission based on this repair plan totaled 338 million tons in project. The effect against cost is US$ 4.75 per 1 CO2 ton at Vladivostok. (NEDO)

  3. Study on European Nuclear Safety Practices during Planned Outages at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The present project was aimed at providing: a description of the current status of nuclear safety practices during planned outages at nuclear power plants followed in Europe; the criteria for the safety analysis of future reactors at the design stage; proposing a set of recommendations on good practices and criteria leading to the improvement of nuclear safety during those conditions. The work was organised in 3 phases: Collecting data on current practices; Analysis of questionnaire answers and drawing up of safety good practices references and recommendations; Collecting relevant ideas related to the future reactors at design stage (European Pressurised Water Reactor, European Passive Plant project, European Utilities Requirements and Utilities Requirement Document project). The key element of the performed work was the detailed questionnaire, based on bibliographical review, expert experience and outage practices available in the working team. Different safety areas and activities were covered: outage context; nuclear safety; outage strategy, organisation and control; operating feedback; use of Probabilistic Safety Assessment. The questionnaire was answered by 12 European nuclear power plants, representing 9 different European countries and three different types of reactors (Pressurised Water Reactor, Boiling Water Reactor and Water Water Energy Reactor). Conclusions were drawn under the following headers: Organisational survey and generalities Organisational effectiveness Quality of maintenance Quality of operation Engineering support, management of modification Specific aspects Each analysed subject includes the following topics: Questions background with a summary and the aim of the questions. Current status, that describes common practices, as derived from the answers to the questionnaire, and some examples of good specific practices. Identified good practices. (author)

  4. Safety Evaluation Report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Revised Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The TVA Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan addresses those corporate concerns identified by the NRC staff. Because much of the TVA corporate plan is programmatic, its effectiveness depends on its implementation, and the NRC staff plans to closely monitor this implementation. The NRC staff will address site-specific concerns in subsequent SERs on each volume of the Nuclear Performance Plan. On the basis of its review, the NRC staff finds TVA's revised Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan (Revision 4) acceptable. The NRC staff concludes that the organization and staffing of TVA's Office of Nuclear Power and the programmatic improvements in place or under way are sufficient, if implemented properly, to resolve the problems at the corporate level that led to issuance of the 10 CFR 50.54(f) letter dated September 17, 1985, and to support continuing TVA nuclear activities, including plant operations. 19 refs., 3 figs

  5. A study on research and development planning of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Byung Chul; Kim, Y. J.; Hong, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    In this research planning, planning object is taken as 4 projects in nuclear safety field, 2 projects in reactor and nuclear fuel field, 2 projects in basic and fundamental field among 'Mid and Long-term Nuclear R and D Program'. These projects were all carried out by KAERI and their intermediate R and D phase is closed in 2001. Major planning contents in each project contains 1) R and D's necessity and aim, 2) Technological level and depth, 3) R and D's plan, 4) R and D's results application. The planning results are summarized as follows: - Development of risk management technology - Development of optimal severe accident management strategy and engineering safety features - Development of verification and assessment technology for thermal hydraulic safety - Technology development for enhancing component and structure integrity - Proliferation-resistant fuel technology development - Liquid metal reactor design technology development - Nuclear material technology development: characterization and improvement of nuclear materials - Development of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches

  6. Interesting tools for the cybersecurity plan of a nuclear power plant; Herramientas de utilidad para el plan de Ciberseguridad de una Planta Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareja, I.; Carrasco, J. A.; Cerro, F. J. del

    2012-07-01

    The use of digital technologies in monitoring and control systems of nuclear power plants and their connectivity requirements, originate cybersecurity difficulties that should be addressed in a cybersecurity plan. This plan should guide the policies and procedures followed during the design maintenance and operation of the systems inside a nuclear power plant. It also should refer to adequate tools able to reach the established cybersecurity requirements. The combination of Datadiodes and tools for publishing video (like tVGA2web), permit an isolation and remote maintenance in a 100% safety way and their use should be disseminated. In the paper other type of tools useful for nuclear power plants are also mentioned.

  7. Nuclear electric propulsion for planetary science missions: NASA technology program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, M.P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the status of technology program planning to develop those Nuclear Electric Propulsion technologies needed to meet the advanced propulsion system requirements for planetary science missions in the next century. The technology program planning is based upon technologies with significant development heritage: ion electric propulsion and the SP-100 space nuclear power technologies. Detailed plans are presented for the required ion electric propulsion technology development and demonstration. Closer coordination between space nuclear power and space electric propulsion technology programs is a necessity as technology plans are being further refined in light of NEP concept definition and possible early NEP flight activities

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  9. Using package MESSAGE for optimization studies of nuclear power structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, A.A.; Fedorova, E.V.; Korobejnikov, V.V.; Poplavskaya, E.V.; Rachkova, E.N.

    2010-01-01

    The results of optimization research of Russia nuclear power strategies, obtained for different assumptions concerning availability of natural uranium resources were presented. The ability of energy planning package MESSAGE (Model for Energy Supply Strategy Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts) application for elaborating breeding parameters requirements of fast sodium reactors and assessing the required scale of nuclear fuel cycle enterprises development was demonstrated [ru

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  12. Enterprise systems in Russia: 1992-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataev, Michael Yu; Bulysheva, Larisa A.; Emelyanenko, Alexander A.; Emelyanenko, Vladimir A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper introduces the enterprise systems (ES) development and implementation in Russia in the past three decades. Historic analysis shows that, in terms of time frame, the development of ACS (Automated Control Systems) in the former Soviet Union and the ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) in the West was almost parallel. In this paper, the current status and the major trend of ES in Russia is discussed.

  13. An Environmental Sector Plan for the nuclear industry in England and Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.; Fawcett, P.; Hunt, C.; Long, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Environment Agency is the principal environmental regulator in England and Wales. As part of its longer term strategic planning, it is developing 'Sector Plans' for the major industry sectors it regulates. The intent of Sector Plans is to promote improvement of the Industry's performance in order to deliver environmental benefit. One of the pilot Sector Plans developed has been for the nuclear sector. The Nuclear Sector Plan has been produced jointly with the nuclear industry as a rolling framework of agreed national environmental objectives and priorities. Operators of nuclear sites have agreed to use this framework as a basis in England and Wales for setting environmental performance targets, monitoring performance against the targets and publicly reporting on their performance. The paper describes the development of the Sector Plan, its content and further development. (Author) 3 refs

  14. Evaluating Russian Dual-Use Nuclear Exports

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bitterman, Blaine S

    2007-01-01

    ...; however, some of its actions contradict its rhetoric. Although Russia's violation of international agreements on nonproliferation is minimal, it is important to understand why Russia transfers nuclear technology...

