WorldWideScience

Sample records for runoff leaching adsorption

  1. Accounting for the Impact of Impermeable Soil Layers on Pesticide Runoff and Leaching in a Landscape Vulnerability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A regional-scale model that estimates landscape vulnerability of pesticide leaching and runoff (solution and particle adsorbed) underestimated runoff vulnerability and overestimated leaching vulnerability compared to measured data when applied to a gently rolling landscape in northeast Missouri. Man...

  2. Removal of hydrocarbons from synthetic road runoff through adsorptive filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesting, Andreas; Heinz, Eva; Helmreich, Brigitte; Wichern, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Compact filter systems, which are installed to significantly reduce the load of pollutants from road runoff, are very promising treatments for urban runoff. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of activated carbon, activated lignite, zero valent iron, exfoliated graphite, amorphous ferric hydroxide, and activated alumina at removing petrol hydrocarbons from synthetic road runoff. Therefore, the kinetics and the equilibrium adsorption of petrol hydrocarbons onto these adsorbents were investigated using column adsorption experiments at levels ranging from 100 to 42 g L(-1). Of the tested adsorbents, exfoliated graphite is the most effective with a maximum adsorption capacity for petrol hydrocarbons of 3,850 mg g(-1). The experimental equilibrium data are fitted to the Freundlich and Langmuir models.

  3. [Characteristics of Adsorption Leaching and Influencing Factors of Dimethyl Phthalate in Purple Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Song, Jiao-yan; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Fa

    2016-02-15

    The typical soil-purple soil in Three Gorges Reservoir was the tested soil, the characteristics of adsorption leaching of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) in contaminated water by the soil, and the influencing factors in the process were conducted using soil column leaching experiment. The results showed that the parabolic equation was the best equation describing adsorption kinetics of DMP by soils. The concentration of DMP in the leaching solution had significant effect on the adsorption amounts of DMP. With the increasing concentration of DMP in the leaching solution, the adsorption capacities of DMP by purple soil increased linearly. The ionic strength and pH in leaching solution had significant effects on adsorption of DMP. On the whole, increasing of the ionic strength restrained the adsorption. The adsorption amounts at pH 5.0-7.0 were more than those under other pH condition. The addition of exogenous organic matter (OM) in purple soil increased the adsorption amount of DMP by purple soil. However, the adsorption amount was less than those with other addition amounts of exogenous OM when the addition of exogenous OM was too high (> or = 30 g x kg(-1)). The addition of surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (SDBS) in purple soil increased the adsorption amount of DMP by purple soil. The adsorption amount was maximal when the addition amount of SDBS was 50 mg x kg(-1). However, the adsorption amounts decreased with increasing addition amounts of SDBS although the adsorption amounts were still more than that of the control group, and the adsorption amount was almost equal to that of the control group when the addition amount of SDBS was 800 mg x kg(-1). Continuous leaching time affected the vertical distribution of DMP in the soil column. When the leaching time was shorter, the upper soil column adsorbed more DMP, while the DMP concentrations in upper and lower soil columns became similar with the extension of leaching time.

  4. Stormwater runoff mitigation and nutrient leaching from a green roof designed to attract native pollinating insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, S.; Grogan, D. S.; Hale, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    a rooftop? 2) How does this design compare with the performance of the extant Green Grid green roof system on the roof in regard to storm water runoff mitigation and nutrient leaching? and 3) Using GIS, can this information be scaled to a larger region (i.e. UNH campus, the NH Seacoast, NH cities, etc.) to determine areas of particular interest for pollinator conservation? Runoff mitigation, as a percentage of precipitation, is expected to be greater than that on the roof with proprietary substrate, though nutrient leaching may be greater as well due to the higher organic matter content. Paired with GIS data on NH ecoregions, these results will help to identify areas in the state that would benefit from the construction of pollinator habitat corridors, including urban areas that may not have been previously considered.

  5. Gold and palladium adsorption from leached electronic scrap using ordered mesoporous carbon nanoscaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) nanoscaffolds are engineered agglomerates of carbon nanotubes held together by small carbon nanofibers with uniform pore sizes, high pore volume, and high channel permeability. These materials exhibit very high affinity for the adsorption of gold from aqueous acidic mixtures. The efficiency of gold recovery is comparable to those typically accomplished using biopolymer-based adsorbents. The adsorption efficiency for other precious metals such as palladium and platinum is lower. Studies on the precious metal (Au, Pd) adsorption on OMC materials from actual liquors of leached electronics will be presented. Adsorption properties will be compared for several different sorbents used for the recovery of precious metals. The leach liquor compositions for three different types of electronic scrap materials (personal computer board, cell phone and tv input/output board) will be presented. The sorption efficiencies for Au, Pd, together with a spectrum of competing and non-competing metals, from such leach mixtures will be compared.

  6. Investigation of insecticide leaching from potted nursery stock and aquatic health benefits of bioretention cells receiving nursery runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Grant M; Vogel, Jason R; Belden, Jason B; Rebek, Eric J; Simpson, Adam M

    2014-01-01

    Tree nurseries and greenhouses within the USDA red imported fire ant (RIFA) quarantine zone are required to incorporate insecticides into their potting media to prevent artificial spread of RIFA. Bifenthrin and fipronil are two common insecticides that are incorporated into potting media. During irrigation and stormwater events, there is potential for insecticides to leach from nursery pots, resulting in the contamination of nearby surface waters. In this study, occurrences of insecticides in simulated nursery runoff were compared with two irrigation strategies and two types of containers in single pot leaching and field runoff simulations. In addition, toxicity of pot leachate to the aquatic invertebrate, Hyallela azteca, was measured, and removal efficiencies of insecticides from bioretention cell media were evaluated. Overhead irrigation resulted in significantly higher concentrations than drip irrigation, and RootMaker pots allowed more leaching as compared to standard slick-wall pots. However, in all tests, the average concentration of bifenthrin during 15 days of leaching in both pot and field simulations was greater than 200 ng/L; more than 100-fold greater than the LC₅₀ for H. azteca. Toxicity studies confirmed this level of toxicity. Higher amounts of compost, 20 and 40%, in bioretention cell media resulted in greater percent reduction of both bifenthrin and fipronil. This study determined that management techniques may be able to limit the amount of insecticide that leaches from pots and runs off to receiving water bodies. Specifically, the selection of appropriate pot types, irrigation strategies, or filtering runoff through bioretention cells may reduce contamination loads. Thus, further best management strategies such as the use of bioretention cells are needed in nursery and greenhouse facilities to prevent surface water runoff from transporting toxic insecticides.

  7. ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER FABRIC IN CYANIDE LEACHING LIQUOR OF GOLD ORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption capacity of ACFF in cyanide leaching liquor of gold ores was studied withcyanide leaching liquor of gold ores, containing various kinds of ions. The adsorbed leaching liquorwas analyzed by atomic emission spectroscopy and colorimetric method. The contents of variouskinds of ions in ACFF were determined with X-ray photoctron spectroscopy. ACFF not onlyadsorbed gold but also adsorbed arsenic, nickel, zinc, calcium, sulphur, bismuth, copper, iron. silverand cyanide anion. Atomic percentage of C and those of O, N, Zr, Fe increase and decreaserespectively with the increase of the layer depth, while those of Ca, Au, Ag keep constant.

  8. Runoff and leaching of metolachlor from Mississippi River alluvial soil during seasons of average and below-average rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Lloyd M; Appelboom, Timothy W; Fouss, James L

    2009-02-25

    The movement of the herbicide metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide] via runoff and leaching from 0.21 ha plots planted to corn on Mississippi River alluvial soil (Commerce silt loam) was measured for a 6-year period, 1995-2000. The first three years received normal rainfall (30 year average); the second three years experienced reduced rainfall. The 4-month periods prior to application plus the following 4 months after application were characterized by 1039 +/- 148 mm of rainfall for 1995-1997 and by 674 +/- 108 mm for 1998-2000. During the normal rainfall years 216 +/- 150 mm of runoff occurred during the study seasons (4 months following herbicide application), accompanied by 76.9 +/- 38.9 mm of leachate. For the low-rainfall years these amounts were 16.2 +/- 18.2 mm of runoff (92% less than the normal years) and 45.1 +/- 25.5 mm of leachate (41% less than the normal seasons). Runoff of metolachlor during the normal-rainfall seasons was 4.5-6.1% of application, whereas leaching was 0.10-0.18%. For the below-normal periods, these losses were 0.07-0.37% of application in runoff and 0.22-0.27% in leachate. When averages over the three normal and the three less-than-normal seasons were taken, a 35% reduction in rainfall was characterized by a 97% reduction in runoff loss and a 71% increase in leachate loss of metolachlor on a percent of application basis. The data indicate an increase in preferential flow in the leaching movement of metolachlor from the surface soil layer during the reduced rainfall periods. Even with increased preferential flow through the soil during the below-average rainfall seasons, leachate loss (percent of application) of the herbicide remained below 0.3%. Compared to the average rainfall seasons of 1995-1997, the below-normal seasons of 1998-2000 were characterized by a 79% reduction in total runoff and leachate flow and by a 93% reduction in corresponding metolachlor movement via these routes

  9. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; McLaurine, S.B.; Airhart, S.P.; LeGore, V.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1987-12-01

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs.

  10. Available content, surface runoff and leaching of phosphorus forms in a typic hapludalf treated with organic and mineral nutrient sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cledimar Rogério Lourenzi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of animal manure to soil can increase phosphorus availability to plants and enhance transfer of the nutrient solution drained from the soil surface or leached into the soil profile. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of successive applications of organic and mineral nutrient sources on the available content, surface runoff and leaching of P forms in a Typic Hapludalf in no-tillage systems. Experiment 1 was set up in 2004 in the experimental area of UFSM, in Santa Maria (RS, Brazil. The treatments consisted of: control (without nutrient application and application of pig slurry (PS, pig deep-litter (PL, cattle slurry (CS, and mineral fertilizers (NPK. The rates were determined to meet the N crop requirements of no-tillage black oat and maize, grown in the 2010/2011 growing season. The soil solution was collected after each event (rain + runoff or leaching and the soluble, particulate and total P contents were measured. In November 2008, soil was collected in 2 cm intervals to a depth of 20 cm, in 5 cm intervals to a depth of 40 cm, and in 10 cm intervals to a depth of 70 cm. The soil was dried and ground, and P determined after extraction by anion exchange resin (AER. In experiment 2, samples collected from the Typic Hapludalf near experiment 1 were incubated for 20, 35, 58, 73 and 123 days after applying the following treatments: soil, soil + PS, soil + PL, soil + CS and soil + NPK. Thereafter, the soil was sampled and P was analyzed by AER. The applications of nutrient sources over the years led to an increase in available P and its migration in the soil profile. This led to P transfer via surface runoff and leaching, with the largest transfer being observed in PS and PL treatments, in which most P was applied. The soil available P and P transfer via surface runoff were correlated with the amounts applied, regardless of the P source. However, P transfer by leaching was not correlated with the applied nutrient

  11. Reducing Phosphorus Runoff and Leaching from Poultry Litter with Alum: Twenty-Year Small Plot and Paired-Watershed Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lidong; Moore, Philip A; Kleinman, Peter J A; Elkin, Kyle R; Savin, Mary C; Pote, Daniel H; Edwards, Dwayne R

    2016-07-01

    Treating poultry litter with alum has been shown to lower ammonia (NH) emissions and phosphorus (P) runoff losses. Two long-term studies were conducted to assess the effects of alum-treated poultry litter on P availability, leaching, and runoff under pasture conditions. From 1995 to 2015, litter was applied annually in a paired watershed study comparing alum-treated and untreated litter and in a small plot study comparing 13 treatments (an unfertilized control, four rates of alum-treated litter, four rates of untreated litter, and four rates of NHNO). In the paired watershed study, total P loads in runoff were 231% higher from pasture receiving untreated litter (1.96 kg P ha) than from that receiving alum-treated litter (0.85 kg P ha). In both studies, alum-treated litter resulted in significantly higher Mehlich III P (M3-P) and lower water-extractable P at the soil surface, reflecting greater retention of applied P and lesser availability of that P to runoff or leaching. In soils fertilized with alum-treated litter, M3-P was much higher when analyzed by inductively coupled argon plasma emission spectrometry than by colorimetry, possibly due to the formation of aluminum phytate. Indeed, alum-treated poultry litter leached less P over the 20-yr study: M3-P at 10 to 50 cm was 266% greater in plots fertilized with untreated litter (331 kg M3-P ha) than with alum-treated litter (124 kg M3-P ha). This research provides compelling evidence that treating poultry litter with alum provides short-term and long-term benefits to P conservation and water quality.

  12. Influence of Organic Amendments on Adsorption, Desorption and Leaching of Methiopyrisulfuron in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chun-xian; NIE Guo; ZHANG Zhong-ming; WANG Guang-cheng; GAO Li-ming; WANG Jin-jun

    2013-01-01

    Methiopyrisulfuron is a novel sulfonylurea herbicide with good activity for annual broadleaf and gramineal weeds control. Present study was to investigate the effects of organic amendments (including peat (PE), sewage sludge (SS), and humic acid (HA)) on adsorption, desorption and leaching of methiopyrisulfuron in soils. The batch equilibration technique was applied for adsorption-desorption experiments and the leaching was tested through soil column simulated experiments under laboratory conditions. The Freundlich model may well describe adsorption-desorption of methiopyrisulfuron on organic amendments, the natural soil, and amended soils. Organic amendments could not only greatly increase the adsorption capacity of methiopyrisulfuron, but also significantly enhance the hysteresis of desorption of methiopyrisulfuron. The correlations between Kf-ads and organic matter content of amended soils were significant, and the correlations between H and soil organic matter in amended soils with PE, SS, and HA were significant too. The results of soil column experiments indicated that organic amendments greatly decreased leaching of methiopyrisulfuron. This study suggested that PE, SS, and HA could greatly influence environmental behavior of methiopyrisulfuron in soils. Use of organic amendments might be an effective management practice for controlling potential pollution of methiopyrisulfuron to environment.

  13. ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER FABRIC IN CYANIDE LEACHING LIQUOR OF GOLD ORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXiaozhen

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption capacity of ACFF in cyanide leaching liquor of gold ores was studied with cyanide leaching liquor of gold ores,containing various kinds of ions.The adsorbed leaching liquor was analyzed by atomic emission spectroscopy and colorimetric method.The contents of various kinds. of ions in ACFF were determined with X-ray photoctron spectroscopy.ACFF not only adsorbed gold but also adsorbed arsenic,nickel,zinc,calcium,sulphur,bismuth,copper,iron,silver and cyanide,anion.Atomic percentage of C and those of O,N,Zn,Fe increase and decrease respectively with the increase of the layer depth,while those of Ca,Au,Ag keep constant.

  14. Cu and Zn adsorption to a heterogeneous natural sediment: Influence of leached cations and natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher-Power, Leanne M; Cheng, Tao; Rastghalam, Zahra Sadat

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals by natural sediments has important implications to the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface environments. Although the importance of major multivalent cations and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in heavy metal adsorption had been previously demonstrated, the leaching of major cations and DOM from sediments and its influence on heavy metal adsorption have not been fully examined. In this study, the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and natural organic matter that leached from a natural sediment in Cu and Zn adsorption experiments were measured and used in surface complexation models to elucidate their effects on Cu and Zn adsorption. Experimental results showed that the leaching of cations and DOM was substantial and pH-dependent. The leached concentrations of Ca and Mg were reasonably simulated based on BaCl2 extractable Ca and Mg at pH MINTEQ simulations showed that the leached cations markedly decreased Cu adsorption at pH 6 due to formation of Cu-DOM aqueous complexes, but increase Zn adsorption at pH 4-7 due to formation of aqueous complexes between DOM and major cations, which reduced competition from these cations against Zn for binding sites on the sediment.

  15. Mineral-leaching chemical transport with runoff and sediment from severely eroded rare-earth tailings in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huizhong; Cao, Longxi; Liang, Yin; Yuan, Jiuqin; Zhu, Yayun; Wang, Yi; Gu, Yalan; Zhao, Qiguo

    2017-08-01

    Rare-earth mining has led to severe soil erosion in southern China. Furthermore, the presence of the mineral-leaching chemical ammonium sulfate in runoff and sediment poses a serious environmental threat to downstream water bodies. In this paper, the characteristics of mineral-leaching chemicals in surface soil samples collected in the field were studied. In addition, NH4+ and SO42- transport via soil erosion was monitored using runoff and sediment samples collected during natural rainfall processes. The results demonstrated that the NH4+ contents in the surface sediment deposits increased from the top of the heap (6.56 mg kg-1) to the gully (8.23 mg kg-1) and outside the tailing heap (13.03 mg kg-1). The contents of SO42- in the different locations of the tailing heaps ranged from 27.71 to 40.33 mg kg-1. During typical rainfall events, the absorbed NH4+ concentrations (2.05, 1.26 mg L-1) in runoff were significantly higher than the dissolved concentrations (0.93, 1.04 mg L-1), while the absorbed SO42- concentrations (2.87, 1.92 mg L-1) were significantly lower than the dissolved concentrations (6.55, 7.51 mg L-1). The dissolved NH4+ and SO42- concentrations in runoff displayed an exponentially decreasing tendency with increasing transport distance (Y = 1. 02 ṡ exp( - 0. 00312X); Y = 3. 34 ṡ exp( - 0. 0185X)). No clear trend with increasing distance was observed for the absorbed NH4+ and SO42- contents in transported sediment. The NH4+ and SO42- contents had positive correlations with the silt and clay ratio in transported sediment but negative correlations with the sand ratio. These results provide a better understanding of the transport processes and can be used to develop equations to predict the transport of mineral-leaching chemicals in rare-earth tailings, which can provide a scientific foundation for erosion control and soil management in rare-earth tailing regions in southern China.

  16. Leaching potential of chlorpyrifos in an Andisol and Entisol: adsorption-desorption and degradation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera-Vivas, Carmen; Walther Hansen, Eddy; Garcia-Santos, Glenda; Obregón-Neira, Nelson; Celis-Ossa, Raul Ernesto; González-Murillo, Carlos Alberto; Juraske, Ronnie; Hellweg, Stefanie; Guerrero-Dallos, Jairo Arturo

    2017-04-01

    Ecological status of tropical soils like high OC content and microbial activity plays a key role to reduce the leaching of insecticide chlorpyrifos through the soil profile and therefore into groundwater. We found that chlorpyrifos has "transitional" leaching potential (GUS values varied between 1.8 and 2.5) throughout the soil depth, which differs from the "nonleacher" classification for temperate soils as based on surface level t1/2 and Koc values from international databases. These findings provide strong evidence of the importance of estimating the transport parameters and insecticide concentrations in different soil layers, especially when the amount and type of OC content vary throughout the soil profile. We got to such conclusions after studying the soil profile structural composition of soil organic matter and the adsorption/desorption characteristics of the insecticide in two different soil profiles (Andisol and Entisol) under agriculture production using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and batch analysis methods.

  17. Leaching of additives from construction materials to urban storm water runoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhardt, Mike; Zuleeg, S.; Vonbank, R.;

    2011-01-01

    in construction materials, i.e., biocides in facades’ render as well as root protection products in bitumen membranes for rooftops. Under wet-weather conditions, the concentrations of diuron, terbutryn, carbendazim, irgarol®1051 (all from facades) and mecoprop in storm water and receiving water exceeded...... the predicted no-effect concentrations values and the Swiss water quality standard of 0.1 μg/L. Under laboratory conditions maximum concentrations of additives were in the range of a few milligrams and a few hundred micrograms per litre in runoff of facades and bitumen membranes. Runoff from aged materials...

  18. Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types : a comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat pruduction

    OpenAIRE

    SvahnbÀck, Lasse

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types: a comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat production. This research project in environmental geology has arisen out of an observed need to be able to predict more accurately the loading of watercourses with detrimental organic substances and nutrients from already existing and planned peat production areas, since the authorities capacity for insisting on such predicti...

  19. Selective recovery of molybdenum from spent HDS catalyst using oxidative soda ash leach/carbon adsorption method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Ho; Mohapatra, D; Reddy, B Ramachandra

    2006-11-16

    The petroleum refining industry makes extensive use of hydroprocessing catalysts. These catalysts contain environmentally critical and economically valuable metals such as Mo, V, Ni and Co. In the present study, a simple hydrometallurgical processing of spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst for the recovery of molybdenum using sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide mixture was investigated. Recovery of molybdenum was largely dependent on the concentrations of Na2CO3 and H2O2 in the reaction medium, which in turn controls the pH of leach liquor and the presence of Al and Ni as impurities. Under the optimum leaching conditions (40 g L(-1) Na2CO3, 6 vol.% H2O2, room temperature, 1h) about 85% recovery of Mo was achieved. The leach liquor was processed by the carbon adsorption method, which selectively adsorbs Mo at pH around 0.75. Desorption of Mo was selective at 15 vol.% NH4OH. With a single stage contact, it was found possible to achieve >99%, adsorption and desorption efficiency. Using this method, recovery of molybdenum as MoO3 product of 99.4% purity was achieved.

  20. Determination of copper speciation in highway stormwater runoff using competitive ligand exchange - Adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, Jeffrey A; Sprick, Matthew S; Bloomquist, Don J

    2012-11-01

    Low concentrations of dissolved copper have been shown to adversely affect the olfactory system of salmonid species, impairing their ability to avoid predators and likely increasing mortality. These studies have resulted in increased regulatory scrutiny of stormwater discharges to surface waters inhabited by threatened and endangered salmonid species. Because it is primarily the free ionic (Cu(2+)) and weakly complexed forms of copper that are bioavailable, it is critical to understand the speciation of copper in stormwater. This paper reports on the characterization of copper binding ligands and copper speciation in composite samples of highway stormwater runoff collected at four sites in Oregon, USA using competitive ligand exchange - adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-ACSV). Although the concentration and strength of copper binding ligands in stormwater varied considerable between sites and storms, the vast majority (>99.9%) of the total dissolved copper in composite samples was complexed by organic ligands in stormwater. Although total dissolved copper concentrations range from 2 to 20 μg/L, the analytically determined free ionic copper concentrations did not exceed 10(-10) M (6.3 ng/L) in any of the fully characterized samples, suggesting that much of the copper in highway stormwater is not bioavailable. Analytically determined free ionic copper concentrations were compared with those predicted by a readily available chemical equilibrium models and found to be in reasonable agreement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modified Coconut Copra Residues as a Low Cost Biosorbent for Adsorption of Humic Substances from Peat Swamp Runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siong Fong Sim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of dissolved organic matter, scientifically known as humic substances, gives an undesirable color and taste to water. In addition, they are the precursors of carcinogenic disinfection by-products upon disinfection treatment. Adsorption provides a potential means of removal of humic substances, and lignocellulosic biomass serves as a promising candidate. In this paper, we report the application of modified coconut copra residues for adsorption of humic substances from peat swamp runoff. The FTIR spectra suggest that coconut copra residues are genuinely rich with carboxyl groups with long alkyl chains; this renders the material a natural biosorbent, attaining an average of 50% removal under the conditions of testing. Upon treatment, dissolution of lignin and hemicellulose with the enhancement of effective carboxyl groups occurs, improving the adsorption efficiency to 96%; the treated water is visibly clear. The relative band abundance and band shifts further confirm the involvement of the surface functional groups in the adsorption process. The modified coconut copra residue is an attractive biosorbent option for removal of humic substances. The operating conditions are mild, involving non-toxic chemicals, and no pH adjustment is necessary to allow adsorption.

  2. Adsorption-desorption of metalaxyl as affecting dissipation and leaching in soils: role of mineral and organic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria C; Cox, Lucía; Hermosin, María C; Cornejo, Juan

    2003-05-01

    Adsorption-desorption studies of metalaxyl in fifteen agricultural soil samples from Southern Portugal and Spain were performed following a batch equilibration method. Very high sorption was observed on a clay soil of high content in altered illite, but, when this soil was excluded from regression analysis, organic matter (OM) was the most important single soil property affecting sorption at low concentrations of metalaxyl. At higher concentrations, no correlation was observed with any soil property. The relevance of OM on sorption was also corroborated by the increase in sorption coefficients when soil OM was increased artificially by the addition of an organic amendment. Sorption studies with the colloidal fraction of selected soils also revealed the importance of mineral surfaces in metalaxyl sorption. Sorption of metalaxyl in most of the soil samples was hysteretic. Selected soil samples were incubated in the dark, sampled periodically and extracted for their fungicide content. Metalaxyl half-lives increased with sorption and OM content of the soil, and were specially high in the amended soil. Leaching studies in hand-packed columns under saturated/unsaturated flow conditions showed an inverse relation between leaching and sorption. Recoveries from the soil columns were close to 80% of the metalaxyl applied, except for the soil which OM was artificially increased, in which recovery was lower and this has been attributed to the much higher irreversibility of metalaxyl sorption in the amended soil.

  3. Adsorption of Vanadium (V) from SCR Catalyst Leaching Solution and Application in Methyl Orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Xuelong; Ma, Wei; Meng, Fanqing; Wang, Ren; Fuping, Tian; Wei, Linsen

    2016-12-01

      In this study, we explored an effective and low-cost catalyst and its adsorption capacity and catalytic capacity for Methyl Orange Fenton oxidation degradation were investigated. The catalyst was directly prepared by reuse of magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) after saturated adsorption of vanadium (V) from waste SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) catalyst. The obtained catalyst was characterized by FTIR, XPS and the results showed that vanadium (V) adsorption process of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was non-redox reaction. The effects of pH, adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms of adsorption were assessed. Adsorption of vanadium (V) ions by Fe3O4 nanoparticles could be well described by the Sips isotherm model which controlled by the mixed surface reaction and diffusion (MSRDC) adsorption kinetic model. The results show that vanadium (V) was mainly adsorbed on external surface of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The separation-recovering tungsten (VI) and vanadium (V) from waste SCR catalyst alkaline solution through pH adjustment was also investigated in this study. The results obtained from the experiments indicated that tungsten (VI) was selectively adsorbed from vanadium (V)/tungsten (VI) mixed solution in certain acidic condition by Fe3O4 nanoparticle to realize their recovery. Tungsten (V) with some impurity can be obtained by releasing from adsorbent, which can be confirmed by ICP-AES. The Methyl Orange degradation catalytic performance illustrated that the catalyst could improve Fenton reaction effectively at pH = 3.0 compare to Fe3O4 nanoparticles alone. Therefore, Fe3O4 nanoparticle adsorbed vanadium (V) has a potential to be employed as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst in the present contribution, and its catalytic activity was mainly evaluated in terms of the decoloration efficiency of Methyl Orange.

  4. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity.

  5. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    Science.gov (United States)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  6. 噻虫嗪在土壤中的吸附和淋溶特性%Adsorption and leaching of thiamethoxam in soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 慕卫; 刘峰; 贺敏; 罗梅梅

    2015-01-01

    采用振荡平衡法、土壤薄层层析法和土柱淋溶法研究了噻虫嗪在砂土、粉砂壤土和砂姜黑土等3种不同理化性质土壤中的吸附和淋溶特性,探讨了农药的吸附与淋溶特性与土壤理化性质的关系以及剂型对农药淋溶特性的影响.结果表明,噻虫嗪在3种土壤中的吸附较好地符合Freundlich方程,Kd值分别为砂土1.25、粉砂壤土2.95、砂姜黑土5.10,其大小顺序与Koc值一致.黏粒含量是影响噻虫嗪在土壤中吸附性的最主要因素,有机质含量为次要因素.土壤薄层层析实验和土柱淋溶实验均表明噻虫嗪在3种土壤中的淋溶速率顺序为砂土>粉砂壤土>砂姜黑土,且油悬浮剂、水悬浮剂淋溶量较高,水分散粒剂次之,颗粒剂最低.噻虫嗪存在对地下水污染的潜在风险,特别是在黏粒和有机质含量低的环境下使用时,其风险应该引起足够的重视.%To study the influence of soil basic physical and chemical properties on the adsorption and leaching behavior of pesticides in soil, the adsorption and leaching of thiamethoxam onto three different soils including Sandy soil, Silt loam soil, Shajiang black soil, were conducted by oscillation equilibrium experiment, soil thin layer chromatography and column leaching. The results showed that the adsorption of thiamethoxam in the soils could be well fitted by the empirical Freundich isotherm. The adsorption constants ( Kd ) were 1. 25, 2. 95 and 5. 10 in Sandy soil, Silt loam soil, Shajiang black soil, respectively. Clay content was the dominant factor affecting the adsorption of terbufos in soils, and the soil organic matter content was the next factor. The leaching of thiamethoxam was in the order of Sandy soil>Silt loam soil>Shajiang black soil. Higher amount of oil suspended agent and water suspended agent leached out, followed by water dispersible granule, and the granulehad the lowest amount of leaching

  7. Gold Adsorption from Chlorination Leaching Solution of Refractory Gold Concentrate%从难处理金精矿氯化浸金溶液中吸附金

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金创石; 张廷安; 曾勇; 洪正秀

    2012-01-01

    对国内某难处理金精矿高压氧化渣进行氯化浸出及吸附试验.结果表明,在下述最佳条件下浸金率达到96.5%:次氯酸钠浓度10 g/L、pH=4、氯化钠浓度75 g/L、温度40℃、液固比3∶1、搅拌速度300 r/min、时间120 min.浸金液在室温采用1 g/L的717阴离子交换树脂吸附30 min,金吸附率达到99.2%.该方法污染少、操作简单、反应速度快.%Chlorination leaching and adsorption of gold on high-pressure oxidation residue of a domestic refractory gold concentrate were investigated. The results show that the gold leaching rate is 96. 5% under the optimum conditions including sodium hypochlorite concentration of 10 g/L, Ph = 4, sodium chloride concentration of 75 g/L, temperature of 40 ℃ , ratio of liquid to solid of 3 : 1, stirring speed of 300 r/min and time of 120 min. The gold absorption rate is 99. 2% when the above gold leaching solution is absorbed with 1 g/L 717 anion exchange resin at room temperature for 30 min. This process is simple, rapid with less pollution.

  8. Condensate water treatment by adsorption onto an activated carbon grade with high-activity and low-silicate leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzer, J. [NORIT Germany, Kempen (Germany); Ernhofer, R. [BAYERNOIL Refineries, Ingolstadt (Germany); Dikkenberg, J. van den [NORIT Activated Carbon, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is frequently used to remove dissolved organic impurities from condensate water. An optimal adsorption capacity and GAC life time are achieved by matching the size of the target organics versus the pore size distribution of the activated carbon. From a product range of over 150 activated carbon grades, eight different NORIT GAC types are available for condensate water polishing. Differences between these grades apply to adsorption properties, hydraulic properties and purity. Guidelines for design and operation of the GAC stage are provided. (orig.)

  9. Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types: A comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svahnbaeck, L.

    2007-07-01

    characteristics of the peat in a mire, although earlier observations have indicated that watercourse loading from peat production can vary greatly and it has been suggested that differences in peat properties may be of significance in this. Sprinkling is used here in combination with simulations of conditions in a milled peat production area to determine the influence of the physical and chemical properties of milled peats in production mires on surface runoff into the drainage ditches and the concentrations of material in the runoff water. Sprinkling and extraction experiments were carried out on 25 samples of milled Carex (C) and Sphagnum (S) peat of humification grades H 2.5-8.5 with moisture content in the range 23.4-89% on commencement of the first sprinkling, which was followed by a second sprinkling 24 hours later. The water retention capacity of the peat was best, and surface runoff lowest, with Sphagnum and Carex peat samples of humification grades H 2.5-6 in the moisture content class 56-75%. On account of the hydrophobicity of dry peat, runoff increased in a fairly regular manner with drying of the sample from 55% to 24-30%. Runoff from the samples with an original moisture content over 55% increased by 63% in the second round of sprinkling relative to the first, as they had practically reached saturation point on the first occasion, while those with an original moisture content below 55% retained their high runoff in the second round, due to continued hydrophobicity. The well-humified samples (H 6.5-8.5) with a moisture content over 80% showed a low water retention capacity and high runoff in both rounds of sprinkling. Once data are available on the area of the mire, its peat depth, peat types and their degrees of humification, dry matter content, calorific value and corresponding energy content, it is possible to produce mutually comparable estimates for individual mires with respect to the annual loading of the drainage ditch system and the surrounding watercourse

  10. Adsorptive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar Gupta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the feasibility of natural fibers derived from Ficus carica plant as an alternative precursor for the preparation of activated carbon via microwave assisted H3PO4 activation. The properties of activated carbon were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTIR. The operational parameters, chemical impregnation ratio, microwave power and irradiation time on the carbon yield and adsorption capability were investigated. Adsorption performance of Cu(II and Ni(II onto activated carbon was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II and Ni(II onto the adsorbent was found to be 23.08 and 18.78 mg/g, respectively. Adsorption of metal ions followed second order kinetics with best fit for Fraundlich adsorption isotherm. The values of thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy change (ΔH°, entropy change (ΔS° and free energy change (ΔG° were evaluated for the adsorption of both the metal ions. Adsorption of metal ions onto activated carbon was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The results suggested that activated carbon developed from natural fibers successfully improved the metal ions adsorption capacity. On the basis of our findings, the adsorbent could be used as a detoxifying agent for better management of industrial effluents.

  11. Runoff erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Evelpidou, Niki; Cordier, Stephane; Merino, Agustin (Ed.); Figueiredo, Tomás; Centeri, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Table of Contents PART I – THEORY OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 1 - RUNOFF EROSION – THE MECHANISMS CHAPTER 2 - LARGE SCALE APPROACHES OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 3 - MEASURING PRESENT RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 4 - MODELLING RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 5 - RUNOFF EROSION AND HUMAN SOCIETIES: THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOIL EROSION PART II - CASE STUDIES CASE STUDIES – INTRODUCTION: RUNOFF EROSION IN MEDITERRANEAN AREA CASE STUDY 1: Soil Erosion Risk...

  12. Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis J.L. Guerra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nontronite is an important phyllosilicate with a high concentration of ferric iron in the octahedral layer. A new occurrence of Brazilian nontronite sample was used for the organofunctionalization process with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Due to the increment of basic centers attached to the pendant chains, the metal adsorption capability of the final chelating material, was found to be higher than its precursor. The ability of these materials to remove Pb2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ from aqueous solutions was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms at room temperature and pH 6.0, in batch adsorption experiments in order to explain the adsorption mechanism. In order to evaluate the phyllosilicate samples as adsorbents in a dynamic system, a glass column was fulfilled with nontronite samples (1.5 g and it was fed with 2.1 mmol dm−3 divalent cations at pH 6.0. The energetic effects caused by metal cations adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations. The effects of three divalent metals adsorption in the zero point of charge of each material were investigated.

  13. Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Banerjee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Application of saw dust for the removal of an anionic dye, tartrazine, from aqueous solutions has been investigated. The experiments were carried out in batch mode. Effect of the parameters such as pH, initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye was studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 70 min. Maximum adsorption of dye was achieved at pH 3. Removal percent was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum removal was found to be 97% at 1 mg/L of tartrazine. The removal increases from 71% to 97% when the initial concentration of dye solution decreases from 15 mg/L to 1 mg/L. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich isotherm models. The (Langmuir adsorption capacity of the adsorbent is found to be 4.71 mg/g at 318 K. Kinetic modeling of the process of removal was carried out and the process of removal was found to follow a pseudo second order model and the value of rate constant for adsorption process was calculated as 2.7 × 10−3 g mg−1 min−1 at 318 K. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (ΔG°, enthalpy (ΔH° and entropy (ΔS° were determined and the negative values of ΔG° indicated that the process of removal was spontaneous at all values of temperatures. Further, the values of ΔH° indicated the endothermic nature of the process of removal.

  14. 不同水稻种植模式对氮磷流失特征的影响%Effects of rice cultivation patterns on nitrogen and phosphorus leaching and runoff losses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳玉波; 沙之敏; 赵峥; 陆欣欣; 张金秀; 赵琦; 曹林奎

    2014-01-01

    The loss of nitrogen and phosphorus due to excessive fertilizer application has become a major form in agricultural non-point pollution. In order to explore the impact of different planting patterns (conventional cultivation, green rice-frog ecosystem, organic rice-frog ecosystem) on nitrogen and phosphorus loss, a field experiment was conducted and the characteristics of nitrogen and phosphorus in surface water, runoff, leakage as well as rice yield differences analyzed in three paddy ecosystems. The results showed that among the paddy ecosystems, the order of average concentration of total nitrogen (TN) in surface water was:conventional cultivation (18.87 mg·L−1) > green rice-frog ecosystem (8.98 mg·L−1) > organic rice-frog ecosystem (8.20 mg·L−1). Compared with conventional cultivation, green rice-frog ecosystem and organic rice-frog ecosystem decreased TN loss during rice growth season by 15.27% and 25.76%, respectively. The TN runoff loss was in the following order: green rice-frog ecosystem >conventional cultivation>organic rice-frog ecosystem. NH4+-N was the main form of TN runoff. The order of TN leaching loss of was conventional cultivation > green rice-frog ecosystem > organic rice-frog ecosystem, with NO3−-N as the main form of TN leaching. Also the ratio of total TN loss to nitrogen fertilizer use in the three treatments was in the range of 1.25%ԟ2.38%, all less than 3%. Average total phosphorus (TP) concentration of surface water was in the following order:organic rice-frog ecosystem (0.82 mg·L−1)>green rice-frog ecosystem (0.64 mg·L−1)>conventional cultivation (0.37 mg·L−1). Total loss of TP was in the order of:organic rice-frog ecosystem > green rice-frog ecosystem > conventional cultivation. Then the order of proportion of total loss of phosphorous fertilizer was:green rice-frog ecosystem>conventionally cultivation treatment>organic rice-frog ecosystem, most of which was dissolved phosphorus. The order of rice yield under the

  15. Adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion-exchange resin Diaion WA21J

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Shaobo, E-mail: shaoboshen@metall.ustb.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Ecological and Recycling Metallurgy, Ministry of Education of China, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physical Chemistry, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Pan Tonglin; Liu Xinqiang; Yuan Lei [Key Laboratory of Ecological and Recycling Metallurgy, Ministry of Education of China, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang Jinchao [Key Laboratory of Ecological and Recycling Metallurgy, Ministry of Education of China, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physical Chemistry, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang Yongjian; Guo Zhanchen [Key Laboratory of Ecological and Recycling Metallurgy, Ministry of Education of China, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-07-15

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Rh(III) ions contained in the chloride solutions obtained, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from the chloride solutions on an anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. Rh, Pd, Pt, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) of Rh(III) decreased with the increase in initial Rh(III) concentration or in adsorption temperature. The isothermal adsorption of Rh(III) was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q{sub max} based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 6.39, 6.61 and 5.81 mg/g for temperatures 18, 28 and 40 deg. C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy of Rh was about -7.6 kJ/mol and thus Rh(III) adsorption was a physical type. The experimental data obtained could be better simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the activation energy obtained was 6.54 J/mol. The adsorption rate of Rh(III) was controlled by intraparticle diffusion in most of time of adsorption process.

  16. Experiment on the River Sand for the Adsorption Effect of Runoff Contaminants%河砂对径流污染物吸附效果试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊岭; 秦全城; 张玉玉; 张雅君; 冯萃敏; 许萍; 李俊奇

    2016-01-01

    River sand is one of the main raw materials of the permeable pavement, bioretention and tree pool, which are facilities in constructing the sponge city.The effect of river sand on the adsorption of runoff contaminants was studied.The results showed that the adsorption capacity for COD, TN, TP and Cu by the river sand increased firstly and then tended to be stable with the increase of the initial solution concentration of runoff contaminants. When the initial solution concentration reached and was over 160 mg/L, the maximum adsorption capacity for COD, TN and Cu were up to 1.83 mg/g, 1.19 mg/g and 1.22 mg/g respectively.And when the initial solution concentration was more than 80 mg/L, the maximum adsorption capacity for TP is about 0.50 mg/g.At the same time, the removal effect of river sand on the low concentration( less than 20 mg/L) for TN and TP was better. When the initial solution concentration was 100 mg/L, the maximum removal rate for COD was 74%.And the re-moval rate for Cu was from 77%to 98%under the condition of different initial solution concentration.The results indicated that the river sand has good adsorption effect on the runoff contaminants, especially in the removal for heavy metal Cu.This also provided the technological support to further promote the relevant technology and facili-ties of the sponge city with river sand as raw material.%河砂是透水铺装、生物滞留池及树池等海绵城市建设用设施的主要原材料之一,对其吸附去除径流污染物的效果进行了试验研究。结果表明,随着污染物初始浓度的增加,河砂对COD、TN、TP、Cu的吸附量均呈现先增加后趋于平稳的趋势。当初始溶液浓度达到160 mg/L以上时,河砂对COD、TN、Cu的最大吸附量分别保持在1.83、1.19、1.22 mg/g左右,当初始溶液浓度达到80 mg/L以上时,河砂对TP的最大吸附量维持在0.50 mg/g左右。同时在去除率方面,河砂对小于20 mg/L的低

  17. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2009-01-01

    Texture is a major factor influencing mobilization and transport of P in soil owing partly to differences in adsorptive properties, and partly to differences in pore-size distribution and pore organization. Slurry application strategies may be important mitigation measures for reducing agricultural...... P leaching. We propose diverse interactions between dominant flow pathways and cattle slurry: - Injection of slurry reduces P leaching compared to surface application in soils with preferential flow behaviour - Injection of slurry has less impact on P leaching compared to surface application...... in soils with matrix dominated flow behaviour We tested these hypotheses on three textural soil classes (Olsen-P 1.6 mg P 100 g-1) on intact soil columns (20*20 cm) and compared them to in situ P leaching before slurry application. In a loamy sand P leaching with both slurry application techniques slightly...

  18. Physicochemical conditions and properties of particles in urban runoff and rivers: Implications for runoff pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Qionghua; Wu, Yaketon; Wang, Xiaochang C

    2017-04-01

    In this study, to gain an improved understanding of the fate and fractionation of particle-bound pollutants, we evaluated the physicochemical conditions and the properties of particles in rainwater, urban runoff, and rivers of Yixing, a city with a large drainage density in the Taihu Lake Basin, China. Road runoff and river samples were collected during the wet and dry seasons in 2015 and 2016. There were significant differences between the physicochemical conditions (pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), and electroconductivity (EC)) of rainwater, runoff, and rivers. The lowest pH and highest ORP values of rainwater provide the optimal conditions for leaching of particle-bound pollutants such as heavy metals. The differences in the physicochemical conditions of the runoff and rivers may contribute to the redistribution of pollutants between particulate and dissolved phases after runoff is discharged into waterways. Runoff and river particles were mainly composed of silt and clay (pollutants and settling ability of particles, which shows that it can be used as an index when monitoring runoff pollution.

  19. Soil conductivity and multiple linear regression for precision monitoring of beef feedlot manure and runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Open-lot cattle feeding operations face challenges in control of nutrient runoff, leaching, and gaseous emissions. This report investigates the use of precision management of saline soils as found on 1) feedlot surfaces and 2) a vegetative treatment area (VTA) utilized to control feedlot runoff. A...

  20. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  1. Nitrate Leaching Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  2. Soils - Potential Runoff

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital spatial data set provides information on the spatial distribution of potential runoff-contributing areas in Kansas. Potential runoff-contributing areas...

  3. Separation of drainage runoff during rainfall-runoff episodes using the stable isotope method and drainage water temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajíček, Antonín; Kvítek, Tomáš; Pomije, Tomáš

    2014-05-01

    Stabile isotopes of 2H 18O and drainage water temperature were used as natural tracers for separation rainfall-runoff event hydrograph on several tile drained catchments located in Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic. Small agricultural catchments with drainage systems built in slopes are typical for foothill areas in the Czech and Moravian highland. Often without permanent surface runoff, the drainage systems represent an important portion of runoff and nitrogen leaching out of the catchment. The knowledge of the drainage runoff formation and the origin of its components are prerequisites for formulation of measures leading to improvement of the drainage water quality and reduction of nutrient leaching from the drained catchments. The results have proved presence of event water in the drainage runoff during rainfall-runoff events. The proportion of event water observed in the drainage runoff varied between 15 - 60 % in the summer events and 0 - 50 % in winter events, while the sudden water temperature change was between 0,1 - 4,2 °C (2 - 35 %). The comparison of isotope separation of the drainage runoff and monitoring the drainage water temperature have demonstrated that in all cases of event water detected in the runoff, a rapid change in the drainage water temperature was observed as well. The portion of event water in the runoff grows with the growing change in water temperature. Using component mixing model, it was demonstrated that water temperature can be successfully used at least as a qualitative and with some degree of inaccuracy as a quantitative tracer as well. The drawback of the non-conservative character of this tracer is compensated by both its economic and technical accessibility. The separation results also resemble results of separations at small streams. Together with a similarly high speed of the discharge reaction to beginning of precipitation, it is obvious that the mechanism of surface runoff formation and drainage runoff formation

  4. VT Nitrate Leaching Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Nitrate Leaching Index data for the state of Vermont. This is a derivative product based on the SSURGO soils data for all counties except Essex...

  5. The influence of dual-substrate-layer extensive green roofs on rainwater runoff quantity and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoou; Tian, Yimei; Zhao, Xinhua

    2017-08-15

    This study investigates the ability of dual-substrate-layer extensive green roofs to retain rainwater and reduce pollutant leaching. The substrates in dual-substrate-layer green roofs consist of an upper organic nutrition layer for plant growth and a lower inorganic adsorption layer for water retention and pollutant reduction. One traditional single-substrate-layer extensive green roof was built for comparison with dual-substrate-layer green roofs. During the experimental period, dual-substrate-layer green roofs supported better natural vegetation growth, with coverage exceeding 90%, while the coverage in single-substrate-layer green roof was over 80%. Based on the average retention value of the total rainfall for four types of simulated rains (the total rainfall depth (mm) was 43.2, 54.6, 76.2 and 86.4, respectively), the dual-substrate-layer green roofs, which used the mixture of activated charcoal with perlite and vermiculite as the adsorption substrate, possessed better rainfall retention performance (65.9% and 55.4%) than the single-substrate-layer green roof (52.5%). All of the dual-substrate-layer green roofs appeared to be sinks for organics, heavy metals and all forms of nitrogen in all cases, while acted as sources of phosphorus contaminants in the case of heavy rains. In consideration of the factors of water retention, pollution reduction and service life of the green roof, a mixture of activated charcoal and/or pumice with perlite and vermiculite is recommended as the adsorption substrate. The green roofs were able to mitigate mild acid rain, raising the pH from approximately 5.6 in rainfall to 6.5-7.6 in green roof runoff. No signs of a first flush effect for phosphate, total phosphorus, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, total nitrogen, organics, zinc, lead, chromium, manganese, copper, pH or turbidity were found in the green roof runoff. Cost analysis further proved the practicability of dual-substrate-layer green roofs in retaining rainwater, and

  6. A Review of Adsorbents Used for Storm Water Runoff Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Agintas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals, petroleum products, sediments and other pollutants get in the environment with insufficiently cleaned storm water runoff. Contaminated storm water runoff is one of the most significant sources for pollution in rivers, lakes and estuaries. Storm water runoff must be treated using not only simple methods but also using adsorption processes. Adsorbents can be natural organic, natural nonorganic and synthetic. Main adsorption characteristic, way of utilization and storm water runoff inflow rate, quantity and pollution need to be investigated when trying to use adsorbents in reasonably way. It is very important to treat storm water properly during the primary mechanical treatment otherwise adsorbents will act as mechanical filters.Article in Lithuanian

  7. Leaching behavior of butanedionedioxime as gold ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Butanedionedioxime, a small organic compound with low-toxicity and good chemical stability, has been proposed as an effective gold ligand in gold extraction. The result of experiment shows that: 1) highly effective gold lixiviantcan be composed of butanedionedioxime (BDM) with many oxidants, especially potassium permanganate; 2)in the leaching system of BD M- K M nO4 the suitable Ox/Lig(ratio of oxidants to gold ligands) tange is 0.20 ~ 0. 50, optimally 0.25 ~0.45 at the pH range of 7 ~ 11; 3) BDM-KMnO4 extraction of gold from an oxide ore is similar to cyanide(cyanide-O2)extraction, but the leaching rate of gold by BDM-KMnO4 is faster than that by cyanide-O2; 4) gold may readily be recov-ered by carbon adsorption and zinc precipitation

  8. Pollutant Concentration in Runoff at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-25

    Monitoring ERDC/CRREL TR-14-15 vii ICP-MS Inductively Coupled Plasma–Mass Spectrometry Mn Manganese Ni Nickel NRDC National Resources Defense...indicated that snowmelt runoff transported metals, including arsenic (As), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn). These metals are...soils and leach into ground and surface waters but are usually not at toxic levels. ERDC/CRREL TR-14-15 6 Kennicutt et al. (2010) and Klein et al

  9. Diffuse emission and control of copper in urban surface runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, M A; Steiner, M

    2002-01-01

    Copper washed off from roofs and roads is considered to be a major contribution to diffuse copper pollution of urban environments. In order to guarantee sustainable protection of soils and water, the long-term strategy is to avoid or replace copper containing materials on roofs and fagades. Until achievement of this goal, a special adsorber system is suggested to control the diffuse copper fluxes by retention of copper by a mixture of granulated iron-hydroxide (GEH) and calcium carbonate. Since future stormwater runoff concepts are based on decentralised runoff infiltration into the underground, solutions are proposed which provide for copper retention in infiltration sites using GEH adsorption layers. The example of a large copper façade of which the runoff is treated in an adsorption trench reveals the first full-scale data on façade runoff and adsorber performance. During the first year of investigation average façade runoff concentrations in the range of 1-10 mg Cu/l are reduced by 96-99% in the adsorption ditch.

  10. Best Management Practices for Minimizing Nitrate Leaching from Container-Grown Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Chen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Containerized plant production represents an extremely intensive agricultural practice; 40,000 to 300,000 containers may occupy one acre of surface area to which a large amount of chemical fertilizer is applied. Currently, recommended fertilizer application rates for the production of containerized nursery ornamental plants are in excess of plant requirements, and up to 50% of the applied fertilizers may run off or be leached from containers. Among the nutrients leached or allowed to runoff, nitrogen (N is the most abundant and is of major concern as the source of ground and surface water pollution. In this report, current N fertilizer application rates for different container-grown nursery ornamental plants, the amount of nitrate leaching or runoff from containers, and the potential for nitrate contamination of ground and surface water are discussed. In contrast, our best N management practices include: (1 applying fertilizers based on plant species need; (2 improving potting medium�s nutrient holding capacity using obscure mineral additives; (3 using controlled-release fertilizers; and (4 implementing zero runoff irrigation or fertigation delivery systems that significantly reduce nitrate leaching or runoff in containerized plant production and encourage dramatic changes in N management.

  11. A pilot study to evaluate runoff quantity from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, Min Jung; Han, Mooyoung

    2015-04-01

    The use of green roofs is gaining increased recognition in many countries as a solution that can be used to improve environmental quality and reduce runoff quantity. To achieve these goals, pilot-scale green roof assemblies have been constructed and operated in an urban setting. From a stormwater management perspective, green roofs are 42.8-60.8% effective in reducing runoff for 200 mm soil depth and 13.8-34.4% effective in reducing runoff for 150 mm soil depth. By using Spearman rank correlation analysis, high rainfall intensity was shown to have a negative relationship with delayed occurrence time, demonstrating that the soil media in green roofs do not efficiently retain rainwater. Increasing the number of antecedent dry days can help to improve water retention capacity and delay occurrence time. From the viewpoint of runoff water quality, green roofs are regarded as the best management practice by filtration and adsorption through growth media (soil).

  12. Temporal Patterns of Glyphosate Leaching at a Loamy Agricultural Field in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Olsen, Preben

    2013-01-01

    applications in combination with the effect of precipitation events, drain water runoff, soil water content at 25 cm soil depth, management, and particle leaching patterns, and compares this with monitored field-scale glyphosate and AMPA leaching to a tile drainage system. Preliminary findings indicate...... that there is an accumulation of glyphosate and AMPA in the soil after the successive applications of glyphosate, as the level of the peaking concentrations right after applications increases. Furthermore, large precipitation events with subsequent high drain water runoff together with management, especially plowing...... and harvesting, trigger the leaching of mobile colloids, glyphosate, and AMPA. As a likely consequence, glyphosate has occasionally been detected in groundwater monitoring wells installed at the location down to 3.5-4.5 m depth in concentrations exceeding the EU drinking water quality criterion....

  13. Partitioning and granulometric distribution of metal leachate from urban traffic dry deposition particulate matter subject to acidic rainfall and runoff retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansalone, J; Ying, G

    2008-09-01

    Vehicular transportation coupled with urban hydrology is a significant source as well as vector of particulate matter (PM) and particulate-bound metal inventories in urban systems. This study examines the granulometric distribution of metals from dry deposition PM generated from 17 dryfall periods and equilibrium metal partitioning with runoff PM distribution from eight rainfall-runoff events at an urban inter-state watershed in Baton Rouge, LA. Dry deposition PM is a coarse non-uniform gradation with a d(50 m)=304 microm and a peak surface area at 106 microm. Results indicate acid rain is not a significant metal contributor to runoff but is capable of leaching metals from PM to runoff. Retained runoff partitioning resulted in particulate-bound predominance for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn while Ca and Mg remained predominately dissolved. The finer PM fraction (75 microm). This coarse fraction is also the most labile when exposed to acidic rainfall; generating up to 90% of the total metal mass leached from the entire PM gradation. Comparing dry deposition and runoff PM of equal mass and size gradation, retained runoff PM is enriched with metals (except Pb). Results indicate the labile coarse fraction of dry deposition PM can be a significant source of metal leaching while runoff PM (mobilized dry deposition PM) stored in a BMP can be metal-enriched with the potential for re-leaching or scour.

  14. Adsorption of Roxarsone onto Drinking Water Treatment Residuals: Preliminary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, J.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Sharma, S.

    2006-05-01

    Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenyl-arsonic acid) is an organo-arsenical compound, commonly used as a feed additive in the broiler poultry industry to control coccidial intestinal parasites. Roxarsone is not toxic to the birds not only because of the low dose, and also because it most likely does not convert to toxic inorganic arsenic (As) in their systems. However, upon excretion, roxarsone may undergo transformation to inorganic As, posing a serious risk of contaminating the agricultural land and water bodies via surface runoff or leaching. The use of poultry litter as fertilizer results in As accumulation rates of up to 50 metric tons per year in agricultural lands. The immediate challenge, as identified by the various regulatory bodies in recent years is to develop an efficient, yet cost-effective and environmentally sound approach to cleaning up such As- contaminated soils. Recent studies conducted by our group have suggested that the drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) can effectively retain As, thereby decreasing its mobility in the environment. The WTRs are byproducts of drinking water treatment processes and are typically composed of amorphous Fe/Al oxides, activated C and cationic polymers. They can be obtained free-of-cost from water treatment plants. It is well demonstrated that the environmental mobility of As is controlled by adsorption/desorption reactions onto mineral surfaces. Hence, knowledge of adsorption and desorption of As onto the WTRs is of environmental relevance. The reported study examined the adsorption and desorption characteristics of As using two types of WTRs, namely the Fe-WTRs (byproduct of Fe salt treatment), and the Al-WTRs (byproduct of Al salt treatment). All adsorption experiments were carried out in batch and As retention on the WTRs was investigated as a function of solid/solution ratio (1:5, 1:10, 1:25 and 1:50), equilibration time (10 min - 48 hr), pH (2 - 10) and initial As load (100, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg As/L). The

  15. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  16. Leaching Test Relationships, Laboratory-to-Field Comparisons and Recommendations for Leaching Evaluation using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents examples of the relationships between the results of laboratory leaching tests, as defined by the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) or analogous international test methods, and leaching of constituents from a broad range of materials under di...

  17. GREENROOF RUNOFF WATER QUALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runoff samples were collected from 5 experimental green roof test plots on small buildings at the Center for Green Roof Research at Rock Springs, PA during the period from January 2005 through May 2006. Samples were either analyzed in-house for pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC), T...

  18. The power of runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.; Lindström, G.; Riml, J.

    2017-05-01

    Although the potential energy of surface water is a small part of Earth's energy budget, this highly variable physical property is a key component in the terrestrial hydrologic cycle empowering geomorphological and hydrological processes throughout the hydrosphere. By downscaling of the daily hydrometeorological data acquired in Sweden over the last half-century this study quantifies the spatial and temporal distribution of the dominating energy components in terrestrial hydrology, including the frictional resistance in surface water and groundwater as well as hydropower. The energy consumed in groundwater circulation was found to be 34.6 TWh/y or a heat production of approximately 13% of the geothermal heat flux. Significant climate driven, periodic fluctuations in the power of runoff, stream flows and groundwater circulation were revealed that have not previously been documented. We found that the runoff power ranged from 173 to 260 TWh/y even when averaged over the entire surface of Sweden in a five-year moving window. We separated short-term fluctuations in runoff due to precipitation filtered through the watershed from longer-term seasonal and climate driven modes. Strong climate driven correlations between the power of runoff and climate indices, wind and solar intensity were found over periods of 3.6 and 8 years. The high covariance that we found between the potential energy of surface water and wind energy implies significant challenges for the combination of these renewable energy sources.

