WorldWideScience

Sample records for runaway air breakdown

  1. Kinetic theory of runaway air breakdown and the implications for lightning initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Gurevich, A.V.; Tunnell, T.; Milikh, G.M.

    1993-11-01

    The kinetic theory for a new air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuring a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms and are examined in the context of lightning initiation

  2. Runaway breakdown and hydrometeors in lightning initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, A V; Karashtin, A N

    2013-05-03

    The particular electric pulse discharges are observed in thunderclouds during the initiation stage of negative cloud-to-ground lightning. The discharges are quite different from conventional streamers or leaders. A detailed analysis reveals that the shape of the pulses is determined by the runaway breakdown of air in the thundercloud electric field initiated by extensive atmospheric showers (RB-EAS). The high amplitude of the pulse electric current is due to the multiple microdischarges at hydrometeors stimulated and synchronized by the low-energy electrons generated in the RB-EAS process. The series of specific pulse discharges leads to charge reset from hydrometeors to the free ions and creates numerous stretched ion clusters, both positive and negative. As a result, a wide region in the thundercloud with a sufficiently high fractal ion conductivity is formed. The charge transport by ions plays a decisive role in the lightning leader preconditioning.

  3. Runaway breakdown and electrical discharges in thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milikh, Gennady; Roussel-Dupré, Robert

    2010-12-01

    This review considers the precise role played by runaway breakdown (RB) in the initiation and development of lightning discharges. RB remains a fundamental research topic under intense investigation. The question of how lightning is initiated and subsequently evolves in the thunderstorm environment rests in part on a fundamental understanding of RB and cosmic rays and the potential coupling to thermal runaway (as a seed to RB) and conventional breakdown (as a source of thermal runaways). In this paper, we describe the basic mechanism of RB and the conditions required to initiate an observable avalanche. Feedback processes that fundamentally enhance RB are discussed, as are both conventional breakdown and thermal runaway. Observations that provide clear evidence for the presence of energetic particles in thunderstorms/lightning include γ-ray and X-ray flux intensifications over thunderstorms, γ-ray and X-ray bursts in conjunction with stepped leaders, terrestrial γ-ray flashes, and neutron production by lightning. Intense radio impulses termed narrow bipolar pulses (or NBPs) provide indirect evidence for RB particularly when measured in association with cosmic ray showers. Our present understanding of these phenomena and their enduring enigmatic character are touched upon briefly.

  4. Conditions for electron runaway under leader breakdown of long gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanov, K. N.

    2008-01-01

    An original hydrodynamic model in which inelastic collisions in the equations of motion and energy balance play a decisive role is developed and applied to simulate electron avalanches in strong electric fields. The mean energy and drift velocity of electrons, as well as the ionization coefficient and electric field in a wide range of mean electron energies, are determined for helium and xenon. A criterion is derived for the runaway of the average electron in discharges with ionization multiplication. It is shown that runaway can take place at any value of E/p, provided that the momentum mean free path exceeds the gap length. The voltage corresponding to electron runaway is found for helium, xenon, and air as a function of the electric field, the electron mean energy, and the parameter pd. Conditions for the formation of a precursor in electronegative gases are analyzed. It is shown that the presence of a precursor with a high electric conductance is necessary for the formation of a new leader step. The voltage and time ranges corresponding to efficient electron runaway and X-ray generation during leader breakdown in air are determined

  5. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fullekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E.M.D.

    2011-01-01

    at a distance of similar to 550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur similar to 4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from similar to 50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical...... electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.......The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which...

  6. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  7. Observation of the Avalanche of Runaway Electrons in Air in a Strong Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, A. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Zybin, K. P.; Yalandin, M. I.; Reutova, A. G.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.

    2012-08-01

    The generation of an avalanche of runaway electrons is demonstrated for the first time in a laboratory experiment. Two flows of runaway electrons are formed sequentially in an extended air discharge gap at the stage of delay of a pulsed breakdown. The first, picosecond, runaway electron flow is emitted in the cathode region where the field is enhanced. Being accelerated in the gap, this beam generates electrons due to impact ionization. These secondary electrons form a delayed avalanche of runaway electrons if the field is strong enough. The properties of the avalanche correspond to the existing notions about the runaway breakdown in air. The measured current of the avalanche exceeds up to an order the current of the initiating electron beam.

  8. Studies of Plasma Instabilities Excited by Ground-Based High Power HF (Heating) Facilities and of X and Gamma Ray Emission in Runaway Breakdown Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gurevich, Aleksander V

    2006-01-01

    .... The runaway breakdown process in inhomogeneous thunderstorm electric field; 5. X-ray emission in different gases due to runaway breakdown phenomena in a laboratory cyclotron installation; 6. An influence of combined effects of runaway breakdown and cosmic rays on lightning processes in thunderstorm atmosphere.

  9. Runaway breakdown in strong electric field as a source of terrestrial gamma flashes and gamma bursts in lightning leader steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, A.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: alex@lpi.ru; Zybin, K.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Medvedev, Yu.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperature, Russian Academy of Sciences, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-01-22

    The new model of lightning step leader is proposed. It includes three main processes developing simultaneously in a strong electric field: conventional breakdown, effect of runaway electrons and runaway breakdown (RB). The theory of RB in strong electric field is developed. Comparison with the existing observational data shows that the model can serve as a background for the explanation of gamma bursts in step leader and TGF.

  10. Runaway breakdown in strong electric field as a source of terrestrial gamma flashes and gamma bursts in lightning leader steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, A.V.; Zybin, K.P.; Medvedev, Yu.V.

    2007-01-01

    The new model of lightning step leader is proposed. It includes three main processes developing simultaneously in a strong electric field: conventional breakdown, effect of runaway electrons and runaway breakdown (RB). The theory of RB in strong electric field is developed. Comparison with the existing observational data shows that the model can serve as a background for the explanation of gamma bursts in step leader and TGF

  11. A comparison between spectra of runaway electron beams in SF6 and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruexue; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor; Gu, Jianwei; Baksht, Evgenii

    2015-01-01

    Runaway electron (RAE) with extremely high-energy plays important role on the avalanche propagation, streamer formation, and ionization waves in nanosecond-pulse discharges. In this paper, the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) in SF 6 and air in an inhomogeneous electric field is investigated. A VPG-30-200 generator with a pulse rise time of ∼1.6 ns and a full width at half maximum of 3–5 ns is used to produce RAE beams. The SAEBs in SF 6 and air are measured by using aluminum foils with different thicknesses. Furthermore, the SAEB spectra in SF 6 and air at pressures of 7.5 Torr, 75 Torr, and 750 Torr are compared. The results showed that amplitude of RAE beam current generated at the breakdown in SF 6 was approximately an order of magnitude less than that in air. The energy of SAEB in air was not smaller than that in SF 6 in nanosecond-pulse discharges under otherwise equal conditions. Moreover, the difference between the maximum energy of the electron distributions in air and SF 6 decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased. It was because the difference between the breakdown voltages in air and SF 6 decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased

  12. A comparison between spectra of runaway electron beams in SF6 and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Tarasenko, Victor; Gu, Jianwei; Baksht, Evgenii; Wang, Ruexue; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Runaway electron (RAE) with extremely high-energy plays important role on the avalanche propagation, streamer formation, and ionization waves in nanosecond-pulse discharges. In this paper, the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) in SF6 and air in an inhomogeneous electric field is investigated. A VPG-30-200 generator with a pulse rise time of ˜1.6 ns and a full width at half maximum of 3-5 ns is used to produce RAE beams. The SAEBs in SF6 and air are measured by using aluminum foils with different thicknesses. Furthermore, the SAEB spectra in SF6 and air at pressures of 7.5 Torr, 75 Torr, and 750 Torr are compared. The results showed that amplitude of RAE beam current generated at the breakdown in SF6 was approximately an order of magnitude less than that in air. The energy of SAEB in air was not smaller than that in SF6 in nanosecond-pulse discharges under otherwise equal conditions. Moreover, the difference between the maximum energy of the electron distributions in air and SF6 decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased. It was because the difference between the breakdown voltages in air and SF6 decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased.

  13. A comparison between spectra of runaway electron beams in SF{sub 6} and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruexue; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tarasenko, Victor [Institute of High Current Electronics, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Gu, Jianwei [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Baksht, Evgenii [Institute of High Current Electronics, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Runaway electron (RAE) with extremely high-energy plays important role on the avalanche propagation, streamer formation, and ionization waves in nanosecond-pulse discharges. In this paper, the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) in SF{sub 6} and air in an inhomogeneous electric field is investigated. A VPG-30-200 generator with a pulse rise time of ∼1.6 ns and a full width at half maximum of 3–5 ns is used to produce RAE beams. The SAEBs in SF{sub 6} and air are measured by using aluminum foils with different thicknesses. Furthermore, the SAEB spectra in SF{sub 6} and air at pressures of 7.5 Torr, 75 Torr, and 750 Torr are compared. The results showed that amplitude of RAE beam current generated at the breakdown in SF{sub 6} was approximately an order of magnitude less than that in air. The energy of SAEB in air was not smaller than that in SF{sub 6} in nanosecond-pulse discharges under otherwise equal conditions. Moreover, the difference between the maximum energy of the electron distributions in air and SF{sub 6} decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased. It was because the difference between the breakdown voltages in air and SF{sub 6} decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased.

  14. In situ measurements of the Runaway Breakdown (RB) on Aragats mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, A.; Hovsepyan, G.; Mailyan, B.

    2017-12-01

    Acceleration and multiplication of the cosmic ray electrons by strong electric fields in the thundercloud are well-established phenomena comprising the core of the atmospheric high-energy physics. The majority of experimental data on particle acceleration in the thunderclouds comes from space-born experiments detecting Terrestrial Gamma flashes (TGFs) and from networks of particle detectors located on the earth's surface observing Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). Models for explaining both TGF and TGE are based on the concept of a Runaway Breakdown (RB) introduced by A. Gurevich. Prove of these models requires registration of the electromagnetic avalanches developing in the thundercloud and reaching the earth's surface. Unfortunately due to high location of cloud and fast attenuation of electrons in the atmosphere the registration of such an avalanches are very rare. On Aragats mountain in Armenia, where the cloud location is very low we observe several TGE events with sizable electron contribution. We present direct measurements of such an avalanches lasting less than a microsecond; hundreds of such avalanches comprise a TGE lasting few minutes. We recovered as well the differential energy spectra of electron and gamma ray content of avalanches. The abrupt termination of the particle flux by nearby lightning indicates that RB process precedes (initiates) the lightning flash.

  15. Breakdowns in Coordination Between Air Traffic Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Chris; Orasanu, Judith; Miller, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    This talk outlines the complexity of coordination in air traffic control, introduces the NextGen technologies, identifies common causes for coordination breakdowns in air traffic control and examines whether these causes are likely to be reduced with the introduction of NextGen technologies. While some of the common causes of breakdowns will be reduced in a NextGen environment this conclusion should be drawn carefully given the current stage of development of the technologies and the observation that new technologies often shift problems rather than reduce them.

  16. Parameters of an avalanche of runaway electrons in air under atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkin, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    The features of runaway-electron avalanches developing in air under atmospheric pressures are investigated in the framework of a three-dimensional numerical simulation. The simulation results indicate that an avalanche of this type can be characterized, besides the time and length of its exponential growth, by the propagation velocity and by the average kinetic energy of the runaway electrons. It is shown that these parameters obey the similarity laws applied to gas discharges.

  17. Nanosecond air breakdown parameters for electron and microwave beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Air breakdown by avalanche ionization plays an important role in the electron beam and microwave propagations. For high electric fields and short pulse applications one needs avalanche ionization parameters for modeling and scaling of experimental devices. However, the breakdown parameters, i.e., the ionization frequency vs E/p (volt. cm -1 . Torr -1 ) in air is uncertain for very high values of E/P. A review is given of the experimental data for the electron drift velocity, the Townsend ionization coefficient in N 2 and O 2 and the ionization frequency and the collision frequency for momentum transfer in air are developed. (author)

  18. Pulsed and streamer discharges in air above breakdown electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Sun (Anbang); H.J. Teunissen (Jannis); U. M. Ebert (Ute)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractA 3D particle model is developed to investigate the streamer formation in electric fields above the breakdown threshold, in atmospheric air (1bar, 300 Kelvin). Adaptive particle management, adaptive mesh refinement and parallel computing techniques are used in the code. Photoionization

  19. Influence of the angular scattering of electrons on the runaway threshold in air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chanrion, O.; Bonaventura, Z.; Bourdon, A.

    2016-01-01

    The runaway electron mechanism is of great importance for the understanding of the generation of x- and gamma rays in atmospheric discharges. In 1991, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. Those emissions are bremsstrahlung from high energy...... electrons that run away in electric fields associated with thunderstorms. In this paper, we discuss the runaway threshold definition with a particular interest in the influence of the angular scattering for electron energy close to the threshold. In order to understand the mechanism of runaway, we compare...... scattering is not valid below 1 MeV where the runaway threshold usually is defined. These results are important for the thermal runaway and the runaway electron avalanche discharge mechanisms suggested to participate in the TGF generation....

  20. Impulse breakdown of small air gap in electric field Part II: Statistical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patterns of shot distribution and maximum coverage at impulse breakdown voltage for positive point electr-odes (needle and cone electrodes) in small air gaps in non-uniform electric fields were investigated. During the breakdown test, a sheet of paper was placed on the plate electrode (-ve), and each breakdown shot ...

  1. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  2. Impulse breakdown of small air gap in electric field Part I: Influence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of barrier position on breakdown voltage in air dielectric has been investigated. Needle and Cone positive point electrodes were used and the effects of electrode curvature on barrier position for maximum breakdown voltage were compared, with air gap for the point to plane electrode fixed at 10 cm for all the ...

  3. Formation of 1.4 MeV runaway electron flows in air using a solid-state generator with 10 MV/ns voltage rise rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesyats, G. A.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Sadykova, A. G.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2018-04-01

    Fulfillment of the condition that the voltage rise time across an air gap is comparable with the time of electron acceleration from a cathode to an anode allows a flow of runaway electrons (REs) to be formed with relativistic energies approaching that determined by the amplitude of the voltage pulse. In the experiment described here, an RE energy of 1.4 MeV was observed by applying a negative travelling voltage pulse of 860-kV with a maximum rise rate of 10 MV/ns and a rise time of 100-ps. The voltage pulse amplitude was doubled at the cathode of the 2-cm-long air gap due to the delay of conventional pulsed breakdown. The above-mentioned record-breaking voltage pulse of ˜120 ps duration with a peak power of 15 GW was produced by an all-solid-state pulsed power source utilising pulse compression/sharpening in a multistage gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line.

  4. Influence of the angular scattering of electrons on the runaway threshold in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanrion, O.; Bonaventura, Z.; Bourdon, A.; Neubert, T.

    2016-04-01

    The runaway electron mechanism is of great importance for the understanding of the generation of x- and gamma rays in atmospheric discharges. In 1991, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. Those emissions are bremsstrahlung from high energy electrons that run away in electric fields associated with thunderstorms. In this paper, we discuss the runaway threshold definition with a particular interest in the influence of the angular scattering for electron energy close to the threshold. In order to understand the mechanism of runaway, we compare the outcome of different Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo models with increasing complexity in the description of the scattering. The results show that the inclusion of the stochastic nature of collisions smooths the probability to run away around the threshold. Furthermore, we observe that a significant number of electrons diffuse out of the runaway regime when we take into account the diffusion in angle due to the scattering. Those results suggest using a runaway threshold energy based on the Fokker-Planck model assuming the angular equilibrium that is 1.6 to 1.8 times higher than the one proposed by [1, 2], depending on the magnitude of the ambient electric field. The threshold also is found to be 5 to 26 times higher than the one assuming forward scattering. We give a fitted formula for the threshold field valid over a large range of electric fields. Furthermore, we have shown that the assumption of forward scattering is not valid below 1 MeV where the runaway threshold usually is defined. These results are important for the thermal runaway and the runaway electron avalanche discharge mechanisms suggested to participate in the TGF generation.

  5. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 μm radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm 2 , sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10 8 nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then scaled to

  6. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ∼0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  7. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-01

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ˜0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  8. Modeling heat dominated electric breakdown in air, with adaptivity to electron or ion time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnihotri, A.; Hundsdorfer, W.; Ebert, U.

    2017-01-01

    We model heat dominated electrical breakdown in air in a short planar gap. We couple the discharge dynamics in fluid approximation with the hydrodynamic motion of the air heated by the discharge. To be computationally efficient, we derive a reduced model on the ion time scale, and we switch between

  9. The humidity effect on the breakdown voltage characteristics and the transport parameters of air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radmilović-Radjenović, M.; Radjenović, B.; Nikitović, Ž.; Matejčik, Š.; Klas, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper contains experimental results for the direct current (DC) breakdown voltages and calculated transport parameters for dry, synthetic and ambient air. The breakdown voltage curves for dry, ambient and synthetic air at the gap size of 100μm are very similar. The differences between them are much more pronounced at the interelectrode separation of 20μm, especially at the right hand branch of the breakdown voltage curves. On the other hand, the effective yields γ for dry and synthetic air are in disagreement at lower values of the E/p. Results of calculations based on the Two Term Approximation indicate that the humidity has no a great influence on the transport parameters at all range of the reduce field E/N.

  10. Effects of load voltage on voltage breakdown modes of electrical exploding aluminum wires in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen, E-mail: xwli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Kun; Chao, Youchuang; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The effects of the load voltage on the breakdown modes are investigated in exploding aluminum wires driven by a 1 kA, 0.1 kA/ns pulsed current in air. From laser probing images taken by laser shadowgraphy, schlieren imaging, and interferometry, the position of the shockwave front, the plasma channel, and the wire core edge of the exploding product can be determined. The breakdown mode makes a transition from the internal mode, which involves breakdown inside the wire core, to the shunting mode, which involves breakdown in the compressed air, with decreasing charging voltage. The breakdown electrical field for a gaseous aluminum wire core of nearly solid density is estimated to be more than 20 kV/cm, while the value for gaseous aluminum of approximately 0.2% solid density decreases to 15–20 kV/cm. The breakdown field in shunting mode is less than 20 kV/cm and is strongly affected by the vaporized aluminum, the desorbed gas, and the electrons emitted from the wire core during the current pause. Ohmic heating during voltage collapses will induce further energy deposition in the current channel and thus will result in different expansion speeds for both the wire core and the shockwave front in the different modes.

  11. Maximized Effective Energy Output of Contact-Separation-Triggered Triboelectric Nanogenerators as Limited by Air Breakdown

    KAUST Repository

    Zi, Yunlong; Wu, Changsheng; Ding, Wenbo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) has demonstrated their promising potential as a high-efficiency mechanical energy harvesting technology, and plenty of effort has been devoted to improving the power output by maximizing the triboelectric surface charge density. However, due to high-voltage air breakdown, most of the enhanced surface charge density brought by material/surface optimization or external ion injection is not retainable or usable for electricity generation during the operation of contact-separation-triggered TENGs. Here, the existence of the air breakdown effect in a contact-separation mode TENG with a low threshold surface charge density of ≈40–50 µC m−2 is first validated under the high impedance external load, and then followed by the theoretical study of the maximized effective energy output as limited by air breakdown for contact-separation-triggered TENGs. The effects of air pressure and gas composition are also studied and propose promising solutions for reducing the air breakdown effect. This research provides a crucial fundamental study for TENG technology and its further development and applications.

  12. Maximized Effective Energy Output of Contact-Separation-Triggered Triboelectric Nanogenerators as Limited by Air Breakdown

    KAUST Repository

    Zi, Yunlong

    2017-05-02

    Recent progress in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) has demonstrated their promising potential as a high-efficiency mechanical energy harvesting technology, and plenty of effort has been devoted to improving the power output by maximizing the triboelectric surface charge density. However, due to high-voltage air breakdown, most of the enhanced surface charge density brought by material/surface optimization or external ion injection is not retainable or usable for electricity generation during the operation of contact-separation-triggered TENGs. Here, the existence of the air breakdown effect in a contact-separation mode TENG with a low threshold surface charge density of ≈40–50 µC m−2 is first validated under the high impedance external load, and then followed by the theoretical study of the maximized effective energy output as limited by air breakdown for contact-separation-triggered TENGs. The effects of air pressure and gas composition are also studied and propose promising solutions for reducing the air breakdown effect. This research provides a crucial fundamental study for TENG technology and its further development and applications.

  13. Amplitude−temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated during subnanosecond breakdown in air and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasenko, V. F., E-mail: vft@loi.hcei.tsc.ru; Baksht, E. Kh.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I. [Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    The amplitude−temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with an amplitude of up to 100 A, as well as of the breakdown voltage and discharge current, are studied experimentally with a picosecond time resolution. The waveforms of discharge and SAEB currents are synchronized with those of the voltage pulses. It is shown that the amplitude−temporal characteristics of the SAEB depend on the gap length and the designs of the gas diode and cathode. The mechanism for the generation of runaway electron beams in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  14. Amplitude-temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated during subnanosecond breakdown in air and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    The amplitude-temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with an amplitude of up to 100 A, as well as of the breakdown voltage and discharge current, are studied experimentally with a picosecond time resolution. The waveforms of discharge and SAEB currents are synchronized with those of the voltage pulses. It is shown that the amplitude-temporal characteristics of the SAEB depend on the gap length and the designs of the gas diode and cathode. The mechanism for the generation of runaway electron beams in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  15. Runaway modeling in ORMAK and TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, A.; Swain, D.W.; Marcus, F.B.; Kammash, T.

    1977-07-01

    A zero-dimensional tokamak start-up code is used to investigate the generation of runaway electrons in the Oak Ridge Tokamak (ORMAK) and The Next Step (TNS) and the effect of the runaways on the plasma breakdown, current, and energy balance, The runaways, which are considered collisionless, are treated self-consistently in the circuit equation by including a runaway current component (determined from a runaway rate equation). During the earliest stages of a discharge, the total current in the plasma is so low that closed flux surfaces do not exist. Runaways produced are lost almost instantly because they follow magnetic field lines that intersect the limiter. Once the current in the tokamak builds up sufficiently, closed flux surfaces start forming which improves runaway containment. The time tau when this occurs is uncertain. Results on ORMAK and TNS are displayed for different values of tau (before which any runaway created is assumed to be lost instantaneously). The assumption of flux surface closure after some arbitrary time tau is then justified by modeling an ORMAK discharge which includes the effects on runaway confinement of error fields generated by currents flowing in the leads to the toroidal field coils. Also shown are ORMAK simulations in different density regimes and TNS results for different loop voltage pulses

  16. Experimental study of CO/sub 2/-laser-induced air breakdown over long distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caressa, J.; Autric, M.; Dufresne, D.; Bournot, P.

    1979-11-01

    Results of an experimental study on air breakdown produced by radiation from a high-power CO/sub 2/ laser are presented. From these measurements, the breakdown threshold over a flux range (1.5 x 10/sup 8/ breakdown region for different laser parameters (5

  17. The inception of pulsed discharges in air: simulations in background fields above and below breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Anbang; Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2014-11-01

    We investigate discharge inception in air, in uniform background electric fields above and below the breakdown threshold. We perform 3D particle simulations that include a natural level of background ionization in the form of positive and \\text{O}2- ions. In background fields below breakdown, we use a strongly ionized seed of electrons and positive ions to enhance the field locally. In the region of enhanced field, we observe the growth of positive streamers, as in previous simulations with 2D plasma fluid models. The inclusion of background ionization has little effect in this case. When the background field is above the breakdown threshold, the situation is very different. Electrons can then detach from \\text{O}2- and start ionization avalanches in the whole volume. These avalanches together create one extended discharge, in contrast to the ‘double-headed’ streamers found in many fluid simulations.

  18. Kinetic and fluid theory of microwave breakdown in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Murphy, T.; Johnson, A.