  15. Cost estimation of sumatra electricity expansion planning with nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwaren Liun

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study is to obtain the cost analysis on optimum solution of Sumatra electricity system using WASP-IV Program. Considering the economic aspect, nuclear power plant (NPP) is feasible in the future. From the geographical aspect Sumatra is prospecting for NPP site, especially the east coastal area due to the absence of hydro power potential and geothermal field. The use of petroleum as fuel in large scale power plants is not feasible. Beside causing high cost for electricity sector, it is also an important fuel for any other sectors such as transportation, electrification of isolated areas. Gas fuelled power plants is still feasible for next several decades in limited capacity. The study presents three scenarios, i.e. Low Scenario, Base Scenario and High Scenario applying discount rate of 8%, 10% and 12% respectively. Cost estimation for Sumatra System Expansion Planning is 57 465 million US$ on the Base Scenario - discount rate 8%, 59 349 million US$ on the Base Scenario - discount rate 10%, and 57 796 million US$ on the Base Scenario - discount rate 12%. The objective function is 15 172 US$ on the Base Scenario - discount rate 8%, 12 663 million US$ on the Base Scenario - discount rate 10%, and 11 017 million US$ on the Base Scenario - discount rate 12%. (author)

  16. Plan of Nordic research in nuclear safety 1994-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    A new four-year Nordic research programme in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection is to start in 1994 as a followup of several preceding Nordic programmes. It will include seven projects and a joint coordination function. The programme is intended to sustain a common understanding among safety authorities in the Nordic countries with respect to reactor safety and radiation protection. It mainly deals with questions that are actual within the Nordic region, but it may also include problems of concern to its eastern neighbours. Two of the projects deal with reactor safety, and one with radioactive waste. The other four projects are on environmental aspects: two of them deal with radioecology, and two with questions related to emergency preparedness. The programme is managed by the Nordic Committee for Safety Research, NKS, consisting of representatives from regulatory authorities, research bodies, and industry. Basic financing is provided by one consortium member from each of the five Nordic countries, whereby an annual budget of approximately 8 million Danish Kroner will be provided. Additional financing comes from sponsors interested in the programme as well as from those organizations taking part in the project work. Definite project plans are to be elaborated within the more general frames described in the present outline. The flexibility of the programme is enhanced by limiting the duration of individual activities to one or two years. This will make it possible to adjust the programme to actual needs in the Nordic countries. (au)

  17. Nuclear power enterprise tax planning strategy in the background of reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yimin

    2012-01-01

    The success of tax planning can be converted into enterprise's productivity, tax planning strategy can maximize the desired effects and bring out its full play to tax planning. Taking new round of tax reform in 12th five-year-plan and the reformation of professional groups as the background, the author detailedly conceived a frame of corporate tax planning strategy for nuclear power enterprises of China National Nuclear Corporation at the forefront of reformation from an all-round comprehensive view and multi-angle stand. (author)

  18. The French governmental organisation and relief in France planning in case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizard, C.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of the unlikeliness of a nuclear accident, emergency planning is a must. It has several aspects: Internal Emergency PLan, Specific Intervention Plan, Post Accident and Relief specialized Plan. As a whole, the organisation is similar to the one used for others industrial risks. In a 'Department', the supervisor for overall emergency action is the 'Prefet', a high civil servant appointed by the Cabinet and responsible for nuclear security; all the other civil servants are under the Prefet's command and assist him. A national post-accident plan is being worked out; it will cover all the fields of intervention: control, administration of stable iodine, sheltering or evacuation. (author)

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R and D) Program is responsible for performing R and D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R and D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  1. Basic processes in nuclear forensics and analytical plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is the analysis of nuclear materials recovered from either the capture of unused materials, or from the radioactive debris following a nuclear explosion and can contribute significantly to the identification of the sources of the materials and the industrial processes used to obtain them. In the case of an explosion, nuclear forensics can also reconstruct key features of the nuclear device. Nuclear forensic analysis works best in conjunction with other law enforcement, radiological protection dosimetry, traditional forensics, and intelligence work to provide the basis for attributing the materials and/or nuclear device to its originators. Nuclear forensics is a piece of the overall attribution process, not a stand-alone activity

  2. The global threat reduction initiative's radiological security cooperation with Russia - 59361

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Tiffany A.; Abramson, William J.; Russell, James W. Jr.; Roberts, Catherine K.

    2012-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) / National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) supports both U.S. and international threat reduction goals by securing vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites throughout the world. GTRI's approach to reducing the threat posed by vulnerable, high-activity radioactive sources includes removing and disposing of orphan or disused radioactive sources; implementing physical security upgrades at civilian sites containing radioactive sources; and establishing a cooperative sustainability program at sites to ensure that upgrades are maintained. For many years GTRI has collaborated successfully with the Russian Federation and international partners to improve radiological security in Russia. This paper provides a synopsis of GTRI's accomplishments and cooperation with Russia in the following areas: 1.) recovering and disposing of orphan and disused radioactive sources, 2.) recovering and disposing of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), and 3.) providing physical security upgrades at civilian sites that contain vulnerable radiological material. The success of GTRI's program to secure radiological material in the Russian Federation over the past decade is due largely to the hard work, technical expertise, and tenacity of the U.S. laboratory teams and the Russian partner organizations with whom GTRI has worked. GTRI plans to continue building on this history of cooperation in order to recover and secure additional, vulnerable radioactive sources in locations throughout Russia. GTRI also is committed to sustainability efforts so that facilities in Russia receiving physical protection equipment and training are prepared to eventually assume responsibility for those security upgrades. In the years to come, GTRI will combine financial support with capacity building to enhance Russia's domestic programs to address these challenges. Through

  3. Support system development for evacuation plan decision in nuclear plant disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Masahiko; Takayama, Jun-ichi; Nakayama, Sho-ichiro; Ushiba, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    These days, our interest in nuclear plant accidents has increased, and civic actions for them have also been activated. Therefore, improvement of the disaster prevention planning to nuclear plant accidents is requested. In this study, we developed a microscopic traffic simulation system for evacuation plan near the nuclear plant as a system which supports to examine the disaster prevention planning, and applied the system to Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear plant area. Furthermore, the risk of each region near the nuclear plant disaster from the viewpoint of wind direction and the population was considered, the importance of each evacuation simulation was examined. As a result, we found that the present plan Kashiwazaki-Kariwa made has the problem on evacuation routes and others. (author)

  4. Comprehensive Plan for Public Confidence in Nuclear Regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwang Sik; Choi, Young Sung; Kim, Ho ki

    2008-01-01

    Public confidence in nuclear regulator has been discussed internationally. Public trust or confidence is needed for achieving regulatory goal of assuring nuclear safety to the level that is acceptable by the public or providing public ease for nuclear safety. In Korea, public ease or public confidence has been suggested as major policy goal in the 'Nuclear regulatory policy direction' annually announced. This paper reviews theory of trust, its definitions and defines nuclear safety regulation, elements of public trust or public confidence developed based on the study conducted so far. Public ease model developed and 10 measures for ensuring public confidence are also presented and future study directions are suggested

  5. IAEA Board of Governors approves IAEA action plan to combat nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA Board of Governors today approved in principal an action plan designed to upgrade worldwide protection against acts of terrorism involving nuclear and other radioactive materials. In approving the plan, the Board has recognized that the first line of defense against nuclear terrorism is the strong physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. 'National measures for protecting nuclear material and facilities are uneven in their substance and application,' the IAEA says. 'There is wide recognition that the international physical protection regime needs to be strengthened.'