  19. Adsorption characteristics of construction waste for heavy metals from urban stormwater runoff☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianlong Wang; Pingping Zhang; Liqiong Yang; Tao Huang

    2015-01-01

    Stormwater runoff has become an important source of surface water pollution. Bioretention, a low impact devel-opment measure in urban stormwater management, has been proven to be effective in the removal of pol utants from stormwater runoff, with appropriate bioretention media. In this study, construction wastes were selected as bioretention media to remove heavy metals from stormwater runoff. Static and dynamic adsorption batch exper-iments were carried out to investigate the adsorption of heavy metals in simulated stormwater runoff system with construction wastes in different particle sizes. The experimental results show that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model characterizes the adsorption process and the adsorption equilibrium data are wel described by Freundlich isotherm model. The construction wastes used can remove heavy metals from stormwater runoff effectively, with their average removal rates al more than 90%. The particle size of construction wastes greatly influences the equilibrium time, rate and adsorption capacity for heavy metals.

  20. Dynamic simulation of the carbon-in-pulp and carbon-in-leach processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. P. de Andrade Lima

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-in-leach and carbon-in-pulp are continuous processes that use activated carbon in a cascade of large agitated tanks, which have been widely used to recover or concentrate precious metals in gold extraction plants. In the carbon-in-pulp process adsorption occurs after the leaching cascade section of the plant, and in the carbon-in-leach process leaching and adsorption occur simultaneously. In both processes the activated carbon is moved from one tank to another in countercurrent with the ore pulp until the recovery of the loaded carbon in the first tank. This paper presents a dynamic model that describes, with minor changes, the carbon-in-leach, the carbon-in-pulp, and the gold leaching processes. The model is numerically solved and calibrated with experimental data from a plant and used to perform a study of the effect of the activated carbon transfer strategy on the performance of the adsorption section of the plant. Based on the calculated values of the gold loss in the liquid and of the gold recovered in the loaded activated carbon that leaves the circuit, the results indicate that strategies in which a significant amount of activated carbon is held in the first tank and the contact time between the carbon and the pulp is longer are the best carbon transfer strategies for these processes.

  1. Coupling leaching of sphalerite concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭鹏; 谢惠琴; 卢立柱

    2004-01-01

    Coupling process of sphalerite concentrate leaching in H2 SO4-HNO3 and tetrachloroethylene extracting of sulfur was investigated. Effects of leaching temperature, leaching time, mass ratio of liquid to solid and tetrachloroethylene addition on zinc leaching processes were examined separately. SEM images of sphalerite concentrate and residues were performed by using JEM-6700F field emission scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the number of recycling and extraction ratio of zinc was studied. The results indicate that 99.6 % zinc is obtained after leaching for 3 h at 85 ℃ and pressure of 0.1 MPa O2, with 20 g sphalerite concentrate in 200 mL leaching solution containing 2.0 mol/L H2SO4 and 0.2 mol/L HNO3, in the presence of 10 mL C2Cl4. The leaching time of zinc is 50% shorter than that in the common leaching. The coupling effect is distinct. The recycled C2Cl4 exerts little influence on extraction ratio of zinc.

  2. [Modeling research on impact of pH on metals leaching behavior of air pollution control residues from MSW incinerator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; He, Pin-Jing; Li, Xin-Jie; Shao, Li-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Metals leaching behavior of air pollution control residues (APC residues) from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) is greatly dependent on the leachate pH. pH-varying leaching tests and Visual MINTEQ modeling were conducted to investigate the mechanism of pH effect on the metals leaching characteristics from MSWI APC residues. Results show that, under acidic environment (for Cd, Zn, and Ni, pH < 8; for Pb, Cu, and Cr, pH < 6; for Al, pH < 4), leaching concentrations of metals increase greatly with the decrease of pH. Release of amphoteric metals, Pb and Zn, can be induced in strong alkaline leachate, reaching to 42 and 2.4 mg x L(-1) at pH 12.5 respectively. The equilibrium modeling results are well in agreement with the analyzed leaching concentrations. Variation of leachate pH changes the metals speciation in the leaching system, thus influencing their leaching concentrations. Speciation and leaching behavior of Pb, Zn, Cu, Ca, and Al mainly depend on their dissolution/precipitation reactions under different leachate pH. Leachability of Cd, Cr, and Ni can be lowered under acidic and neutral leachate pH due to HFO adsorption, while under alkaline conditions, the effect of adsorption is not significant and dissolution/precipitation becomes the major reactions controlling the leaching toxicity of these heavy metals.

  3. Transport of three veterinary antimicrobials from feedlot pens via simulated rainfall runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sura, Srinivas; Degenhardt, Dani; Cessna, Allan J; Larney, Francis J; Olson, Andrew F; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-07-15

    Veterinary antimicrobials are introduced to wider environments by manure application to agricultural fields or through leaching or runoff from manure storage areas (feedlots, stockpiles, windrows, lagoons). Detected in manure, manure-treated soils, and surface and ground water near intensive cattle feeding operations, there is a concern that environmental contamination by these chemicals may promote the development of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. Surface runoff and leaching appear to be major transport pathways by which veterinary antimicrobials eventually contaminate surface and ground water, respectively. A study was conducted to investigate the transport of three veterinary antimicrobials (chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, tylosin), commonly used in beef cattle production, in simulated rainfall runoff from feedlot pens. Mean concentrations of veterinary antimicrobials were 1.4 to 3.5 times higher in surface material from bedding vs. non-bedding pen areas. Runoff rates and volumetric runoff coefficients were similar across all treatments but both were significantly higher from non-bedding (0.53Lmin(-1); 0.27) than bedding areas (0.40Lmin(-1); 0.19). In keeping with concentrations in pen surface material, mean concentrations of veterinary antimicrobials were 1.4 to 2.5 times higher in runoff generated from bedding vs. non-bedding pen areas. Water solubility and sorption coefficient of antimicrobials played a role in their transport in runoff. Estimated amounts of chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, and tylosin that could potentially be transported to the feedlot catch basin during a one in 100-year precipitation event were 1.3 to 3.6ghead(-1), 1.9ghead(-1), and 0.2ghead(-1), respectively. This study demonstrates the magnitude of veterinary antimicrobial transport in feedlot pen runoff and supports the necessity of catch basins for runoff containment within feedlots.

  4. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...... with geochemical modelling were carried out both on fresh and aged samples. The results showed that the material is comparable to residues from wood combustion and the leaching behaviour was dominated by Ca-containing minerals and solid solutions. Heavy metals were detected in very low concentrations in the bulk...

  5. [Remediation of Cu-Pb-contaminated loess soil by leaching with chelating agent and biosurfactant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Wang, Jian-Tao; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Li; Yang, Ya-Ti

    2013-04-01

    Because of its strong chelation, solubilization characteristics, the chelating agents and biosurfactant are widely used in remediation of heavy metals and organic contaminated soils. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid (CIT) and dirhamnolipid (RL2) were selected as the eluent. Batch experiments and column experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching effect of the three kinds of eluent, as well as the mixture of biosurfactant and chelating agent for Cu, Pb contaminated loess soil. The results showed that the leaching efficiencies of different eluent on Cu, Pb contaminated loess soil followed the sequence of EDTA > CIT > RL2. At an eluent concentration of 0.02 mol x L(-1), the Cu leaching efficiency was 62.74% (EDTA), 52.28% (CIT) and 15.35% (RL2), respectively; the Pb leaching efficiency was 96.10% (EDTA), 23.08% (CIT) and 14.42% (RL2), respectively. When the concentration of RL2 was 100 CMC, it had synergistic effects on the other two kinds of chelating agent in Cu leaching, and when the concentration of RL2 was 200 CMC, it had antagonism effects. The effect of RL2 on EDTA in Pb leaching was similar to that in Cu leaching. Pb leaching by CIT was inhibited in the presence of RL2. EDTA and CIT could effectively remove Cu and Pb in exchangeable states, adsorption states, carbonate salts and organic bound forms; RL2 could effectively remove Cu and Pb in exchangeable and adsorbed states.

  6. Increasing silver leaching rate from leaching-resistant zinc residues by thiourea leaching method with pressurized preoxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡天觉; 曾光明; 黄国和; 袁兴中; 李建兵

    2003-01-01

    As for the leaching-resistant zinc residues, the silver leaching rate can be over 98% through the processof pressurized preoxidation and thiourea leaching. Compared with the method of extracting the silver directly fromthe leaching-resistant zinc residues, the silver leaching rate is greatly improved. The optimum preoxidation condi-tions are: particle size range 40 - 60 μm, oxygen partial pressure 106 Pa, temperature 80 - 90 ℃, pH= 1.0, andleaching time 5 h. After pretreatment, the time of thiourea leaching silver is shortened to 1.5 h, and the thioureaconsumption is reduced greatly. The oxidation mechanism and the thiourea leaching kinetics were also explored.

  7. Runoff of pesticides from rice fields in the Ile de Camargue (Rhone river delta, France): Field study and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comoretto, Laetitia; Arfib, Bruno; Talva, Romain; Chauvelon, Philippe; Pichaud, Marc; Chiron, Serge [Laboratoire Chimie et Environnement, Universite de Provence, Case 29, 3, Place Victor Hugo, F-13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France); Hoehener, Patrick [Laboratoire Chimie et Environnement, Universite de Provence, Case 29, 3, Place Victor Hugo, F-13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: hoehener@up.univ-mrs.fr

    2008-02-15

    A field study on the runoff of pesticides was conducted during the cultivation period in 2004 on a hydraulically isolated rice farm of 120 ha surface with one central water outlet. Four pesticides were studied: Alphamethrin, MCPA, Oxadiazon, and Pretilachlor. Alphamethrin concentrations in runoff never exceeded 0.001 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The three other pesticides were found in concentrations between 5.2 and 28.2 {mu}g L{sup -1} in the runoff water shortly after the application and decreased thereafter. The data for MCPA compared reasonably well with predictions by an analytical runoff model, accounting for volatilization, degradation, leaching to groundwater, and sorption to soil. The runoff model estimated that runoff accounted for as much as 18-42% of mass loss for MCPA. Less runoff is observed and predicted for Oxadiazon and Pretilachlor. It was concluded that runoff from rice paddies carries important loads of dissolved pesticides to the wetlands in the Ile de Camargue, and that the model can be used to predict this runoff. - Runoff of dissolved pesticides was measured on a rice farm in the Camargue (France) and modeled with an analytical model.

  8. Multiple runoff processes and multiple thresholds control agricultural runoff generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarpour, Shabnam; Western, Andrew W.; Adams, Russell; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-11-01

    Thresholds and hydrologic connectivity associated with runoff processes are a critical concept for understanding catchment hydrologic response at the event timescale. To date, most attention has focused on single runoff response types, and the role of multiple thresholds and flow path connectivities has not been made explicit. Here we first summarise existing knowledge on the interplay between thresholds, connectivity and runoff processes at the hillslope-small catchment scale into a single figure and use it in examining how runoff response and the catchment threshold response to rainfall affect a suite of runoff generation mechanisms in a small agricultural catchment. A 1.37 ha catchment in the Lang Lang River catchment, Victoria, Australia, was instrumented and hourly data of rainfall, runoff, shallow groundwater level and isotope water samples were collected. The rainfall, runoff and antecedent soil moisture data together with water levels at several shallow piezometers are used to identify runoff processes in the study site. We use isotope and major ion results to further support the findings of the hydrometric data. We analyse 60 rainfall events that produced 38 runoff events over two runoff seasons. Our results show that the catchment hydrologic response was typically controlled by the Antecedent Soil Moisture Index and rainfall characteristics. There was a strong seasonal effect in the antecedent moisture conditions that led to marked seasonal-scale changes in runoff response. Analysis of shallow well data revealed that streamflows early in the runoff season were dominated primarily by saturation excess overland flow from the riparian area. As the runoff season progressed, the catchment soil water storage increased and the hillslopes connected to the riparian area. The hillslopes transferred a significant amount of water to the riparian zone during and following events. Then, during a particularly wet period, this connectivity to the riparian zone, and

  9. Fractal kinetic characteristics for dissolving and leaching processes of strontium residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Longjun; WANG Xingmin; QU Ge; ZHOU Zhengguo; YUE Fenhua

    2010-01-01

    The pore structural characteristics of strontium residue were studied with the N2 adsorption method (ASAP2010). The kinetic properties concerning dissolving and leaching strontium waste were described by determining the concentrations of Sr2+, Ba2+ and soluble sulphides in solutions. The results showed that the specific surface area and pore volume increased with decreasing granule diameter, and the micropore surface of the residue was fractal. In the dissolving and leaching processes of strontium residue, soluble ion concentrations increased with decreasing granule diameter of the residue, and the reaction dimension was lower than the fractal dimension of pore surface. Sr2+ and soluble sulphide concentrations significantly exceeded the defined standard values, while Ba2+ concentrations did not, either in the dissolving or leaching solutions. In addition, dissolving and leaching reactions selectively occurred on the micropore surface of strontium residue.

  10. Runoff inundation hazard cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineux, N.; Degré, A.

    2012-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2004, Europe suffered from more than hundred major inundations, responsible for some 700 deaths, for the moving of about half a million of people and the economic losses of at least 25 billions Euros covered by the insurance policies. Within this context, EU launched the 2007/60/CE directive. The inundations are natural phenomenon. They cannot be avoided. Nevertheless this directive permits to better evaluate the risks and to coordinate the management measures taken at member states level. In most countries, inundation maps only include rivers' overflowing. In Wallonia, overland flows and mudflows also cause huge damages, and must be included in the flood hazard map. Indeed, the cleaning operations for a village can lead to an estimated cost of 11 000 €. Average construction cost of retention dams to control off-site damage caused by floods and muddy flows was valued at 380 000€, and yearly dredging costs associated with these retention ponds at 15 000€. For a small city for which a study was done in a more specific way (Gembloux), the mean annual cost for the damages that can generate the runoff is about 20 000€. This cost consists of the physical damages caused to the real estate and movable properties of the residents as well as the emergency operations of the firemen and the city. On top of damages to public infrastructure (clogging of trenches, silting up of retention ponds) and to private property by muddy flows, runoff generates a significant loss of arable land. Yet, the soil resource is not an unlimited commodity. Moreover, sediments' transfer to watercourses alters their physical and chemical quality. And that is not to mention the increased psychological stress for people. But to map overland flood and mud flow hazard is a real challenge. This poster will present the methodology used to in Wallonia. The methodology is based on 3 project rainfalls: 25, 50 and 100 years return period (consistency with the cartography of the

  11. Germanium separation and purification by leaching and precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saeid Bayat; Sajjad Aghazadeh; Mohammad Noaparast; Mahdi Gharabaghi; Behrooz Taheri

    2016-01-01

    In this research work, extraction and purification of germanium from zinc leach residues (ZLR) were investigated. The results of ICP, XRF, and atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS) tests show that contents of germanium, iron, lead, and zinc within the leaching residue were 105×10−6, 3.53%, 10.35%, and 8.8%, respectively. XRD results indicate that the main minerals were in different forms of sulfates (CaSO4·2H2O, PbSO4 and ZnSO4·6H2O), silicate (SiO2), and oxide (Fe2O3). Dissolution of leaching filter cake was carried out using 5 parameters and each in 4 levels (acid concentration, temperature, time, liquid-to-solid ratio, and stirring speed) by Taguchi method (L16), and then optimization of the effective parameters by response surface method. Under optimum conditions, zinc and germanium dissolution efficiencies were 88.71% and 8%, respectively. Leaching tests with sulfuric acid (added di-ammonium oxalate monohydrate) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) on the residues obtained from previous-stage sulfuric acid dissolution, yielded germanium and iron recoveries of 83%, 88%, 40%, and 90%, respectively. Thus, leaching experiment with sulfuric acid (added di-ammonium oxalate monohydrate) was superior to that with hydrochloric acid due to high and low extraction amounts of germanium and iron, respectively. Precipitation experiments revealed that germanium purification with tannic acid presented a better result compared to sodium hydroxide and ammonia. Under optimum conditions, contents of germanium and iron in the solution after precipitation were 0.1505% and 14.7% with precipitation yields of 91% and 52%, respectively.

  12. Spatial and temporal variation of nitrogen exported by runoff from sandy agricultural soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The eutrophication problem has drawn attention to nutrient leaching from agricultural soils.and an understanding of spatial and temporal variability is needed to develop decision-making tools.Thus,eleven sites were selected to monitor,over a two-year period,spatial and temporal variation of runoff discharge and various forms of N in surface runoff in sandy agricultural soils.Factors influencing the variation of runoff discharge and various forms of N in surface runoff were analyzed.Variation of annual rainfall was small among 11 situs.especially between 2001 and 2002.However,variation of annual discharge was significant among the sites.The results suggest that rainfall patterns and land usc had significant effect on discharge.The concentrations of total N,total kjeldahl N (TKN),organic matter-associated N (OM-N),NO3--N,and NH4+-N in the runoff ranged widely from 0.25 to 54.1,0.15 to 20.3,0.00 to 14.6,0.00 to 45.3,and 0.00 to 19.7 mg/L,respectively.Spatial and temporal variations in the N concentration and runoff discharge were noted among the different sites.Annual loads of N in the runoff varied widely among monitoring sites and depend mainly on runoff discharge.High loads of total N,OM-N,NO3--N,and NH4+-N in the runoff either in citrus groves or on vegetable farms occurred from June to October for each year,which coincided with the rainy season in the region.This study found that N in surface runoff was related to rainfall intensity,soil N level,and fertilizer use.

  13. Spatial and temporal variation of nitrogen exported by runoff from sandy agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Kui; Wang, Li-Ping; He, Zhen-Li

    2007-01-01

    The eutrophication problem has drawn attention to nutrient leaching from agricultural soils, and an understanding of spatial and temporal variability is needed to develop decision-making tools. Thus, eleven sites were selected to monitor, over a two-year period, spatial and temporal variation of runoff discharge and various forms of N in surface runoff in sandy agricultural soils. Factors influencing the variation of runoff discharge and various forms of N in surface runoff were analyzed. Variation of annual rainfall was small among 11 sites, especially between 2001 and 2002. However, variation of annual discharge was significant among the sites. The results suggest that rainfall patterns and land use had significant effect on discharge. The concentrations of total N, total kjeldahl N (TKN), organic matter-associated N (OM-N), NO3(-)-N, and NH4(+)-N in the runoff ranged widely from 0.25 to 54.1, 0.15 to 20.3, 0.00 to 14.6, 0.00 to 45.3, and 0.00 to 19.7 mg/L, respectively. Spatial and temporal variations in the N concentration and runoff discharge were noted among the different sites. Annual loads of N in the runoff varied widely among monitoring sites and depend mainly on runoff discharge. High loads of total N, OM-N, NO3(-)-N, and NH4(+)-N in the runoff either in citrus groves or on vegetable farms occurred from June to October for each year, which coincided with the rainy season in the region. This study found that N in surface runoff was related to rainfall intensity, soil N level, and fertilizer use.

  14. Zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily P; Ren, Zhiyong; Mays, David C

    2012-12-04

    Because tires contain approximately 1-2% zinc by weight, zinc leaching is an environmental concern associated with civil engineering applications of tire crumb rubber. An assessment of zinc leaching data from 14 studies in the published literature indicates that increasing zinc leaching is associated with lower pH and longer leaching times, but the data display a wide range of zinc concentrations, and do not address the effect of crumb rubber size or the dynamics of zinc leaching during flow through porous crumb rubber. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of crumb rubber size using the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), the effect of exposure time using quiescent batch leaching tests, and the dynamics of zinc leaching using column tests. Results indicate that zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber increases with smaller crumb rubber and longer exposure time. Results from SPLP and quiescent batch leaching tests are interpreted with a single-parameter leaching model that predicts a constant rate of zinc leaching up to 96 h. Breakthrough curves from column tests displayed an initial pulse of elevated zinc concentration (~3 mg/L) before settling down to a steady-state value (~0.2 mg/L), and were modeled with the software package HYDRUS-1D. Washing crumb rubber reduces this initial pulse but does not change the steady-state value. No leaching experiment significantly reduced the reservoir of zinc in the crumb rubber.

  15. Pesticide leaching via subsurface drains in different hydrologic situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajíček, Antonín; Fučík, Petr; Liška, Marek; Dobiáš, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    degradates varried between 1 730 - 5 760 ng/l. During R-R events, pesticide concentration varried according to runoff composition and time between sprayng and event. Event with no protortiom of event water in drainage runoff were typical by incereas in degradates concentrations (up to 20 000ng/l) and none or low occurence of parent matters. Events with significant event water proportion in drainage runoff were characterised by decrease in degradates concentrations and (when event happened soon affter spraying) by presence of paternal pesticides in drinage runoff. Instanteous concentrations of paren matters can be extremely high in that causes, up to 23 000 ng/l in drainage waters and up to 40 000 ng/l in small stream. Above results suggest that drainage systems could act as significant source of pesticide leaching. When parent compounds leaches via tile drainage systems, there are some border conditions that must exist together such as the occurence of R-R event soon after the pests application and the presence of event water (or water with short residence time in the catchment) in the drainage runoff.

  16. Accelerated leach test of paraffin waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Kim, Ju Youl; Cho, Young Ok; Park, Joo Wan [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, KEPCO, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Leach test for the paraffin waste forms, which was recently introduced to immobilize the dry radioactive waste concentrates at the nuclear power plants in Korea, was conducted in accordance with the Accelerated Leach Test adopted by ASTM as Standard Test Method. The specimens were made of 22 w% paraffin, 78 w% boric acid, and little amount of Co, Sr. and Cs to determine the leaching mechanism. Leach tests for the specimens with different amounts of additives were conducted at three temperatures to investigate the effect of additives on the leach rates. The leach rates of boric acid, Co, Sr, and Cs were measured. The results showed that boric acid and Co leached congruently. The leaching rates are dependent on the temperature as expected. The ALT computer program was used to simulate the experimental data. The ALT program calculation shows that the diffusion can not explain the experimental data. (author)

  17. The biological effects of magnesium-leached chrysotile asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A.; Davies, P.; Wagner, J. C.; Berry, G.; Holmes, A.

    1977-01-01

    Chrysotile asbestos was leached in N hydrochloric acid for varying times to produce a range of magnesium-depleted samples. The protein adsorptive capacity, the haemolytic activity, and the capacity to cause selective release of acid hydrolases from macrophages were measured for the various samples in vitro. The carcinogenicity of the same materials was determined following intrapleural inoculation in rats. The adsorptive capacity for albumin decreased linearly with magnesium removal. The haemolytic activity also declined until about half the magnesium had been removed, after which there was little further change. The selective release of acid hydrolases from macrophages in culture increased up to the point at which half the magnesium had been removed but by 90% depletion had declined rapidly. The carcinogenicity of 50% -depleted chrysotile was similar to that of intact, but at 90% depletion the incidence of mesothelial tumours had fallen considerably. There was no evidence that the leached samples fragmented more than the unleached in vivo. Images Fig. 1 PMID:588440

  18. Copper leaching of MSWI bottom ash co-disposed with refuse: effect of short-term accelerated weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lianghu; Guo, Guangzhai; Shi, Xinlong; Zuo, Minyu; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Aihua; Zhao, Youcai

    2013-06-01

    Co-disposal of refuse with municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash (IBA) either multi-layered as landfill cover or mixed with refuse could pose additional risk to the environment because of enhanced leaching of heavy metals, especially Cu. This study applied short-term accelerated weathering to IBA, and monitored the mineralogical and chemical properties of IBA during the weathering process. Cu extractability of the weathered IBA was then evaluated using standard leaching protocols (i.e. SPLP and TCLP) and co-disposal leaching procedure. The results showed that weathering had little or no beneficial effect on Cu leaching in SPLP and TCLP, which can be explained by the adsorption and complexation of Cu with DOM. However, the Cu leaching of weathered IBA was reduced significantly when situated in fresh simulated landfill leachate. This was attributed to weakening Cu complexation with fulvic acid or hydrophilic fractions and/or intensifying Cu absorption to neoformed hydr(oxide) minerals in weathered IBA. The amount of total leaching Cu and Cu in free or labile complex fraction (the fraction with the highest mobility and bio-toxicity) of the 408-h weathered IBA were remarkably decreased by 86.3% and 97.6% in the 15-day co-disposal leaching test. Accelerated weathering of IBA may be an effective pretreatment method to decrease Cu leaching prior to its co-disposal with refuse. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimating subsoil resistance to nitrate leaching from easily measurable pedological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Keiti Nakagawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Leaching of nitrate (NO3- can increase the groundwater concentration of this anion and reduce the agronomical effectiveness of nitrogen fertilizers. The main soil property inversely related to NO3- leaching is the anion exchange capacity (AEC, whose determination is however too time-consuming for being carried out in soil testing laboratories. For this reason, this study evaluated if more easily measurable soil properties could be used to estimate the resistance of subsoils to NO3- leaching. Samples from the subsurface layer (20-40 cm of 24 representative soils of São Paulo State were characterized for particle-size distribution and for chemical and electrochemical properties. The subsoil content of adsorbed NO3- was calculated from the difference between the NO3- contents extracted with 1 mol L-1 KCl and with water; furthermore, NO3- leaching was studied in miscible displacement experiments. The results of both adsorption and leaching experiments were consistent with the well-known role exerted by AEC on the nitrate behavior in weathered soils. Multiple regression analysis indicated that in subsoils with (i low values of remaining phosphorus (Prem, (ii low soil pH values measured in water (pH H2O, and (iii high pH values measured in 1 moL L-1 KCl (pH KCl, the amounts of surface positive charges tend to be greater. For this reason, NO3- leaching tends to be slower in these subsoils, even under saturated flow condition.

  20. Leaching of iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) anions from synthetic layered double hydroxide materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Frederick L; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L

    2016-09-15

    Several studies have previously demonstrated that layered double hydroxides (LDHs) show considerable potential for the adsorption of radioiodine from aqueous solution; however, few studies have demonstrated that these materials are able to store radioactive (131)I for an acceptable period. The leaching of iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) form Mg/Al LDHs has been carried out. Contact time appeared to be a more significant variable for the leaching of iodate (IO3(-)) compared to that of iodide (I(-)). Experimental results are fitted to the pseudo second order model, suggesting that diffusion is likely to be the rate-limiting step. The presence of carbonate in the leaching solution appeared to significantly increase the leaching of iodide (I(-)) as did the presence of chloride to a lesser extent. The maximum amount of iodate (IO3(-)) leached using ultrapure water as the leaching solution was 21% of the iodate (IO3(-)) originally present. The corresponding result for iodide (I(-)) was even lower at 3%.

  1. Intensified alkaline leaching pretreatment of refractory gold concentrates at common temperature and pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟宇群; 吴敏杰; 宿少玲; 王隆保

    2003-01-01

    A new process for the hydrometallurgy of refractory gold concentrates was presented. The process comprises grinding-leaching, intensified alkaline leaching (IAL), cyanidation and adsorption. In a stirring-type pulverizing-leaching tower mill, the concentrate is ground to <35.6μm of 95.5 % while simultaneously leached by NaOH of 12kg/t, then carried out intensified alkaline leaching for 48h by NaOH of 108kg/t in enhanced agitation tanks with the pulp concentration of 40% solids at the environmental temperature of 9.5 ~ 13.5℃ and the environmental pressure of 105Pa. The oxidation rate of As is 94.9%, and 47.6% for S. The total consumption of NaOH is only 20% of that theoretically calculated under the conditions of full oxidation at the same oxidation rates of arsenic to arsenate and sulfur to sulfate. The gold leaching rate by NaCN in 24h is increased from 9.2% before pretreatment to 94.2%. The consumption of NaCN is 7.5kg/t, which is one times less than that before pretreatment. The extraction cost of gold is about 422Yuan/t.

  2. [Effects of biochar on soil nutrients leaching and potential mechanisms: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-xue; Lyu, Hao-hao; Shi, Yan; Wang, Yao-feng; Zhong, Zhe-ke; Yang, Sheng-mao

    2015-01-01

    Controlling soil nutrient leaching in farmland ecosystems has been a hotspot in the research field of agricultural environment. Biochar has its unique physical and chemical properties, playing a significant role in enhancing soil carbon storage, improving soil quality and increasing crop yield. As a kind of new exogenous material, biochar has the potential in impacting soil nutrient cycling directly or indirectly, and has profound influences on soil nutrient leaching. This paper analyzed the intrinsic factors affecting how biochar affects soil nutrient leaching, such as the physical and chemical properties of biochar, and the interaction between biochar and soil organisms. Then the latest literatures regarding the external factors, including biochar application rates, soil types, depth of soil layer, fertilization conditions and temporal dynamics, through which biochar influences soil nutrient (especially nitrogen and phosphorus) leaching were reviewed. On that basis, four related action mechanisms were clarified, including direct adsorption of nutrients by biochar due to its micropore structure or surface charge, influencing nutrient leaching through increasing soil water- holding capacity, influencing nutrient cycling through the interaction with soil microbes, and preferential transport of absorbed nutrients by fine biochar particles. At last future research directions for better understanding the interactions between biochar and nutrient leaching in the soil were proposed.

  3. Bioretention column studies of phosphorus removal from urban stormwater runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chi-hsu; Davis, Allen P; Needelman, Brian A

    2007-02-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of bioretention as a stormwater management practice using repetitive bioretention columns for phosphorus removal. Bioretention media, with a higher short-term phosphorus sorption capacity, retained more phosphorus from infiltrating runoff after 3 mg/L phosphorus loading. A surface mulch layer prevented clogging after repetitive total suspended solids input. Evidence suggests that long-term phosphorus reactions will regenerate active short-term phosphorus adsorption sites. A high hydraulic conductivity media overlaying one with low hydraulic conductivity resulted in a higher runoff infiltration rate, from 0.51 to 0.16 cm/min at a fixed 15-cm head, and was more efficient in phosphorus removal (85% mass removal) than a profile with low conductivity media over high (63% mass removal). Media extractions suggest that most of the retained phosphorus in the media layers is available for vegetative uptake and that environmental risk thresholds were not exceeded.

  4. Highway runoff quality in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu Desta, Mesfin; Bruen, Michael; Higgins, Neil; Johnston, Paul

    2007-04-01

    Highway runoff has been identified as a significant source of contaminants that impact on the receiving aquatic environment. Several studies have been completed documenting the characteristics of highway runoff and its implication to the receiving water in the UK and elsewhere. However, very little information is available for Ireland. The objective of this study was to determine the quality of highway runoff from major Irish roads under the current road drainage design and maintenance practice. Four sites were selected from the M4 and the M7 motorways outside Dublin. Automatic samplers and continuous monitoring devices were deployed to sample and monitor the runoff quality and quantity. More than 42 storm events were sampled and analysed for the heavy metals Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn, 16 US EPA specified PAHs, volatile organic compounds including MTBE, and a number of conventional pollutants. All samples were analysed based on the Standard Methods. Significant quantities of solids and heavy metals were detected at all sites. PAHs were not detected very often, but when detected the values were different from quantities observed in UK highways. The heavy metal concentrations were strongly related to the total suspended solids concentrations, which has a useful implication for runoff management strategies. No strong relationship was discovered between pollutant concentrations and event characteristics such as rainfall intensity, antecedent dry days (ADD), or rainfall depth (volume). This study has demonstrated that runoff from Irish motorways was not any cleaner than in the UK although the traffic volume at the monitored sites was relatively smaller. This calls for a site specific investigation of highway runoff quality before adopting a given management strategy.

  5. Adsorption ability of rare earth elements on clay minerals and its practical performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖燕飞; 龙志奇; 黄莉; 冯宗玉; 王良士

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of rare earth elements on clay minerals would have great influence on the mineralization process and the leaching process of the ion-adsorption type rare earths ore. In this work, the adsorption thermodynamics of REEs on kaolin were investigated thoroughly and systematically. The experimental results showed that the adsorption characteristics of La, Nd, Y on kaolin did fit well with the Langmuir isotherm model and their saturated adsorption capacities were 1.731, 1.587 and 0.971 mg/g, re-spectively. The free energy change (ΔG) values were –16.91 kJ/mol (La), –16.05 kJ/mol (Nd) and –15.58 kJ/mol (Y), respectively. The negative values ofΔG demonstrated that the adsorption of rare earth on kaolin was a spontaneously physisorption process. The deposit characteristic of the volcanic ion-adsorption type rare earths ore and the behavior of the rare earth in the column leaching process were also developed here. With the increase of the ore body depth, the distribution of the LREEs decreased and the HREEs increased. And the slight differences in the adsorption ability of REEs on clay minerals led to the fractionation effect in the column leaching process. These developed more evidences and better understanding of metallogenic regularity, and provided a theoretical ba-sis and scientific approach to separation of the HREEs and LREEs in the leaching process.

  6. Field-scale evaluation of water fluxes and manure solution leaching in feedlot pen soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana R; Maisonnave, Roberto; Massobrio, Marcelo J; Fabrizio de Iorio, Alicia R

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of beef cattle manure on feedlot pen surfaces generates large amounts of dissolved solutes that can be mobilized by water fluxes, affecting surface and groundwater quality. Our objective was to examine the long-term impacts of a beef cattle feeding operation on water fluxes and manure leaching in feedlot pens located on sandy loam soils of the subhumid Sandy Pampa region in Argentina. Bulk density, gravimetric moisture content, and chloride concentration were quantified. Rain simulation trials were performed to estimate infiltration and runoff rates. Using chloride ion as a tracer, profile analysis techniques were applied to estimate the soil moisture flux and manure conservative chemical components leaching rates. An organic stratum was found over the surface of the pen soil, separated from the underlying soil by a highly compacted thin layer (the manure-soil interface). The soil beneath the organic layer showed greater bulk density in the A horizon than in the control soil and had greater moisture content. Greater concentrations of chloride were found as a consequence of the partial sealing of the manure-soil interface. Surface runoff was the dominant process in the feedlot pen soil, whereas infiltration was the main process in control soil. Soil moisture flux beneath pens decreased substantially after 15 yr of activity. The estimated minimum leaching rate of chloride was 13 times faster than the estimated soil moisture flux. This difference suggests that chloride ions are not exclusively transported by advective flow under our conditions but also by solute diffusion and preferential flow.

  7. Effect of Medicinal Plants Cultivation on the Physicochemical Properties of Leached Chernozem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svistova, I. D.; Stekol'nikov, K. E.; Paramonov, A. Yu.; Kuvshinova, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    For the first time, a nonspecific neutralizing effect of rhizodeposits of medicinal plants has been found in a leached chernozem. The neutralization of actual, exchangeable, and total acidity of the soil takes place against the background of a decrease in the activity of calcium ions in the soil solution. It can be supposed that this effect is due to the release of secondary metabolites of phenol nature in the rhizodeposits. These substances can change the anionic composition of the soil adsorption complex. Plant species with the maximum effect on the composition of the soil adsorption complex have been identified.

  8. Stochastic analyses of field-scale pesticide leaching risk as influenced by spatial variability in physical and biochemical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loll, Per; Moldrup, Per

    2000-04-01

    Field-scale pesticide leaching risk assessments were performed by incorporating a numerical, one-dimensional, water and pesticide transport and fate model into the two-step stochastic modeling approach by Loll and Moldrup [1998]. The numerical model included first-order pesticide degradation, linear equilibrium adsorption, and plant uptake of water and pesticide. Simazine was used as a model pesticide, and leaching risk was expressed as the cumulative mass fraction of applied pesticide leached below 100 cm after 1 year. Spatial variability in soil physical and biochemical data, as well as measured meteorological data from an average and a relatively wet year, was considered for two Danish field sites: (1) a coarse sandy soil, with relatively small variability in hydraulic properties, and (2) a sandy loam, with large variability in hydraulic properties. The two-step stochastic modeling approach was used to investigate the relative impact of spatial variability in saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks, soil-water retention through the Campbell [974] soil-water retention parameter b, and pesticide sorption through the organic carbon content (OC). For the coarse sandy soil, field-scale spatial variability in OC was the single most important parameter influencing leaching risk, whereas for the sandy loam, Ks was found more important than OC. The relative impact of field-scale spatial variability in these parameters was found independent of the meteorological conditions, whereas the absolute level of leaching risk was highly dependent on the meteorological conditions. Assuming a linear dependency between pesticide half-life and OC, a unified approach to modeling simultaneous field-scale variability in biodegradation and adsorption was proposed. Leaching risk assessments based on this approach showed that the parts of the field with both low biological activity and low adsorption capacity contributed with a dramatic increase in leaching risk, and suggested that field

  9. Nitrate leaching from Silage Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years the area with maize in Denmark has increased dramatically and reached 163,000 ha in 2008. Silage maize is easy to grow, is a suitable fodder for cows and goes well with grass-clover in the diet. This means that silage maize is often found in crop rotations with grass-clover on sandy soils in western Denmark. The ploughing in of grass-clover fields poses a serious risk of increased nitrate leaching on a coarse sandy soil, even when carried out in spring. With increased...

  10. Reduced nutrient pollution in a rural stream following septic tank upgrade and installation of runoff retention measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenden, M C; Quinton, J N; Favaretto, N; Deasy, C; Surridge, B

    2014-07-01

    Surface water quality in the UK and much of Western Europe has improved in recent decades, in response to better point source controls and the regulation of fertilizer, manure and slurry use. However, diffuse sources of pollution, such as leaching or runoff of nutrients from agricultural fields, and micro-point sources including farmyards, manure heaps and septic tank sewerage systems, particularly systems without soil adsorption beds, are now hypothesised to contribute a significant proportion of the nutrients delivered to surface watercourses. Tackling such sources in an integrated manner is vital, if improvements in freshwater quality are to continue. In this research, we consider the combined effect of constructing small field wetlands and improving a septic tank system on stream water quality within an agricultural catchment in Cumbria, UK. Water quality in the ditch-wetland system was monitored by manual sampling at fortnightly intervals (April-October 2011 and February-October 2012), with the septic tank improvement taking place in February 2012. Reductions in nutrient concentrations were observed through the catchment, by up to 60% when considering total phosphorus (TP) entering and leaving a wetland with a long residence time. Average fluxes of TP, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and ammonium-N (NH4-N) at the head of the ditch system in 2011 (before septic tank improvement) compared to 2012 (after septic tank improvement) were reduced by 28%, 9% and 37% respectively. However, TP concentration data continue to show a clear dilution with increasing flow, indicating that the system remained point source dominated even after the septic tank improvement.

  11. Forecasting runoff from Pennsylvania landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying sites prone to surface runoff has been a cornerstone of conservation and nutrient management programs, relying upon site assessment tools that support strategic, as opposed to operational, decision making. We sought to develop simple, empirical models to represent two highly different me...

  12. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations.

  13. Tillage, cover-crop residue management, and irrigation incorporation impact on fomesafen runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Thomas L; Truman, Clint C; Webster, Theodore M; Bosch, David D; Strickland, Timothy C

    2011-07-27

    Intensive glyphosate use has contributed to the evolution and occurrence of glyphosate-resistant weeds that threaten production of many crops. Sustained use of this highly valued herbicide requires rotation and/or substitution of herbicides with different modes of action. Cotton growers have shown considerable interest in the protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor, fomesafen. Following registration for cotton in 2008, use has increased rapidly. Environmental fate data in major use areas are needed to appropriately evaluate risks. Field-based rainfall simulation was used to evaluate fomesafen runoff potential with and without irrigation incorporation in a conventional tillage system (CT) and when conservation tillage (CsT) was practiced with and without cover crop residue rolling. Without irrigation incorporation, relatively high runoff, about 5% of applied, was measured from the CT system, indicating that this compound may present a runoff risk. Runoff was reduced by >50% when the herbicide was irrigation incorporated after application or when used with a CsT system. Data indicate that these practices should be implemented whenever possible to reduce fomesafen runoff risk. Results also raised concerns about leaching and potential groundwater contamination and crop injury due to rapid washoff from cover crop residues in CsT systems. Further work is needed to address these concerns.

  14. MINTEQ modeling for evaluating the leaching behavior of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; JIANG Jianguo; CHEN Maozhe

    2008-01-01

    At present, all kinds of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash stabilization technology has been reported and successfully applied in many countries. However, leaching procedures are very different that the technologies lack uniform standard, and it is even impossible to predict the long-term stabilization. Geochemical model can explain the environmental stabilization based on chemical phase and thermodynamic crystal structure, and it is also able to guide the development of environment-friendly stabilization technology and choosing of chemical agents. Both experiment analysis and geochemical modeling were used to study the correlation between leaching behavior of MSWI fly ash and variation of pH. Dissolution/precipitation mechanism was applied in the simulation. The result indicated that the pH-dependent leaching behavior predicted by Visual MINTEQ is well in agreement with the result of pH-dependent test. pH value of leachate can significantly change the leaching behavior of MSWI fly ash. The leaching behavior of heavy metals for Pb and Cd is controlled by dissolution/precipitation mechanism, whereas for Zn and Ni, it is effected by surface adsorption reaction over a special extent of pH value.

  15. Heavy metals in urban soils of East St. Louis, IL. Part II: Leaching characteristics and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, M D; Landsberger, S

    2000-09-01

    The city of East St. Louis, IL, has a history of abundant industrial activities including smelters of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, a coal-fired power plant, companies that produced organic and inorganic chemicals, and petroleum refineries. Following a gross assessment of heavy metals in the community soils (see Part I of this two-part series), leaching tests were performed on specific soils to elucidate heavy metal-associated mineral fractions and general leachability. Leaching experiments, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TLCP) and column tests, and sequential extractions, illustrated the low leachability of metals in East St. Louis soils. The column leachate results were modeled using a formulation developed for fly ash leaching. The importance of instantaneous dissolution was evident from the model. By incorporating desorption/adsorption terms into the source term, the model was adapted very well to the time-dependent heavy metal leachate concentrations. The results demonstrate the utility of a simple model to describe heavy metal leaching from contaminated soils.

  16. MINTEQ modeling for evaluating the leaching behavior of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Jianguo; Chen, Maozhe

    2008-01-01

    At present, all kinds of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash stabilization technology has been reported and successfully applied in many countries. However, leaching procedures are very different that the technologies lack uniform standard, and it is even impossible to predict the long-term stabilization. Geochemical model can explain the environmental stabilization based on chemical phase and thermodynamic crystal structure, and it is also able to guide the development of environment-friendly stabilization technology and choosing of chemical agents. Both experiment analysis and geochemical modeling were used to study the correlation between leaching behavior of MSWI fly ash and variation of pH. Dissolution/precipitation mechanism was applied in the simulation. The result indicated that the pH-dependent leaching behavior predicted by Visual MINTEQ is well in agreement with the result of pH-dependent test. pH value of leachate can significantly change the leaching behavior of MSWI fly ash. The leaching behavior of heavy metals for Pb and Cd is controlled by dissolution/precipitation mechanism, whereas for Zn and Ni, it is effected by surface adsorption reaction over a special extent of pH value.

  17. Retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash under the landfill circumstance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could affect its migration in the landfill. In this study, the effect of the dosage of MSWI bottom ash as well as the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the nitrite retention and leaching behavior was investigated by batch experiments. The highest removal percentage (73.0%) of nitrite was observed when the dosage of MSWI bottom ash was 10 g L(-1) in 2 mg L(-1) nitrite solution. Further increase of the dosage would retard the retention, as the nitrite leaching from MSWI bottom ash was enhanced. The optimum retention of nitrite was observed when the pH was 5.0, while the leaching of nitrite showed a consistent reduction with the increase of pH. Besides, the presence of Cl(-), SO4(2)(-) and acetic acid could enhance the leaching of nitrite and mitigate the retention process. However, the retention of nitrite was enhanced by PO4(3)(-), which was probably due to the formation of the apatite, an active material for the adsorption of the nitrite. These results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of nitrite in the landfill, which was related to the variation of the landfill circumstance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tricht, K.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370612345; Van Den Broeke, M. R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; Turner, D. D.; Van Lipzig, N. P M

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative

  19. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tricht, K.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370612345; Van Den Broeke, M. R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; Turner, D. D.; Van Lipzig, N. P M

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative

  20. Leaching of heavy metals from contaminated soils: an experimental and modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Joris J; Meeussen, Johannes C L; Comans, Rob N J

    2004-08-15

    In this paper, we characterize the leaching of heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) from eight contaminated soils over a wide range of pH (pH 0.4-12) using an original approach based on batch pH-static leaching experiments in combination with selective chemical extractions and geochemical modeling. The leached concentrations of the heavy metals are generally much lower than the total concentrations and show a strong pH dependency, resulting in "V-shaped" leaching curves with orders of magnitude changes in solution concentrations. The "multisurface" model used incorporates adsorption to dissolved and solid organic matter (NICA-Donnan), iron/aluminum (hydr)oxide (generalized two-layer model) and clay (Donnan model). These models were applied without modifications, and only the standard set of binding constants and parameters was used (i.e., without any fitting). The model predictions of heavy metal leaching are generally adequate and sometimes excellent. Results from speciation calculations are consistent with the well-recognized importance of organic matter as the dominant reactive solid phase in soils. The observed differences between soils with respect to element speciation in the solid phase correspond to the relative amounts of the reactive surfaces present in the soils. In the solution phase, complexes with dissolved organic matter (DOM) are predominant over most of the pH range. Free metal ions (Me2+) are generally the dominant species below pH 4. The combination of the experimental and modeling approach as used in this study is shown to be promising because it leads to a more fundamental understanding of the pH-dependent leaching processes in soils. The "multisurface" modeling approach, with the selected sorption models, is shown to be able to adequately predict the leaching of heavy metals from contaminated soils over a wide range of conditions, without any fitting of parameters.

  1. Leaching of Terbutryn and Its Photodegradation Products from Artificial Walls under Natural Weather Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Ulla E; Minelgaite, Greta; Schlüsener, Michael; Ternes, Thomas; Vollertsen, Jes; Bester, Kai

    2016-04-19

    Terbutryn is a commonly used biocide in construction materials. Especially polymer-resin-based renders and paints, used in external thermal insulation composite systems, are very susceptible to microbial deterioration. Previous studies have shown that biocides leach out of the material when contacted with rainwater; thus, they reach surface waters where they might have adverse effects on aquatic organisms. The knowledge on the long-term leaching performance and especially the formation and fate of degradation products is rare. In the present study, the leaching of terbutryn from artificial walls equipped with two types of render was observed for 19 months. In addition to concentration and mass load determinations for terbutryn, photodegradation products were identified and studied in the leachate and render. The results show that terbutryn leached mainly within the first 6-12 months. During the exposure, only 3% of the initial terbutryn was emitted to the runoff, while 64-80% remained in the coating. The overall mass balance could be closed by including several degradation products. Contrary to expectations, the major fraction of transformation products remained in the material and was not washed off immediately, which is of high importance for the long-term assessment of biocides in coating materials.

  2. Atrazine leaching from biochar-amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Kyle B; Lehmann, Johannes; Walter, M Todd

    2014-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine is used extensively throughout the United States, and is a widespread groundwater and surface water contaminant. Biochar has been shown to strongly sorb organic compounds and could be used to reduce atrazine leaching. We used lab and field experiments to determine biochar impacts on atrazine leaching under increasingly heterogeneous soil conditions. Application of pine chip biochar (commercially pyrolyzed between 300 and 550 °C) reduced cumulative atrazine leaching by 52% in homogenized (packed) soil columns (p=0.0298). Biochar additions in undisturbed soil columns did not significantly (p>0.05) reduce atrazine leaching. Mean peak groundwater atrazine concentrations were 53% lower in a field experiment after additions of 10 t ha(-1) acidified biochar (p=0.0056) relative to no biochar additions. Equivalent peat applications by dry mass had no effect on atrazine leaching. Plots receiving a peat-biochar mixture showed no reduction, suggesting that the peat organic matter may compete with atrazine for biochar sorption sites. Several individual measurement values outside the 99% confidence interval in perched groundwater concentrations indicate that macropore structure could contribute to rare, large leaching events that are not effectively reduced by biochar. We conclude that biochar application has the potential to decrease peak atrazine leaching, but heterogeneous soil conditions, especially preferential flow paths, may reduce this impact. Long-term atrazine leaching reductions are also uncertain.

  3. Properties of Leach-Flessas-Gorringe polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursey, D. L.

    1990-09-01

    A generating function is obtained for the polynomials recently introduced by Leach, Flessas, and Gorringe [J. Math. Phys. 30, 406 (1989)], and is then used to relate the Leach-Flessas-Gorringe (or LFG) polynomials to Hermite polynomials. The generating function is also used to express a number of integrals involving the LFG polynomials as finite sums of parabolic cylinder functions.

  4. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral Processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestimates the levels of metals such as oxo...

  5. PRESERVATIVE LEACHING FROM WEATHERED CCA-TREATED WOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disposal of discarded CCA-treated wood in landfills raises concerns with respect to leaching of preservative compounds. When unweathered CCA-treated wood is leached using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), arsenic concentrations exceed the toxicity characteris...

  6. LEACH Algorithm Based on Load Balancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses advantages of LEACH Algorithm and the existing improved model which takes the famous hierarchy clustering routing protocol LEACH Algorithm as researching object. Then the paper indicates the problem that in the algorithm capacity factor of cluster head node is not taken into account leading the structure of clusters to be not so reasonable. This research discusses an energy-uniform cluster and cluster head selecting mechanism in which “Pseudo cluster head” concept is introduced in order to coordinate with “Load Monitor” Mechanism and “Load Leisure” Mechanism to maintain load balancing of cluster head character and stability of network topology. On the basis of LEACH Protocol improving algorithm of LEACH-C, CEFL and DCHS. NS2 simulation instrument is applied to do simulation analysis on the improved algorithm. Simulation result shows that LEACH-P Protocol effectively increase energy utilization efficiency, lengthens network lifetime and balances network load.  

  7. Rule of oxygen transmission in dump leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    According to the chemical equations, the flux and concentration of oxygen required during bacterial leaching sulfuric mineral were investigated; the rule of air bubble transmitted in granular was researched in the Dump Leaching Plant of Dexing Copper Mine. The results show that lack of oxygen in dump leaching is the critical factor of restricting leaching reaction. Pyrite is the primary oxygen-consuming mineral in bioleaching. When its content is too high, it needs a great deal of oxygen for reaction and competes for the finite oxygen with objective minerals, and thus the leaching velocity decreases greatly. The average size of ore particles and diameter of bubbles are the key parameters affecting the mass transfer coefficient. Reverse analysis was adopted, and it shows that 44.8 m3 air per unit ore can meet the requirement of production if the molar ratio of pyrite to chalcopyrite is 10.

  8. Leaching of heavy metals from steelmaking slags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, J. F. P.; Pino, C. G.

    2006-07-01

    Leaching tests with EAF and Ladle slags were performed, using a flow through tests and the standard batch test DIN 38414-S4. The previous method was used to simulate the leaching behaviour of steel slags under landfill. the chemical analysis of the leachates during this period shows, in general, for both types of slag, and increase of heavy metal releases with ageing. Standard test method DIN 38414-S4 was used to evaluate leachability of heavy metals by water in unprocessed slags. After more than one year of trials, slang samples submitted to these trials presented very low total leaching levels. The most extracted elements are calcium and magnesium. Nevertheless, in flow-though test, calcium and magnesium leached from solid slags are below 0.5% and all other metals below 0.1%. Leachates obtained with DIN 38414-S4 present, as expected, higher leaching values; however, these are inferior to 5% (Ca) and 1% (other elements). (Author) 12 refs.

  9. Microbial leaching of marmatite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; QIU Guan-zhou; QIN Wen-qing; ZHANG Yan-sheng

    2006-01-01

    The bioleaching of marmatite in shaken flasks was studied. After leaching for 29 days, the leaching ratio of zinc was 91%.Three kinds of bacteria, mixture-based bacteria, 9K-based bacteria and sulfur-based bacteria were used in marmatite leaching, of which the mixture-based bacteria have the best leaching result while the sulfur-based bacteria have the worst. By analyzing the leaching residue using SEM and EDXA, the marmatite leaching mechanism was discussed.

  10. Chemical weathering and runoff chemistry in a steep headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Suzanne Prestrud; Dietrich, William E.

    2001-07-01

    We present here deductions about the location, rate, and mechanisms of chemical weathering in a small catchment based on a catchment-scale sprinkling experiment. In this experiment demineralized water was applied at an approximately steady rate in the CB1 catchment in the Oregon Coast Range to reach and maintain a quasi-steady discharge for a period of 4 days. Because of nearly steady flow conditions within the catchment, the contribution to solute fluxes from soil and bedrock could be partitioned. One half of the solute flux from the catchment derived from colluvial soil, and one half from weathering in bedrock. This implies more intense weathering in the thin colluvium mantling the catchment than in the thick underlying weathered bedrock. The annual solute flux from the catchment, scaled to the annual runoff from the catchment, is 32 +/- 10 t km-2 year-1, equivalent to published chemical denudation rates for nearby rivers with drainage areas 106 times greater than the experiment site. Soil waters sampled during the sprinkling experiment had steady compositions following a period of transient water flow conditions, implying steady-state chemical evolution in the soil. The waters leached organic anions from shallow depths in the soil, which solubilized aluminium and iron, indicating that podzolization is occurring in these soils. Carbonate dissolution appears to be an important source of solutes from the bedrock, despite being present as only a minor phase in the rock. Water balance suggests that the residence time of water in the catchment is about 2 months, and that typical 24 h storms displace only a fraction of the stored water. A consequence is that runoff chemistry is dominated by old water, which imposes strong limits on the variability of runoff composition.

  11. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  12. Isopentyl-Sulfide-Impregnated Nano-MnO2 for the Selective Sorption of Pd(II from the Leaching Liquor of Ores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengjie Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional separation methods are not suitable for recovering palladium present in low concentrations in ore leaching solutions. In this study, a novel isopentyl sulfide (S201-impregnated α-MnO2 nanorod adsorbent (BISIN was prepared, characterized, and applied for the selective adsorption and separation of palladium from the leaching liquor of ores. Batch studies were carried out, and the main adsorption parameters were systematically investigated, in addition to the relevant thermodynamic parameters, isotherms, and kinetic models. The thermodynamic parameters reflected the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the adsorption. Moreover, the experimental results indicated that the Langmuir isotherm model fits the palladium adsorption data well and the adsorption was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The main adsorption mechanisms of palladium were elucidated at the molecular level by X-ray crystal structure analysis. Thiourea was found to be an excellent desorption agent, and the palladium-thiourea complex was also confirmed by X-ray crystal structure analysis. The results indicated that almost all of the Pd(II (>99.0% is adsorbed on BISIN, whereas less than 2% of the adsorbed Pt(IV, Fe3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Co2+ is observed under the optimum conditions. The proposed method can be used for the efficient adsorption and separation of palladium from the leaching liquor of ores.

  13. Mobilization and distribution of lead originating from roof dust and wet deposition in a roof runoff system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianghua; Yu, Haixia; Huang, Xiaogu

    2015-12-01

    In this research, the mobilization and distribution of lead originating in roof dust and wet deposition were investigated within a roof dust-rooftop-runoff system. The results indicated that lead from roof dust and wet deposition showed different transport dynamics in runoff system and that this process was significantly influenced by the rainfall intensity. Lead present in the roof dust could be easily washed off into the runoff, and nearly 60 % of the total lead content was present in particulate form. Most of the lead from the roof dust was transported during the late period of rainfall; however, the lead concentration was higher for several minutes at the rainfall beginning. Even though some of the lead from wet deposition, simulated with a standard isotope substance, was adsorbed onto adhered roof dust and/or retained on rooftop in runoff system, most of it (50-82 %) remained as dissolved lead in the runoff for rainfall events of varying intensity. Regarding the distribution of lead in the runoff system, the results indicated that it could be carried in the runoff in dissolved and particulate form, be adsorbed to adhered roof dust, or remain on the rooftop because of adsorption to the roof material. Lead from the different sources showed different distribution patterns that were also related to the rainfall intensity. Higher rainfall intensity resulted in a higher proportion of lead in the runoff and a lower proportion of lead remaining on the rooftop.

  14. Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for presentation on Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions. The abstract is attached.