    1987-01-01

    We have developed time-dependent fluid and kinetic treatments of electron transport in air in the presence of a propagating microwave pulse. In both cases the HPM pulses are assumed to be of short enough duration so that electron spatial diffusion can be neglected. In addition, we limit our calculations to the non-relativistic regime where effects due to the ponderomotive force are negligible. 6 refs., 4 figs

  19. Antarctic air over New Zealand following vortex breakdown in 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ajtic

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available An ozonesonde profile over the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC site at Lauder (45.0° S, 169.7° E, New Zealand, for 24 December 1998 showed atypically low ozone centered around 24 km altitude (600 K potential temperature. The origin of the anomaly is explained using reverse domain filling (RDF calculations combined with a PV/O3 fitting technique applied to ozone measurements from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instrument. The RDF calculations for two isentropic surfaces, 550 and 600 K, show that ozone-poor air from the Antarctic polar vortex reached New Zealand on 24–26 December 1998. The vortex air on the 550 K isentrope originated in the ozone hole region, unlike the air on 600 K where low ozone values were caused by dynamical effects. High-resolution ozone maps were generated, and their examination shows that a vortex remnant situated above New Zealand was the cause of the altered ozone profile on 24 December. The maps also illustrate mixing of the vortex filaments into southern midlatitudes, whereby the overall mid-latitude ozone levels were decreased.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere composition and chemistry – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  20. Antarctic air over New Zealand following vortex breakdown in 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ajtic

    Full Text Available An ozonesonde profile over the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC site at Lauder (45.0° S, 169.7° E, New Zealand, for 24 December 1998 showed atypically low ozone centered around 24 km altitude (600 K potential temperature. The origin of the anomaly is explained using reverse domain filling (RDF calculations combined with a PV/O3 fitting technique applied to ozone measurements from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instrument. The RDF calculations for two isentropic surfaces, 550 and 600 K, show that ozone-poor air from the Antarctic polar vortex reached New Zealand on 24–26 December 1998. The vortex air on the 550 K isentrope originated in the ozone hole region, unlike the air on 600 K where low ozone values were caused by dynamical effects. High-resolution ozone maps were generated, and their examination shows that a vortex remnant situated above New Zealand was the cause of the altered ozone profile on 24 December. The maps also illustrate mixing of the vortex filaments into southern midlatitudes, whereby the overall mid-latitude ozone levels were decreased.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere composition and chemistry – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  1. Numerical simulations of compact intracloud discharges as the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche-Extensive Air Shower process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabshahi, S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Nag, A.; Rakov, V. A.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2014-01-01

    Compact intracloud discharges (CIDs) are sources of the powerful, often isolated radio pulses emitted by thunderstorms. The VLF-LF radio pulses are called narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs). It is still not clear how CIDs are produced, but two categories of theoretical models that have previously been considered are the Transmission Line (TL) model and the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche-Extensive Air Showers (RREA-EAS) model. In this paper, we perform numerical calculations of RREA-EASs for various electric field configurations inside thunderstorms. The results of these calculations are compared to results from the other models and to the experimental data. Our analysis shows that different theoretical models predict different fundamental characteristics for CIDs. Therefore, many previously published properties of CIDs are highly model dependent. This is because of the fact that measurements of the radiation field usually provide information about the current moment of the source, and different physical models with different discharge currents could have the same current moment. We have also found that although the RREA-EAS model could explain the current moments of CIDs, the required electric fields in the thundercloud are rather large and may not be realistic. Furthermore, the production of NBPs from RREA-EAS requires very energetic primary cosmic ray particles, not observed in nature. If such ultrahigh-energy particles were responsible for NBPs, then they should be far less frequent than is actually observed.

  2. LASER PLASMA: Experimental confirmation of the erosion origin of pulsed low-threshold surface optical breakdown of air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min'ko, L. Ya; Chumakou, A. N.; Chivel', Yu A.

    1988-08-01

    Nanosecond kinetic spectroscopy techniques were used to identify the erosion origin of pulsed low-threshold surface optical breakdown of air as a result of interaction of microsecond neodymium and CO2 laser pulses with some metals (indium, lead).

  3. Simulation study on avoiding runaway electron generation by magnetic perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, S.; Yoshino, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Hudson, S.R.; Kawano, Y.; Takizuka, T.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations have demonstrated that magnetic islands having the widths expected on the major disruption cause the collisionless loss of the relativistic electrons, and that the resultant loss rate is high enough to avoid or to suppress the runaway generation. It is because, for the magnetic fluctuations in the disruption, the loss of the electron confinement due to the breakdown of the toroidal momentum conservation overwhelms the runaway electron confinement due to the phase-averaging effect of relativistic electrons. Simulation results agree closely with recent experiments on fast plasma shutdown, showing that it is possible to prevent the generation of runaway electrons. (author)

  4. Electron run-away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinson, I.B.

    1975-01-01

    The run-away effect of electrons for the Coulomb scattering has been studied by Dricer, but the question for other scattering mechanisms is not yet studied. Meanwhile, if the scattering is quasielastic, a general criterion for the run-away may be formulated; in this case the run-away influence on the distribution function may also be studied in somewhat general and qualitative manner. (Auth.)

  5. Numerical study of the propagation of high power microwave pulses in air breakdown environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Kuo, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical model based on a set of two modal equations has been developed to describe self-consistently the propagation of an intense microwave pulse in an air breakdown environment. It includes Poynting's equation for the continuity of the power flux of the pulse and the rate equation of the electron density. A forward wave approximation is used to simplify Poynting's equation and a semi-empirical formula for the ionization frequency as a function of the wave field amplitude is adopted for this model. In order to improve the numerical efficiency of the model in terms of the required computation time and available subroutines for numerical analysis of pulse propagation over a long distance, a transformation to the frame of local time of the pulse is introduced. The effect of space-time dependence of the group velocity of the pulse is included in this properly designed transformation. The inhomogeneous feature of the background pressure is also preserved in the model. The resultant equations are reduced to the forms which can be solved directly by the available subroutine of ODE solver. In this work, a comprehensive numerical analysis of the propagation of high power microwave pulse through the atmosphere is performed. It is shown that the pulse energy can severely be attenuated by the self-generated plasma. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to identify the optimum parameters of the pulse so that the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination can be minimized. These parameters include the power, frequency, shape and length of the pulse. The conditions for maximizing the ionization at a destinated region in the upper atmosphere will also be determined

  6. Problems of Maltreated Runaway Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, P. David; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Shelter staff from 8 states completed Client Information Records on 2,019 runaways. Found significant differences in problems reported by physically abused and sexually abused runaways when compared to nonabused runaway peers. Runaways who were both physically and sexually maltreated were significantly more vulnerable and much worse off than those…

  7. Computational fluid-dynamic model of laser-induced breakdown in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dors, Ivan G.; Parigger, Christian G.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature and pressure profiles are computed by the use of a two-dimensional, axially symmetric, time-accurate computational fluid-dynamic model for nominal 10-ns optical breakdown laser pulses. The computational model includes a kinetics mechanism that implements plasma equilibrium kinetics in ionized regions and nonequilibrium, multistep, finite-rate reactions in nonionized regions. Fluid-physics phenomena following laser-induced breakdown are recorded with high-speed shadowgraph techniques. The predicted fluid phenomena are shown by direct comparison with experimental records to agree with the flow patterns that are characteristic of laser spark decay

  8. Elemental analysis of halogens using molecular emission by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.; Eliezer, N.; Groisman, Y. [Laser Distance Spectrometry, 9 Mota Gur St., Petah Tikva 49514 (Israel); Forni, O. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2014-08-01

    Fluorine and chlorine do not produce atomic and ionic line spectra of sufficient intensity to permit their detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. They do, however, combine with alkali-earths and other elements to form molecules whose spectra may be easily identified, enabling detection in ambient conditions with much higher sensitivity than using F I and Cl I atomic lines. - Highlights: • We studied laser induced breakdown spectra of halogens with alkali-earth elements. • Emission and temporal behavior of CaF and CaCl molecules were determined. • Sensitivity of F and Cl detection by molecules and atoms was compared.

  9. Runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreshkin, E V; Barengolts, S A; Chaikovsky, S A; Oreshkin, V I

    2015-01-01

    A numerical simulation was performed to study the formation of a runaway electron (RAE) beam from an individual emission zone in atmospheric pressure air discharges with a highly overvolted interelectrode gap. It is shown that the formation of a RAE beam in discharges at high overvoltages is much contributed by avalanche processes. (paper)

  10. Runaway electrons in toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoepfel, H.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of runaway electrons in toroidal devices are reviewed here, with particular reference to tokamaks. The complex phenomenology of runaway effects, which have been the subject of research for the past twenty years, is organized within the framework of a number of physical models. The mechanisms and rates for runaway production are discussed first, followed by sections on runaway-driven kinetic relaxation processes and runaway orbit confinement. Next, the equilibrium and stability of runaway-dominated discharges are reviewed. Models for runaway production at early times in the discharge and the scaling of runaway phenomena to larger devices are also discussed. Finally, detection techniques and possible applications of runaways are mentioned. (author)

  11. Model predictions for atmospheric air breakdown by radio-frequency excitation in large gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. K.; Mankowski, J.; Dickens, J. C.; Neuber, A. A.; Joshi, R. P.

    2017-07-01

    The behavior of the breakdown electric field versus frequency (DC to 100 MHz) for different gap lengths has been studied numerically at atmospheric pressure. Unlike previous reports, the focus here is on much larger gap lengths in the 1-5 cm range. A numerical analysis, with transport coefficients obtained from Monte Carlo calculations, is used to ascertain the electric field thresholds at which the growth and extinction of the electron population over time are balanced. Our analysis is indicative of a U-shaped frequency dependence, lower breakdown fields with increasing gap lengths, and trends qualitatively similar to the frequency-dependent field behavior for microgaps. The low frequency value of ˜34 kV/cm for a 1 cm gap approaches the reported DC Paschen limit.

  12. Breakdown voltage at the electric terminals of GCFR-core flow test loop fuel rod simulators in helium and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntley, W.R.; Conley, T.B.

    1979-12-01

    Tests were performed to determine the ac and dc breakdown voltage at the terminal ends of a fuel rod simulator (FRS) in helium and air atmospheres. The tests were performed at low pressures (1 to 2 atm) and at temperatures from 20 to 350 0 C (68 to 660 0 F). The area of concern was the 0.64-mm (0.025-in.) gap between the coaxial conductor of the FRS and the sheaths of the four internal thermocouples as they exit the FRS. The tests were prformed to ensure a sufficient safety margin during Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) operations that require potentials up to 350 V ac at the FRS terminals. The primary conclusion from the test results is that the CFTL cannot be operated safely if the terminal ends of the FRSs are surrounded by a helium atmosphere but can be operated safely in air

  13. Runaway electrons during tokamak startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.S.; Jayakumar, R.

    1988-01-01

    Runaway electrons significantly affect the plasma and impurity evolution during tokamak startup. During its rise, a runaway pulse stores magnetic flux inductively; this is then released during the decay phase of the runaway pulse. This process affects plasma formation, current initiation and current buildup. Because of their relativistic velocities the runaway electrons have higher ionization and excitation rates than the plasma electrons. This leads to a significant modification of the impurity behaviour and consequently the plasma evolution. (author). 20 refs, 8 figs

  14. Runaway snakes in TEXTOR-94

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Entrop, I.; R. Jaspers,; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Finken, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of a runaway beam confined in an island-like structure, a so-called runaway snake, are reported. The observations are made in TEXTOR-94 by measurement of synchrotron radiation emitted by these runaways. A full poloidal View allows for the study of the synchrotron pattern of the snake to

  15. Generation of runaway electron beams in high-pressure nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Burachenko, A. G.; Baksht, E. Kh

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the results of experimental studies of the amplitude-temporal characteristics of a runaway electron beam, as well as breakdown voltage in nitrogen are presented. The voltage pulses with the amplitude in incident wave ≈120 kV and the rise time of ≈0.3 ns was used. The supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) was detected by a collector behind the flat anode. The amplitude-time characteristics of the voltage and SAEB current were studied with subnanosecond time resolution. The maximum pressure at which a SAEB is detectable by collector was ∼1 MPa. This pressure increases with decreasing the voltage rise time. The waveforms of the discharge and runaway electron beam currents was synchronized with the voltage pulses. The mechanism of the runaway electron generation in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  16. High frequency breakdown voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Thanh Duy.

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information about the effect of frequency on the breakdown voltage of an air gap at standard pressure and temperature, 76 mm Hg and O degrees C, respectively. The frequencies of interest are 47 MHz and 60 MHz. Additionally, the breakdown in vacuum is briefly considered. The breakdown mechanism is explained on the basis of collision and ionization. The presence of the positive ions produced by ionization enhances the field in the gap, and thus determines the breakdown. When a low-frequency voltage is applied across the gap, the breakdown mechanism is the same as that caused by the DC or static voltage. However, when the frequency exceeds the first critical value f c , the positive ions are trapped in the gap, increasing the field considerably. This makes the breakdown occur earlier; in other words, the breakdown voltage is lowered. As the frequency increases two decades or more, the second critical frequency, f ce , is reached. This time the electrons start being trapped in the gap. Those electrons that travel multiple times across the gap before reaching the positive electrode result in an enormous number of electrons and positive ions being present in the gap. The result is a further decrease of the breakdown voltage. However, increasing the frequency does not decrease the breakdown voltage correspondingly. In fact, the associated breakdown field intensity is almost constant (about 29 kV/cm).The reason is that the recombination rate increases and counterbalances the production rate, thus reducing the effect of the positive ions' concentration in the gap. The theory of collision and ionization does not apply to the breakdown in vacuum. It seems that the breakdown in vacuum is primarily determined by the irregularities on the surfaces of the electrodes. Therefore, the effect of frequency on the breakdown, if any, is of secondary importance

  17. Runaway snakes in TEXTOR-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entrop, I.; Jaspers, R.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Finken, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of a runaway beam confined in an island-like structure, a so-called runaway snake, are reported. The observations are made in TEXTOR-94 by measurement of synchrotron radiation emitted by these runaways. A full poloidal view allows for the study of the synchrotron pattern of the snake to estimate runaway energy, pitch angle and the radius, shift and safety factor of the drift surface q D at which the runaway beam has developed. The runaway snake parameters are investigated under different current and magnetic field strength conditions. Examples are found of a runaway snake at the q D =1 and the q D =2 drift surface. The radial diffusion coefficient of runaways inside a snake is D r approx. 0.01m 2 s -1 . The rapid runaway losses in regions of (macroscopic) magnetic perturbations outside a snake and the good confinement inside an island assumed to consist of perfect nested surfaces are consistent with magnetic turbulence as the main cause for runaway transport. (author)

  18. Runaway electron beam control for longitudinally pumped metal vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbychev, G. V.; Kolbycheva, P. D.

    1995-08-01

    Physics and techniques for producing of the pulsed runaway electron beams are considered. The main obstacle for increasing electron energies in the beams is revealed to be a self- breakdown of the e-gun's gas-filled diode. Two methods to suppress the self-breakdown and enhance the volumetric discharge producing the e-beam are offered and examined. Each of them provides 1.5 fold increase of the ceiling potential on the gun. The methods also give the ways to control several guns simultaneously. Resulting in the possibility of realizing the powerful longitudinal pumping of metal-vapor lasers on self-terminated transitions of atoms or ions.

  19. Runaway in the landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Walcher, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    We consider flux compactifications of type IIB string theory on the mirror of a rigid Calabi-Yau. In special cases, these models are dual to the type IIA flux vacua with runaway direction in flux space. We show that new weak coupling AdS solutions can be found for large complex structure, while Minkowski solutions with all moduli stabilized are confined to be at strong coupling. The existence of these solutions, as found in a previous work, is nevertheless guaranteed by a nonrenormalization theorem of the type IIB flux superpotential. Based on our results, we are led to the conjecture that supersymmetric runaway directions in flux space are always accompanied by a spectrum of moduli masses reaching down to the AdS scale. This could be violated in a nonsupersymmetric situation

  20. Dynamics of runaways in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.D.; Alper, B.; Edwards, A.W.; Ingesson, L.C.; Johnson, M.F.; Ward, D.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the properties of the runaway beams generated in JET following disruptions. Radiation is emitted by the runaways, both when they are in flight and when they hit the vessel walls. Because radiation protected soft x-ray cameras were developed for the JET DT campaign, it has been possible to make the first direct observations of the runaway beam in flight from the x-ray line radiation produced by the beam excitation of K-shell vacancies in the metallic impurities of the residual plasma. These observations give clear images of the runaway beam and provide detailed information on its time development, size, position and stability. The current density and q-profile have also been determined. It has been found that there is a delay between the disruption and the start of runaway generation and this offers a possibility of instigating runaway control methods. Detailed determination of the runaway-wall interaction suggests that the runaways have a braided structure. (author)

  1. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Asma; Laroussi, Mounir; Pervez, Mohammad Rasel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10 11 cm -3 and it reaches to the maximum of 10 12 cm -3 .

  2. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Asma [Independent University, Bangladesh, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Bashundhara, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Laroussi, Mounir [Old Dominion University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Norfolk, Virginia (United States); Pervez, Mohammad Rasel [Master Mind College, Department of Physics, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  3. Inflation expels runaways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C. [Department of Physics, Columbia University,New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2016-12-30

    We argue that moduli stabilization generically restricts the evolution following transitions between weakly coupled de Sitter vacua and can induce a strong selection bias towards inflationary cosmologies. The energy density of domain walls between vacua typically destabilizes Kähler moduli and triggers a runaway towards large volume. This decompactification phase can collapse the new de Sitter region unless a minimum amount of inflation occurs after the transition. A stable vacuum transition is guaranteed only if the inflationary expansion generates overlapping past light cones for all observable modes originating from the reheating surface, which leads to an approximately flat and isotropic universe. High scale inflation is vastly favored. Our results point towards a framework for studying parameter fine-tuning and inflationary initial conditions in flux compactifications.

  4. Theory of runaway electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, H [Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, University of California, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1958-07-01

    This paper treats the problem of electrons moving through an infinite gas of positive ions under the influence of a static uniform electric field of arbitrary strength. In evaluating the electrical conductivity of such a gas the conventional treatment involves a perturbation solution of the time-independent Boltzmann equation, and results in the well-known (temperature){sup 3/2} law. Two assumptions are basic to these treatments: 1) that a steady state electron velocity distribution is attained several mean-free collision times after the electric field is applied, and 2) that the terminal electron drift velocity is small compared to the average random electron speed. Both assumptions are avoided in this paper. In the next section the problem is formulated starting with the Boltzmann equation and a review of approximate analytic solutions appropriate to the weak and strong electric field cases is presented. We then describe a time-dependent numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation and compare these results with the approximate solutions. All of these treatments lead to the conclusion that this problem does not admit a time-independent solution. Because of the strong energy dependence of the Rutherford scattering law, the electron drift velocity is not bounded by a terminal value, rather it grows monotonically with time. This is the so-called runaway effect predicted by Giovanelli. Collective effects, or plasma oscillations, are ignored in this work, although these undoubtedly play an important role in the conduction of electricity through the plasma.

  5. The Origin of Runaway Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerwerf, R.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2000-12-01

    Milliarcsecond astrometry provided by Hipparcos and by radio observations makes it possible to retrace the orbits of some of the nearest runaway stars and pulsars to determine their site of origin. The orbits of the runaways AE Aurigae and μ Columbae and of the eccentric binary ι Orionis intersected each other ~2.5 Myr ago in the nascent Trapezium cluster, confirming that these runaways were formed in a binary-binary encounter. The path of the runaway star ζ Ophiuchi intersected that of the nearby pulsar PSR J1932+1059, ~1 Myr ago, in the young stellar group Upper Scorpius. We propose that this neutron star is the remnant of a supernova that occurred in a binary system that also contained ζ Oph and deduce that the pulsar received a kick velocity of ~350 km s-1 in the explosion. These two cases provide the first specific kinematic evidence that both mechanisms proposed for the production of runaway stars, the dynamical ejection scenario and the binary-supernova scenario, operate in nature.

  6. Electron runaway in rf discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.F.

    1992-10-01

    The critical electric field is computed as a function of pressure and starting energy for electrons to run away to high energies in moderate pressure discharges. The runaway conditions depend critically on the shape of the elastic cross section vs. energy curve. Computations are made for H, H 2 , and He gases, and it is shown that runaway occurs much more readily in atomic hydrogen than in the other gases. The values of the runaway fields are larger than would normally occur in dc discharges, where large voltages would lead to arc formation. However, in rf discharges such electric fields can be sustained over times long compared to electron transit times but short compared to ion transit times. (author)

  7. Thermonuclear Runaway model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, W.M.; Kutter, G.S.; Starrfield, S.; Truran, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The nova outburst requires an energy source that is energetic enough to eject material and is able to recur. The Thermonuclear Runaway (TNR) model, coupled with the binary nature of nova systems satisfies these conditions. The white dwarf/red dwarf binary nature of novae was first recognized as a necessary conditions by Kraft. The small separation characteristic of novae systems allows the cool, red secondary to overflow is Roche lobe. In the absence of strong, funneling magnetic fields, the angular momentum of this material prevents it from falling directly onto the primary, and it first forms a disk around the white dwarf. This material is eventually accreted from the disk onto the white dwarf. As the thickness of this hydrogen-rich layer increases, the degenerate matter at the base reaches a temperature that is high enough to initiate thermonuclear fusion of hydrogen. Thermonuclear energy release increases the temperature which in turn increases the energy generation rate. Because the material is degenerate, the pressure does not increase with temperature, which normally allows a star to adjust itself to a steady nuclear burning rate. Thus the temperature and nuclear energy generation increase and a TNR results. When the temperature reaches the Fermi temperature, degeneracy is lifted and the rapid pressure increase causes material expansion. The hydrogen-rich material either is ejected or consumed by nuclear burning, and the white dwarf returns to its pre-outburst state. The external source of hydrogen fuel from the secondary allows the while process to repeat. 43 refs., 8 figs

  8. Runaway Youths: Families in Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Margaret; And Others

    The Hamden Mental Health Service staff collaborated with the police on a joint research project concerning runaway youth. The data suggest that adolescents who run away come from broken homes where disruption during preadolescence has been associated with parental separation and remarriage. These adolescents often exhibit symptoms of depression…

  9. Remote Shutoff Stops Runaway Lawnmower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambo, Alan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how electronics students at Central Nine Career Center designed a kill switch circuit to stop a runaway lawnmower. This project is ideal for a career center since the electronics/robotics, small engines and horticulture classes can all work together on their respective parts of the modification, installation…

  10. Runaway Reaction: Solving for X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Solveig A.

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the runaway reaction as it was displayed by Barry, a 14-year-old eighth-grade boy with learning disabilities. It identifies some of the common characteristics of this response and proposes school intervention methods. Functional behavioral assessments and strength-based assessments are encouraged, along with using strategy…

  11. Theoretical Investigations of Dielectric Breakdown in CO2: Implications for Atmospheric Discharges on Mars (and Venus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riousset, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The detection of an atmospheric discharge in the Martian atmosphere by Ruf et al. [GRL, 36, L13202, 2009] supports the idea of a Martian atmospheric electric circuit [Farrell and Desch, JGR, 106, E4, 2001]. However, the lack of subsequent detection of similar events raises the question of the conditions of their initiation, and the existence of Martian lightning remains a controversial question. On Earth, atmospheric electricity manifests itself in the form of glow, corona, streamer, and leader discharges observed as Saint Elmo's fire, sprites, lightning and jets discharges, and other Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). All of these are dielectric breakdown governed by different physics. Their initiation is associated with the crossing of specific electric field thresholds: relativistic runaway, streamer propagation, conventional breakdown, or thermal runaway thresholds, some better understood than others. For example, the initiation of a lightning discharge is known to occur when the local electric field exceeds a value similar to relativistic runaway field, but the exact threshold, as well as the physical mechanisms at work, remain unclear to date. Scaling laws for electric fields (and other quantities) have been established by Pasko et al. [GRL, 25(12), 2123-2126, 1998] and Pasko [NATO Sci. Series, Springer, 253-311, 2006]. In this work, we develop profiles for initiation criteria in air and in other atmospheric environments. We further calculate their associated scaling laws to determine the ability to trigger lightning flashes and TLEs on Mars. This lets us predict the likelihood of electrical discharges and calculate the expected electric field conditions, under which discharges could be observed. We develop the analogy between Earth sand storm [Nicoll et al., Env. Res. Lett., 6, 014001, 2001] and Martian dust storms [Melnik and Parrot, JGR, 103(A12), 1998] to investigate the charge structure and resulting electric fields necessary to initiate dielectric

  12. A model for disruption generated runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.; Campbell, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    One of the possible consequences of disruptions in tokamaks is the generation of runaway electrons which can impact plasma facing components and cause damage, owing to high local energy deposition. This problem becomes more serious as the machine size and plasma current increase. Since large size and high currents are characteristics of proposed future machines, control of runaway generation is an important design consideration. A lumped circuit model for disruption runaway electron generation indicates that impurity concentration and type, as well as plasma motion, can strongly influence runaway behaviour. A comparison of disruption data from several runs on JET and DIII-D with model results demonstrate the effects of impurities, and plasma motion, on runaway number density and energy. The model is also applied to the calculation of runaway currents for ITER. (author). 16 refs, 13 figs

  13. Runaway electron generation in tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.; Andersson, F.; Fueloep, T.; Smith, H.; Anderson, D.; Lisak, M.; Eriksson, L.-G.