  6. Workshop on IAEA Tools for Nuclear Energy System Assessment for Long-Term Planning and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop is to present to Member States tools and methods that are available from the IAEA in support of long-term energy planning and nuclear energy system assessments, both focusing on the sustainable development of nuclear energy. This includes tools devoted to energy system planning, indicators for sustainable energy development, the INPRO methodology for Nuclear Energy System Assessment (NESA) and tools for analysing nuclear fuel cycle material balance. The workshop also intends to obtain feedback from Member States on applying the tools, share experiences and lessons learned, and identify needs for IAEA support

  7. Planning of the development of the MMIS core technology based on nuclear-IT convergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Kim, Chang Hwoi; Hwang, In Koo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-01-15

    - Drive nuclear-IT convergence technologies such as middleware applied new concept nuclear instrumentation and control architecture, automated operation of future nuclear power plant, virtual reality/augmented reality, design and verification technology of a nuclear power plant main control room, software dependability, and cyber security technology - Write state-of-the-art report for the nuclear instrumentation and control based on IT convergence - A prototype which implemented related equipment and software subject to nuclear reactor operator that reside in the main control room (Reactor Operator, RO) order to a on-site operator (Local Operator, LO) and confirm the task performance matches the RO's intention - 'IT Convergence intelligent instrumentation and control technology' project planning for the Fourth Nuclear Power Research and Development in the long-term plan.

  8. Planning of the development of the MMIS core technology based on nuclear-IT convergence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Kim, Chang Hwoi; Hwang, In Koo

    2012-01-01

    - Drive nuclear-IT convergence technologies such as middleware applied new concept nuclear instrumentation and control architecture, automated operation of future nuclear power plant, virtual reality/augmented reality, design and verification technology of a nuclear power plant main control room, software dependability, and cyber security technology - Write state-of-the-art report for the nuclear instrumentation and control based on IT convergence - A prototype which implemented related equipment and software subject to nuclear reactor operator that reside in the main control room (Reactor Operator, RO) order to a on-site operator (Local Operator, LO) and confirm the task performance matches the RO's intention - 'IT Convergence intelligent instrumentation and control technology' project planning for the Fourth Nuclear Power Research and Development in the long-term plan

  9. Savannah River Site FY 1998 Spent Nuclear Fuel Interim Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    This document has been prepared to present in one place the near and long-term plans for safe management of Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel inventories until final disposition has been identified and implemented. The activities described are consistent with FY 1998 Annual Operational Plan guidance and with the December 1997 SRS Accelerated Cleanup Plan update. Summarized are highlights, key decision dates, and baseline assumptions of this plan

  10. Basic plan for nuclear power development and utilization in 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents specific measures to be carried out in 1987 to promote research, development and application of nuclear power. The first part deals with the strengthening of safety measures, centering on the improvement in regulation and administration for nuclear power safety; promotion of safety studies; improvement and strengthening of disaster prevention measures; improvement and strengthening of environmental activity surveys; improvement in exposure control measures for nuclear power operation workers; and establishment of the nuclear fuel cycle and safety in such activities as development of new reactors. The second part of the report addresses the promotion of nuclear power generation. Measures for this will be focused on the promotion of location of nuclear power plants and the development of advanced technology for light water reactors. The third part describes measures for establishing the nuclear fuel cycle, which cover the procurement of uranium resources; enrichment of uranium; reprocessing of spent fuel and utilization of plutonium and recovered uranium; and disposal of radioactive waste. Other parts presents measures to be carried out for the development of new power reactors; research on nuclear fusion; development of nuclear powered vessels; application of radiations; improvement in the infrastructure for nuclear power development and utilization; etc. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Present state and long term planning on nuclear power plants in principal countries in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Junichi

    1978-01-01

    The situation of nuclear power stations and the long term planning in each major country in the world were summarized, but the situation is changing from time to time, therefore it is difficult to make the long term prediction. The advanced countries in terms of nuclear power established the long term plans to adopt nuclear power generation largely owing to the oil crisis, but thereafter the revision was carried out again and again in respective countries. The developing countries already started the operation of nuclear power generation occupy only 2 to 3% of the total installed capacity in the world, but the countries constructing or planning nuclear power generation are many, and if the operation will be started as scheduled, their capacity will reach 30 million kW by 1985, and occupy about 10% of the total installed capacity of nuclear power generation in the world. As for the range of investigation of this report, the countries where the long term plans are unknown or the number of construction is small, Japan, Great Britain, USA and communist countries are excluded. As a rule, the light water reactors with power output of more than 200,000 kW are listed. The number of nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and in planning stage, national situation, long term plan, and others in each country are described. (Kako, I.)

  12. Decontamination and Decommissioning at Small Nuclear Facilities: Facilitating the Submission of Decommissioning Funding Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, D.A.; Grumbles, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the efforts of the Washington State Department of Health to ensure that small nuclear facilities have the tools each needs to submit Decommissioning Funding Plans. These Plans are required by both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and in some states - in the case of Washington state, the Washington State Department of Health is the regulator of radioactive materials. Unfortunately, the guidance documents provided by the U.S. NRC pertain to large nuclear facilities, such as nuclear fuel fabrication plants, not the small nuclear laboratory nor small nuclear laundry that may also be required to submit such Plans. These small facilities are required to submit Decommissioning Funding Plans by dint of their nuclear materials inventory, but have only a small staff, such as a Radiation Safety Officer and few authorized users. The Washington State Department of Health and Attenuation Environmental Company have been working on certain tools, such as templates and spreadsheets, that are intended to assist these small nuclear facilities prepare compliant Decommissioning Funding Plans with a minimum of experience and effort. (authors)

  13. The Planning, Licensing, Modifications, and Use of a Russian Vessel for Shipping Spent Nuclear Fuel by Sea in Support of the DOE RRRFR Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyacke, Michael; Bolshinsky, Igor; Tomczak, Wlodzimierz; Naletov, Sergey; Pichugin, Oleg

    2001-01-01

    The Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program, under the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, began returning Russian-supplied high-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), stored at Russian-designed research reactors throughout the world, to Russia in January 2006. During the first years of making HEU SNF shipments, it became clear that the modes of transportation needed to be expanded from highway and railroad to include sea and air to meet the extremely aggressive commitment of completing the first series of shipments by the end of 2010. The first shipment using sea transport was made in October 2008 and used a non-Russian flagged vessel. The Russian government reluctantly allowed a one-time use of the foreign-owned vessel into their highly secured seaport, with the understanding that any future shipments would be made using a vessel owned and operated by a Russian company. ASPOL-Baltic of St. Petersburg, Russia, owns and operates a small fleet of vessels and has a history of shipping nuclear materials. ASPOL-Baltic's vessels were licensed for shipping nuclear materials; however, they were not licensed to transport SNF materials. After a thorough review of ASPOL Baltic's capabilities and detailed negotiations, it was agreed that a contract would be let with ASPOL-Baltic to license and refit their MCL Trader vessel for hauling SNF in support of the RRRFR Program. This effort was funded through a contract between the RRRFR Program, Idaho National Laboratory, and Radioactive Waste Management Plant of Swierk, Poland. This paper discusses planning, Russian and international maritime regulations and requirements, Russian authorities reviews and approvals, licensing, design, and modifications made to the vessel in preparation for SNF shipments. A brief summary of actual shipments using this vessel, experiences, and lessons learned also are described.