  15. Assessment of runoff contributing catchment areas in rainfall runoff modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Johansen, C.; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    2006-01-01

    recommended literature values for residential areas. It is proven by comparing rainfall-runoff measurements from four different residential catchments that the literature values of the hydrological reduction factor are over-estimated for this type of catchment. In addition, different catchment descriptions...... are presented in order to investigate how the hydrological reduction factor depends on the level of detail regarding the catchment description. When applying a total survey of the catchment area, including all possible impervious surfaces, a hydrological reduction factor of approximately 0.5 for residential...

  16. Assessment of Runoff Contributing Catchment Areas in Rainfall Runoff Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Johansen, C.; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    2005-01-01

    recommended literary values for residential areas. It is proven by comparing rainfall-runoff measurements from four different residential catchments that the literary values of the hydrological reduction factor are over-estimated for this type of catchments. In addition, different catchment descriptions...... are presented in order to investigate how the hydrological reduction factor depends on the level of detail regarding the catchment description. When applying a total survey of the catchment area, including all possible impervious surfaces, a hydrological reduction factor of approximately 0.5 for residential...

  17. Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.

    2008-02-15

    Leaching of pollutants from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) residues has been investigated combining a range of laboratory leaching experiments with geochemical modeling. Special attention was paid to assessing the applicability of laboratory data for subsequent modeling with respect to presumed full-scale conditions; both sample pretreatment and actual influence of leaching conditions on the results of laboratory experiments were considered. It was shown that sample pretreatment may have large impact on leaching test data. In particular, a significant fraction of Pb was shown mobile during the washing of residues with water. In addition, drying of residues (i.e. slow oxidation) prior to leaching experiments increased the leaching of Cr significantly. Significant differences regarding the leaching behavior of individual elements with respect to (non)equilibrium conditions in column percolation experiments were observed in the study. As a result, three groups of elements were identified based on the predominant leaching control and the influence of (non)equilibrium on the results of the laboratory column experiments: I. Predominantly availability-controlled elements (e.g. Na, K, Cl) II. Solubility-controlled elements (e.g. Ca, S, Si, Al, Ba, and Zn) III. Complexation-controlled elements (e.g. Cu and Ni) With respect to the above groups it was suggested that results of laboratory column experiments can, with consideration, be used to estimate full-scale leaching of elements from Group I and II. However, in order to avoid large underestimations in the assessment of leaching from Group III, it is imperative to describe the time-dependent transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the tested system or to minimize the physical non-equilibrium during laboratory experiments (e.g. bigger column, slower flow velocity). Forward geochemical modeling was applied to simulate long-term release of elements from a MSWI air-pollution-control residue. Leaching of a

  18. Biocide Runoff from Building Facades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollmann, Ulla E.; Fernández-Calviño, David; Brandt, Kristian K.

    2017-01-01

    Biocides are common additives in building materials. In-can and film preservatives in polymer-resin render and paint, as well as wood preservatives are used to protect facade materials from microbial spoilage. Biocides leach from the facade material with driving rain, leading to highly polluted...... and most biocides can be considered as "pseudo-persistent"-contaminants in this context. This was verified by (sub)urban soil screening, where concentrations of up to 0.1 μg g(-1) were detected for parent compounds as well as terbutryn degradation products in soils below biocide treated facades....

  19. Effect of accelerated carbonation and zero valent iron on metal leaching from bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M; Andreas, L; Lagerkvist, A

    2016-05-01

    About 85% of the ashes produced in Sweden originated from the incineration of municipal solid waste and biofuel. The rest comes from the thermal treatment of recycled wood, peat, charcoal and others. About 68% of all ashes annually produced in Sweden are used for constructions on landfills, mainly slopes, roads and embankments, and only 3% for construction of roads and working surfaces outside the landfills (SCB, 2013). Since waste bottom ash (BA) often has similar properties to crushed bedrock or gravel, it could be used for road constructions to a larger extent. However, the leaching of e.g. Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn can cause a threat to the surrounding environment if the material is used as it is. Carbonation is a commonly used pre-treatment method, yet it is not always sufficient. As leaching from aged ash is often controlled by adsorption to iron oxides, increasing the number of Fe oxide sorption sites can be a way to control the leaching of several critical elements. The importance of iron oxides as sorption sites for metals is known from both mineralogical studies of bottom ash and from the remediation of contaminated soil, where iron is used as an amendment. In this study, zero valent iron (Fe(0)) was added prior to accelerated carbonation in order to increase the number of adsorption sites for metals and thereby reduce leaching. Batch, column and pHstat leaching tests were performed and the leaching behaviour was evaluated with multivariate data analysis. It showed that leaching changed distinctly after the tested treatments, in particular after the combined treatment. Especially, the leaching of Cr and Cu clearly decreased as a result of accelerated carbonation. The combination of accelerated carbonation with Fe(0) addition reduced the leaching of Cr and Cu even further and reduced also the leaching of Mo, Zn, Pb and Cd compared to untreated BA. Compared with only accelerated carbonation, the Fe(0) addition significantly reduced the leaching of Cr, Cu and Mo

  20. Watchdog-LEACH: A new method based on LEACH protocol to Secure Clustered Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rohbanian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network comprises of small sensor nodes with limited resources. Clustered networks have been proposed in many researches to reduce the power consumption in sensor networks. LEACH is one of the most interested techniques that offer an efficient way to minimize the power consumption in sensor networks. However, due to the characteristics of restricted resources and operation in a hostile environment, WSNs are subjected to numerous threats and are vulnerable to attacks. This research proposes a solution that can be applied on LEACH to increase the level of security. In Watchdog-LEACH, some nodes are considered as watchdogs and some changes are applied on LEACH protocol for intrusion detection. Watchdog-LEACH is able to protect against a wide range of attacks and it provides security, energy efficiency and memory efficiency. The result of simulation shows that in comparison to LEACH, the energy overhead is about 2% so this method is practical and can be applied to WSNs.

  1. Adsorption Rate Models for Multicomponent Adsorption Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚春才

    2004-01-01

    Three adsorption rate models are derived for multicomponent adsorption systems under either pore diffusion or surface diffusion control. The linear driving force (LDF) model is obtained by assuming a parabolic intraparticle concentration profile. Models I and Ⅱ are obtained from the parabolic concentration layer approximation. Examples are presented to demonstrate the usage and accuracy of these models. It is shown that Model I is suitable for batch adsorption calculations and Model Ⅱ provides a good approximation in fixed-bed adsorption processes while the LDF model should not be used in batch adsorption and may be considered acceptable in fixed-bed adsorption where the parameter Ti is relatively large.

  2. Runoff estimation in residencial area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meire Regina de Almeida Siqueira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the watershed runoff caused by extreme events that often result in the flooding of urban areas. The runoff of a residential area in the city of Guaratinguetá, São Paulo, Brazil was estimated using the Curve-Number method proposed by USDA-NRCS. The study also investigated current land use and land cover conditions, impermeable areas with pasture and indications of the reforestation of those areas. Maps and satellite images of Residential Riverside I Neighborhood were used to characterize the area. In addition to characterizing land use and land cover, the definition of the soil type infiltration capacity, the maximum local rainfall, and the type and quality of the drainage system were also investigated. The study showed that this neighborhood, developed in 1974, has an area of 792,700 m², a population of 1361 inhabitants, and a sloping area covered with degraded pasture (Guaratinguetá-Piagui Peak located in front of the residential area. The residential area is located in a flat area near the Paraiba do Sul River, and has a poor drainage system with concrete pipes, mostly 0.60 m in diameter, with several openings that capture water and sediments from the adjacent sloping area. The Low Impact Development (LID system appears to be a viable solution for this neighborhood drainage system. It can be concluded that the drainage system of the Guaratinguetá Riverside I Neighborhood has all of the conditions and characteristics that make it suitable for the implementation of a low impact urban drainage system. Reforestation of Guaratinguetá-Piagui Peak can reduce the basin’s runoff by 50% and minimize flooding problems in the Beira Rio neighborhood.

  3. Biocides from façade coatings in urban surface waters: Estimating the leaching of biocides from render by polyacrylate-water partitioning constants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollmann, Ulla E.; Styszko, Kartarzyna; Ou, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Leaching of biocides from façade coatings attracts more and more attention within recent years. In-can as well as film preserving biocides are added to polymer resin based renders and paints in order protect from microbial spoilage. However, several studies revealed that biocides leach from...... the façade coating and are detectable in urban stormwater runoff. The present study focussed on the occurrence of biocides in the aqueous environment - both in urban water close to the sources as well as further away in fresh and marine waters. It could be shown that biocides are ubiquitous in the aqueous...

  4. Adsorption and wetting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, L.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Adsorption and wetting are related phenomena. In order to improve knowledge of both and their relations, experiments, thermodynamics and a theoretical interpretation have been connected, starring n-alkanes.Starting from the Gibbs adsorption equation thermodynamic relations between vapour adsorption

  5. Effect of Tetrachloroethylene on Sphalerite Leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴尧; 彭鹏; 谢慧琴; 卢立柱

    2004-01-01

    The effects of tetrachloroethylene (C2C14) on sphalerite leaching in FeCl3-HCl wereinvestigated in view of simultaneous mass transfer and reaction, and the leaching models with andwithout organic solvent C2Cl4 were derived. The leaching experiments and the SEM results show thatC2C14 is an effective organic solvent for sphalerite leaching in FeC13-HC1 system to be accelerated andfor the sulfur to be separated. Adding C2C14 in the FeCl3-HC1 medium will turn the kinetic modelcontrolled by sulfur layer diffusion with process activation energy of 67.9 kJ/mol into mixed diffusionwith the energy reduced to 55.1 kJ/mol when 20 ml of C2C14 was added.

  6. YACON INULIN LEACHING DURING HOT WATER BLANCHING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scher, Caroline Fenner; Brandelli, Adriano; Noreña, Caciano Zapata

    2015-01-01

    .... However, inulin is very soluble in water. The loss of this important nutrient during blanching is caused mainly by diffusion or leaching, which might be diminished if blanching temperature - time conditions are correctly employed...

  7. Redox potential (Eh) and anion effects of pyrite (FeS 2 ) leaching at pH 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Anand P.; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2011-11-01

    Pyrite plays the central role in the environmental issue of acid rock drainage. Natural weathering of pyrite results in the release of sulphuric acid which can lead to further leaching of heavy and toxic metals from other associated minerals. Understanding how pyrite reacts in aqueous solution is critical to understanding the natural weathering processes undergone by this mineral. To this end an investigation of the effect of solution redox potential (Eh) and various anions on the rate of pyrite leaching under carefully controlled conditions has been undertaken. Leaching of pyrite has been shown to proceed significantly faster at solution Eh of 900 mV (SHE) than at 700 mV, at pH 1, for the leach media of HCl, H 2SO 4 and HClO 4. The predominant effect of Eh suggests electrochemical control of pyrite leaching with similar mechanism(s) at Eh of 700 and 900 mV albeit with different kinetics. Leach rates at 700 mV were found to decrease according to HClO 4 > HCl > H 2SO 4 while at 900 mV the leach rate order was HCl > HClO 4 > H 2SO 4. Solution Fe 3+ activity is found to continually increase during all leaches; however, this is not accompanied by an increase in leach rate. Synchrotron based photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) measurements showed a localised distribution of adsorbed and oxidised surface species highlighting that pyrite oxidation and leaching is a highly site specific process mediated by adsorption of oxidants onto specific surface sites. It appears that rates may be controlled, in part, by the propensity of acidic anions to bind to the surface, which varies according to SO42->Cl->ClO4-, thus reducing the reactive or effective surface area. However, anions may also be involved in specific reactions with surface leach products. Stoichiometric dissolution data (Fe/S ratio), XPS and XRD data indicate that the highest leach rates (in HCl media at 900 mV Eh) correlate with relatively lower surface S abundance. Furthermore, there are indications that

  8. Lead Isotopes in Highway Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, M.; Lau, S.; Green, P. G.; Stenstrom, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Lead (Pb) isotopes have been used extensively to study the provenance of lead pollution on air, water, and sediments. In this study, we measured Pb isotopes and Pb aqueous concentration in highway runoff in three west Los Angeles sites. Those three sites, part of a long-term study sponsored by the California Department of Transportation, represent small catchment areas, and host heavy traffic. In addition, there were no inputs of sand or salt to the highway because the sites are almost completely impervious and also due to the lack of snow to be controlled. Highway runoff from the three sites was collected for 7 storms during the 2004-2005 Winter. Grab samples were collected every 15 minutes during the first hour, and hourly afterwards. A total of 202 samples were collected and filtered into five size fractions (100μm). Aqueous concentration of Pb range from 0.08μg/L to 46.95μg/L (7.98±10.89μg/L) and it is not correlated with any of the lead isotope ratios. The 208Pb/206Pb ratio ranges from 1.983 to 2.075 (2.024±0.026) and there is no statistical difference for the mean value of the 208Pb/206Pb ratio for the four particulate size fractions (0.45-8μm, 8-20μm, 20-100μm, >100μm). However, the 208Pb/206Pb ratio of nearby soils yield 2.060±0.021 and it is statistically different from the ratios obtained for the highway runoff. This hints that the lead present in highway runoff does not come from local soils. The 207Pb/206Pb ratio ranges from 0.804 to 0.847 (0.827±0.011) and there is no statistical difference for the mean value of the 207Pb/206Pb ratio for the four particulate size fractions (0.45-8μm, 8-20μm, 20-100μm, >100μm). Surprisingly, there is also no statistical difference with the 207Pb/206Pb ratio of nearby soils (0.833±0.009).

  9. Treatment of cadmium dust with two-stage leaching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The treatment of cadmium dust with a two-stage leaching process was investigated to replace the existing sulphation roast-leaching processes. The process parameters in the first stage leaching were basically similar to the neutralleaching in zinc hydrometallurgy. The effects of process parameters in the second stage leaching on the extraction of zincand cadmium were mainly studied. The experimental results indicated that zinc and cadmium could be efficiently recoveredfrom the cadmium dust by two-stage leaching process. The extraction percentages of zinc and cadmium in two stage leach-ing reached 95% and 88% respectively under the optimum conditions. The total extraction percentage of Zn and Cdreached 94%.

  10. Heat transfer law in leaching dump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ai-xiang; WANG Hong-jiang; XI Yong; YANG Bao-hua; LI Jian-feng; YIN Sheng-hua; ZHA Ke-bing

    2005-01-01

    Based on the law of temperature changes in the leaching dump and the forming process of heat flux, the basic balance equation of heat flow in dump was established, the dissipated heat flow from dump to the atmosphere was analyzed to estimate the surface temperature of the ore particle in dump and discover the law of forced heat convection of heat flow transfer in dump. And the lixiviate flow formula taking a certain heat flow out of dump was deduced by using the inversion method. Through theoretic analysis, combining Dexing copper mine heap leaching production practice, the results show that the heat flow of chalcopyrite leaching emitted is not so great, but the heat flow of pyrite leaching and sulphur oxidation produced take up a higher proportion of total heat flow; the dissipated heat flow takes up a lower proportion, and most of heat flow is absorbed by itself, thus the inside temperature rises gradually; and the saturation flow form for leaching is adopted, which makes the lixiviate seepage in the transitional flow or even in the turbulent flow, so as to accelerate the heat flow diffusing and keep the leaching dump temperature suitable for bacteria living.

  11. Zinc Leaching from Tire Crumb Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. P.; Ren, J.; Mays, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that more than 2 billion scrap tires are currently stockpiled in the United States and approximately 280 million more tires are added annually. Various engineering applications utilize recycled tires in the form of shredded tire crumb rubber. However, the use of tire crumb rubber may have negative environmental impacts, especially when the rubber comes into contact with water. A review of the literature indicates that leaching of zinc from tire crumb rubber is the most significant water quality concern associated with using this material. Zinc is generally used in tire manufacturing, representing approximately 1.3% of the final product by mass. This study will report results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure, batch leaching tests, and column leaching tests performed to quantify the process by which zinc leaches from tire crumb rubber into water. Results are interpreted with a first-order kinetic attachment/detachment model, implemented with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service software HYDRUS-1D, in order to determine the circumstances when zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber would be expected to comply with the applicable discharge limits. One potential application for recycled tires is replacing sand with tire crumb rubber in granular media filters used for stormwater pollution control. For this to be a viable application, the total zinc in the stormwater discharge must be below the EPA’s benchmark value of 0.117 mg/L.

  12. Use of fly ash, phosphogypsum and red mud as a liner material for the disposal of hazardous zinc leach residue waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri

    2010-01-15

    Increasing amounts of residues and waste materials coming from industrial activities in different processes have become an increasingly urgent problem for the future. The release of large quantities of heavy metals into the environment has resulted in a number of environmental problems. The present study investigated the safe disposal of the zinc leach residue waste using industrial residues such as fly ash, phosphogypsum and red mud. In the study, leachability of heavy metals from the zinc leach residue has been evaluated by mine water leaching procedure (MWLP) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Zinc removal from leachate was studied using fly ash, phosphogypsum and red mud. The adsorption capacities and adsorption efficiencies were determined. The adsorption rate data was analyzed according to the pseudo-second-order kinetic, Elovich kinetic and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models. The pseudo-second-order kinetic was the best fit kinetic model for the experimental data. The results show that addition of fly ash, phosphogypsum and red mud to the zinc leach residue drastically reduces the heavy metal content in the leachate and could be used as liner materials.

  13. Leaching and heating process as alternative to produce fish protein powder from Kilka (Clupeonella cultiventris caspia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAVEH RAHMANIFARAH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rahmanifarah K, Shabanpour B, Shaviklo AR, Aalami M. 2014. Leaching and heating process as alternative to produce fish protein powder from Kilka (Clupeonella cultiventris caspia. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 1-6. The effect of protein extraction procedures (leached mince and heated suspension on selected properties of fish protein powder (proximate composition, pH, color, density, viscosity, fat adsorption, emulsifying capacity, emulsifying stability, foaming capacity, foaming stability, WBC, protein solubility in water, hygroscopicity, Trichloroacetic acid (TCA-soluble peptides and free sulfhydryl groups was investigated. Results showed that Fish protein powder (FPP produced by leaching mince (LM have higher protein, moisture, ash, pH, L*, viscosity, emulsion capacity, emulsion stability, foam capacity, foam stability, water binding capacity (WBC, protein solubility, hygroscopicity, TCA soluble peptides and free sulfhydryl group content than heated suspension (HS (P0.05. Overall, it was observed that high temperature during heating of suspension in HS method makes possible protein denaturation and aggregation. Consequently, based on functional, chemical and physical properties, extraction of fish protein by leaching process was found to be suitable for the production of fish protein powder.

  14. Leaching Behavior and Mechanism of Cement Solidiifed Heavy Metal Pb in Acid Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Mingkai; WANG Caiping; CHEN Yan; CHEN Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Pb leaching concentration and the solution’s pH with time was analyzed when cement in its solidiifed form was leached in an acid medium. The effects of the particle size of the solidified form, the cement adding method, and the hydration degree on Pb solidification were also investigated. The experimental results indicate that cement is quickly dissolved and hydrated in the acid medium, forming a C-S-H gel or silicic acid sol with good adsorption. When cement-Pb solidified form is leached in an acetate solution, the hydrated product erodes with time, so the Pb concentration increases slightly in the beginning. Then, some of the Pb ions are absorbed by the newly generated silicic acid sol, C-S-H. Others produce Pb(OH)2 precipitation for secondary solidification, leading to a gradual decrease in the Pb concentration in a leaching time of more than two hours. Moreover, the particle size of the solidiifed form has important effects on the Pb dissolution. When the amount of added cement is low, with a pH of less than 9.5, the solidiifcation affects the sequence of the original cement powder, the cement hydrated powder, and the cement-Pb solidiifed form. When the added amount of cement increases with a pH of more than 11, the effect of adding methods on solidiifcation decreases, and the solidiifed form is a little better than others.

  15. A mathematical model for soil solute transfer into surface runoff as influenced by rainfall detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Wang, Quanjiu; Wu, Laosheng; Zhao, Guangxu; Liu, Yanli; Zhang, Pengyu

    2016-07-01

    Nutrients transport is a main source of water pollution. Several models describing transport of soil nutrients such as potassium, phosphate and nitrate in runoff water have been developed. The objectives of this research were to describe the nutrients transport processes by considering the effect of rainfall detachment, and to evaluate the factors that have greatest influence on nutrients transport into runoff. In this study, an existing mass-conservation equation and rainfall detachment process were combined and augmented to predict runoff of nutrients in surface water in a Loess Plateau soil in Northwestern Yangling, China. The mixing depth is a function of time as a result of rainfall impact, not a constant as described in previous models. The new model was tested using two different sub-models of complete-mixing and incomplete-mixing. The complete-mixing model is more popular to use for its simplicity. It captured the runoff trends of those high adsorption nutrients, and of nutrients transport along steep slopes. While the incomplete-mixing model predicted well for the highest observed concentrations of the test nutrients. Parameters inversely estimated by the models were applied to simulate nutrients transport, results suggested that both models can be adopted to describe nutrients transport in runoff under the impact of rainfall.

  16. Multiple-event study of bioretention for treatment of urban storm water runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C H; Davis, A P

    2005-01-01

    Bioretention is a novel best management practice for urban storm water, employed to minimize the impact of urban runoff during storm events. Bioretention consists of porous media layers that can remove pollutants from infiltrating runoff via mechanisms that include adsorption, precipitation, and filtration. However, the effectiveness of bioretention in treating repetitive inputs of runoff has not been investigated. In this study, a bioretention test column was set up and experiments proceeded once every week for a total of 12 tests. Through all 12 repetitions, the infiltration rate remained constant (0.35 cm/min). All 12 tests demonstrated excellent removal efficiency for TSS, oil/grease, and lead (99%). For total phosphorus, the removal efficiency was about 47% the system removal efficiency ranged from 2.3% to 23%. Effluent nitrate concentration became higher than the influent concentration during the first 28 days and removal efficiency ranged from 9% to 20% afterward. Some degree of denitrification was apparently proceeding in the bioretention system. Overall, the top mulch layer filtered most of TSS in the runoff and prevented the bioretention media from clogging during 12 repetitions. Runoff quality was improved by the bioretention column.

  17. Impacts of Future Land-Use Change on Nitrogen Leaching and Global Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiyappan, P.; Barman, R.; Jain, A. K.; McIsaac, G.; Lawrence, P.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural expansion, excessive application of fertilizers, and increase in fossil fuel burning have led to widespread increases in anthropogenic production of reactive nitrogen (N), increasing N-deposition rates. An important consequence of these processes is intensification of soil nutrient leaching activities, leading to serious ground water and coastal water contamination problems. During the 21st century, projected land-use changes due to expansion of cropland surface are likely to significantly enhance anthropogenic soil N loading, intensifying nutrient leaching activities. Additionally, projected soil warming and increased fire disturbances in the high latitude forest ecosystems is also likely to increasingly mobilize soil N, and significantly contributing to the global leaching budget. In this study we employ a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), recently coupled to the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM1), to investigate the 21st century budget of soil N-leaching due to both anthropogenic and natural causes. ISAM (spatial resolution of 0.5ox0.5o) contains process based representation of prognostically coupled carbon-nitrogen cycles, and simulates all major N processes (immobilization, mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, leaching, biological fixation, and vegetation uptake). Biogeophysical schemes in the ISAM have been adapted from the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM3.5/CLM4) and the Common Land Model (CoLM), and fluxes of water and carbon are integrated at a time step of 30 minutes. ISAM incorporates land use change and secondary forest dynamics, to simulate the anthropogenic perturbation effects to the N cycle including atmospheric deposition and fertilizer application. Finally, the ISAM-CESM framework integrates a nutrient runoff tracer into the existing River Transport Model (RTM) in the CESM, enabling this study. In this talk, we will specifically focus on the results of a series of simulation

  18. Modelling effects of acid deposition and climate change on soil and run-off chemistry at Risdalsheia, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Mol-Dijkstra

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated carbon dioxide levels, caused by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, and higher temperature may lead to increased plant growth and uptake of nitrogen, but increased temperature may lead to increased nitrogen mineralisation causing enhanced nitrogen leaching. The overall result of both counteracting effects is largely unknown. To gain insight into the long-term effects, the geochemical model SMART2 was applied using data from the catchment-scale experiments of the RAIN and CLIMEX projects, conducted on boreal forest ecosystems at Risdalsheia, southern Norway. These unique experiments at the ecosystem scale provide information on the short-term effects and interactions of nitrogen deposition and increased temperature and carbon dioxide on carbon and nitrogen cycling and especially the run-off chemistry. To predict changes in soil processes in response to climate change, the model was extended by including the temperature effect on mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification, aluminium dissolution and mineral weathering. The extended model was tested on the two manipulated catchments at Risdalsheia and long-term effects were evaluated by performing long-time runs. The effects of climate change treatment, which resulted in increased nitrogen fluxes at both catchments, were slightly overestimated by SMART2. The temperature dependency of mineralisation was simulated adequately but the temperature effect on nitrification was slightly overestimated. Monitored changes in base cation concentrations and pH were quite well simulated with SMART2. The long-term simulations indicate that the increase in nitrogen run-off is only a temporary effect; in the long-term, no effect on total nitrogen leaching is predicted. At higher deposition levels the temporary increase in nitrogen leaching lasts longer than at low deposition. Contrary to nitrogen leaching, temperature increase leads to a permanent decrease in aluminium

  19. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  20. Estimating Runoff Coefficients Using Weather Radars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating runoff coefficients of urban drainage catchments based on a combination of high resolution weather radar data and insewer flow measurements. By utilising the spatial variability of the precipitation it is possible to estimate the runoff coefficients...

  1. Estimating Runoff Coefficients Using Weather Radars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating runoff coefficients of urban drainage catchments based on a combination of high resolution weather radar data and insewer flow measurements. By utilising the spatial variability of the precipitation it is possible to estimate the runoff coefficients...

  2. Silylation of leached-vermiculites following reaction with imidazole and copper sorption behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Saloana S.G.; Pereira, Mariana B.B. [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Almeida, Ramon K.S. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Caixa Postal 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Souza, Antônio G. [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Fonseca, Maria G., E-mail: mgardennia@quimica.ufpb.br [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Jaber, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8220, Laboratoire d' archéologie moléculaire et structurale (LAMS), Boîte courrier 225, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Silylated vermiculites reacted covalently with imidazole. • Modified vermiculites adsorbed copper from aqueous solution. • Copper retention in all solids occurred at rapid time of 80 min. • Higher organic content on the solid improved the copper adsorption. - Abstract: Organically modified vermiculites were synthesized by previous silylation of three leached vermiculites, V0.3Cl, V0.5Cl and V0.8Cl, under anhydrous conditions following reaction with imidazole (Im), which acted as chelating agent for copper retention. Elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C NMR and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements were used to characterize pristine, leached and organofunctionalized solids. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to evaluate the surface after copper sorption. Parameters such as contact time, pH and initial cation concentration for the adsorption of Cu(II) ions were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted using the Langmuir isotherm model and the monolayer adsorption capacities were 2.38, 2.52 and 2.69 mmol g{sup −1} for V0.5Cl-Im, V0.3Cl-Im and V0.8Cl-Im, respectively, at pH 6.0 and 298 K for a time reaction of 80 min. The sorption rates were described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The chloropropyl imidazole vermiculites are promising adsorbents for the rapid removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution.

  3. Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals from Cement Pastes Using a Modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minrui; Feng, Huajun; Shen, Dongsheng; Li, Na; Chen, Yingqiang; Shentu, Jiali

    2016-03-01

    As the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) can not exhaust the acid neutralizing capacity of the cement rotary kiln co-processing solid wastes products which is particularly important for the assessment of the leaching concentrations of heavy metals. A modified TCLP was proposed. The extent of leaching of heavy metals is low using the TCLP and the leaching performance of the different metals can not be differentiated. Using the modified TCLP, however, Zn leaching was negligible during the first 180 h and then sharply increased (2.86 ± 0.18 to 3.54 ± 0.26 mg/L) as the acidity increased (pH cement rotary kiln co-processing products.

  4. Long-term lessons on pesticide leaching obtained via the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Anette E.; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn

    To avoid any unacceptable influence on the environment posed by pesticides and their degradation products, all pesticides used in the European Union needs authorization. The authorization procedure includes assessing the leaching risk of both pesticides and their degradation products...... to the groundwater. There are shortcomings to the procedure, however, as revealed by the results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme from the period 1990/2000 to 2012 (app. twelve years). This monitoring program has for this period assessed leaching into groundwater via the variably-saturated zone...... of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on sandy and loamy agricultural fields, and 47 of their degradation products. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the authorization procedure: i) long-term leaching of degradation products of pesticides applied...

  5. Influence of organic amendments on diuron leaching through an acidic and a calcareous vineyard soil using undisturbed lysimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevenot, M. [UMR 1229 Microbiologie et Geochimie des Sols, CMSE, INRA - Universite de Bourgogne, UFR des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Environnement, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France)], E-mail: mathieu.thevenot@u-bourgogne.fr; Dousset, S. [UMR 5561 Biogeosciences, CNRS - Universite de Bourgogne, UFR des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Environnement, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Rousseaux, S. [EA 4149 Laboratoire de Recherche en Vigne et Vin, Institut Universitaire de la Vigne et du Vin, rue Claude Ladrey, 21000 Dijon (France); Andreux, F. [UMR 1229 Microbiologie et Geochimie des Sols, CMSE, INRA - Universite de Bourgogne, UFR des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Environnement, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France)

    2008-05-15

    The influence of different organic amendments on diuron leaching was studied through undisturbed vineyard soil columns. Two composts (A and D), the second at two stages of maturity, and two soils (VR and Bj) were sampled. After 1 year, the amount of residues (diuron + metabolites) in the leachates of the VR soil (0.19-0.71%) was lower than in the Bj soil (4.27-8.23%), which could be explained by stronger diuron adsorption on VR. An increase in the amount of diuron leached through the amended soil columns, compared to the blank, was observed for the Bj soil only. This result may be explained by the formation of mobile complexes between diuron and water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) through the Bj soil, or by competition between diuron and WEOM for the adsorption sites in the soil. For both soils, the nature of the composts and their degree of maturity did not significantly influence diuron leaching. - The application of organic amendments increased diuron leaching through a sandy-loam soil, in contrast to a clay-loam soil.

  6. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  7. Runoff initiation versus runoff yield: Understanding the complexity of the hydrological effect of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidron, G. J.; Monger, H. C.; Büdel, B.; Vonshak, A.; Conrod, W.

    2012-04-01

    The differentiation between runoff initiation and runoff yield (amount) is not always clear. In many cases they often seem interchangeable. Some of the differences were pinpointed following research conducted at two sand fields in Israel (Nizzanim, NIM, at the southern coast and Nizzana, NIZ in the Negev) and three sites in the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA (silty-loessial sediments at the Jornada Experimental Range, JER; quartzose sand in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge, SEV; gypseous sand at the White Sands National Monument, WS) during which intact plots were compared to scalped plots. While the parent material, the effective rain, and the exopolysacharide (EPS) content of the crust determined runoff initiation in the Chihuahuan Desert, the effective rain and the crust microrelief determined the amount (yield) of runoff in areas where runoff initiation took place. Low EPS-crusts did not facilitated runoff initiation, even at high-chlorophyll crusts such as in WS. Similar results were obtained for NIM. Data from NIZ also highlighted the fundamental role played by the EPS in the determination of the amounts of runoff. This however was not the case with the chlorophyll content per se, that did not determine runoff initiation or yield. The findings also indicate that under the conditions examined, microrelief could not have controlled runoff initiation. Nevertheless, it affected the runoff amounts, as found in the Chihuahuan Desert and the Negev. The presence of rills and gullies may be indicative of the potentiality of BSCs to initiate runoff.

  8. Average annual runoff in the United States, 1951-80

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a line coverage of average annual runoff in the conterminous United States, 1951-1980. Surface runoff Average runoff Surface waters United States

  9. Geochemical modeling and assessment of leaching from carbonated municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi; Jamro, Imtiaz Ali; Li, Rundong; Li, Yanlong; Li, Shaobai; Luan, Jingde

    2016-06-01

    Municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes are characterized by high calcium oxide (CaO) content. Carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption by MSWI fly ash was discussed based on thermogravimetry (TG)/differential thermal analysis (DTA), minerology analysis, and adapting the Stenoir equation. TG/DTA analysis showed that the weight gain of the fly ash below 440 °C was as high as 5.70 %. An adapted Stenoir equation for MSWI fly ash was discussed. The chloride in MSWI fly ash has a major impact on CO2 adsorption by MSWI fly ash or air pollution control (APC) residues. Geochemical modeling of the critical trace elements copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and antimony (Sb) before and after carbonation was performed using a thermodynamic equilibrium model for solubility and a surface complexation model for metal sorption. Leaching of critical trace elements was generally found to be strongly dependent on the degree of carbonation attained, and their solubility appeared to be controlled by several minerals. Adsorption on ferrum (Fe) and aluminum (Al) colloids was also responsible for removal of the trace elements Cd, Pb, and Sb. We used Hakanson's potential ecological risk index (HPERI) to evaluate the risk of trace element leaching in general. The results demonstrate that the ecological risk showed a V-shaped dependency on pH; the optimum pH of the carbonated fly ash was found to be 10.3-11, resulting from the optimum carbonation (liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio = 0.25, carbonation duration = ∼30-48 h). The dataset and modeling results presented here provide a contribution to assessing the leaching behavior of MSWI fly ash under a wide range of conditions.

  10. Characterization and source identification of pollutants in runoff from a mixed land use watershed using ordination analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jin Hwi; Mendoza, Joseph A; Lee, Chang Hee; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2016-05-01

    While identification of critical pollutant sources is the key initial step for cost-effective runoff management, it is challenging due to the highly uncertain nature of runoff pollution, especially during a storm event. To identify critical sources and their quantitative contributions to runoff pollution (especially focusing on phosphorous), two ordination methods were used in this study: principal component analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). For the ordination analyses, we used runoff quality data for 14 storm events, including data for phosphorus, 11 heavy metal species, and eight ionic species measured at the outlets of subcatchments with different land use compositions in a mixed land use watershed. Five factors as sources of runoff pollutants were identified by PCA: agrochemicals, groundwater, native soils, domestic sewage, and urban sources (building materials and automotive activities). PMF identified similar factors to those identified by PCA, with more detailed source mechanisms for groundwater (i.e., nitrate leaching and cation exchange) and urban sources (vehicle components/motor oils/building materials and vehicle exhausts), confirming the sources identified by PCA. PMF was further used to quantify contributions of the identified sources to the water quality. Based on the results, agrochemicals and automotive activities were the two dominant and ubiquitous phosphorus sources (39-61 and 16-47 %, respectively) in the study area, regardless of land use types.

  11. Clomazone dissipation, adsorption and translocation in four paddy topsoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-fang; Li, Guo-xue; Yang, Ren-bin; Guo, Zheng-yuan; Liao, Xiao-yong

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory experiments about the dissipation, adsorption and translocation in four paddy topsoils were conducted in this paper. From the results it can be concluded as follows: the dissipation rate of clomazone differed greatly in different paddy soil derived from different parent materials. The half-lives for clomazone degradation in paddy soils ranged from 5.7 to 22.0 d. The order of clomazone dissipation rate was reddish yellow paddy soil > alluvial sandy paddy soil > yellow clayey paddy soil > purple sandy paddy soil. Clomazone sorption quantity was significantly correlated with organic carbon (R2 = 0.62) and clay content(R2 = 0.67) in the tested paddy soils. Positive correlation was found between apparent Kd value and cation exchange content(CEC). The consequences for the adsorption of different soils were purple sandy paddy soil > yellow clayey paddy soil > reddish yellow paddy soil > alluvial sandy paddy soil. Under the simulated rainfall of 200 mm through four different unsaturated soil lysimeters over 24 h, clomazone was readily to be leached into lower surface soil and there was about 2.6%--4.2% of applied clomazone leached out of 20 cm cultivated soil layer. Translocation experiments showed that the order of clomazone leaching ability was: alluvial sandy paddy soil > reddish yellow paddy soil > yellow clayey paddy soil > purple sandy paddy soil. Simple regression results manifested that factors like CEC, organic carbon, clay, and adsorption rate constant had been negatively correlated with the percentage of clomazone loss from soil lysimeters.

  12. Kinetics of Leaching Calcium from Dolomite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizi, A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesia is obtained from magnesite ore and the production process applied should remove accompanying minerals that reduce its refractoriness. Given that magnesite reservoirs are more exploited and largely exhausted, there is a growing need for production of magnesia on the basis of other magnesium minerals. Dolomite is a promising source of magnesia because it forms large deposits, is easy to exploit, and generally contains a small quantity of impurities.The kinetics of calcium leaching from dolomite by magnesium-nitrate solution has been studied. The research program included the influence of temperature, mass fraction of magnesium nitrate in solution, dolomite particle size and leaching time. Time dependence of calcium leaching is described by relevant kinetic equations. Rate coefficients, their temperature dependence and Arrhenius activation energy have been determined.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizas reduce nitrogen loss via leaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R Asghari

    Full Text Available The capacity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root systems to reduce nitrate (NO₃⁻ and ammonium (NH₄⁺ loss from soils via leaching was investigated in a microcosm-based study. A mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant and its mycorrhizal wildtype progenitor were used in this experiment in order to avoid the indirect effects of establishing non-mycorrhizal control treatments on soil nitrogen cycling and the wider soil biota. Mycorrhizal root systems dramatically reduced nitrate loss (almost 40 times less via leaching, compared to their non-mycorrhizal counterparts, following a pulse application of ammonium nitrate to experimental microcosms. The capacity of AM to reduce nutrient loss via leaching has received relatively little attention, but as demonstrated here, can be significant. Taken together, these data highlight the need to consider the potential benefits of AM beyond improvements in plant nutrition alone.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizas reduce nitrogen loss via leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Hamid R; Cavagnaro, Timothy R

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root systems to reduce nitrate (NO₃⁻) and ammonium (NH₄⁺) loss from soils via leaching was investigated in a microcosm-based study. A mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant and its mycorrhizal wildtype progenitor were used in this experiment in order to avoid the indirect effects of establishing non-mycorrhizal control treatments on soil nitrogen cycling and the wider soil biota. Mycorrhizal root systems dramatically reduced nitrate loss (almost 40 times less) via leaching, compared to their non-mycorrhizal counterparts, following a pulse application of ammonium nitrate to experimental microcosms. The capacity of AM to reduce nutrient loss via leaching has received relatively little attention, but as demonstrated here, can be significant. Taken together, these data highlight the need to consider the potential benefits of AM beyond improvements in plant nutrition alone.

  15. Behavior of calcium silicate in leaching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamic calculation, the mole ratio of CaO to SiO2, temperature and A/S of bauxitehave a profound influence on the mole ratio of 2CaO @ SiO2 to CaO @ SiO2 in sinter. CaO @ SiO2 and β-2CaO @ SiO2appear stable in caustic solution but unstable in soda solution, and CaO @ SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO @ SiO2 un-der the same leaching condition. Compared with the conventional sinter, the rate of alumina extraction of the newsinter is large and the secondary reaction is restricted in the leaching, which might be mainly due to the more contentof CaO @ SiO2 in sinter and better stability of CaO @ SiO2 in leaching.

  16. Using natural Chinese zeolite to remove ammonium from rainfall runoff following urea fertilization of a paddy rice field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Qiao, Bin; Li, Song-Min; Li, Jian-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    The potential of natural Chinese zeolite to remove ammonium from rainfall runoff following urea applications to a paddy rice field is assessed in this study. Laboratory batch kinetic and isotherm experiments were carried out first to investigate the ammonium adsorption capacity of the natural zeolite. Field experiments using zeolite adsorption barriers installed at drain outlets in a paddy rice field were also carried out during natural rainfall events to evaluate the barrier's dynamic removal capacity of ammonium. The results demonstrate that the adsorption kinetics are accurately described by the Elovich model, with a coefficient of determination (R (2)) ranging from 0.9705 to 0.9709, whereas the adsorption isotherm results indicate that the Langmuir-Freundlich model provides the best fit (R (2) = 0.992) for the equilibrium data. The field experiments show that both the flow rate and the barrier volume are important controls on ammonium removal from rainfall runoff. A low flow rate leads to a higher ammonium removal efficiency at the beginning of the tests, while a high flow rate leads to a higher quantity of ammonium adsorbed over the entire runoff process.

  17. Saltstone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.; Burns, H. H.

    2013-02-24

    Cementitious waste forms can be designed to chemically stabilize selected contaminants, such as Tc{sup +7} and Cr{sup +6}, by chemically reduction to lower valance states, Tc{sup +4} and Cr{sup +3}, respectively, and precipitation of these species in alkaline media as low solubility solid phases. Data for oxidation of this type of cementitious waste form cured under field conditions as a function of time is required for predicting the performance of the waste form and disposal facility. The rate of oxidation (oxidation front advancement) is an important parameter for predicting performance because the solubilities of some radionuclide contaminants, e.g., technetium, are a function of the oxidation state. A non-radioactive experiment was designed for quantifying the oxidation front advancement using chromium, as an approximate redox-sensitive surrogate (Cr{sup +6} / Cr{sup +3}) for technetium (Tc{sup +7} / Tc{sup +4}). Nonradioactive cementitious waste forms were prepared in the laboratory and cured under both laboratory and ?field conditions.? Laboratory conditions were ambient temperature and sealed sample containers. Field conditions were approximated by curing samples in open containers which were placed inside a plastic container stored outdoors at SRS. The container had a lid and was instrumented with temperature and humidity probes. Subsamples as thin as 0.2 mm were taken as a function of distance from the exposed surface of the as-cast sample. The subsamples were leached and the leachates were analyzed for chromium, nitrate, nitrite and sodium. Nitrate, nitrite, and sodium concentrations were used to provide baseline data because these species are not chemically retained in the waste form matrix to any significant extent and are not redox sensitive. ?Effective? oxidation fronts for Cr were measured for samples containing 1000, 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr added as soluble sodium chromate, Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. For a sample cured for 129 days under field conditions

  18. Alkaline leaching of metal melting industry wastes dseparation of zinc and lead in the leach solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this work, a thorough examinations on the extractability of zinc and lead present in the steelmaking dusts using alkaline leaching process and the effectiveness of the zinc and lead separation in the resultant leaching solutions using sulfide precipitation method were made. It was found that only about 53% of zinc and over 70% of the lead could be leached out of the dusts, while the other 47% of zinc and 306 of lead were left in the leaching residues. The zinc and lead in the resultant leaching solution can be effectively and selectively separated. When the weight ratio of sodium sulfide (M. W. = 222-240) to Pb was kept at 1.8, the lead in the solution could be precipitated out quantitatively while all the zinc was remained in the solution. The zinc left in the solution can be further recovered by the addition of extra sodium sulfide with a weight ratio of sodium sulfide to the zinc over 2.6. The resultant filtrate can be recycled to the leaching of dust in the next leaching process.

  19. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegrini, E., E-mail: elia@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Butera, S. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Kosson, D.S. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Box 1831 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Van Zomeren, A. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Department of Environmental Risk Assessment, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Van der Sloot, H.A. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy, Dorpsstraat 216, 1721 BV Langedijk (Netherlands); Astrup, T.F. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Relevance of metal leaching in waste management system LCAs was assessed. • Toxic impacts from leaching could not be disregarded. • Uncertainty of toxicity, due to background activities, determines LCA outcomes. • Parameters such as pH and L/S affect LCA results. • Data modelling consistency and coverage within an LCA are crucial. - Abstract: Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results

  20. Phosphorus losses in furrow irrigation runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, D T; Bjorneberg, D L; Aase, J K; Robbins, C W

    2001-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) often limits the eutrophication of streams, rivers, and lakes receiving surface runoff. We evaluated the relationships among selected soil P availability indices and runoff P fractions where manure, whey, or commercial fertilizer applications had previously established a range of soil P availabilities on a Portneuf silt loam (coarse-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic Durinodic Xeric Haplocalcid) surface-irrigated with Snake River water. Water-soluble P, Olsen P (inorganic and organic P), and iron-oxide impregnated paper-extractable P (FeO-Ps) were determined on a 0.03-m soil sample taken from the bottom of each furrow before each irrigation in fall 1998 and spring 1999. Dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in a 0.45-microm filtered runoff sample, and iron-oxide impregnated paper-extractable P (FeO-Pw), total P, and sediment in an unfiltered runoff sample were determined at selected intervals during a 4-h irrigation on 18.3-m field plots. The 1998 and 1999 data sets were combined because there were no significant differences. Flow-weighted average runoff DRP and FeO-Pw concentrations increased linearly as all three soil P test concentrations increased. The average runoff total P concentration was not related to any soil P test but was linearly related to sediment concentration. Stepwise regression selected the independent variables of sediment, soil lime concentration, and soil organic P extracted by the Olsen method as related to average runoff total P concentration. The average runoff total P concentration was 1.08 mg L(-1) at a soil Olsen P concentration of 10 mg kg(-1). Soil erosion control will be necessary to reduce P losses in surface irrigation runoff.

  1. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  2. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  3. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2)Wm-2. Co...

  4. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    OpenAIRE

    K. Van Tricht; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B; Van Den Broeke, M.R.; Turner, D. D.; Van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2)Wm-2. Co...

  5. Leaching of Main Elements of Glass Immersed in Beishan Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The leaching quantities of the elements from the HLW are very important parameters for the safety assessments of the repository of high level radioactive wastes. It is necessary to study the leaching

  6. Spent LWR fuel leach tests: Waste Isolation Safety Assessment program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Y.B.

    1979-04-01

    Spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels with burnups of 54.5, 28 and 9 MWd/kgU were leach-tested in deionized water at 25/sup 0/C. Fuel burnup has no apparent effect on the calculated leach rates based upon the behavior of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 239 +240/Pu. A leach test of 54.5 MWd/kgU spent fuel in synthetic sea brine showed that the cesium-based leach rate is lower in sea brine than in deionized water. A rise in the leach rate was observed after approximately 600 d of cumulative leaching. During the rise, the leach rate for all the measured radionuclides become nearly equal. Evidence suggests that exposure of new surfaces to the leachant may cause the increase. As a result, experimental work to study leaching mechanisms of spent fuel has been initiated. 22 figures.

  7. Gold and Silver Extraction from Leach Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bagdaulet K. Kenzhaliyev; Renata R. Iskhakova; Zamzagul D. Dosymbaeva; Esen N. Sulejmenov

    2014-01-01

    There has been carried out an investigation on the extraction of gold and silver from thiosulfate solutions: standard test and technological solutions of chemical and electrochemical leaching. The influence of related metals on the process of extracting gold from solution was studied. There has been conducted a comparative study of the IR spectra of solutions after the sorption of gold, silver and related metals.

  8. Leaching of Plastic Additives to Marine Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that ingestion of microplastics by aquatic species leads to increased exposure to plastic additives. However, experimental data or model based evidence is lacking. Here we assess the potential of leaching of nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the intestinal tracts of Areni

  9. Leaching of toluene-neoprene adhesive wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, R; Sabater, M C; Martínez, M A

    2001-03-01

    This work consists of the study of the extraction of solvent (toluene) from a polymeric (neoprene) substrate during a leaching process. Total organic carbon (TOC) is the main contaminant parameter in the leaching of these systems due to the solution of the toluene and the dispersion of the polymer. The toxicity of the extracts was measured with a Microtox equipment, using Photobacteria phosphoreum, deducing that the toxicity of the extracts is low due to the low solubility of toluene but that the toxicity of toluene is high. On the basis of the experimental results, the amount of toluene diffused vs time in plane sheet systems was studied. A kinetic model has been developed considering two stages: In the first stage, the toluene diffuses into the system across the neoprene chains at a constant rate, not depending on the initial toluene concentration. This fact is explained by considering that there is a constant difference of the toluene concentration between the interface with the water and the inner part of the sample. In the second stage, the dispersion of the polymer with the corresponding amount of toluene takes place. The diffusion of toluene in the leaching process is compared and analyzed considering the diffusion of toluene in a desorption process in air so that the difference of toluene concentration between the interface and the interior can be estimated. A mathematical model is also proposed for considering the leaching process in other operating conditions.

  10. Duality properties of Gorringe Leach equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandati, Yves; Bérard, Alain; Mohrbach, Hervé

    2009-02-01

    In the category of motions preserving the angular momentum direction, Gorringe and Leach exhibited two classes of differential equations having elliptical orbits. After enlarging slightly these classes, we show that they are related by a duality correspondence of the Arnold Vassiliev type. The specific associated conserved quantities (Laplace Runge Lenz vector and Fradkin Jauch Hill tensor) are then dual reflections of each other.

  11. Leaching of Plastic Additives to Marine Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that ingestion of microplastics by aquatic species leads to increased exposure to plastic additives. However, experimental data or model based evidence is lacking. Here we assess the potential of leaching of nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the intestinal tracts of Areni

  12. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of biomass combustion ashes for forest soil liming and fertilizing has been addressed in literature. Though, a deep understanding of the ash chemical composition and leaching behavior is necessary to predict potential benefits and environmental risks related to this practice...

  13. Enhancements of LEACH Algorithm for Wireless Networks: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madheswaran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH protocol is the first hierarchical cluster based routing protocol successfully used in the Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN. In this paper, various enhancements used in the original LEACH protocol are examined. The basic operations, advantages and limitations of the modified LEACH algorithms are compared to identify the research issues to be solved and to give the suggestions for the future proposed routing algorithms of wireless networks based on LEACH routing algorithm.

  14. Chalcopyrite leaching: The rate controlling factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Kawashima, N.; Kaplun, K.; Absolon, V. J.; Gerson, A. R.

    2010-05-01

    The processes that determine the rate of chalcopyrite leaching are central to understanding how chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) behaves under the environmentally adverse conditions of acid rock drainage. To this end the effect of the acid anion on chalcopyrite leach rates using a variety of acidic media (H 2SO 4, HClO 4, HCl and H 2SO 4 with 0.25 M NaCl) under carefully controlled solution conditions (pH 1 and 2, Eh 750 mV (SHE) and 75 °C) has been examined. These conditions have been chosen to enable sufficient leach rates for accurate experimental determination and to compare to the previous mechanistic analysis carried out by Harmer et al. (2006). Extensive surface analysis of leach residues demonstrated that variations in the surface speciation could not be responsible for the observed variations in leach rate. The rate of Cu release, however, was found to be first order with respect to Fe 3+ activity and inversely proportional with respect to H + activity to the power of 0.7: {1}/{S}{dC}/{dt}=(2.0±0.2){a}/{aH0.7} where S is the relative surface area, C is concentration of Cu in the solution (M), t is the time (h), 2.0 is the rate constant (M 0.7 h -1) and a and a are Fe 3+ and H + activities, respectively (M). The rate model was further validated against additional leaches carried out in H 2SO 4 media with the initial addition of Fe 3+ (8 mM as Fe 2(SO 4) 3) at 75 °C under various pH and Eh regimes. The only condition under which this rate model was found not to hold was at simultaneously low a and high a, that is at pH 1 and a<5×10-5M, where the concentration of dissolved O 2 may be leach rate determining.

  15. Influence of sugarcane bagasse-derived biochar application on nitrate leaching in calcaric dark red soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, K; Miyamoto, T; Shiono, T; Shinogi, Y

    2012-01-01

    Application of biochar has been suggested to improve water- and fertilizer-retaining capacity of agricultural soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of bagasse charcoal (sugarcane [ L.] bagasse-derived biochar) on nitrate (NO) leaching from Shimajiri Maji soil, which has low water- and fertilizer-retaining capacity. The nitrate adsorption properties of bagasse charcoal formed at five pyrolysis temperatures (400-800° C) were investigated to select the most suitable bagasse charcoal for NO adsorption. Nitrate was able to adsorb onto the bagasse charcoal formed at pyrolysis temperatures of 700 to 800° C. Nitrate adsorption by bagasse charcoal (formed at 800° C) that passed through a 2-mm sieve was in a state of nonequilibrium even at 20 h after the addition of 20 mg N L KNO solution. Measurements suggested that the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of bagasse charcoal (800° C)-amended soils are affected by changes in soil tortuosity and porosity and the presence of meso- and micropores in the bagasse charcoal, which did not contribute to soil water transfer. In NO leaching studies using bagasse charcoal (800° C)-amended soils with different charcoal contents (0-10% [w/w]), the maximum concentration of NO in effluents from bagasse charcoal-amended soil columns was approximately 5% less than that from a nonamended soil column because of NO adsorption by bagasse charcoal (800° C). We conclude that application of bagasse charcoal (800°C) to the soil will increase the residence time of NO in the root zone of crops and provide greater opportunity for crops to absorb NO.

  16. Green Roofs for Stormwater Runoff Control - Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated green roofs as a stormwater management tool. Specifically, runoff quantity and quality from green and flat asphalt roofs were compared. Evapotranspiration from planted green roofs and evaporation from unplanted media roofs were also compared. The influence...

  17. Total pollution effects of urban surface runoff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Hong-bing; LUO Lin; HUANG Gu; LIU Ping; LI Jing-xian; HU Sheng; WANG Fu-xiang; XU Rui; HUANG Xiao-xue

    2009-01-01

    e values of MFFn (mass first flush ratio) and FF30 (first 30% of runoff volume) can be considered as split-flow control criteria to enable more effective and economical design of structural BMPs (best management practices) facilities.

  18. Leaching of used CANDU fuel: Results from a 19-year leach test under oxidizing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Johnson, L.H.; Tait, J.C.; McConnell, J.L.; Porth, R.J. [AECL, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1997-12-31

    A fuel leaching experiment has been in progress since 1977 to study the dissolution behavior of used CANDU fuel in aerated aqueous solution. The experiment involves exposure of 50-mm clad segments of an outer element of a Pickering fuel bundle (burnup 610 GJ/kg U; linear and peak power ratings 53 and 58 kW/m, respectively), to deionized distilled water (DDH{sub 2}O, {approximately}2 mg/L carbonate) and tapwater ({approximately}50 mg/L carbonate). In 1992, it was observed that the fuel in at least one of the leaching solutions showed some signs of deterioration and, therefore, in 1993, parts of the fuel samples were sacrificed for a detailed analysis of the physical state of the fuel, using SEM and optical microscopy. Leaching results to date show that even after >6900 days only 5 to 7.7% of the total calculated inventory of {sup 137}Cs has leached out preferentially and that leach rates suggest a development towards congruent dissolution. Total amounts of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr leached are slightly larger in tapwater than in DDH{sub 2}O. SEM examinations of leached fuel surface fragments indicate that the fuel surface exposed to DDH{sub 2}O is covered in a needle-like precipitate. The fuel surface exposed to tapwater shows evidence of leaching but no precipitate, likely because uranium is kept in solution by carbonate. Detailed optical and SEM microscopy examinations on fuel cross sections suggest that grain-boundary dissolution in DDH{sub 2}O is not prevalent, and in tapwater appears to be limited to the outer {approximately}0.5 mm (pellet/cladding) region of the fuel. Grain boundary attack seems to be limited to microcracks at or near the surface of the fuel. It thus appears that grain-boundary attack occurs only near the fuel pellet surface and is prevalent only in the presence of carbonate in solution.

  19. Understanding Greenland Ice Sheet Runoff Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Smith, L. C.; Pitcher, L. H.; Mote, T. L.; Yager, P. L.; Moustafa, S.; Cooper, M. G.; van As, D.; Hasholt, B.; Mikkelsen, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    One of the main ways the ice sheet loses mass is by meltwater runoff. Because of Greenland's great size, regional surface mass balance models are key to understanding large-scale runoff patterns and trends. At the same time, remote sensing and field observations reveal a complex hydrological system on the ice sheet's surface that are not well captured by these models. Yet, understanding the fate and impact of the meltwater on the ocean depends on knowing these temporal and spatial details. Unusually thick, near surface, ice lenses found in firn cores, most likely formed during very large recent melt events signify meltwater refreezing, but may also prevent further infiltration while facilitating runoff. Maps derived from remote sensing show how this runoff flows through an extensive network of supraglacial streams and lakes before it drains into the ice via moulins. Observations of discharge on the ice sheet surface and its margin provide evidence of runoff delays and retention before it is exported to the surrounding oceans. Here, trends and spatial patterns in ice sheet runoff will be examined by using model outputs from the regional surface mass balance model Modèle Atmosphérique Régional and compared with recent remotely sensed and field observations.