    2005-01-01

    The time evolution of the plasma current during a tokamak disruption is calculated by solving the equations for runaway electron production simultaneously with the induction equation for the toroidal electric field. The resistive diffusion time in a post-disruption plasma is typically comparable to the runaway avalanche growth time. Accordingly, the toroidal electric field induced after the thermal quench of a disruption diffuses radially through the plasma at the same time as it accelerates runaway electrons, which in turn back-react on the electric field. When these processes are accounted for in a self-consistent way, it is found that (1) the efficiency and time scale of runaway generation agrees with JET experiments; (2) the runaway current profile typically becomes more peaked than the pre-disruption current profile; and (3) can easily become radially filamented. It is also shown that higher runaway electron generation is expected if the thermal quench is sufficiently fast. (author)

  14. Runaway Children in America: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, William H.; Burkhead, E. Jane

    1989-01-01

    The paper reviews the literature regarding runaway children, defines runaway youth, and discusses predisposing factors. Suggestions are offered for further research on the etiology and treatment of runaway behavior. (JDD)

  15. Safe venting of ''red oil'' runaway reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paddleford, D.F.; Fauske, H.K.

    1994-01-01

    Calorimetry testing of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) saturated with strong nitric acid was performed to determine the relationship between vent size and pressure buildup in the event of a runaway reaction. These experiments show that runaway can occur in an open system, but that even when runaway is induced in the TBP/HN0 3 system, dangerous pressure buildup will be prevented with practical vent size

  16. Stochastic runaway of dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Graeff, P.

    1984-10-01

    One-dimensional, stochastic, dynamical systems are well studied with respect to their stability properties. Less is known for the higher dimensional case. This paper derives sufficient and necessary criteria for the asymptotic divergence of the entropy (runaway) and sufficient ones for the moments of n-dimensional, stochastic, dynamical systems. The crucial implication is the incompressibility of their flow defined by the equations of motion in configuration space. Two possible extensions to compressible flow systems are outlined. (orig.)

  17. Relativistic runaway electrons in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaspers, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Runaway electrons are inherently present in a tokamak, in which an electric field is applied to drive a toroidal current. The experimental work is performed in the tokamak TEXTOR. Here runaway electrons can acquire energies of up to 30 MeV. The runaway electrons are studied by measuring their synchrotron radiation, which is emitted in the infrared wavelength range. The studies presented are unique in the sense that they are the first ones in tokamak research to employ this radiation. Hitherto, studies of runaway electrons revealed information about their loss in the edge of the discharge. The behaviour of confined runaways was still a terra incognita. The measurement of the synchrotron radiation allows a direct observation of the behaviour of runaway electrons in the hot core of the plasma. Information on the energy, the number and the momentum distribution of the runaway electrons is obtained. The production rate of the runaway electrons, their transport and the runaway interaction with plasma waves are studied. (orig./HP)

  18. Runaway companions of supernova remnants with Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubert, Douglas; Fraser, Morgan; Evans, N. Wyn

    2018-04-01

    It is expected that most massive stars have companions and thus that some core-collapse supernovae should have a runaway companion. The precise astrometry and photometry provided by Gaia allows for the systematic discovery of these runaway companions. We combine a prior on the properties of runaway stars from binary evolution with data from TGAS and APASS to search for runaway stars within ten nearby supernova remnants. We strongly confirm the existing candidate HD 37424 in S147, propose the Be star BD+50 3188 to be associated with HB 21, and suggest tentative candidates for the Cygnus and Monoceros Loops.

  19. Air pollution and children: neural and tight junction antibodies and combustion metals, the role of barrier breakdown and brain immunity in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vojdani, Aristo; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Friedle, Albrecht; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Sarathi-Mukherjee, Partha; Martínez-Aguirre, Xavier; Park, Su-Bin; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children are exposed to concentrations of air pollutants, including fine particulate matter (PM2.5), above safety standards. In the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) megacity, children show an early brain imbalance in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune response-associated genes, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We investigated serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibodies to neural and tight junction proteins and environmental pollutants in 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 y with high versus low air pollution exposures. We also measured metals in serum and CSF. MCMA children showed significantly higher serum actin IgG, occludin/zonulin 1 IgA, IgG, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein IgG and IgM (p < 0.01), myelin basic protein IgA and IgG, S-100 IgG and IgM, and cerebellar IgG (p < 0.001). Serum IgG antibodies to formaldehyde, benzene, and bisphenol A, and concentrations of Ni and Cd were significantly higher in exposed children (p < 0.001). CSF MBP antibodies and nickel concentrations were higher in MCMA children (p = 0.03). Air pollution exposure damages epithelial and endothelial barriers and is a robust trigger of tight junction and neural antibodies. Cryptic 'self' tight junction antigens can trigger an autoimmune response potentially contributing to the neuroinflammatory and Alzheimer and Parkinson's pathology hallmarks present in megacity children. The major factor determining the impact of neural antibodies is the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Defining the air pollution linkage of the brain/immune system interactions and damage to physical and immunological barriers with short and long term neural detrimental effects to children's brains ought to be of pressing importance for public health.

  20. Fiber-optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of zirconium metal in air: Special features of the plasma produced by a long-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ayumu; Ohba, Hironori; Toshimitsu, Masaaki; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Ruas, Alexandre; Sakka, Tetsuo; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2018-04-01

    The decommissioning of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is an essential issue in nuclear R&D. Fiber-optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (Fiber-optic LIBS) could be used for in-situ elemental analysis of the inside of the damaged reactors. To improve the performances under difficult conditions, using a long-pulse laser can be an efficient alternative. In this work, the emission spectra of zirconium metal in air obtained for a normal-pulse laser (6 ns) and a long-pulse laser (100 ns) (wavelength: 1064 nm, pulse energy: 12.5 mJ, spot diameter: 0.35 mm) are compared to investigate the fundamental aspects of fiber-optic LIBS with the long-pulse laser. The spectral features are considerably different: when the long-pulse laser is used, the atomic and molecular emission is remarkably enhanced. The enhancement of the atomic emission at the near infrared (NIR) region would lead to the observation of emission lines with minimum overlapping. To understand the differences in the spectra induced respectively from the normal-pulse laser and the long-pulse laser, photodiode signals, time-resolved spectra, plasma parameters, emission from the ambient air, and emission regions are investigated, showing the particular characteristics of the plasma produced by the long-pulse laser.

  1. Runaways: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer; Mosteller, Frederick

    More than half of runaway adolescents cite poor family communication and conflict as the primary reasons for running. Runaways (.5-1.5 million annually) generally arrive on the streets with few survival skills and little money. They are often subject to abuse of various sorts, and many eventually resort to criminal activity or use drugs in efforts…

  2. Runaway Slave Advertisements: Teaching from Primary Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tom; Doyle, Brooke

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss how children can learn from runaway slave advertisements. The advertisements for runaway slaves that masters placed in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century newspapers are among the documentary sources available to teachers for studying the lives of African-American slaves. Such advertisements often describe a…

  3. The Meaning of Home for Runaway Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Einat; Muzicant, Amit

    2008-01-01

    This naturalistic qualitative study examines the concept of "home" for runaway girls. Through the "home story" of girls who run away from home, the authors hoped to understand the many facets of home, as well as broaden the existing knowledge-base about the phenomenon of adolescent runaway girls. Data consisted of in-depth interviews with 15 girls…

  4. Runaway acceleration during magnetic reconnection in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P; Eriksson, L-G; Andersson, F

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the basic theory of runaway electron production is reviewed and recent progress is discussed. The mechanisms of primary and secondary generation of runaway electrons are described and their dynamics during a tokamak disruption is analysed, both in a simple analytical model and through numerical Monte Carlo simulation. A simple criterion for when these mechanisms generate a significant runaway current is derived, and the first self-consistent simulations of the electron kinetics in a tokamak disruption are presented. Radial cross-field diffusion is shown to inhibit runaway avalanches, as indicated in recent experiments on JET and JT-60U. Finally, the physics of relativistic post-disruption runaway electrons is discussed, in particular their slowing down due to emission of synchrotron radiation, and their ability to produce electron-positron pairs in collisions with bulk plasma ions and electrons

  5. Runaway pacemaker: a forgotten phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Daniel F; Sammartino, M Victoria; Pellegrino, Graciela M M; Barja, Luis D; Albina, Gaston; Segura, Eliseo V; Balado, Roberto; Laiño, Ruben; Giniger, Alberto G

    2005-11-01

    Runaway is an uncommon pacemaker dysfunction, characterized by fast and erratic spikes at non-physiological rates. This infrequent but potentially lethal failure mode may be related to low battery voltage. Four single chamber pacemaker patients were analyzed (Medtronic Minix ST 8330, Minneapolis, MN, had been implanted in two patients and two CPI Triumph VR 1124, St Paul, MN, in the other two). They had been admitted because of presyncopal episodes. Typical high rate stimuli at 2000 ppm alternating with pacing at 60-65 ppm were recorded in all ECGs. Lead system tests were normal. The pulse generators had to be replaced.

  6. Disk tides and accretion runaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, William R.; Hahn, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    It is suggested that tidal interaction of an accreting planetary embryo with the gaseous preplanetary disk may provide a mechanism to breach the so-called runaway limit during the formation of the giant planet cores. The disk tidal torque converts a would-be shepherding object into a 'predator,' which can continue to cannibalize the planetesimal disk. This is more likely to occur in the giant planet region than in the terrestrial zone, providing a natural cause for Jupiter to predate the inner planets and form within the O(10(exp 7) yr) lifetime of the nebula.

  7. Needs and Self-Concept of Runaway Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Phyllis; McCoard, Douglas

    1994-01-01

    Developed Needs of Adolescent Runaways to assess needs of runaway adolescents housed in runaway shelter. Findings from 76 adolescent runaways revealed that greatest needs were concerned with living arrangements, family relationships, and communication with parents. Respondents perceived information about sex, drugs, and alcohol as least important.…

  8. Runaway Children Twelve Years Later: A Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lucy; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This study was based on intensive interviews with former runaways, nonrunaway siblings, parents, and other relatives. Differences in outcome were found between: (1) runaways and siblings; (2) runaway repeaters and nonrepeaters; and (3) runaways from working-class and middle-class backgrounds. (Author)

  9. The Prevalence of Disabilities and Maltreatment among Runaway Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patricia M.; Knutson, John F.

    2000-01-01

    Descriptive information was analyzed for maltreated and nonmaltreated runaways from hospital (N=39,352, 255 runaways) and school (N=40,211, 562 runaways) populations. Children and youth with disabilities (especially those with behavior disorders, mental retardation, and communication disorders) were at increased risk to become runaways in both…

  10. Influence of Er:YAG and Nd:YAG wavelengths on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements under air or helium atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detalle, Vincent; Sabsabi, Mohamad; St-Onge, Louis; Hamel, Andre; Heon, Rene

    2003-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is widely dependent on the conditions of its implementation in terms of laser characteristics (wavelength, energy, and pulse duration), focusing conditions, and surrounding gas. In this study two wavelengths, 1.06 and 2.94 μm, obtained with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers, respectively, were used for LIBS analysis of aluminum alloy samples in two conditions of surrounding gas. The influence of the laser wavelength on the laser-produced plasma was studied for the same irradiance by use of air or helium as a buffer gas at atmospheric pressure. We used measurements of light emission to determine the temporally resolved space-averaged electron density and plasma temperature in the laser-induced plasma. We also examined the effect of laser wavelength in two different ambient conditions in terms of spectrochemical analysis by LIBS. The results indicate that the effect of the surrounding gas depends on the laser wavelength and the use of an Er:YAG laser could increase linearity by limiting the leveling in the calibration curve for some elements in aluminum alloys. There is also a significant difference between the plasma induced by the two lasers in terms of electron density and plasma temperature

  11. Spatial characterization of red and white skin potatoes using nano-second laser induced breakdown in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Imran; Rehan, Kamran; Sultana, S.; Haq, M. Oun ul; Niazi, Muhammad Zubair Khan; Muhammad, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    We presents spectroscopic study of the plasma generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser irradiation of the flesh of red and white skin potatoes. From the spectra recorded with spectrometer (LIBS2500+, Ocean Optics, USA) 11 elements were identified in red skin potato, whereas, the white skin potato was found to have nine elements. Their relative concentrations were estimated using CF-LIBS method for the plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The target was placed in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The electron temperature and number density were calculated from Boltzmann plot and stark broadened line profile methods, respectively using Fe I spectral lines. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters were also studied which show a decreasing trend of 6770 K-4266 K and (3-2.0) × 1016 cm-3. Concentrations of the detected elements were monitored as a function of depth of the potatoes. Our study reveals a decreasing tendency in concentration of iron from top to the centre of potato's flesh, whereas, the concentrations of other elements vary randomly.

  12. On the inward drift of runaway electrons during the plateau phase of runaway current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Di, E-mail: hudi-2@pku.edu.cn [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qin, Hong [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-03-15

    The well observed inward drift of current carrying runaway electrons during runaway plateau phase after disruption is studied by considering the phase space dynamic of runaways in a large aspect ratio toroidal system. We consider the case where the toroidal field is unperturbed and the toroidal symmetry of the system is preserved. The balance between the change in canonical angular momentum and the input of mechanical angular momentum in such a system requires runaways to drift horizontally in configuration space for any given change in momentum space. The dynamic of this drift can be obtained by integrating the modified Euler-Lagrange equation over one bounce time. It is then found that runaway electrons will always drift inward as long as they are decelerating. This drift motion is essentially non-linear, since the current is carried by runaways themselves, and any runaway drift relative to the magnetic axis will cause further displacement of the axis itself. A simplified analytical model is constructed to describe such inward drift both in the ideal wall case and no wall case, and the runaway current center displacement as a function of parallel momentum variation is obtained. The time scale of such displacement is estimated by considering effective radiation drag, which shows reasonable agreement with the observed displacement time scale. This indicates that the phase space dynamic studied here plays a major role in the horizontal displacement of runaway electrons during plateau phase.

  13. Runaway tails in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of a runaway tail driven by a dc electric field in a magnetized plasma is analyzed. Depending on the strength of the electric field and the ratio of plasma to gyrofrequency, there are three different regimes in the evolution of the tail. The tail can be (1) stable with electrons accelerated to large parallel velocities, (2) unstable to Cerenkov resonance because of the depletion of the bulk and the formation of a positive slope, (3) unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance instability driven by the large velocity anisotropy in the tail. Once an instability is triggered (Cerenkov or anomalous Doppler resonance) the tail relaxes into an isotropic distribution. The role of a convection type loss term is also discussed.

  14. Production of runaway electrons by negative streamer discharges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chanrion, Olivier Arnaud; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    thunderstorms, the so-called Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes. The radiation is thought to be bremsstrahlung from energetic (MeV) electrons accelerated in a thunderstorm discharge. The observation goes against conventional wisdom that discharges in air are carried by electrons with energies below a few tens of e...... and the conditions on the electric field for the acceleration of electrons into the runaway regime. We use particle codes to describe the process of stochastic acceleration and introduce a novel technique that improves the statistics of the relatively few electrons that reach high energies. The calculation...

  15. Runaway electrons in TEXT-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Runaway electrons have long been studied in tokamak plasmas. The previous results regarding runaway electrons and the detection of hard x-rays are reviewed. The hard x-ray energy on TEXT-U is measured and the scaling of energy with electron density, n e , is noted. This scaling suggests a runaway source term that scales roughly as n e / 1 . The results indicate that runaways are created throughout the discharges. An upper bound for X e due to magnetic fluctuations was found to be .0343 m 2 /s. This is an order of magnitude too low to explain the thermal transport in TEXT, implying that electrostatic fluctuations are important in thermal transport in TEXT

  16. Measurements of Silicon Detector Thermal Runaway

    CERN Document Server

    Heusch, C A; Moser, H G

    1999-01-01

    We measured thermal runaway properties of previously irradiated silicon detectors cooled by TPG bars. We simulated their expected behaviour to measure the energy gap in the detector material and to test the validity of various underlying assumptions.

  17. Runaway electrons in the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The runaway electrons have been studied in the start-up phase [12–14], as well as in the steady phase [15–17]. We have confined ourselves here to the initial rise phase of the discharge mainly because the runaway electrons find the initial low density (Т ) and large applied toroidal electric field ( М = Оloop 2 К), where К is ...

  18. Runaway electrons beams in ITER disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-01-01

    In agreement with the initial projections, the potential generation of runaway beams in disruptions of ITER discharges was performed. This analysis was based on the best-available present projections of plasma parameters existing in large-tokamak disruptions. Using these parameters, the potential contributions from various basic mechanisms for the generation of runway electrons were estimated. The envisioned mechanisms included (i) the well-known Dreicer process (assuming an evaporation of the runways from the thermal distribution), (ii) the seeding of runaway beams resulting from the potential presence of trapped high-temperature electrons from the original discharge still remaining in the disruption plasma at time of reclosure of the magnetic surfaces, and (iii) the generation of runaway beams through avalanche exponentiation of low-level seed runaways resulting via close collisions of existing runaways with cold plasma electrons. Finally, the prospective behavior of the any generated runaway beams -- in particular during their decay -- as well as their potential avoidance and/or damage controlled extraction through the use of magnetic perturbation fields also was considered in some detail

  19. Diffusion with Varying Drag; the Runaway Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, David Kenneth

    We study the motion of electrons in an ionized plasma of electrons and ions in an external electric field. A probability distribution function describes the electron motion and is a solution of a Fokker-Planck equation. In zero field, the solution approaches an equilibrium Maxwellian. For arbitrarily small field, electrons overcome the diffusive effects and are freely accelerated by the field. This is the electron runaway phenomenon. We treat the electric field as a small perturbation. We consider various diffusion coefficients for the one dimensional problem and determine the runaway current as a function of the field strength. Diffusion coefficients, non-zero on a finite interval are examined. Some non-trivial cases of these can be solved exactly in terms of known special functions. The more realistic case where the diffusion coefficient decays with velocity are then considered. To determine the runaway current, the equivalent Schrodinger eigenvalue problem is analysed. The smallest eigenvalue is shown to be equal to the runaway current. Using asymptotic matching a solution can be constructed which is then used to evaluate the runaway current. The runaway current is exponentially small as a function of field strength. This method is used to extract results from the three dimensional problem.

  20. Diffusion with varying drag; the runaway problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The motion of electrons in an ionized plasma of electrons and ions in an external electric field is studied. A probability distribution function describes the electron motion and is a solution of a Fokker-Planck equation. In zero field, the solution approaches an equilibrium Maxwellian. For arbitrarily small field, electrons overcome the diffusive effects and are freely accelerated by the field. This is the electron-runaway phenomenon. The electric field is treated as a small perturbation. Various diffusion coefficients are considered for the one dimensional problem, and the runaway current is determined as a function of the field strength. Diffusion coefficients, non-zero on a finite interval are examined. Some non-trivial cases of these can be solved exactly in terms of known special functions. The more realistic case where the diffusion coeffient decays with velocity are then considered. To determine the runaway current, the equivalent Schroedinger eigenvalue problem is analyzed. The smallest eigenvalue is shown to be equal to the runaway current. Using asymptotic matching, a solution can be constructed which is then used to evaluate the runaway current. The runaway current is exponentially small as a function of field strength. This method is used to extract results from the three dimensional problem

  1. Investigations of dc breakdown fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ramsvik, Trond; Reginelli, Alessandra; Taborelli, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    The need for high accelerating gradients for the future 30 GHz multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) at CERN has triggered a comprehensive study of DC breakdown fields of metals in UHV. The study shows that molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti) and TiVAl reach high breakdown fields, and are thus good candidates for the iris material of CLIC structures. A significant decrease in the saturated breakdown field (Esat) is observed for molybdenum and tungsten when exposed to air. Specifically, at air pressures of 10-5 mbar, the decrease in Esat is found to be 50% and 30% for molybdenum and tungsten, respectively. In addition, a 30% decrease is found when molybdenum is conditioned with a CO pressure of ~1-10-5 mbar. Surface analysis measurements and breakdown conditioning in O2 ambience imply that the origin of the decrease in Esat is closely linked to oxide formation on the cathode surface. "Ex-situ" treatments by ion bombardment of molybdenum effectively reduce the oxide layers, and improve the brea...

  2. Runaway electron transport studies in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongzhen; Qi Changwei; Ding Xuantong; Li Wenzhong

    2002-01-01

    The transport of runaway electrons in a hot plasma has been studied in four experiments, which provide the runaway diffusivity D r The first experiment obtained runaway electrons using a steady state approach for values of the runaway confinement time τ r , deduced from hard X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra. In the second experiment, diffusion has been interpreted in terms of the magnetic fluctuation, from which a electron thermal diffusivity can be deduced. Runaway electro diffusion coefficient is determined by intrinsic magnetic fluctuations, rather than electrostatic fluctuations because of the high energy involved. The results presented here demonstrate the efficiency of using runaway transport techniques for determining intrinsic magnetic fluctuations

  3. AC BREAKDOWN IN GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    electron- emission (multipactor) region, and (3) the low-frequency region. The breakdown mechanism in each of these regions is explained. An extensive bibliography on AC breakdown in gases is included.

  4. Simulation of tokamak runaway-electron events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Miyahara, A.; Miyake, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    1987-08-01

    High energy runaway-electron events which can occur in tokamaks when the plasma hits the first wall are a critical issue for the materials selection of future devices. Runaway-electron events are simulated with an electron linear accelerator to better understand the observed runaway-electron damage to tokamak first wall materials and to consider the runaway-electron issue in further materials development and selection. The electron linear accelerator produces beam energies of 20 to 30 MeV at an integrated power input of up to 1.3 kW. Graphite, SiC + 2 % AlN, stainless steel, molybdenum and tungsten have been tested as bulk materials. To test the reliability of actively cooled systems under runaway-electron impact layer systems of graphite fixed to metal substrates have been tested. The irradiation resulted in damage to the metal compounds but left graphite and SiC + 2 % AlN without damage. Metal substrates of graphite - metal systems for actively cooled structures suffer severe damage unless thick graphite shielding is provided. (author)

  5. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2.

  6. Obstacle-induced spiral vortex breakdown

    OpenAIRE

    Pasche, Simon; Gallaire, François; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation on vortex breakdown dynamics is performed. An adverse pressure gradient is created along the axis of a wing-tip vortex by introducing a sphere downstream of an elliptical hydrofoil. The instrumentation involves high-speed visualizations with air bubbles used as tracers and 2D Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). Two key parameters are identified and varied to control the onset of vortex breakdown: the swirl number, defined as the maximum azimuthal velocity divided by...

  7. Simulation study on dynamics of runaways in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Qin Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons with high velocities can be accelerated to very high energies by a strong electric field to form runaway electrons. In tokamak, runaway electrons are produced in many different processes, including the acceleration from the high-energy tail of thermal distribution, through the runaway avalanche, during the rf wave heating and other non-Ohmic current drive, and even in the magnetic reconnection. This proceeding focus on different dynamical problems of runaway electrons in tokamaks. (author)

  8. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    . It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional...