  14. The Planning, Licensing, Modifications, and Use of a Russian Vessel for Shipping Spent Nuclear Fuel by Sea in Support of the DOE RRRFR Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Wlodzimierz Tomczak; Sergey Naletov; Oleg Pichugin

    2001-10-01

    The Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program, under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative, began returning Russian-supplied high-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), stored at Russian-designed research reactors throughout the world, to Russia in January 2006. During the first years of making HEU SNF shipments, it became clear that the modes of transportation needed to be expanded from highway and railroad to include sea and air to meet the extremely aggressive commitment of completing the first series of shipments by the end of 2010. The first shipment using sea transport was made in October 2008 and used a non-Russian flagged vessel. The Russian government reluctantly allowed a one-time use of the foreign-owned vessel into their highly secured seaport, with the understanding that any future shipments would be made using a vessel owned and operated by a Russian company. ASPOL-Baltic of St. Petersburg, Russia, owns and operates a small fleet of vessels and has a history of shipping nuclear materials. ASPOL-Baltic’s vessels were licensed for shipping nuclear materials; however, they were not licensed to transport SNF materials. After a thorough review of ASPOL Baltic’s capabilities and detailed negotiations, it was agreed that a contract would be let with ASPOL-Baltic to license and refit their MCL Trader vessel for hauling SNF in support of the RRRFR Program. This effort was funded through a contract between the RRRFR Program, Idaho National Laboratory, and Radioactive Waste Management Plant of Swierk, Poland. This paper discusses planning, Russian and international maritime regulations and requirements, Russian authorities’ reviews and approvals, licensing, design, and modifications made to the vessel in preparation for SNF shipments. A brief summary of actual shipments using this vessel, experiences, and lessons learned also are described.

  15. 27 September 1991-Royal Order establishing an emergency plan for nuclear risks on Belgian territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This emergency plan is to serve as guidance for the protection measures to be taken whenever necessary. It establishes the duties of the different services and bodies, in accordance with their responsibilities under the national laws and regulations. The plan, which describes the general organisation, must be supplemented by intervention plans at the different action levels: by the provincial authorities, the communal authorities and the various services and institutions concerned. This plan mainly concerns large nuclear installations and transport of nuclear fuels and radioactive materials; however, lower risks from other activities are also covered. (NEA)

  16. On-site emergency intervention plan for nuclear accident situation at SCN-Pitesti TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, S.; Oprea, I.

    2008-01-01

    A 14 MW TRIGA research reactor is operated on the Institute for Nuclear Research site. In the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency that may affect the public the effectiveness of protective actions depends on the adequacy of intervention plans prepared in advance. Considerable planning is necessary to reduce to manageable levels the types of decisions leading to effective responses to protect the public in such an event. The essential structures of our on-site, off-site and county emergency intervention plan and the correlation between emergency intervention plans are presented. (authors)

  17. Nuclear electric propulsion for planetary science missions: NASA technology program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the status of technology program planning to achieve readiness of Nuclear Electric Propulsion technologies needed to meet the advanced propulsion system requirements for planetary science missions in the next century. The technology program planning is based upon technologies of significant maturity: ion electric propulsion and the SP-100 space nulcear power technologies. Detailed plans are presented herein for the required ion electric propulsion technology development and demonstration. Closer coordination between space nuclear power and space electric propulsion technology programs is a necessity as technology plans are being further refined in light of NEP concept definition and possible early NEP flight activities

  18. Russia And East Asia: New Opportunities And Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Kireeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on major dimensions, achievements, challenges and prospects of relations between Russia and East Asia. Strategic importance of the region is shaped by East Asia's increasing role in world politics and economy as well as by its appeal for Russia's modernization agenda. Russia's great power status rests upon the effectiveness of its East Asian policy and development model of Siberia and the Russian Far East. Russia's positions in East Asia have improved substantially over the 2000s. However, its involvement in regional economic interaction is still insignificant and Russia cannot be regarded as a full-fledged regional player in this domain. Russian-Chinese strategic partnership has been the axis of Russia's East Asian foreign policy, though overdependence on China threatens Russia's independent policy in the region and encourages Russia to search for ways to diversify its ties. Russia's national interests reside in multivector policy, aimed at developing substantive relations not only with China but also with Japan, South Korea, ASEAN (Vietnam in the first place and India along with Russia's involvement in the resolution of Korean nuclear crisis. The rise of China and the US counter-offensive have resulted in a changing strategic environment in East Asia. A need for balancing between the US and China has brought about ASEAN countries' desire to welcome Russia as a "balancer" or an "honest player" in the region. It corresponds with Russia's course on playing a greater role in regional cooperation and integration. Russia's improving ties in political, economic, energy and security dimensions have the potential to contribute to the stability of the emerging polycentric regional order in East Asia and development of Russia's regions of Siberia and the Far East.

  19. RUSSIA AND EAST ASIA: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Kireeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on major dimensions, achievements, challenges and prospects of relations between Russia and East Asia. Strategic importance of the region is shaped by East Asia's increasing role in world politics and economy as well as by its appeal for Russia's modernization agenda. Russia's great power status rests upon the effectiveness of its East Asian policy and development model of Siberia and the Russian Far East. Russia's positions in East Asia have improved substantially over the 2000s. However, its involvement in regional economic interaction is still insignificant and Russia cannot be regarded as a full-fledged regional player in this domain. Russian-Chinese strategic partnership has been the axis of Russia's East Asian foreign policy, though overdependence on China threatens Russia's independent policy in the region and encourages Russia to search for ways to diversify its ties. Russia's national interests reside in multivector policy, aimed at developing substantive relations not only with China but also with Japan, South Korea, ASEAN (Vietnam in the first place and India along with Russia's involvement in the resolution of Korean nuclear crisis. The rise of China and the US counter-offensive have resulted in a changing strategic environment in East Asia. A need for balancing between the US and China has brought about ASEAN countries' desire to welcome Russia as a "balancer" or an "honest player" in the region. It corresponds with Russia's course on playing a greater role in regional cooperation and integration. Russia's improving ties in political, economic, energy and security dimensions have the potential to contribute to the stability of the emerging polycentric regional order in East Asia and development of Russia's regions of Siberia and the Far East.

  20. Status, plans, and capabilities of the Nuclear Criticality Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS), in preparation since 1981, has substantially evolved and now contains a growing number of resources pertinent to nuclear criticality safety. These resources include bibliographic compilations, experimental data, communications media, and the International Directory of Nuclear Criticality Safety Personnel. These resources are part of the LLNL Technology Information System (TIS) which provides the host computer for NCIS. The TIS provides nationwide access to authorized members of the nuclear criticality community via interactive dial-up from computer terminals that utilize communication facilities such as commercial and federal telephone networks, toll-free WATS lines, TYMNET, and the ARPANET/MILNET computer network

  1. Status and future plan of nuclear data activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Soo-Youl; Chang, Jonghwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    It was reviewed the nuclear data related activities in Korea, and was explained a 15-year term nation-wide R and D project that had been launched at 1996. The experiences up to now show, as a whole, that the nuclear data field in Korea is in the early stage. Through the long term project, however, it is expected that a firm foundation be established. Then it would be possible to contribute actively to the international nuclear data community as well as to meet domestic requests for nuclear data. Also it was pointed out the necessity of the international collaboration such as consultings and co-works. (author)

  2. Nuclear reactors: built, being built, or planned in the United States as of Dec 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    Information is tabulated in nuclear reactor and critical assembly facilities in operation, shut down, under construction, or planned. The data include name, owner, location, type, power, and startup date

  3. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned in the United States as of June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulden, A.M.