  20. Effects of a wood-based biochar on the leaching of pesticides chlorpyrifos, diuron, glyphosate and MCPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, Harald; Börjesson, Elisabet; Stenström, John

    2017-04-15

    We studied the ability of a wood-based biochar to reduce the leaching of the pesticides chlorpyrifos, diuron, glyphosate and MCPA in a sand column test system. In addition, time-dependent adsorption of the pesticides to the biochar and to the sand used in the columns was determined. The sorption kinetics was shown to be controlled by the log Kow-values of the pesticides and sorption rates varied in the order: chlorpyrifos (log Kow = 4.7) > diuron (log Kow = 2.87) > MCPA (log Kow = -0.8) > glyphosate (log Kow = -3.2). Glyphosate sorbed very weakly to the biochar but strongly to the sand. Biochar was most effective at retaining the pesticides if applied as a distinct layer rather than mixed with the sand. Leaching of diuron and MCPA was reduced by biochar application, and the retention was linearly related to the thickness of the biochar layers. However, leaching of chlorpyrifos and glyphosate was not affected by biochar addition. Leaching was low for all pesticides when the pesticides were added directly to biochar that was then added to the column. Together, our results suggest that a viable strategy for using biochar as a means to mitigate leaching of pesticides may be to use it as an adsorptive layer directly on or close to the soil surface. This would be especially useful in areas where pesticides are routinely handled and potentially spilled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Soil amendments for heavy metals removal from stormwater runoff discharging to environmentally sensitive areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenouth, William R.; Gharabaghi, Bahram

    2015-10-01

    Concentrations of dissolved metals in stormwater runoff from urbanized watersheds are much higher than established guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Five potential soil amendment materials derived from affordable, abundant sources have been tested as filter media using shaker tests and were found to remove dissolved metals in stormwater runoff. Blast furnace (BF) slag and basic oxygenated furnace (BOF) slag from a steel mill, a drinking water treatment residual (DWTR) from a surface water treatment plant, goethite-rich overburden (IRON) from a coal mine, and woodchips (WC) were tested. The IRON and BOF amendments were shown to remove 46-98% of dissolved metals (Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, Zn) in repacked soil columns. Freundlich adsorption isotherm constants for six metals across five materials were calculated. Breakthrough curves of dissolved metals and total metal accumulation within the filter media were measured in column tests using synthetic runoff. A reduction in system performance over time occurred due to progressive saturation of the treatment media. Despite this, the top 7 cm of each filter media removed up to 72% of the dissolved metals. A calibrated HYDRUS-1D model was used to simulate long-term metal accumulation in the filter media, and model results suggest that for these metals a BOF filter media thickness as low as 15 cm can be used to improve stormwater quality to meet standards for up to twenty years. The treatment media evaluated in this research can be used to improve urban stormwater runoff discharging to environmentally sensitive areas (ESAs).

  2. Adsorption of Compounds that Mimic Urban Stormwater Dissolved Organic Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Mehrdad; James, Bruce R; Davis, Allen P

    2017-02-01

      Stormwater runoff carrying nitrogen can accelerate eutrophication. Bioretention facilities are among low impact development systems which are commonly used to manage urban stormwater quality and quantity. They are, however, not designed to remove dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and may become a net DON exporter. Adsorption of seven organic nitrogenous compounds onto several adsorbents was examined. Batch adsorption study revealed that coal activated carbon (AC) exhibited the best performance in adsorption of the selected organic nitrogenous compounds. The highest adsorption capacity of coal AC was 0.4 mg N/g for pyrrole at an equilibrium concentration of 0.02 mg N/L, while adsorption was not detectable for urea at the same equilibrium concentration. The fastest compound to reach equilibrium adsorption capacity onto the coal AC was pyrrole (1 hour). The adsorption capacity of the coal AC for pyrrole and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and 1-hour contact time is recommended for designing bioretention systems targeting organic nitrogenous compounds.

  3. Polytetrafluoroethylene/TiO2 Composite Pellets as Sulfur Adsorbents for Pressure Oxidation Leaching of Chalcopyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaiah, Patakamuri; Grundy, Mark; Guerra, Eduard; Choi, Yeonuk; Ye, Zhibin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we report the use of polytetrafluoroethylene/titanium dioxide (PTFE/TiO2) composite pellets as sulfur adsorbents in the extraction of copper from chalcopyrite by pressure oxidation leaching. PTFE/TiO2 composites of various compositions were prepared by compression molding followed by pelletization. The mass percentage of TiO2 filler in the PTFE matrix was varied from 0 to 35 wt pct. With the use of the composite pellets, significant enhancements in copper leaching were observed, indicating their role as adsorbents for the adsorption of molten elemental sulfur. In particular, the enhancement in copper extraction was increasingly pronounced (from 75 to 89 pct) with the increase of the mass percentage of TiO2 in the composite pellets from 0 to 35 wt pct. This is reasoned to result from the loss of TiO2 domains from the pellet surface, which creates additional rough hydrophobic surface to better capture elemental sulfur. The composite pellet adsorbents show excellent reusability, with the performance well maintained for 10 leaching cycles. In addition, the effectiveness of composite adsorbents at different chalcopyrite pulp densities was also investigated.

  4. Metal concentrations in soil and seepage water due to infiltration of roof runoff by long term numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, J; Dierkes, C; Göbel, P; Klinger, C; Stubbe, H; Coldewey, W G

    2005-01-01

    The qualitative effects of stormwater infiltration on soil and seepage water are investigated with long term numerical modelling. The retention behaviour of different soils and materials used in infiltration devices is determined with batch and column tests. Results of the laboratory tests are adsorption isotherms which represent input data for numerical transport modelling. The long term simulations are performed with combinations of different solutions (types of roof runoff) and infiltration devices (swale and trench) under different hydrogeological conditions. The presented results contain the infiltration of low polluted roof runoff, runoff from a roof with zinc sheets and from a roof with copper sheets concerning the heavy metals zinc, copper and lead. The increase of concentrations in the infiltration body is high. For the infiltrated water, the results show a migration to groundwater only for the low adsorbing soil.

  5. A Tire-Sulfur Hybrid Adsorption Denitrification (T-SHAD) process for decentralized wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Lynn, Thomas J; Banihani, Qais; Bartacek, Jan; Jenicek, Pavel; Ergas, Sarina J

    2014-09-15

    Nitrogen discharges from decentralized wastewater treatment (DWT) systems contribute to surface and groundwater contamination. However, the high variability in loading rates, long idle periods and lack of regular maintenance presents a challenge for biological nitrogen removal in DWT. A Tire-Sulfur Hybrid Adsorption Denitrification (T-SHAD) process was developed that combines nitrate (NO3(-)) adsorption to scrap tire chips with sulfur-oxidizing denitrification. This allows the tire chips to adsorb NO3(-) when the influent loading exceeds the denitrification capacity of the biofilm and release it when NO3(-) loading rates are low (e.g. at night). Three waste products, scrap tire chips, elemental sulfur pellets and crushed oyster shells, were used as a medium in adsorption, leaching, microcosm and up-flow packed bed bioreactor studies of NO3(-) removal from synthetic nitrified DWT wastewater. Adsorption isotherms showed that scrap tire chips have an adsorption capacity of 0.66 g NO3(-)-N kg(-1) of scrap tires. Leaching and microcosm studies showed that scrap tires leach bioavailable organic carbon that can support mixotrophic metabolism, resulting in lower effluent SO4(2-) concentrations than sulfur oxidizing denitrification alone. In column studies, the T-SHAD process achieved high NO3(-)-N removal efficiencies under steady state (90%), variable flow (89%) and variable concentration (94%) conditions.

  6. Leaching of metals from steel samples in peracetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabutani, Tomoki; Nakamura, Takamasa; Takayabagi, Toshio

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, leaching behavior of metallic species from steel samples in peracetic acid was investigated. We compared the leaching efficiency between peracetic acid and acetic acid to estimate the role of peroxo functional group for the leaching. As a result, peracetic acid enhanced the leaching ability of metallic species from the high speed steel and the alloy steel samples. MoO3, Mo, MO2C, W, WO3, VC and MnO2 were effectively leached by peracetic acid, while the stainless steel had a high resistance against corrosion by peracetic acid.

  7. Radiological investigation of phosphate fertilizers: Leaching studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Miklós; Tóth-Bodrogi, Edit; Németh, Szabolcs; Somlai, János; Kovács, Tibor

    2017-07-01

    The raw materials of the phosphate fertilizer industry are the various apatite minerals. Some of these have high levels of natural radionuclides, and thus phosphate fertilizers contain significant amounts of U-238, K-40 and Ra-226. These can leach out of the fertilizers used in large quantities for resupplying essential nutrients in the soil and can then enter the food chain through plants, thereby increasing the internal dose of the affected population. In the current study, the radiological risk of eight commercially available phosphate fertilizers (superphosphate, NPK, PK) and their leaching behaviours were investigated using different techniques (gamma and alpha spectrometry), and the dose contributions of using these fertilizers were estimated. To characterize the leaching behaviour, two leaching procedures were applied and compared -the MSZ 21470-50 (Hungarian standard) and the Tessier five-step sequential extraction method. Based on the evaluation of the gamma-spectra, it is found that the level of Th-232 in the samples was low (max.7 ± 6 Bq kg(-1)), the average Ra-226 activity concentration was 309 ± 39 Bq kg(-1) (min. 10 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), max. 570 ± 46 Bq kg(-1)), while the K-40 concentrations (average 3139 ± 188 Bq kg(-1), min. 51 ± 36 Bq kg(-1)) could be as high as 7057 ± 427 Bq kg(-1). The high K-40 can be explained by reference to the composition of the investigated fertilizers (NPK, PK). U concentrations were between 15 and 361 Bq kg(-1), with the average of 254 Bq kg(-1), measured using alpha spectrometry. The good correlation between P2O5 content and radioactivity reported previously is not found in our data. The leaching studies reveal that the mobility of the fertilizer's uranium content is greatly influenced by the parameters of the leaching methods. The availability of U to water ranged between 3 and 28 m/m%, while the Lakanen-Erviö solution mobilized between 10 and 100% of the U content. Copyright © 2016

  8. Foliar and soil deposition of pesticide sprays in peanuts and their washoff and runoff under simulated worst-case rainfall conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauchope, R Don; Johnson, W Carroll; Sumner, Harold R

    2004-11-17

    There are few studies that relate the timing and amounts of pesticide washoff from plant foliage during rainfall to runoff losses at the edge of the field. We hypothesized that foliar deposits, if washed onto the soil slowly during rainfall, may then undergo less leaching during the period of infiltration that occurs prior to soil saturation and runoff, thus exhibiting larger runoff losses than pesticides on/in the soil at the beginning of rain. We measured the runoff of ethalfluralin, metolachlor, chlorothalonil, and rhodamine WT dye using simulated rainfall on 450 m2 mesoplots planted in peanut. Ethalfluralin was applied preplant incorporated, and metolachlor was applied preemergence on bare soil. Chlorothalonil and rhodamine WT were applied to the peanut canopy at maturity. Rainfall was simulated 24 h after each chemical application (in May and July, 1998, and May and August, 1999) using raindrop sprinklers, applying 5.5 +/- 0.5 cm over a 2 h period to create reasonable worst-case conditions; between 3 and 9 mm of runoff was generated. Volume-weighted average concentrations of chemicals in runoff were 7, 104, 163, and 179 ug L(-1) for ethalfluralin, metolachlor, chlorothalonil, and rhodamine WT, respectively. The total amounts of chemicals lost in the runoff events were 0.04 +/- 0.01, 0.2 +/- 0.1, 0.6 +/- 0.5, and 0.2 +/- 0.1, as percents of amounts applied, respectively. Rhodamine WT formed a vivid red solution on wetting and provided visual clues to the dynamics of chemical washoff/runoff. The washoff from rain-exposed peanut foliage appeared to be complete within a few minutes of the beginning of rainfall, and disappearance of dye from rain-exposed soil surface occurred within the first 10 min of rainfall. However, dye was present in runoff water at near-constant concentrations throughout the 2 h runoff event, indicating that near-constant amounts of chemical remained in the soil extraction zone. These results confirm earlier studies showing that soil

  9. Evaluation of removal of orthophosphate and ammonia from rainfall runoff using aboveground permeable reactive barrier composed of limestone and zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Rajani; Hoffman, Dennis W; Wolfe, June E; Prcin, Lisa J

    2008-10-01

    This paper evaluates the design and performance of an Aboveground Permeable Reactive Barrier (APRB) system made of polyethylene mesh bags (FlowBags) containing crushed limestone and zeolite for adsorption of orthophosphate-P (PO4-P) and ammonia-N (NH4-N) from rainfall runoff. Laboratory batch experiments, simulated runoff experiments and actual APRB implementations were performed to evaluate the performance of the APRB. Batch experiments were performed to determine adsorption efficiency of crushed zeolite and limestone as reactive materials in APRB for removal of dissolved ammonium nitrogen and orthophosphate phosphorus from aqueous solutions under controlled laboratory conditions. Adsorption efficiencies of zeolite and limestone were tested individually and in combination. Results show adsorption efficiency increases when the materials are used in combination. Effects of particle size, contact time, pH, and temperature were studied. Major emphasis was given to short contact times because the contact of rainfall runoff water under field conditions with APRBs would be approximately 5 minutes. Maximum removal of approximately 70% PO4-P and NH4-N was seen at 45 degrees C in 5 minutes within a pH range of 8-11. Optimum adsorbent concentration was 0.3 ppm with 20 g limestone and 10 g of zeolites. Simulated field experiments and actual APRB field installations showed variable results. Results from field evaluations of APRB showed mixed results from very high to negligible removal of orthophosphate-P and ammonia-N at different monitoring sites and storm events. Such variability may be due to the design of the bags, other biotic and abiotic factors and various physical factors, which are absent in the laboratory conditions. Some APRB design problems were also observed under field conditions and solutions are suggested. Overall results indicate that APRBs composed of combinations of crushed zeolite and limestone will offer an effective low maintenance and green alternative

  10. Runoff production from intercrater plains on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, R. P., III; Matsubara, Y.; Cawley, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Ancient fluvial paleochannels and paleolakes constrain the hydrology of a wetter epoch in the early history of Mars. The cross-sectional dimensions of fluvial channels scale with discharge, watershed topography is generally well preserved, and adjustments can be made for gravity. These factors have supported conservative estimates of runoff production during event floods more than 3.5 billion years ago. Assuming weak channel banks, such that discharge is low per unit channel width, event floods in smaller watersheds had estimated runoff production of 1 cm/day. Highland surfaces generated runoff inefficiently, such that channel width increases with only the 0.3 power of watershed area. Inefficient runoff production on Mars is also suggested by new landscape evolution modeling. In long-term simulations that accurately reproduce the present landscape, forming and degrading all of the Middle and Late Noachian impact craters in selected study areas, inefficient runoff production is needed to degrade craters without intensely dissecting intercrater surfaces. The model shows that discharge generally cannot increase at more than the 0.3 power of watershed area. Paleolakes provide useful constraints on paleohydrology over intermediate timescales of years to millennia. Most local highland basins were never integrated into regional drainage systems, but some have both a contributing valley network and an outlet valley, indicating that they overflowed. Paleolake overflows require a medium-term water supply that exceeds losses to evaporation. Reasonable evaporation of 0.1 to 1 m/yr and watersheds that are mostly >10 times the area of overflowed paleolakes suggest runoff production of gardening, and lesser aeolian erosion. Low drainage density is an obvious explanation for inefficient runoff production, but it may be the consequence of moderate rainfall or snowmelt, as well as incision of valley networks over a finite timescale.

  11. Mechanochemical leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate by sulfuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadabad, Farhad Khorramshahi; Hejazi, Sina; khaki, Jalil Vahdati; Babakhani, Abolfazl

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to introduce a new cost-effective methodology for increasing the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite concentrates at ambient temperature and pressure. Mechanical activation was employed during the leaching (mechanochemical leaching) of chalcopyrite concentrates in a sulfuric acid medium at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. High energy ball milling process was used during the leaching to provide the mechanochemical leaching condition, and atomic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to determine the leaching behavior of chalcopyrite. Moreover, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the chalcopyrite powder before and after leaching. The results demonstrated that mechanochemical leaching was effective; the extraction of copper increased significantly and continuously. Although the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite was very low at ambient temperature, the percentages of copper dissolved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3) after 20 h of mechanochemical leaching reached 28% and 33%, respectively. Given the efficiency of the developed method and the facts that it does not require the use of an autoclave and can be conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, it represents an economical and easy-to-use method for the leaching industry.

  12. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: the importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, E; Butera, S; Kosson, D S; Van Zomeren, A; Van der Sloot, H A; Astrup, T F

    2015-04-01

    Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results of the study, recommendations are provided regarding the use of leaching data in LCA studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Removal of phosphorus from iron ores by chemical leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yong-shi; JIANG Tao; YANG Yong-bin; LI Qian; LI Guang-hui; GUO Yu-feng

    2006-01-01

    Alkali-leaching and acid-leaching were proposed for the dephosphorization of Changde iron ore, which contains an average of 1.12% for phosphorus content. Sodium hydroxide, sulfuriced, hydrochloric and nitric acids were used for the preparation of leach solutions. The results show that phosphorus occurring as apatite phase could be removed by alkali-leaching, but those occurring in the iron phase could not. Sulfuric acid is the most effective among the three kinds of acid. 91.61% phosphorus removal was attained with 1% sulfuric acid after leaching for 20 min at room temperature. Iron loss during acid-leaching can be negligible, which was less than 0.25%.The pH value of solution after leaching with 1% sulfuric acid was about 0.86, which means acid would not be exhausted during the process and it could be recycled, and the recycle of sulfuric acid solution would make the dephosphorization process more economical.

  14. Leaching of Electronic Waste Using Biometabolised Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Saidan; B. Brown; M. Valix

    2012-01-01

    The revolution in information and communication technology has brought huge technical benefits and wealth, but has created a major global problem: the generation of vast amounts of electronic waste, or e-waste through product obsolesce. The challenge in managing e-waste will be in developing sustainable recycling tech- nologies that are able to address the volume and complexity of this waste using cost effective and ecologically sen-sitive methods. In this study, the capability or microorganism metabolic acids in dissolving the metallic tractions from waste printed circuit boards was examined. Several factors were considered in the examination of the activityof the acids-including secondary reactions, solution pH, temperature and the nature of ligands in solutions (or bioacid constituents). The leaching tests were cgnducted ex-situ, using synthetic organic acids. Leaching was performed for periods of up to 6 hat 70-90 ℃ and 1000 r-min-1.

  15. Leaching from denture base materials in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lygre, H.; Solheim, E.; Gjerdet, N.R. [School of Medicine, Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    1995-04-01

    Specimens made from denture base materials were leached in Ringer Solution and in ethanol. The specimens comprised a heat-cured product processed in two different ways and two cold-cured materials. The organic compounds leaching from the specimens to the solutions were separated, identified, and quantified by a combined gas-chromatography and gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry technique. Additives and degradation products, possibly made by free radical reactions, were released from the denture base materials. In Ringer solution only phthalates could be quantified. In ethanol solvent, biphenyl, dibutyl phthalate, dicyclohexyl phthalate, phenyl benzoate, and phenyl salicylate were quantified. In addition, copper was found in the ethanol solvent from one of the denture base materials. The amount of leachable organic compounds varies among different materials. Processing temperature influences the initial amount of leachable compounds. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Effects of suburban development on runoff generation in the Croton River basin, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Douglas; Vitvar, Tomas; McDonnell, Jeffrey; Hassett, James; Duncan, Jonathan; Kendall, Carol

    2005-09-01

    The effects of impervious area, septic leach-field effluent, and a riparian wetland on runoff generation were studied in three small (0.38-0.56 km 2) headwater catchments that represent a range of suburban development (high density residential, medium density residential, and undeveloped) within the Croton River basin, 70 km north of New York City. Precipitation, stream discharge, and groundwater levels were monitored at 10-30 min intervals for 1 year, and stream water and groundwater samples were collected biweekly for δ 18O, NO 3-, and SO 42- analysis for more than 2 years during an overlapping period in 2000-2002. Data from 27 storms confirmed that peak magnitudes increased and recession time decreased with increasing development, but lags in peak arrival and peak discharge/mean discharge were greatest in the medium density residential catchment, which contains a wetland in which storm runoff is retained before entering the stream. Baseflow during a dry period from Aug. 2001-Feb. 2002 was greatest in the high-density residential catchment, presumably from the discharge of septic effluent through the shallow groundwater system and into the stream. In contrast, moderate flows during a wet period from Mar.-Aug. 2002 were greatest in the undeveloped catchment, possibly as a result of greater subsurface storage or greater hydraulic conductivity at this site. The mean residence time of baseflow was about 30 weeks at all three catchments, indicating that human influence was insufficient to greatly affect the groundwater recharge and discharge properties that determine catchment residence time. These results suggest that while suburban development and its associated impervious surfaces and storm drains accelerate the transport of storm runoff into streams, the combined effects of remnant natural landscape features such as wetlands and human alterations such as deep groundwater supply and septic systems can change the expected effects of human development on storm

  17. Duality properties of Gorringe-Leach equations

    OpenAIRE

    Grandati, Yves; Berard, Alain; Mohrbach, Herve

    2004-01-01

    International audience; In the category of motions preserving the angular momentum's direction, Gorringe and Leach exhibited two classes of differential equations having elliptical orbits. After enlarging slightly these classes, we show that they are related by a duality correspondence of the Arnold-Vassiliev type. The specific associated conserved quantities (Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector and Fradkin-Jauch-Hill tensor) are then dual reflections one of the other

  18. Duality properties of Gorringe-Leach equations

    CERN Document Server

    Grandati, Yves; Mohrbach, Herve

    2007-01-01

    In the category of motions preserving the angular momentum's direction, Gorringe and Leach exhibited two classes of differential equations having elliptical orbits. After enlarging slightly these classes, we show that they're related by a duality correspondence of the Arnold-Vassiliev type. The specific associated conserved quantities (Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector and Fradkin-Jauch-Hill tensor) are then dual reflections one of the other.

  19. Gold and Silver Extraction from Leach Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagdaulet K. Kenzhaliyev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been carried out an investigation on the extraction of gold and silver from thiosulfate solutions: standard test and technological solutions of chemical and electrochemical leaching. The influence of related metals on the process of extracting gold from solution was studied. There has been conducted a comparative study of the IR spectra of solutions after the sorption of gold, silver and related metals.

  20. Leaching of boron, arsenic and selenium from sedimentary rocks: II. pH dependence, speciation and mechanisms of release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar, E-mail: carlito@trans-er.eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Soil Environment Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Hashimoto, Ayaka, E-mail: a.hashimoto@diaconsult.co.jp [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Sapporo (Japan); Igarashi, Toshifumi, E-mail: tosifumi@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Groundwater and Mass Transport, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Yoneda, Tetsuro, E-mail: yonet@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Soil Environment Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Sedimentary rocks excavated in Japan from road- and railway-tunnel projects contain relatively low concentrations of hazardous trace elements like boron (B), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se). However, these seemingly harmless waste rocks often produced leachates with concentrations of hazardous trace elements that exceeded the environmental standards. In this study, the leaching behaviors and release mechanisms of B, As and Se were evaluated using batch leaching experiments, sequential extraction and geochemical modeling calculations. The results showed that B was mostly partitioned with the residual/crystalline phase that is relatively stable under normal environmental conditions. In contrast, the majority of As and Se were associated with the exchangeable and organics/sulfides phases that are unstable under oxidizing conditions. Dissolution of water-soluble phases controlled the leaching of B, As and Se from these rocks in the short term, but pyrite oxidation, calcite dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions became more important in the long term. The mobilities of these trace elements were also strongly influenced by the pH of the rock-water system. Although the leaching of Se only increased in the acidic region, those of B and As were enhanced under both acidic and alkaline conditions. Under strongly acidic conditions, the primarily release mechanism of B, As and Se was the dissolution of mineral phases that incorporated and/or adsorbed these elements. Lower concentrations of these trace elements in the circumneutral pH range could be attributed to their strong adsorption onto minerals like Al-/Fe-oxyhydroxides and clays, which are inherently present and/or precipitated in the rock-water system. The leaching of As and B increased under strongly alkaline conditions because of enhanced desorption and pyrite oxidation while that of Se remained minimal due to its adsorption onto Fe-oxyhydroxides and co-precipitation with calcite. - Highlights: • The bulk of

  1. Trace Metals in Urban Stormwater Runoff and their Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Hall, K.; Li, L. Y.; Schreier, H.

    2009-04-01

    In past decades, due to the rapid urbanization, land development has replaced forests, fields and meadows with impervious surfaces such as roofs, parking lots and roads, significantly affecting watershed quality and having an impact on aquatic systems. In this study, non-point source pollution from a diesel bus loop was assessed for the extent of trace metal contamination of Cu, Mn, Fe, and Zn in the storm water runoff. The study was carried out at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) of British Columbia, Canada. Fifteen storm events were monitored at 3 sites from the diesel bus loop to determine spatial and temporal variations of dissolved and total metal concentrations in the storm water runoff. The dissolved metal concentrations were compared with the provincial government discharge criteria and the bus loop storm water quality was also compared with previous studies conducted across the GVRD urban area. To prevent storm water with hazardous levels of contaminants from being discharged into the urban drainage system, a storm water catch basin filter was installed and evaluated for its efficiency of contaminants removal. The perlite filter media adsorption capacities for the trace metals, oil and grease were studied for better maintenance of the catch basin filter. Dissolved copper exceeded the discharge criteria limit in 2 out of 15 cases, whereas dissolved zinc exceeded the criteria in 4 out of 15 cases, and dissolved manganese was below the criteria in all of the events sampled. Dissolved Cu and Zn accounted for 36 and 45% of the total concentration, whereas Mn and Fe only accounted for 20 and 4% of their total concentration, respectively. Since they are more mobile and have higher bioaccumulation potentials, Zn and Cu are considered to be more hazardous to the aquatic environment than Fe and Mn. With high imperviousness (100%) and intensive traffic at the UBC diesel bus loop, trace metal concentrations

  2. Leaching of heavy metals from steelmaking slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes, J. F. P

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaching tests with EAF and Ladle slags were performed, using a flow through test and the standard batch test DIN 38414-S4. The previous method was used to simulate the leaching behaviour of steel slags under landfill. The chemical analysis of the leachates during this period shows, in general, for both types of slag, an increase of heavy metal releases with ageing. Standard test method DIN 38414-S4 was used to evaluate leachability of heavy metals by water in unprocessed slags. After more than one year of trials, slag samples submitted to these trials presented very low total leaching levels. The most extracted elements are calcium and magnesium. Nevertheless, in flow-through test, calcium and magnesium leached from solid slags are below 0.5% and all other metals below 0.1%. Leachates obtained with DIN 38414-S4 present, as expected, higher leaching values; however, these are inferior to 5 % (Ca and 1% (other elements.

    Este articulo contiene los resultados obtenidos en ensayos de lixiviación de escorias de acero (horno electrico y cuchara ejecutados siguiendo la metodologia de flujo dinámico así como el ensayo normalizado DIN 38414-S4. El primer ensayo intenta simular el comportamiento de lixiviación de las escorias en vertedero. Para las escorias ensayadas se han complementado los ensayos con el análisis químico de los lixiviados y se ha verificado un aumento de la liberación de metales pesados. El ensayo DIN 38414-S4 se ha utilizado para evaluar la lixiviación por agua de metales pesados, en muestras de escorias originales. Despues de un año de ensayos, se han observado niveles muy bajos de lixiviación. Los elementos mas lixiviados han sido calcio y magnesio. No obstante, en los ensayos de flujo dinámico, el calcio y el magnesio lixiviados de las escorias sólidas era menor de 0,5% y el resto de los otros metales era inferior a 0,1%. Los lixiviados obtenidos con el ensayo DIN 38414-S4 presentan, como era de esperar, valores

  3. Changes in speciation and leaching behaviors of heavy metals in dredged sediment solidified/stabilized with various materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianping; Wang, Liang; Xiao, Man

    2016-05-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) of sediments is frequently used to treat contaminants in dredged sediments. In this study, sediment collected from the Pearl River Delta (China) was solidified/stabilized with three different kinds of functional materials: cement, lime and bentonite. Lime primarily acted via induced increases in pH, while cements stabilization occurred through their silicate-based systems and the main function of bentonite was adsorption. The speciation and leaching behaviors of specific heavy metals before and after S/S were analyzed and the results showed that the residual speciation of Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn increased in all treatments except for Cu, as the exchangeable speciation, carbonate-bound speciation and Fe-Mn-oxide-bound speciation of Cu (all of which could be stabilized) were less than 2 % of the total amount. Pb leaching only decreased when pH increased, while the mobility of Cr and Ni only decreased in response to the silicate-based systems. The leached portion of the Fe-Mn-oxide-bound speciation followed the order Zn > Cu > Ni/Cd > Pb > Cr. The leached portion of organic-matter-bound species was less than 4 % for Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb, but 35.1 % and 20.6 % for Cu and Zn, respectively.

  4. Zeolite (Na) modified by nano-Fe particles adsorbing phosphate in rainwater runoff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lili Gan; Jiane Zuo; Bangmi Xie; Peng Li; Xia Huang

    2012-01-01

    Zeolite (Na) modified by self-synthesized nano-Fe particles was used as infiltration media to adsorb phosphate in rainwater runoff.The adsorption capacities increased up to 75 times that of natural zeolite at a saturated equilibrium phosphate concentration of 0.42 mg/L.The correlation of capacity and material-specific surface area indicated that specific surface area was not the key factor contributing to the capacity improvement.SEM and XRD analysis showed that chemical reaction between Fe and P to form new products like cacoxenite is the main reason for the increased capacity,and that the method of adding metal ions or particles to improve the adsorption capacity for phosphate is feasible.

  5. Interfacial adsorption of insulin - Conformational changes and reversibility of adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollmann, SH; Jorgensen, L; Bukrinsky, JT; Elofsson, U; Norde, W; Frokjaer, S

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of human insulin to Teflon particles was studied with respect to conformational changes and the reversibility of adsorption was examined by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Adsorption isotherms for the adsorption of human insulin indicated high affinity adsorption, even

  6. Interfacial adsorption of insulin. Conformational changes and reversibility of adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollmann, S.H.; Bukrinsky, J.T.; Elofsson, U.; Norde, W.; Frokjaer, S.

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of human insulin to Teflon particles was studied with respect to conformational changes and the reversibility of adsorption was examined by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Adsorption isotherms for the adsorption of human insulin indicated high affinity adsorption, even

  7. Application of wavelet transform in runoff sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A wavelet transform is applied to runoff analysis to obtain the composition of the runoff sequence and to forecast future runoff. An observed runoff sequence is firstly decomposed and reconstructed by wavelet transform and its expanding tendency is derived. Then, the runoff sequence is forecasted by the back propagation artificial neural networks (BPANN) and by a wavelet transform combined with BPANN. The earlier researches seldom involve the problem of how to choose wavelet function, which is important and cannot be ignored when the wavelet transform is used. With application of the developed approach to the analysis of runoff sequence, several kinds of wavelet functions have been tested.

  8. Leaching potential of pervious concrete and immobilization of Cu, Pb and Zn using pervious concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solpuker, U; Sheets, J; Kim, Y; Schwartz, F W

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the leaching potential of pervious concrete and its capacity for immobilizing Cu, Pb and Zn, which are common contaminants in urban runoff. Batch experiments showed that the leachability of Cu, Pb and Zn increased when pHconcrete might function to attenuate contaminant migration. A porous concrete block was sprayed with low pH water (pH=4.3±0.1) for 190 h. The effluent was highly alkaline (pH~10 to 12). In the first 50 h, specific conductance and trace-metal were high but declined towards steady state values. PHREEQC modeling showed that mixing of interstitial alkaline matrix waters with capillary pore water was required in order to produce the observed water chemistry. The interstitial pore solutions seem responsible for the high pH values and relatively high concentrations of trace metals and major cations in the early stages of the experiment. Finally, pervious concrete was sprayed with a synthetic contaminated urban runoff (10 ppb Cu, Pb and Zn) with a pH of 4.3±0.1 for 135 h. It was found that Pb immobilization was greater than either Cu or Zn. Zn is the most mobile among three and also has the highest variation in the observed degree of immobilization.

  9. STUDY OF RUNOFF IN UNDA WATERSHED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SATRIA WAHYU 0ETOM0

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When rain falls on the earth, it just does not sit there, it starts moving according to the laws of gravity. A portion of the precipitation seeps into the ground to replenish Earth's groundwater. Most of it flows downhill as runoff. Runoff is extremely important in that not only does it keep rivers and lakes full of water, but it also changes the landscape by the action of erosion. The purpose and objective in this study are to estimate the conditions of land cover of Unda Watershed based on the results of image processing, to estimate the monthly average runoff and discharge in outlet of Unda Watershed from 1999 to 2003. The research location is in Unda Watershed. This watershed lies in Province of Bali which has wide 233.1 km2 (23.310 Ha (Balai Wilayah Sungai Bali-Penida. Administratively this watershed lies in 3 Regencies that are Karangasem, Klungkung and Bangli Regency. Mostly the region lies in the Karangasem Regency. In this research, the monthly rainfall data employed to generate the runoff process. Analyze of contour map from topography map obtained the watershed area, physical parameter of river and concentration time. In this research used monthly average rainf all data (from 1999 to 2003 from Pempatan, Besakih, Singarata, Sidemen, Klungkung, Telengan, Rain Gauge Station and Polygon Thiesen method employed to analyze the datas. Apart of rainfall, there are a number of site specific factors which have a direct bearing on the occurrence and volume of runoff, they are soil type, land cover and slope. The soil types in this research area are all Regosol, this soil mapping does not need to be overlayed in obtaining the land unit. Analyze of land cover was employed by Supervised Classification method. By image processing obtained land cover of Unda Watershed estimated consists of 38.129 km2 of forest area (16.357°Ai, 19.122 km2 of grassland area (8.203%, 100.991 km2 of farmland area (43.325%, 62-412 km2 of area housing (26.775%, 2.625 km2

  10. Estimating Subcatchment Runoff Coefficients using Weather Radar and a Downstream Runoff Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.;

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating runoff coefficients of urban drainage subcatchments based on a combination of high resolution weather radar data and flow measurements from a downstream runoff sensor. By utilising the spatial variability of the precipitation it is possible to estimate...... the runoff coefficients of the separate subcatchments. The method is demonstrated through a case study of an urban drainage catchment (678 ha) located in the city of Aarhus, Denmark. The study has proven that it is possible to use corresponding measurements of the relative rainfall distribution over...

  11. Effect of P-Reactive Drainage Aggregates on Green Roof Runoff Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Karczmarczyk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The main hypothesis of the presented study is that the negative effect of phosphorus leaching from a green roof substrate can be reduced by including P-reactive material in a drainage layer. In this work, different aggregates (Pollytag®, lightweight expanded clay aggregates, chalcedony, serpentynite and crushed autoclaved aerated concrete to be used as the green roof drainage layer are described. Physical parameters, e.g., granulometric composition, water absorption, bulk density and porosity are assessed. A phosphorus sorption isotherm and a kinetic test were performed. Physical and chemical characteristics of the materials were used as a base for choosing the best media for the drainage layer. The P-removal efficiency of crushed autoclaved aerated concrete was confirmed in a column experiment. Adding the implementation of the P-reactive material in a drainage layer during construction can reduce the negative effect of substrate on green roof runoff quality.

  12. Leaching and recycling of zinc from liquid waste sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Bing; GAO Hui-mei; CHAI Li-yuan; SHU Yu-de

    2008-01-01

    The selective leaching and recovery of zinc in a zinciferous sediment from a synthetic wastewater treatment was investigated. The main composition of the sediment includes 6% zinc and other metal elements such as Ca, Fe, Cu, Mg. The effects of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, leaching time and the liquid-to-solid ratio on the leaching rate of zinc were studied by single factor and orthogonal experiments. The maximum difference of leaching rate between zinc and iron, 89.85%, was obtained by leaching under 170 g/L H2SO4 in liquid-to-solid ratio 4.2 mL/g at 65 "C for 1 h, and the leaching rates of zinc and iron were 91.20% and 1.35%, respectively.

  13. Stabilization of arsenic and fluoride bearing spent adsorbent in clay bricks: Preparation, characterization and leaching studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Vineet Kumar; Mondal, Prasenjit

    2017-09-15

    The presence of arsenic and fluoride in groundwater has been observed throughout the world. Many technologies have been developed by various research groups in order to tackle this problem. Adsorption has emerged as one of the best possible technique for the removal of arsenic, fluoride and many other pollutants from drinking water. Although a considerable amount of work has been published on the adsorptive removal of arsenic and fluoride, the area related to the management of spent adsorbent is not well explored. Present paper deals with the adsorptive removal of arsenic and fluoride from aqueous solution by three different types of adsorbents, namely, thermally treated laterite (TTL), acid-base treated laterite (ABTL) and aluminum oxide/hydroxide nanoparticles (AHNP). Under the experimental conditions in batch operation, the adsorption capacities of TTL, ABLT and AHNP for arsenic are found to be 6.43 μg/g, 9.25 μg/g and 48.5 μg/g respectively, whereas for fluoride, these values are found as 0.21 mg/g, 0.85 mg/g and 4.65 mg/g respectively. After adsorption, the spent adsorbents have been stabilized in the form of clay bricks. The effects of spent adsorbent concentration on the properties of bricks and their leaching properties are investigated. The bricks have been tested for various properties like density, percentage water absorption, shrinkage, compressive strength and efflorescence. The maximum values of density and shrinkage of the bricks formed are found as 2.3 g/cm(3) and 10.2%, whereas the percentage water absorption and compressive strength of the bricks are found between 11 and 14% and 35 to 150 kgf/cm(2) respectively. All the test results are in accordance with the criteria set by Indian Standards. The leaching test of arsenic and fluoride from the bricks reveals that their maximum values in leachate are 510 μg/L and 2.1 mg/L respectively, which are below the permissible limits of USEPA standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  14. Leaching refuse after sphalerite mineral for extraction zinc and cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brožová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a possibility of zinc and cobalt extraction from refuse after sphalerite mineral leaching. It contains theoretic analysis of hydrometallurgical processes. Practical part describes samples and their leaching in 10 % and 20 % sulphuric acid. In the end of the paper it is evaluated under which conditions the highest yield of zinc and cobalt from refuse after sulphide ore leaching is reached.

  15. Leaching studies for metals recovery from waste printed wiring boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyima, Alex; Shi, Honglan; Zhang, Lifeng

    2011-08-01

    The leaching behavior of most metals present in printed wiring boards is evaluated, aiming at its recycling by hydrometallurgy. Two leaching reagents (nitric acid and aqua regia) are compared. The effects of acid concentration, particle size of sample, leaching time, and temperature are examined. The results reveal that small particle size and a combination of both nitric acid and aqua regia are capable of dissolving most of the metals content of printed wiring boards.

  16. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lanigan, David C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    This revision to the original report adds two longer term leach sets of data to the report and provides more discussion and graphics on how to interpret the results from long-term laboratory leach tests. The leach tests were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams.

  17. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  19. Sulfide treatment to inhibit mercury adsorption onto activated carbon in carbon-in-pulp gold recovery circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touro, F.J.; Lipps, D.A.

    1988-03-29

    A process for treating a mercury-contaminated, precious metal-containing ore slurry is described comprising: (a) reacting sulfide anions in an aqueous ore slurry of a mercury and precious metal-containing carbonaceous ore, and (b) conducting a simultaneous cyanide leach and carbon-in-pulp adsorption of the precious metal from the carbonaceous ore in the sulfide-containing ore slurry.

  20. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, Stef; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Turner, David D.; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m-2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  1. Groundwater Recharge, Evapotranspiration and Surface Runoff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Department of Earth Science, CNCS, P.O. Box 231, Mekelle University, ... The mean annual groundwater recharge, evapotranspiration and runoff were ... Accordingly, recharge accounts for 12% of the precipitation .... So, to apply the WetSpass for Illala catchment, input of the meteorological grid map ..... Review of Australian.

  2. Green Roofs for Stormwater Runoff Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated green roofs as a stormwater management tool. Specifically, runoff quantity and quality from green and flat asphalt roofs were compared. Evapotranspiration from planted green roofs and evaporation from unplanted media roofs were also compared. The influence...

  3. water infiltration, conductivity and runoff under fallow

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sections of sloping terraces on water infiltration and subsequent runoff on a Haplic ... Infiltration measurements, done by a tension infiltrometer, were conducted under 3-year old tree .... head first avoid hysteresis (Reynolds and Elrick, ..... terrace (60%), perhaps reflecting the influence of ..... Water Resources Research 14:.

  4. Characterization of chromium species in urban runoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the presence of the element Cr in its toxic hexavalent form Cr(VI) in stormwater runoff from urban areas. Most studies report only total Cr concentration, i.e., including also the nontoxic Cr(III) molecular form. The objective of this study was to evaluate a field method bas...

  5. Urban Runoff and Combined Sewer Overflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Richard; Gardner, Bradford B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater treatment, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes areas such as: (1) urban runoff quality and quantity; (2) urban hydrology; (3) management practices; and (4) combined sewer overflows. A list of 140 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tricht, K; Lhermitte, S; Lenaerts, J T M; Gorodetskaya, I V; L'Ecuyer, T S; Noël, B; van den Broeke, M R; Turner, D D; van Lipzig, N P M

    2016-01-12

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m(-2). Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  7. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tricht, K.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Turner, D. D.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m−2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise. PMID:26756470

  8. Pesticide leaching in a changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Signe Bonde

    leaching amounts under specific pre and post event weather conditions. This clearly illustrated the importance of including weather variability in pesticide fate modelling. An ensemble of 11 climate model projections were downscaled by perturbing a weather generator calibrated on local meteorological data......, resulting in 3000-year long weather series of statistically stationary climate. Effects of pesticide properties (sorption and degradation), pesticide application dates, and soil properties were included. The synthetic weather series produced in relation to objective (II) were used to simulate future changes...

  9. Coupling GIS with Nitrogen Leaching Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geographical information systems (GIS) are increasingly being applied to surface and subsurface flow and transport modeling issues. In this paper, more attentions are focused on the methodology and strategies of coupling GIS with non-point pollution models. Suggestions are made on how to best integrate current available or selected nitrogen leaching models, especially in the aspect of programming development so as to effectively and flexibly address the specific tasks. The new possibilities for dealing with non-point pollution problems at a regional scale are provided in the resulting integrated approach, including embedding grid-based GIS components in models.

  10. Surface runoff in the Itaim Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Teixeira Batista

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a work done in the Itaim watershed at Taubaté, SP, and had the objective of estimating the surface runoff based on the Curve-Number (CN method in area with vegetation cover of grassland (Brachiaria Decumbens, that prevails in this watershed. The surface runoff was estimated using three different methods: 1st values of accumulated Infiltration (IAc obtained in the field were used, considered as the Potential Infiltration (S, which varied from 15.37 mm to 51.88 mm with an average value of 23.46 mm. With those measured infiltration rates and using the maximum precipitation values for Taubaté, SP, with duration time of 3 hours: P = 54.4; 70.3; 80.8; 86.7; 90.9; 94.1 and 103.9 mm, respectively, for the return times, Tr = 2, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50 and 100 years, the following values of surface runoff were generated: 34.83; 49.33; 59.14; 64.71; 68.69; 71.73 and 81.10 mm, respectively; In the 2nd method it was considered that the prevailing vegetation cover of the watershed was Dirty Pasture (Pasture with regrowth of natural vegetation and therefore, a value of CN = 75 was used and generated a potential infiltration, S = 84,7 mm and resulted in surface runoff values that varied from 11 to 44 mm; In the 3rd method, the value of CN was considered equal to 66.57. This value was calculated weighting the contribution of all land use cover classes of the watershed, and as a result a higher value of potential infiltration, S = 127 mm, was obtained. Consequently, the surface runoff values were 5.33; 11.64; 16.72; 19.83; 22.16; 23.98 and 29.83 mm, respectively. Therefore, the comparison with the results obtained by the two Curve-Number methods (conventional and weighted allowed to be concluded that the Curve-Number method applied in a conventional way underestimated the surface runoff in the studied area. However, results indicate that it is possible to use this method for surface runoff estimates as long as adjustments based on potential

  11. Electrogenerative leaching of nickel sulfide concentrate with ferric chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王少芬; 方正; 王云燕; 陈阳国

    2004-01-01

    In order to utilize the chemical energy in hydrometallurgical process of sulfide minerals reasonably and to simplify the purifying process, the electrogenerative process was applied and a dual cell system was introduced to investigate FeCl3 leaching of nickel sulfide concentrate. Some factors influencing the electrogenerative leaching, such as electrode structure, temperature and solution concentration were studied. The results show that a certain quantity of electrical energy accompanied with the leached products can be acquired in the electrogenerative leaching process.The output current and power increase with the addition of acetylene black to the electrode. Varying the components of electrode just affects the polarization degree of anode. Increasing FeCl3 concentration results in a sharp increase in the output of the leaching cell when c(FeCl3) is less than 0.1 mol/L. The optimum value of NaCl concentration for electrogenerative leaching nickel sulfide concentrate with FeCl3 is 3.0 mol/L. Temperature influences electrogenerative leaching by affecting anodic and cathodic polarization simultaneously. The apparent activation energy is determined to be 34.63 kJ/mol in the range of 298 K to 322 K. The leaching rate of Ni2+ is 29.3% after FeCl3 electrogenerative leaching of nickel sulfide concentrate for 620 min with a filter bag electrode.

  12. Effect of peroxodisulfate on uranium leaching with ammonium bicarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurbek Nurpeisov

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, uranium leaching from ore material using acid solution and bicarbonate in a presence peroxodisulfate ion was examined. For experiments two different tips of leaching methods were used: leaching in static and dynamic conditions. The determination of uranium concentrations in product solutions were analyzed by titrimetric (by ammonia vanadate solution method. The maximum yield of uranium leached with ammonium bicarbonate in a presence of ammonium peroxodisulfate (5 g/L was only 33%, which is half the corresponding value obtained by sulfuric acid (65%.

  13. Actinide speciation in glass leach-layers: An EXAFS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biwer, B.M.; Soderholm, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Greegor, R.B. [Boeing Co., Seattle, WA (United States); Lytle, F.W. [EXAFS Co., Pioche, NV (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Uranium L{sub 3} X-ray absorption data were obtained from two borosilicate glasses, which are considered as models for radioactive wasteforms, both before and after leaching. Surface sensitivity to uranium speciation was attained by a novel application of simultaneous fluorescence and electron-yield detection. Changes in speciation are clearly discernible, from U(VI) in the bulk to (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+}-uranyl in the leach layer. The leach-layer uranium concentration variations with leaching times are also determined from the data.

  14. Recovery of nickel from low grade laterite by electrochemical leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Gyu; Lee, Hwa-Young; Oh, Jong-Kee [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-06-30

    A study on the recovery of nickel from low-grade laterite is carried out by the electrochemical leaching. The results show that the leaching reaction of Ni and Fe increases with time until 60 minutes, after which the leaching rate decreases. The leaching efficiencies of Ni and Fe are 73% and 64% at 2 hr. reaction, respectively. And current density plays an important role in the leaching rate of nickel, but power consumption increases with increase of current density which proportionally corresponds to nickel leaching. Also, the leaching efficiency of nickel appears to decrease in a small amount with increasing solid density. However, so as to reduce power consumption solid density has to be raised so long as the stirring intensity is not restricted due to heavy load. When the pH of the leaching solution is increased to 6.0, iron and nickel are remaining about 10% and 90% of initial concentrations in the leaching solution, respectively. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  15. Long-term leaching from MSWI air-pollution-control residues: Leaching characterization and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    Long-term leaching of Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Na, S, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mo, Sb, Si, Sri, Sr, Ti, V, P, Cl, and dissolved organic carbon from two different municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) air-pollution-control residues was monitored during 24 months of column...

  16. MODELING OF STORM WATER RUNOFF FROM GREEN ROOFS

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Burszta-Adamiak; Wiesław Fiałkiewicz

    2014-01-01

    Apart from direct measurements, modelling of runoff from green roofs is valuable source of information about effectiveness of this type of structure from hydrological point of view. Among different type of models, the most frequently used are numerical models. They allow to assess the impact of green roofs on decrease and attenuation of runoff, reduction of peak runoff and value of water retention. This paper presents preliminary results of research on computing the rate of runoff from green ...

  17. 29 CFR 452.30 - Run-off elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Run-off elections. 452.30 Section 452.30 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Frequency and Kinds of Elections § 452.30 Run-off elections. A run-off election must meet the... example, if the run-off is to be held at the same meeting as the original election, the original notice...

  18. Assessment of some straw-derived materials for reducing the leaching potential of Metribuzin residues in the soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cara, Irina Gabriela, E-mail: coroirina@yahoo.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, 3M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Trincă, Lucia Carmen, E-mail: lctrinca@uaiasi.ro [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Horticulture, 3 M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Trofin, Alina Elena, E-mail: aetrofin@yahoo.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Horticulture, 3 M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Cazacu, Ana, E-mail: anagarlea@gmail.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Horticulture, 3 M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Ţopa, Denis, E-mail: topadennis@yahoo.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, 3M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Peptu, Cătălina Anişoara, E-mail: catipeptu@yahoo.co.uk [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, 73 D. Mangeron Street, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Jităreanu, Gerard, E-mail: gerardj@uaiasi.ro [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, 3M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Surface characteristics of activated straw (wheat, corn, soybean) were assessed. • Modification methods to enhance materials sorption were presented. • Adsorption mechanism of metribuzin was revealed and discussed. - Abstract: Biomass (straw waste) can be used as raw to obtain materials for herbicide removal from wastewater. These by-products have some important advantages, being environmentally friendly, easily available, presenting low costs, and requiring little processing to increase their adsorptive capacity. In the present study, some materials derived from agricultural waste (wheat, corn and soybean straw) were investigated as potential adsorbents for metribuzin removal from aqueous solutions. The straw wastes were processed by grinding, mineralisation (850 °C) and KOH activation in order to improve their functional surface activity. The materials surface characteristics were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The adsorbents capacity was evaluated using batch sorption tests and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for herbicide determination. For adsorption isotherms, the equilibrium time considered was 3 h. The experimental adsorption data were modelled by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The activated straw and ash-derived materials from wheat, corn and soybean increased the adsorption capacity of metribuzin with an asymmetrical behaviour. Overall, our results sustain that activated ash-derived from straw and activated straw materials can be a valuable solution for reducing the leaching potential of metribuzin through soil.

  19. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton

    2009-01-01

    Texture is a major factor influencing mobilization and transport of P in soil owing partly to differences in adsorptive properties, and partly to differences in pore-size distribution and pore organization. Slurry application strategies may be important mitigation measures for reducing agricultur...

  20. Woody plant encroachment reduces annual runoff and shifts runoff mechanisms in the tallgrass prairie, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei; Zou, Chris B.; Stebler, Elaine; Will, Rodney E.

    2017-06-01

    Woody plant encroachment into semiarid and subhumid rangelands is a global phenomenon with important hydrological implications. Observational and experimental results reported both increases and decreases in annual runoff for encroached watersheds and little is known regarding the underlying runoff generation mechanisms. To systematically study the effect of woody plant encroachment on runoff generation processes, seven experimental watersheds were instrumented in 2010, three on grassland sites and four on adjacent sites that were heavily encroached by eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) in the southern Great Plains, USA. Results showed that the runoff coefficient was 1.4 ± 0.6% in eastern redcedar encroached watersheds, significantly lower than 4.4 ± 0.7% in grassland watersheds for the four water years from 2011 to 2014. Eastern redcedar encroachment resulted in reduction of both surface and subsurface flows and the magnitude of reduction depended on annual precipitation. While there were nearly equal contributions between overland flow and subsurface flow, 87% of the total runoff from grassland watersheds occurred under saturated or nearly saturated soil condition, while 86% of runoff under encroached watersheds was generated under unsaturated soil condition, suggesting a shift from saturation excess overland flow to infiltration excess overland flow. These results permitted reconciliation of observed difference of streamflow responses associated with Juniperus spp. encroachment in the region and provided insights to better predict change in water resources under vegetation changes in subhumid regions of the south-central USA.

  1. Clomazone dissipation,adsorption and translocation in four paddy topsoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lian-fang; LI Guo-xue; YANG Ren-bin; GUO Zheng-yuan; LIAO Xiao-yong

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory experiments about the dissipation, adsorption and translocation in four paddy topsoils were conducted in this paper. From the results it can be concluded as follows: the dissipation rate of clomazone differed greatly in different paddy soil derived from different parent materials. The half-lives for clomazone degradation in paddy soils ranged from 5.7 to 22.0 d. The order of clomazone dissipation rate was reddish yellow paddy soil >alluvial sandy paddy soil > yellow clayey paddy soil > purple sandy paddy soil. Clomazone sorption quantity was significantly correlated with organic carbon ( R2 = 0.62) and clay content ( R2 = 0.67) in the tested paddy soils.Positive correlation was found between apparent Kd value and cation exchange content(CEC). The consequences for the adsorption of different soils were purple sandy paddy soil > yellow clayey paddy soil > reddish yellow paddy soil > alluvial sandy paddy soil. Under the simulated rainfall of 200 mm through four different unsaturated soil lysimeters over 24 h, clomazone was readily to be leached into lower surface soil and there was about 2.6%-4.2%of applied clomazone leached out of 20 cm cultivated soil layer. Translocation experiments showed that the order of clomazone leaching ability was: alluvial sandy paddy soil > reddish yellow paddy soil > yellow clayey paddy soil >purple sandy paddy soil. Simple regression results manifested that factors like CEC, organic carbon, clay, and adsorption rate constant had been negatively correlated with the percentage of clomazone loss from soil lysimeters.

  2. Physically based modelling of rainfall-runoff processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diermanse, F.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    This PhD. research was set up to investigate the use of rainfall-runoff models for simulation of high water events in hillslope areas. First, dominant parameters for runoff production during high water events have been identified. Subsequently, the influence of antecedent conditions on runoff percen

  3. APPROACHES FOR DETERMINING SWALE PERFORMANCE FOR STORMWATER RUNOFF - Wilmington, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swales are “engineered vegetated ditches” that provide stable routing for stormwater runoff and a low-cost drainage option for highways, farms, industrial sites, and commercial areas. It is reported in the literature that swales mitigate runoff-carried pollutants, reduce runoff ...

  4. APPROACHES FOR DETERMINING SWALE PERFORMANCE FOR STORMWATER RUNOFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swales are “engineered vegetated ditches” that provide stable routing for stormwater runoff and a low-cost drainage option for highways, farms, industrial sites, and commercial areas. It is reported in the literature that swales mitigate runoff-carried pollutants, reduce runoff v...

  5. High temperature bacterial leaching: HIOX project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, D.; D' Hugues, P.; Bonney, C. F.; Norris, P.; Shwab, W.; Sundkvist, J-E.; Bridges, P. [Bureau de Recherhes Geologiques et Minieres, Orleans (France)

    2001-07-01

    The HIOX project was designed to investigate the use of thermophilic bacterial cultures for the leaching of chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}, the natural source of copper). Beyond bacterial leaching, the study also encompassed the downstream processing steps in an effort to develop a new method for the recovery of copper in an economical and environmentally-friendly process. Using the HIOX process copper recovery was increased to better than 90 per cent within 5 days with a 12 per cent solids culture, although some potentially limiting factors such as foam generation, nutrient concentrations and mixing/aeration efficiency were also identified. The study resulted in the establishment of a mass balance based on a simplified flowsheet of the process. Techno-economic evaluation carried out at three sites indicated technical feasibility using relatively conventional equipment and capital and operating costs in ranges that suggest that bioleaching with high temperature bacteria is an attractive alternative for the treatment of chalcopyrite concentrate. 5 tabs.

  6. A Simulator for Copper Ore Leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, B.

    1999-05-14

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Copper is a strategic metal and the nation needs a secure supply both for industrial use and military needs. However, demand is growing worldwide and is outstripping the ability of the mining industry to keep up. Improved recovery methods are critically needed to maintain the balance of supply and demand. The goal of any process design should be to increase the amount of copper recovered, control movement of acid and other environmentally harmful chemicals, and reduce energy requirements. To achieve these ends, several improvements in current technology are required, the most important of which is a better understanding of, and the ability to quantify, how fluids move through heterogeneous materials in a complex chemical environment. The goal of this project is create a new modeling capability that couples hydrology with copper leaching chemistry . once the model has been verified and validated, we can apply the model to specific problems associated with heap leaching (flow channeling due to non-uniformities in heap structure, precipitation/dissolution reactions, and bacterial action), to understand the causes of inefficiencies, and to design better recovery systems. We also intend to work with representatives of the copper mining industry to write a coordinated plan for further model development and application that will provide economic benefits to the industry and the nation.