  9. Predictors of Social Network Composition among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K.D.; Whitbeck, L.B.; Hoyt, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research on the social support networks of homeless and runaway youth suggest the social networks of runaway youth are made up largely of transient deviant peer relationships. This paper examined social network characteristics of 428 homeless and runaway adolescents from small-to moderate-sized cities in four Midwestern states. We…

  10. Disruption generated runaway electrons in TEXTOR and ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Jaspers,; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Schüller, F. C.; Finken, K.H.; Grewe, T.; Mank, G.

    1996-01-01

    Runaway generation during a major disruption has been observed in TEXTOR. Measurements of the synchrotron radiation yielded number, energy and pitch angle of the runaways. A simple model, which assumes that the runaways take over the current density in the centre of the discharge, successfully

  11. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-01-01

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativistic energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. The physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.

  12. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boozer, Allen H., E-mail: ahb17@columbia.edu [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativistic energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. The physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.

  13. Localized thermonuclear runaways and volcanoes on degenerate dwarf stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, M.M.

    1982-10-15

    Practically all studies to date of thermonuclear runaways on degenerate dwarf stars in binary systems have considered only spherically symmetric eruptions. We emphasize that even slightly non-spherically symmetric accretion leads to transverse temperature gradients in the dwarfs' accreted envelopes. Over a rather broad range of parameter space, thermalization time scales in accreted envelopes are much longer than thermonuclear runaway time scales. Thus localized thermonuclear runaways (i.e., runaways much smaller than the host degenerate star) rather than spherically symmetric global eruptions are likely to occur on many degenerate dwarfs. Localized runaways are more likely to occur on more massive and/or hotter dwarfs.

  14. The influence of plasma motion on disruption generated runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    One of the possible consequences of disruptions is the generation of runaway electrons which can impact plasma facing components and cause damage due to high local energy deposition. This problem becomes more serious as the machine size and plasma current increases. Since large size and high currents are characteristics of proposed future machines, control of runaway generation is an important design consideration. A lumped circuit model for disruption runaway electron generation indicates that control circuitry on strongly influence runaway behavior. A comparison of disruption data from several shots on JET and D3-D with model results, demonstrate the effects of plasma motion on runaway number density and energy. 6 refs., 12 figs

  15. Transport of runaway and thermal electrons due to magnetic microturbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.; Strachan, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The ratio of the runaway electron confinement to thermal electron energy confinement is derived for tokamaks where both processes are determined by free streaming along stochastic magnetic field lines. The runaway electron confinement is enhanced at high runaway electron energies due to phase averaging over the magnetic perturbations when the runaway electron drift surfaces are displaced from the magnetic surfaces. Comparison with experimental data from LT-3, Ormak, PLT, ST, and TM-3 indicates that magnetic stochasticity may explain the relative transport rates of runaways and thermal electron energy

  16. On the avalanche generation of runaway electrons during tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-01-01

    A simple zero dimensional model for a tokamak disruption is developed to evaluate the avalanche multiplication of a runaway primary seed during the current quench phase of a fast disruptive event. Analytical expressions for the plateau runaway current, the energy of the runaway beam, and the runaway energy distribution function are obtained allowing the identification of the parameters dominating the formation of the runaway current during disruptions. The effect of the electromagnetic coupling to the vessel and the penetration of the external magnetic energy during the disruption current quench as well as of the collisional dissipation of the runaway current at high densities are investigated. Current profile shape effects during the formation of the runaway beam are also addressed by means of an upgraded one-dimensional model

  17. Runaway electrons in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Takemichi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Toi, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji

    1981-01-01

    Pulse height analysis of soft X-rays is carried out in the TRIAM-1 tokamak. The electron temperatures determined from the soft X-ray spectrum agree well with those from Thomson scattering. It is observed that low-energy runaway (slideaway) electrons appear in the high-current-density discharges. (author)

  18. Runaway electrons in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, T; Nakamura, K; Toi, K; Nakamura, Y; Hiraki, N [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-09-01

    Pulse height analysis of soft X-rays is carried out in the TRIAM-1 tokamak. The electron temperatures determined from the soft X-ray spectrum agree well with those from Thomson scattering. It is observed that low-energy runaway (slideaway) electrons appear in the high-current-density discharges.

  19. On the dynamics of a subnanosecond breakdown in nitrogen below atmospheric pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shklyaev, V. A., E-mail: shklyaev@to.hcei.tsc.ru, E-mail: beh@loi.hcei.tsc.ru [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Technology Physics, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Baksht, E. Kh., E-mail: shklyaev@to.hcei.tsc.ru, E-mail: beh@loi.hcei.tsc.ru; Tarasenko, V. F. [Laboratory of Optical Radiations, Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Grishkov, A. A. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Burachenko, A. G. [Laboratory of Optical Radiations, Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Low Temperature Plasma, Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    The dynamics of a breakdown in a gas-filled diode with a highly inhomogeneous electric field was studied in experiments at a time resolution of ∼100 ps and in numerical simulation by the 2D axisymmetric particle-in-cell (PIC) code XOOPIC. The diode was filled with nitrogen at pressures of up to 100 Torr. The dynamics of the electric field distribution in the diode during the breakdown was analyzed, and the factors that limit the pulse duration of the runaway electron beam current at different pressures were determined.

  20. Control of runaway electron energy using externally injected whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zehua; McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2018-03-01

    One way of mitigating runaway damage of the plasma-facing components in a tokamak fusion reactor is by limiting the runaway electron energy under a few MeV, while not necessarily reducing the runaway current appreciably. Here, we describe a physics mechanism by which such momentum space engineering of the runaway distribution can be facilitated by externally injected high-frequency electromagnetic waves such as whistler waves. The drastic impact that wave-induced scattering can have on the runaway energy distribution is fundamentally the result of its ability to control the runaway vortex in the momentum space. The runaway vortex, which is a local circulation of runaways in momentum space, is the outcome of the competition between Coulomb collisions, synchrotron radiation damping, and runaway acceleration by the parallel electric field. By introducing a wave that resonantly interacts with runaways in a particular range of energies which is mildly relativistic, the enhanced scattering would reshape the vortex by cutting off the part that is highly relativistic. The efficiency of resonant scattering accentuates the requirement that the wave amplitude can be small so the power requirement from external wave injection is practical for the mitigation scheme.

  1. On dielectric breakdown statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncer, Enis; James, D Randy; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R; Pace, Marshall O

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dielectric breakdown data of some insulating materials and focus on the applicability of the two- and three-parameter Weibull distributions. A new distribution function is also proposed. In order to assess the model distribution's trustworthiness, we employ the Monte Carlo technique and, randomly selecting data-subsets from the whole dielectric breakdown data, determine whether the selected probability functions accurately describe the breakdown data. The utility and strength of the proposed expression are illustrated distinctly by the numerical procedure. The proposed expression is shown to be a valuable alternative to the Weibull ones

  2. Radial transport of high-energy runaway electrons in ORMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Swain, D.W.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1978-01-01

    The transport of high-energy runaway electrons near the outside of a low-density ORMAK discharge is investigated by measuring the flux of runaways to the outer limiter during and after an inward shift of the plasma column. The experimental results are interpreted through a runaway confinement model which includes both the classical outward displacement of the runaway orbit with increasing energy and an additional runaway spatial diffusion coefficient which simulates an unspecified source of anomalous transport. Diffusion coefficients in the range D approximately equal to 10 2 -10 4 cms -1 are found under various discharge conditions indicating a significant non-collisional runaway transport near the outside of the discharge, particularly in the presence of MHD instability. (author)

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies of runaway electrons in the TEXTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, S.S.; Finken, K.H.; Wongrach, K.; Willi, O.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of runaway electrons in tokamaks and their mitigations, particularly the recent studies performed by a group of the Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf in collaboration with the Institute of Energy and Climate Research of the Research Centre (Forschungszentrum) of Juelich are reviewed. The main topics focus on (i) runaway generation mechanisms, (ii) runaway orbits in equilibrium plasma, (iii) transport in stochastic magnetic fields, (iv) diagnostics and investigations of transport of runaway electron and their losses in low density discharges (v) runaway electrons during plasma disruptions, and (vi) runaway mitigation methods. The development of runaway diagnostics enables the measurement of runaway electrons in both the centre and edge of the plasma. The diagnostics provide an absolute runaway energy resolved measurement, the radial decay length of runaway electrons and, the structure and dynamics of runaway electron beams. The new mechanism of runaway electron formation during plasma disruptions is discussed.

  4. Theoretical and experimental studies of runaway electrons in the TEXTOR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullaev, S.S.; Finken, K.H.; Wongrach, K.; Willi, O.

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of runaway electrons in tokamaks and their mitigations, particularly the recent studies performed by a group of the Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf in collaboration with the Institute of Energy and Climate Research of the Research Centre (Forschungszentrum) of Juelich are reviewed. The main topics focus on (i) runaway generation mechanisms, (ii) runaway orbits in equilibrium plasma, (iii) transport in stochastic magnetic fields, (iv) diagnostics and investigations of transport of runaway electron and their losses in low density discharges (v) runaway electrons during plasma disruptions, and (vi) runaway mitigation methods. The development of runaway diagnostics enables the measurement of runaway electrons in both the centre and edge of the plasma. The diagnostics provide an absolute runaway energy resolved measurement, the radial decay length of runaway electrons and, the structure and dynamics of runaway electron beams. The new mechanism of runaway electron formation during plasma disruptions is discussed.

  5. Runaway-ripple interaction in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, L.; Rax, J.M.

    1989-08-01

    Two approaches of the interaction between runaway electrons and the ripple field, in tokamaks, are discussed. The first approach considers the resonance effect as an intense cyclotron heating of the electrons, by the ripple field, in the guiding center frame of the fast particles. In the second approach, an Hamiltonian formalism is used. A criterion for the onset of chaotic behavior and the results are given. A new universal instability of the runaway population in tokamak configuration is found. When combined with cyclotron losses one of its major consequence is to act as an effective slowing down mechanism preventing the free fall acceleration toward the synchrotron limit. This configuration allows the explanation of some experimental results of Tore Supra and Textor

  6. Disruption generated secondary runaway electrons in present day tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, I.M.; Jaspers, R.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of the runaway electron secondary generation during disruptions in present day tokamaks (JET, JT-60U, TEXTOR) was made. It was shown that even for tokamaks with the plasma current I approx 100 kA the secondary generation may dominate the runaway production during disruptions. In the same time in tokamaks with I approx 1 MA the runaway electron secondary generation during disruptions may be suppressed

  7. Product Work Breakdown Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okayama, Y; Chirillo, L. D

    1980-01-01

    .... Any such subdivision scheme is a work breakdown structure. Traditional shipbuilders employ work subdivisions by ships functional systems which are natural and appropriate for estimating and for early design stages...

  8. Scaling of Dielectric Breakdown Thresholds in Earth's and CO2-rich atmospheres: Impact for Predictions of Extraterrestrial Transient Luminous Events and Lightning Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riousset, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's atmospheric electricity manifests itself in the form of glow, corona, streamer, and leader discharges observed as Saint Elmo's fire, sprites, lightning and jets discharges, and other Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). All of these are types of dielectric breakdown, but are governed by different physics. In particular, their initiation is associated with the crossing of specific electric field thresholds: relativistic runaway, streamer propagation, conventional breakdown, or thermal runaway thresholds, some better understood than others. For example, the initiation of a lightning discharge is known to occur when the local electric field exceeds a value similar to relativistic runaway field, but the exact threshold, as well as the physical mechanisms at work, remain rather unclear to date. Scaling laws for electric fields (and other quantities) have been established by Pasko et al. [GRL, 25(12), 2123-2126, 1998] and Pasko [NATO Sci. Series, Springer, 253-311, 2006]. In this work, we develop profiles for initiation criteria in air and in other atmospheric environments. We further calculate their associated scaling laws to determine the ability to trigger lightning flashes and TLEs in our solar system. This lets us predict the likelihood of electrical discharges on, e.g., Mars, Venus and Titan, and calculate the expected electric field conditions, under which discharges have been observed on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune [Leblanc et al., ISSI Spa. Sci. Series, Springer, 2008, Yair, Adv. Space Res., 50(3), 293-310, 2012]. Our results anticipate the arrival of ExoMars 2016's Schiaparelli module, which will provide the first records of electric field at the surface of the planet [Déprez et al., EGU GA, 16, 16613, 2014]. This research is also motived by the increasing probability of manned missions to Mars and the potential electrostatic hazards it may face [Yair, 2012], and by the role of electrical discharges in the creation of active radicals, some of

  9. Runaway-electron-materials interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Miyahara, A.

    1990-03-01

    During the operation of magnetic fusion devices it has been frequently observed that runaway electrons can cause severe damage to plasma facing components. The energy of the runaway electrons could possibly reach several 100 MeV in a next generation device with an energy content in the plasma in the order of 100 MJ. In this study effects of high energy electron - materials interaction were determined by laboratory experiments using particle beam facilities, i.e. the Electron Linear Accelerator of the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research of Osaka University and the 10 MW Neutral Beam Injection Test Stand of the National Institute for Fusion Science. The experiments and further analyses lead to a first assessment of the damage thresholds of plasma facing materials and components under runaway electron impact. It was found that metals (stainless steel, molybdenum, tungsten) showed grain growth, crack formation and/or melting already below the threshold for crack initiation on graphite (14-33 MJ/m 2 ). Strong erosion of carbon materials would occur above 100 MJ/m 2 . Damage to metal coolant channels can occur already below an energy deposition of 100 MJ/m 2 . The energy deposited in the metal coolant channels depends on the thickness of the plasma facing carbon material D, with the shielding efficiency S of carbon approximately as S∼D 1.15 . (author) 304 refs. 12 tabs. 59 figs

  10. Numerical analysis on pump turbine runaway points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, L; Liu, J T; Wang, L Q; Jiao, L; Li, Z F

    2012-01-01

    To research the character of pump turbine runaway points with different guide vane opening, a hydraulic model was established based on a pumped storage power station. The RNG k-ε model and SMPLEC algorithms was used to simulate the internal flow fields. The result of the simulation was compared with the test data and good correspondence was got between experimental data and CFD result. Based on this model, internal flow analysis was carried out. The result show that when the pump turbine ran at the runway speed, lots of vortexes appeared in the flow passage of the runner. These vortexes could always be observed even if the guide vane opening changes. That is an important way of energy loss in the runaway condition. Pressure on two sides of the runner blades were almost the same. So the runner power is very low. High speed induced large centrifugal force and the small guide vane opening gave the water velocity a large tangential component, then an obvious water ring could be observed between the runner blades and guide vanes in small guide vane opening condition. That ring disappeared when the opening bigger than 20°. These conclusions can provide a theory basis for the analysis and simulation of the pump turbine runaway points.

  11. MHD stability of runaway electron discharge in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.

    1978-04-01

    A runaway current concentrating in the central region has stabilizing effects on kink and tearing instabilities on the basis of a model in which the runaway current is assumed rigid. The Kruskal-Shafranov limit (iota(a) = iota sub(σ(a) + iota sub( b)(a) <= 1) disappears for iota sub(σ(a) <= 0.2 in the case of parabolic profiles of both the runaway current and the conduction current. Here iota sub(σ)(a) is a rotational transform due to the conduction current and iota sub( b)(a) is a rotational transform due to the runaway current. (auth.)

  12. Equilibrium, confinement and stability of runaway electrons in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.

    1976-03-01

    Some of the ramifications of the runaway population in tokamak experiments are investigated. Consideration is given both to the normal operating regime of tokamaks where only a small fraction of high energy runaways are present and to the strong runaway regime where runaways are thought to carry a significant portion of the toroidal current. In particular, the areas to be examined are the modeling of strong runaway discharges, single particle orbit characteristics of runaways, macroscopic beam-plasma equilibria, and stability against kink modes. A simple one-dimensional, time-dependent model has been constructed in relation to strong runaway discharges. Single particle orbits are analyzed in relation to both the strong runaway regime and the weak regime. The effects of vector E x vector B drifts are first considered in strong runaway discharges and are found to lead to a slow inward shrinkage of the beam. Macroscopic beam-plasma equilibria are treated assuming a pressureless relativistic beam with inertia and using an ideal MHD approximation for the plasma. The stability of a toroidal relativistic beam against kink perturbations is examined using several models

  13. Collisional avalanche exponentiation of runaway electrons in electrified plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Fleischmann, H.H.; Zweben, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to earlier expectations, it is estimated that generation of runaway electrons from close collisions of existing runaways with cold plasma electrons can be significant even for small electric fields, whenever runaways can gain energies of about 20 MeV or more. In that case, the runaway population will grow exponentially with the energy spectrum showing an exponential decrease towards higher energies. Energy gains of the required magnitude may occur in large tokamak devices as well as in cosmic-ray generation. (orig.)

  14. Electrical breakdown in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukema, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    The main part of this thesis is dedicated to the field enhancement factor; in particular to the study of the origin, alteration and influence on the breakdown properties of different materials. This work required the examination of large surface areas on the same microscopic scale on which the relevant phenomena occur. (Pre)-breakdown measurements are described in which the anode condition does not play a role in the initiation of a breakdown, while the cathode can be considered as a broad-area electrode. The influence of adsorbed gases on pre-breakdown currents is investigated. It is shown that ions, released by field emission electrons from adsorbed layers on the anode change the emitting properties of a well-conditioned cathode if the current density at the anode is small. A new experimental arrangement is outlined to better distinguish between the different parameters which are important for the initiation of electrical breakdown. Comparative measurements between stainless steel and titanium electrodes are described to study the influence of either the cathode or the anode upon the initiation of a breakdown. (Auth.)

  15. Vortex breakdown in a supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Levey, Brian S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports a study of a vortex breakdown in a supersonic jet. A supersonic vortical jets were created by tangential injection and acceleration through a convergent-divergent nozzle. Vortex circulation was varied, and the nature of the flow in vortical jets was investigated using several types of flow visualization, including focusing schlieren and imaging of Rayleigh scattering from a laser light sheet. Results show that the vortical jet mixed much more rapidly with the ambient air than a comparable straight jet. When overexpanded, the vortical jet exhibited considerable unsteadiness and showed signs of vortex breakdown.

  16. Ecton processes in the generation of pulsed runaway electron beams in a gas discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesyats, G. A.

    2017-09-01

    As was shown earlier for pulsed discharges that occur in electric fields rising with extremely high rates (1018 V/(cm s)) during the pulse rise time, the electron current in a vacuum discharge is lower than the current of runaway electrons in an atmospheric air discharge in a 1-cm-long gap. In this paper, this is explained by that the field emission current from cathode microprotrusions in a gas discharge is enhanced due to gas ionization. This hastens the initiation of explosive electron emission, which occurs within 10-11 s at a current density of up to 1010 A/cm2. Thereafter, a first-type cathode spot starts forming. The temperature of the cathode spot decreases due to heat conduction, and the explosive emission current ceases. Thus, the runaway electron current pulse is similar in nature to the ecton phenomenon in a vacuum discharge.

  17. A backward Monte Carlo method for efficient computation of runaway probabilities in runaway electron simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guannan; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2017-10-01

    Kinetic descriptions of RE are usually based on the bounced-averaged Fokker-Planck model that determines the PDFs of RE. Despite of the simplification involved, the Fokker-Planck equation can rarely be solved analytically and direct numerical approaches (e.g., continuum and particle-based Monte Carlo (MC)) can be time consuming specially in the computation of asymptotic-type observable including the runaway probability, the slowing-down and runaway mean times, and the energy limit probability. Here we present a novel backward MC approach to these problems based on backward stochastic differential equations (BSDEs). The BSDE model can simultaneously describe the PDF of RE and the runaway probabilities by means of the well-known Feynman-Kac theory. The key ingredient of the backward MC algorithm is to place all the particles in a runaway state and simulate them backward from the terminal time to the initial time. As such, our approach can provide much faster convergence than the brute-force MC methods, which can significantly reduce the number of particles required to achieve a prescribed accuracy. Moreover, our algorithm can be parallelized as easy as the direct MC code, which paves the way for conducting large-scale RE simulation. This work is supported by DOE FES and ASCR under the Contract Numbers ERKJ320 and ERAT377.

  18. Predictors of Trauma-Related Symptoms among Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael D.; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about trauma-related symptoms among runaway adolescents. Precocious departure from familial homes often exposes youth to traumatic victimization. This study examined the extent to which runaway adolescents present trauma symptomotology and assessed factors that predict trauma symptoms. Participants (N = 350) were 12-18 years of age…

  19. Understanding and Preventing Runaway Behavior: Indicators and Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Lisa A.; Raimondi, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Runaway behavior is a national epidemic that affects many school-aged youths. Although there are no definitive numbers, it has been estimated that between 1.3 and 2.8 million youths run away each year, and youths with disabilities are more at risk for engaging in runaway behavior than their nondisabled peers. Considering the high number of youths…

  20. Study of runaway current generation following disruptions in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z Y; Kim, W C; Yu, Y W; England, A C; Yoo, J W; Hahn, S H; Yoon, S W; Lee, K D; Oh, Y K; Kwak, J G; Kwon, M

    2013-01-01

    The high fraction of runaway current conversion following disruptions has an important effect on the first wall for next-generation tokamaks. Because of the potentially severe consequences of a large full current runaway beam on the first wall in an unmitigated disruption, runaway suppression is given a high priority. The behavior of runaway currents both in spontaneous disruptions and in D 2 massive gas injection (MGI) shutdown experiments is investigated in the KSTAR tokamak. The experiments in KSTAR show that the toroidal magnetic field threshold, B T >2 T, for runaway generation is not absolute. A high fraction of runaway current conversion following spontaneous disruptions is observed at a much lower toroidal magnetic field of B T = 1.3 T. A dedicated fast valve for high-pressure gas injection with 39.7 bar is developed for the study of disruptions. A study of runaway current parameters shows that the conversion efficiency of pre-disruptive plasma currents into runaway current can reach over 80% both in spontaneous disruptions and in D 2 MGI shutdown experiments in KSTAR. (paper)

  1. Experimental Investigation of Runaway Electron Generation in Textor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Jaspers,; Finken, K.H.; Mank, G.; Hoenen, F.; Boedo, J. A.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Schüller, F. C.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of the generation of runaway electrons in TEXTOR has been performed. From the infrared synchrotron radiation emitted by relativistic electrons, the number of runaway electrons can be obtained as a function of time. In low density discharges (n(e)BAR < 1 X 10(19) m-3)

  2. Ecologically Based Family Therapy Outcome with Substance Abusing Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, N.; Prestopnik, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Runaway youth report a broader range and higher severity of substance-related, mental health and family problems relative to non-runaway youth. Most studies to date have collected self-report data on the family and social history; virtually no research has examined treatment effectiveness with this population. This study is a treatment development…

  3. Runaway greenhouse atmospheres: Applications to Earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Runaway greenhouse atmospheres are discussed from a theoretical standpoint and with respect to various practical situation in which they might occur. The following subject areas are covered: (1) runaway greenhouse atmospheres; (2) moist greenhouse atmospheres; (3) loss of water from Venus; (4) steam atmosphere during accretion; and (5) the continuously habitable zone.

  4. Runaway greenhouse atmospheres: Applications to Earth and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasting, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Runaway greenhouse atmospheres are discussed from a theoretical standpoint and with respect to various practical situation in which they might occur. The following subject areas are covered: (1) runaway greenhouse atmospheres; (2) moist greenhouse atmospheres; (3) loss of water from Venus; (4) steam atmosphere during accretion; and (5) the continuously habitable zone

  5. Thermal effects of runaway electrons in an armoured divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stad, R.C.L. van der.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the results of a numerical thermal analysis of the heat deposition of runaway electrons accompanying plasma disruptions in a armoured divertor. The divertor concepts studied are carbon on molybdenum and beryllium on copper. The conclusion is that the runaway electrons can cause melting of the armour as well as melting of the structure and can damage the divertor severely. (orig.)