    1980-12-01

    Information is tabulated on nuclear reactor and critical assembly facilities in operation, shut down, under construction, or planned. The data included name, owner, location, type, power, and startup date

  4. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of nuclear power reactor security plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This guidance document contains acceptance criteria to be used in the NRC license review process. It contains specific criteria for use in evaluating the acceptability of nuclear power reactor security programs as detailed in security plans

  5. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station five-year business plan and operating results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shanming

    2000-01-01

    Guangdong Nuclear Power Joint Venture Company, Ltd. first 5-Year Business Plan (hereinafter referred to as 5-Year Business Plan) serves as guidance of both the operations and management of the company. Continuous performance improvement of the nuclear power station has been achieved through the fulfillment of goals and improvement plan defined by the 5-Year Business Plan, and through standard and systematic management. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) has made great contributions to sustainable economic developments of both Guangdong and Hong Kong since its commercial operation in 1994. As of the end of 1999, the cumulative off-take electricity generated by GNPS had reached 69.9 billion kWh. Of the WANO indicators universally applied by nuclear power industry throughout the world, 6 indicators of Daya Bay performance entered the world top quartile while 9 the medium level

  6. Preparation, review, and approval of implementation plans for nuclear safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This standard describes an acceptable method to prepare, review, and approve implementation plans for DOE Nuclear Safety requirements. DOE requirements are identified in DOE Rules, Orders, Notices, Immediate Action Directives, and Manuals

  7. Overview Of Planning Direction Of Nuclear Power Development In Vietnam In The Period Up To 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ta Van Huong; Tran Hong Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Research for peaceful application of nuclear energy, in general, and in particular, for construction of nuclear power plants (NPP) in Vietnam is urgent for social-economic development and for meeting the increasing national electrical demand in future. The expected plan for developing NPPs in Vietnam is defined in the Planning Direction of Nuclear Power Development in Vietnam in the period up to 2030. In according to which, NPPs have been planned in selected sites by the period depends on the detailed conditions of each site, as well as on specification of the national electrical grid. The present report reviews the highlights of this Planning Direction of Nuclear Power Development in Vietnam in the period up to 2030. (author)

  8. Prevent, Counter, and Respond - A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats (FY 2016-FY2020)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    NNSA’s second core mission is reducing global nuclear dangers by preventing the acquisition of nuclear weapons or weapons-usable materials, countering efforts to acquire such weapons or materials, and responding to nuclear or radiological incidents. In 2015, NNSA reorganized its nonproliferation activities based on core competencies and realigned its counterterrorism and counterproliferation functions to more efficiently address both current and emerging threats and challenges. The reorganization accompanied the March 2015 release of the first ever Prevent, Counter, and Respond – A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats. This report, which NNSA will update annually, highlights key nuclear threat trends and describes NNSA’s integrated threat reduction strategy.

  9. Spent nuclear fuel project quality assurance program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    This main body of this document describes how the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120 are met by the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project through implementation of WHC-SP-1131. Appendix A describes how the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P are met by the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project through implementation of specific policies, manuals, and procedures

  10. Review of the proposed Strategic National Plan for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Development: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    On August 9, 1985, the Secretary of Energy requested that the Chairman of the Energy Research Advisory Board establish an ad-hoc Panel to review a draft ''Strategic National Plan for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Development.'' The resulting report, approved by the Board, contains suggestions for improving the draft plan and also contains major recommendations for alleviating the several institutional barriers that appear to preclude the construction of any new nuclear power plants in this country

  11. Minimum dose method for walking-path planning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yong-kuo; Li, Meng-kun; Xie, Chun-li; Peng, Min-jun; Wang, Shuang-yu; Chao, Nan; Liu, Zhong-kun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • For radiation environment, the environment model is proposed. • For the least dose walking path problem, a path-planning method is designed. • The path-planning virtual–real mixed simulation program is developed. • The program can plan walking path and simulate. - Abstract: A minimum dose method based on staff walking road network model was proposed for the walking-path planning in nuclear facilities. A virtual–reality simulation program was developed using C# programming language and Direct X engine. The simulation program was used in simulations dealing with virtual nuclear facilities. Simulation results indicated that the walking-path planning method was effective in providing safety for people walking in nuclear facilities

  12. Outage planning in nuclear power plants. A paradigm shift from an external towards an integrated project planning tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemann, Andreas [Gesellschaft fuer integrierte Systemplanung (GiS) mbH, Weinheim (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    In nuclear power plants it is common to carry out the technical planning of the annual outage work orders in an Enterprise Application Management (EAM) system and to schedule the outage tasks in a project planning tool. The reason for this is historical: Former EAM systems did not (or just to some extend) offer the necessary functionalities to realise the scheduling of the outage; graphical support for the planning was not provided at all. Consequently, scheduling the annual outage was performed in a separate planning tool. Modern Enterprise Application Management (EAM) software builds on established project planning tools with respect to the functionalities and timing of work orders. As a standard they provide editable charts as well as a lot of functionalities which are required for scheduling the annual outage. The functional gap between the demanded planning functionalities and the functionalities provided by the EAM system has been significantly reduced. Depending on the deployed software itself it is possible to extend the EAM system with little effort (in comparison to the promising advantages) so that external project timing planning tools are not required any more. By shifting towards an integrated planning tool, efficiency in planning an outage as well as the quality of communication of the current planning status increases. Furthermore, the basis of information for work orders by the control room staff and therefore safety can be enhanced. (orig.)

  13. Outage planning in nuclear power plants. A paradigm shift from an external towards an integrated project planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In nuclear power plants it is common to carry out the technical planning of the annual outage work orders in an Enterprise Application Management (EAM) system and to schedule the outage tasks in a project planning tool. The reason for this is historical: Former EAM systems did not (or just to some extend) offer the necessary functionalities to realise the scheduling of the outage; graphical support for the planning was not provided at all. Consequently, scheduling the annual outage was performed in a separate planning tool. Modern Enterprise Application Management (EAM) software builds on established project planning tools with respect to the functionalities and timing of work orders. As a standard they provide editable charts as well as a lot of functionalities which are required for scheduling the annual outage. The functional gap between the demanded planning functionalities and the functionalities provided by the EAM system has been significantly reduced. Depending on the deployed software itself it is possible to extend the EAM system with little effort (in comparison to the promising advantages) so that external project timing planning tools are not required any more. By shifting towards an integrated planning tool, efficiency in planning an outage as well as the quality of communication of the current planning status increases. Furthermore, the basis of information for work orders by the control room staff and therefore safety can be enhanced. (orig.)