  7. Heterogeneous LEACH Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishi Sharma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks are networks of large number of tiny, battery powered sensor nodes having limited on-board storage, processing, and radio capabilities. Nodes sense and send their reports toward a processing center which is called base station. Since this transmission and reception process consumes lots of energy as compare to data processing, Designing protocols and applications for such networks has to be energy aware in order to prolong the lifetime of the network. Generally, real life applications deal with such Heterogeneity rather than Homogeneity. In this paper, a protocol is proposed, which is heterogeneous in energy. We analyze the basic distributed clustering routing protocol LEACH (Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy, which is a homogeneous system, and then we study the impact of heterogeneity in energy of nodes to prolong the life time of WSN. Simulation results using MATLAB shows that the proposed Leach-heterogeneous system significantly reduces energy consumption and increase the total lifetime of the wireless sensor network.

  8. YACON INULIN LEACHING DURING HOT WATER BLANCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fenner Scher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTYacon roots contain inulin, which has prebiotic properties and it may be used as sucrose or fat substitutes. However, inulin is very soluble in water. The loss of this important nutrient during blanching is caused mainly by diffusion or leaching, which might be diminished if blanching temperature - time conditions are correctly employed. The aim of this study was to determine the leaching of the sugars inulin, glucose and fructose, present in yacon roots, during hot water blanching under different time/temperature conditions. The samples were cleaned and peeled and cut into geometric forms of 1.75 ± 0.35 mm thick disks. A complete factorial experimental design was used, and the treatments of the samples were compared using the Tukey test. The results indicated that the time and temperature were significant in the dissolution of the sugars. The lowest inulin losses occurred at temperatures and times lower than 60 ºC and 3 minutes. For all temperatures, the lowest glucose and fructose losses were obtained at time lower than 3 and 5 minutes, respectively.

  9. Structure sensitivity in adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Nielsen, Ole Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1997-01-01

    The structure sensitivity of CO adsorption on different flat, stepped, kinked and reconstructed Pt surfaces is studied using large-scale density-functional calculations. We find an extremely strong structure sensitivity in the adsorption energy with variations up to 1 eV (or 100%) from one...

  10. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  11. Transmission Time and Throughput analysis of EEE LEACH, LEACH and Direct Transmission Protocol: A Simulation Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Sharma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description about some routing protocols like EEE LEACH, LEACH and DirectTransmission protocol (DTx in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN and a comparison study of theseprotocols based on some performance matrices. Addition to this an attempt is done to calculate theirtransmission time and throughput. To calculate these, MATLAB environment is used. Finally, on the basisof the obtained results from the simulation, the above mentioned three protocols are compared. Thecomparison results show that, the EEE LEACH routing protocol has a greater transmission time thanLEACH and DTx protocol and with smaller throughput

  12. Transmission Time and Throughput analysis of EEE LEACH, LEACH and Direct Transmission Protocol: A Simulation Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Sharma

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description about some routing protocols like EEE LEACH, LEACH and DirectTransmission protocol (DTx in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN and a comparison study of theseprotocols based on some performance matrices. Addition to this an attempt is done to calculate theirtransmission time and throughput. To calculate these, MATLAB environment is used. Finally, on the basisof the obtained results from the simulation, the above mentioned three protocols are compared. Thecomparison results show that, the EEE LEACH routing protocol has a greater transmission time thanLEACH and DTx protocol and with smaller throughput.

  13. Use of biomass sorbents for oil removal from gas station runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Eakalak; Virojnagud, Wanpen; Ratpukdi, Thunyalux

    2004-11-01

    The use of biomass sorbents, which are less expensive and more biodegradable than synthetic sorbents, for oil removal from gas station runoff was investigated. A bench-scale flume experiment was conducted to evaluate the oil removal and retention capabilities of the biomass sorbents which included kapok fiber, cattail fiber, Salvinia sp., wood chip, rice husk, coconut husk, and bagasse. Polyester fiber, a commercial synthetic sorbent, was also experimented for comparison purpose. Oil sorption and desorption tests were performed at a water flow rate of 20 lmin-1. In the oil sorption tests, a 50 mgl(-1) of used engine oil-water mixture was synthesized to simulate the gas station runoff. The mass of oil sorbed for all sorbents, except coconut husk and bagasse, was greater than 70%. Cattail fiber and polyester fiber were the sorbents that provided the least average effluent oil concentrations. Oil selectivity (hydrophobic properties) and physical characteristics of the sorbents are the two main factors that influence the oil sorption capability. The used sorbents from the sorption tests were employed in the desorption tests. Results indicated that oil leached out of all the sorbents tested. Polyester fiber released the highest amount of oil, approximately 4% (mass basis) of the oil sorbed.

  14. SURFACE RUNOFF AND SOIL ORGANIC MATTER AVAILABILITY IN BAMBOO-BASED AGROFORESTRY IN LOMBOK TIMUR DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecep Handoko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo-based agroforestry is suitable for soils which are poor in nutrient. The characteristics of bamboo and the rapid closure of  its canopy improve soil cover, soil nutrient availability and soil moisture  content,  and  prevent  erosion  by reducing surface runoff. The  research was aimed at determining the factors that influenced surface runoff and the availability of soil organic matter (SOM in the bamboo-based agroforestry in East Lombok. Research was done from March 2010 to March 2011 in Lenek Daya village, Aikmel sub-district, East Lombok district. The research plots were located on slopes of 0-15o, 30-45o, and 45-65o; with bamboo canopy closures of 0-25%, 25-50%, 50-75%, and over 75%. The research involving 12 plots, each in 4 x 12 m size. Measurements included surface runoff, bamboo canopy closure, weeds and bamboo leaves litter weight, rainfall depth and duration, dissolved sediment, and soil physical and chemical properties as well as SOM. Correlation and multiple linear regression tests were used in data analysis. The results of the regression tests showed a change in surface runoff which was influenced by changes in bamboo canopy closure, rain duration, rain intensity and soil sand fraction, each by -0.019, 0.418, 0.049 and -0.065 respectively. Rain duration was the highest influencing variable, whereas bamboo canopy closure significantly decreased surface runoff. Bamboo canopy closure had no correlation with the increase of SOM. But, the increase of SOM had correlation with the increase of  soil cation exchange capacity (CEC. The positive impact of  bamboo canopy closure  on  Regosol soil fertility in  bamboo-based  agroforestry land  was determined  by  land management intensity which could increase the availability of SOM and decrease phosphorus element loss due to leaching of nutrient.

  15. Potential for leaching of heavy metals in open-burning bottom ash and soil from a non-engineered solid waste landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwenzi, Willis; Gora, Dorcas; Chaukura, Nhamo; Tauro, Tonny

    2016-03-01

    Bottom ash from open-burning of municipal waste practised in developing countries poses a risk of heavy metal leaching into groundwater. Compared to incineration ash, there is limited information on heavy metal leaching from open-burning ash and soil from non-engineered landfills. Batch and column experiments were conducted to address three specific objectives; (1) to determine aqua regia extractable concentrations of heavy metals in fresh ash, old ash and soil from beneath the landfill, (2) to determine the relationship between heavy metal leaching, initial and final pH of leaching solution, and aqua regia extractable concentrations, and (3) to determine the breakthrough curves of heavy metals in ashes and soil. Aqua regia extractable concentrations of Cd, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni and Pb were significantly higher (p heavy metals were not correlated with aqua regia extractable concentrations. Final pH of leachate rebounded to close to original pH of the material, suggesting a putative high buffering capacity for all materials. Both batch and column leaching showed that concentrations of leached heavy metals were disproportionately lower (heavy metals was further evidenced by sigmoidal breakthrough curves. Heavy metal retention was attributed to precipitation, pH-dependent adsorption and formation of insoluble organo-metallic complexes at near-neutral to alkaline pH. Overall, the risk of heavy metal leaching from ash and soil from the waste dump into groundwater was low. The high pH and the presence of Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu make ash an ideal low-cost liming material and source of micronutrients particularly on acidic soils prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Surface adsorption of organoarsenic roxarsone and arsanilic acid on iron and aluminum oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Ru; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2012-08-15

    Aromatic organoarsenicals roxarsone (ROX) and p-arsanilic acid (ASA) are common feed additives for livestock and could be released into the environment via animal manure and agricultural runoff. To evaluate their environmental fate, the adsorption behavior of ROX and ASA was investigated with two common soil metal oxides, goethite (FeOOH) and aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)), under different reactant loading, water pH and competing ion conditions. ROX and ASA exhibit essentially identical adsorption characteristics. FeOOH and Al(2)O(3) exhibit similar adsorption trends for both organoarsenicals; however, the adsorption efficiency on the surface site basis was about three times lower for Al(2)O(3) than for FeOOH. The adsorption reaction is favorable at neutral and acidic pH. Phosphate and natural organic matter significantly interfere with aromatic arsenical adsorption on both metal oxides, whereas sulfate and nitrate do not. Pre-adsorbed aromatic arsenicals can be quickly but not completely displaced by phosphate, indicating that ion exchange is not the only mechanism governing the adsorption process. The adsorption envelope was successfully modeled by a diffuse double layer surface complexation model, identifying the critical role of di-anionic organoarsenic species in the adsorption. Results of this research can help predict and control the mobility of aromatic arsenicals in the environment.

  17. Nitrogen Deposition and Leaching from Two Forested Catchments in Southwest China — Preliminary Data and Research Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Larssen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased nitrogen deposition has resulted in increased nitrogen pools and nitrogen leaching in European and North American forest soils. The development in Asia in general, and China in particular, suggests increased deposition of reduced nitrogen from changes in agricultural practices and of oxidized nitrogen from rapid growth of the transportation sector. Decreased nitrogen retention in forested areas in the future may cause increased NO3– leaching and, thus, acidification and eutrophication in surface waters. The differences in climate, ecosystems, land use, and deposition history make direct application of knowledge from studies in Europe and North America difficult. In Southwest China the potential for nitrogen mobilization from forest soils may be high because of the warm and humid climate, resulting in high decomposition rates of soil organic matter. However, there are very few data available for quantifying the suspected potential for increased nitrogen leaching in forest ecosystems. Here we present data from two forested catchments, dominated by Masson pine (Pinus massoniana, near Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively, in Southwest China. The present nitrogen deposition is moderate, estimated in the range from 10 to 40 kg N ha–1 year–1. The C/N ratios of the soils are generally below 15. Nitrate concentrations in soil water are rather variable in space, with highest values of several hundred microequivalents per liter. The turnover rate of nitrogen in the forest ecosystem is quite high compared to the atmospheric deposition rate. At present, nitrate runoff from the catchments is low and intermediate in Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively. More research is needed to improve our ability to predict future nitrogen leaching from subtropical Asian coniferous forests.

  18. Nitrogen deposition and leaching from two forested catchments in Southwest China--preliminary data and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larssen, T; Mulder, J; Wang, Y; Chen, X; Xiao, J; Zhao, D

    2001-11-15

    Increased nitrogen deposition has resulted in increased nitrogen pools and nitrogen leaching in European and North American forest soils. The development in Asia in general, and China in particular, suggests increased deposition of reduced nitrogen from changes in agricultural practices and of oxidized nitrogen from rapid growth of the transportation sector. Decreased nitrogen retention in forested areas in the future may cause increased NO3- leaching and, thus, acidification and eutrophication in surface waters. The differences in climate, ecosystems, land use, and deposition history make direct application of knowledge from studies in Europe and North America difficult. In Southwest China the potential for nitrogen mobilization from forest soils may be high because of the warm and humid climate, resulting in high decomposition rates of soil organic matter. However, there are very few data available for quantifying the suspected potential for increased nitrogen leaching in forest ecosystems. Here we present data from two forested catchments, dominated by Masson pine (Pinus massoniana), near Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively, in Southwest China. The present nitrogen deposition is moderate, estimated in the range from 10 to 40 kg N ha(-1) year(-1). The C/N ratios of the soils are generally below 15. Nitrate concentrations in soil water are rather variable in space, with highest values of several hundred microequivalents per liter. The turnover rate of nitrogen in the forest ecosystem is quite high compared to the atmospheric deposition rate. At present, nitrate runoff from the catchments is low and intermediate in Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively. More research is needed to improve our ability to predict future nitrogen leaching from subtropical Asian coniferous forests.

  19. Optimization and mechanism of surfactant accelerating leaching test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾纯明; 吴爱祥; 王贻明; 侯春来

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem of slow leaching speed of copper, surfactant was added into lixivium as leaching agent in the experiment. Based on physical chemistry and seepage flow mechanics, the leaching mechanics of surfactant was analyzed. The solution surface tension and surfactant adsorbing on the surface of ore have a significant impact on the surface wetting effect. With leaching rate for response, the study screened out three main factors by Plackett-Burman design method: the sulfuric acid concentration, surfactant concentration and temperature. Among these three factors, the surfactant concentration is the most important contributor to leaching rate. After obtaining the experiment center by the steepest ascent experiment, a continuous variable surface model was built by response surface methodology. By solving quadratic polynomial equation, optimal conditions for leaching were finally obtained as follows:the sulfuric acid concentration was 60 g/L, the surfactant concentration was 0.00914 mol/L, and the temperature was 45 °C. The leaching rate was 66.81%in the optimized leaching conditions, which was close to the predicted value, showing that regression result was good.

  20. Nitrate leaching and pesticide use in energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well.......Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well....

  1. Pesticide leaching in macroporous clay soils: field experiment and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords : pesticide leaching, macropores, preferential flow, preferential transport, cracked clay soil, pesticide leaching models, groundwater contamination, inverse modeling, bentazone and imidacloprid. The presence of macropores (i.e. shrinkage c

  2. METALS LEACHING FROM A MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE: A COLUMN STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A mineral processing waste was used to study the effect of liquid to solid ratio (L/S) on the leaching behavior of metals. Leaching tests in the form of column and batch studies were carried out to investigate liquid to solid ratios ranging from 0.7 to 50. Although the waste pass...

  3. Aqueous leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from bitumen and asphalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, H C; de Groot, P C

    2001-12-01

    The application of bitumen in, e.g. asphalt roads, roofs and hydraulic applications will lead to the leaching of compounds from the bitumen/asphalt into the environment. Because polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in bitumen, static and dynamic leach tests have been performed to study the leaching behaviour of this class of compounds. Nine petroleum bitumens covering a representative range of commercially available products and one asphalt made from one of the bitumens have been tested in a static leach test. The asphalt has been also subjected to a dynamic leach test. The main conclusions are that a 30h dynamic leach test is sufficient to determine the equilibrium concentration that will be reached after bitumen or asphalt has been in contact with the water for more than 3-6 days. As an alternative to performing a leach test, this concentration can be calculated from the PAH concentrations in the bitumen, and their distribution coefficients, as calculated here, or from their aqueous solubilities. The equilibrium PAH concentrations in the leach water from bitumens stay well below the surface water limits that exist in several EEC-countries and are also more than an order of magnitude lower than the current EEC limits for potable water.

  4. Feasiblity of collecting naturally leached rice straw for thermal conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.; Jenkins, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    The practical application of field or natural leaching to rice straw was evaluated with the goal of improving biomass fuel value. Observations on three rice farms in the Sacramento Valley, California indicated that potassium, chlorine and total ash are leached from rice straw by rainfall regardless

  5. Effects of nitrogen deposition and climate change on nitrogen runoff at Norwegian boreal forest catchments: the MERLIN model applied to Risdalsheia (RAIN and CLIMEX projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Wright

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The catchment scale-experiments of the RAIN and CLIMEX projects conducted on boreal forest ecosystems at Risdalsheia, southernmost Norway, provide a unique set of data on the flux of nitrogen (N in runoff following changes in N deposition, carbon dioxide (CO2 level and temperature. MERLIN (Model of Ecosystem Retention and Loss of Inorganic Nitrogen, a recently-developed model that focuses on N leaching, provides a means by which these data can be placed into a quantitative framework. The features of the N flux in runoff at Risdalsheia to be explained include (1 leaching of about 30-50 mmol m-2 yr-1 (30-40% of N deposition during the period 1985-1997 at reference catchments, (2 rapid and dramatic reduction in N leaching following experimental reduction in N deposition in 1985 at KIM catchment, (3 increased flux of about 5 mmol m-2 yr-1 following onset of 3-5°C warming and increased CO2 in 1995 at KIM catchment, and (4 increased flux of about 12 mmol m-2 yr-1 following 3-5°C warming of soil in 1995 at EGIL catchment. One set of calibrated model parameters is sufficient to simulate the changes in N runoff at both experimental catchments for both of the manipulations. The model support the conceptual picture of the soil as the major sink for N inputs from deposition with N accumulating in both the forest floor (labile organic matter LOM and the bulk soil (refractory organic matter ROM. As the molar carbon/nitrogen (C/N ratio of LOM decreases to below 23, progressively less N is immobilised and more goes to runoff. The model also supports the conceptual picture of increased rate of decomposition of old soil organic matter in response to higher temperature. An increase of 5% is sufficient to produce the 5-12 mmol m-2 yr-1 increase in N flux in runoff observed at the 2 experimental catchments. The MERLIN simulations are consistent with measurements of increase in net mineralisation rates (per catchment area by 70 mmol m-2 yr-1 and N contents in

  6. Comparing flow duration curve and rainfall-runoff modelling for predicting daily runoff in ungauged catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Vaze, Jai; Chiew, Francis H. S.; Li, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Predicting daily runoff time series in ungauged catchments is both important and challenging. For the last few decades, the rainfall-runoff (RR) modelling approach has been the method of choice. There have been very few studies reported in literature which attempt to use flow duration curve (FDC) to predict daily runoff time series. This study comprehensively compares the two approaches using an extensive dataset (228 catchments) for a large region of south-eastern Australia and provides guidelines for choosing the suitable method. For each approach we used the nearest neighbour method and two weightings - a 5-donor simple mathematical average (SA) and a 5-donor inverse-distance weighting (5-IDW) - to predict daily runoff time series. The results show that 5-IDW was noticeably better than a single donor to predict daily runoff time series, especially for the FDC approach. The RR modelling approach calibrated against daily runoff outperformed the FDC approach for predicting high flows. The FDC approach was better at predicting medium to low flows in traditional calibration against the Nash-Sutcliffe-Efficiency or Root Mean Square Error, but when calibrated against a low flow objective function, both the FDC and rainfall-runoff models performed equally well in simulating the low flows. These results indicate that both methods can be further improved to simulate daily hydrographs describing the range of flow metrics in ungauged catchments. Further studies should be carried out for improving the accuracy of predicted FDC in ungauged catchments, including improving the FDC model structure and parameter fitting.

  7. Precipitation-runoff modeling system; user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, G.H.; Lichty, R.W.; Troutman, B.M.; Saindon, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The concepts, structure, theoretical development, and data requirements of the precipitation-runoff modeling system (PRMS) are described. The precipitation-runoff modeling system is a modular-design, deterministic, distributed-parameter modeling system developed to evaluate the impacts of various combinations of precipitation, climate, and land use on streamflow, sediment yields, and general basin hydrology. Basin response to normal and extreme rainfall and snowmelt can be simulated to evaluate changes in water balance relationships, flow regimes, flood peaks and volumes, soil-water relationships, sediment yields, and groundwater recharge. Parameter-optimization and sensitivity analysis capabilites are provided to fit selected model parameters and evaluate their individual and joint effects on model output. The modular design provides a flexible framework for continued model system enhancement and hydrologic modeling research and development. (Author 's abstract)

  8. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  9. Chemical composition of runoff water in Raipur city, central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambade, Balram

    2015-03-01

    Runoff water is an important transporting medium for various pollutants from land to surface water. Several mobiles and stationary sources such as vehicles, steel cement and thermal power plants, cooking, street, construction debris, etc. are emitting effluents in the environment of the central India. The rain runoff water washes out the air as well as land pollutants and flushes out into water bodies. Therefore, rain runoff water pollution in most urbanized and industrialized city of central India, i.e., Raipur during rainy season (May-September 2012) is analyzed statistically using cluster and principal component analysis to assess sources. The cluster analysis grouped runoff water samples into two clusters based on the similarity of runoff water quality characteristics of the total variance. The factor analysis differentiated the diffused sources of runoff water contaminants. The enrichment factors and runoff fluxes of the contaminants are discussed.

  10. Runoff production on a slope with randomly distributed infiltrabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouche, E.; Harel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Runoff generated on one- and two-dimensional slopes with randomly distributed infiltrability is studied in the queuing theory and connectivity frameworks. The equivalence between the runoff-runon equation and the customers waiting time in a single server queue provides a theoretical link between the statistical descriptions of infiltrability and that of runoff flow rate. Different distributions of infiltrability, representing soil heterogeneities at different scales, are considered. Numerical simulations validate these results and improve our understanding of runoff-runon process. All of the quantities describing the generation of runoff (runoff one-point statistics) and its organization into patterns (patterns statistics and connectivity) are studied as functions of rainfall rate and runoff dimensionality.

  11. Characterizing dry deposition of mercury in urban runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, M.; Nnadi, F.N.; Chasar, L.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stormwater runoff from urban surfaces often contains elevated levels of toxic metals. When discharged directly into water bodies, these pollutants degrade water quality and impact aquatic life and human health. In this study, the composition of impervious surface runoff and associated rainfall was investigated for several storm events at an urban site in Orlando, Florida. Total mercury in runoff consisted of 58% particulate and 42% filtered forms. Concentration comparisons at the start and end of runoff events indicate that about 85% of particulate total mercury and 93% of particulate methylmercury were removed from the surface before runoff ended. Filtered mercury concentrations showed less than 50% reduction of both total and methylmercury from first flush to final flush. Direct comparison between rainfall and runoff at this urban site indicates dry deposition accounted for 22% of total inorganic mercury in runoff. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. RUNOFF POTENTIAL OF MUREŞ RIVER UPPER BASIN TRIBUTARIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. SOROCOVSCHI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Runoff Potential of Mureş River Upper Basin Tributaries. The upper basin of the Mureş River includes a significant area of the Eastern Carpathians central western part with different runoff formation conditions. In assessing the average annual runoff potential we used data from six gauging stations and made assessments on three distinct periods. Identifying the appropriate areas of the obtained correlations curves (between specific average runoff and catchments mean altitude allowed the assessment of potential runoff at catchment level and on geographical units. The potential average runoff is also assessed on altitude intervals of the mentioned areas. The runoff potential analysis on hydrographic basins, geographical units and altitude intervals highlights the variant spatial distribution of this general water resources indicator in the different studied areas.

  13. Speciation and leaching of trace metal contaminants from e-waste contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin-Li; Luo, Chun-Ling; Tang, Chloe Wing-Yee; Chan, Ting-Shan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-05-05

    Primitive electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) recycling activities have caused serious environmental problems. However, little is known about the speciation and leaching behaviors of metal contaminants at e-waste contaminated sites. This study investigated trace metal speciation/mobilization from e-waste polluted soil through column leaching experiments involving irrigation with rainwater for almost 2.5 years. Over the experimental period, Cu and Zn levels in the porewater were 0.14±0.08mg/L, and 0.16±0.08mg/L, respectively, increasing to 0.33±0.16mg/L, and 0.69±0.28mg/L with plant growth. The amounts of Cu, Zn, and Pb released in surface soil (0-2cm) contributed 43.8%, 22.5%, and 13.8%, respectively, to the original levels. The released Cu and Zn were primarily caused by the mobilization of the carbonate species of metals, including Cu(OH)2, CuCO3, and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6, and amorphous Fe/Mn oxides associated fractions characterized by sequential extraction coupling with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. During the experiments, trace metals were not detected in the effluent, and the re-sequestration of trace metals was mainly attributed to the adsorption on the abundant Fe/Mn oxides in the sub-layer soil. This study quantitatively elucidated the molecular speciation of Cu and Zn in e-waste contaminated soil during the column leaching process.

  14. Soil stabilisation using AMD sludge, compost and lignite: TCLP leachability and continuous acid leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A; Yip, Alex C K

    2013-11-01

    Utilising locally available industrial by-products for in situ metal stabilisation presents a low-cost remediation approach for contaminated soil. This study explored the potential use of inorganic (acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge and zero-valent iron) and carbonaceous materials (green waste compost, manure compost, and lignite) for minimising the environmental risks of As and Cu at a timber treatment site. After 9-month soil incubation, significant sequestration of As and Cu in soil solution was accomplished by AMD sludge, on which adsorption and co-precipitation could take place. The efficacy of AMD sludge was comparable to that of zero-valent iron. There was marginal benefit of adding carbonaceous materials. However, in a moderately aggressive environment (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure), AMD sludge only suppressed the leachability of As but not Cu. Therefore, the provision of compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of Cu leachability, probably via surface complexation with oxygen-containing functional groups. Under continuous acid leaching in column experiments, combined application of AMD sludge with compost proved more effective than AMD sludge with lignite. This was possibly attributed to the larger amount of dissolved organic matter with aromatic moieties from lignite, which may enhance Cu and As mobility. Nevertheless, care should be taken to mitigate ecological impact associated with short-term substantial Ca release and continuous release of Al at a moderate level under acid leaching. This study also articulated the engineering implications and provided recommendations for field deployment, material processing, and assessment framework to ensure an environmentally sound application of reactive materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential mobility of heavy metals through coupled application of sequential extraction and isotopic exchange: comparison of leaching tests applied to soil and soakaway sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Furumai, Hiroaki; Kurisu, Futoshi; Kasuga, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Artificial infiltration facilities (AIFs) that enhance groundwater recharge and regulate urban runoff are going to be an integral element of the urban infrastructure. However, AIFs provide a sink which trap pollutants that are likely to cause groundwater contamination. The current study aimed first to examine the mobility characteristics of Cu, Zn, and Pb through soil and soakaway sediment using an integrated analytical approach for column leaching with artificial road runoff (ARR) and then to differentiate the sorption patterns among different samples, (i.e., surface soil, underlying soil, and soakaway sediments) using mass balances. In addition, the study compares metal retention and release under continuous and intermittent flow conditions. Column leaching experiments were conducted using batches for 10 and 30 d under continuous flow condition and for 20 d of intermittent leaching. Heavy metal content and partitioning in soil and sediment used in columns were well characterized before and after leaching experiments. The results showed that a gradual increase in pH and decrease in dissolved organic carbon had pronounced effect on the mobilization of heavy metals. Pb showed the highest retention compared to Cu and Zn which implies that metal complexes play a pivotal role in metal transport. Labile fractions were found to be trapped by the solid materials for retention and their high concentration in ARR is a major concern from the pollution point of view through infiltration facilities. Results obtained in this study predict the risk associated with the release of retained heavy metal under changing environmental conditions in AIFs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dissipation and Adsorption Behavior of the Insecticide Ethiprole on Various Cultivated Soils in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin-gang; DONG Feng-shou; XU Jun; YUAN Shan-kui; ZHENG Yong-quan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the hydrolysis of the insecticide ethiprole in buffered solutions at pH 4.0, 7.0 and 9.0, respectively, and the degradation and adsorption-desorption behaviors of ethiprole in ifve agricultural soil samples from China were investigated. The half-lives under anaerobic conditions were faster than that in the aerobic experiment. Ethiprole was relatively stable under both acidic and neutral conditions while it was readily hydrolyzed under alkaling condition. The sorption of ethiprole on ifve soils was well described by the linear and Freundlich equation and mainly governed by soil organic matter. The exothermic process of ethiprole adsorption can also be well explained by physical adsorption. A weak adsorption capacity was observed in all soils, which could readily lead to leaching problems.

  17. Multifractal modelling of runoffs of karstic springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márkus, L.

    2003-04-01

    A new multifractal stochastic process, Terdik and Iglói call the Limit of the Integrated Superposition of Diffusion processes with Linear differential Generator (LISDLG) , has been defined for modelling network traffic multifractality. The process is stationary, and exhibits long range dependency or long memory. Its characteristic property is that its bispectrum is real. It serves as the basis of distinction e.g. from the superposition of Levy-processes driven Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes. Its further appealing property is that its finite dimensional distribution stems from multivariate Gamma, therefore it is inherently positive and skewed (and hence non-Gaussian). All together, this makes it a very promising candidate for modelling e.g. runoff data of springs or river flows. Quite recently Labat et al. (2002, J. of Hydrology, Vol 256, pp.176-195) pointed out multifractal properties of the runoff time series of French karstic springs. We show that runoff data of karstic springs in north-east Hungary possesses multifractal and cumulant-multifractal property as well as long range dependency and fit the above described LISDLG process, to model the phenomenon. Acknowledgement: This research was supported by the Nat. Sci. Research Fund OTKA, grant No.: T 032725.

  18. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  19. 一种LEACH协议的改进算法LEACH_EH%An improved algorithm of LEACH protocol LEACH-EH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐鹏

    2014-01-01

    根据 LEACH 协议的特点和局限性对其进行了改进,提出了一种 LEACH_EH ( LEACH EAHANCE )算法。它使用 K_MEANS 算法对簇进行一次性分簇,之后结合节点到簇内质心距离与节点自身剩余能量选举出簇头。它将簇形成的顺序由先簇头后成簇变为先成簇后簇头,形成一次分簇多次选举簇头的模式。通过 MATLAB 进行仿真,实验结果表明,改进后的算法比原来的协议在节点能量均衡方面有了较大的提升,延长了网络生存周期。%This paper propose a LEACH_EH algorithm based on the characteristics and limitations of the LEACH protocol.It uses the K_MEANS algorithm to cluster only once, and then elects the cluster heads by considersing the distance from node to cluster center and the node′s residual energy. It makes the order from electing cluster first and clustering second to clustering first and electing cluster second. It forms the formation of clustering only once and electing cluster multi-times. The MATLAB simulation shows that comparing with LEACH, the LEACH_ED algorithm has a great improvement in the energy balance of the node,and prolong the network life cycle abviously.

  20. SULPHUR DIOXIDE LEACHING OF URANIUM CONTAINING MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Rabbits, F.T.; Hester, K.D.; Smith, H.W.

    1958-12-01

    A process is described for extracting uranlum from uranium containing material, such as a low grade pitchblende ore, or mill taillngs, where at least part of the uraniunn is in the +4 oxidation state. After comminuting and magnetically removing any entrained lron particles the general material is made up as an aqueous slurry containing added ferric and manganese salts and treated with sulfur dioxide and aeration to an extent sufficient to form a proportion of oxysulfur acids to give a pH of about 1 to 2 but insufficient to cause excessive removal of the sulfur dioxide gas. After separating from the solids, the leach solution is adjusted to a pH of about 1.25, then treated with metallic iron in the presence of a precipitant such as a soluble phosphate, arsonate, or fluoride.

  1. Structural conformation and leaching from in vitro aged and retrieved Invisalign appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Susan; Eliades, George; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, Theodore; Bradley, T Gerard

    2004-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the structure of Invisalign appliances (Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif) after intraoral exposure, and to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the substances leached from the aligners after accelerated in vitro aging. Samples of Invisalign appliances were randomly selected from 10 patients before intraoral placement and after retrieval, and the prepared specimens were subjected to (1) bright-field optical reflection microscopy to study the surface morphology; (2) Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy to characterize the in vivo changes in molecular composition induced on appliance surfaces, (3) scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis to identify the elemental composition of integuments formed on the surface, and (4) Vickers hardness (HV 200) testing. Another set of reference and retrieved appliances was subjected to artificial aging for 2 weeks, and the extracts were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The retrieved appliances demonstrated substantial morphological variation relative to the as-received specimens involving abrasion at the cusp tips, adsorption of integuments, and localized calcification of the precipitated biofilm at stagnation sites. Buccal segments of retrieved appliances showed an increase in hardness, which might be attributed to mastication-induced cold work; however, the clinical implication of this effect on mechanotherapy is unknown. In vitro aged and retrieved appliances were found to leach no traceable amount of substances in an ethanol aging solution.

  2. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Butera, Stefania; Kosson, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic...... of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens...... in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results of the study, recommendations are provided regarding the use of leaching data in LCA studies....

  3. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  4. Runoff and drainage water quality from geotextile and gravel pads used in livestock feeding and loafing areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anshu; Bicudo, José R; Workman, Stephen R

    2008-05-01

    Geotextile and gravel pads offer a low-cost alternative to concrete for providing all-weather surfaces for cattle and vehicle traffic, and are used in many livestock facilities to minimize mud, runoff and erosion of heavy traffic areas. The objective of this study was to compare different combinations of geotextile and gravel used in heavy livestock traffic areas that minimize the potential for water pollution. Three different pad combinations were constructed in 2.4 x 6-m plots as follows: (i) woven geotextile+100mm of gravel+50mm Dense Grade Aggregate (DGA); (ii) woven geotextile + geoweb+100 mm DGA; and (iii) non-woven geotextile+152 mm of gravel+50mm DGA; (iv) mud lots as control. The third combination was equivalent to one of the base treatments specified by the Kentucky Natural Resource and Conservation Service (NRCS). All treatment combinations were duplicated. Lysimeter pans were installed in four out of eight plots for the collection of leachate or drainage water. Runoff was collected at the lower end of the plots. About 14 kg of beef cattle manure were added evenly to the plots. Rainfall at 50mm/h was applied using rainfall simulators. In the first five of ten experiments, manure was removed from the surface of the pads after each experiment. In the remaining five experiments manure accumulated on the surface of the pads. The effect of pad treatment was significant on the electrical conductivity (EC), total solids (TS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrite (NO2-N), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) values in surface runoff at the 5% level. Manure removal did not have any significant effect on the nutrient content of runoff or leachate samples except for ammonia (NH4-N) values. Although a mass balance indicated relatively small amounts of organic matter and nutrients were lost by runoff and leaching, the actual contamination level of both runoff and leachate samples were high; TP levels as high as 12 mg/l (5.4 mg/m2) in runoff and nitrate (NO3

  5. Atmospheric leaching of nickel and cobalt from nickel saprolite ores using the Starved Acid Leaching Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisinger, David

    2017-01-01

    There is great potential to recover nickel from below cut-off grade nickel saprolite ores using the Starved Acid Leach Technology (SALT). Nickel saprolite ores are normally mined as feed to Fe-Ni smelters or Ni matte smelting operations. The smelting processes typically require high Ni cut-off grades of 1.5 to 2.2% Ni, depending on the operation. These very high cutoff grades result in a significant portion of the saprolite profile being regarded as "waste" and hence having little to no value. The below cut-off grade (waste) material can be processed by atmospheric acid leaching with "starvation" levels of acid addition. The leached nickel and cobalt may be recovered as a mixed hydroxide (or alternate product). The mixed hydroxide may be added to the saprolite smelting operation feed system to increase the nickel production of the smelter or may be refined separately. The technical development of the SALT process will be described along with an economic summary. The SALT process has great potential to treat many Indonesian Nickel ores that are too low a grade for current technology.

  6. Adsorption of valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes using biopolymers and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazycki, Maria A; Tanabe, Eduardo H; Bertuol, Daniel A; Dotto, Guilherme L

    2017-03-01

    In this work, chitin (CTN), chitosan (CTS) and activated carbon (AC) were used as adsorbents to recover valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes. The mobile phone wastes (contactors) were collected and characterized. The valuable metals were extracted by thiourea leaching. The adsorption of valuable metals from leachates was studied according to the kinetic and equilibrium viewpoints. It was found that the contactors were composed by Au, Ni, Cu and Sn. The thiourea leaching provided extraction percentages of 68.6% for Au, 22.1% for Ni and 2.8% for Cu. Sn was not extracted. The leachate presented 17.5 mg L(-1) of Au, 324.9 mg L(-1) of Ni and 573.1 mg L(-1) of Cu. The adsorption was fast, being the equilibrium attained within 120 min. The adsorption of Au, Ni and Cu onto CTN and AC followed the Langmuir model, while, the adsorption of these metals onto CTS, followed the Freundlich model. Removal percentages higher than 95% were obtained for all metals, depending of the type and amount of adsorbent. It was demonstrated that the adsorption onto chitin, chitosan and activated carbon can be an alternative to recover valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes.

  7. Pelletized ponderosa pine bark for adsorption of toxic heavy metals from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoung Oh; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2007-01-01

    Bark flour from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) was consolidated into pellets using citric acid as cross-linking agent. The pellets were evaluated for removal of toxic heavy metals from synthetic aqueous solutions. When soaked in water, pellets did not leach tannins, and they showed high adsorption capacity for Cu(ll), Zn(ll), Cd(ll). and Ni(ll) under both equilibrium...

  8. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  9. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  10. Leaching of Natural Gravel and Concrete by CO2 - Experimental Design, Leaching Behaviour and Dissolution Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Rita; Leis, Albrecht; Mittermayr, Florian; Harer, Gerhard; Wagner, Hanns; Reichl, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The durability of building material in aggressive aqueous environments is a key factor for evaluating the product quality and application as well as of high economic interest. Therefore, aspects of durability have been frequently investigated with different approaches such as monitoring, modelling and experimental work. In the present study an experimental approach based on leaching behaviour of natural calcite-containing siliceous gravel used as backfill material in tunnelling and sprayed concrete by CO2 was developed. CO2 was introduced to form carbonic acid, which is known as an important agent to induce chemical attack. The goals of this study were (i) to develop a proper experimental design to survey the leaching of building materials on-line, (ii) to decipher individual reaction mechanisms and kinetics and (iii) to estimate time-resolved chemical resistance of the used material throughout leaching. A combined flow through reactor unit was successfully installed, where both open and closed system conditions can be easily simulated by changing flow directions and rates. The chemical compositions of the experimental solutions were adjusted by CO2 addition at pHstat conditions and monitored in-situ by pH/SpC electrodes and by analysing the chemical composition of samples throughout an experimental run. From the obtained data e.g. dissolution rates with respect to calcite were obtained for the gravel material, which were dependent on the individual calcite content of the leached material. The rates were found to reflect the flow rate conditions, and the kinetic data lay within the range expected from dissolution experiments in the CaCO3-CO2-H2O system. In case of concrete the reactions throughout the leaching experiment were complex. Coupled dissolution and precipitation phenomena (e.g. portlandite dissolution, calcite formation) occurred. The coupled reactions can be followed by the evolution of the solution chemistry. The overall rates of elemental removal from

  11. From runoff to rainfall: inverse rainfall–runoff modelling in a high temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herrnegger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel technique to calculate mean areal rainfall in a high temporal resolution of 60 min on the basis of an inverse conceptual rainfall–runoff model and runoff observations. Rainfall exhibits a large spatio-temporal variability, especially in complex alpine terrain. Additionally, the density of the monitoring network in mountainous regions is low and measurements are subjected to major errors, which lead to significant uncertainties in areal rainfall estimates. The most reliable hydrological information available refers to runoff, which in the presented work is used as input for a rainfall–runoff model. Thereby a conceptual, HBV-type model is embedded in an iteration algorithm. For every time step a rainfall value is determined, which results in a simulated runoff value that corresponds to the observation. To verify the existence, uniqueness and stability of the inverse rainfall, numerical experiments with synthetic hydrographs as inputs into the inverse model are carried out successfully. The application of the inverse model with runoff observations as driving input is performed for the Krems catchment (38.4 km2, situated in the northern Austrian Alpine foothills. Compared to station observations in the proximity of the catchment, the inverse rainfall sums and time series have a similar goodness of fit, as the independent INCA rainfall analysis of Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG. Compared to observations, the inverse rainfall estimates show larger rainfall intensities. Numerical experiments show, that cold state conditions in the inverse model do not influence the inverse rainfall estimates, when considering an adequate spin-up time. The application of the inverse model is a feasible approach to obtain improved estimates of mean areal rainfall. These can be used to enhance interpolated rainfall fields, e.g. for the estimation of rainfall correction factors, the parameterisation of

  12. Derivation of climate elasticity of runoff to assess the effects of climate change on annual runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanbo; Yang, Dawen

    2011-07-01

    Climate elasticity of runoff is an important indicator for evaluating the effects of climate change on runoff. Consequently, this paper proposes an analytical derivation of climate elasticity. Based on the mean annual water-energy balance equation, two dimensionless numbers (the elasticities of runoff to precipitation and potential evaporation) were derived. Combining the first-order differential of the Penman equation, the elasticities of runoff to precipitation, net radiation, air temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity were derived to separate the contributions of different climatic variables. The case study was carried out in the Futuo River catchment in the Hai River basin, as well as in 89 catchments of the Hai River and the Yellow River basins of China. Based on the mean annual of climatic variables, the climate elasticity in the Futuo River basin was estimated as follows: precipitation elasticity ?, net radiation elasticity ?, air temperature elasticity ?, wind speed elasticity ?, and relative humidity elasticity ?. In this catchment, precipitation decrease was mainly responsible for runoff decline, and wind speed decline had the second greatest effect on runoff. In the 89 catchments of the Hai River and the Yellow River basins of China, climate elasticity was estimated as follows: ? ranging from 1.6 to 3.9, ? ranging from -1.9 to -0.3, ? ranging from -0.11 to -0.02°C-1, ? ranging from -0.8 to -0.1, and ? ranging from 0.2 to 1.9. Additional analysis shows that climate elasticity was sensitive to catchment characteristics.

  13. Accelerating column leaching trial on copper sulfide ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongjiang; WU Aixiang; ZHOU Xun; WANG Shaoyong; ZHANG Jie

    2008-01-01

    The main measures to accelerate leaching sulfide ore are large spraying intensity,manual oxygen supply,temperature control and acclimated bacteria.The indoor experiment accelerating sulfide ore leaching detected the temperature during leaching process,dissolvability of oxygen,bacterial concentration,Cu concentration and slag grade.At the same time,this paper also analyzed the effect of four factors,which are bacterial diversity cultivation stage,spraying intensity,air supply,and whether to control temperature,on the leaching efficiency of copper.The results indicate that the oxygen content of leach solution has a close relationship with temperature but it is rarely affected by air supply.The bacterial concentration preserves from 106 to 107 mL-1,and temperature has a great effect on the bacterial activity under the condition of proper temperature and oxygen supply,and the lack of nutrition prevents the bacterial concentration from rising in the late stage.The relationships of the copper leaching efficiency to temperature,air feed,and spraying intensity are directly proportional.The leaching efficiencies of the cultivated bacteria and acclimation bacteria are 1.2 and 1.4 times as large as that of the original bacteria.

  14. Regional assessment of NLEAP NO3-N leaching indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, B.K.; Shaffer, M.J.; Hall, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Nonpoint source ground water contamination by nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) leached from agricultural lands can be substantial and increase health risks to humans and animals. Accurate and rapid methods are needed to identify and map localities that have a high potential for contamination of shallow aquifers with NO3-N leached from agriculture. Evaluation of Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis Package (NLEAP) indices and input variables across an irrigated agricultural area on an alluvial aquifer in Colorado indicated that all leaching indices tested were more strongly correlated with aquifer NO3-N concentration than with aquifer N mass. Of the indices and variables tested, the NO3-N Leached (NL) index was the NLEAP index most strongly associated with groundwater NO3-N concentration (r2 values from 0.37 to 0.39). NO3-N concentration of the leachate was less well correlated with ground water NO3-N concentration (r2values from 0.21 to 0.22). Stepwise regression analysis indicated that, although inorganic and organic/inorganic fertilizer scenarios had similar r2 values, the Feedlot Indicator (proximity) variable was significant over and above the NO3-N Leached index for the inorganic scenario. The analysis also showed that combination of either Movement Risk Index (MIRI) or NO3-N concentration of the leachate with the NO3-N Leached index leads to an improved regression, which provides insight into area-wide associations between agricultural activities and ground water NO3-N concentration.

  15. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  16. A mathematical model for isothermal heap and column leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima L.R.P. de Andrade

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaching occurs in metals recovery, in contaminated soil washing, and in many natural processes, such as fertilizer dissolution and rock weathering. This paper presents a model developed to simulate the transient evolution of the dissolved chemical species in the heap and column isothermal leaching processes. In this model, the solid bed is numerically divided into plane layers; the recovery of the chemical species, the enrichment of the pregnant leach solution, and the residual concentration of the leaching agent are calculated by interactions among the layers. The solution flow in the solid bed is assumed as unidirectional without dispersion, and the solid-fluid reaction is described by a diffusive control model that is integrated analytically for each time step. The data set used in the model include physical-chemical, geometrical, and operational variables, such as: leachable chemical species content, leaching agent flow rate and concentration, particles size distribution, solution residence time in the solid bed, and solid bed length, weight and irrigated area. The results for two case studies, namely, an industrial gold heap leaching and a pilot column copper acid leaching, showed that the model successful predict the general features of the process time evolution.

  17. Dynamics of aluminum leaching from water purification sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Po; Fu, Chi-Hua; Chen, Ping-Hung; Yu, Ruey-Fang

    2012-05-30

    In this investigation, the shrinking core model is used to study the rate of aluminum salt leaching from water purification sludge (WPS). This model, which describes the aluminum leaching rate, can be developed to maximize the Al(III) recovering efficiency. Laboratory results indicate that when the mixing speed exceeds 80rpm, the effect of film diffusion control on the leaching process is greatly reduced, such that any further increase in the mixing speed does not affect the Al(III) leaching rate. Additionally, increasing the temperature or acid concentration improves Al(III) leaching rate. The laboratory data were verified by using the shrinking core model to confirm that the leaching of Al(III) from WPS is consistent with the inert-layer diffusion control model. This finding reveals that large amounts of SiO(2), Al(2)O(3) and other inert constituents will form an inter diffusion layer in the WPS and thus become the major limiting factors that control the Al(III) leaching process. The dynamic equation can be expressed as 1-3(1-x)(2/3)+2(1-x)=(2707.3 exp(-3887.6/T))t, in which the apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factors are 32.32 kJ/mol and 2707.3 min(-1), respectively, as determined by solving the Arrhenius equation.

  18. Acidic leaching of copper and tin from used consumer equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orac D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on studying thermal pretreatment and leaching of copper and tin from printed circuit boards (PCBs from used consumer equipment. Thermal treatment experiments were realized with and without presence of oxygen at 300°C, 500°C, 700°C and 900°C for 30 minutes. Leaching experiments were performed at 80°C in 2M HCl in two stages. The first stage consisted of classic leaching experiments of samples without and after thermal treatment. The second stage consisted of oxidative leaching experiments (blowing of air or oxygen with the aim to intensify metals leaching. The results of thermal treatment experiments show that maximal mass loss after burning (combustion was 53 % (700°C and after pyrolysis 47 % (900 %. Oxidative leaching resulted in complete dissolution of copper and tin after 60. or 90 minutes of thermally treated samples. Pyrolysis and combustion have positive effects on metals dissolution in comparison with samples without thermal pretreatment. Moreover, the dissolution of metals is more effective and needs shorter leaching time.

  19. Advances in Nitrogen Loss Leached by Precipitation from Plant Canopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shi-qing; JI Chun-rong; FANG Ya-ning; CHEN Xiao-li; LI Sheng-xiu

    2008-01-01

    Function of canopy in changing nutrient cycle and flux is one of the focuses in recent years. On the basis of comprehensively appraising published research, we analyzed the nitrogen loss leaching from plant canopy and several factors which affected it. We pointed out the disadvantages of the published researches and the key issues that ought to be solved: (1) The menstruation need to be advanced, and the research should be carried out on nitrogen loss leaching from the canopy of the field plant. (2) If the nitrogen is leached from the plant canopy, the research on the type of nitrogen loss should be carried out, and the nitrogen use efficiency of different varieties should be dealt on a research perspective with regard to the nitrogen leaching. (3) The research should be conducted on the mechanism and pathway, and the progress of nitrogen leaching; and the factors affecting nitrogen leaching should be included in the research, such as the leaf area of different growth stages, stomata densities, stomata conductance, and the apparent free space, which are beneficial to explain the mechanism of nitrogen leaching from the plant canopy.

  20. Thiosulfate leaching of gold from waste mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Vinh Hung; Lee, Jae-chun; Jeong, Jinki; Hai, Huynh Trung; Jha, Manis K

    2010-06-15

    The present communication deals with the leaching of gold from the printed circuit boards (PCBs) of waste mobile phones using an effective and less hazardous system, i.e., a copper-ammonia-thiosulfate solution, as an alternative to the conventional and toxic cyanide leaching of gold. The influence of thiosulfate, ammonia and copper sulfate concentrations on the leaching of gold from PCBs of waste mobile phones was investigated. Gold extraction was found to be enhanced with solutions containing 15-20 mM cupric, 0.1-0.14 M thiosulfate, and 0.2-0.3 M ammonia. Similar trends were obtained for the leaching of gold from two different types of scraps and PCBs of waste mobile phones. From the scrap samples, 98% of the gold was leached out using a solution containing 20 mM copper, 0.12 M thiosulfate and 0.2 M ammonia. Similarly, the leaching of gold from the PCBs samples was also found to be good, but it was lower than that of scrap samples in similar experimental conditions. In this case, only 90% of the gold was leached, even with a contact time of 10h. The obtained data will be useful for the development of processes for the recycling of gold from waste mobile phones.

  1. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  2. Complex Leaching Process of Scheelite in Hydrochloric and Phosphoric Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Xue, Jilai; Liu, Kang; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Zengjie

    2016-09-01

    The complex leaching process of synthetic scheelite and scheelite concentrate in hydrochloric and phosphoric solutions has been investigated for improving process efficiency. A higher leaching rate, compared with the classic acid leaching process, can be obtained through the synergy of HCl and H3PO4 with appropriate W/P mole ratio, temperature, and acid concentration. For synthetic scheelite, the optimum leaching conditions were W/P mole ratio 7:1, temperature 50°C, HCl 0.72 mol/L, and stirring speed 600 rpm; for scheelite concentrate, W/P mole ratio 7:1, temperature 80°C, HCl 2.16 mol/L, and stirring speed 1000 rpm. The leaching rates under the optimized conditions can reach up to 98% or even higher. FTIR spectra analysis confirmed that the leachate composition remained as H3[PW12O40] in the range of varying W/P mole ratios, so the PO4 3- in acidic solution and phosphorus content in the leaching product could be better controlled. The function 1 - (1 - X)1/3 against leaching time was applied to fit the experimental data, and the apparent activation energy, E a, was calculated as 60.65 kJ/mol. The results would be valuable for effectively using scheelite as a raw material resource for sustainable tungsten production.

  3. Long-term leaching behavior of phenol in cement/activated-carbon solidified/stabilized hazardous waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianguo; Nie, Xiaoqin; Zeng, Xianwei; Su, Zhaoji

    2013-01-30

    The long-term leaching behavior of phenol in solidified/stabilized (S/S) hazardous wastes cured for 28 d with different amounts of activated carbon (AC) was investigated using synthetic inorganic acid (H(2)SO(4):HNO(3) = 2:1, pH = 3.2), acetic acid buffer (HAc/NaAc, pH = 4.93), and deionized water as leachants to simulate the leaching of phenol in three exposure scenarios: acid-precipitation, co-disposal, and neutral-precipitation. Phenol immobilization was enhanced by AC adsorption and impaired by the growth of micropores with increasing amount of AC; thus the optimal added amount of AC to be to added S/S wastes was 2%. The leaching behavior of phenol in co-disposal scenario was unpredictable due to inadequate ionization of HAc in the HAc-NaAc buffer solution. The findings indicated that S/S products should be disposed of in hazardous waste landfills rather than municipal solid waste landfills.

  4. Impact of carbonaceous materials in soil on the transport of soil-bound PAHs during rainfall-runoff events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaolin; Zheng, Yi; Wu, Bin; Lin, Zhongrong; Han, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xuejun

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) transported from contaminated soils by surface runoff pose significant risk for aquatic ecosystems. Based on a rainfall-runoff simulation experiment, this study investigated the impact of carbonaceous materials (CMs) in soil, identified by organic petrology analysis, on the transport of soil-bound PAHs under rainfall conditions. The hypothesis that composition of soil organic matter significantly impacts the enrichment and transport of PAHs was proved. CMs in soil, varying significantly in content, mobility and adsorption capacity, act differently on the transport of PAHs. Anthropogenic CMs like black carbon (BC) largely control the transport, as PAHs may be preferentially attached to them. Eventually, this study led to a rethink of the traditional enrichment theory. An important implication is that CMs in soil have to be explicitly considered to appropriately model the nonpoint source pollution of PAHs (possibly other hydrophobic chemicals as well) and assess its environmental risk.

  5. A field study to evaluate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Jianghai

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff and to provide reference data for the engineering design of dual substrate layer green roofs. The data were collected from eight different trays under three kinds of artificial rains. The results showed that except for total phosphorus, dual substrate layer green roofs behaved as a sink for most of the nutrient pollutants (significant at p < 0.05), and the first-flush effect did not occur during the 27 simulated rain events. The results also revealed that the concentration of these nutrient pollutants in the runoff strongly depended on the features of the nutrient substrates used in the green roof and the depth of the adsorption substrates. Compared with the influence of the substrates, the influence of the plant density and drainage systems was small.

  6. Assessment of some straw-derived materials for reducing the leaching potential of Metribuzin residues in the soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cara, Irina Gabriela; Trincă, Lucia Carmen; Trofin, Alina Elena; Cazacu, Ana; Ţopa, Denis; Peptu, Cătălina Anişoara; Jităreanu, Gerard

    2015-12-01

    Biomass (straw waste) can be used as raw to obtain materials for herbicide removal from wastewater. These by-products have some important advantages, being environmentally friendly, easily available, presenting low costs, and requiring little processing to increase their adsorptive capacity. In the present study, some materials derived from agricultural waste (wheat, corn and soybean straw) were investigated as potential adsorbents for metribuzin removal from aqueous solutions. The straw wastes were processed by grinding, mineralisation (850 °C) and KOH activation in order to improve their functional surface activity. The materials surface characteristics were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The adsorbents capacity was evaluated using batch sorption tests and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for herbicide determination. For adsorption isotherms, the equilibrium time considered was 3 h. The experimental adsorption data were modelled by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The activated straw and ash-derived materials from wheat, corn and soybean increased the adsorption capacity of metribuzin with an asymmetrical behaviour. Overall, our results sustain that activated ash-derived from straw and activated straw materials can be a valuable solution for reducing the leaching potential of metribuzin through soil.

  7. Using microbiological leaching method to remove heavy metals from sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuyu Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial leaching is one of the most effective methods to remove heavy metals from sludge. In the conducted researches, the sludge samples were processed with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans obtained via cultivation, extraction and purification processes. Heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni were leached from sludge by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans within different substrate concentration and pH value conditions. It is defined that from the point of view of economy and efficiency the optimal concentration of FeSO4.7H2O and sulfur for bio-leaching process was 0.2 g. The leaching rates of heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni of the same concentration were 74.72%, 81.54%, 70.46% and 77.35% respectively. However, no significant differences depending on the pH value among the leaching rates were defined, even for the pH value of 1.5. Along with the removal of heavy metals from sludge, the organic matter, N, P, K were also leached to some extent. The losing rate of phosphorus was the highest and reached 38.44%. However, the content of organic matter, N, P, K in the processed sludge were higher in comparison with level I of the National Soil Quality Standards of China. Ecological risk of heavy metals in sludge before and after leaching was assessed by Index of Geo-accumulation (Igeo and comprehensive potential risk (RI. The results of research defined that the content of heavy metals in sludge meets the level of low ecological risk after leaching and their contents is lower in comparison with the National Agricultural Sludge Standard of China. Sludge leached by biological methods is possible to use for treatment for increasing soil fertility.

  8. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  9. Evaluation of ferrolysis in arsenate adsorption on the paddy soil derived from an Oxisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Dai, Zhaoxia; Sun, Rui; Zhao, Zhenjie; Dong, Ying; Hong, Zhineng; Xu, Renkou

    2017-07-01

    Iron oxides are dominant effective adsorbents for arsenate in iron oxide-rich variable charge soils. Oxisol-derived paddy soils undergo intensive ferrolysis, which results in high leaching and transformation of iron oxides. However, little information is available concerning the effect of ferrolysis on arsenate adsorption by paddy soil and parent Oxisol. In the present study, we examined the arsenate affinity of soils using arsenate adsorption/desorption isotherms, zeta potential, adsorption kinetics, pH effect and phosphate competition experiments. Results showed that ferrolysis in an alternating flooding-drying Oxisol-derived paddy soil resulted in a significant decrease of free iron oxides and increase of amorphous iron oxides in the surface and subsurface layers. There were more reactive sites exposed on amorphous than on crystalline iron oxides. Therefore, disproportionate ratios of arsenate adsorption capacities and contents of free iron oxides were observed in the studied Oxisols compared with paddy soils. The Gibbs free energy values corroborated that both electrostatic and non-electrostatic adsorption mechanisms contributed to the arsenate adsorption by bulk soils, and the kinetic adsorption data further suggested that the rate-limiting step was chemisorption. The zeta potential of soil colloids decreased after arsenate was adsorbed on the surfaces, forming inner-sphere complexes and thus transferring their negative charges to the soil particle surfaces. The adsorption/desorption isotherms showed that non-electrostatic adsorption was the main mechanism responsible for arsenate binding to the Oxisol and derived paddy soils, representing 91.42-94.65% of the adsorption capacities. Further studies revealed that arsenate adsorption was greatly inhibited by increasing suspension pH and incorporation of phosphate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Studies on Leaching of Heavy Metals from E – waste

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Michael; R.Wilfred Sugumar

    2013-01-01

    One of the global problems in the present day world is the negative impacts created by the growing e-waste on the natural resources like air, soil and water. In the present work, the discarded electronic components were allowed to leach in water samples drawn from different rivers and the leachate were analyzed for the presence of heavy metals. The results highlight that even if the contact time is short, the toxic elements tend to leach to a great extent. In our studies, Arsenic had leached ...