  6. On the origin of high-velocity runaway stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gvaramadze, V.V.; Gualandris, A.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2009-01-01

    We explore the hypothesis that some high-velocity runaway stars attain their peculiar velocities in the course of exchange encounters between hard massive binaries and a very massive star (either an ordinary 50-100 M-circle dot star or a more massive one, formed through runaway mergers of ordinary

  7. Simulation of long-term dynamic behavior of runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yulei; Liu Jian; Zhang Ruili; He Yang

    2015-01-01

    The secular dynamics of runaway electrons in Tokamak electromagnetic field is studied. The radiation effect is added into a relativistic volume-preserving algorithm to gain long-term stability of calculation. The results shows that the method we used is able to reveal the behavior of a runaway electron in configuration space. (author)

  8. An Impact Triggered Runaway Greenhouse on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, T. L.; McKay, C. P.; Toon, O. B.

    2004-01-01

    When a planet is in radiative equilibrium, the incoming solar flux balances the outgoing longwave flux. If something were to perturb the system slightly, say the incoming solar flux increased, the planet would respond by radiating at a higher surface temperature. Since any radiation that comes in must go out, if the incoming is increased, the outgoing must also increase, and this increase manifests itself as a warmer equilibrium temperature. The increase in solar flux would correspond to an increase in temperature, which would increase the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere due to increased evaporation. Since water vapor is a greenhouse gas, it would absorb more radiation in the atmosphere leading to a yet warmer equilibrium temperature. The planet would reach radiative equilibrium at this new temperature. There exists a point, however, past which this positive feedback leads to a "runaway" situation. In this case, the planet does not simply evaporate a little more water and eventually come to a slightly higher equilibrium temperature. Instead, the planet keeps evaporating more and more water until all of the planet's available liquid and solid water is in the atmosphere. The reason for this is generally understood. If the planet's temperature increases, evaporation of water increases, and the absorption of radiation increases. This increases the temperature and the feedback continues until all water is in the atmosphere. The resulting equilibrium temperature is very high, much higher than the equilibrium temperature of a point with slightly lower solar flux. One can picture that as solar flux increases, planetary temperature also increases until the runaway point where temperature suddenly "jumps" to a higher value, in response to all the available water now residing in the atmosphere. This new equilibrium is called a "runaway greenhouse" and it has been theorized that this is what happened to the planet Venus, where the surface temperature is more than 700 K

  9. Impulse breakdown of liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Ushakov, Vasily Y

    2007-01-01

    The book describes the main physical processes and phenomena in pulsed electric breakdown. The knowledge and the control of the electric breakdown of liquids is important not only for the insulation inside power systems but it is also used for the creation and information of high voltage and high current pulses. Such high-voltage micro- and nanosecond pulses find wide application in experimental physics, electro discharge technology, physics of dielectrics, radar detection and ranging, high-speed photography. The nature of charge carriers, mechanism of formation and evolution of the gas phase,

  10. Effective regimes of runaway electron beam generation in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-04-01

    Runaway electron beam parameters and current-voltage characteristics of discharge in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at pressures in the range of several Torr to several hundred Torr have been studied. It is found that the maximum amplitudes of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) with a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps are achieved in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a pressure of ˜60, ˜30, and ˜10 Torr, respectively. It is shown that, as the gas pressure is increased in the indicated range, the breakdown voltage of the gas-filled gap decreases, which leads to a decrease in the SAEB current amplitude. At pressures of helium within 20-60 Torr, hydrogen within 10-30 Torr, and nitrogen within 3-10 Torr, the regime of the runaway electron beam generation changes and, by varying the pressure in the gas-filled diode in the indicated intervals, it is possible to smoothly control the current pulse duration (FWHM) from ˜100 to ˜500 ps, while the beam current amplitude increases by a factor of 1.5-3.

  11. Mechanism of Runaway Electron Generation at Gas Pressures from a Few Atmospheres to Several Tens of Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarev, N. M.; Ivanov, S. N.

    2018-04-01

    The mechanism of runaway electron generation at gas pressures from a few atmospheres to several tens of atmospheres is proposed. According to this mechanism, the electrons pass into the runaway mode in the enhanced field zone that arises between a cathode micropoint—a source of field-emission electrons—and the region of the positive ion space charge accumulated near the cathode in the tails of the developing electron avalanches. As a result, volume gas ionization by runaway electrons begins with a time delay required for the formation of the enhanced field zone. This process determines the delay time of breakdown. The influence of the gas pressure on the formation dynamics of the space charge region is analyzed. At gas pressures of a few atmospheres, the space charge arises due to the avalanche multiplication of the very first field-emission electron, whereas at pressures of several tens of atmospheres, the space charge forms as a result of superposition of many electron avalanches with a relatively small number of charge carriers in each.

  12. Runaway dilaton and equivalence principle violations

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume; Veneziano, Gabriele; Damour, Thibault; Piazza, Federico; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2002-01-01

    In a recently proposed scenario, where the dilaton decouples while cosmologically attracted towards infinite bare string coupling, its residual interactions can be related to the amplitude of density fluctuations generated during inflation, and are large enough to be detectable through a modest improvement on present tests of free-fall universality. Provided it has significant couplings to either dark matter or dark energy, a runaway dilaton can also induce time-variations of the natural "constants" within the reach of near-future experiments.

  13. A Thermal Runaway Failure Model for Low-Voltage BME Ceramic Capacitors with Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Reliability of base metal electrode (BME) multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) that until recently were used mostly in commercial applications, have been improved substantially by using new materials and processes. Currently, the inception of intrinsic wear-out failures in high quality capacitors became much greater than the mission duration in most high-reliability applications. However, in capacitors with defects degradation processes might accelerate substantially and cause infant mortality failures. In this work, a physical model that relates the presence of defects to reduction of breakdown voltages and decreasing times to failure has been suggested. The effect of the defect size has been analyzed using a thermal runaway model of failures. Adequacy of highly accelerated life testing (HALT) to predict reliability at normal operating conditions and limitations of voltage acceleration are considered. The applicability of the model to BME capacitors with cracks is discussed and validated experimentally.

  14. Alfvénic instabilities driven by runaways in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fülöp, T.; Newton, S.

    2014-01-01

    Runaway particles can be produced in plasmas with large electric fields. Here, we address the possibility that such runaway ions and electrons excite Alfvénic instabilities. The magnetic perturbation induced by these modes can enhance the loss of runaways. This may have important implications for the runaway electron beam formation in tokamak disruptions

  15. Beauty in the Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisco, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Most human beings look at erosion as the destruction of a surface, but artists can see that erosion often creates indefinable beauty. Where do you see beauty in the breakdown? In this article, the author presents an innovative lesson that would allow students to observe both human and physical nature. In this activity students will create a work…

  16. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, E; Peysson, Y; Saint-Laurent, F; Decker, J; Granetz, R S; Vlainic, M

    2015-01-01

    Runaway electrons can be generated in tokamak plasmas if the accelerating force from the toroidal electric field exceeds the collisional drag force owing to Coulomb collisions with the background plasma. In ITER, disruptions are expected to generate runaway electrons mainly through knock-on collisions (Hender et al 2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 S128–202), where enough momentum can be transferred from existing runaways to slow electrons to transport the latter beyond a critical momentum, setting off an avalanche of runaway electrons. Since knock-on runaways are usually scattered off with a significant perpendicular component of the momentum with respect to the local magnetic field direction, these particles are highly magnetized. Consequently, the momentum dynamics require a full 3D kinetic description, since these electrons are highly sensitive to the magnetic non-uniformity of a toroidal configuration. For this purpose, a bounce-averaged knock-on source term is derived. The generation of runaway electrons from the combined effect of Dreicer mechanism and knock-on collision process is studied with the code LUKE, a solver of the 3D linearized bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker–Planck equation (Decker and Peysson 2004 DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3D drift kinetic equation Report EUR-CEA-FC-1736, Euratom-CEA), through the calculation of the response of the electron distribution function to a constant parallel electric field. The model, which has been successfully benchmarked against the standard Dreicer runaway theory now describes the runaway generation by knock-on collisions as proposed by Rosenbluth (Rosenbluth and Putvinski 1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 1355–62). This paper shows that the avalanche effect can be important even in non-disruptive scenarios. Runaway formation through knock-on collisions is found to be strongly reduced when taking place off the magnetic axis, since trapped electrons can not contribute to the runaway electron population. Finally

  17. Thermal Runaways in LHC Interconnections: Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Willering, G P; Bottura, L; Scheuerlein, C; Verweij, A P

    2011-01-01

    The incident in the LHC in September 2008 occurred in an interconnection between two magnets of the 13 kA dipole circuit. This event was traced to a defect in one of the soldered joints between two superconducting cables stabilized by a copper busbar. Further investigation revealed defective joints of other types. A combination of (1) a poor contact between the superconducting cable and the copper stabilizer and (2) an electrical discontinuity in the stabilizer at the level of the connection can lead to an unprotected quench of the busbar. Once the heating power in the unprotected superconducting cable exceeds the heat removal capacity a thermal run-away occurs, resulting in a fast melt-down of the non-stabilized cable. We have performed a thorough investigation of the conditions upon which a thermal run-away in the defect can occur. To this aim, we have prepared heavily instrumented samples with well-defined and controlled defects. In this paper we describe the experiment, and the analysis of the data, and w...

  18. Measurements of the runaway electron energy during disruptions in the tokamak TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, M.; Finken, K. H.; Willi, O.; Lehnen, M.; Xu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements of the total runaway electron energy are carried out using a reciprocating probe during induced TEXTOR disruptions. A comparison with the energy inferred from runaway energy spectra, which are measured with a scintillator probe, is used as an independent check of the results. A typical runaway current of 100 kA at TEXTOR contains 30 to 35 kJ of runaway energy. The dependencies of the runaway energy on the runaway current, the radial probe position, the toroidal magnetic field and the predisruptive plasma current are studied. The conversion efficiency of the magnetic plasma energy into runaway energy is calculated to be up to 26%.

  19. Direct measurements of sample heating by a laser-induced air plasma in pre-ablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Janna; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Angel, S Michael

    2012-08-01

    Direct measurements of temperature changes were made using small thermocouples (TC), placed near a laser-induced air plasma. Temperature changes up to ~500 °C were observed. From the measured temperature changes, estimates were made of the amount of heat absorbed per unit area. This allowed calculations to be made of the surface temperature, as a function of time, of a sample heated by the air plasma that is generated during orthogonal pre-ablation spark dual-pulse (DP) LIBS measurements. In separate experiments, single-pulse (SP) LIBS emission and sample ablation rate measurements were performed on nickel at sample temperatures ranging from room temperature to the maximum surface temperature that was calculated using the TC measurement results (500 °C). A small, but real sample temperature-dependent increase in both SP LIBS emission and the rate of sample ablation was found for nickel samples heated up to 500 °C. Comparison of DP LIBS emission enhancement values for bulk nickel samples at room temperature versus the enhanced SP LIBS emission and sample ablation rates observed as a function of increasing sample temperature suggests that sample heating by the laser-induced air plasma plays only a minor role in DP LIBS emission enhancement.

  20. One-Dimensional Modelling of Marine Current Turbine Runaway Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Lundin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available If a turbine loses its electrical load, it will rotate freely and increase speed, eventually achieving that rotational speed which produces zero net torque. This is known as a runaway situation. Unlike many other types of turbine, a marine current turbine will typically overshoot the final runaway speed before slowing down and settling at the runaway speed. Since the hydrodynamic forces acting on the turbine are dependent on rotational speed and acceleration, turbine behaviour during runaway becomes important for load analyses during turbine design. In this article, we consider analytical and numerical models of marine current turbine runaway behaviour in one dimension. The analytical model is found not to capture the overshoot phenomenon, while still providing useful estimates of acceleration at the onset of runaway. The numerical model incorporates turbine wake build-up and predicts a rotational speed overshoot. The predictions of the models are compared against measurements of runaway of a marine current turbine. The models are also used to recreate previously-published results for a tidal turbine and applied to a wind turbine. It is found that both models provide reasonable estimates of maximum accelerations. The numerical model is found to capture the speed overshoot well.

  1. Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyusnin, V.V.; Riccardo, V.; Jaspers, R.; Alper, B.; Kiptily, V.G.; Mlynar, J.; Popovichev, S.; Luna, E. de La; Andersson, F.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive analysis of disruptions in JET has helped advance the understanding of trends of disruption-generated runaway electrons. Tomographic reconstruction of the soft x-ray emission has made possible a detailed observation of the magnetic flux geometry evolution during disruptions. With the aid of soft and hard x-ray diagnostics runaway electrons have been detected at the very beginning of disruptions. A study of runaway electron parameters has shown that an approximate upper bound for the conversion efficiency of pre-disruptive plasma currents into runaways is about 60% over a wide range of plasma currents in JET. Runaway generation has been simulated with a test particle model in order to verify the results of experimental data analysis and to obtain the background for extrapolation of the existing results onto larger devices such as ITER. It was found that close agreement between the modelling results and experimental data could be achieved if in the calculations the post-disruption plasma electron temperature was assumed equal to 10 eV and if the plasma column geometry evolution is taken into account in calculations. The experimental trends and numerical simulations show that runaway electrons are a critical issue for ITER and, therefore, the development of mitigation methods, which suppress runaway generation, is an essential task

  2. On the kinematics of a runaway Be star population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubert, D.; Evans, N. W.

    2018-04-01

    We explore the hypothesis that B type emission-line stars (Be stars) have their origin in mass-transfer binaries by measuring the fraction of runaway Be stars. We assemble the largest-to-date catalogue of 632 Be stars with 6D kinematics, exploiting the precise astrometry of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) from the first Gaia Data Release. Using binary stellar evolution simulations, we make predictions for the runaway and equatorial rotation velocities of a runaway Be star population. Accounting for observational biases, we calculate that if all classical Be stars originated through mass transfer in binaries, then 17.5% of the Be stars in our catalogue should be runaways. The remaining 82.5% should be in binaries with subdwarfs, white dwarfs or neutron stars, because those systems either remained bound post-supernova or avoided the supernova entirely. Using a Bayesian methodology, we compare the hypothesis that each Be star in our catalogue is a runaway to the null hypothesis that it is a member of the Milky Way disc. We find that 13.1^{+2.6}_{-2.4}% of the Be stars in our catalogue are runaways, and identify a subset of 40 high-probability runaways. We argue that deficiencies in our understanding of binary stellar evolution, as well as the degeneracy between velocity dispersion and number of runaway stars, can explain the slightly lower runaway fraction. We thus conclude that all Be stars could be explained by an origin in mass-transfer binaries. This conclusion is testable with the second Gaia data release (DR2).

  3. Electrical Breakdown Phenomena Involving Material Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    create ozone through chemical reactions involving reactive species created by the electrical discharge [3]. The glow discharge breakdown in such...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation Of Pre-Ionization And Atmospheric Pulsed Discharge Plasma 5a...growth of the air discharge in the form of a conductive filament consisting of electrons and ions. This filament is created by temporal pulse that

  4. Runaway electrons dynamics and confinement in Tore-Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.; Geraud, A.; Joyer, P.; Martin, G.; Rax, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The lack of energy of runaway electrons, confined in Tore Supra tokamak, is studied. Ohmic discharges, obtained with helium gas, exhibit a small amount of runaway electrons on both hard X-ray monitors and neutron sensors. The observations show an important lack of energy for runaway electrons confined in Tore Supra. It is assumed to be dued to a small pitch-angle scattering (a few degrees), and many candidates for this are compared: the strongest known one collisions seems not to be enough by an order of magnitude. Density and magnetic scans on Tore Supra are needed to discriminate between enhanced collisional scattering processes and purely magnetic phenomena

  5. Gas breakdown in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.A.; Pogutse, O.P.; Yurchenko, Eh.I.

    1975-01-01

    The initial stage of the charge development in a tokomak is considered theoretically. It is supposed that all electrons produced in neutral gas ionisation process are in the regime of an almost continuous acceleration. The production time of a given electron density is calculated as a function of the neutral gas density and of parameters of the vortex electric field. The mechanism of plasma escape on walls is considered. It is shown that the escaping time is defined by a specific inertial flow of plasma and depends on whether chamber walls are metal or dielectric. The criterion of the gas breakdown in a toroidal system is formulated. The developed theory is shown to explain a strong dependence of the breakdown on the gas initial density [ru

  6. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, I. M.; Zhou, R. J.; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior

  7. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankratov, I. M., E-mail: pankratov@kipt.kharkov.ua, E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Academicheskaya Str. 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Zhou, R. J., E-mail: pankratov@kipt.kharkov.ua, E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Hu, L. Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  8. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, I. M.; Zhou, R. J.; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  9. Naturalness from Runaways in Direct Mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer-Nameki, Sakura; /UC, Santa Barbara /King' s Coll. London; Tamarit, Carlos; /UC, Santa Barbara; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    Postulating that the NMSSM singlet is a meson of a microscopic confining theory opens up new model-building possibilities. Based on this, we construct calculable models of direct mediation that solve the {mu}/B{mu} problem and simultaneously lead to realistic phenomenology. The singlet that couples to the Higgs fields develops a runaway produced by soft interactions, then stabilized by a small superpotential perturbation. The mechanism is first realized in an O'Raifeartaigh model of direct gauge mediation with metastable supersymmetry breaking. Focusing then on the microscopic theory, we argue that super QCD with massless and massive flavors in the free magnetic phase gives rise to this dynamics in the infrared. A deformation of the SQCD superpotential leads to large spontaneous R-symmetry breaking, gaugino masses naturally at the scale of the Higgs mass parameters, and absence of CP violating phases.

  10. Analytical treatment of the runaway-effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, H.J.

    1980-09-01

    In the analytical treatment of the runaway-effect there appear the integrals Isub(m)(α). For m = 1, 2 and 3, series expansions for these integrals can be found in the literature. Furthermore, asymptotic solutions for Isub(m)(α) are known. It is shown here that the solutions for Isub(m)(α) can be approximated by the modified Bessel Function Ksub(n)(αsup(ν)) in such a way that for α → 0 the exact limiting value for Isub(m)(α) follows and that for α → infinite essentially the known asymptotic solutions for Isub(m)(α) follow. The maximum error for this approximation in the order of percent is considered justifiable for the application considered. (orig.)

  11. Radio-frequency wave enhanced runaway production rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.S.; McClain, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    Enhancement of runaway electron production (over that of an Ohmic discharge) can be achieved by the addition of radio-frequency waves. This effect is studied analytically and numerically using a two-dimensional Fokker--Planck quasilinear equation

  12. Runaway electrons and rational q-surfaces in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheetham, A.D.; Hogg, G.R.; Kuwahara, H.; Morton, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Results of measurements with LT-4 of runaway electron behaviour during the current rise stage of discharges when q = rBsub(T)/RBsub(p) (where r and R are minor and major radii, Bsub(T) and Bsub(p) are toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields) is changing continuously are reported. The results establish a role for outward moving rational q regions in removing runaway electrons from a tokamak plasma. The model indicates that as well as carrying a proportion of low energy runaways with them the rational q regions also scatter high energy electrons from the discharge. This leads to an upper limit for the energy of fully confined electrons. The size of the runaway population might be minimised by controlling the rate of movement of rational surfaces. This would be achieved by programming the rate of rise of the plasma current

  13. Mitigating Thermal Runaway Risk in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Eric; Jeevarajan, Judy; Russell, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The JSC/NESC team has successfully demonstrated Thermal Runaway (TR) risk reduction in a lithium ion battery for human space flight by developing and implementing verifiable design features which interrupt energy transfer between adjacent electrochemical cells. Conventional lithium ion (li-Ion) batteries can fail catastrophically as a result of a single cell going into thermal runaway. Thermal runaway results when an internal component fails to separate electrode materials leading to localized heating and complete combustion of the lithium ion cell. Previously, the greatest control to minimize the probability of cell failure was individual cell screening. Combining thermal runaway propagation mitigation design features with a comprehensive screening program reduces both the probability, and the severity, of a single cell failure.

  14. Comments on thermal runaway experiments in sub-ignition tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.

    1982-09-01

    Justification of deuterium-tritium operations is discussed from the physics viewpoint and optimal thermal runaway experiments in high-field, high-density compact tokamaks are suggested within the minimization of the induced radioactivation. (author)

  15. Runaway pacemaker: a still existing complication and therapeutic guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H; Andersen, C; Nielsen, L H

    1989-01-01

    Runaway pacemaker is a rare, but still existing potential lethal complication in permanent pacemakers. Within 4 1/2 years, we saw two cases of runaway pacemaker in patients with multiprogrammable, VVI pacemakers (Siemens-Elema, Model 668). In both cases a pacemaker-induced ventricular tachycardia...... pacemaker may be connected to the permanent pacing lead. Thereafter, the lead can be safely cut. As an alternative, a temporary transvenous pacing lead may be established prior to disconnecting the permanent pacing lead....

  16. Sawtooth-induced loss of runaway electrons in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Longwen; Shi Bingren; Jiao Yiming

    2001-01-01

    A model based on banana orbit loss has been proposed to explain the sawtooth effect on the loss of the runaway electrons in tokamaks. Circulating runaway electrons can be transferred into the trapped ones due to magnetic perturbation during sawtooth crashes, then they are repelled to the limiter via toroidal precession drift with a time delay. This model may also clarify the hard X-ray oscillations correlated with the m = 2 mode and the hard X-ray bursts during outer disruptions

  17. Destabilization of the electron Bernstein modes by runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchcock, D.A.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the electromagnetic finite k/sub parallel/ electron Bernstein mode can be destabilized by the runaway electron distribution which results from the quasilinear action of the magnetized plasma oscillation. This mechanism is shown to yield growth rates of the order of 10 8 sec -1 and is suggested as a mechanism for the enchanced cyclotron harmonic emission in the presence of runaway electrons

  18. Numerical simulation of runaway electron effect on Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Akiba, Masato; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    1998-07-01

    The runaway electron effects on Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) are studied by the numerical analyses. The present study is the first investigation of time-dependent thermal response of PFCs caused by runaway electron impact. For this purpose, we developed a new integrated numerical code, which consists of the Monte Carlo code for the coupled electrons and photons transport analysis and the finite element code for the thermo-mechanical analysis. In this code, we apply the practical incident parameters and distribution of runaway electrons recently proposed by S. Putvinski, which can express the time-dependent behavior of runaway electrons impact. The incident parameters of electrons in this study are the energy density ranging from 10 to 75 MJ/m 2 , the average electrons' energy of 12.5 MeV, the incident angle of 0.01deg and the characteristic time constant for decay of runaway electrons event of 0.15sec. The numerical results showed that the divertor with CFC (Carbon-Fiber-Composite) armor did not suffer serious damage. On the other hand, maximum temperatures at the surface of the divertor with tungsten armor and the first wall with beryllium armor exceed the melting point in case of the incident energy density of 20 and 50 MJ/m 2 . Within the range of the incident condition of runaway electrons, the cooling pipe of each PFCs can be prevented from the melting or burn-out caused by runaway electrons impact, which is one of the possible consequences of runaway electrons event so far. (author)

  19. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Granetz, R.S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Vlainic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 9 (2015), č. článku 095006. ISSN 0741-3335 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma physics * runaway electrons * knock-on collisions * tokamak * Fokker-Planck * runaway avalanches Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2015

  20. Conversion of magnetic energy to runaway kinetic energy during the termination of runaway current on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, A. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Zhang, J.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Wang, X. L.; Yang, H. Y.; Gao, H. L.; Pan, Y.; the J-TEXT Team

    2018-05-01

    A large number of runaway electrons (REs) with energies as high as several tens of mega-electron volt (MeV) may be generated during disruptions on a large-scale tokamak. The kinetic energy carried by REs is eventually deposited on the plasma-facing components, causing damage and posing a threat on the operation of the tokamak. The remaining magnetic energy following a thermal quench is significant on a large-scale tokamak. The conversion of magnetic energy to runaway kinetic energy will increase the threat of runaway electrons on the first wall. The magnetic energy dissipated inside the vacuum vessel (VV) equals the decrease of initial magnetic energy inside the VV plus the magnetic energy flowing into the VV during a disruption. Based on the estimated magnetic energy, the evolution of magnetic-kinetic energy conversion are analyzed through three periods in disruptions with a runaway current plateau.