  14. Savannah River Site nuclear materials management plan FY 2017-2031

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magoulas, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-22

    The purpose of the Nuclear Materials Management Plan (herein referred to as “this Plan”) is to integrate and document the activities required to disposition the legacy and/or surplus Enriched Uranium (EU) and Plutonium (Pu) and other nuclear materials already stored or anticipated to be received by facilities at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as well as the activities to support the DOE Tritium mission. It establishes a planning basis for EU and Pu processing operations in Environmental Management Operations (EMO) facilities through the end of their program missions and for the tritium through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Defense Programs (DP) facilities. Its development is a joint effort among the Department of Energy - Savannah River (DOE-SR), DOE – Environmental Management (EM), NNSA Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3), NNSA Savannah River Field Office (SRFO), and the Management and Operations (M&O) contractor, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS). Life-cycle program planning for Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Disposition and the Tritium Enterprise may use this Plan as a basis for the development of the nuclear materials disposition scope and schedule. This Plan assumes full funding to accomplish the required project and operations activities. It is recognized that some aspects of this Plan are pre decisional with regard to National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); in such cases new NEPA actions will be required.

  15. Human metabolism and ecological transfer of radioactive caesium. Comparative studies of Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout, in southern Sweden and in Bryansk, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeaef, C.L.

    2000-05-01

    The whole-body content of radiocaesium was measured in a South Swedish urban group of people residing in the city of Lund between 1960 and 1994. The results from the survey have been analysed in order to estimate the ecological half time, T eff,eco of fallout radiocaesium, and the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man in the region. After 1987, the biological half times, T e of 137 Cs and 40 K in man were also determined in the reference group through whole-body content measurements in combination with 24-hour urine sampling. Relationships between 24-hour urinary excretion and body burden of 137 Cs in the group together with data from the literature were then applied to urine samples collected in 1994 and 1995 from adult subjects living in the highly contaminated region of Bryansk, Russia, in order to estimate their average body burden of 137 Cs. The equivalent biological half-time for 137 Cs in females of the Lund reference group was, on average 66±3 d, which agrees with other findings, whereas the value for the males, 81±4 d, was, on average, significantly lower than what is found in the literature. This is partly explained by the elevated mean age and relatively low mean body muscle mass of the males investigated. The 137 Cs from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s still gave a significant contribution to the total 137 Cs levels in man during the post-Chernobyl study period (1987-1994). About 10% of the peak post-Chernobyl concentration level of 137 Cs (3.5-4 Bq/kg) in 1987, was attributed to pre-Chernobyl 137 Cs. The effective ecological half-time for 137 Cs from Chernobyl was found to be 1.8±0.2 y. The time-integrated aggregate transfer of 137 Cs from ground deposition to mean activity concentration in man was estimated to be 0.4 Bq/kg/kBq/m 2 . These values may be compared with an effective ecological half-time of 1.3 years found in the Lund reference group in the 1960s, and in time-integrated aggregate transfer factor of 4.4 Bq

  16. 78 FR 49726 - International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Finance/Regulatory/Energy Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ..., (2) government commitment and support, and (3) a sound business plan. This workshop will be designed... power purchase agreements, are playing today in the financing of nuclear power projects in emerging... opportunity to network, build relationships in the global civil nuclear sector and learn more about current...

  17. Program plan for US Department of Energy support for nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the plan developed to address the growing concern for the continued deterioration of nuclear engineering education in the United States and its ability to meet the manpower demands for this Nation's work force requiring nuclear related talent in the foreseeable future

  18. Lenin nuclear reactor research institute in the tenth five-year plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsykanov, V.A.; Kulov, E.V.

    1980-01-01

    Main tasks and research results of Lenin Nuclear Reactor Reseach Institute in the 10-th Five-Year Plan are considered. Main research achievements are noted in nuclear power, radiation material testing, accumulation of transuranium elements and investigation of their physicochemical properties at VK-50, BOR-60, SM-2, RBT-6 and MIR reactor plants and in material testing laboratories

  19. Development of Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan for 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Sung; Kim, Woong Sik; Park, Dong Keuk; Kim, Ho Ki

    2006-01-01

    The Article 8-2 of Atomic Energy Act requires the government to establish Atomic Energy Promotion Plan every five years. It sets out national nuclear energy policies in a systematic and consistent way. The plan presents the goals and basic directions of national nuclear energy policies on the basis of current status and prospects. Both areas of utilization and safety management of nuclear energy are included and various projects and schedules are delineated based on the national policy directions. The safety management area in this plan deals with the overall safety and regulation policy. Its detail projects and schedule should be developed in separate plans by responsible ministries under the mediation of the MOST. As a regulatory authority, MOST is responsible for safety management area and its technical support organization, KINS has developed Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan as an implementation plan of safety area. This paper presents the development process and specific projects contained in the Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan which is under development now

  20. Which Russia, twenty years later?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Claudín

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Russia is proud of its position among the emerging powers, of the strength provided by its ample energetic resources and its nuclear potential with which it can influence the world and always be taken into account. Nevertheless, the perception within the country is that stagnation has become Russia’s dominant characteristic at present. The objective of this article is to explore how this situation came about, analysing the evolution of domestic processes in Russia during both of its most defining periods: Yeltsin and Putin’s leadership, since the ephemeral presidency of Medvedev proved to be basically a continuation of the latter. During the eight years of Boris Yeltsin’s tenure, the state of crisis, latent or open, developed into the way that political processes are carried out in Russia. With Putin’s arrival, however, stability and State control are imposed, against the backdrop of economic growth, and they become values in themselves, far from the democratic discourse of the first years.

  1. RUSSIA DOESN’T SUPPORT «SHALE REVOLUTION»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Zhiltsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth of volumes of production of shale gas in the USA compelled Russia to pay attention to this type of resourses. The interest to shale gas in Russia was limited to discussions at the level of experts and reflection of importance of this problem in statements of politicians. In the next years in Russia don't plan production of shale gas commercially. It is connected with existence in Russia of considerable reserves of traditional natural gas, absence of exact data of reserves of shale gas, high costs of production, and also environmental risks which accompany development of fields of shale gas.