  11. Leaching characteristics of actinides from simulated reactor waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weed, H.C.; Coles, D.G.; Bradley, D.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Schweiger, J.S.; Rego, J.H.

    1979-08-01

    Even without statistical analysis, some general trends can be seen in the results: leach rate increases with flow rate at high temperature, but is approximately independent of it at room temperature; agreement between the results from the one-pass method and those from the IAEA method are fair in the case of WIPP brine solution, and good in the case of the others; and the /sup 237/Np leach rate increases with temperature, but the /sup 239/Pu leach rate either decreases with temperature or does not change.

  12. PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2009-09-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A and B, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in

  13. DESIGN OF AN EXPERT CONTROL SYSTEM FOR LEACHING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    One important step in zinc hydrometallurgy is the leaching process, which involves the dissolving of zinc-bearing material in dilute sulfuric acid to form zinc sulfate solution. The key problem in the process control is to determine the optimal pHs of the overflows of the continuous leaches and track them. An expert control system for the leaching process was designed to solve the key problem. A methodology is proposed for determining and tracking the optimal pHs with an expert control strategy based on a combination of steadystate mathematical models and rule models of the process.

  14. Preferential Leaching of Pinitol from Soybeans during Imbibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, P

    1984-10-01

    Sugars and cyclitols leached from soybeans (Glycine max var Sparks) during imbibition were assayed as a function of time. Pinitol leached many times faster than carbohydrates. During the initial 20 minutes of imibition, the pinitol/carbohydrate ratio was 3.4, declining to 0.29 for fully imbibed seeds. The value for dry soybeans was 0.14. Hypochlorite treatment of seeds more than doubled the rate at which carbohydrates leached out, but had little effect on pinitol. A role in development of soil microorganisms is postulated for pinitol.

  15. Testing the Runoff Tool in Sicilian vineyards: adopting best management practices to prevent agricultural surface runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpriet; Dyson, Jeremy; Capri, Ettore

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades rainfall has become more intense in Sicily, making large proportions of steeply sloping agricultural land more vulnerable to soil erosion, mainly orchards and vineyards (Diodato and Bellocchi 2010). The prevention of soil degradation is indirectly addressed in the European Union's Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) and Sustainable Use Directive (2009/128/EC). As a consequence, new EU compliance conditions for food producers requires them to have tools and solutions for on-farm implementation of sustainable practices (Singh et al. 2014). The Agricultural Runoff and Best Management Practice Tool has been developed by Syngenta to help farm advisers and managers diagnose the runoff potential from fields with visible signs of soil erosion. The tool consists of 4 steps including the assessment of three key landscape factors (slope, topsoil permeability and depth to restrictive horizon) and 9 mainly soil and crop management factors influencing the runoff potential. Based on the runoff potential score (ranging from 0 to 10), which is linked to a runoff potential class, the Runoff Tool uses in-field and edge-of-the-field Best Management Practices (BMPs) to mitigate runoff (aligned with advice from ECPA's TOPPS-prowadis project). The Runoff tool needs testing in different regions and crops to create a number of use scenarios with regional/crop specific advice on BMPs. For this purpose the Tool has been tested in vineyards of the Tasca d'Almerita and Planeta wineries, which are large family-owned estates with long-standing tradition in viticulture in Sicily. In addition to runoff potential scores, Visual Soil Assessment (VSA) scores have been calculated to allow for a comparison between different diagnostic tools. VSA allows for immediate diagnosis of soil quality (a higher score means a better soil quality) including many indicators of runoff (Shepherd 2008). Runoff potentials were moderate to high in all tested fields. Slopes were classified as

  16. Kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption of cadusafos on soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElShafei, Gamal S., E-mail: elshafei_gamal@yahoo.com [Chem. Dpt., Fac. of Sci., Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt); Nasr, I.N.; Hassan, Ayman S.M.; Mohammad, S.G.M. [Central Agricultural Pesticide Laboratory, Dokki, Giza (Egypt)

    2009-12-30

    Laboratory batch experiments were designed to study the adsorption of cadusafos on two types of soils: clay loamy and sandy, collected from two regions around the Nile Delta in Egypt. The adsorption process is fast reaching equilibrium in 60 min, decreases with increasing soil mass and independent on pH in the range 3-11. The experimental results were well fitted to linear partition model, and to a lesser extent to Freundlich non-linear model, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. However, the 1/n parameter of Freundlich relation being of value around one supported the linear partition model. The K{sub d} values obtained from the linear model were 4.20 and 2.74 L/g for sandy and clay soils, respectively. The energy of adsorption calculated from D-R equation was 4.36 and 5.04 kJ/mol for clay and sandy soils, respectively, in the range assigned to physical forces. This kind of weak interaction, together with pH-independence implies that for the studied soils the organic content (that is higher in the clay soil) is not a major parameter in the adsorption of cadusafos. Water movement taking place more readily in sandy soil caused increased uptake relative to the case of clay soil. The higher uptake in sandy soil denotes that cadusafos may be mobile with a potential to leach and eventually pollutes ground water and surface water. The kinetics of adsorption was well fitted by the pseudo-second order equation. The intraparticles diffusion is of lower significance in case of sandy soil than in clay soil. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption is spontaneous, endothermic accompanied by increase in entropy.

  17. 水处理污泥中几种重金属的浸出变化研究%Study on the Leaching Change of Several Heavy Metals in Sludge from Water Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凤彩

    2016-01-01

    Taking the case of the sludge from electronics industry water treatment, the variation of leaching rate of the heavy metals in sludge samples was studied by changing the type of extraction agent and the ratio of liquid to solid. Experimental result shows that the leaching rate of heavy metals was higher with acetic acid as leaching agent than that with water and sulfuric acid/nitric acid as leaching agent. In addition, liquid to solid ratio significantly affects the leaching of heavy metals. High liquid to solid ratio contributes more effectively to increasing the leaching of heavy metals due to the adsorption or common-ion effect.%以电子工业水处理污泥为实例,通过改变浸提剂种类及液固比研究了污泥样品中重金属元素的浸出变化规律。结果表明:以醋酸缓冲溶液为浸提剂时重金属的浸出率显著高于纯水及硫硝混酸浸提剂;由于吸附或共离子效应,不同液固比对浸出结果影响显著,较高液固比时浸出率增加明显。

  18. Effects of Pregnant Leach Solution Temperature on the Permeability of Gravelly Drainage Layer of Heap Leaching Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi amini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In copper heap leaching structures, the ore is leached by an acidic solution. After dissolving the ore mineral, the heap is drained off in the acidic solution using a drainage system (consisting of a network of perforated polyethylene pipes and gravelly drainage layers and is, then, transferred to the leaching plant for copper extraction where the copper is extracted and the remaining solution is dripped over the ore heap for re-leaching. In this process, the reaction between the acidic solution and copper oxide ore is exothermal and the pregnant leach solution (PLS, which is drained off the leaching heap, has a higher temperature than the dripped acidic solution. The PLS temperature variations cause some changes in the viscosity and density which affect the gravelly drainage layer's permeability. In this research, a special permeability measuring system was devised for determining the effects of the PLS temperature variations on the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer of heap leaching structures. The system, consisting of a thermal acid resistant element and a thermocouple, controls the PLS temperature, which helps measure the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer. The PLS and gravelly drainage layer of Sarcheshmeh copper mine heap leaching structure No. 1 were used in this study. The permeability coefficient of the gravelly soil was measured against the PLS and pure water at temperatures varying between 3°C to 60°C. Also, the viscosity and density of the PLS and pure water were measured at these temperatures and, using existing theoretical relations, the permeability coefficient of the gravel was computed. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results revealed a good conformity between the two sets of results. Finally, a case (Taft heap leaching structure, Yazd, Iran was studied and its gravelly drainage layer was designed based on the results of the present research.

  19. Quantifying runoff water quality characteristics from nurseries and avocado groves subjected to altered irrigation and fertilizer regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, S. A.; Beighley, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    In agriculture, improper, excessive or poorly timed irrigation and fertilizer applications can result in increased pollutants in runoff and degraded water quality. Specifically, the cultivation of salt sensitive plants and nurseries require significant irrigation and fertilizer that leads to high nutrient leaching. In southern California, a large producer of Avocados and nursery plant, waterways are often subjected to elevated nutrient concentrations, which stress the aquatic ecosystem. In this research, the specific objectives are to determine optimal irrigation and fertilizer application rates for minimizing nutrient and sediment export from avocado groves and nurseries. Altered irrigation and fertilizer application experiments will be implemented and monitored at the San Diego State University's Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve, which contains a 12 ha avocado grove and newly constructed 0.4 ha nursery. The study will last for twelve months, with runoff from natural rainfall or irrigation sampled and analyzed for nutrient concentrations on a monthly basis. The growth rate, leaf nutrient content and plant yield will also be monitored monthly. The nursery site is divided into eight plots (13.5-m x 13.5-m), with each plot containing 1200 plants consisting of four commonly used landscaping varieties in southern California. The avocado grove of the Hass variety is divided into four 1-ha plots. The experimental plots represent combinations of irrigation and fertilization practices with different methods and rates. In all cases, irrigation is fully automated based on soil moisture. To assess the effectiveness of the altered irrigation and fertilizer strategies, runoff water quality and plant yield will be compared to controlled treatments. This research is intended to provide a better understanding of how irrigation and fertilizer management can be used for the long-term reduction of nutrients in the Santa Margarita Watershed, which in turn will lead to improved

  20. Runoff of copper and zinc caused by atmospheric corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuenberger-Minger, A.U.; Faller, M.; Richner, P. [Swiss Federal Labs. for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2002-03-01

    Runoff and total corrosion loss for copper and zinc were investigated at seven sites in Switzerland. The exposure sites were chosen near the stations of the national air pollution monitoring network (NABEL), where climatic and air pollution data are measured. Runoff and corrosion rates were investigated after 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 years of exposure. Runoff rates differ from corrosion rates depending on the material, the exposure time and the sampling site. (orig.)

  1. Pollutants in stormwater runoff in Shanghai (China): Implications for management of urban runoff pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siaka Ballo; Min Liu; Lijun Hou; Jing Chang

    2009-01-01

    Runoff samples were collected from four functional areas (traffic, residential, commercial and industrial) and four roof types (old con-crete, new concrete, old clay and new clay) in central Shanghai, China, during rain events. The event mean concentrations (EMCs) of three forms of nitrogen (NH4+-N,NO3--N,NO2--N) and the temporal variations of total phosphorus (TP) were then measured to evaluate the effects of runoff from different areas on water quality management. The results revealed that the TP levels varied significantly in the samples collected from different functional areas and roof types during rain events. In addition, although the NO3--N and NO2--N concentrations in runoff remained well below the fifth class values of the national surface water quality standards, the NH4+-N levels were 1.36, 1.17, 1.10 and 0.85 times higher than the standard value in samples collected from commercial, traffic, indus-trial, and residential areas, respectively. Similarly, the concentrations of NH4+-N in samples collected from old concrete, new concrete, old clay and new clay roofs exceeded the fifth class standard by 6.66, 5.72, 4.32 and 3.32 times, respectively. And the NO3--N levels were 1.86 and 1.53 times higher than the standard values in runoff samples collected from new and old concrete roofs, respectively.

  2. Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagadu, C P K; Akaho, E H K; Danso, K A; Stegowski, Z; Furman, L

    2012-01-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process.

  3. Mesophilic leaching of copper sulphide sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR B. CVETKOVSKI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper was precipitated using a sodium sulphide solution as the precipitation agent from an acid solution containing 17 g/l copper and 350 g/l sulphuric acid. The particle size of nearly 1 µm in the sulphide sludge sample was detected by optical microscopy. Based on chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, covellite was detected as the major sulphide mineral. The batch bioleach amenability test was performed at 32 °C on the Tk31 mine mesophilic mixed culture using a residence time of 28 days. The dissolution of copper sulphide by direct catalytic leaching of the sulphides with bacteria attached to the particles was found to be worthy, although a small quantity of ferrous ions had to be added to raise the activity of the bacteria and the redox potential of the culture medium. Throughout the 22-day period of the bioleach test, copper recovery based on residue analysis indicated a copper extraction of 95 %, with copper concentration in the bioleach solution of 15 g/l. The slope of the straight line tangential to the exponential part of the extraction curve gave a copper solubilisation rate of 1.1 g/l per day. This suggests that a copper extraction of 95 % for the period of bioleach test of 13.6 days may be attained in a three-stage bioreactor system.

  4. Bacterial oxidation activity in heap leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳建设; 夏海波; 王兆慧; 胡岳华

    2004-01-01

    Bioleaching of sulfide minerals by bacteria, mainly Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T. f. ) and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, plays an important role in hydrometallurgy because of its economic and environmental attractions. The surveys of production process and the bacterial oxidation activity in the heap bioleaching were investigated. The results show that pH value is high, bacteria biomass and ferric concentration are low, generation time (above 7.13 h)is long in leachate, and less bacteria are adsorbed on the ores. The bacteria in the leachate exposing on the surface and connecting with mineral, have much faster oxidation rate of Fe( Ⅱ ) and shorter generation time, compared with those which are in the reservoir for a long time. There is diversity for oxidation activity of Fe( Ⅱ ), while there is no diversity for oxidation of sulfur. So it is advisable to add sulfuric acid to degrade pH value to 2.0, add nutrients and shorten recycling time of leachate, so as to enhance bacteria concentration of leachate and the leaching efficiency.

  5. Use of short-term (5-Minute) and long-term (18-Hour) leaching tests to characterize, fingerprint, and rank mine-waste material from historical mines in the Deer Creek, Snake River, and Clear Creek Watersheds in and around the Montezuma Mining District, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation-induced runoff from historical mine-waste located adjacent to the headwaters of the Snake River, Deer Creek, Saints John Creek, Grizzly Gulch, Stevens Gulch, and Leavenworth Creek contributes to the degradation of water quality in these streams. Because historical mine-waste piles have had long-term exposure to the atmosphere, it is surmised that runoff from these piles, induced by meteorological events such as cloudbursts and snowmelt, may cause mobility of acid and metals into a watershed due to dissolution of soluble minerals. For this study, 13 mine-waste composite samples from various mine-wastes in these drainage basins were leached using both a short-term and a long-term leach test. Analytical results from this combination of leach tests are tools that allow the investigator to quantify (fingerprint) which geochemical components could be expected in runoff from these piles if they were leached by a cloudburst (5-minute leach test), as well as what the ?worst-case? geochemical profile would look like if the material were subject to extended leaching and breakdown of the mine-waste material (18-hour leach test). Also, this combination of leach tests allows the geoscientist the ability to see geochemical changes in the mine-waste leachate over time. That is, does the leachate become more or less acidic over time; does the specific conductance increase or decrease; and are there changes in the concentrations of major or trace elements? Further, use of a ranking scheme described herein will aid in prediction of which historical mine-waste piles have the greatest potential for impact on a watershed should runoff occur. Because of long-term weathering of these historical mine-waste piles, geochemical profiles, leachate time-trends, and relative ranking of the mine-wastes produced from analysis of the leachates are Hageman_SIR_2508.doc 1 7/21/2004 2:50 PM indicative of how the mine-waste piles can be expected to act in the environment and may help to

  6. STUDY ON HIGH ACID LEACHING REACTIVE CALCINED KAOLIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Leaching experiments on metakaolin show that the final Al extraction ratio reached in a batch reaction is strikingly influenced by the inferior pore structure geometry of the metakaolin pellets. By calcining kaolin particles adhered in low humidity state,a variety of metakaolin pellet,inside which a large openings structure developed,has been prepared. The structure remarkably benefits leachant ion transference,so,the variety has high acid leaching reactivity,even coarse as the pellets are,its aluminum extracted ratio still has a linear relationship with leaching time,and the leaching kinetics is maintained zero order up to a significant conversion degree. A revised Pellet-Particle Model has been developed to interpret the structure influence on Al extraction ratio.

  7. Complex sulphide-barite ore leaching in ferric chloride solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Sokić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of research on the leaching process of complex sulphide-barite ore were presented in this paper. The leaching process was carried out in a laboratory autoclave by ferric chloride solution. Considering that those minerals are represented in complex structural-textural relationships, it is not possible to extract lead, zinc and copper minerals from ore by flotation methods. The obtained results confirmed possibility of the ore processing directly, by chemical methods. The effect of temperature, time and oxygen partial pressure on the lead, zinc and copper dissolution was studied. The maximal leaching degree was achieved at 100 °C and amount of 91.5 % for Pb, 96.1 % for Zn and 60.7 % for Cu. Leaching at temperatures above 100 °C is impractical.

  8. Sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Zhao; Cheng-jun Liu; Pei-yang Shi; Bo Zhang; Mao-fa Jiang; Qing-song Zhang; Ron Zevenhoven; Henrik Saxn

    2015-01-01

    The sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite was investigated. The negative influence of a solid product layer constituted of a silicon-rich phase and chromium-rich sulfate was eliminated by crushing the chromite and by selecting proper leaching con-ditions. The dimensionless change in specific surface area and the conversion rate of the chromite were observed to exhibit a proportional re-lationship. A modified shrinking particle model was developed to account for the change in reactive surface area, and the model was fitted to experimental data. The resulting model was observed to describe experimental findings very well. Kinetics analysis revealed that the leach-ing process is controlled by a chemical reaction under the employed experimental conditions and the activation energy of the reaction is 48 kJ·mol–1.

  9. Molybdenum removal from copper ore concentrate by sodium hypochlorite leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Youcai; Zhong Hong; Cao Zhanfang

    2011-01-01

    The removal of molybdenum from a copper ore concentrate by sodium hypochlorite leaching was investigated. The results show that leaching time, liquid to solid ratio, leaching ternperature, agitation speed, and sodium hypochlorite and sodium hydroxide concentrations all have a significant effect on the removal of molybdenum. The optimum process operating parameters were found to be: time, 4 h: sodium hydroxide concentration, 10%; sodium hypochlorite concentration, 8%; liquid to solid ratio, 10:1; temperature, 50℃; and,agitation speed, 500 r/min. Under these conditions the extraction of molybdenum is greater than 99.9% and the extraction of copper is less than 0.01%. A shrinking particle model could be used to describe the leaching process. The apparent activation energy of the dissolution reaction was found to be approximately 8.8 kJ/mol.

  10. Leaching behavior of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in shredder residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, S; Urano, S; Takatsuki, H

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that some kinds of waste contain persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as PCDD/DFs and PCBs. Leaching behaviors of these chemicals, however, have not been focused so much because of their low leachability. On the other hand, shredder residues originated from automobiles and electric appliances consist mainly of plastics, such as PVC, which contain additives including DEHP. In this study, contents analyses and leaching tests with and without surfactant-like substances for shredder residues were conducted. As a result, shredder residues from automobile and electric appliance contained PCBs in ppm level and a quantity of PCDD/DFs. Surfactant-like substances increase the leaching concentration of POPs. DEHP also leached out considerably even though using distilled water.

  11. An Energy Balanced Algorithm of LEACH Protocol in WSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyao Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor networks (WSNs, due to the limitation of nodes energy, energy efficiency is an important factor should be considered when the protocols are designing. As a typical representative of hierarchical routing protocols, LEACH Protocol plays an important role. In response to the uneven energy distribution that is caused by the randomness of cluster heads forming , this paper proposes a new improved algorithm of LEACH protocol (LEACH-TLCH which is intended to balance the energy consumption of the entire network and extend the life of the network . The new algorithm is emulated by Matlab simulation platform, the simulation results indicate that both energy efficiency and the lifetime of the network are better than that of LEACH Protocol.

  12. The leaching behavior of simulated HLW glass under repository condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As the multibarrier system has been adopted to dispose HLW glass in geological formation in many countries, it was important to study the leaching behavior of vitrification under geological formation. This article describes the leaching behavior of simulated high level waste glass (90Nd/10), which can incorporate 16 wt.% simulated HLW in five kinds of geological media, such as granite, cement, bentonite, Fe3O4, etc. The durable experimental results show that the glass had less mass loss in granite and more mass loss in bentonite after a two-year leaching test. The SEM/XEDS analysis shows some element distributions on the leached specimen's surface, i.e., Na, Si and Mg elements were reduced on the specimen's surface, whereas Ba, Al, and Fe were enriched on the specimen's surface.

  13. Leaching of nutrient salts from fly ash from biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Vu, Duc Thuong; Stenby, Mette

    2005-01-01

    Methods to selectively leach nutrient salts from fly ash, while leaving cadmium un-dissolved were studied. Temperature, pH, water to fly ash ratio are all expected to influence the kinetics and the equilibrium boundaries for this process. Three different leaching methods were investigated....... The first method was a counter current moving bed process in four stages. The ash was kept in filter bags and leached with water that was introduced into the bags at 40-50°C. In the second method, fly ash and water was brought into contact in a partially fluidized bed. The third method was a counter current...... moving bed process with agitation/centrifugation. It was found that a satisfactory leaching of the nutrient salts could be achieved with the third method using only two or three stages, depending on the water to fly ash ratio. It is an advantage to perform the process at temperatures above 50°C...

  14. Leaching of Added Selenium in Soils Low in Native Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel; Hamdy, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A soil column experiment was performed to evaluate the influence of organic matter and lime on the leaching and distribution of added selenite. 75Se-labeled Na2SeO3 was added to water-saturated soil columns with a diameter of 4.25 cm and a length of 16-20 cm. Leaching started immediately, one l...... water being added per column during the course of 1 wk. Most of the selenite did not move through the soil, and only a few per cent were found in the leaching water. Leaching was greatest in sandy soil. It was increased by the addition of lime, but decreased by addition of organic matter. Most...

  15. Metaldehyde removal from aqueous solution by adsorption and ion exchange mechanisms onto activated carbon and polymeric sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Bing; Fletcher, Ashleigh J

    2013-01-15

    Metaldehyde removal from aqueous solution was evaluated using granular activated carbon (GAC), a non-functionalised hyper-cross-linked polymer Macronet (MN200) and an ion-exchange resin (S957) with sulfonic and phosphonic functional groups. Equilibrium experimental data were successfully described by Freundlich isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity of S957 (7.5 g metaldehyde/g S957) exceeded those of MN200 and GAC. Thermodynamic studies showed that sorption of metaldehyde onto all sorbents is endothermic and processes are controlled by entropic rather than enthalpic changes. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that experimental data for MN200 and GAC obey pseudo-second order models with rates limited by particle diffusion. Comparatively, S957 was shown to obey a pseudo-first order model with a rate-limiting step of metaldehyde diffusion through the solid/liquid interface. Results obtained suggest that metaldehyde adsorption onto MN200 and GAC are driven by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding, as leaching tendencies were high since no degradation of metaldehyde occurred. Conversely, adsorption of metaldehyde onto S957 occurs via ion-exchange processes, where sulfonic and phosphonic functionalities degrade adsorbed metaldehyde molecules and failure to detect metaldehyde in leaching studies for S957 supports this theory. Consequently, the high adsorption capacity and absence of leaching indicate S957 is promising for metaldehyde removal from source water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of vermicompost as a raw natural adsorbent for adsorption of pesticide methylparathion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Camila Bitencourt; Lima, Giovana de Fátima; Alves, Vanessa Nunes; Coelho, Nívia Maria Melo; Dragunski, Douglas Cardoso; Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of vermicompost (VC) as a low-cost and alternative adsorbent for the removal of the pesticide methylparathion (MP) from an aqueous medium has been investigated by batch and column experiments. Parameters related to MP adsorption, i.e. equilibrium time (61.5 min) and adsorption pH (6.8) were optimized by using Doehlert design. The initial and final MP concentrations after adsorption assays were determined by square-wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry using an electrode composed of a multiwalled carbon nanotube dispersed in mineral oil. Batch adsorption experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm adsorptions, and a very good fit to the Langmuir linear model, giving a maximum adsorption capacity (MAC) of 0.17 mg g(-1). This result was very similar to that obtained with the column experiments. In order to evaluate the MP desorption from column packed VC, 100.0 ml of nitric acid solution (pH 3.0) has been percolated through material. No leaching of MP was observed, thus confirming the strong interaction between MP and VC. The satisfactory MAC obtained and low cost makes the VC a reliable natural material for the removal of MP from aqueous effluents.

  17. CODCr leaching rules of municipal solid waste in Songtao Reservoir,Hainan Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大勇; 王里奥

    2009-01-01

    By the means of static leaching experiment and dynamic leaching experiment,CODCr leaching rules of dumped MSW(Municipal Solid Waste) in Songtao Reservoir,Hainan Province,China,were studied. And according to academic experience and fitted results of experiment data,the models of CODCr leaching rules in the leaching condition were deduced. The static leaching experiment indicates that,both in water-changing section and no-water-changing section,the ratio of liquid to solid has a remarkable influence on CODCr leaching concentration. The exponential model could be established to approximately describe CODCr leaching rules and the curve fits well. The dynamic leaching experiment indicates that,leaching rules of MSW can be approximately described by power model,which can well fit the leaching experiment data. By the contrast of the static leaching experiment and dynamic leaching experiment,the differences of CODCr leaching rules between the two experiments are significant. By the exponential model,the average static leaching rate of CODCr is calculated as 882.24 mg/(kg·d) for water-changing section and 320.39 mg/(kg·d) for no-water-changing section; by the power model,the average dynamic leaching rate of CODCr is 208.77 mg/(kg·d).

  18. The geomorphic structure of the runoff peak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rigon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a theoretical framework to investigate the core dependence of peak flows on the geomorphic properties of river basins. Based on the theory of transport by travel times, and simple hydrodynamic characterization of floods, this new framework invokes the linearity and invariance of the hydrologic response to provide analytical and semi-analytical expressions for peak flow, time to peak, and area contributing to the peak runoff. These results are obtained for the case of constant-intensity hyetograph using the Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF curves to estimate extreme flow values as a function of the rainfall return period. Results show that, with constant-intensity hyetographs, the time-to-peak is greater than rainfall duration and usually shorter than the basin concentration time. Moreover, the critical storm duration is shown to be independent of rainfall return period as well as the area contributing to the flow peak. The same results are found when the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion are accounted for. Further, it is shown that, when the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion are negligible, the basin area contributing to the peak discharge does not depend on the channel velocity, but is a geomorphic propriety of the basin. As an example this framework is applied to three watersheds. In particular, the runoff peak, the critical rainfall durations and the time to peak are calculated for all links within a network to assess how they increase with basin area.

  19. Steady-state leaching of tritiated water from silica gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, H.A.; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion.......Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion....

  20. Steady-state leaching of tritiated water from silica gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, H.A.; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion.......Aqueous leaching of tritium from silica gel, loaded by absorption of water vapor, makes part of reactor de-commissioning. It is found to follow the formulation of steady-state diffusion....

  1. Property Changes in Lime Treated Expansive Clays under Continuous Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    decreasing soil-lime reactivity in areas of better drainage . In poorly drained soils, the removal of soil "constituents" are slowed and leaching effects are...minimized, thereby maintaining the calcium/magnesium ratio and higher soil pH (Thompson 1966; Joffe 1949). Also, soils with poor drainage will have a...these soil-lime mixtures may not exhibit as much autogenous healing, particularly after prolonged leaching, as they are generally believed to have

  2. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

  3. The improvement and simulation for LEACH clustering routing protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ai-guo; Zhao, Jun-xiang

    2017-01-01

    An energy-balanced unequal multi-hop clustering routing protocol LEACH-EUMC is proposed in this paper. The candidate cluster head nodes are elected firstly, then they compete to be formal cluster head nodes by adding energy and distance factors, finally the date are transferred to sink through multi-hop. The results of simulation show that the improved algorithm is better than LEACH in network lifetime, energy consumption and the amount of data transmission.

  4. Leaching of metals from cement under simulated environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huixia; Wei, Fang; Tang, Jingchun; Giesy, John P

    2016-03-15

    Leaching of metals from cement under various environmental conditions was measured to evaluate their environmental safety. A cement product containing clinker, which was produced from cement kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes, was solidified and leaching of metals was characterized using the 8-period test. Concentrations and speciation of metals in cements were determined. Effects of ambient environment and particle size on leachability of metals and mineralogical phases of cement mortars were evaluated by use of XRD and SEM. Results indicated that metals in cements were leachable in various media in descending order of: sea water, groundwater and acid rain. Cr, Ni, As, Co and V were leached by simulated sea water, while Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn, Sb and Tl were not leached in simulated sea water, groundwater or acid rain. When exposed to simulated acid rain or groundwater, amounts of Cr, Ni, As and V leached was inversely proportional to particle size of cement mortar. According to the one-dimensional diffusion equation, Cr was most leachable and the cumulative leached mass was predicted to be 9.6 mg kg(-1) after 20 years. Results of this study are useful in predicting releases of metals from cement products containing ash and clinkers cement kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes, so that they can be safely applied in the environment.

  5. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iles, Gail N., E-mail: gail.iles@helmholtz-berlin.de; Reinhart, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.reinhart@im2np.fr [European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Devred, François, E-mail: fdevred@ulb.ac.be [Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Henry, Paul F., E-mail: paul.henry@esss.se; Hansen, Thomas C., E-mail: hansen@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 3} continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  6. Studies on Leaching of Heavy Metals from E – waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Michael

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the global problems in the present day world is the negative impacts created by the growing e-waste on the natural resources like air, soil and water. In the present work, the discarded electronic components were allowed to leach in water samples drawn from different rivers and the leachate were analyzed for the presence of heavy metals. The results highlight that even if the contact time is short, the toxic elements tend to leach to a great extent. In our studies, Arsenic had leached to an extent of 0.053ppm, Cadmium 0.010 ppm, Chromium 0.029 ppm, Lead 0.042ppm and Mercury 0.061ppm. The results indicate that most of the metals have a tendency to leach and the extent of leaching depends on the quality of the water. As a result of leaching the physico-chemical parameters like pH, hardness, conductance and TDS of the water samples underwent a change. On the other hand, the physical parameters like viscosity, density, were not much affected. These studies highlight the danger of dumping the discarded electronic components in river beds especially when the water flow is less and when the water is stagnated.

  7. Leaching behaviour of different scrap materials at recovery and recycling companies: full-, pilot- and lab-scale investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeel, E; Chys, M; Depuydt, V; Folens, K; Du Laing, G; Verliefde, A; Van Hulle, S W H

    2014-12-01

    Scrap material recovery and recycling companies are confronted with waste water that has a highly fluctuating flow rate and composition. Common pollutants, such as COD, nutrients and suspended solids, potentially toxic metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and poly chlorinated biphenyls can exceed the discharge limits. An analysis of the leaching behaviour of different scrap materials and scrap yard sweepings was performed at full-scale, pilot-scale and lab-scale in order to find possible preventive solutions for this waste water problem. The results of these leaching tests (with concentrations that frequently exceeded the Flemish discharge limits) showed the importance of regular sweeping campaigns at the company, leak proof or covered storage of specific scrap materials and oil/water separation on particular leachates. The particulate versus dissolved fraction was also studied for the pollutants. For example, up to 98% of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons, poly chlorinated biphenyls and some metals were in the particulate form. This confirms the (potential) applicability of sedimentation and filtration techniques for the treatment of the majority of the leachates, and as such the rainwater run-off as a whole.

  8. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields e Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products aimed at avoiding any unacceptable influence on the environment, in particular contamination of water, including drinking water and groundwater...

  9. Single-pass continuous-flow leach test of PNL 76-68 glass: some selected Bead Leach I results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, D.G.

    1981-08-20

    A single-pass continuous-flow leach test of PNL 76-68 glass beads (7 mm dia) was concluded after 420 days of uninterrupted operation. Variables included in the experimental matrix were flow-rate, leachant composition, and temperature. Analysis was conducted on all leachate samples for /sup 237/Np and /sup 239/Pu as well as a number of nonradioactive elements. Results indicated that flow-rate and leachant systematically affected the leach rate, but only slightly. Temperature effects were significant. Plutonium leach rate was lower at higher temperature suggesting that Pu sorption onto the beads was enhanced at the higher temperature. The range of leach rates for all analyzed elements (except Pu), at both temperatures, at all three flow rates, and with all three leachant compositions varied over only three orders of magnitude. The range of variables used in this experiment covered those expected in many proposed repository environments.

  10. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2013-12-26

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  11. Leaching behavior of microtektite glass compositions in sea water and the effect of precipitation on glass leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The present study attempts to account for the slow corrosion rates of microtektite glass in nature by comparing the leach rates of synthetic microtektite glass samples in deionized water and in sea-water, respectively. In order to obtain systematic data about leachant composition effects, leach tests were also carried out with synthetic leachant compositions enriched with respect to silica or depleted with respect to certain major components of sea-water (Mg, Ca).

  12. Effect of oxidation treatment on the adsorption and the stability of mercury on activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chang-xing; ZHOU Jin-song; LUO Zhong-yang; HE Sheng; WANG Guang-kai; CEN Ke-fa

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation treatment on the adsorption and the stability of Hg on activated carbon (AC) was inrestigated. Both MnO2-AC and FeCl3-AC were produced during oxidation treatment. The measurement of modified AC's mercury adsorption capacity was conducted in a simulated coal-fired flue gas by adsorbing test apparatus. TCLP and column leaching methods were used to test the stability of mercury adsorbed on ACs. The results indicate that the oxidation treatment changed the pore structure of the AC and modified the carbon surface by creating chemical components such as MnO4-, Mn4+, O, NO3-, Fe3+, Cl-, etc. The Hg sorption capacity on MnO2-AC or FeCl3-AC was about three times higher than that of untreated carbon. In addition, the mercury control cost of each of the formers was about the half cost of the untreated carbon. The stability of Hg absorption was studied, it found that mercury adsorbed on the oxidation treated AC was not better than that of untreated carbon. It could concluded that the insoluble form of Hg is very important to the stability of mercury adsorbed on AC. This study suggests that the FeCl3-AC is the best absorbent for Hg with high adsorption capacity, better Hg adsorption stability in leaching environment, and lower cost among the three ACs tested.

  13. Effect of oxidation treatment on the adsorption and the stability of mercury on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, C.X.; Zhou, J.S.; Luo, Z.Y.; He, S.; Wang, G.K.; Cen, K.F. [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2006-07-01

    Oxidation treatment on the adsorption and the stability of Hg on activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Both MnO{sub 2}-AC and FeCl{sub 3}-AC were produced during oxidation treatment. The measurement of modified AC's mercury adsorption capacity was conducted in a simulated coal-fired flue gas by adsorbing test apparatus. TCLP and column leaching methods were used to test the stability of mercury adsorbed on ACs. The results indicate that the oxidation treatment changed the pore structure of the AC and modified the carbon surface by creating chemical components such as MnO{sub 4}{sup -}, Mn{sup 4+}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Fe{sup 3+} Cl{sup -}, etc. The Hg sorption capacity on MnO{sub 2}-AC or FeCl3-AC was about three times higher than that of untreated carbon. In addition, the mercury control cost of each of the formers was about the half cost of the untreated carbon. The stability of Hg absorption was studied. It was found that mercury adsorbed on the oxidation treated AC was not better than that of untreated carbon. It could be concluded that the insoluble form of Hg is very important to the stability of mercury adsorbed on AC. This study suggests that the FeCl3-AC is the best absorbent for Hg with high adsorption capacity, better Hg adsorption stability in leaching environment, and lower cost among the three ACs tested.

  14. Urban Runoff and Nutrients Loading Control from Sustainable BMPs (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Q.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change alters hydrodynamic and nutrient dynamic in both large and small geographic scales. These changes in our freshwater system directly affect drinking water, food production, business, and all aspects of our life. Along with climate change is increasing urbanization which alters natural landscape. Urban runoff has been identified as one of many potential drivers of the decline of pelagic fishes in san Francisco Bay-Delta region. Recent found of Pyrethroids in American River has increased scientists, public, and policy makers’ concern about our fresh water system. Increasing our understanding about the fundamental hydrodynamic, nutrient dynamics, and the transport mechanics of runoff and nutrients are important for future water resource and ecosystem management. Urbanization has resulted in significantly increasing the amount of impervious land cover. Most impervious land covers are hydrophobic that alters surface runoff because of the effects on surface retention storage, rainfall interception, and infiltration. Large volumes of excess storm runoff from urbanized areas cause flooding, water pollution, groundwater recharge deficits, destroyed habitat, beach closures, and toxicity to aquatic organisms. Parking lot alone accounts for more than 11% of these impervious surfaces. Contrast to impervious parking lot, turfgrass can accouter for 12% of urban land in California. Irrigated urban landscapes create considerable benefits to our daily living. However, the use of fertilizers and pesticides has caused environmental problems. Preventing fertilizers and pesticides from entering storm drains is an important goal for both landscape and storm runoff managers. Studies of urban runoff have found that the most fertilizers and pesticides are from dry weather runoff which conveys pollutants to sidewalks, streets, and storm drains. Controlling surface runoff is critical to preventing these pollutants from entering storm drains and water bodies. Large scale

  15. Single-pass continuous-flow leach test of PNL 76-68 glass: some selected Bead Leach I results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, D.G.

    1981-01-22

    A single-pass continuous-flow leach test of PNL 76-68 glass beads (7 mm dia) was concluded after 420 days of uninterrupted operation. Variables included in the experimental matrix were flow-rate, leachant composition, and temperature. Analysis was conducted on all leachate samples for /sup 237/Np and /sup 239/Pu as well as a number of nonradioactive elements. Results indicated that flow-rate and leachant systematically affected the leach rate, but only slightly. Temperature effects were significant. Plutonium leach rate was lower at higher temperature suggesting that Pu sorption onto the beads was enhanced at the higher temperature. The range of leach rates for all analyzed elements (except Pu), at both temperature, at all three flow rates, and with all three leachant compositions varied only three orders of magnitude. The range of variables used in this experiment covered those expected in many proposed repository environments. The preliminary interpretation of the results also indicated that matrix dissolution may be the dominant leaching mechanism, at least for Np in bicarbonate leachant. Regardless of the leaching mechanism the importance of this study is that it bounds the effects of repository environments when the ground water is oxidizing and when it doesn't reach the waste form until the waste has cooled to ambient rock temperature.

  16. Modelling the response of soil and runoff chemistry to forest harvesting in a low deposition area (Kangasvaara, eastern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kämäri

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple dynamic soil model developed to analyse the effects of atmospheric deposition and nutrient cycling on terrestrial ecosystems, SMART 2, was applied to the Kangasvaara catchment in eastern Finland. Given the historical deposition and forest growth patterns and reasonable values for the input parameters, SMART 2 was calibrated successfully to reproduce present-day soil and Kangasvaara catchment on the soil and runoff water chemistry under a future deposition scenario (GRP scenario. These impacts were also compared to the effects of further reducing the deposition of sulphur and nitrate under the maximum feasible reduction (MFR scenario. The model demonstrates the consequences of breaking the nutrient cycle, and predicts that final cutting results in increased leaching of inorganic nitrogen and base cations from the cut part of the catchment for about 10 years. The resulting concentrations in the stream will depend on the ability of the buffer zones surrounding the stream to capture and utilize these nutrients.

  17. Geometric dependency of Tibetan lakes on glacial runoff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan Hien, V.; Lindenbergh, R.C.; Menenti, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan plateau is an essential source of water for South-East Asia. The run-off from its ~ 34 000 glaciers, which occupy an area of ~ 50 000 km2, feed Tibetan lakes and major Asian rivers like Indus and Brahmaputra. Reported glacial shrinkage likely has its impact on the run-off. Unfortunately,

  18. Geometric dependency of Tibetan lakes on glacial runoff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan Hien, V.; Lindenbergh, R.C.; Menenti, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is an essential source of water for Southeast Asia. The runoff from its ~34 000 glaciers, which occupy an area of ~50 000 km2, feeds Tibetan lakes and major Asian rivers like the Indus and Brahmaputra. Reported glacial shrinkage likely has an impact on the runoff. Unfortunately,

  19. Runoff Characterization and Variations at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-13

    can potentially migrate into the permeable thawed ground and into the drainage channels during runoff. A review of the runoff data collection and...sensors. 7. We used long nails /stakes to center the sensor in the ditch as best as pos- sible (Figure A4a). 8. We installed stake upstream and

  20. Curve number estimation from Brazilian Cerrado rainfall and runoff data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Curve Number (CN) method has been widely used to estimate runoff from rainfall events in Brazil, however, CN values for use in the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) are poorly documented. In this study we used experimental plots to measure natural rainfall-driven rates of runoff under undisturbed Cerr...

  1. Modeling tropical river runoff:A time dependent approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashmi Nigam; Sudhir Nigam; Sushil K.Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting of rainfall and subsequent river runoff is important for many operational problems and applications related to hydrol-ogy. Modeling river runoff often requires rigorous mathematical analysis of vast historical data to arrive at reasonable conclusions. In this paper we have applied the stochastic method to characterize and predict river runoff of the perennial Kulfo River in south-ern Ethiopia. The time series analysis based auto regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) approach is applied to mean monthly runoff data with 10 and 20 years spans. The varying length of the input runoff data is shown to influence the forecasting efficiency of the stochastic process. Preprocessing of the runoff time series data indicated that the data do not follow a seasonal pattern. Our forecasts were made using parsimonious non seasonal ARIMA models and the results were compared to actual 10-year and 20-year mean monthly runoff data of the Kulfo River. Our results indicate that river runoff forecasts based upon the 10-year data are more accurate and efficient than the model based on the 20-year time series.

  2. Specifics of surface runoff contents and treatment in large cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Chechevichkin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The degree of surface runoff pollution in large cities has been assessed in modern conditions in the case study of production sites of St. Petersburg. Increased content of petroleum derivatives and heavy metal ions both in rainwater runoff and especially in snowmelt runoff has been revealed. It has been established that the composition of infiltration runoff from the newly built-up sites within the city limits commonly depends on their background, especially in the places of former unauthorized dumps, which are usually buried under the building sites. The content of petroleum derivatives in such surface runoff can exceed significantly their content in the runoff of landfills. Most petroleum derivatives appear in the surface runoff as emulsified and associated with suspended matters forms, which are a source of secondary pollution of waste water as it is accumulated in settlers and traps of local waste water treatment plants. Filtrational-sorptive technologies of surface runoff treatment are the most effective and simple in terms of both treatment and waste disposal.

  3. Microchannels affect runoff and sediment yield from a shortgrass prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runoff and sediment yield from rangelands are extremely important variables that affect productivity, but are difficult to quantify. Studies have been conducted to assess erosion on rangelands, but very little has been done to determine if microchannels (rills) affect runoff and sediment yield. Rain...

  4. Herbicide volatilization trumps runoff losses, a multi-year investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface runoff and volatilization are two processes critical to herbicide off-site transport. To determine the relevance of these off-site transport mechanisms, runoff and turbulent vapor fluxes were simultaneously monitored on the same site for eight years. Site location, herbicide formulations, ...

  5. CONTROLLING EXCESS STORM WATER RUNOFF WITH TRADABLE CREDITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development that increases the impervious surface in a watershed causes excess storm water runoff (SWR) that has been identified as a major contributor to stream and riparian habitat degradation. Reduction of storm water runoff can be achieved through establishment of a number of...

  6. Genesis of ion-adsorption type REE ores in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanematsu, K.; Yoshiaki, K.; Watanabe, Y.

    2012-04-01

    anomalies reflecting a redox condition during weathering. The upper part of the profile is a leached zone characterized by positive Ce anomaly and lower REE contents compared with the parent granite. This indicates that acidic soil water in an oxidizing condition immobilized Ce4+ as CeO2 and transported REE3+ downward. In contrast, the lower part of the profile is an accumulation zone characterized by negative Ce anomaly and higher REE contents. This indicates that the transported REE3+ (depleted in Ce) were adsorbed onto weathering products and/or distributed into secondary minerals such as rhabdophane. This immobilization of REE results from the increase of pH and subsequent decrease of REE solubility due to the contact with higher pH groundwater. Percentages of adsorbed REE to whole-rock REE are also higher in the accumulation zone than in the leached zone. As the majority of REE in the weathered granites are present in the ion-adsorption phase with negative Ce anomaly, the percentages of adsorbed REE are positively correlated with the whole-rock negative Ce anomaly. Although fractionation of LREE/HREE is controlled by the occurrences of REE-bearing minerals and adsorption by weathering products, the ion-adsorption phase tends to be enriched in LREE relative to whole-rock compositions of weathered granites.

  7. Blind Inlet as a Possible Technology for the Remediation of Phosphorus from Surface Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmlechner, M.; Wu, X.; Livingston, S.; Klik, A.; Huang, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element for plant life, but too much P in runoff water can cause eutrophication and harmful algal blooms. Hence, mitigation of agricultural P losses into the water cycle is a very important issue. In-stream P treatment is difficult to implement because the large amount of storm runoff needs to be treated in short durations. In this research, we evaluated the potential to use blind inlet as an in-field P treatment technology. A box system was built to simulate hydrological and chemical processes occurring in a blind inlet. Current blind inlets, which are already installed in the field, use a bed of limestone with a sand/pea gravel layer on the top. In this study, steel slags has been tested, which has a very high P sorption potential, as the filter media through a series of adsorption and desorption experiments. The P mass balance results are compared with the limestone material used in current blind inlet construction. The total mass of P which was absorbed by the limestone was 14 % of the P input into the system whereas 26 % P was absorbed by the steel slags. Therefore the steel slags show potential to sequester dissolved P. Additional research is on-going to come up with a design criteria for field implementation.

  8. Kinetics of the Carbonate Leaching for Calcium Metavanadate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyang Shi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The sodium salt roasting process was widely used for extracting vanadium due to its high yield rate of vanadium. However, the serious pollution was a problem. The calcium roasting process was environmentally friendly, but the yield rate of vanadium was relatively lower. Focusing on the calcium metavanadate produced in the calcium roasting process of vanadium minerals, the mechanism of the carbonate leaching for calcium metavanadate and its leaching kinetics of calcium metavanadate were studied. With the increase of the leaching agent content, the decrease of the particle size, the increase of the temperature and the increase of the reaction time, the leaching rate of vanadium increased, and the constant of reaction rate increased. In the carbonate leaching process, the calcium carbonate was globular and attached to the surface of calcium metavanadate. In the solution containing bicarbonate radical, lots of cracks formed in the dissolution process. However, the cracks were relatively fewer in the solution containing carbonate. In the present study, the carbonate leaching for calcium metavanadate was controlled by diffusion, the activation energy reached maximum and minimum in the sodium bicarbonate and the sodium carbonate solution, respectively. The activation energy value in the ammonium bicarbonate solution was between those two solutions. The kinetic equations of the carbonate leaching for calcium metavanadate were as follows: 1 − 2/3η − (1 − η2/3 = 4.39[Na2CO3]0.75/r0 × exp(−2527.06/Tt; 1 − 2/3η − (1 − η2/3 = 7.89[NaHCO3]0.53/r0 × exp(−2530.67/Tt; 1 − 2/3η − (1 − η2/3 = 6.78[NH4HCO3]0.69/r0 × exp(−2459.71/Tt.

  9. Hillslope soil erosion and runoff model for natural rainfall events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanyu Zhang; Guohua Zhang; Changqing Zuo; Xiaoyu Pi

    2008-01-01

    By using the momentum theorem and water balance principle, basic equations of slope runoff were derived, soil erosion by raindrop splash and runoff were discussed and a model was established for decribing hillslope soil erosion processes. The numerical solution of the model was obtained by adopting the Preissmann format and considering the common solution-determining conditions, from which not only the runoff and soil erosion but also their processes can be described. The model was validated by ten groups of observation data of Soil Conservation Ecological Science and Technology Demonstration Park of Jiangxi Province. Comparisons show that the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental data is about 10.98% for total runoff and 15% for total erosion, 5.2% for runoff process and 6.1% for erosion process, indicating that the model is conceptually realistic and reliable and offers a feasible approach for further studies on the soil erosion process.

  10. MODELING OF STORM WATER RUNOFF FROM GREEN ROOFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Burszta-Adamiak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Apart from direct measurements, modelling of runoff from green roofs is valuable source of information about effectiveness of this type of structure from hydrological point of view. Among different type of models, the most frequently used are numerical models. They allow to assess the impact of green roofs on decrease and attenuation of runoff, reduction of peak runoff and value of water retention. This paper presents preliminary results of research on computing the rate of runoff from green roofs using GARDENIA model. The analysis has been carried out for selected rainfall events registered during measuring campaign on pilot-scale green roofs. Obtained results are promising and show good fit between observed and simulated runoff.

  11. Improving catchment scale water quality modelling with continuous high resolution monitoring of metals in runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Markus; Rossi, Pekka; Blomberg von der Geest, Kalle; Mäkinen, Ari; Postila, Heini; Marttila, Hannu

    2017-04-01

    High metal concentrations in natural waters is one of the key environmental and health problems globally. Continuous in-situ analysis of metals from runoff water is technically challenging but essential for the better understanding of processes which lead to pollutant transport. Currently, typical analytical methods for monitoring elements in liquids are off-line laboratory methods such as ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy) and ICP-MS (ICP combined with a mass spectrometer). Disadvantage of the both techniques is time consuming sample collection, preparation, and off-line analysis at laboratory conditions. Thus use of these techniques lack possibility for real-time monitoring of element transport. We combined a novel high resolution on-line metal concentration monitoring with catchment scale physical hydrological modelling in Mustijoki river in Southern Finland in order to study dynamics of processes and form a predictive warning system for leaching of metals. A novel on-line measurement technique based on micro plasma emission spectroscopy (MPES) is tested for on-line detection of selected elements (e.g. Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd and Pb) in runoff waters. The preliminary results indicate that MPES can sufficiently detect and monitor metal concentrations from river water. Water and Soil Assessment Tool (SWAT) catchment scale model was further calibrated with high resolution metal concentration data. We show that by combining high resolution monitoring and catchment scale physical based modelling, further process studies and creation of early warning systems, for example to optimization of drinking water uptake from rivers, can be achieved.

  12. Mapping dominant runoff processes: an evaluation of different approaches using similarity measures and synthetic runoff simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonetti, Manuel; Buss, Rahel; Scherrer, Simon; Margreth, Michael; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2016-07-01

    The identification of landscapes with similar hydrological behaviour is useful for runoff and flood predictions in small ungauged catchments. An established method for landscape classification is based on the concept of dominant runoff process (DRP). The various DRP-mapping approaches differ with respect to the time and data required for mapping. Manual approaches based on expert knowledge are reliable but time-consuming, whereas automatic GIS-based approaches are easier to implement but rely on simplifications which restrict their application range. To what extent these simplifications are applicable in other catchments is unclear. More information is also needed on how the different complexities of automatic DRP-mapping approaches affect hydrological simulations. In this paper, three automatic approaches were used to map two catchments on the Swiss Plateau. The resulting maps were compared to reference maps obtained with manual mapping. Measures of agreement and association, a class comparison, and a deviation map were derived. The automatically derived DRP maps were used in synthetic runoff simulations with an adapted version of the PREVAH hydrological model, and simulation results compared with those from simulations using the reference maps. The DRP maps derived with the automatic approach with highest complexity and data requirement were the most similar to the reference maps, while those derived with simplified approaches without original soil information differed significantly in terms of both extent and distribution of the DRPs. The runoff simulations derived from the simpler DRP maps were more uncertain due to inaccuracies in the input data and their coarse resolution, but problems were also linked with the use of topography as a proxy for the storage capacity of soils. The perception of the intensity of the DRP classes also seems to vary among the different authors, and a standardised definition of DRPs is still lacking. Furthermore, we argue not to use

  13. Flood damage claims reveal insights about surface runoff in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, D. B.; Prasuhn, V.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    A few case studies in Switzerland exemplify that not only overtopping water bodies frequently cause damages to buildings. Reportedly, a large share of the total loss due to flooding in Switzerland goes back to surface runoff that is formed and is propagating outside of regular watercourses. Nevertheless, little is known about when, where and why such surface runoff occurs. The described process encompasses surface runoff formation, followed by unchannelised overland flow until a water body is reached. It is understood as a type of flash flood, has short response times and occurs diffusely in the landscape. Thus, the process is difficult to observe and study directly. A promising source indicating surface runoff indirectly are houseowners' damage claims recorded by Swiss Public Insurance Companies for Buildings (PICB). In most of Switzerland, PICB hold a monopoly position and insure (almost) every building. Consequently, PICB generally register all damages to buildings caused by an insured natural hazard (including surface runoff) within the respective zones. We have gathered gapless flood related claim records of most of all Swiss PICB covering more than the last two decades on average. Based on a subset, we have developed a methodology to differentiate claims related to surface runoff from other causes. This allows us to assess the number of claims as well as total loss related to surface runoff and compare these to the numbers of overtopping watercourses. Furthermore, with the good data coverage, we are able to analyze surface runoff related claims in space and time, from which we can infer spatial and temporal characteristics of surface runoff. Although the delivered data of PICB are heterogeneous and, consequently, time-consuming to harmonize, our first results show that exploiting these damage claim records is feasible and worthwhile to learn more about surface runoff in Switzerland.

  14. What Controls Runoff Ratios in the Congo Basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, M. T.; Wei, R.

    2014-12-01

    As the second-largest river globally, the Congo is a critical part of large-scale water, energy, and carbon cycles, and thus has a significant influence on regional climate. The runoff ratio is a coefficient relating runoff to precipitation; it is a parameter that integrates and summarizes upstream hydrologic processes. The Budyko equation depicts the expected partitioning of precipitation (P) into evapotranspiration (E) and runoff (R): P=R+E. It is hypothesized that radiation and precipitation are primary controls of the partitioning process; the effects of the surface control (e.g. soil and slope) are implicitly assumed to be minor. In this study, we explored thirty years of data in the Congo River basin. We will correlate the runoff ratio to a variety of factors, including precipitation, radiation and surface controls (e.g. soil, slope). Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) by pentad precipitation was used as primary precipitation data, and Climatic Research Unit (CRU) by data was used for comparison. For discharge and drainage area were derived from Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC), and net radiation is from NASA Earth Observatory. Congo sub basins are analyzed as well. Interannual variability in the runoff ratio for the Congo basin ranged from 0.2 to 0.3, but was generally uncorrelated with precipitation. Runoff is generally uncorrelated with precipitation, whereas evapotranspiration calculated as residual (P-R) is highly correlated with precipitation, with E ranging from 1000 to 1300 mm per year, and P explaining 85% of the variance. Spatial variability was explored by analysis of long-term mean runoff ratio for 10 sub-basins. Spatially, both R and runoff ratio are highly correlated with P, with P explaining 59% of the variance in the runoff ratio. Physical mechanisms to explain these results are explored, and the implications for the Congo's role in partitioning rainfall over sub-Saharan Africa are discussed.

  15. Molybdate adsorption from steel slag eluates by subsoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matern, K; Rennert, T; Mansfeldt, T

    2013-11-01

    Steel slags are industrial by-products which are generated in large amounts worldwide, e.g. 150-230×10(6) Mg in 2012, and which are partly used for construction. Molybdenum (Mo) can be added during steel processing in order to harden the steel. The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption behaviour of molybdate (MoO4(2-)) from slag eluates in subsoils. Molybdate batch adsorption experiments were carried out with eluates obtained from two different kinds of steel slags (i) LD slag (Linz-Donawitz operation, LDS) and (ii) electric arc furnace slag (EAF) to assess the risk that may arise from the contamination of groundwater by the leaching of molybdate. Six different subsoils were chosen in order to provide a wide range of chemical properties (pH 4.0-7.6; dithionite-extractable Fe 0.73-14.7 g kg(-1)). Molybdate adsorption experiments were carried out at the pH of the steel slag eluates (pH 11-12) as well as at pH values adjusted to the soil pH. The data were evaluated with the Freundlich equation. Molybdate adsorption exhibited a maximum near pH 4 for steel slag eluates adjusted to the soil pH, and decreased rapidly with increasing pH until adsorption was virtually zero at pH>11. Adsorption was greater for soils with high amounts of dithionite-extractable Fe oxides. The extent and behaviour of molybdate adsorption from both eluates was similar. After a reaction time of 24h, the pH of the EAF slag eluate was lower than that of the LD steel slag eluate, which was caused by different acid buffer capacities. Some soils were able to decrease the pH of the EAF slag eluates by about 4 pH units, enhancing the adsorption of molybdate. Transport simulations indicated that molybdate discharge is low in acidic soils.