  1. PHENIX Work Breakdown Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M ampersand S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate shows Total, M ampersand S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry

  2. Scaling law of runaway electrons in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongzhen

    2005-01-01

    Runaway confinement time in ohmic and additionally heated tokamak plasmas presents an anomalous behavior in comparison with theoretical predictions based on neoclassical models. A one-dimensional numerical including generation and loss effects for runaway electrons is used to deduce the dependence of runaway energy ε τ on runaway confinement time. The simulation results are presented in the form of a scaling law for ε τ on plasma parameters. The scaling of ε τ and therefore the runaway confinement time and runaway electron diffusivity has been studied in the HL-1M tokamak, by measuring hard X-ray spectra under different experimental conditions. (authors)

  3. Breakdowns in collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative information seeking is integral to many professional activities. In hospital work, the medication process encompasses continual seeking for information and collaborative grounding of information. This study investigates breakdowns in collaborative information seeking through analyses...... of the use of the electronic medication record adopted in a Danish healthcare region and of the reports of five years of medication incidents at Danish hospitals. The results show that breakdowns in collaborative information seeking is a major source of medication incidents, that most of these breakdowns...... are breakdowns in collaborative grounding rather than information seeking, that the medication incidents mainly concern breakdowns in the use of records as opposed to oral communication, that the breakdowns span multiple degrees of separation between clinicians, and that the electronic medication record has...

  4. On the breakdown modes and parameter space of Ohmic Tokamak startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanli; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Ya; Hu, Xiwei; Zhuang, Ge; Innocenti, Maria; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2017-10-01

    Tokamak plasma has to be hot. The process of turning the initial dilute neutral hydrogen gas at room temperature into fully ionized plasma is called tokamak startup. Even with over 40 years of research, the parameter ranges for the successful startup still aren't determined by numerical simulations but by trial and errors. However, in recent years it has drawn much attention due to one of the challenges faced by ITER: the maximum electric field for startup can't exceed 0.3 V/m, which makes the parameter range for successful startup narrower. Besides, this physical mechanism is far from being understood either theoretically or numerically. In this work, we have simulated the plasma breakdown phase driven by pure Ohmic heating using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo code, with the aim of giving a predictive parameter range for most tokamaks, even for ITER. We have found three situations during the discharge, as a function of the initial parameters: no breakdown, breakdown and runaway. Moreover, breakdown delay and volt-second consumption under different initial conditions are evaluated. In addition, we have simulated breakdown on ITER and confirmed that when the electric field is 0.3 V/m, the optimal pre-filling pressure is 0.001 Pa, which is in good agreement with ITER's design.

  5. The resonance between runaway electrons and magnetic ripple in HT-7 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ruijie; Hu Liqun; Lu Hongwei; Lin Shiyao; Zhong Guoqiang; Xu Ping; Zhang Jizong

    2011-01-01

    For suppressing the energy of runaway electrons in tokamak plasma, we analyzed the X-ray energy spectra by runaway electrons in different discharges of the HT-7 tokamak experiment performed in the autumn of 2009. The resonant phenomenon between runaway electrons and magnetic ripple was found. Although, the energy of runaway electrons in the plasma core can be as high as several tens of MeV, but when they are transported to the edge, the electron energy are limited to a certain range by resonance with the magnetic ripple of different harmonic numbers. The runaway electrons under high loop voltage resonate with low step magnetic perturbations, with high energy gain; whereas the runaway electrons under low loop voltage resonate with high level magnetic perturbations, with low energy gain. Using this mechanism, the energy of runaway electrons can be restricted to a low level, and this will significantly mitigate the damage effect on the equipment caused by runaway electrons. (authors)

  6. Characteristics of post-disruption runaway electrons with impurity pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Yasunori; Nakano, Tomohide; Isayama, Akihiko; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kubo, Hirotaka; Takenaga, Hidenobu; Bakhtiari, Mohammad; Ide, Shunsuke; Kondoh, Takashi; Hatae, Takaki

    2005-01-01

    Characteristics of post-disruption runaway electrons with impurity pellet injection were investigated for the first time using the JT-60U tokamak device. A clear deposition of impurity neon ice pellets was observed in a post-disruption runaway plasma. The pellet ablation was attributed to the energy deposition of relativistic runaway electrons in the pellet. A high normalized electron density was stably obtained with n e bar /n GW ∼2.2. Effects of prompt exhaust of runaway electrons and reduction of runaway plasma current without large amplitude MHD activities were found. One possible explanation for the basic behavior of runaway plasma current is that it follows the balance of avalanche generation of runaway electrons and slowing down predicted by the Andersson-Helander model, including the combined effect of collisional pitch angle scattering and synchrotron radiation. Our results suggested that the impurity pellet injection reduced the energy of runaway electrons in a stepwise manner. (author)

  7. 78 FR 64153 - Direct Certification and Certification of Homeless, Migrant and Runaway Children for Free School...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ...-0001] RIN 0584-AD60 Direct Certification and Certification of Homeless, Migrant and Runaway Children... interim rule entitled Direct Certification and Certification of Homeless, Migrant and Runaway Children for...

  8. Thermal Runaway Severity Reduction Assessment and Implementation: On Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Preventing cell-cell thermal runaway propagation and flames/sparks from exiting battery enclosure is possible with proper thermal & electrical design and cell thermal runaway ejecta/effluent management and can be had with minimal mass/volume penalty.

  9. Models of primary runaway electron distribution in the runaway vortex regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Generation of runaway electrons (RE) beams can possibly induce the most deleterious effect of tokamak disruptions. A number of recent numerical calculations have confirmed the formation of a RE bump in their energy distribution by taking into account Synchrontron radiational damping force due to RE’s gyromotions. Here, we present a detailed examination on how the bump location changes at different pitch-angle and the characteristics of the RE pitch-angle distribution. Although REs moving along the magnetic field are preferably accelerated and then populate the phase-space of larger pitch-angle mainly through diffusions, an off-axis peak can still form due to the presence of the vortex structure which causes accumulation of REs at low pitch-angle. A simplified Fokker- Planck model and its semi-analytical solutions based on local expansions around the O point is used to illustrate the characteristics of RE distribution around the O point of the runaway vortex in phase-space. The calculated energy location of the O point together with the local energy and pitch-angle distributions agree with the full numerical solution.

  10. Intracellular protein breakdown. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohley, P.; Kirschke, H.; Langner, J.; Wiederanders, B.; Ansorge, S.

    1976-01-01

    Double-labelled proteins from rat liver cytosol ( 14 C in long-lived, 3 H in short-lived proteins after in-vivo-labelling) are used as substrates for unlabelled proteinases in vitro. Differences in the degradation rates of short-lived and long-lived proteins in vitro by different proteinases and after addition of different effectors allow conclusions concerning their importance for the in-vivo-turnover of substrate proteins. The main activity (>90%) of soluble lysosomal proteinases at pH 6.1 and pH 6.9 is caused by thiolproteinases, which degrade preferentially short-lived cytosol proteins. These proteinases are inhibited by leupeptin. Autolysis of double-labelled cell fractions shows a remarkably faster breakdown of short-lived substrate proteins only in the soluble part of lysosomes. Microsomal fractions degrade in vitro preferentially long-lived substrate proteins. (author)

  11. Breakdown concepts for contingency tables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhnt, S.

    2010-01-01

    Loglinear Poisson models are commonly used to analyse contingency tables. So far, robustness of parameter estimators as well as outlier detection have rarely been treated in this context. We start with finite-sample breakdown points. We yield that the breakdown point of mean value estimators

  12. Numerical analysis of heat propagation in a battery pack using a novel technology for triggering thermal runaway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coman, Paul T.; Darcy, Eric C.; Veje, Christian T.; White, Ralph E.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Heat propagation during thermal runaway (TR) in a battery pack with aluminum heat sink was analyzed. •TR in the battery pack, triggered by a novel internal short circuit device (ISCD) was modeled. •A 2D geometry and model couplings reduce computation time significantly. •Small air gaps and mica paper in combination with a thermally conductive matrix increase safety in battery packs. -- Abstract: This paper presents a numerical model used for analyzing heat propagation as a safety feature in a custom-made battery pack. The pack uses a novel technology consisting of an internal short circuit device implanted in a cell to trigger thermal runaway. The goal of the study is to investigate the importance of wrapping cylindrical battery cells (18650 type) in a thermally and electrically insulating mica sleeve, to fix the cells in a thermally conductive aluminum heat sink. By modeling the full-scale pack using a 2D model and coupling the thermal model with an electrochemical model, good agreement with a 3D model and experimental data was found (less than 6%). The 2D modeling approach also reduces the computation time considerably (from 11 h to 25 min) compared to using a 3D model. The results showed that the air trapped between the cell and the boreholes of the heat sink provides a good insulation which reduces the temperature of the adjacent cells during thermal runaway. At the same time, a highly conductive matrix dissipates the heat throughout its thermal mass, reducing the temperature even further. It was found that for designing a safe battery pack which mitigates thermal runaway propagation, a combination of small insulating layers wrapped around the cells, and a conductive heat sink is beneficial.

  13. Runaway electron generation during plasma shutdown by killer pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, K; Feher, T; Smith, H; Fueloep, T; Helander, P

    2008-01-01

    Tokamak discharges are sometimes terminated by disruptions that may cause large mechanical and thermal loads on the vessel. To mitigate disruption-induced problems it has been proposed that 'killer' pellets could be injected into the plasma in order to safely terminate the discharge. Killer pellets enhance radiative energy loss and thereby lead to rapid cooling and shutdown of the discharge. But pellets may also cause runaway electron generation, as has been observed in experiments in several tokamaks. In this work, runaway dynamics in connection with deuterium or carbon pellet-induced fast plasma shutdown is considered. A pellet code, which calculates the material deposition and initial cooling caused by the pellet is coupled to a runaway code, which determines the subsequent temperature evolution and runaway generation. In this way, a tool has been created to test the suitability of different pellet injection scenarios for disruption mitigation. If runaway generation is avoided, the resulting current quench times are too long to safely avoid large forces on the vessel due to halo currents

  14. Dielectric oil-based polymer actuator for improved thickness strain and breakdown voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Min Sung; Yamamoto, Akio [Dept. of Precision Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) have been increasingly investigated as alternative actuators to conventional ones. However, DEAs suffer from high rates of premature failure. Therefore, this study proposes a dielectric oil-based polymer actuator, also called a Dielectric liquid actuator (DLA), to compensate for the drawbacks of DEAs. DLA was experimentally compared with conventional DEAs. Results showed that DLA successfully prevented thermal runaway at defects in the electrode and excessive thinning of the film, resulting in increased breakdown voltage. Consequently, premature failure was inhibited, and the performance was improved. The breakdown voltages of DLA and DEA were 6000 and 2000 V, respectively, and their maximum thickness strains were 49.5% and 37.5%, respectively.

  15. Dielectric oil-based polymer actuator for improved thickness strain and breakdown voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Min Sung; Yamamoto, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) have been increasingly investigated as alternative actuators to conventional ones. However, DEAs suffer from high rates of premature failure. Therefore, this study proposes a dielectric oil-based polymer actuator, also called a Dielectric liquid actuator (DLA), to compensate for the drawbacks of DEAs. DLA was experimentally compared with conventional DEAs. Results showed that DLA successfully prevented thermal runaway at defects in the electrode and excessive thinning of the film, resulting in increased breakdown voltage. Consequently, premature failure was inhibited, and the performance was improved. The breakdown voltages of DLA and DEA were 6000 and 2000 V, respectively, and their maximum thickness strains were 49.5% and 37.5%, respectively

  16. Cave breakdown by vadose weathering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osborne R. Armstrong L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Vadose weathering is a significant mechanism for initiating breakdown in caves. Vadose weathering of ore bodies, mineral veins, palaeokarst deposits, non-carbonate keystones and impure, altered or fractured bedrock, which is intersected by caves, will frequently result in breakdown. Breakdown is an active, ongoing process. Breakdown occurs throughout the vadose zone, and is not restricted to large diameter passages, or to cave ceilings. The surfaces of disarticulated blocks are commonly coated, rather than having fresh broken faces, and blocks continue to disintegrate after separating from the bedrock. Not only gypsum, but also hydromagnesite and aragonite are responsible for crystal wedging. It is impossible to study or identify potential breakdown foci by surface surveys alone, in-cave observation and mapping are essential.

  17. Rural Runaways: Rurality and Its Implications for Services to Children and Young People Who Run Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Myfanwy; Goswami, Haridhan

    2010-01-01

    This article debates options for service provision to young rural runaways in the UK. Using data drawn from two national surveys and follow-on qualitative studies, the authors trace urban myths of rurality and their effects on runaway provision. The authors review models of rural refuge, systemic advocacy and mobile services for rural runaways.…

  18. 76 FR 22785 - Direct Certification and Certification of Homeless, Migrant and Runaway Children for Free School...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... [FNS-2008-0001] RIN 0584-AD60 Direct Certification and Certification of Homeless, Migrant and Runaway... concerning the certification of certain children who are homeless, runaway, or migratory. This rule affects... children who are homeless, runaway, or migratory, as determined by the homeless coordinator for homeless or...

  19. 30 CFR 56.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad..., and Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment. Stopblocks, derail devices, or other devices that protect against moving or runaway rail equipment shall be...

  20. 30 CFR 57.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad..., Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment. Stopblocks, derail devices, or other devices that protect against moving or runaway rail equipment shall be...

  1. 77 FR 33223 - Announcement of the Publication of Funding Opportunity Announcements Under the Runaway and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... the Publication of Funding Opportunity Announcements Under the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act AGENCY... Statutory Authority: Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, 42 U.S.C. sections 5701-5752, as amended by the.... Porter, Director, Runaway and Homeless Youth Program, Family and Youth Services Bureau, 1250 Maryland Ave...

  2. Effects of Spatial Gradients on Electron Runaway Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeice, Peter; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1996-01-01

    The runaway process is known to accelerate electrons in many laboratory plasmas and has been suggested as an acceleration mechanism in some astrophysical plasmas, including solar flares. Current calculations of the electron velocity distributions resulting from the runaway process are greatly restricted because they impose spatial homogeneity on the distribution. We have computed runaway distributions which include consistent development of spatial gradients in the energetic tail. Our solution for the electron velocity distribution is presented as a function of distance along a finite length acceleration region, and is compared with the equivalent distribution for the infinitely long homogenous system (i.e., no spatial gradients), as considered in the existing literature. All these results are for the weak field regime. We also discuss the severe restrictiveness of this weak field assumption.

  3. Relation of the runaway avalanche threshold to momentum space topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2018-02-01

    The underlying physics responsible for the formation of an avalanche instability due to the generation of secondary electrons is studied. A careful examination of the momentum space topology of the runaway electron population is carried out with an eye toward identifying how qualitative changes in the momentum space of the runaway electrons is correlated with the avalanche threshold. It is found that the avalanche threshold is tied to the merger of an O and X point in the momentum space of the primary runaway electron population. Such a change of the momentum space topology is shown to be accurately described by a simple analytic model, thus providing a powerful means of determining the avalanche threshold for a range of model assumptions.

  4. Application of Statistical Potential Techniques to Runaway Transport Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguilior, S.; Castejon, F.; Parrondo, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A method is presented for computing runaway production rate based on techniques of noise-activated escape in a potential is presented in this work. A generalised potential in 2D momentum space is obtained from the deterministic or drift terms of Langevin equations. The diffusive or stochastic terms that arise directly from the stochastic nature of collisions, play the role of the noise that activates barrier crossings. The runaway electron source is given by the escape rate in such a potential which is obtained from an Arrenius-like relation. Runaway electrons are those skip the potential barrier due to the effect of stochastic collisions. In terms of computation time, this method allows one to quickly obtain the source term for a runway electron transport code.(Author) 11 refs

  5. Investigating the effects of counseling programs on runaway youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the effects of counseling programs on reducing the runaway youth in Iran. The study selects a sample of 30 students and divides them into two groups of control and experiment. The first group is kept under eight sessions of social skills training and a questionnaire consists of various questions including confidence items is distributed among both groups after the training ends. The implementation of Kolmogorov-Smirnov has revealed that both pre and post-test data are normally distributed. In addition, the result of ANOVA test has revealed that training program could significantly improve runaway youth’s confidence.

  6. Power-law and runaway growth in conserved aggregation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Toshiya; Fujihara, Akihiro; Tanimoto, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    The z-transform technique is used to analyze the Smoluchowski coagulation equation for conserved aggregation systems. A universal power law with the exponent -5/2 appears when a total 'mass' has a certain critical value. Below the threshold, ordinary scaling relations hold and the system exhibits a behavior like usual critical phenomena. Above the threshold, in contrast, the excess amount of mass coagulates into a runaway member, and remaining members follow the power law. Here the runaway growth coexists with the power law. It is argued that these behaviors are observed universally in conserved aggregation processes

  7. On the origin of the hypervelocity runaway star HD271791

    OpenAIRE

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the runaway early B-type star HD271791 and show that its extremely high velocity (\\simeq 530-920 km/s) cannot be explained within the framework of the binary-supernova ejection scenario. Instead, we suggest that HD271791 attained its peculiar velocity in the course of a strong dynamical encounter between two hard massive binaries or via an exchange encounter between a hard massive binary and a very massive star, formed through runaway mergers of ordinary massive stars...

  8. On the origin of the hypervelocity runaway star HD 271791

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the early-B-type runaway star HD 271791 and show that its extremely high velocity (≃530 - 920km s-1) cannot be explained within the framework of the binary-supernova ejection scenario. Instead, we suggest that HD 271791 attained its peculiar velocity in the course of a strong dynamical encounter between two hard, massive binaries or through an exchange encounter between a hard, massive binary and a very massive star, formed through runaway mergers of ordinary massive stars in the dense core of a young massive star cluster.

  9. 45 CFR 1351.10 - What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless... FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.10 What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth...

  10. 45 CFR 1351.20 - What are the additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.20 Section 1351.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND... Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? (a) To improve the administration of the Runaway and Homeless...

  11. 45 CFR 1351.12 - Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and... FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.12 Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and...

  12. 45 CFR 1351.17 - How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless... FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.17 How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless...

  13. 45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What costs are supportable under a Runaway and... FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.15 What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless...

  14. 45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and... FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.11 Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless...

  15. 45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund? 1351.18 Section 1351.18 Public... SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to...

  16. 45 CFR 1351.16 - What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and... FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.16 What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and...

  17. Mitigation of current quench by runaway electrons in LHCD discharges in the HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, H.W.; Hu, L.Q.; Lin, S.Y.; Zhong, G.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Production of runaway electrons during a major disruption has been observed in HT-7 Tokamak. The runaway current plateaus, which can carry part of the pre-disruptive current, are observed in lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) limiter discharges. It is found that the runaway current can mitigate the disruptions effectively. Detailed observations are presented on the runaway electrons generated following disruptions in the HT-7 tokamak with carbon limited discharges. The results indicate that the magnetic oscillations play an important role in the activity of runaway electrons in disruption. (author)

  18. Suppression of Runaway Electrons by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in TEXTOR Disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnen, M.; Bozhenkov, S. A.; Abdullaev, S. S.; TEXTOR Team,; Jakubowski, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    The generation of runaway electrons in the international fusion experiment ITER disruptions can lead to severe damage at plasma facing components. Massive gas injection might inhibit the generation process, but the amount of gas needed can affect, e.g., vacuum systems. Alternatively, magnetic perturbations can suppress runaway generation by increasing the loss rate. In TEXTOR disruptions runaway losses were enhanced by the application of resonant magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n=1 and n=2. The disruptions are initiated by fast injection of about 3x10 21 argon atoms, which leads to a reliable generation of runaway electrons. At sufficiently high perturbation levels a reduction of the runaway current, a shortening of the current plateau, and the suppression of high energetic runaways are observed. These findings indicate the suppression of the runaway avalanche during disruptions

  19. Analyzing randomly occurring voltage breakdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    During acceptance testing of high-vacuum neutron tubes, 40% of the tubes failed after experiencing high-voltage breakdowns during the aging process. Use of a digitizer in place of an oscilloscope revealed two types of breakdowns, only one of which affected acceptance testing. This information allowed redesign of the aging sequence to prevent tube damage and improve yield and quality of the final product

  20. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; Vries, P. de; Fil, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Runaway electrons (RE) have been obtained at JET-ILW using massive argon injection. • The runaway electron domain entry points are similar between JET-C and JET-ILW. • Inside the runaway electron domain, higher RE currents are observed with JET-ILW. • RE impact has been observed without material melting up to 100 kA RE current. • Heat deposition of 2 ± 1 mm is confirmed by measurements and simulations. - Abstract: Runaway electrons (RE) during disruptions are a concern for future tokamaks including ITER with its metallic wall. Although RE are rare in spontaneous disruptions with the JET ITER-like Wall (JET-ILW), RE beams up to 380 kA were obtained using massive injection (MGI) of argon in JET-ILW divertor discharges. Entry points into the RE domain defined by operational parameters (toroidal field, argon fraction in MGI) are unchanged but higher RE currents have been obtained inside the JET-ILW MGI-generated RE domain when compared to JET-C. This might be due to the influence of the metallic wall on the current quench plasma. Temperatures of 900 °C have been observed following RE impacts on beryllium tiles. Heat deposition depth of ∼2 mm has to be assumed to match the tile cooling time. 3D simulations of the RE energy deposition using the ENDEP/MEMOS codes show that material melting is unlikely with 100 kA RE beams

  1. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reux, C., E-mail: cedric.reux@cea.fr [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Plyusnin, V. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Alper, B. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alves, D. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Bazylev, B. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Institut für Hochleistungsimpuls und Mikrowellentechnik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Nord, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Belonohy, E. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie-und Klimaforschung-Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Decker, J. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Devaux, S. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vries, P. de [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Fil, A. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Runaway electrons (RE) have been obtained at JET-ILW using massive argon injection. • The runaway electron domain entry points are similar between JET-C and JET-ILW. • Inside the runaway electron domain, higher RE currents are observed with JET-ILW. • RE impact has been observed without material melting up to 100 kA RE current. • Heat deposition of 2 ± 1 mm is confirmed by measurements and simulations. - Abstract: Runaway electrons (RE) during disruptions are a concern for future tokamaks including ITER with its metallic wall. Although RE are rare in spontaneous disruptions with the JET ITER-like Wall (JET-ILW), RE beams up to 380 kA were obtained using massive injection (MGI) of argon in JET-ILW divertor discharges. Entry points into the RE domain defined by operational parameters (toroidal field, argon fraction in MGI) are unchanged but higher RE currents have been obtained inside the JET-ILW MGI-generated RE domain when compared to JET-C. This might be due to the influence of the metallic wall on the current quench plasma. Temperatures of 900 °C have been observed following RE impacts on beryllium tiles. Heat deposition depth of ∼2 mm has to be assumed to match the tile cooling time. 3D simulations of the RE energy deposition using the ENDEP/MEMOS codes show that material melting is unlikely with 100 kA RE beams.

  2. Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plyusnin, V.V.; Riccardo, V.; Jaspers, R.; Alper, B.; Kiptily, V.G.; Mlynář, Jan; Popovichev, S.; de La Luna, E.; Andersson, F.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2006), s. 277-284 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : JET * tokamak * fusion * dicsruption * runaway electrons * tomography Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.839, year: 2006

  3. Gang Involvement and Membership among Homeless and Runaway Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Kevin A.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2003-01-01

    Assessed the extent of gang involvement among homeless and runaway youth, comparing gang members, gang-involved youth (not members), and non-gang youth on several dimensions. Interview data indicated that 15.4 percent of the youth were gang members and 32.2 percent were involved in gangs. These youth reported more family problems and school…

  4. Low Simulated Radiation Limit for Runaway Greenhouse Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Colin; Robinson, Tyler D.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Crisp, David

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial planet atmospheres must be in long-term radiation balance, with solar radiation absorbed matched by thermal radiation emitted. For hot moist atmospheres, however, there is an upper limit on the thermal emission which is decoupled from the surface temperature. If net absorbed solar radiation exceeds this limit the planet will heat uncontrollably, the so-called \\runaway greenhouse". Here we show that a runaway greenhouse induced steam atmosphere may be a stable state for a planet with the same amount of incident solar radiation as Earth has today, contrary to previous results. We have calculated the clear-sky radiation limits at line-by-line spectral resolution for the first time. The thermal radiation limit is lower than previously reported (282 W/sq m rather than 310W/sq m) and much more solar radiation would be absorbed (294W/sq m rather than 222W/sq m). Avoiding a runaway greenhouse under the present solar constant requires that the atmosphere is subsaturated with water, and that cloud albedo forcing exceeds cloud greenhouse forcing. Greenhouse warming could in theory trigger a runaway greenhouse but palaeoclimate comparisons suggest that foreseeable increases in greenhouse gases will be insufficient to do this.