  2. Development of in-service inspection plans for nuclear components at the Surry 1 nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, T.V.; Simonen, F.A.; Doctor, S.R.; Smith, B.W.; Gore, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the nondestructive evaluation reliability program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, a methodology has been developed for establishing in-service inspection priorities of nuclear power plant components. The method uses results of probabilistic risk assessment in conjunction with the techniques of failure modes and effects analysis to identify and prioritize the most risk-important systems and components for inspection at nuclear power plants. Surry nuclear power station unit 1 was selected for demonstrating the methodology. The specific systems selected for analysis were the reactor pressure vessel, the reactor coolant, the low pressure injection including the accumulators, and the auxiliary feedwater. The results provide a risk-based ranking of components that can be used to establish a prioritization of the components and a basis for developing improved in-service inspection plans at nuclear power plants

  3. Russia skyshine experiment analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubosaka, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kawabe, Toshiaki [The Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ueki, Kohtaro [National Maritime Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    Experimental studies of neutron and gamma-radiation skyshine at nuclear reactor are proceeding in cooperation with Russia, Kazakhstan and Japan as a project of international science technology center (ISTC). Fast neutron streaming from the vertical experimental hole of IVG.1M reactor which has a cylindrical core are analyzed by a monte carlo n-particle transport code (MCNP) with variance reduction methods, in which a weight window method and a cell importance method can be selected. Calculation results on radial distribution of fast neutron flux at 100 cm above the reactor is compared with the experimental values. The calculated values of neutron flux by using the cell importance method, however, is very different from the experimental values at close distance of 10 cm from the center. Skyshine analysis of neutron radiation streaming from the reactor are also carried out by the equivalent source model in which a point source and the detectors are located at 10 cm and 1 m above the ground, respectively. The calculated values of total neutron flux distribution are very close to the experimental values. The effects of the air composition on neutron flux calculation are also investigated. (M. Suetake)

  4. SCWR Concept in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    An increase in the efficiency of NPPs with light-water reactors through ‘nuclear’ steam superheating was one of the problems solved in the field of nuclear power industry. The commissioning of the Beloyarsk NPP, Units 1&2 with the channel-type reactor in the sixties of the 20th century showed the potential of realization of this idea and the necessity to solve a series of problems in technology and materials science. The NPP operation experience, elaboration and operational experience of steam superheating channels are extremely important in choosing the ways of design development of Generation IV reactors with supercritical pressure coolant water. The first technical proposal on a supercritical water cooled reactor of vessel type made in Russia in 1986 was the design of a two-circuit reactor plant (RP). The concept of the two-circuit RP of integrated type VVER-SCP-I with electric power of 500 MW was proposed in 1990. The design activities on these projects were performed at OKB GIDROPRESS and the analyses were carried out at the RRC Kurchatov Institute. The State Science Center of the Russian Federation Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF IPPE) has been performing the computational studies of a single-circuit RP VVER-SCP since 2001. In 2006 OKB GIDROPRESS launched the design effort and computational analyses to corroborate the design of a single loop RP.

  5. Plans to expand nuclear power production in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The Finnish Government made in January 2002 a Decision in Principle which concludes that constructing of a new nuclear power plant in Finland is in line with the overall good of the society. The Finnish Parliament ratified the decision in May 2002. Based on this decision, the electricity generating company TVO is authorised to continue preparations for the construction of a new nuclear power plant unit

  6. Development of NPP safety regulation in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevsky, Y.G.; Gutsalov, A.T.; Bukrinsky, A.M.; Gordon, B.G.

    1999-01-01

    The presentation describes the organisation scheme of Russian safety regulatory bodies, their tasks and responsibilities. Legislative and regulatory basis of NPP safety regulations rely on the federal laws: Law on the Use of Nuclear Energy and Law on Radiation Safety of the Population. Role of international cooperation and Improvement of regulatory activities in Russia are emphasised

  7. Planning for off-site response to radiation accidents in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to give guidance to those who are responsible for the protection of the public in the event of an accident occurring at a land-based nuclear facility. This guidance should assist in the advance preparation of emergency response plans and implementing procedures. Basic principles of protective measures along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Other principles related to emergency planning and the operational response to an emergency are outlined. Although the guidance is primarily oriented towards land-based nuclear power facilities, the guidance does have general application to other types of nuclear facility

  8. Documentation of a Model Action Plan to Deter Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D; Kristo, M; Niemeyer, S; Dudder, G

    2006-01-01

    Theft, illegal possession, smuggling, or attempted unauthorized sale of nuclear and radiological materials remains a worldwide problem. The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) has adopted a model action plan to guide investigation of these cases through a systematic approach to nuclear forensics. The model action plan was recently documented and provides recommendations concerning incident response, collection of evidence in conformance with required legal standards, laboratory sampling and distribution of samples, radioactive materials analysis, including categorization and characterization of samples, forensics analysis of conventional evidence, and case development including interpretation of forensic signatures

  9. Plans for a reduction of the radiation exposure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobschuetz, P. von; Herrmann, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    In order to reduce the radiation exposure of the personnel engaged in maintenance and repair jobs in future nuclear installations a study has been carried out to investigate whether planning new facilities on the basis of models could open up possibilities to improve the radiological protection of workers. It has been found that planning, construction, operation and dismantling of nuclear facilities can be carried out much more effectively on the basis of three-dimensional models than by mere two-dimensional drawings. However, it is necessary to align the sizes of the models and their details to the needs of nuclear technology. (orig.) [de

  10. Documentation of a model action plan to deter illicit nuclear trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.; Kristo, M.J.; Niemeyer, S.; Dudder, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    Theft, illegal possession, smuggling, or attempted unauthorized sale of nuclear and radiological materials remains a worldwide problem. The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) has adopted a model action plan to guide investigation of these cases through a systematic approach to nuclear forensics. The model action plan was recently documented and provides recommendations concerning incident response, collection of evidence in conformance with required legal standards, laboratory sampling and distribution of samples, radioactive materials analysis, including categorization and characterization of samples, forensics analysis of conventional evidence, and case development including interpretation of forensic signatures. (author)

  11. A study on the planning for the research and development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Byong Chull; Won, B. C.; Bang, J. K.; Jung, Y. H.; Kim, M. R.; Cho, C. Y.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. U.; Yeo, J. W.; Hong, Y. P.; Kim, I. C.; Rha, K. H.; Yoon, Y. S.; Park, J. H.; Ko, Y. S.; Kim, S. S.; Kang, W. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Shim, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    This study has performed aiming to provide the government with the basic input to establish 'the comprehensive promotion plan for utilization, research and development of nuclear energy' and 'the mid- and long-term nuclear research and development program', thus the government set it up as a national plan after endorsement of Atomic Energy Commission. Next, the feasibility study of the proton accelerators construction which is expected to use for nuclear research and development and industry. And a systematic and integrated research and development management system for the large-scale projects has been studied considering the inherent uncertainty and high risk of research and development. (author). 24 tabs., 6 figs

  12. A plan for research by the atmospheric research section in support of Ontario Hydro's nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogram, G.L.; Melo, O.T.

    1984-01-01

    A plan for nuclear studies by the Atmospheric Research Section is presented. The need for research is discussed and research objectives are established. Recommended research activities include the study of fundamental processes governing the fate of emissions released to the atmosphere by Hydro's nuclear facilities and the development of improved transport models describing the fate of these emissions. A Sectional goal of providing technical expertise in the atmospheric sciences in support of Ontario Hydro's present and future nuclear activities is proposed. The plan covers a five-year time frame (1984-1988)

  13. Chemical and nuclear emergencies: Interchanging lessons learned from planning and accident experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, V.; Sorensen, J.H.; Rogers, G.O.