  16. Removal of I by adsorption with AgX (Ag-impregnated X Zeolite) from high-radioactive seawater waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eil Hee; Lee, Keun Young; Kim, Kwang Wook; Kim, Hyung Ju; Kim, Ik Soo; Chung, Dong Yong; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study aimed to the adsorption-removal of high- radioactive iodide (I) contained in the initially generated high-radioactive seawater waste (HSW), with the use of AgX (Ag-impregnated X zeolite). Adsorption of I by AgX (hereafter denoted as AgX-I adsorption) was increased by increasing the Ag-impregnated concentration in AgX, and its concentration was suitable at about 30 wt%. Because of AgCl precipitation by chloride ions contained in seawater waste, the leaching yields of Ag from AgX (Ag-impregnated concentration : about 30-35 wt%) was less than those in distilled water (< 1 mg/L). AgX-I adsorption was above 99% in the initial iodide concentration (Ci) of 0.01-10 mg/L at m/V (ratio of weight of adsorbent to solution volume)=2.5 g/L. This shows that efficient removal of I is possible. AgX-I adsorption was found to be more effective in distilled water than in seawater waste, and the influence of solution temperature was insignificant. Ag-I adsorption was better described by a Freundlich isotherm rather than a Langmuir isotherm. AgX-I adsorption kinetics can be expressed by a pseudo-second order rate equation. The adsorption rate constants (k2) decreased by increasing Ci, and conversely increased by increasing the ratio of m/V and the solution temperature. This time, the activation energy of AgX-I adsorption was about 6.3 kJ/mol. This suggests that AgX-I adsorption is dominated by physical adsorption with weaker bonds. The evaluation of thermodynamic parameters (a negative Gibbs free energy and a positive Enthalpy) indicates that AgX-I adsorption is a spontaneous reaction (forward reaction), and an endothermic reaction indicating that higher temperatures are favored.

  17. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  18. Polymer structure modifications for immersion leaching and watermark control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Oh, Seung Keun; Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Sang Hyang; Jeong, Young Ho; Kim, Sang Soo; Park, Myoung Hwan; Kim, Deogbae; Kim, Jaehyun; Lee, Geunsu; Moon, Seung-Chan

    2006-03-01

    Immersion materials have to overcome immersion-issues for successful wet process introduction to semiconductor mass production. Component-leaching issue is one of the most influential wet process huddles, which is related to immersion-liquid and projection lens contamination as well as resist patterning performances. In this paper, we will introduce our experimental results of leaching blocking effects resulted from the modification of polymer and additive structures and from the application of top surface blocking layers. PAG-leaching level of resist film formed of low Tg resin shows the highest meanwhile that of high Tg resin is the smallest leaching value. The interaction forces between additives and resin platforms are the most important to prevent additives leaching to immersion liquid. We have tested 3 different types of resin structures to modify the interaction forces between resin platform and resist components especially PAG molecules and photo-generated acid molecules. We changed 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate(2-HEMA) contents to be 5, 10, 15% in our base resin, COMA-acrylate hybrid system to modify the hydrophilicity of resist platforms. By mimicking immersion process to obtain wet-performance of their resists we have obtained relative value of component-leaching. Interaction-force between resist platform and PAG was seemed to be largest when resist component-leaching is least so that the pattern profiles become to be vertical. It was appeared that the 5% 2-HEMA containing resin and TPS-Nonaflate PAG system showed the best performance because of its low leaching resulted from their strong interaction forces. Another polymer parameter to determine the component-diffusivity is glass transition temperature, Tg. Low Tg means high mobility of resin by small thermal energy due to high free volume contents inside of the resist film which can act as diffusion pathways of resist components. 10% MA resin system shows the lowest Tg, around 140 degrees C and the most

  19. Sodium sulfide leaching of low-grade jamesonite concentrate in production of sodium pyroantimoniate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tian-zu; JIANG Ming-xi; LAI Qiong-lin; CHEN Jin-zhong

    2005-01-01

    Sodium sulfide leaching of a low-grade jamesonite concentrate in the production of sodium pyroantimoniate through the air oxidation process and the influencing factors on the leaching rate of antimony were investigated.In order to decrease the consumption of sodium sulfide and increase the concentration of antimony in the leaching solution, two-stage leaching of jamesonite concentrate and combination leaching of high-grade stibnite concentrate and jamesonite concentrate were used. The experimental results showthat the consumptions of sodium sulfide for the two-stage leaching process and the combination leaching process are decreased by 20% and 60% compared to those of one-stage leaching process respectively. The final concentrations of antimony in the leaching solutions of both processes are above 100 g/L.

  20. Kinetic process of oxidative leaching of chalcopyrite under low oxygen pressure and low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Ting-sheng; NIE Guang-hua; WANG Jun-feng; CUI Li-feng

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic process of oxidative leaching of chalcopyrite in chloride acid hydroxide medium under oxygen pressure and low temperature was investigated. The effect on leaching rate of chalcopyrite caused by these factors such as ore granularity, vitriol concentration, sodium chloride concentration, oxygen pressure and temperature was discussed. The results show that the leaching rate of chalcopyrite increases with decreasing the ore granularity. At the early stage of oxidative reaction, the copper leaching rate increases with increasing the oxygen pressure and dosage of vitriol concentration, while oxygen pressure affects leaching less at the later stage. At low temperature, the earlier oxidative leaching process of chalcopyrite is controlled by chemical reactions while the later one by diffusion. The chalcopyrite oxidative leaching rate has close relation with ion concentration in the leaching solution. The higher ion concentration is propitious for chalcopyrite leaching.

  1. Experimental Study of Preferential Solute Transportation During Dump Leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Sheng-hua; WU Ai-xiang

    2006-01-01

    The production of dump leaching of the Dexing Copper Mine was affected by a preferential solution flow. Formative mechanism of the preferential solution flow was investigated by analyzing the relationship between both dump permeability and surface tension and ore diameter. The preferential solution flow occurred in the fine ore area when the application rate was low. The preferential solution flow entered into the coarse ore area because the negative pore water pressure disappeared with an increase of the application rate. The preferential solute transportation experiment was conducted by selecting NaCl as mineral. Results of the experiment showed that the concentration of the outflow solution reduced over time. The concentration of the coarse ore area outflow solution was greater than that of the fine ore area. The process of NaCl leaching can be divided into two stages. NaCl was carried out directly by diffusion-convection during the first stage, so the leaching rate increased sharply. But in the second stage, only a small amount of NaCl dissolved in the immobile water. The leaching rate increased slowly because NaCl, dissolved in the immobile water, can only be leached by diffusion.

  2. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  3. Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudeen, David Keith; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

  4. Leaching hydrodynamics of weathered elution-deposited rare earth ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Both porosity (φ) and permeability (k) of the weathered elution-deposited rare earth ores are basic hydrodynamic parameters for RE leaching. The relationship between k and φ of two typical rare earth ores of South China in the packed bed was investigated by measuring the flow (Q) under various leaching pressure difference (Δp). The experimental results show that the relationship between k and φ is unique, moreover the relationship between Q and Δp is in accord with the Darcy's law. The effects of the type of ores, the leaching reagents and its concentration, the granule ore size on the leaching permeability have also been investigated. It is demonstrated that kH (for heavy RE ore, kH=35.98 mm2)>kM-H (for middle-heavy RE ore,kM-H=28.50 mm2), whereas k(NH4NO3)>k(NH4Cl)>k[(NH4)2SO4], and the k value increases with increasing leaching reagents concentration and granule ore size(k0.60~0.75 mm=99.96 mm2,k0.125~0.60 mm=11.83 mm2, k0.074~0.125 mm=0.84 mm2).

  5. Assessment of leaching potential of highly leaded jewelry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhamer, Jeffrey D; Newman, Breinn E; Clever, Ashley

    2010-05-15

    Lead is a potent neurotoxin particularly toxic to young children, and in response to recent poisonings of children and high levels of lead contamination in children's jewelry, US regulatory standards for lead content in these items have become much more stringent. Parents are often advised to throw out suspect items in the trash. While household wastes are generally exempt from consideration as hazardous waste, the potential for leaching of hazardous quantities of lead from such items is unknown. A modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), in which intact jewelry components were subjected to leaching, was used to evaluate the potential for leaching of lead from highly leaded jewelry. Of 62 jewelry components tested, 61 exceeded the US regulatory standard for lead of 5mg/L, and leachate lead concentrations averaged 1460 mg/L. Twenty-six of the component items tested yielded TCLP lead concentrations exceeding 1000 mg/L. These results demonstrate that highly leaded jewelry items may leach significant amounts of lead, and provide another reason to remove lead from these products. Furthermore, these results suggest that while the volume of such items in the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream is small, they have the potential to contribute significant quantities of lead to MSW leachates.

  6. Alkaline Leaching of Low Zinc Content Iron-Bearing Sludges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargul K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Various types of waste materials containing zinc (e.g. dusts and sludges from gas dedusting process are obtained in steel industry. The contents of Zn in these materials may vary considerably. Even a low concentration of zinc in recirculated products precludes their recycling in ferrous metallurgy aggregates. Long storage of this type of material can lead to contamination of soil and water by zinc compounds which can be leached out by acid rain, for example. This paper focuses on research involving alkaline leaching tests of low zinc content iron-bearing materials. These tests were preceded by the analysis of the elemental, phase and grain size composition, and analysis of the thermodynamic conditions of the leaching process. The main aim of research was to decrease the content of the zinc in the sludge to the level where it is suitable as an iron-bearing material for iron production (~1% Zn. Leaching at elevated temperatures (368 K, 60 min has led to a decrease in the zinc content in the sludge of about 66%. The research revealed that long hour leaching (298 K, 100 hours carried out at ambient temperatures caused a reduction in zinc content by 60% to the value of 1.15-1.2% Zn.

  7. Simultaneous leaching and carbon sequestration in constrained aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Won; Cho, Kyu-Seong; Moberly, James G; Roh, Yul; Phelps, Tommy J

    2011-12-01

    The behavior of metal ions' leaching and precipitated mineral phases of metal-rich fly ash (FA) was examined in order to evaluate microbial impacts on carbon sequestration and metal immobilization. The leaching solutions consisted of aerobic deionized water (DW) and artificial eutrophic water (AEW) that was anaerobic, organic- and mineral-rich, and higher salinity as is typical of bottom water in eutrophic algae ponds. The Fe- and Ca-rich FAs were predominantly composed of quartz, mullite, portlandite, calcite, hannebachite, maghemite, and hematite. After 86 days, only Fe and Ca contents exhibited a decrease in leaching solutions while other major and trace elements showed increasing or steady trends in preference to the type of FA and leaching solution. Ca-rich FA showed strong carbon sequestration efficiency ranging up to 32.3 g CO(2)/kg FA after 86 days, corresponding to almost 65% of biotic carbon sequestration potential under some conditions. Variations in the properties of FAs such as chemical compositions, mineral constituents as well as the type of leaching solution impacted CO(2) capture. Even though the relative amount of calcite increased sixfold in the AEW and the relative amount of mineral phase reached 37.3 wt% using Ca-rich FA for 86 days, chemical sequestration did not accomplish simultaneous precipitation and sequestration of several heavy metals.

  8. Leaching characteristics of fly ash from Chinese medical waste incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhongxin; Xiao, Gang

    2012-03-01

    Many of the characteristics of typical medical waste ash can be found by using ash leaching experiments. The present study investigated the characteristics of fly ash derived from incineration of medical waste in China. The particle diameter of the fly ash was in the range 154-900 μm. Elemental analyses of the fly ash indicated that it contained calcium, aluminium, iron, sodium, potassium and magnesium, and that copper, lead, chromium and mercury were the dominant heavy metals it contained. As leaching time was increased the leaching concentrations of the heavy metals increased and the leaching toxicity was augmented. When the pH was neutral, the concentrations of most heavy metals in the leachate were minimum whereas when the pH was alkali or acid, the leaching toxicity was greatly enhanced. High temperature melting was found to be a good method of fixing heavy metals, and the main components of the sinter were Fe3O4, SiO2, CaSO4 and CaSiO3, etc.

  9. Simultaneous leaching and carbon sequestration in constrained aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Moon, Ji Won [ORNL; Roh, Yul [Chonnam National University, Gwangju; Cho, Kyu Seong [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of metal ions leaching and precipitated mineral phases of metal-rich fly ash (FA) was examined in order to evaluate microbial impacts on carbon sequestration and metal immobilization. The leaching solutions consisted of aerobic deionized water (DW) and artificial eutrophic water (AEW) that was anaerobic, organic- and mineral-rich, and higher salinity as is typical of bottom water in eutrophic algae ponds. The Fe- and Ca-rich FAs were predominantly composed of quartz, mullite, portlandite, calcite, hannebachite, maghemite, and hematite. After 86 days, only Fe and Ca contents exhibited a decrease in leaching solutions while other major and trace elements showed increasing or steady trends in preference to the type of FA and leaching solution. Ca-rich FA showed strong carbon sequestration efficiency ranging up to 32.3 g CO(2)/kg FA after 86 days, corresponding to almost 65% of biotic carbon sequestration potential under some conditions. Variations in the properties of FAs such as chemical compositions, mineral constituents as well as the type of leaching solution impacted CO(2) capture. Even though the relative amount of calcite increased sixfold in the AEW and the relative amount of mineral phase reached 37.3 wt% using Ca-rich FA for 86 days, chemical sequestration did not accomplish simultaneous precipitation and sequestration of several heavy metals.

  10. Removal of copper from acid wastewater of bioleaching by adsorption onto ramie residue and uptake by Trichoderma viride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Buyun; Wang, Kai

    2013-05-01

    A continuous batch bioleaching was built to realize the bioleaching of sewage sludge in large scale. In the treatment, heavy metal in acid wastewater of bioleaching was removed by adsorption onto ramie residue. Then, acid wastewater was reused in next bioleaching batch. In this way, most time and water of bioleaching was saved and leaching efficiency of copper, lead and chromium kept at a high level in continuous batch bioleaching. It was found that residual heavy metal in sewage sludge is highly related to that in acid wastewater after bioleaching. To get a high leaching efficiency, concentration of heavy metal in acid wastewater should be low. Adsorption of copper from acid wastewater onto ramie residue can be described by pseudo first-order kinetics equation and Freundlich isotherm model. Trichoderma viride has the potential to be used for the concentration and recovery of heavy metal adsorbed onto ramie residue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Runoff prediction in ungauged basins: synthesis across processes, places and scales

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blöschl, Günter

    2013-01-01

    "Predicting water runoff in ungauged water catchment areas is vital to practical applications such as the design of drainage infrastructure and flooding defences, runoff forecasting, and for catchment...

  12. Preparation and characterization of TiO2/acid leached serpentinite tailings composites and their photocatalytic reduction of chromium(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiming; Zheng, Liming; Zheng, Shuilin; Frost, Ray L

    2013-08-15

    Composite TiO2/acid leached serpentine tailings (AST) were synthesized through the hydrolysis-deposition method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and surface area measurement (BET). The XRD analysis showed that TiO2 coated on the surface of acid leached serpentine tailings was mixed crystal phases of rutile and anatase, the grain size of which is 10-30 nm. SEM, TEM, and EDS analysis exhibited that nano-TiO2 particles were deposited on the surface and internal cavities of acid leaching serpentine tailings. The XPS and FT-IR analysis demonstrated that the coating process of TiO2 on AST was a physical adsorption process. The large specific surface area, porous structure, and plentiful surface hydroxyl group of TiO2/AST composite resulted in the high adsorption capacity of Cr(VI). The experimental results demonstrated that initial concentration of Cr(VI), the amount of the catalyst, and pH greatly influenced the removal efficiency of Cr(VI). The removal kinetics of Cr(VI) at a relative low initial concentration was fitted well with Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics model with R(2) value of about unity. The as-prepared composites exhibited strong adsorption and photocatalytic capacity for the removal of Cr(VI), and the possible photocatalytic reduction mechanism was studied. The photodecomposition of Cr(VI) was as high as 95% within 2h, and the reusability of the photocatalysis was proven.

  13. The impacts of conifer harvesting on runoff water quality: a regional survey for Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Major, minor and trace element chemistry of runoff at stormflow and baseflow from 67 catchments (2 to 5 ha in area has been determined to investigate the effects of clear felling and replanting of conifers on stream water quality across Wales. Samples, collected by local forestry workers (Forest Enterprise staff on a campaign basis on up to eight occasions, were for 16 mature first rotation standing forest: the remainder represented areas completely clear felled from less than one to up to forty years previously. As the waters drain acidic and acid sensitive soils, acidic runoff is often encountered. However, higher pH values with associated positive alkalinities and base cation enrichments are observed due to the influence of weathering reactions within the bedrock. There is little systematic variation in water quality between baseflow and stormflow for each site indicating a complex and erratic contribution of waters from the soil and underlying parent material. 80% or more of the data points show hardly any changes with felling time, but there are a few outlier points with much higher concentrations that provide important information on the processes operative. The clearest outlier felling response is for nitrate at five of the more recently felled sites on brown earth, gley and podzolic soil types. ANC, the prime indicator of stream acidity, shows a diverse response from both high to low outlier values (>+400 to -300 μEq/l. In parallel to nitrate, aluminium, potassium and barium concentrations are higher in waters sampled up to 4 years post felling, but the time series response is even less clear than that for nitrate. Cadmium, zinc and lead and lanthanides/actinides show large variations from site to site due to localized vein ore-mineralization in the underlying bedrock. The survey provides a strong indication that forest harvesting can have marked local effects on some chemical components of runoff for the first four years after felling

  14. The impacts of conifer harvesting on runoff water quality: a regional survey for Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C.; Reynolds, B.; Wilkinson, J.; Hill, T.; Neal, M.; Hill, S.; Harrow, M.

    Major, minor and trace element chemistry of runoff at stormflow and baseflow from 67 catchments (2 to 5 ha in area) has been determined to investigate the effects of clear felling and replanting of conifers on stream water quality across Wales. Samples, collected by local forestry workers (Forest Enterprise staff) on a campaign basis on up to eight occasions, were for 16 mature first rotation standing forest: the remainder represented areas completely clear felled from less than one to up to forty years previously. As the waters drain acidic and acid sensitive soils, acidic runoff is often encountered. However, higher pH values with associated positive alkalinities and base cation enrichments are observed due to the influence of weathering reactions within the bedrock. There is little systematic variation in water quality between baseflow and stormflow for each site indicating a complex and erratic contribution of waters from the soil and underlying parent material. 80% or more of the data points show hardly any changes with felling time, but there are a few outlier points with much higher concentrations that provide important information on the processes operative. The clearest outlier felling response is for nitrate at five of the more recently felled sites on brown earth, gley and podzolic soil types. ANC, the prime indicator of stream acidity, shows a diverse response from both high to low outlier values (>+400 to -300 μEq/l). In parallel to nitrate, aluminium, potassium and barium concentrations are higher in waters sampled up to 4 years post felling, but the time series response is even less clear than that for nitrate. Cadmium, zinc and lead and lanthanides/actinides show large variations from site to site due to localized vein ore-mineralization in the underlying bedrock. The survey provides a strong indication that forest harvesting can have marked local effects on some chemical components of runoff for the first four years after felling but that this is

  15. Investigating causes of changes in runoff using hydrological simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Jianyun; Li, Xuemei; Bao, Zhenxin; Liu, Yanli; Liu, Cuishan; He, Ruimin; Luo, Junsong

    2017-09-01

    Stream flow plays a crucial role in environmental, social and economic contexts. It is of significance to investigate the causes of change in runoff for better water resources management. This study detects the variation trend of recorded runoff of the Gushan River, a tributary of the Yellow River located on the Loess Plateau with severe soil and water losing, and investigates the impacts of climate change and human activities on runoff using hydrological simulation approach. Results show that the recorded runoff at Gaoshiya station on the Gushan River has experienced a significant declining trend from 1954-2013 with an abrupt change occurring in 1973. SimHyd rainfall runoff model performs well for monthly discharge simulation with Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of 82.6 % and relative error of 0.32 %. Runoff depth over the catchment in 1980-2013 reduced by 52.4 mm compared to the previous period, in which human activities and climate change contribute 61.5 and 38.5 % of the total runoff reduction, respectively. However, the human-induced impact tends to increase. Therefore, efforts to improve the ecology of the Loess Plateau should give sufficient attention to the impacts of human activity.

  16. Investigating causes of changes in runoff using hydrological simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Jianyun; Li, Xuemei; Bao, Zhenxin; Liu, Yanli; Liu, Cuishan; He, Ruimin; Luo, Junsong

    2016-03-01

    Stream flow plays a crucial role in environmental, social and economic contexts. It is of significance to investigate the causes of change in runoff for better water resources management. This study detects the variation trend of recorded runoff of the Gushan River, a tributary of the Yellow River located on the Loess Plateau with severe soil and water losing, and investigates the impacts of climate change and human activities on runoff using hydrological simulation approach. Results show that the recorded runoff at Gaoshiya station on the Gushan River has experienced a significant declining trend from 1954-2013 with an abrupt change occurring in 1973. SimHyd rainfall runoff model performs well for monthly discharge simulation with Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of 82.6 % and relative error of 0.32 %. Runoff depth over the catchment in 1980-2013 reduced by 52.4 mm compared to the previous period, in which human activities and climate change contribute 61.5 and 38.5 % of the total runoff reduction, respectively. However, the human-induced impact tends to increase. Therefore, efforts to improve the ecology of the Loess Plateau should give sufficient attention to the impacts of human activity.

  17. Modelling the dissipation and leaching of two herbicides in decomposing mulch of crop residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Sohaib; Iqbal, Akhtar; Lafolie, François; Recous, Sylvie; Benoit, Pierre; Garnier, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    greater leaching from mulch than S-metolachlor because of its lower adsorption coefficients to organic mulch. Moreover, simulated results showed a much faster degradation of glyphosate but greater non-extractable residue formation for S-metolachlor. Keywords: Mulch; Pesticides; Transport; Degradation; Modeling; Pastis-mulch References Findeling, A., Garnier, P., Coppens, F., Lafolie, F., Recous, S., 2007. Modelling water, carbon and nitrogen dynamics in soil covered with decomposing mulch. European Journal of Soil Science 58, 196-206. Lashermes, G., Zhang, Y., Houot, S., Barriuso, E., Steyer, J.P., Patureau, D., Garnier, P., 2013. A model coupling organic carbon and organic pollutant dynamics during composting. Journal of Environmental Quality. In Press.

  18. Leaching of Light Rare Earth Elements from Sichuan Bastnaesite: A Facile Process to Leach Trivalent Rare Earth Elements Selectively from Tetravalent Cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yueyue; Jiang, Ying; Qiu, Xianying; Zhao, Shilin

    2017-07-01

    The effects of the nitric acid concentration, leaching time, leaching temperature, and solid-to-liquid ratio on leaching efficiency were examined. From those results, a facile process for the selective leaching of trivalent rare earth elements (RE(III)) from tetravalent cerium (Ce(IV)) was proposed. The roasted bastnaesite was used to leach 34.87% of RE(III) and 2.15% of Ce(IV) at 60°C for 0.5 h with an acid concentration of 0.5 mol/L. This selective leaching process can be described by the shrinking-core model that follows the kinetic model 1 - 2/3α - (1 - α)2/3. Subsequently, the leached slag was hydrothermally treated and followed by thorough leaching with 4.0-mol/L nitric acid. Furthermore, the specific surface area of the final leached slag is 57.7 m2/g, which is approximately 650 times higher than that of raw ore. Finally, selective leaching of RE(III) (>90%) was achieved without using an organic solvent for extraction, whereas lower value Ce(IV)was presented in the leached slag (>92%).

  19. Total probabilities of ensemble runoff forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olav Skøien, Jon; Bogner, Konrad; Salamon, Peter; Smith, Paul; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Ensemble forecasting has for a long time been used as a method in meteorological modelling to indicate the uncertainty of the forecasts. However, as the ensembles often exhibit both bias and dispersion errors, it is necessary to calibrate and post-process them. Two of the most common methods for this are Bayesian Model Averaging (Raftery et al., 2005) and Ensemble Model Output Statistics (EMOS) (Gneiting et al., 2005). There are also methods for regionalizing these methods (Berrocal et al., 2007) and for incorporating the correlation between lead times (Hemri et al., 2013). Engeland and Steinsland Engeland and Steinsland (2014) developed a framework which can estimate post-processing parameters which are different in space and time, but still can give a spatially and temporally consistent output. However, their method is computationally complex for our larger number of stations, and cannot directly be regionalized in the way we would like, so we suggest a different path below. The target of our work is to create a mean forecast with uncertainty bounds for a large number of locations in the framework of the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS - http://www.efas.eu) We are therefore more interested in improving the forecast skill for high-flows rather than the forecast skill of lower runoff levels. EFAS uses a combination of ensemble forecasts and deterministic forecasts from different forecasters to force a distributed hydrologic model and to compute runoff ensembles for each river pixel within the model domain. Instead of showing the mean and the variability of each forecast ensemble individually, we will now post-process all model outputs to find a total probability, the post-processed mean and uncertainty of all ensembles. The post-processing parameters are first calibrated for each calibration location, but assuring that they have some spatial correlation, by adding a spatial penalty in the calibration process. This can in some cases have a slight negative

  20. Ee-Leach(Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy Modified Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishita Payar,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A wireless sensor network is made by many homogeneous and/or nodes which can sense data and communicate to each other. As energy is a scarce resource in WSN, the main issue is energy efficient routing. Many flat and hierarchical protocols have been projected to enhance the network lifetime. Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH protocol is a basic energy efficient hierarchical routing protocol in WSN. In LEACH, cluster heads are selected and cluster is formed by joining non cluster head nodes. Member nodes transmit the data to respective cluster head and the cluster head is conscientious to transmit the gathered and aggregated data directly to the base station. This paper examines the performance of the conventional LEACH protocol and gives an enhancement to it for energy efficiency. The proposed protocol considers many parameters like residual energy and distance from base station etc. for cluster head selection and energy efficient routing.

  1. Assessment of weathering and leaching rates of Thule hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Outola, I. (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Nygren, U.; Ramebaeck, H. (FOI CBRN Defence and Security (Sweden)); Sidhu, R. (Institute of Energy Technology, Environmental Monitoring Section, Health and Safety Dept. (Norway))

    2010-03-15

    Within the current project a methodology for separating actinide particles originating from the Thule 1968 accident has been developed. Particles were completely isolated in water using visual and radiometric methods. The particles were attached electrostatic to a plastic support and could easily be moved to any container for leaching studies or other type of studies. Leaching and dissolution studies performed within the project indicate that some particles are relatively easily destroyed or leached while others are more refractory. The results shows that even though the oxide particles are hard to completely dissolve they release material even when exposed to weak solvents like water and salt solutions. Exposures to lung simulant fluids show relatively slow dissolution rates comparable to what is found using only water. Sequential extraction of particles shows that variation between particles is very large; some dissolve easily while some does not. Of radiological importance is the disruption of particles when exposed to dissolution. (author)

  2. Incorporating Fault Tolerance in LEACH Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudranath Mitra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Routing protocols have been a challenging issue in wireless sensor networks. WSN is one of the focussed are of research because of its multi-aspect applications. These networks are self-organized using clustering algorithms to conserve energy. LEACH (Low-Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy protocol[1] is one of the significant protocols for routing in WSN. In LEACH, sensor nodes are organized in several small clusters where there are cluster heads in each cluster. These CHs gather data from their local clusters aggregate them & send them to the base station. On the LEACH many new schemes have been proposed to enhance its activity like its efficiency, security etc. In this paper the fault tolerance issue is being incorporated.

  3. Leaching kinetics of gibbsitic bauxite with sodium hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aal El-Sayed A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results of a leaching kinetics study of bauxite ore with sodium hydroxide are presented. The effect of ore particle size, sodium hydroxide concentration and reaction temperature on the Al2O3 extraction rate was determined. The results obtained showed that 99% of Al2O3 was leached out using −200+270 mesh ore particle size at a reaction temperature of 105 °C for 60 min reaction time with 250 g/L NaOH. The solid-to-liquid ratio was maintained constant at 1:20. The results indicated that leaching of bauxite is the rate controlling process. The activation energy was determined to be 46.04 kJ/mole, which was characteristic for a chemically controlled process.

  4. Influence of soil structure on contaminant leaching from injected slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, M. G. Mostofa; Pedersen, Christina Østerballe; Forslund, Anita;

    2016-01-01

    macropore flow paths. The slurry constituents that ended up in or near the macropore flow paths of the intact soil were presumably washed out relatively quickly in the first event. For the last three events the intact soil leached fewer microorganisms than the disturbed soil due to the bypassing effect...... and persistence of nitrogen, microorganisms (bacteriophage, E. coli, and Enterococcus) and a group of steroid hormone (estrogens) were investigated after injection of swine slurry into either intact (structured) or disturbed (homogeneous repacked) soil. The slurry was injected into hexaplicate soil columns...... of water through the macropore flow path in the intact soil. Estrogen leached from the intact soil in the first event only, but for the disturbed soil it was detected in the leachates of last two events also. Leaching from the later events was attributed to higher colloid transport from the disturbed soils...

  5. Round robin testing of a percolation column leaching procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Roeland; Spooren, Jeroen; Quaghebeur, Mieke; Broos, Kris; Kenis, Cindy; Debaene, Luc

    2016-09-01

    Round robin test results of a percolation column leaching procedure (CEN/TS 14405:2004), organised by the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), over a time span of 13years with a participation of between 8 and 18 different laboratories are presented and discussed. Focus is on the leachability of heavy metals As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn from mineral waste materials. By performing statistical analyses on the obtained results, insight into the reproducibility and repeatability of the column leaching test is gathered. A ratio of 1:3 between intra- and inter-laboratory variability is found. The reproducibility of the eluates' element concentrations differ significantly between elements, materials and fractions (i.e. different liquid-to-solid ratios). The reproducibility is discussed in light of the application of the column leaching test for legal and environmental policy purposes. In addition, the performances of laboratories are compared.

  6. Stability and leaching of cobalt smelter fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vítková, Martina; Hyks, Jiri; Ettler, Vojtěch

    2013-01-01

    The leaching behaviour of fly ash from a Co smelter situated in the Zambian Copperbelt was studied as a function of pH (5–12) using the pH-static leaching test (CEN/TS 14997). Various experimental time intervals (48h and 168h) were evaluated. The leaching results were combined with the ORCHESTRA...... elements, the released concentrations were very similar after 48h and 168h, indicating near-equilibrium conditions in the system. Calcite, clinopyroxenes, quartz and amorphous phases predominated in the fly ash. Various metallic sulfides, alloys and the presence of Cu, Co and Zn in silicates and glass were...... and Cu. However, there is a high risk of Co, Cu, Pb and Zn mobility in the acidic soils around the smelter facility. Therefore, potential local options for “stabilisation” of the fly ash were evaluated on the basis of the modelling results using the PHREEQC code....

  7. BACTERIAL LEACHING OF ELECTRONIC SCRAP: INFLUENCE OF PROCESS PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Harue Yamane

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of bacterial leaching in the ore treatment is already known and also can be applied such as treatment of electronic waste to copper recovery. This paper investigates the influence of process parameters (pulp density, inoculums volume, rotation speed and initial concentration of ferrous iron on bacterial leaching of copper from printed circuit board of computers using the bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans–LR. Printed circuit boards from computers were comminuted using a hammer mill. The powder obtained was magnetically separated and the non-magnetic material used in this study. A shake flask study was carried out on the non-magnetic material using a shaker. The results show that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans–LR can leach 99% of copper from printed circuit boards (non–magnetic material under the determined conditions through of the studies.

  8. Spatial Distribution of the Increased Porosity of Cement Paste due to Calcium Leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Keshu; LI Lin; XU Qiong; SUN Wei

    2015-01-01

    Using the tomography image, a method to characterize the 3D spatial distributions of increased porosity was proposed, and the increased porosity distributions of cement pastes with different leaching degrees were given using the current method. The leaching processes of CH/C-S-H and the contribution of CH/C-S-H leaching to porosity evolution were discussed. The proposed method can be applied to all cement-based materials with any leaching degrees. From the quantitative increased porosity results, we ifnd that the CH leaching ifnished quickly on the sharp CH leaching front.

  9. Microorganisms for desulphurization of coal: the influence of leaching compounds on their growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, G.; Larsson, L.; Holst, O.; Karlsson, H.T. (Lund University (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering II)

    1989-10-01

    An investigation was undertaken to outline how microorganisms suggested for use in coal desulphurization are affected by compounds leached from coal. Three species of the genus Sulfolobus were studied. Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was seen to be affected by compounds leached from coal more negatively than Sulfolobus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus. It was observed that certain conditions during leaching, such as pH, temperature and leaching time, were important for the concentration of compounds leached from coal. It was seen that compounds leached from coal, in some cases, can improve the growth yield for the microorganisms. 7 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Investigations into Recycling Zinc from Used Metal Oxide Varistors via pH Selective Leaching: Characterization, Leaching, and Residue Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Gutknecht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide varistors (MOVs are a type of resistor with significantly nonlinear current-voltage characteristics commonly used in power lines to protect against overvoltages. If a proper recycling plan is developed MOVs can be an excellent source of secondary zinc because they contain over 90 weight percent zinc oxide. The oxides of antimony, bismuth, and to a lesser degree cobalt, manganese, and nickel are also present in varistors. Characterization of the MOV showed that cobalt, nickel, and manganese were not present in the varistor material at concentrations greater than one weight percent. This investigation determined whether a pH selective dissolution (leaching process can be utilized as a starting point for hydrometallurgical recycling of the zinc in MOVs. This investigation showed it was possible to selectively leach zinc from the MOV without coleaching of bismuth and antimony by selecting a suitable pH, mainly higher than 3 for acids investigated. It was not possible to leach zinc without coleaching of manganese, cobalt, and nickel. It can be concluded from results obtained with the acids used, acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, and sulfuric, that sulfate leaching produced the most desirable results with respect to zinc leaching and it is also used extensively in industrial zinc production.

  11. Scenarios of annual and seasonal runoff for Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roald, L. A.; Skaugen, T. E.; Beldring, S.; Væringstad, T.; Engeset, R.; Førland, E. J.

    2003-04-01

    Scenarios of the annual and seasonal runoff for the period 2030-49 compared to the recent period 1980-99 have been developed. The scenarios are based on daily temperature and precipitation series from the research project: Regional Climate Development Under Global Warming (RegClim) in Norway. The study utilises dynamically downscaled series for the period 1980-99 and for the scenario period 2030-49 based on the GSDIO simulation with the global climate model ECHAM4/OPYC3 of the Max Planck Institute für Meteorologie in Hamburg. The runoff has been modelled by a gridded version of the HBV-model with grid size 1 x 1 km^2 as well as a basin based HBV-model for 42 Norwegian river basins. The main results were: i) increase in the annual runoff in almost all parts of Norway, most in the west, where the mean annual runoff may increase by 400 to 1100 mm, and only a marginal increase in East Norway and in Finnmark; ii) largest increase in the winter runoff in lowland areas close to the coast; iii) increasing spring runoff in the inland areas, especially in the north; iv) decreasing summer runoff; v) increasing autumn runoff in most regions, most on the west coast. The evapotranspiration will increase moderately, and the water equivalent will decrease for the snow cover by 1.April in lowland regions, but will increase in the high alpine areas. The year to year variability of the runoff will remain as under the present climate.

  12. Modelling surface run-off and trends analysis over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P. K.; Chauhan, S.; Oza, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    The present study is mainly concerned with detecting the trend of run-off over the mainland of India, during a time period of 35 years, from 1971-2005 (May-October). Rainfall, soil texture, land cover types, slope, etc., were processed and run-off modelling was done using the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) model with modifications and cell size of 5×5 km. The slope and antecedent moisture corrections were incorporated in the existing model. Trend analysis of estimated run-off was done by taking into account different analysis windows such as cell, medium and major river basins, meteorological sub-divisions and elevation zones across India. It was estimated that out of the average 1012.5 mm of rainfall over India (considering the study period of 35 years), 33.8% got converted to surface run-off. An exponential model was developed between the rainfall and the run-off that predicted the run-off with an R 2 of 0.97 and RMSE of 8.31 mm. The run-off trend analysed using the Mann-Kendall test revealed that a significant pattern exists in 22 medium, two major river basins and three meteorological sub-divisions, while there was no evidence of a statistically significant trend in the elevation zones. Among the medium river basins, the highest positive rate of change in the run-off was observed in the Kameng basin (13.6 mm/yr), while the highest negative trend was observed in the Tista upstream basin (-21.4 mm/yr). Changes in run-off provide valuable information for understanding the region's sensitivity to climatic variability.

  13. Modelling surface run-off and trends analysis over India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Gupta; S Chauhan; M P Oza

    2016-08-01

    The present study is mainly concerned with detecting the trend of run-off over the mainland of India, during a time period of 35 years, from 1971–2005 May–October). Rainfall, soil texture, land cover types, slope, etc., were processed and run-off modelling was done using the Natural Resources ConservationService (NRCS) model with modifications and cell size of 5×5 km. The slope and antecedent moisture corrections were incorporated in the existing model. Trend analysis of estimated run-off was done by taking into account different analysis windows such as cell, medium and major river basins, meteorologicalsub-divisions and elevation zones across India. It was estimated that out of the average 1012.5 mm of rainfall over India (considering the study period of 35 years), 33.8% got converted to surface run-off. An exponential model was developed between the rainfall and the run-off that predicted the run-off with an $R^2$ of 0.97 and RMSE of 8.31 mm. The run-off trend analysed using the Mann–Kendall test revealed that a significant pattern exists in 22 medium, two major river basins and three meteorological subdivisions, while there was no evidence of a statistically significant trend in the elevation zones. Among the medium river basins, the highest positive rate of change in the run-off was observed in the Kameng basin (13.6 mm/yr), while the highest negative trend was observed in the Tista upstream basin (−21.4 mm/yr). Changes in run-off provide valuable information for understanding the region’s sensitivity to climatic variability.

  14. Contrasting effects of microbiotic crusts on runoff in desert surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidron, Giora J.; Monger, H. Curtis; Vonshak, Ahuva; Conrod, William

    2012-02-01

    Microbiotic crusts (MCs) play an important role in surface hydrology by altering runoff yield. In order to study the crust's role on water redistribution, rainfall and runoff were measured during 1998-2000 at three sites within the northern Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA: the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (SEV), the White Sands National Monument (WS), and the Jornada Experimental Range (JER). Whereas quartz and gypsum sand characterize the SEV and WS sites, respectively, both of which have high infiltration rates, silty alluvial deposits characterize the JER site. Runoff was measured in four pairs of 1.8-6.4 m 2 plots having MCs, one of which was scalped in each pair. No runoff was generated at WS, whether on the crusted or the scalped plots. Runoff was however generated at SEV and JER, being higher on the crusted plots at SEV and lower on the JER plots. The results were explained by the combined effect of (a) parent material and (b) the crust properties, such as species composition, microrelief (surface roughness) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) content (reflected in the ratio of carbohydrates to chlorophyll). Whereas the effective rainfall, the fines and the EPS content were found to explain runoff initiation, the effective rainfall and the crust microrelief were found to explain the amount of runoff at SEV and JER where runoff generation took place. The findings attest to the fundamental role of the parent material and the crust's species composition and properties on runoff and hence to the complex interactions and the variable effects that MCs have on dryland hydrology.

  15. Nitrogen Leaching in Vegetable Fields in the Suburbs of Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Lin-Kui; CHEN Guo-Jun; LU Yi-Tong

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) leaching in vegetable fields from December 2002 to May 2003 with equal dressings of total N for a sequential rotation of Chinese flat cabbage (Brassica chinensis L. var. rosularis) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) in a suburban major vegetable production base of Shanghai were examined using the lysimeter method to provide a scientific basis for rational utilization of nitrogen fertilizers so as to prevent nitrogen pollution of water resources. Results showed that leached N consisted mainly of nitrate N, which accounted for up to more than 90% of the total N loss and could contribute to groundwater pollution. Data also showed that by partly substituting chemical N (30%) in a basal dressing with equivalent N of refined organic fertilizer in the Chinese fiat cabbage field, 64.5% of the leached nitrate N was reduced,while in the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) field, substituting 1/2 of the chemical N in a basal dressing and 1/3 of the chemical N in a top dressing with equivalent N of refined organic fertilizers reduced 46.6% of the leached nitrate N. In the two-year sequential rotation system of Chinese fiat cabbage and lettuce, nitrate-N leaching in the treatment with the highest amount of chemical fertilizer was up to 46.55 kg ha-1, while treatment plots with the highest amount of organic fertilizer had only 17.58 kg ha-1. Thus, partly substituting refined organic fertilizer for chemical nitrogen in the first two seasons has a great advantage of reducing nitrate-N leaching.

  16. Radiocesium leaching from contaminated litter in forest streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masaru; Gomi, Takashi; Naito, Risa S; Negishi, Junjiro N; Sasaki, Michiko; Toda, Hiroto; Nunokawa, Masanori; Murase, Kaori

    2015-06-01

    In Japanese forests suffering from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, litter fall provides a large amount of radiocesium from forests to streams. Submerged litter is processed to become a vital food resource for various stream organisms through initial leaching and subsequent decomposition. Although leaching from litter can detach radiocesium similarly to potassium, radiocesium leaching and its migration are poorly understood. We examined both radiocesium and potassium leaching to the water column and radiocesium allocation to minerals (glass beads, silica sand, and vermiculite) in the laboratory using soaked litter with and without minerals on a water column. The mineral types did not affect radiocesium leaching from litter, but soaking in water for 1, 7, and 30 days decreased the radiocesium concentration in litter by ×0.71, ×0.66, and ×0.56, respectively. Meanwhile, the 1-, 7-, and 30-day experiments decreased potassium concentration in litter by ×0.17, ×0.11, and ×0.09, respectively. Leached radiocesium remained in a dissolved form when there was no mineral phases present in the water, whereas there was sorption onto the minerals when they were present. In particular, vermiculite adsorbed radiocesium by two to three orders of magnitude more effectively than the other minerals. Because radiocesium forms (such as that dissolved or adsorbed to organic matter or minerals) can further mobilize to ecosystems, our findings will increase our understanding regarding the dynamics of radiocesium in stream ecosystems.

  17. [Mixture Leaching Remediation Technology of Arsenic Contaminated Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun-feng; Li, Xiao-ming; Chen, Can; Yang, Qi; Deng, Lin-jing; Xie, Wei-qiang; Zhong, Yui; Huang, Bin; Yang, Wei-qiang; Zhang, Zhi-bei

    2016-03-15

    Soil contamination of arsenic pollution has become a severely environmental issue, while soil leaching is an efficient method for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soil. In this study, batch tests were primarily conducted to select optimal mixture leaching combination. Firstly, five conventional reagents were selected and combined with each other. Secondly, the fractions were analyzed before and after the tests. Finally, to explore the feasibility of mixed leaching, three soils with different arsenic pollution levels were used to compare the leaching effect. Comparing with one-step washing, the two-step sequential washing with different reagents increased the arsenic removal efficiency. These results showed that the mixture of 4 h 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH + 4 h 0.1 mol · L⁻¹ EDTA was found to be practicable, which could enhance the removal rate of arsenic from 66.67% to 91.83%, and the concentration of arsenic in soil was decreased from 186 mg · kg⁻¹ to 15.2 mg · kg⁻¹. Furthermore, the results indicated that the distribution of fractions of arsenic in soil changed apparently after mixture leaching. Leaching process could significantly reduce the available contents of arsenic in soil. Moreover, the mixture of 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH + 0.1 mol L⁻¹ EDTA could well decrease the arsenic concentration in aluminum-type soils, while the mixture of 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ OX + 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH could well decrease the arsenic concentration in iron-type soils.

  18. Effect of the addition of wine distillery wastes to vineyard soils on the adsorption and mobility of fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, Maria Soledad; Rodriguez-Cruz, Maria Sonia; Sanchez-Martin, Maria Jesus; Sanchez-Camazano, Maria

    2004-05-19

    In the present work, a study was made of the effect of the addition of liquid and solid wine distillery wastes (WLW and WSW) to vineyard soils on the adsorption and leaching of penconazole and metalaxyl, two fungicides of different hydrophobic character that are widely used in vine cultivation. The study of these processes is of great interest, since currently the green filter system is implemented simultaneously in vine cultivation and as an alternative to classic purification methods of such organic wastes. Three vineyard soils selected from the La Rioja region (NW Spain) were used. Adsorption isotherms of the 14C-labeled fungicides by the soils in aqueous medium and in WLW medium were obtained, together with the percolation curves of the fungicides in packed soil columns under saturated flow conditions. The adsorption and leaching of metalaxyl in a soil amended with WSW were also studied. The Freundlich Kf constants indicated an increase in the adsorption of both fungicides by the soils in WLW medium as compared to aqueous medium. The amounts of penconazole leached in the three soils when they were washed with water and WLW ranged between 3.18 and 39.3% and between 2.00 and 10.4%, respectively, of the total fungicide added to the columns. In the case of metalaxyl, these amounts represented 69.1-100 and 91.6-117%. Variations were also observed in the shape and parameters of the breakthrough curves obtained in both systems and in the presence of WSW. The soluble organic compounds of WLW must be retained by the soil components, creating new adsorbent hydrophobic surfaces, which increase the retention in the soil of the highly hydrophobic compound penconazole. In the case of metalaxyl, which is very water soluble, the soluble organic compounds of WLW seem to contribute to the increase in its leaching, whereas the WSW favors the opposite effect. The results obtained, indicating modifications in the adsorption and leaching of penconazole and metalaxyl in the presence

  19. Urban runoff drainage : case of Kjelsrud in Oslo

    OpenAIRE

    Moheseen, Fida Amin

    2015-01-01

    The volume of the urban runoff is subjected to increase due to urbanization and climate change. The urbanisation plan for the catchment of Kjelsrud implies increasing the impervious surfaces in forms of roads and rooftops, in return this increases the generated runoff. The catchment area of 38 ha will be able to generate a considerable runoff volume of about 5069 l/s under current rainfall and 11406 l/s with climate change consideration. The goal of this thesis is t o provide V...

  20. Theory and practice of runoff space-time distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hao; WANG; Chengming; WANG; Jianhua; QIN; Dayong; ZH

    2004-01-01

    Based on the domestic and foreign concerning researches, this paper submits the runoff space-time distribution theory which shows evident scientific significances and powerful practical functions. On the basis of digital basin unit cell deriving from the digital elevation model (DEM) and assumption of linear confluence, this theory has been applied successfully to the runoff correlation researches in humid regions. In order to prove the adaptability of the theory in arid and semi-drought regions,this paper is used to the runoff correlation analysis in Wuding River basin--a tributary of Yellow River Basin, and has gained preliminary effective verification.

  1. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli – Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and accelerated the dissolution of manganese in acidic media.

  2. Influence of soil structure on contaminant leaching from injected slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M G Mostofa; Pedersen, Christina Østerballe; Forslund, Anita; Veith, Tamie L; Laegdsmand, Mette

    2016-12-15

    Animal manure application to agricultural land provides beneficial organic matter and nutrients but can spread harmful contaminants to the environment. Contamination of fresh produce, surface water and shallow groundwater with the manure-borne pollutants can be a critical concern. Leaching and persistence of nitrogen, microorganisms (bacteriophage, E. coli, and Enterococcus) and a group of steroid hormone (estrogens) were investigated after injection of swine slurry into either intact (structured) or disturbed (homogeneous repacked) soil. The slurry was injected into hexaplicate soil columns at a rate of 50 t ha(-1) and followed with four irrigation events: 3.5-h period at 10 mm h(-1) after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The disturbed columns delayed the leaching of a conservative tracer and microorganisms in the first irrigation event compared to the intact columns due to the effect of disturbed macropore flow paths. The slurry constituents that ended up in or near the macropore flow paths of the intact soil were presumably washed out relatively quickly in the first event. For the last three events the intact soil leached fewer microorganisms than the disturbed soil due to the bypassing effect of water through the macropore flow path in the intact soil. Estrogen leached from the intact soil in the first event only, but for the disturbed soil it was detected in the leachates of last two events also. Leaching from the later events was attributed to higher colloid transport from the disturbed soils. In contrast, NO3-N leaching from the intact soil was higher for all events except the first event, probably due to a lower nitrification rate in the disturbed soil. A week after the last irrigation event, the redistribution of all slurry constituents except NO3-N in most of the sections of the soil column was higher for the disturbed soil. Total recovery of E. coli was significantly higher from the disturbed soil and total leaching of mineral nitrogen was significantly lower

  3. Studies on Environmentally Friendly Leaching Processes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The newly developed green leaching processes for chromium, lead and gold extraction from ores or concentrates are described. The chromium is extracted from the iron chromite ore with fused sodium hydroxide at 500-550°C as sodium chromate. The galena in lead sulfide concentrate is converted into lead carbonate in ammonium or sodium carbonate solution at 50-80°C followed by the separation of lead carbonate formed from the unconverted sulfide ores by flotation. Gold associated with sulfide ore (such as pyrite and chalcopyrite) can be extracted into sodium thiosulfate solution without any pretreatment such as roasting, high pressure aqueous oxidation or bacteria pre-leaching.

  4. Oxidative leaching of chromium from layered double hydroxides: Mechanistic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A V Radha; P Vishnu Kamath

    2004-08-01

    The layered double hydroxide (LDH) of Zn with Cr on treatment with a hypochlorite solution releases chromate ions as a result of oxidative leaching by a dissolution–reprecipitation mechanism. The residue is found to be -Zn(OH)2. The LDH of Mg with Cr on the other hand is resistant to oxidative leaching. In contrast, a X-ray amorphous gel of the coprecipitated hydroxides of Mg and Cr yields chromate ions. These results suggest that the oxidation potential of Cr(III) in LDHs is determined by the nature of the divalent ion and the crystallinity of the phase while being unaffected by the nature of the intercalated anions.

  5. Assessment of leaching from Construction & Demolition Waste concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste features two very important properties when considering its management options: the large amounts, and the low environmental hazardousness. Therefore, concrete waste can be recycled relatively easily: most common end-of-life option is utilization as unbound...... aggregates in road sub-bases, where it substitutes for natural aggregates such as gravel and crushed rocks. However, leaching of heavy metals may occur in such uncontrolled environmental conditions, and become a limiting factor for utilization. Therefore, proper assessment of leaching is crucial. Different...

  6. The use of constructed wetlands for removal of pesticides from agricultural runoff and drainage: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymazal, Jan; Březinová, Tereza

    2015-02-01

    Pesticides are used in modern agriculture to increase crop yields, but they may pose a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems. Pesticides may enter water bodies through diffuse and point sources, but diffuse sources are probably the most important. Among diffuse pollution, surface runoff and erosion, leaching and drainage represent the major pathways. The most commonly used mitigation techniques to prevent pesticide input into water bodies include edge-of-field and riparian buffer strips, vegetated ditches and constructed wetlands. The first attempts to use wetland macrophytes for pesticide removal were carried out as early as the 1970s, but only in the last decade have constructed wetlands for pesticide mitigation become widespread. The paper summarizes 47 studies in which removal of 87 pesticides was monitored. The survey revealed that constructed wetlands with free water surface are the most commonly used type. Also, it has been identified that removal of pesticides is highly variable. The results of the survey revealed that the highest pesticide removal was achieved for pesticides of the organochlorine, strobilurin/strobin, organosphosphate and pyrethroid groups while the lowest removals were observed for pesticides of the triazinone, aryloxyalkanoic acid and urea groups. The removal of pesticides generally increases with increasing value of KOC but the relationship is not strong. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a computerized data base for low-level radioactive waste leaching data: Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Colombo, P.

    1986-09-01

    This report documents the development of a computerized data base (db) of leaching data for solidified low-level radioactive waste (LLW) forms. Brookhaven National Lab performed this work under contract with the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program as part of an effort to develop an accelerated leach test(s) that can be used to predict leachabilities of LLW forms over long time periods, i.e., hundreds of years. The accelerated leach test(s) is (are) to be developed based on knowledge of leaching mechanisms and factors that affect leaching. Although developed specifically for the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program, this db may be useful to others concerned with the management of low-level waste. The db is being developed to provide efficient data compilation and analysis capabilities. The data compiled in the db, which include data from the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program and selected data from the literature, have been selected to elucidate leaching mechanisms and factors that affect leaching and are not meant to be a comprehensive compilation of leaching data. This report presents the data compilation aspect of the db. It does not present the programmatic results obtained from analysis of the data regarding leaching mechanisms and factors that affect leaching, which will be presented in reports from the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program. 6 refs.

  8. Adaptive measurements of urban runoff quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brandon P.; Kerkez, Branko

    2016-11-01

    An approach to adaptively measure runoff water quality dynamics is introduced, focusing specifically on characterizing the timing and magnitude of urban pollutographs. Rather than relying on a static schedule or flow-weighted sampling, which can miss important water quality dynamics if parameterized inadequately, novel Internet-enabled sensor nodes are used to autonomously adapt their measurement frequency to real-time weather forecasts and hydrologic conditions. This dynamic approach has the potential to significantly improve the use of constrained experimental resources, such as automated grab samplers, which continue to provide a strong alternative to sampling water quality dynamics when in situ sensors are not available. Compared to conventional flow-weighted or time-weighted sampling schemes, which rely on preset thresholds, a major benefit of the approach is the ability to dynamically adapt to features of an underlying hydrologic signal. A 28 km2 urban watershed was studied to characterize concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) and total phosphorus. Water quality samples were autonomously triggered in response to features in the underlying hydrograph and real-time weather forecasts. The study watershed did not exhibit a strong first flush and intraevent concentration variability was driven by flow acceleration, wherein the largest loadings of TSS and total phosphorus corresponded with the steepest rising limbs of the storm hydrograph. The scalability of the proposed method is discussed in the context of larger sensor network deployments, as well the potential to improving control of urban water quality.

  9. Copper adsorption in tropical oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Maria Lucia Azevedo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu adsorption, at concentrations between 0 to 800 mg L-1, was evaluated in surface and subsurface samples of three Brazilian soils: a heavy clayey-textured Rhodic Hapludalf (RH, a heavy clayey-textured Anionic ''Rhodic'' Acrudox (RA and a medium-textured Anionic ''Xanthic'' Acrudox (XA. After adsorption, two consecutive extractions were performed to the samples which received 100 mg L-1 copper. Surface samples adsorbed higher amounts of Cu than the subsurface, and exhibited lower Cu removed after the extractions, reinforcing the influence of the organic matter in the reactions. Cu adsorption was significant in the subsurface horizons of the Oxisols, despite the positive balance of charge, demonstrating the existence of mechanisms for specific adsorption, mainly related to the predominance of iron and aluminum oxides in the mineral fractions. In these samples, Cu was easily removed from the adsorption sites. RH demonstrated a higher capacity for the Cu adsorption in both horizons.

  10. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  11. Weather Radar Adjustment Using Runoff from Urban Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Rasmussen, Michael Robdrup

    2017-01-01

    Weather radar data used for urban drainage applications are traditionally adjusted to point ground references, e.g., rain gauges. However, the available rain gauge density for the adjustment is often low, which may lead to significant representativeness errors. Yet, in many urban catchments......, rainfall is often measured indirectly through runoff sensors. This paper presents a method for weather radar adjustment on the basis of runoff observations (Z-Q adjustment) as an alternative to the traditional Z-R adjustment on the basis of rain gauges. Data from a new monitoring station in Aalborg......, Denmark, were used to evaluate the flow-based weather radar adjustment method against the traditional rain-gauge adjustment. The evaluation was performed by comparing radar-modeled runoff to observed runoff. The methodology was both tested on an events basis and multiple events combined. The results...

  12. Runoff Simulation of Shitoukoumen Reservoir Basin Based on SWAT Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Miao; LI; Hong-yan; LIU; Tie-juan; RU; Shi-rong

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]The study aimed to simulate the runoff of Shitoukoumen Reservoir basin by using SWAT model. [Method] Based on DEM elevation, land use type, soil type and hydrometeorological data, SWAT model, a distributed hydrological model was established to simulate the monthly runoff of Shitoukoumen Reservoir basin, and the years 2006 and 2010 were chosen as the calibration and validation period respectively. [Result] The simulation results indicated that SWAT model could be used to simulate the runoff of Shitoukoumen Reservoir basin, and the simulation effect was good. However, the response of the model to local rainstorm was not obvious, so that the actual runoff in June and July of 2010 was abnormally higher than the simulation value. [Conclusion] The research could provide theoretical references for the plan and management of water resources in Shitoukoumen Reservoir basin in future.