  5. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2016) 37: 22. DOI: 10.1007/s12036-016-9400-2. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in the Galaxy. Abudusaimaitijiang Yisikandeer. ∗. , Chunhua Zhu, Zhaojun Wang. & Guoliang Lü. School of Physical Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi, 830046, China. ∗.

  6. Quantitative mixture fraction measurements in combustion system via laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Mohy S.; Imam, Hisham; Elsayed, Khaled A.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Abbass, Wafaa

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to quantitative mixture fraction measurements in flames. The measured spectra of different mixtures of natural gas and air are used to obtain the calibration parameters for local

  7. Runaway transient simulation of a model Kaplan turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S; Liu, D; Wu, Y [State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Department of Thermal Eng., Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Zhou, D [Water Conservancy and Hydropower Eng., Hohai University, Nanjing. 210098 (China); Nishi, M, E-mail: liushuhong@tsinghua.edu.c [Kyushu Inst. Tech. Senior Academy, Kitakyushu, 804-8550 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    The runaway transient is a typical transient process of a hydro power unit, where the rotational speed of a turbine runner rapidly increases up to the runaway speed under a working head as the guide vanes cannot be closed due to some reason at the load rejection. In the present paper, the characteristics of the runaway transient of a model Kaplan turbine having ns = 479(m-kW) is simulated by using a time-dependent CFD technique where equation of rotational motion of runner, continuity equation and unsteady RANS equations with RNG k-{epsilon} turbulence model are solved iteratively. In the calculation, unstructured mesh is used to the whole flow passage, which consists of several sub-domains: entrance, casing, stay vanes + guide vanes, guide section, runner and draft tube. And variable speed sliding mesh technique is used to exchange interface flow information between moving part and stationary part, and three-dimensional unstructured dynamic mesh technique is also adopted to ensure mesh quality. Two cases were treated in the simulation of runaway transient characteristics after load rejection: one is the rated operating condition as the initial condition, and the other is the condition at the maximum head. Regarding the runaway speed, the experimental speed is 1.45 times the initial speed and the calculation is 1.47 times the initial for the former case. In the latter case, the experiment and the calculation are 1.67 times and 1.69 times respectively. From these results, it is recognized that satisfactorily prediction will be possible by using the present numerical method. Further, numerical results show that the swirl in the draft-tube flow becomes stronger in the latter part of the transient process so that a vortex rope will occur in the draft tube and its precession will cause the pressure fluctuations which sometimes affect the stability of hydro power system considerably.

  8. Runaway transient simulation of a model Kaplan turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Zhou, D.; Liu, D.; Wu, Y.; Nishi, M.

    2010-08-01

    The runaway transient is a typical transient process of a hydro power unit, where the rotational speed of a turbine runner rapidly increases up to the runaway speed under a working head as the guide vanes cannot be closed due to some reason at the load rejection. In the present paper, the characteristics of the runaway transient of a model Kaplan turbine having ns = 479(m-kW) is simulated by using a time-dependent CFD technique where equation of rotational motion of runner, continuity equation and unsteady RANS equations with RNG k-epsilon turbulence model are solved iteratively. In the calculation, unstructured mesh is used to the whole flow passage, which consists of several sub-domains: entrance, casing, stay vanes + guide vanes, guide section, runner and draft tube. And variable speed sliding mesh technique is used to exchange interface flow information between moving part and stationary part, and three-dimensional unstructured dynamic mesh technique is also adopted to ensure mesh quality. Two cases were treated in the simulation of runaway transient characteristics after load rejection: one is the rated operating condition as the initial condition, and the other is the condition at the maximum head. Regarding the runaway speed, the experimental speed is 1.45 times the initial speed and the calculation is 1.47 times the initial for the former case. In the latter case, the experiment and the calculation are 1.67 times and 1.69 times respectively. From these results, it is recognized that satisfactorily prediction will be possible by using the present numerical method. Further, numerical results show that the swirl in the draft-tube flow becomes stronger in the latter part of the transient process so that a vortex rope will occur in the draft tube and its precession will cause the pressure fluctuations which sometimes affect the stability of hydro power system considerably.

  9. Runaway transient simulation of a model Kaplan turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S; Liu, D; Wu, Y; Zhou, D; Nishi, M

    2010-01-01

    The runaway transient is a typical transient process of a hydro power unit, where the rotational speed of a turbine runner rapidly increases up to the runaway speed under a working head as the guide vanes cannot be closed due to some reason at the load rejection. In the present paper, the characteristics of the runaway transient of a model Kaplan turbine having ns = 479(m-kW) is simulated by using a time-dependent CFD technique where equation of rotational motion of runner, continuity equation and unsteady RANS equations with RNG k-ε turbulence model are solved iteratively. In the calculation, unstructured mesh is used to the whole flow passage, which consists of several sub-domains: entrance, casing, stay vanes + guide vanes, guide section, runner and draft tube. And variable speed sliding mesh technique is used to exchange interface flow information between moving part and stationary part, and three-dimensional unstructured dynamic mesh technique is also adopted to ensure mesh quality. Two cases were treated in the simulation of runaway transient characteristics after load rejection: one is the rated operating condition as the initial condition, and the other is the condition at the maximum head. Regarding the runaway speed, the experimental speed is 1.45 times the initial speed and the calculation is 1.47 times the initial for the former case. In the latter case, the experiment and the calculation are 1.67 times and 1.69 times respectively. From these results, it is recognized that satisfactorily prediction will be possible by using the present numerical method. Further, numerical results show that the swirl in the draft-tube flow becomes stronger in the latter part of the transient process so that a vortex rope will occur in the draft tube and its precession will cause the pressure fluctuations which sometimes affect the stability of hydro power system considerably.

  10. A Runaway Yellow Supergiant Star in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip; Morrell, Nidia I.; Skiff, Brian; Georgy, Cyril

    2018-05-01

    We recently discovered a yellow supergiant (YSG) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a heliocentric radial velocity of ∼300 km s‑1, which is much larger than expected for a star at its location in the SMC. This is the first runaway YSG ever discovered and only the second evolved runaway star discovered in a galaxy other than the Milky Way. We classify the star as G5-8 I and use de-reddened broad-band colors with model atmospheres to determine an effective temperature of 4700 ± 250 K, consistent with what is expected from its spectral type. The star’s luminosity is then log L/L ⊙ ∼ 4.2 ± 0.1, consistent with it being a ∼30 Myr 9 M ⊙ star according to the Geneva evolution models. The star is currently located in the outer portion of the SMC’s body, but if the star’s transverse peculiar velocity is similar to its peculiar radial velocity, in 10 Myr the star would have moved 1.°6 across the disk of the SMC and could easily have been born in one of the SMC’s star-forming regions. Based on its large radial velocity, we suggest it originated in a binary system where the primary exploded as a supernovae, thus flinging the runaway star out into space. Such stars may provide an important mechanism for the dispersal of heavier elements in galaxies given the large percentage of massive stars that are runaways. In the future, we hope to look into additional evolved runaway stars that were discovered as part of our other past surveys. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  11. X-ray study of bow shocks in runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, M.; del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.

    2017-11-01

    Massive runaway stars produce bow shocks through the interaction of their winds with the interstellar medium, with the prospect for particle acceleration by the shocks. These objects are consequently candidates for non-thermal emission. Our aim is to investigate the X-ray emission from these sources. We observed with XMM-Newton a sample of five bow shock runaways, which constitutes a significant improvement of the sample of bow shock runaways studied in X-rays so far. A careful analysis of the data did not reveal any X-ray emission related to the bow shocks. However, X-ray emission from the stars is detected, in agreement with the expected thermal emission from stellar winds. On the basis of background measurements we derive conservative upper limits between 0.3 and 10 keV on the bow shocks emission. Using a simple radiation model, these limits together with radio upper limits allow us to constrain some of the main physical quantities involved in the non-thermal emission processes, such as the magnetic field strength and the amount of incident infrared photons. The reasons likely responsible for the non-detection of non-thermal radiation are discussed. Finally, using energy budget arguments, we investigate the detectability of inverse Compton X-rays in a more extended sample of catalogued runaway star bow shocks. From our analysis we conclude that a clear identification of non-thermal X-rays from massive runaway bow shocks requires one order of magnitude (or higher) sensitivity improvement with respect to present observatories.

  12. Controlling runaway vortex via externally injected high-frequency electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zehua; McDevitt, Chris; Tang, Xianzhu

    2017-10-01

    One way of mitigating runaway damage of the plasma-facing components in a tokamak fusion reactor is by limiting the runaway electron energy under a few MeV, while not necessarily reducing the runaway current appreciably. Here we describe a physics mechanism by which such momentum space engineering of the runaway distribution can be facilitated by externally injected high-frequency electromagnetic waves such as the whistler waves. The drastic impact that wave-induced scattering can have on the runaway energy distribution is fundamentally the result of its ability to control the runaway vortex in the momentum space. The runaway vortex, which is a local circulation of runaways in momentum space, is the outcome of the competition between Coulomb collisions, synchrotron radiation damping, and runaway acceleration by parallel electric field. By introducing a wave that resonantly interacts with runaways at a particular range of energy that is mildly relativistic, the enhanced scattering would reshape the vortex by cutting off the part that is highly relativistic. The efficiency of resonant scattering accentuates the requirement that the wave amplitude can be small so the power requirement from external wave injection is practical for the mitigation scheme.

  13. High gradient RF breakdown study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Scheitrum, G.; Hanna, S.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.

    1998-01-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and UC Davis have been investigating high gradient RF breakdown and its effects on pulse shortening in high energy microwave devices. RF breakdown is a critical issue in the development of high power microwave sources and next generation linear accelerators since it limits the output power of microwave sources and the accelerating gradient of linacs. The motivation of this research is to find methods to increase the breakdown threshold level in X-band structures by reducing dark current. Emphasis is focused on improved materials, surface finish, and cleanliness. The test platform for this research is a traveling wave resonant ring. A 30 MW klystron is employed to provide up to 300 MW of traveling wave power in the ring to trigger breakdown in the cavity. Five TM 01 cavities have previously been tested, each with a different combination of surface polish and/or coating. The onset of breakdown was extended up to 250 MV/m with a TiN surface finish, as compared to 210 MV/m for uncoated OFE copper. Although the TiN coating was helpful in depressing the field emission, the lowest dark current was obtained with a 1 microinch surface finish, single-point diamond-turned cavity

  14. Field O stars: formed in situ or as runaways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Weidner, C.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2012-08-01

    A significant fraction of massive stars in the Milky Way and other galaxies are located far from star clusters and star-forming regions. It is known that some of these stars are runaways, i.e. possess high space velocities (determined through the proper motion and/or radial velocity measurements), and therefore most likely were formed in embedded clusters and then ejected into the field because of dynamical few-body interactions or binary-supernova explosions. However, there exists a group of field O stars whose runaway status is difficult to prove via direct proper motion measurements (e.g. in the Magellanic Clouds) or whose (measured) low space velocities and/or young ages appear to be incompatible with their large separation from known star clusters. The existence of this group led some authors to believe that field O stars can form in situ. Since the question of whether or not O stars can form in isolation is of crucial importance for star formation theory, it is important to thoroughly test candidates of such stars in order to improve the theory. In this paper, we examine the runaway status of the best candidates for isolated formation of massive stars in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds by searching for bow shocks around them, by using the new reduction of the Hipparcos data, and by searching for stellar systems from which they could originate within their lifetimes. We show that most of the known O stars thought to have formed in isolation are instead very likely runaways. We show also that the field must contain a population of O stars whose low space velocities and/or young ages are in apparent contradiction to the large separation of these stars from their parent clusters and/or the ages of these clusters. These stars (the descendants of runaway massive binaries) cannot be traced back to their parent clusters and therefore can be mistakenly considered as having formed in situ. We argue also that some field O stars could be detected in optical

  15. Vortex breakdown incipience: Theoretical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity of the onset and the location of vortex breakdowns in concentrated vortex cores, and the pronounced tendency of the breakdowns to migrate upstream have been characteristic observations of experimental investigations; they have also been features of numerical simulations and led to questions about the validity of these simulations. This behavior seems to be inconsistent with the strong time-like axial evolution of the flow, as expressed explicitly, for example, by the quasi-cylindrical approximate equations for this flow. An order-of-magnitude analysis of the equations of motion near breakdown leads to a modified set of governing equations, analysis of which demonstrates that the interplay between radial inertial, pressure, and viscous forces gives an elliptic character to these concentrated swirling flows. Analytical, asymptotic, and numerical solutions of a simplified non-linear equation are presented; these qualitatively exhibit the features of vortex onset and location noted above.

  16. Breakdown-prone volume in terahertz wave beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Qiao, F.; Kashyn, D. G.; Pu, R. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3511 (United States); Dolin, L. S. [Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod 603600 (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-21

    This study was motivated by the recently proposed concept of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials by a focused terahertz (THz) radiation [V. L. Granatstein and G. S. Nusinovich, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 063304 (2010)]. According to this concept, a high-power THz radiation should be focused in a small spot where the field intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons in such a breakdown-prone volume, a THz discharge will occur there. However, this volume should be so small that in the absence of ionizing sources in its vicinity the probability to have there any free electrons is low. Then, the increased breakdown rate in a series of THz pulses would indicate the presence of hidden radioactive materials in the vicinity of the focused spot. For this concept, it is important to accurately determine the breakdown-prone volume created by a focused THz radiation. This problem is analyzed in this paper, first, for the case of a single wave beam and, then, for the case of crossing wave beams of different polarizations. The problem is studied first ignoring the diffraction spread of wave beams in the vicinity of the focal plane and, then, with the account for the diffraction spreading. Then, relations between the THz wave power, the range of such a system and the breakdown-prone volume are analyzed. Finally, the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on propagation and focusing of THz wave beams in air is considered.

  17. Dramatically enhanced electrical breakdown strength in cellulose nanopaper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical breakdown behaviors of nanopaper prepared from nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC were investigated. Compared to conventional insulating paper made from micro softwood fibers, nanopaper has a dramatically enhanced breakdown strength. Breakdown field of nanopaper is 67.7 kV/mm, whereas that of conventional paper is only 20 kV/mm. Air voids in the surface of conventional paper are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Further analyses using mercury intrusion show that pore diameter of conventional paper is around 1.7 μm, while that of nanopaper is below 3 nm. Specific pore size of nanopaper is determined to be approximately 2.8 nm by the gas adsorption technique. In addition, theoretical breakdown strengths of nanopaper and conventional paper are also calculated to evaluate the effect of pore size. It turns out that theoretical values agree well with experimental data, indicating that the improved strength in nanopaper is mainly attributed to the decreased pore size. Due to its outstanding breakdown strength, this study indicates the suitability of nanopaper for electrical insulation in ultra-high voltage convert transformers and other electrical devices.

  18. Breakdown-prone volume in terahertz wave beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Qiao, F.; Kashyn, D. G.; Pu, R.; Dolin, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    This study was motivated by the recently proposed concept of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials by a focused terahertz (THz) radiation [V. L. Granatstein and G. S. Nusinovich, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 063304 (2010)]. According to this concept, a high-power THz radiation should be focused in a small spot where the field intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons in such a breakdown-prone volume, a THz discharge will occur there. However, this volume should be so small that in the absence of ionizing sources in its vicinity the probability to have there any free electrons is low. Then, the increased breakdown rate in a series of THz pulses would indicate the presence of hidden radioactive materials in the vicinity of the focused spot. For this concept, it is important to accurately determine the breakdown-prone volume created by a focused THz radiation. This problem is analyzed in this paper, first, for the case of a single wave beam and, then, for the case of crossing wave beams of different polarizations. The problem is studied first ignoring the diffraction spread of wave beams in the vicinity of the focal plane and, then, with the account for the diffraction spreading. Then, relations between the THz wave power, the range of such a system and the breakdown-prone volume are analyzed. Finally, the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on propagation and focusing of THz wave beams in air is considered.

  19. Runaway electrons in disruptions and perturbed magnetic topologies of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear fusion represents a valuable perspective for a safe and reliable energy supply from the middle of the 21st century on. Currently, the tokamak is the most advanced principle of confining a man-made fusion plasma. The operation of future, reactor sized tokamaks like ITER faces a crucial difficulty in the generation of runaway electrons. The runaway of electrons is a free fall acceleration into the relativistic regime which is known in various kinds of plasmas including astrophysical ones, thunderbolts and fusion plasmas. The tokamak disruption instability can include the conversion of a substantial part of the plasma current into a runaway electron current. When the high energetic runaways are lost, they can strike the plasma facing components at localised spots. Due to their high energies up to a few tens of MeV, the runaways carry the potential to reduce the lifetimes of wall components and even to destroy sensitive, i.e. actively cooled parts. The research for effective ways to suppress the generation of runaway electrons is hampered by the lack of a complete understanding of the physics of the runaways in disruptions. As it is practically impossible to use standard electron detectors in the challenging environment of a tokamak, the experimental knowledge about runaways is limited and it relies on rather indirect techniques of measurement. The main diagnostics used for this PhD work are three reciprocating probes which measure the runaway electrons directly at the plasma edge of the tokamak TEXTOR. A calorimetric probe and a material probe which exploits the signature that a runaway beam impact leaves in the probe were developed in the course of the PhD work. Novel observations of the burst-like runaway electron losses in tokamak disruptions are reported. The runaway bursts are temporally resolved and first-time measurements of the corresponding runaway energy spectra are presented. A characteristic shape and typical burst to burst variations of the

  20. Note: Measurement of the runaway electrons in the J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X. Q.; Luo, Y. H.; Jin, W.; Li, J. C.; Chen, Z. P.; Wang, Z. J.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.

    2012-01-01

    The runaway electrons have been measured by hard x-ray detectors and soft x-ray array in the J-TEXT tokamak. The hard x-ray radiations in the energy ranges of 0.5-5 MeV are measured by two NaI detectors. The flux of lost runaway electrons can be obtained routinely. The soft x-ray array diagnostics are used to monitor the runaway beam generated in disruptions since the soft x-ray is dominated by the interaction between runaway electrons and metallic impurities inside the plasma. With the aid of soft x-ray array, runaway electron beam has been detected directly during the formation of runaway current plateau following the disruptions.

  1. Observation of runaway electrons by infrared camera in J-TEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, R. H.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, M.; Huang, D. W.; Yan, W.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-11-15

    When the energy of confined runaway electrons approaches several tens of MeV, the runaway electrons can emit synchrotron radiation in the range of infrared wavelength. An infrared camera working in the wavelength of 3-5 μm has been developed to study the runaway electrons in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT). The camera is located in the equatorial plane looking tangentially into the direction of electron approach. The runaway electron beam inside the plasma has been observed at the flattop phase. With a fast acquisition of the camera, the behavior of runaway electron beam has been observed directly during the runaway current plateau following the massive gas injection triggered disruptions.

  2. Fokker-Planck simulations of knock-on electron runaway avalanche and bursts in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.C.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Chan, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    The avalanche of runaway electrons in an ohmic tokamak plasma triggered by knock-on collisions of traces of energetic electrons with the bulk electrons is simulated by the bounce averaged Fokker-Planck code, CQL3D. It is shown that even when the electric field is small for the production of Dreicer runaways, the knock-on collisions can produce significant runaway electrons in a fraction of a second at typical reactor parameters. The energy spectrum of these knock-on runaways has a characteristic temperature. The growth rate and temperature of the runaway distribution are determined and compared with theory. In simulations of pellet injection into high temperature plasmas, it is shown that a burst of Dreicer runaways may also occur depending on the cooling rate due to the pellet injection. Implications of these phenomena on disruption control in reactor plasmas are discussed. (author)

  3. Physics of gas breakdown for ion beam transport in gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Rose, D.V.; Hubbard, R.F.; Lampe, M.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.; Welch, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed analysis, experiments, and computer simulations are producing a new understanding of gas breakdown during intense ion beam transport in neutral gas. Charge neutralization of beam micro clumps is shown to limit the net clump potentials to a non-zero value π min , which can lead to divergence growth and axial energy spreading. At pressures approx-gt 1 Torr, plasma shielding should substantially reduce this effect Current neutralization has been studied in experiments on the GAMBLE II accelerator. The importance of fast electrons (knockons and runaways) has been established in IPROP simulations, which are in agreement with the experiments. For light ion fusion parameters with pressures approx-gt 1 Torr, very small net current fractions (much-lt 1%) appear feasible, permitting ballistic transport in gas. Self-pinched requires higher net current fractions (≥ 2%) and preliminary IPROP code results indicate that this appears achievable for small-radius intense beams in lower pressure gases (approx-gt Torr). Several self-pinched transport concepts look promising. The importance of these results for both light ion fusion and heavy ion fusion is discussed

  4. Effects of continuum breakdown on hypersonic aerothermodynamics for reacting flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Timothy D.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of continuum breakdown on the surface aerothermodynamic properties (pressure, stress, and heat transfer rate) of a sphere in a Mach 25 flow of reacting air in regimes varying from continuum to a rarefied gas. Results are generated using both continuum [computational fluid dynamics (CFD)] and particle [direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC)] approaches. The DSMC method utilizes a chemistry model that calculates the backward rates from an equilibrium constant. A preferential dissociation model is modified in the CFD method to better compare with the vibrationally favored dissociation model that is utilized in the DSMC method. Tests of these models are performed to confirm their validity and to compare the chemistry models in both numerical methods. This study examines the effect of reacting air flow on continuum breakdown and the surface properties of the sphere. As the global Knudsen number increases, the amount of continuum breakdown in the flow and on the surface increases. This increase in continuum breakdown significantly affects the surface properties, causing an increase in the differences between CFD and DSMC. Explanations are provided for the trends observed.

  5. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Lupelli, I.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Manzanares, A.; Mlynář, Jan; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A.E.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 463, August (2015), s. 143-149 ISSN 0022-3115. [PLASMA-SURFACE INTERACTIONS 21: International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices. Kanazawa, 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * JET * runaway electrons * disruptions * ILW Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 2.199, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311514006850

  6. Effect of runaway electrons and VDE's on ITER first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffray, A.R.; Cardella, A.; Federici, G.; Ioki, K.; Parker, R.; Akiba, M.; Ezato, K.