    1989-01-01

    Because the goal of emergency preparedness for both chemical and nuclear hazards is to reduce human exposure to hazardous materials, this paper examines the interchange of lessons learned from emergency planning and accident experience in both industries. While the concerns are slightly different, sufficient similarity is found for each to draw implications from the others experience. Principally the chemical industry can learn from the dominant planning experience associated with nuclear power plants, while the nuclear industry can chiefly learn from the chemical industry's accident experience. 23 refs

  14. Planning for off-site response to radiation accidents in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to give guidance to those who are responsible for the protection of the public in the event of an accident occurring at a land-based nuclear facility. This guidance should assist in the advance preparation of emergency response plans and implementing procedures. Basic principles of protective measures along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Other principles related to emergency planning and the operational response to an emergency are outlined. Although the guidance is primarily oriented toward land-based nuclear power facilities, the guidance does have general application to other types of nuclear facilities

  15. Legislative framework on establishing emergency response plan in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Valcic, I.; Biscan, R.

    2000-01-01

    To give an overview of the legislative framework, which defined emergency planning in Croatia in the case of a nuclear accident, it's necessary to look at all international recommendations and obligations and the national legislation, acts and regulations. It has to be emphasized that Croatia signed three international conventions in this field, and by that took over some responsibilities and obligations. Beside that, it is also in Croatian interest to follow the recommendations of international institutions such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA standards and technical documents). On the other hand, national legislation in this field consists of several laws, which cover nuclear safety measures, governmental organization, natural disasters and acts (decree, decisions) of responsible authority for emergency planning in the case of a nuclear accident (Ministry of Economy). This paper presents an overview of the international and Croatian legislation which influenced the emergency planning in the case of a nuclear accident. (author)

  16. Non-nucleon degrees of freedom in nuclei and ABC plan for developing fundamental nuclear theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiren

    1996-01-01

    We emphasize that to develop a fundamental nuclear theory one has to consider various non-nucleon degrees of freedom in nuclei and to make the theory relativistic. A three step ABC Plan for this purpose is proposed. The A pan is to reform the relativistic hadron field theory by taking the finite baryon size into account. We call finite size baryons atoms in contrast with points. The fundamental nuclear theory in this form is therefore a quantum atom dynamics (QAD). The B plan is to reform the bag model for hadrons by making it be quantum bag dynamics (QBD). This is a model fundamental nuclear theory on the quark level. The fundamental nuclear theory should eventually be developed on the basis of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This is the C Plan

  17. Preliminary plan for decommissioning - repository for spent nuclear fuel; Preliminaer plan foer avveckling - slutfoervar foer anvaent kaernbraensle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallberg, Bengt; Tiberg, Liselotte (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    The final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel is part of the KBS-3 system, which also consists of a central facility for interim storage and encapsulation of the spent nuclear fuel and a transport system. The nuclear fuel repository will be a nuclear facility. Regulation SSMFS 2008:1 (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority's regulations on safety of nuclear facilities) requires that the licensee must have a current decommissioning plan throughout the facility lifecycle. Before the facility is constructed, a preliminary decommissioning plan should be reported to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority. This document is a preliminary decommissioning plan, and submitted as an attachment to SKB's application for a license under the Nuclear Activities Act to construct, own and operate the facility. The final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel consists of an above ground part and a below ground part and will be built near Forsmark and the final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR. The parts above and below ground are connected by a ramp and several shafts, e.g. for ventilation. The below ground part consists of a central area, and several landfill sites. The latter form the repository area. The sealed below ground part constitutes the final repository. The decommissioning is taking place after the main operation has ended, that is, when all spent nuclear fuel has been deposited and the deposition tunnels have been backfilled and plugged. The decommissioning involves sealing of the remaining parts of the below ground part and demolition of above ground part. When decommissioning begins, there will be no contamination in the facility. The demolition is therefore performed as for a conventional plant. Demolition waste is sorted and recycled whenever possible or placed in landfill. Hazardous waste is managed in accordance with current regulations. A ground investigation is performed and is the basis for after-treatment of the site. The timetable

  18. Political crisis poses problems for nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitev, Lubomir [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-11-15

    The political crisis in Ukraine has given rise to several problematic issues for the nuclear industry, including the country's obvious dependence on Russia for nuclear fuel supplies and the transport of nuclear material. A 2013 report by the Polish Institute of International Affairs (PIIA) concluded that Ukraine will lean towards the development of ''intensive cooperation'' with Western nuclear regulators and companies as it seeks to increase its control over the sector and reduce its dependency on Russia. The PIIA report said the gas crises of 2006 and 2009, and especially the current destabilisation of the country, have highlighted Ukraine's ''excessive and problematic dependence'' on energy supply from Russia. The 'Energy Strategy of Ukraine Until 2030' assumes that the share of nuclear energy will remain the same in 2030 as it was in 2005 - about 50 % of the energy mix. To achieve its goals, Ukraine's strategy envisages several priority actions. Firstly, work should begin on identification of three or four sites for new nuclear stations. Secondly, the plan says that Khmelnistki-3 and -4 should be completed by 2016. Thirdly, the plan envisages six gigawatts of new nuclear capacity becoming operational between 2019 and 2021. Finally, lifetime extensions are planned for South Ukraine units 1 to 3, Zaporozhye units 1 to 6, Rovno units 2 and 3 and Khmelnitski-1.

  19. Relation between source term and emergency planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhongqi; Yang Ling

    1992-01-01

    Some background information of the severe accidents and source terms related to the nuclear power plant emergency planning are presented. The new source term information in NUREG-0956 and NUREG-1150, and possible changes in emergency planning requirements in U.S.A. are briefly provided. It is suggested that a principle is used in selecting source terms for establishing the emergency planning policy and a method is used in determining the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) size in China. Based on the research results of (1) EPZ size of PWR nuclear power plants being built in China, and (2) impact of reactor size and selected source terms on the EPZ size, it is concluded that the suggested principle and the method are suitable and feasible for PWR nuclear power plants in China

  20. Energetic dialog EU and Russia slows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirman, K.

    2004-01-01

    European Union maintains an individual dialog with Russia about cooperation in energy sphere since joint summit in Paris in October 2000. Both sides agreed there to create four export groups: for energy strategy, investments, infrastructure and technologies, efficiency and ecology. European Union expects that Russia will unequivocally take over the obligations by creation of suitable climate for investors. European Union considers as key preconditions the restructuring of the largest national monopoles. These conditions are also the important component of asking strategy of EU by the discussions about integration of Russia to WTO. One of the most important requests of Brussels is the restructuring of Gazprom concern, what means its division to mining and transport part. Russian part refuses all steps in this sphere. Author analyses the strategic interests of Russian government and of president Putin by planning and mining of oil and gas as like as by investments to the pipelines and gas lines. International Energetic Agency (IEA) assumes that the investments to oil and gas mining in Russia will be around 330 million USD till 2030. The similar situation is also in oil sector. More than half of huge oil deposits with the highest output are already mined. The oil mining in Russia reached 421 million tons in 2003. According to pessimistic estimations the gas mining will reach from 550 to 560 billion m 3 in the following decades, according to optimistic scenario it can reach up to 730 billion m 3 per year. In this case the netto export of oil from Russia could rise from present around 175 billion m 3 to 280 billion m 3 in 2030. IEA warns that these plans should be fulfilled only if massive foreign investments enter this sector. IEA also warns before concerns of investors about Russian legislation, property protection, cooperative regulation and transparentness of undertaking. Proposed pipelines among Russia, Near East, Africa and European Union are shown