  13. Heavy Metal Runoff in Relation to Soil Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cu,Zn,Pb and Hg runoff from yellow limestone soil and purple soils and the relationships between the mobility of the heavy metals and the soil characteristics were studied in laboratory using a rainfall simulator.The results showed that the concentrations of soluble Zn in surface runoff were significantly negatively correlated with the contents of <0.002 mm particles and CEC of the soils, indicating that Zn was mostly adsorbed by clays in the soils.The contents of Cu and Hg in surface runoff were positively related to their contents in the soils.The amounts of Gu, Zn,Pb and Hg removed by surface runoff were influenced by the amounts of soil and water losses and their contents in the soils,and were closely related to the contents of soil particles 1~0.02 mm in size.

  14. Nitrogen removal from urban stormwater runoff through layered bioretention columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chi-hsu; Davis, Allen P; Needelman, Brian A

    2007-11-01

    Bioretention is a low-impact technology used for the treatment of stormwater runoff in developed areas. The fates of mineral nitrogen compounds in two bioretention columns (RP1 and RP2) with different media-layering characteristics were investigated under multiple loadings of simulated urban runoff. The immediate capture of nitrogen was evaluated, with nitrogen transformation reactions that occurred during the drying periods between rainfall events. A greater proportion of ammonium was removed from runoff in RP2 (68 +/- 16%), which had a high permeability layer over a lower permeability layer, than in RP1 (12 +/- 6%), which had the inverse configuration. Both column systems demonstrated nitrate export (9 +/- 32% and 54 +/- 22% greater than input for RP1 and RP2, respectively), attributed to washout of nitrate resulting from nitrification processes between runoff loading events. Bioretention media with a less permeable bottom soil layer could form an anoxic/anaerobic zone for promoting nitrification/denitrification processes.

  15. RAINFALL-RUNOFF MODELING IN THE TURKEY RIVER USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-15

    Jan 15, 2015 ... Modeling rainfall-runoff relationships in a watershed have an important role in water .... Initial estimations will improve following the development of the model. .... Resources Research Nordic Hydrology, 33 (5), 2002,33 1-346.

  16. Runoff modeling of the Mara River using Satellite Observed Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with European Remote Sensing (ERS) Scatterometer in modeling runoff of the Zambezi river basin. ... (2008) using Geospatial Stream Flow ... obtained for Mara River at Mara mines, Nyangores at Bomet and Amala at Mulot river gauging ...

  17. Kresoxim methyl deposition, drift and runoff in a vineyard catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancq, M; Imfeld, G; Payraudeau, S; Millet, M

    2013-01-01

    Surface runoff and spray drift represent a primary mode of pesticide mobilisation from agricultural land to ecosystem. Though pesticide drift has mainly been studied at small scale (inverse weighting distance and ordinary kriging) and ranged between 53 g and 61 g (5.8 and 6.6% of the total mass applied). The amount of KM drifted on roads was 50 times larger than that in runoff water collected at the outlet of the catchment. Although KM application was carried out under regular operational and climatic conditions, its deposition on non-target surfaces may be significant and lead to pesticide runoff. These results can be anticipated as a starting point for assessing pesticide deposition during spray application and corresponding pesticide runoff in agricultural catchments.

  18. Reconstructing Greenland meltwater runoff using bivalve shell chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Versteegh, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Poster "Reconstructing Greenland meltwater runoff using bivalve shell chemistry", presented at: Frontiers in Environmental Geoscience - Mineralogical Society's Annual Conference 2011, 21-24 June 2011, Aberystwyth, UK.

  19. Calibration of Rainfall-Runoff Parameters in Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walle Menberu, Meseret; Torabi Haghighi, Ali; Kløve, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Finland is a country where its possession of peatlands compared to the total surface area of the country puts in the leading categories globally in peatland possession having 33.5% of its total land area covered with peatlands. Recent interest has grown in using peatlands as temporary flood control barriers by taking advantage of the high water holding capacity of peat soils. Water holding capacity of peat soils enables to reduce high rate of runoff and peak flow which might endanger downstream of the flow and in the process of doing that, the rest of the water leaving the peatland areas is less polluted due to the wetlands' potential in purifying polluted water. Therefore, in order to understand how capable enough peatlands are in holding water by reducing the peak flow or slowing down the rate of runoff, this paper analyses the rainfall-runoff phenomena in peatland catchments through important runoff parameters. Among the most important runoff parameters; the initial abstraction, the curve number and lag time are selected for this paper due to their highest impact on rainfall-runoff process. For this study, two peatland catchments of drained and pristine are selected. Managing to explain the initial abstraction and curve number behaviour in the catchments will able to clearly understand and as well predict the rainfall-runoff process in the catchments. In the selected study sites, observed rainfall and runoff data are collected. The study sites are modelled with the help of Arc-GIS and Hec-GeoHMS and from that are exported to HEC-HMS (Hydrologic modelling software) for rainfall-runoff analysis. The two important parameters; the initial abstraction and curve number are used to calibrate the model. And finally, the parameters that have given the best fit between the modelled and observed rainfall-runoff process are suggested for the study sites. Having these parameters estimated eases to understand rainfall-runoff process in the catchments for whatsoever purpose

  20. Description and evaluation of a surface runoff susceptibility mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadec, Lilly-Rose; Patrice, Pierre; Braud, Isabelle; Chazelle, Blandine; Moulin, Loïc; Dehotin, Judicaël; Hauchard, Emmanuel; Breil, Pascal

    2016-10-01

    Surface runoff is the hydrological process at the origin of phenomena such as soil erosion, floods out of rivers, mudflows, debris flows and can generate major damage. This paper presents a method to create maps of surface runoff susceptibility. The method, called IRIP (Indicator of Intense Pluvial Runoff, French acronym), uses a combination of landscape factors to create three maps representing the susceptibility (1) to generate, (2) to transfer, and (3) to accumulate surface runoff. The method input data are the topography, the land use and the soil type. The method aims to be simple to implement and robust for any type of study area, with no requirement for calibration or specific input format. In a second part, the paper focuses on the evaluation of the surface runoff susceptibility maps. The method is applied in the Lézarde catchment (210 km2, northern France) and the susceptibility maps are evaluated by comparison with two risk regulatory zonings of surface runoff and soil erosion, and two databases of surface runoff impacts on roads and railways. Comparison tests are performed using a standard verification method for dichotomous forecasting along with five verification indicators: accuracy, bias, success ratio, probability of detection, and false alarm ratio. The evaluation shows that the susceptibility map of surface runoff accumulation is able to identify the concentrated surface runoff flows and that the susceptibility map of transfer is able to identify areas that are susceptible to soil erosion. Concerning the ability of the IRIP method to detect sections of the transportation network susceptible to be impacted by surface runoff, the evaluation tests show promising probabilities of detection (73-90%) but also high false alarm ratios (77-92%). However, a qualitative analysis of the local configuration of the infrastructure shows that taking into account the transportation network vulnerability can explain numerous false alarms. This paper shows that the

  1. Influence of chalcopyrite structure on their leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Sokić

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the chalcopyrite leaching by sodium nitrate and sulfuric acid solution, leaching rate decreases with increasing the time and a part of chalcopyrite mineral grains remains in the leach residue. In chalcopyrite concentrate, 95.5 % of chalcopyrite mineral occurs as in liberated grains, and the rest is in association with gangue minerals, which is very favorably from the aspect of hydrometallurgical treatment. Complex forms, like impregnations and complex intergrowths, do not exist. After experiments carried out, leaching of copper achieved 84 % at temperature 80 o C and time 240 min. In the all leach residues, 97 % chalcopyrite mineral grains occur as liberated with highly corroded surfaces. Therefore, the structural assembly of chalcopyrite grains is favorable and no reason to reduce the leaching rate in the final stage of reaction. Reason for this is elemental sulfur, which was formed during the reaction, precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process.

  2. Interlaboratory Validation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) Method 1313 and Method 1316

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document summarizes the results of an interlaboratory study conducted to generate precision estimates for two parallel batch leaching methods which are part of the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF). These methods are: (1) Method 1313: Liquid-Solid Partition...

  3. Thermal treatment of solid waste in view of recycling: Chromate and molybdate formation and leaching behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbinnen, Bram; Billen, Pieter; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    Elevated Cr and Mo concentrations are often found in leachates of thermally treated solid waste, but there is no general explanation for this so far. Therefore, we studied the leaching behaviour after thermal treatment as a function of heating temperature and residence time for two types of solid waste: contaminated sludge and bottom ash from municipal solid waste incineration. The leaching behaviour of both waste streams was compared with experiments on synthetic samples, allowing deduction of a general mechanism for Cr and Mo leaching. Cr and Mo showed a similar leaching behaviour: after an initial increase, the leaching decreased again at higher temperatures. Oxidation of these elements from their lower oxidation states to chromate and molybdate at temperatures up to 600 °C was responsible for the increased leaching. At higher temperatures, both Mo and Cr leaching decreased again owing to the formation of an amorphous phase, incorporating the newly formed chromate and molybdate salts, which prevents them from leaching.

  4. Adsorption design for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooney, D.O.

    1998-12-31

    Understand the premier method for removing organic contaminants from water. Straight forward explanations and illustrations allow this overview to fill a dual purpose: study manual and design guide. The book discusses basic properties of activated carbons; explains the kinetics of adsorption processes; describes the design of both fixed-bed and batch process adsorption systems; contains useful knowledge that can be extended to other applications of adsorption, including drinking water treatment; and includes many illustrated examples and practice exercises.

  5. Climate change impacts on runoff in West Africa: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Roudier, P.; A. Ducharne; Feyen, L.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This review summarizes the impacts of climate change on runoff in West Africa, assesses the uncertainty in the projections and describes future research needs for the region. To do so, we constitute a meta-database made of 19 studies and 301 future runoff change values. The future tendency in streamflow developments is overall very uncertain (median of the 301 points is 0% and mean +5.2%), except for (i) the Gambia River, which exhibits a significant negative change (m...

  6. Rainfall, runoff and sediment transport in a Mediterranean mountainous catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuset, J; Vericat, D; Batalla, R J

    2016-01-01

    The relation between rainfall, runoff, erosion and sediment transport is highly variable in Mediterranean catchments. Their relation can be modified by land use changes and climate oscillations that, ultimately, will control water and sediment yields. This paper analyses rainfall, runoff and sediment transport relations in a meso-scale Mediterranean mountain catchment, the Ribera Salada (NE Iberian Peninsula). A total of 73 floods recorded between November 2005 and November 2008 at the Inglabaga Sediment Transport Station (114.5 km(2)) have been analysed. Suspended sediment transport and flow discharge were measured continuously. Rainfall data was obtained by means of direct rain gauges and daily rainfall reconstructions from radar information. Results indicate that the annual sediment yield (2.3 t km(-1) y(-1) on average) and the flood-based runoff coefficients (4.1% on average) are low. The Ribera Salada presents a low geomorphological and hydrological activity compared with other Mediterranean mountain catchments. Pearson correlations between rainfall, runoff and sediment transport variables were obtained. The hydrological response of the catchment is controlled by the base flows. The magnitude of suspended sediment concentrations is largely correlated with flood magnitude, while sediment load is correlated with the amount of direct runoff. Multivariate analysis shows that total suspended load can be predicted by integrating rainfall and runoff variables. The total direct runoff is the variable with more weight in the equation. Finally, three main hydro-sedimentary phases within the hydrological year are defined in this catchment: (a) Winter, where the catchment produces only water and very little sediment; (b) Spring, where the majority of water and sediment is produced; and (c) Summer-Autumn, when little runoff is produced but significant amount of sediments is exported out of the catchment. Results show as land use and climate change may have an important

  7. Characterization of surface runoff from a subtropics urban catchment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jin-liang; DU Peng-fei; AO Chi-tan; LEI Mui-heong; ZHAO Dong-quan; HO Man-him; WANG Zhi-shi

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of surface runoff from a 0.14-km2 urban catchment with separated sewer in Macau was investigated. Water quality measurements of surface runoff were carried out on five rainfall events during the period of August to November, 2005. Water quality parameters such as pH, turbidity, TSS, COD, TN, Zn, Pb, and Cu were analyzed. The results show that TN and COD are the major pollutants from surface runoff with mean concentration of 8.5 and 201.4 mg/L, both over 4-fold higher compared to the Class V surface water quality standard developed by China SEPA. Event mean concentration (EMC) for major pollutants showed considerable variations between rainfall events. The largest rainfall event with the longest length of antecedent dry weather period (ADWP) produced the highest EMC of TN, TSS and COD. From the pollutographs analysis, the peak concentration of TN precedes the peak runoff flow rate for all three rainfall events. The tendency of the concentration of TSS, turbidity and COD changing with runoff flow varies between rainfall events. The relationship between TSS and other parameters were analyzed to evaluate the efficiency of the physical treatment process to control the surface runoff in the urban catchment. Based on the correlation of parameters with TSS, high treatment efficiency of TSS, TN and COD was expected. The most significant event in term of first flush is the one with the strongest rainfall intensity and longest length of ADWP. TN always showed first flush phenomenon in all three rainfall events, which suggested that the surface runoff in the early stage of surface runoff should be dealt with for controlling TN losses during rainfall events.

  8. Laboratory experiments on drought and runoff in blanket peat

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, J; Burt, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Global warming might change the hydrology of upland blanket peats in Britain. We have therefore studied in laboratory experiments the impact of drought on peat from the North Pennines of the UK. Runoff was dominated by surface and near-surface flow; flow decreased rapidly with depth and differed from one type of cover to another. Infiltration depended on the intensity of rain, and runoff responded rapidly to rain, with around 50% of rainwater emerging as overland flow. Drought changed the str...

  9. Stormwater runoff - modeling impacts of urbanization and climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, Anne; Sanger, Denise; Holland, Frderick; White, David; Vandiver, Lisa; White, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Development pressure throughout the coastal areas of the United States continues to build, particularly in the southeast (Allen and Lu 2003, Crossett et al. 2004). It is well known that development alters watershed hydrology: as land becomes covered with surfaces impervious to rain, water is redirected from groundwater recharge and evapotranspiration to stormwater runoff, and as the area of impervious cover increases, so does the volume and rate of runoff (Schueler 1994, Corbett et al. 1997)....

  10. 29 CFR 1206.1 - Run-off elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Run-off elections. 1206.1 Section 1206.1 Labor Regulations... LABOR ACT § 1206.1 Run-off elections. (a) If in an election among any craft or class no organization or individual receives a majority of the legal votes cast, or in the event of a tie vote, a second or...

  11. Comparative assessment of infiltration, runoff and erosion sprinkler irrigated soils

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Francisco Lúcio; Reis, João; Martins, Olga; Castanheira, Nádia; Serralheiro, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The impacts of sprinkler irrigation on infiltration, runoff and sediment loss of ten representative soils of Southern Portugal were assessed by laboratory sprinkler irrigation simulation tests. All soils showed very low permeability to applied water. The mechanical impact of water droplets enhanced soil dispersion and further lowered their infiltration capacity, particularly for high clay plus silt content soils that showed the poorest results. As a consequence, high runoff and se...

  12. Use of different organic wastes as strategy to mitigate the leaching potential of phenylurea herbicides through the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, José; Garrido, Isabel; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Vela, Nuria; Navarro, Simón

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the leaching of 14 substituted phenylurea herbicides (PUHs) through disturbed soil columns packed with three different soils was investigated in order to determine their potential for groundwater pollution. Simultaneously, a series of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the effect of four different organic wastes (composted sheep manure (CSM), composted pine bark (CPB), spent coffee grounds (SCG) and coir (CR)) on their mobility. All herbicides, except difenoxuron, showed medium/high leachability through the unamended soils. In general, addition of agro-industrial and composted organic wastes at a rate of 10% (w/w) increased the adsorption of PUHs and decreased their mobility in the soil, reducing their leaching. In all cases, the groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) index was calculated for each herbicide on the basis of its persistence (as t ½) and mobility (as K OC). The results obtained point to the interest in the use of agro-industrial and composted organic wastes in reducing the risk of groundwater pollution by pesticide drainage.

  13. Leaching characteristics of copper flotation waste before and after vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri

    2006-12-01

    Copper flotation waste from copper production using a pyrometallurgical process contains toxic metals such as Cu, Zn, Co and Pb. Because of the presence of trace amounts of these highly toxic metals, copper flotation waste contributes to environmental pollution. In this study, the leaching characteristics of copper flotation waste from the Black Sea Copper Works in Samsun, Turkey have been investigated before and after vitrification. Samples obtained from the factory were subjected to toxicity tests such as the extraction procedure toxicity test (EP Tox), the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the "method A" extraction procedure of the American Society of Testing and Materials. The leaching tests showed that the content of some elements in the waste before vitrification exceed the regulatory limits and cannot be disposed of in the present form. Therefore, a stabilization or inertization treatment is necessary prior to disposal. Vitrification was found to stabilize heavy metals in the copper flotation waste successfully and leaching of these metals was largely reduced. Therefore, vitrification can be an acceptable method for disposal of copper flotation waste.

  14. Study on indium leaching from mechanically activated hard zinc residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, changes in physicochemical properties and leachability of indium from mechanically activated hard zinc residue by planetary mill were investigated. The results showed that mechanical activation increased specific surface area, reaction activity of hard zinc residue, and decreased its particle size, which had a positive effect on indium extraction from hard zinc residue in hydrochloric acid solution. Kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled and activated hard zinc residue were also investigated, respectively. It was found that temperature had an obvious effect on indium leaching rate. Two different kinetic models corresponding to reactions which are diffusion controlled, [1-(1- x1/3]2=kt and (1-2x/3-(1-x2/3=kt were used to describe the kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled sample and activated sample, respectively. Their activation energies were determined to be 17.89 kJ/mol (umilled and 11.65 kJ/mol (activated within the temperature range of 30°C to 90°C, which is characteristic for a diffusion controlled process. The values of activation energy demonstrated that the leaching reaction of indium became less sensitive to temperature after hard zinc residue mechanically activated by planetary mill.

  15. Teaching Paleontology with an Acid-Leaching Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talent, John A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Described is an acid-leaching facility at Macquarie University in Australia for teaching paleontology. The facility is used for teaching both undergraduate and graduate students and for research by staff and graduate students. Drawings of the facility are included and courses are described. (Author/RH)

  16. Estimated water requirements for gold heap-leach operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water necessary for conventional gold heap-leach operations. Water is required for drilling and dust suppression during mining, for agglomeration and as leachate during ore processing, to support the workforce (requires water in potable form and for sanitation), for minesite reclamation, and to compensate for water lost to evaporation and leakage. Maintaining an adequate water balance is especially critical in areas where surface and groundwater are difficult to acquire because of unfavorable climatic conditions [arid conditions and (or) a high evaporation rate]; where there is competition with other uses, such as for agriculture, industry, and use by municipalities; and where compliance with regulatory requirements may restrict water usage. Estimating the water consumption of heap-leach operations requires an understanding of the heap-leach process itself. The task is fairly complex because, although they all share some common features, each gold heap-leach operation is unique. Also, estimating the water consumption requires a synthesis of several fields of science, including chemistry, ecology, geology, hydrology, and meteorology, as well as consideration of economic factors.

  17. Leaching of Silver from Silver-Impregnated Food Storage Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Niece, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of silver in commercial products has proliferated in recent years owing to its antibacterial properties. Food containers impregnated with micro-sized silver promise long food life, but there is some concern because silver can leach out of the plastic and into the stored food. This laboratory experiment gives students the opportunity to…

  18. Pesticide Leaching Models in a Brazilian Agricultural Field Scenario

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza, R.P.; Oliveira Rigitano, de R.L.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2011-01-01

    The use of Pesticide Leaching Models (PLM) for risk assessment may be an efficient and attractive way of assessing solutions to some agricultural and environmental problems. Many countries of the European Union and the USA have been using PLM for risk assessment already for a few decades. This chapt

  19. Soil dissipation and leaching behavior of a neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Suman; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, R K

    2008-05-01

    Persistence and leaching of thiamethoxam in soil were studied under laboratory conditions. The persistence studies carried out at two fortification levels and under three moisture regimes revealed that thiamethoxam persisted beyond 90 days in all the treatments with half-life varying from 46.3 to 301.0 days. Under dry conditions, the dissipation was faster at 10 mg kg(-1) level as compared to 1 mg kg(-1), whereas the reverse trend was observed under field capacity moisture and submerged conditions. The effect of moisture was prominent and longer persistence was observed under dry conditions (t1/2 200.7-301.0 days) followed by field capacity moisture (t1/2 91.2-94.1 days) and submerged condition (t1/2 46.3-75.3 days). The leaching experiment carried out under laboratory conditions showed that on leaching the soil column with water equivalent to 65 cm rainfall, 66-79% of the applied thiamethoxam was recovered from leachate and no residues were detected in soil. Results showed that thiamethoxam has a potential to leach down under heavy rainfall conditions.

  20. Primary beneficiation of tantalite using magnetic separation and acid leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Nete; F Koko; T Theron; W Purcell; JT Nel

    2014-01-01

    Primary beneficiation was successfully performed prior to dissolution of manganotantalite (sample A) and ferrotantalite (sample C) samples obtained from two different mines in the Naquissupa area, Mozambique. Magnetic separation removed the majority of iron and tita-nium, whereas H2SO4 leaching removed a large portion of thorium and uranium in these samples. Analytical results indicated that 64.14wt%and 72.04wt%of the total Fe and Ti, respectively, and~2wt%each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample C (ferrotantalite) using the magnetic separation method, whereas only 9.64wt%and 8.66wt%of total Fe2O3 and TiO2, respectively, and~2wt%each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample A (manganotantalite). A temperature of 50°C and a leaching time of 3 h in the presence of concentrated H2SO4 were observed to be the most appropriate leaching conditions for removal of radioactive elements from the tantalite ores. The results obtained for sample A under these conditions indicated that 64.14wt%U3O8 and 60.77wt%ThO2 were leached into the acidic solution, along with 4.45wt%and 0.99wt%of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5, respectively.

  1. Pesticide Leaching from Agricultural Fields with Ridges and Furrows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2010-01-01

    In the evaluation of the risk of pesticide leaching to groundwater, the soil surface is usually assumed to be level, although important crops like potato are grown on ridges. A fraction of the water from rainfall and sprinkler irrigation may flow along the soil surface from the ridges to the furrows

  2. Effect of processing history of pyrite on its leaching kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵中伟; 李洪桂; 孙培梅; 李运姣; 霍广生

    2003-01-01

    Different researchers often attained scattered kinetic results for the same leaching process. Usually, the difference is ascribed to the variation in mineral resource, chemical composition and, accuracy of experimental methods, while less attention is paid to the sample processing history. The present study shows that processing history of pyrite sample can cause great changes in its physico-chemical properties. Crushing, grinding and milling lead to an increase of the leachability of pyrite and the leaching becomes less temperature dependence owing to the decreasing of apparent activation energy of the reaction. The activation energy for its leaching in H2SO4-HNO3 solution is depressed from 73.9 to 47.5kJ/mol after being activated through vibrating milling for 40min. On the contrary, aging causes the reverse change owing to the release of extra inner energy stored during mechanical treatments. Thus activity of pyrite will decrease towards its original value. Surely the processing history of concentrate sample should be taken into consideration when studying the kinetics of leaching reaction.

  3. Speciation of arsenic and selenium during leaching of fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, E.E. van der

    1995-01-01

    The leaching (release) of large amounts of oxyanions, such as those of arsenic and selenium, is an major environmental problem when it comes to the disposal or use of coal fly ash. To predict environmentally safe conditions for the disposal or use of fly ash in, for example,

  4. Leaching of complex sulphide concentrate in acidic cupric chloride solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. TCHOUMOU; M. ROYNETTE

    2007-01-01

    The chemical analysis of a complex sulphide concentrate by emission spectrometry and X-ray diffraction shows that it contains essentially copper, lead, zinc and iron in the form of chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena. A small amount of pyrite is also present in the ore but does not be detected with X-ray diffraction. The cupric chloride leaching of the sulphide concentrate at various durations and solid/liquid ratios at 100 ℃ shows that the rate of dissolution of the ore is the fastest in the first several hours, and after 12 h it does not evolve significantly. If oxygen is excluded from the aqueous cupric chloride solution during the leaching experiment at 100 ℃, the pyrite in the ore will not be leached. The determination of principal dissolved metals in the leaching liquor by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and the chemical analysis of solid residues by emission spectrometry and X-ray diffraction allow to conclude that the rate of dissolution of the minerals contained in the complex sulphide concentrate are in the order of galena>sphalerite>chalcopyrite.

  5. Phosphorus leaching from cow manure patches on soil columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chardon, W.J.; Aalderink, G.H.; Salm, van der C.

    2007-01-01

    The loss of P in overland flow or leachate from manure patches can impair surface water quality. We studied leaching of P from 10-cmhigh lysimeters filled with intact grassland soil or with acid-washed sand. A manure patch was created on two grassland and two sandfilled lysimeters, and an additional

  6. The Rhizocephalan parasite of the crab Xantho incisus (Leach)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1955-01-01

    As shown by Holthuis (1954), the correct name for the European crab commonly referred to as Xantho floridus (Montagu) is Xantho incisus (Leach). A Rhizocephalan parasite of this crab was first mentioned (without an indication of specific characters) by Gerbe (1862); afterwards specimens were recorde

  7. Leach and mold resistance of essential oil metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2011-01-01

    Purified primary metabolites from essential oils were previously shown to be bioactive inhibitors of mold fungi on unleached Southern pine sapwood, either alone or in synergy with a second metabolite. This study evaluated the leachability of these compounds in Southern pine that was either dip- or vacuum-treated. Following laboratory leach tests, specimens were...

  8. Temporal and spatial variation in the status of acid rivers and potential prevention methods of AS soil-related leaching in peatland forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, T.

    2013-06-01

    This thesis examines temporal and spatial variations in the status of different rivers and streams of western Finland in terms of acidity and sources of acid load derived from the catchment area. It also examines the monitoring of acid runoff water derived from maintenance drainage in peatland forestry and suggests potential mitigation methods. A total of 17 river basins of different sizes in western Finland were selected for study, including rivers affected by both drainage of agricultural AS soils and forested peatlands. Old data from 1911-1931 were available, but most data were from the 1960s onwards and were taken from the HERTTA database. During 2009-2011, pH and conductivity measurements and water sampling were conducted. Biological monitoring for ecological classification was conducted in the Sanginjoki river system during 2008 and 2009. Three peatland forestry sites were selected to study acid leaching via pH and EC measurements and water sampling. Fluctuations in groundwater level in different drainage conditions were simulated and acid leaching was investigated in laboratory experiments in order to replicate a situation where the groundwater level drops and allows oxidation of sulphidic materials. It was found that river pH decreased and metal concentrations increased with runoff. The highest acidity observed coincided with periods of intense drainage in the 1970s and after dry summers in the past decade. Together with pH, electric conductivity and sulphate in river water were identified as suitable indicators of AS soils in a catchment, because they directly respond to acid leaching derived from AS soils. Acidity derived from organic acids was clearly observed in catchments dominated by forested peatlands and wetlands. Temporal and spatial variations in ecological status were observed, but monitoring at whole-catchment scale and during consecutive years is needed to increase the reliability of the results. Simulations on the potential effects of

  9. Suspended solids in and turbidity of runoff from green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Susan; Alyaseri, Isam; Retzlaff, William

    2011-01-01

    Green roof technology is used to reduce the quantity of stormwater runoff, but questions remain regarding its impact on quality. This study analyzed the total suspended solids (TSS) in and the turbidity of runoff from green roof growth media mixed with composted pine bark in an indoor pot study. The results showed that there were elevated levels of TSS and turbidity in the runoff that decreased over time for all growth media. Both TSS and turbidity are affected by the type of growth media. Lava and haydite had higher mean TSS and mean turbidity than arkalyte and bottom ash. Vegetation reduced the mean turbidity and mean TSS of the first flush by an average of 53% and 63%, respectively, but generally had no statistically significant effect thereafter. The results indicate that the media, rather than the vegetation, has a greater effect on TSS and turbidity in the runoff In areas with stringent water quality regulations for stormwater runoff from developed sites, media selection may be an important consideration. It may also be necessary in these regions to ensure that the roof is planted prior to receiving rainfall to minimize the first flush effect and that any irrigation does not result in runoff.

  10. Characterization of Urban Runoff Pollution between Dissolved and Particulate Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitrogen, and total dissolved phosphorus in total ones for all the catchments were 26.19%–30.91%, 83.29%–90.51%, and 61.54–68.09%, respectively. During rainfall events, the pollutant concentration at the initial stage of rainfall was high and then sharply decreased to a low value. Affected by catchments characterization and rainfall distribution, the highest concentration of road pollutants might appear in the later period of rainfall. Strong correlations were also found among runoffs pollutants in different phases. Total suspended solid could be considered as a surrogate for particulate matters in both road and roof runoff, while dissolved chemical oxygen demand could be regarded as a surrogate for dissolved matters in roof runoff.

  11. Knowledge techniques for the analysis of urban runoff using SWMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffaut, C.

    1988-01-01

    An expert system was built to facilitate and to automate the calibration of the Runoff block of the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM). The expert system is divided in two parts that can be linked together. The first one calibrates the runoff quantity simulation model. The second, that calibrates the runoff quality simulation module, has two versions. One calibrates the model with the only objective of a correct prediction of the pollutant loads. The second calibrates the model on the basis of the loadographs shapes. The expert systems act as a front end to counsel the user on the choice of the parameters. It interprets the results using backward chaining and suggest some useful changes in the values of the relevant parameters using forward chaining. The calibrations achieved by means of the expert systems has been tested on several watersheds. It has been found that, for runoff quality simulation, the accuracy of the prediction results is limited by the quality of the calibration data that are used and by the model itself that does not take into account all the processes involved in the transport of pollutant by urban runoff. A fuzzy set approach is proposed to try to take into account some of the uncertainties related with runoff quality simulation. A simplified fuzzy set version of SWMM is proposed that has been tested on two watersheds, giving some encouraging results.

  12. Advanced sensor-computer technology for urban runoff monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Byunggu; Behera, Pradeep K.; Ramirez Rochac, Juan F.

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the project team's advanced sensor-computer sphere technology for real-time and continuous monitoring of wastewater runoff at the sewer discharge outfalls along the receiving water. This research significantly enhances and extends the previously proposed novel sensor-computer technology. This advanced technology offers new computation models for an innovative use of the sensor-computer sphere comprising accelerometer, programmable in-situ computer, solar power, and wireless communication for real-time and online monitoring of runoff quantity. This innovation can enable more effective planning and decision-making in civil infrastructure, natural environment protection, and water pollution related emergencies. The paper presents the following: (i) the sensor-computer sphere technology; (ii) a significant enhancement to the previously proposed discrete runoff quantity model of this technology; (iii) a new continuous runoff quantity model. Our comparative study on the two distinct models is presented. Based on this study, the paper further investigates the following: (1) energy-, memory-, and communication-efficient use of the technology for runoff monitoring; (2) possible sensor extensions for runoff quality monitoring.

  13. Modeling of the Monthly Rainfall-Runoff Process Through Regressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos-Aranda Daniel Francisco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problems associated with the assessment of water resources of a river, the modeling of the rainfall-runoff process (RRP allows the deduction of runoff missing data and to extend its record, since generally the information available on precipitation is larger. It also enables the estimation of inputs to reservoirs, when their building led to the suppression of the gauging station. The simplest mathematical model that can be set for the RRP is the linear regression or curve on a monthly basis. Such a model is described in detail and is calibrated with the simultaneous record of monthly rainfall and runoff in Ballesmi hydrometric station, which covers 35 years. Since the runoff of this station has an important contribution from the spring discharge, the record is corrected first by removing that contribution. In order to do this a procedure was developed based either on the monthly average regional runoff coefficients or on nearby and similar watershed; in this case the Tancuilín gauging station was used. Both stations belong to the Partial Hydrologic Region No. 26 (Lower Rio Panuco and are located within the state of San Luis Potosi, México. The study performed indicates that the monthly regression model, due to its conceptual approach, faithfully reproduces monthly average runoff volumes and achieves an excellent approximation in relation to the dispersion, proved by calculation of the means and standard deviations.

  14. Bivariate Rainfall and Runoff Analysis Using Entropy and Copula Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate hydrologic frequency analysis has been widely studied using: (1 commonly known joint distributions or copula functions with the assumption of univariate variables being independently identically distributed (I.I.D. random variables; or (2 directly applying the entropy theory-based framework. However, for the I.I.D. univariate random variable assumption, the univariate variable may be considered as independently distributed, but it may not be identically distributed; and secondly, the commonly applied Pearson’s coefficient of correlation (g is not able to capture the nonlinear dependence structure that usually exists. Thus, this study attempts to combine the copula theory with the entropy theory for bivariate rainfall and runoff analysis. The entropy theory is applied to derive the univariate rainfall and runoff distributions. It permits the incorporation of given or known information, codified in the form of constraints and results in a universal solution of univariate probability distributions. The copula theory is applied to determine the joint rainfall-runoff distribution. Application of the copula theory results in: (i the detection of the nonlinear dependence between the correlated random variables-rainfall and runoff, and (ii capturing the tail dependence for risk analysis through joint return period and conditional return period of rainfall and runoff. The methodology is validated using annual daily maximum rainfall and the corresponding daily runoff (discharge data collected from watersheds near Riesel, Texas (small agricultural experimental watersheds and Cuyahoga River watershed, Ohio.

  15. Estimating degree day factors from MODIS for snowmelt runoff modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. He

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Degree-day factors are widely used to estimate snowmelt runoff in operational hydrological models. Usually, they are calibrated on observed runoff, and sometimes on satellite snow cover data. In this paper, we propose a new method for estimating the snowmelt degree-day factor (DDFS directly from MODIS snow covered area (SCA and ground based snow depth data without calibration. Subcatchment snow volume is estimated by combining SCA and snow depths. Snow density is estimated as the ratio of observed precipitation and changes in the snow volume for days with snow accumulation. Finally, DDFS values are estimated as the ratio of changes in the snow water equivalent and degree-day temperatures for days with snow melt. We compare simulations of basin runoff and snow cover patterns using spatially variable DDFS estimated from snow data with those using spatially uniform DDFS calibrated on runoff. The runoff performances using estimated DDFS are slightly improved, and the simulated snow cover patterns are significantly more plausible. The new method may help reduce some of the runoff model parameter uncertainty by reducing the total number of calibration parameters.

  16. Zinc corrosion runoff process induced by humid tropical climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veleva, L. [Center for Investigation and Advanced Study (CINVESTAV-Merida), Applied Physics Department, Carr. Ant. a Progreso, Km.6, C.P. 97310, Merida, Yuc. (Mexico); Meraz, E. [Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Division Academica de Ingenieria y Arquitectura, Km 1 Carretera Cunduacan-Jalpa de M., A.P. 24, C.P. 86690, Cunduacan, Tabasco (Mexico); Acosta, M. [Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Division Academica de Ciencias Basicas, Km 1 Carretera Cunduacan-Jalpa de M., A.P. 24, C.P. 86690, Cunduacan, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2007-05-15

    Zinc and hot dip galvanized steel are frequently used metals in building application. They have relatively good atmospheric resistance to corrosion, due to its oxidation in air and formation of protective rust on its surface, which acts as barrier between the metal and environment. However, some part of the rust can be dissolved by pluvial precipitations and water condensed on the metal surface. This process, called metal runoff, contributes for zinc dispersion in soils and waters. In order to make accurate estimation of zinc runoff induced by atmosphere in humid tropical climate, samples of pure Zn and hot dip galvanized steel have been exposed in the Gulf of Mexico. The data reveal that this process is strongly influenced by factors which determine the aggressivity of the environment (pluvial precipitations, cycles of dry and rainy periods, atmospheric pollutants, air humidity). High annual rates of zinc runoff (6.5 - 8.5 {+-} 0.30 g Zn m{sup -2}yr{sup -1}) were released, being the runoff 63 - 87% of the zinc corrosion rust. The zinc mass loss has been related to several independent parameters, presenting linear equation, which indicates the air contaminant SO{sub 2} as the major factor controlling the runoff of zinc. The reported results show higher runoff of zinc samples, compared to that of hot dip galvanized steel. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Total probabilities of ensemble runoff forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olav Skøien, Jon; Bogner, Konrad; Salamon, Peter; Smith, Paul; Pappenberger, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Ensemble forecasting has a long history from meteorological modelling, as an indication of the uncertainty of the forecasts. However, it is necessary to calibrate and post-process the ensembles as the they often exhibit both bias and dispersion errors. Two of the most common methods for this are Bayesian Model Averaging (Raftery et al., 2005) and Ensemble Model Output Statistics (EMOS) (Gneiting et al., 2005). There are also methods for regionalizing these methods (Berrocal et al., 2007) and for incorporating the correlation between lead times (Hemri et al., 2013). Engeland and Steinsland Engeland and Steinsland (2014) developed a framework which can estimate post-processing parameters varying in space and time, while giving a spatially and temporally consistent output. However, their method is computationally complex for our larger number of stations, which makes it unsuitable for our purpose. Our post-processing method of the ensembles is developed in the framework of the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS - http://www.efas.eu), where we are making forecasts for whole Europe, and based on observations from around 700 catchments. As the target is flood forecasting, we are also more interested in improving the forecast skill for high-flows rather than in a good prediction of the entire flow regime. EFAS uses a combination of ensemble forecasts and deterministic forecasts from different meteorological forecasters to force a distributed hydrologic model and to compute runoff ensembles for each river pixel within the model domain. Instead of showing the mean and the variability of each forecast ensemble individually, we will now post-process all model outputs to estimate the total probability, the post-processed mean and uncertainty of all ensembles. The post-processing parameters are first calibrated for each calibration location, but we are adding a spatial penalty in the calibration process to force a spatial correlation of the parameters. The penalty takes

  18. Supporting data for “A glacier runoff extension to the precipitation runoff modeling system”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beusekom, Ashley; Viger, Roland

    2017-01-01

    This product is an archive of the modeling artifacts used to produce a journal paper (Van Beusekom and Viger, 2016). The abstract for that paper follows. A module to simulate glacier runoff, PRMSglacier, was added to PRMS (Precipitation Runoff Modeling System), a distributed-parameter, physical-process hydrological simulation code. The extension does not require extensive on-glacier measurements or computational expense but still relies on physical principles over empirical relations as much as is feasible while maintaining model usability. PRMSglacier is validated on two basins in Alaska, Wolverine, and Gulkana Glacier basin, which have been studied since 1966 and have a substantial amount of data with which to test model performance over a long period of time covering a wide range of climatic and hydrologic conditions. When error in field measurements is considered, the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies of streamflow are 0.87 and 0.86, the absolute bias fractions of the winter mass balance simulations are 0.10 and 0.08, and the absolute bias fractions of the summer mass balances are 0.01 and 0.03, all computed over 42 years for the Wolverine and Gulkana Glacier basins, respectively. Without taking into account measurement error, the values are still within the range achieved by the more computationally expensive codes tested over shorter time periods.

  19. Effects of aging process on adsorption-desorption and bioavailability of fomesafen in an agricultural soil amended with rice hull biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Lin, Dunli; Zhang, Qian; Zheng, Yuan; Fang, Hua; Yu, Yunlong

    2017-06-01

    Biochar has been introduced as an acceptable soil amendment due to its environmental benefits such as sequestering soil contaminants. However, the aging process in biochar amended soil probably decreases the adsorption capacity of biochar through changing its physico-chemical properties. Adsorption, leaching and bioavailability of fomesafen to corn in a Chinese soil amended by rice hull biochar after 0, 30, 90 and 180days were investigated. Results showed that the addition of 0.5%-2% fresh biochar significantly increases the adsorption of fomesafen 4-26 times compare to unamended soil due to higher SSA of biochar. Biochar amendment also decreases fomesafen concentration in soil pore water by 5%-23% resulting lower risk of the herbicide for cultivated plants. However, the aging process decreased the adsorption capacity of biochar since the adsorption coefficient values which was 1.9-12.4 in 0.5%-2% fresh biochar amended soil, declined to 1.36-4.16, 1.13-2.78 and 0.95-2.31 in 1, 3 and 6-month aged treatments, respectively. Consequently, higher desorption, leaching and bioavailable fraction of fomesafen belonged to 6-month aged treatment. Nevertheless, rice hull biochar was effective for sequestering fomesafen as the adsorption capacity of biochar amended soil after 6months of aging was still 2.5-5 times higher compared to that of unamended soil. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Adsorption and collective paramagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Selwood, Pierce W

    1962-01-01

    Adsorption and Collective Paramagnetism describes a novel method for studying chemisorption. The method is based on the change in the number of unpaired electrons in the adsorbent as chemisorption occurs. The method is applicable to almost all adsorbates, but it is restricted to ferromagnetic adsorbents such as nickel, which may be obtained in the form of very small particles, that is to say, to ferromagnetic adsorbents with a high specific surface. While almost all the data used illustratively have been published elsewhere this is the first complete review of the subject. The book is addresse

  1. Adsorption and degradation of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides in soils: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszko, Tadeusz; Muszyński, Paweł; Materska, Małgorzata; Bojanowska, Monika; Kostecka, Małgorzata; Jackowska, Izabella

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of the present review on phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4-D), 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA), (2R)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid (dichlorprop-P), (2R)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid (mecoprop-P), 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butanoic acid (2,4-DB), and 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) butanoic acid (MCPB)-was to compare the extent of their adsorption in soils and degradation rates to assess their potential for groundwater contamination. The authors found that adsorption decreased in the sequence of 2,4-DB > 2,4-D > MCPA > dichlorprop-P > mecoprop-P. Herbicides are predominantly adsorbed as anions-on organic matter and through a water-bridging mechanism with adsorbed Fe cations-and their neutral forms are adsorbed mainly on organic matter. Adsorption of anions of 2,4-D, MCPA, dichlorprop-P, and mecoprop-P is inversely correlated with their lipophilicity values, and modeling of adsorption of the compounds based on this relationship is possible. The predominant dissipation mechanism of herbicides in soils is bacterial degradation. The contribution of other mechanisms, such as degradation by fungi, photodegradation, or volatilization from soils, is much smaller. The rate of bacterial degradation decreased in the following order: 2,4-D > MCPA > mecoprop-P > dichlorprop-P. It was found that 2,4-D and MCPA have the lowest potential for leaching into groundwater and that mecoprop-P and dichlorprop-P have slightly higher potential. Because of limited data on adsorption and degradation of 2,4-DB and MCPB, estimation of their leaching potential was not possible.

  2. Laboratory Simulation of Urban Runoff and Estimation of Runoff Hydrographs with Experimental Curve Numbers Implemented in USEPA SWMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prognostic capabilities of a lumped hydrologic modeling approach may be complicated by routing and connectivity among infiltrative and impervious surfaces. We used artificial rainfall to generate runoff from impervious and bare soil boxes arranged in series to simulate differ...

  3. Mineralogical and morphological changes of fly ashes with leaching phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta, J.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three Fly Ashes (FA from Spanish Power Plants with CaO contents between 2-30% in weight were examined. They were leached using a variation on EPA-EP leaching test, checking the influence of the leaching process on FA. Leaches were analyzed by ICP. XRD and SEM-EDX technique were used to analyze the leached FA. The study carried out was mainly centered in following the evolution of the most soluble elements and the formation of new secondary crystalline phases. The relationship between dissolution pH and the percentage of the extracted element was also confirmed.

    La investigación se realiza en tres cenizas volantes españolas con contenidos de CaO entre 2-30% en peso. Para observar el proceso de lixiviación en estos subproductos industriales se lleva a cabo un ensayo similar al descrito por la EPA-EP. Las aguas lixiviadas se analizan por la técnica ICP, mientras que los residuos se caracterizan por difracción de rayos X y SEM-EDX. El estudio se centra en el seguimiento de los elementos más solubles, según la metodología aplicada, y en la formación de nuevas fases cristalinas secundarias. Además, se confirma la relación existente entre el pH de la disolución y el porcentaje de elemento extraído.

  4. Technical Note: Comparison of accelerated methods for evaluating leaching from preservative-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Patricia K. Lebow; Kolby C. Hirth

    2017-01-01

    Current standardized methods are not well-suited for estimating in-service preservative leaching from treated wood products. This study compared several alternative leaching methods to a commonly used standard method, and to leaching under natural exposure conditions. Small blocks or lumber specimens were pressure treated with a wood preservative containing borax and...

  5. Effect of harsh or mild extraction of soil on pesticide leaching to groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, Jos J.T.I.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of leaching to groundwater is an important aspect of pesticide risk assessment. The first leaching tier usually consists of simulations with leaching scenarios based on pesticide- soil properties derived from laboratory studies. Because the extractability of pesticide residues in such

  6. [Dynamic leaching behavior of heavy metals in eco-cement mortar block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Jun-Li; Yue, Dong-Bei; Nie, Yong-Feng; Wang, Chang-Hai

    2008-03-01

    A dynamic leaching test with the renewal of acidic leaching medium was designed to study the leaching behavior of the seven heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) in three solidified eco-cement mortar samples with different particle size (fine granule, coarse granule, block) under a long-term leaching condition. It was demonstrated that all the heavy metals were detected in the leachate except Cd. The leaching ratio of Cr was the highest when compared with other metals in the same sample, and the leaching ratio of every metal showed an identical tendency: fine granule> coarse granule > block. The on-going leaching part of the relationship curve of accumulative leaching point (Pt) and t1/2 of each metal presented a fairly good linearity, which indicated that the leaching process was under the control of diffusion mechanism by the Fick Law. To each metal, the effective diffusion coefficient (Deff) showed a tendency of fine granule mortar with a bigger size would have a lower leaching ratio and a shorter period to finish the leaching test. To all the metals, the Deff was very low, with the magnitude around 10(-10) cm2/s, which meant the leaching process would take a relatively long time.

  7. Chapter 14: Evaluating the Leaching of Biocides from Preservative-Treated Wood Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Leaching of biocides is an important consideration in the long term durability and any potential for environmental impact of treated wood products. This chapter discusses factors affecting biocide leaching, as well as methods of evaluating rate and quantity of biocide released. The extent of leaching is a function of preservative formulation, treatment methods, wood...

  8. Geochemical modeling of leaching from MSWI air-pollution control residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astrup, T.; Dijkstra, J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Sloot, van der H.A.; Christensen, T.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from r

  9. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF SHORT-TERM LEACH TESTS FOR HEAVY METAL RELEASE FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of metal leaching using a single leach test such as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) is often questionable. The pH, redox potential (Eh), particle size and contact time are critical variables in controlling metal stability, not accounted...

  10. Geochemical modeling of leaching from MSWI air-pollution control residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astrup, T.; Dijkstra, J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Sloot, van der H.A.; Christensen, T.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from r

  11. Study of the relation between hydrated portland cement composition and leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly re

  12. Glacier runoff variation and its influence on river runoff during 1961–2006 in the Tarim River Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using monthly precipitation and temperature data from national meteorological stations, 90 m resolution DEM and a digital vector map of modern glaciers from the Chinese Glacier Inventory, the glacier mass balance and glacier runoff in the Tarim River Basin (TRB), China, were estimated based on a monthly degree-day model for 1961–2006. The results suggest that the modified monthly degree-day model can simulate the long-term changes in glacier mass balance and glacier runoff, which have been confirmed by short-term observation data and other results in literatures. The characteristics and trends of mass balance and glacier runoff variation were analyzed. It was found that the mean annual glacier mass balance during 1961–2006 was ?139.2 mm per year and the cumulative mass balance over the 46 year period was ?6.4 m in the TRB. The glacier mass balance displayed a clear decreasing trend over the entire TRB during 1961–2006. The average annual glacier runoff in the TRB was 144.16×108 m3 for 1961–2006. The results also show that glacier runoff has increased in the last 46 years, especially since the 1990s with 85.7% of the increased river flow being derived from the increased glacier runoff caused by loss of ice mass. Over the entire TRB, glacier runoff accounts for 41.5% of the total river flow during 1961–2006. The impact of glacier runoff on river flow has increased in the TRB as a result of glacier shrinkage.

  13. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Brian; Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth. L.

    2008-06-10

    The dissolution of synthetic boehmite (?-AlOOH) by 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) was examined in a series of batch adsorption/dissolution experiments. Additionally, the leaching behavior of {sup 233}U(VI) from boehmite was examined as a function of pH and HEDPA concentration. The results are discussed in terms of sludge washing procedures that may be utilized during underground tank waste remediation. In the pH range 4 to 10, complexation of Al(III) by HEDPA significantly enhanced dissolution of boehmite. This phenomenon was especially pronounced in the neutral pH region where the solubility of aluminum, in the absence of complexants, is limited by the formation of sparsely soluble aluminum hydroxides. At pH higher than 10, dissolution of synthetic boehmite was inhibited by HEDPA, likely due to sorption of Al(III):HEDPA complexes. Addition of HEDPA to equilibrated U(VI)-synthetic boehmite suspensions yielded an increase in the aqueous phase uranium concentration. Partitioning of uranium between the solid and aqueous phase is described in terms of U(VI):HEDPA speciation and dissolution of the boehmite solid phase.

  14. Selective Leaching of Vanadium from Roasted Stone Coal by Dilute Sulfuric Acid Dephosphorization-Two-Stage Pressure Acid Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Huang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel staged leaching process has been reported in this paper to selectively extract vanadium from roasted stone coal and the mechanisms have been clarified. Results showed that the leaching efficiency of V, Al, P and Fe was 80.46%, 12.24%, 0.67% and 3.12%, respectively, under the optimum dilute sulfuric acid dephosphorization (DSAD-two-stage pressure acid leaching (PAL conditions. The efficient separation of V from Fe, Al and P was realized. As apatite could be leached more easily than mica, the apatite could completely react with sulfuric acid, while the mica had almost no change in the DSAD process, which was the key aspect in realizing the effective separation of V from P. Similarly, the hydrolyzation of Fe and Al could be initiated more easily than that of V by decreasing the residual acid of leachate. The alunite and iron-sulphate compound generated in the first-stage PAL process resulted in the effective separation of V from Fe and Al.

  15. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  16. Modelling runoff from a Himalayan debris-covered glacier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fujita

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the processes by which glacial debris-mantles alter the melting of glacier ice have been well studied, the mass balance and runoff patterns of Himalayan debris-covered glaciers and the response of these factors to climate change are not well understood. Many previous studies have addressed mechanisms of ice melt under debris mantles by applying multiplicative parameters derived from field experiments, and other studies have calculated the details of heat conduction through the debris layer. However, those approaches cannot be applied at catchment scales because debris distributions are heterogeneous and difficult to measure. Here, we establish a runoff model for a Himalayan debris-covered glacier in which the spatial distribution of the thermal properties of the debris mantle is estimated from remotely sensed multi-temporal data. We validated the model for the Tsho Rolpa Glacial Lake–Trambau Glacier basin in the Nepal Himalaya, using hydro-meteorological observations obtained for a 3.5 yr period (1993–1996. We calculated long-term averages of runoff components for the period 1980–2007 using gridded reanalysis datasets. Our calculations suggest that excess meltwater from the debris-covered area contributes significantly to the total runoff, mainly because of its location at lower elevations. Uncertainties in runoff values due to estimations of the thermal properties and albedo of the debris-covered surface were assessed to be approximately 8% of the runoff from the debris-covered area. We evaluated the sensitivities of runoff components to changes in air temperature and precipitation. As expected, warmer air temperatures increase the total runoff by increasing the melting rate; however, increased precipitation slightly reduces the total runoff, as ice melting is suppressed by the increased snow cover and associated high albedo. The response of total runoff to changing precipitation is complex because of the different responses of

  17. U.S. Geological Survey Field Leach Test for Assessing Water Reactivity and Leaching Potential of Mine Wastes, Soils, and Other Geologic and Environmental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a fast (5-minute), effective, simple, and cost-effective leach test that can be used to simulate the reactions that occur when materials are leached by water. The USGS Field Leach Test has been used to predict, assess, and characterize the geochemical interactions between water and a broad variety of geologic and environmental matrices. Examples of some of the samples leached include metal mine wastes, various types of dusts, biosolids (processed sewage sludge), flood and wetland sediments, volcanic ash, forest-fire burned soils, and many other diverse matrices. The Field Leach Test has been an integral part of these investigations and has demonstrated its value as a geochemical characterization tool. It has enabled investigators to identify which constituents are water reactive, soluble, mobilized, and made bioaccessible because of leaching by water, and to understand potential impacts of these interactions on the surrounding environment.

  18. Preparation and adsorption behaviors of Cu(Ⅱ) ion-imprinted polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Shi-an; YUAN Zhou-lv; QIAO Rong; LI Wei

    2008-01-01

    Imprinted polymers were prepared for selective removal of Cu(II) ions from metal solutions. Three ion-imprinted polymers were synthesized with methacrylic acid (MAA), acrylamide (AA) and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBAA) respectively as the functional monomers, ethleneglycoldimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linking agent, 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator and Cu (II) ion as the imprint ion. The template Cu (II) ion was removed from the polymer by leaching with a liquid of a 1:1 volumetric ratio of HCl to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The capacity and selectivity of Cu(II) ion adsorption were investigated with the three imprinted polymers and their non-imprinted counterparts. The polymers have a maximum adsorption capacity at pH 7.0. The isotherm of their batch adsorption of Cu(II) ions shows a Langmuir adsorption pattern. Imprinted polymers all have a much higher capacity and higher selectivity of Cu(II) adsorption than non-imprinted ones. MAA polymer benefits the most from imprinting. Imprinted MAA polymer has the highest selectivity when used to rebind Cu (II) ion from an aqueous solution in the presence of other metal ions. Ion imprinting can be a promising technique of preparing selective adsorbents to separate and preconcentrate metal in a medium of multiple competitive metal ions through solid phase extraction (SPE).

  19. Modelling of leaching and geochemical processes in an aged MSWIBA subbase layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, David; Suer, Pascal; Sloot, Hans van der; Kosson, David; Flyhammar, Peter

    2009-07-15

    In a previous project, the accumulated effects of leaching and aging in a subbase layer of bottom ash in a test road were investigated. The test road were constructed in 1987 in Linkoeping, Sweden, and was in use until the start of the Vaendoera Q4-241 study in September 2003. The overall objective of the present study is to bring the evaluation of the previous project (Q4-241) further by taking advantage of the existing data, perform complementary laboratory experiments on four composite samples reflecting different degree of exposure to atmosphere and leaching. The specific objectives were to investigate: (i) what processes and mineral phases that govern leaching of macro- and trace elements and DOC in the bottom ash after 16 years (1987- 2003) of aging under field conditions. (ii) how the hydrologic conditions, infiltration of water and leachate production has evolved with time. The following tests were performed on the composite samples: pH-stat test, column test, Fe/Al oxide extraction and TOC fractioning. Geochemical and hydrological modelling where performed with LeachXS/Orchestra and Hydrus 2-D. Daily precipitation data from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) from the Malmslaett (Linkoeping) measurement station was used in the hydrological modelling of January 1988 to the 1st of september 2003. The hydraulic modeling results show that the bottom ash subbase layer endure seasonal wet and dry cycles. The results confirm that, depending on the boundary conditions along the shoulders the capillary potential may drive moisture either in or out of the road body. The water retention parameters for bottom ash were crucial in the hydraulic modeling and the capillary forces in bottom ash were found to be significant with a water retention curve close to silt. This explains the observed depletion of easily soluble salts in the test road. The results showed that the accumulated LS ratio for the bottom ash subbase layer reached about LS:10 in

  20. Leaching and ponding of viral contaminants following land application of biosolids on sandy-loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin; Harrigan, Tim; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2012-12-15

    Much of the land available for application of biosolids is cropland near urban areas. Biosolids are often applied on hay or grassland during the growing season or on corn ground before planting or after harvest in the fall. In this study, mesophilic anaerobic digested (MAD) biosolids were applied at 56,000 L/ha on a sandy-loam soil over large containment lysimeters seeded to perennial covers of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), or planted annually to maize (Zea mays L.). Portable rainfall simulators were to maintain the lysimeters under a nearly saturated (90%, volumetric basis) conditions. Lysimeter leachate and surface ponded water samples were collected and analyzed for somatic phage, adenoviruses, and anionic (chloride) and microbial (P-22 bacteriophage) tracers. Neither adenovirus nor somatic phage was recovered from the leachate samples. P-22 bacteriophage was found in the leachate of three lysimeters (removal rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.2 log(10)/m). Although the peak of the anionic tracer breakthrough occurred at a similar pore volume in each lysimeter (around 0.3 pore volume) the peak of P-22 breakthrough varied between lysimeters (worm holes or other natural phenomena. The concentration of viral contaminants collected in ponded surface water ranged from 1 to 10% of the initial concentration in the applied biosolids. The die off of somatic phage and P-22 in the surface water was fit to a first order decay model and somatic phage reached background level at about day ten. In conclusion, sandy-loam soils can effectively remove/adsorb the indigenous viruses leached from the land-applied biosolids, but there is a potential of viral pollution from runoff following significant rainfall events when biosolids remain on the soil surface.