    1998-01-01

    Runaway electron and VDE energy deposition transients pose a major Be and W armour lifetime issue depending on their frequencies. The impact is more severe in the case of W because of the high minimum armour thickness required to prevent Cu from melting. Use of W armour should be limited to regions where such 'slow' high energy deposition transients are highly unlikely. Future effort is required to better understand and characterise these events and to develop design measures to address the issue. (author)

  7. Investigation of runaway electrons in the PRETEXT Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstrand, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    High energy (0.2 to 0.4 MeV) runaway electrons have been studied in PRETEXT discharges by detecting the hard x-ray bremsstrahlung radiation produced when they escape from the discharge and strike the limiter. A pulse height analysis system, which included pileup rejection circuitry because of the high count rate, recorded both the amplitude and arrival time of each pulse

  8. On the physics of runaway particles in JET and MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.; Akers, R.J.; Gimblett, C.G.; Tournianski, M.R.; Byrom, C.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Andersson, F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the physics of runaway particles observed in MAST and JET. During internal reconnection events in MAST, it is observed that the ion distribution function, as measured by a neutral-particle analyser, develops a high-energy tail, which subsequently decays on the time scale of collisional slowing down. These observations are explained in terms of runaway ion acceleration in the electric field induced by the reconnection - a phenomenon predicted theoretically by Furth and Rutherford in 1972 but not commonly noted in tokamaks. In JET, long-lived post-disruption currents carried by runaway electrons have been observed to decay on a time scale of 1-2 s. A relativistic kinetic theory is developed to explain this decay as a consequence of the combined action of Coulomb collisions and synchrotron radiation emission. It is also pointed out that substantial electron-positron pair production should occur in such discharges, which have also been made more recently on JT-60U. In fact, tokamaks may be the largest positron repositories made by man. (author)

  9. THE NATURE OF THE HYPER-RUNAWAY CANDIDATE HIP 60350

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irrgang, Andreas; Przybilla, Norbert; Heber, Ulrich; Fernanda Nieva, M.; Schuh, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Young, massive stars in the Galactic halo are widely supposed to be the result of an ejection event from the Galactic disk forcing some stars to leave their place of birth as so-called runaway stars. Here, we present a detailed spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of the runaway B star HIP 60350 to determine which runaway scenario-a supernova explosion disrupting a binary system or dynamical interaction in star clusters-may be responsible for HIP 60350's peculiar orbit. Based on a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium approach, a high-resolution optical echelle spectrum was examined to revise spectroscopic quantities and for the first time to perform a differential chemical abundance analysis with respect to the B-type star 18 Peg. The results together with proper motions from the Hipparcos Catalog further allowed the three-dimensional kinematics of the star to be studied numerically. The abundances derived for HIP 60350 are consistent with a slightly supersolar metallicity agreeing with the kinematically predicted place of birth ∼6 kpc away from the Galactic center. However, they do not exclude the possibility of an α-enhanced abundance pattern expected in the case of the supernova scenario. Its outstanding high Galactic rest-frame velocity of 530 ± 35 km s -1 is a consequence of ejection in the direction of Galactic rotation and slightly exceeds the local Galactic escape velocity in a standard Galactic potential. Hence, HIP 60350 may be unbound to the Galaxy.

  10. Runaway transport studies in the TJ-I tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Vega, J.; Rodriguez-Yunta, A.; Castejon, F.; Pardo, C.; Navarro, A. P.

    1994-01-01

    Runaway diffusion coefficient, Dr, for TJ-I tokamak has been deduced using two different methods: In the first one, Dr is obtained using the steady state approach for values of the runaway confinement time Tτ r deduced from hard-X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra; in the second method, D r is deduced from sawteeth oscillations of HXR flux, and of SXR intensity, recorded simultaneously. Data have been taken in a scan with the toroidal magnetic field Bp Values obtained for Dr=[5-10] m 2 s ,decreasing with B Γ , are in both cases consistent. Assuming that magnetic turbulence is responsible for their transport, from D r we can deduce b/B Γ , the magnetic fluctuations level, and then infer the thermal conductivity coefficient χ c . The radial energy resolution of runaway electrons allow us to infer for b B Γ and χ c values at the plasma edge and for an inner position about r=a/2. Results are in good agreement with those ones obtained in TJ-I using probes, spectroscopic methods, power balance analysis and a coupled analysis for temperature and density pulses. (Author) 32 refs

  11. Mechanistic elucidation of thermal runaway in potassium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ryan A.; Varma, Arvind; Pol, Vilas G.

    2018-01-01

    For the first time, thermal runaway of charged graphite anodes for K-ion batteries is investigated, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to probe the exothermic degradation reactions. Investigated parameters such as state of charge, cycle number, surface area, and binder demonstrate strong influences on the DSC profiles. Thermal runaway initiates at 100 °C owing to KxC8 - electrolyte reactions, but the K-ion graphite anode evolves significantly less heat as compared to the analogous Li-ion system (395 J g-1 vs. 1048 J g-1). The large volumetric expansion of graphite during potassiation cracks the SEI layer, enabling contact and reaction of KC8 - electrolyte, which diminishes with cycle number due to continuous SEI growth. High surface area graphite decreases the total heat generation, owing to thermal stability of the K-ion SEI layer. These findings illustrate the dynamic nature of K-ion thermal runaway and its many contrasts with the Li-ion graphite system, permitting possible engineering solutions for safer batteries.

  12. High-velocity runaway stars from three-body encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Gualandris, A.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2010-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of dynamical encounters between hard, massive binaries and a very massive star (VMS; formed through runaway mergers of ordinary stars in the dense core of a young massive star cluster) to explore the hypothesis that this dynamical process could be responsible for the origin of high-velocity (≥ 200 - 400 km s-1) early or late B-type stars. We estimated the typical velocities produced in encounters between very tight massive binaries and VMSs (of mass of ≥ 200 M⊙) and found that about 3 - 4% of all encounters produce velocities ≥ 400 km s-1, while in about 2% of encounters the escapers attain velocities exceeding the Milky Ways's escape velocity. We therefore argue that the origin of high-velocity (≥ 200 - 400 km s-1) runaway stars and at least some so-called hypervelocity stars could be associated with dynamical encounters between the tightest massive binaries and VMSs formed in the cores of star clusters. We also simulated dynamical encounters between tight massive binaries and single ordinary 50 - 100 M⊙ stars. We found that from 1 to ≃ 4% of these encounters can produce runaway stars with velocities of ≥ 300 - 400 km s-1 (typical of the bound population of high-velocity halo B-type stars) and occasionally (in less than 1% of encounters) produce hypervelocity (≥ 700 km s-1) late B-type escapers.

  13. Study of the generation and suppression of runaway currents in provoked disruptions in J-TEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: zychen@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Chen, Z.P., E-mail: zpchen@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Zhang, Y.; Jin, W.; Fang, D.; Ba, W.G.; Wang, Z.J.; Zhang, M.; Yang, Z.J.; Ding, Y.H.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2012-05-14

    Runaway currents following disruptions have an important effect on the first wall for the next generation tokamak. The behaviors of runaway currents following intentional provoked disruptions have been investigated in the J-TEXT tokamak. It is found that the runaway current generation following provoked disruptions depends on both the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current. The conversion efficiency of pre-disruptive plasma currents into runaway currents is in the ranges of 30% to 60% in J-TEXT. The runaway currents can be avoided by the intensive gas puffing of H{sub 2} due to the low multiplication factor in J-TEXT. -- Highlights: ► The regime of runaway generation in disruptions in J-TEXT has been established. ► The magnetic field threshold for runaway current generation in disruptions is 2.2 T. ► The conversion efficiency of runaway current is in the ranges of 30% to 60%. ► The runaway currents can be avoided by the intensive gas puffing of H{sub 2}.

  14. Collisional avalanche exponentiation of run-away electrons in electrified plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Fleischmann, H.H.; Zweben, S.J.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY

    1992-07-01

    In contrast to earlier expectations, it is estimated that generation of runaway electrons from close collisions of existing runaways with cold plasma electrons can be significant even for small electric fields, whenever runaways can gain energies of about 20 MeV or more. In that case, the runaway population will grow exponentially with the energy spectrum showing an exponential decrease towards higher energies.Energy gains of the required magnitude may occur in large Tokamak devices as well as in cosmic-ray generation

  15. Investigation of ring-like runaway electron beams in the EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, R J; Hu, L Q; Li, E Z; Xu, M; Zhong, G Q; Xu, L Q; Lin, S Y; Zhang, J Z

    2013-01-01

    In the EAST tokamak, asymmetrical ring-like runaway electron beams with energy more than 30 MeV and pitch angle about 0.1 were investigated. Those runaway beams carried about 46% of the plasma current and located around the q = 2 rational surface when m/n = 1/1 and m/n = 2/1 MHD modes existed in the plasma. Those runaway beams changed from a hollow to a filled structure during the slow oscillations in the discharge about every 0.2 s, which correlated with a large step-like jump in electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signals, a big spike-like perturbation in Mirnov signals and a large decrease in runaway energy. Between those slow oscillations with large magnitude, fast oscillations with small magnitude also existed about every 0.02 s, which correlated with a small step-like jump in ECE signals, a small spike-like perturbation in Mirnov signals, but no clear decrease in runaway energy and changes in the runaway beam structure. Resonant interactions occurred between runaway electrons and magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which gave rise to fast pitch angle scattering processes of those resonant runaway electrons, and hence increased the synchrotron radiation. Theoretical calculations of the resonant interaction were given based on a test particle description. Synchrotron radiation of those resonant runaway electrons was increased by about 60% until the end of the resonant interaction. (paper)

  16. Study of the generation and suppression of runaway currents in provoked disruptions in J-TEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.Y.; Chen, Z.P.; Zhang, Y.; Jin, W.; Fang, D.; Ba, W.G.; Wang, Z.J.; Zhang, M.; Yang, Z.J.; Ding, Y.H.; Zhuang, G.

    2012-01-01

    Runaway currents following disruptions have an important effect on the first wall for the next generation tokamak. The behaviors of runaway currents following intentional provoked disruptions have been investigated in the J-TEXT tokamak. It is found that the runaway current generation following provoked disruptions depends on both the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current. The conversion efficiency of pre-disruptive plasma currents into runaway currents is in the ranges of 30% to 60% in J-TEXT. The runaway currents can be avoided by the intensive gas puffing of H 2 due to the low multiplication factor in J-TEXT. -- Highlights: ► The regime of runaway generation in disruptions in J-TEXT has been established. ► The magnetic field threshold for runaway current generation in disruptions is 2.2 T. ► The conversion efficiency of runaway current is in the ranges of 30% to 60%. ► The runaway currents can be avoided by the intensive gas puffing of H 2 .

  17. Prevent thermal runaway of lithium-ion batteries with minichannel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jian; Lan, Chuanjin; Qiao, Yu; Ma, Yanbao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3D model was developed to study nail penetration induced thermal runaway. • Effects of flow rate, thermal abuse reactions, and nail dimensions were examined. • Minichannel cooling at cell level cannot cease thermal runaway in a single cell. • Minichannel cooling can prevent thermal runaway propagation between cells. - Abstract: Thermal management on lithium-ion batteries is a crucial problem for the performance, lifetime, and safety of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Fire and explosions can be triggered by thermal runaway if the temperature of the lithium-ion batteries is not maintained properly. This work describes a minichannel cooling system designed at the battery module level and the investigation on its efficacy on the mitigation of thermal runaway. Nail penetration was employed to simulate the internal short circuits, which in reality may be caused by vehicle collisions and/or manufacturing defects. Two integrated models were utilized to study thermal runaway: the conjugate heat transfer model and the reaction kinetics model. Numerical simulations were conducted to understand the thermal runaway process and the effects of flow rate, thermal abuse reactions, nail penetration depth, and nail diameter. It is concluded that minichannel cooling at cell level cannot cease thermal runaway in a single cell, but it can prevent battery fratricide due to thermal runaway propagation between cells.

  18. 30 CFR 250.510 - Diesel engine air intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine air intakes. 250.510 Section 250... engine air intakes. Diesel engine air intakes must be equipped with a device to shut down the diesel engine in the event of runaway. Diesel engines that are continuously attended must be equipped with...

  19. 30 CFR 250.610 - Diesel engine air intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine air intakes. 250.610 Section 250... engine air intakes. No later than May 31, 1989, diesel engine air intakes shall be equipped with a device to shut down the diesel engine in the event of runaway. Diesel engines which are continuously...

  20. Gauge theories as theories of spontaneous breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.A.; Ogievetsky, V.I.

    1976-01-01

    Any gauge theory is proved to arise from spontaneous breakdown of symmetry under certain infinite parameter group, the corresponding gauge field being the Goldstone field by which this breakdown is accompanied

  1. The Runaway Greenhouse Effect on Earth and other Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; McKay, Christopher; Young, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Water vapor is an efficient absorber of outgoing longwave infrared radiation on Earth and is the primary greenhouse gas. Since evaporation increases with increasing sea surface temperature, and the increase in water vapor further increases greenhouse warming, there is a positive feedback. The runaway greenhouse effect occurs if this feedback continues unchecked until all the water has left the surface and enters the atmosphere. For Mars and the Earth the runaway greenhouse was halted when water vapor became saturated with respect to ice or liquid water respectively. However, Venus is considered to be an example of a planet where the runaway greenhouse effect did occur, and it has been speculated that if the solar luminosity were to increase above a certain limit, it would also occur on the Earth. Satellite data acquired during the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) under clear sky conditions shows that as the sea surface temperature (SST) increases, the rate of outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere also increases, as expected. Over the pacific warm pool where the SST exceeds 300 K the outgoing radiation emitted to space actually decreases with increasing SST, leading to a potentially unstable system. This behavior is a signature of the runaway greenhouse effect on Earth. However, the SST never exceeds 303K, thus the system has a natural cap which stops the runaway. According to Stefan-Boltzmann's law the amount of heat energy radiated by the Earth's surface is proportional to (T(sup 4)). However, if the planet has a substantial atmosphere, it can absorb all infrared radiation from the lower surface before the radiation penetrates into outer space. Thus, an instrument in space looking at the planet does not detect radiation from the surface. The radiation it sees comes from some level higher up. For the earth#s atmosphere the effective temperature (T(sub e)) has a value of 255 K corresponding to the middle troposphere, above most of the

  2. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten [DTU Compute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Herrada, Miguel A [E.S.I, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, E-41092 (Spain); Shtern, Vladimir N, E-mail: mobr@dtu.dk [Shtern Research and Consulting, Houston, TX 77096 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, H{sub w}, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as H{sub w} varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small H{sub w}, the AMF effect dominates. As H{sub w} increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors. (paper)

  3. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A; Shtern, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, H w , and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as H w varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small H w , the AMF effect dominates. As H w increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors. (paper)

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): a new spectrochemical technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.; Loree, T.R.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    We have used the breakdown spark from a focused laser beam to generate analytically useful emission spectra of minor constituents in air and other carrier gases. The medium was sampled directly. It was not necessary to reduce the sample to solution nor to introduce electrodes. The apparatus is particularly simple; a pulsed laser, spectrometer, and some method for time resolution. The latter is essential in laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) because of the strong early continuum. High temperatures in the spark result in vaporization of small particles, dissociation of molecules, and excitation of atomic and ionic spectra, including species which are normally difficult to detect. In one application, we have monitored beryllium in air at conventrations below 1 μg/m 3 , which is below 1 ppB (w/w). In another we have monitored chlorine and fluorine atoms in real time. LIBS has the potential for real-time direct sampling of contaminants in situ

  5. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor

  6. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C, 1983963113 Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemehrezaei@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, 15875-4416 Shariati, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  7. Individual breakdown of pension rights

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    You should have recently received, via email, your “Individual breakdown of pension rights”.   Please note that: the calculation was based on data as at 1st July 2016, as at 1st September 2016, CERN will introduce a new career structure; the salary position will now be expressed as a percentage of a midpoint of a grade.   We would like to draw your attention to the fact that your pension rights will remain unchanged. Benefits Service CERN Pension Fund

  8. Voltage breakdown on niobium and copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, G.R.; Padamsee, H.; Betzwieser, J.C.; Liu, Y.G.; Rubin, K.H.R.; Shipman, J.E.; Ying, L.T.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that voltage breakdown in superconducting niobium RF cavities is in many ways similar to voltage breakdown on niobium cathodes in DC voltage gaps; most striking are the distinctive starburst patterns and craters that mark the site of voltage breakdown in both superconducting cavities and DC vacuum gaps. Therefore, we can learn much about RF breakdown from simpler, faster DC experiments. We have direct evidence, in the form of before'' and ''after'' pictures, that breakdown events caused by high surface electric fields occur with high probability at contaminant particles on surfaces. Although the pre-breakdown behavior (field emission) seems to depend mostly on the contaminant particles present and little on the substrate, the breakdown event itself is greatly affected by the substrate-niobium, heavily oxidized niobium, electropolished copper, and diamond-machined copper cathodes lead to different kinds of breakdown events. By studying DC voltage breakdown we hope to learn more details about the processes involved in the transition from field emission to catastrophic arcing and the cratering of the surface; as well as learning how to prevent breakdown, we would like to learn how to cause breakdown, which could be important when ''processing'' cavities to reduce field emission. (author)

  9. Runaway electron beam generation and mitigation during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Coffey, I.; Decker, J.; Drewelow, P.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.C.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Giacomelli, L.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lupelli, I.; Lomas, P. J.; Manzanares, A.; Martin De Aguilera, A.; Matthews, G.F.; Mlynář, Jan; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Perez von Thun, C.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A.E.; Sips, G.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 9 (2015), 093013-093013 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : runaway electrons * disruptions * tokamak * JET * massive gas injection * disruption mitigation * runaway background plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/55/9/093013

  10. Comparative study of runaway electron diffusion in the rise phase of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The behaviour of runaway electrons in the SINP tokamak, which can be operated in a normal edge safety factor () (NQ) discharge configuration as well as in a low (LQ) configuration, was experimentally investigated, during the initial plasma generation phase. An energy analysis of the runaway electron dynamics in ...

  11. Comparative study of runaway electron diffusion in the rise phase of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The behaviour of runaway electrons in the SINP tokamak, which can be operated in a normal edge safety factor (qa) (NQ) discharge configuration as well as in a low qa (LQ) configuration, was experimentally investigated, during the initial plasma generation phase. An energy analysis of the runaway electron ...

  12. 76 FR 30368 - Announcement of the Publication of Funding Opportunity Announcements under the Runaway and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Announcement of the Publication of Funding Opportunity Announcements under the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act AGENCY... (SOP) are now available for application. CFDA Number: 93.623, 93.557. Statutory Authority: Runaway and...

  13. Parents, Teachers, and Peers and Early Adolescent Runaway in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chan-Kiu; Liu, Suk-Ching; Lee, Tak-Yan

    2005-01-01

    Parental monitoring, teacher support, classmate support, and friend relationship presumably affect adolescents' runaway from home. According to social control theory, social control based on conventional social norms would prevent adolescent runaway, but association with friends may erode such control. This expectation appears to hold true in a…

  14. RUNAWAY STARS AND THE ESCAPE OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, Charlie; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 30% of all massive stars in the Galaxy are runaways with velocities exceeding 30 km s –1 . Their high speeds allow them to travel ∼0.1-1 kpc away from their birthplace before they explode at the end of their several Myr lifetimes. At high redshift, when galaxies were much smaller than in the local universe, runaways could venture far from the dense inner regions of their host galaxies. From these large radii, and therefore low column densities, much of their ionizing radiation is able to escape into the intergalactic medium. Runaways may therefore significantly enhance the overall escape fraction of ionizing radiation, f esc , from small galaxies at high redshift. We present simple models of the high-redshift runaway population and its impact on f esc as a function of halo mass, size, and redshift. We find that the inclusion of runaways enhances f esc by factors of ≈1.1-8, depending on halo mass, galaxy geometry, and the mechanism of runaway production, implying that runaways may contribute 50%-90% of the total ionizing radiation escaping from high-redshift galaxies. Runaways may therefore play an important role in reionizing the universe.

  15. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  16. Comparison of Family Therapy Outcome with Alcohol-Abusing, Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L

    2009-01-01

    Treatment evaluation for alcohol problem, runaway adolescents and their families is rare. This study recruited primary alcohol problem adolescents (N = 119) and their primary caretakers from two runaway shelters and assigned them to (a) home-based ecologically based family therapy (EBFT), (b) office-based functional family therapy (FFT), or (c)…

  17. Control of runaway electron secondary generation by changing Z(eff)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pankratov, I. M.; R. Jaspers,; Finken, K.H.; Entrop, I.; Mank, G.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of Z(eff) on the runaway generation process by close collisions has been studied experimentally in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak in ohmic low density discharges. It is shown that the effective avalanching time increases with increasing Z(eff). This opens the possibility of controlling the runaway

  18. Propensity for Violence among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents: An Event History Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Devan M.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of violent behaviors among homeless and runaway adolescents or the specific behavioral factors that influence violent behaviors across time. In this longitudinal study of 300 homeless and runaway adolescents aged 16 to 19 at baseline, the authors use event history analysis to assess the factors associated with…

  19. Interaction Of CO2 Laser Nanosecond Pulse Train With The Metallic Targets In Optical Breakdown Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Silenok, A. S.; Sorochenko, V. R.

    1986-11-01

    In the present paper the electric field and currents in the air-breakdown plasma, produced by the train of nanosecond pulses of TEA-002 - regenerative amplifier near the un-charged targets are studied. The breakdown thresholds and the efficiency of plasma-target heat transmission are also measured. The results of numerical calculations made for increasing of the pulse train contrast with respect to the background in a regenerative amplifier are advanced.

  20. CFD research on runaway transient of pumped storage power station caused by pumping power failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L G; Zhou, D Q

    2013-01-01

    To study runaway transient of pumped storage power station caused by pumping power failure, three dimensional unsteady numerical simulations were executed on geometrical model of the whole flow system. Through numerical calculation, the changeable flow configuration and variation law of some parameters such as unit rotate speed,flow rate and static pressure of measurement points were obtained and compared with experimental data. Numerical results show that runaway speed agrees well with experimental date and its error was 3.7%. The unit undergoes pump condition, brake condition, turbine condition and runaway condition with flow characteristic changing violently. In runaway condition, static pressure in passage pulses very strongly which frequency is related to runaway speed

  1. First Direct Observation of Runaway-Electron-Driven Whistler Waves in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, D. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Du, X. D.; Thome, K. E.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Collins, C.; Lvovskiy, A.; Moyer, R. A.; Austin, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Liu, C.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, C.

    2018-04-01

    DIII-D experiments at low density (ne˜1019 m-3 ) have directly measured whistler waves in the 100-200 MHz range excited by multi-MeV runaway electrons. Whistler activity is correlated with runaway intensity (hard x-ray emission level), occurs in novel discrete frequency bands, and exhibits nonlinear limit-cycle-like behavior. The measured frequencies scale with the magnetic field strength and electron density as expected from the whistler dispersion relation. The modes are stabilized with increasing magnetic field, which is consistent with wave-particle resonance mechanisms. The mode amplitudes show intermittent time variations correlated with changes in the electron cyclotron emission that follow predator-prey cycles. These can be interpreted as wave-induced pitch angle scattering of moderate energy runaways. The tokamak runaway-whistler mechanisms have parallels to whistler phenomena in ionospheric plasmas. The observations also open new directions for the modeling and active control of runaway electrons in tokamaks.

  2. Are some of the luminous high-latitude stars accretion-powered runaways?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, P.J.T.; Hills, J.G.; Dewey, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that (1) runaway stars can be produced via supernova explosions in close binary systems, (2) most of such runaways should possess neutron star companions, and (3) neutron stars receive randomly oriented kicks of ≅ 100 to 200 km s -1 at birth. We find that this kick sometimes has the right amplitude and direction to make the neutron star fall into the runaway. Accretion onto a neutron star is a source of energy that is roughly an order of magnitude more mass efficient than nuclear burning. Thus, runaways containing neutron stars may live much longer than would normally be expected, which would allow them to travel great distances from their birthplaces during their lifetimes. Some of the early B-type stars far from the Galactic plane and the high-latitude F and G-type supergiants may be accretion-powered runaway stars

  3. The production and confinement of runaway electrons with impurity ''killer'' pellets in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Taylor, P.L.; Whyte, D.G.

    1998-12-01

    Prompt runaway electron bursts, generated by rapidly cooling DIII-D plasmas with argon killer pellets, are used to test a recent knock-on avalanche theory describing the growth of multi-MeV runaway electron currents during disruptions in tokamaks. Runaway current amplitudes, observed during some but not all DIII-D current quenches, are consistent with growth rates predicted by the theory assuming a pre-current quench runaway electron density of approximately 10 15 m -3 . Argon killer pellet modeling yields runaway densities of between 10 15 --10 16 m -3 in these discharges. Although knock-on avalanching appears to agree rather well with the measurements, relatively small avalanche amplification factors combined with uncertainties in the spatial distribution of pellet mass and cooling rates make it difficult to unambiguously confirm the proposed theory with existing data

  4. Observation of thermal quench induced by runaway electrons in magnetic perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, MunSeong; Seo, Dongcheol; Kim, Junghee

    2018-04-01

    Experimental observations in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasmas show that a loss of pre-disruptive runaway electrons can induce a rapid radiative cooling of the plasma, by generating impurity clouds from the first wall. The synchrotron radiation image shows that the loss of runaway electrons occurs from the edge region when the resonant magnetic perturbation is applied on the plasma. When the impact of the runaway electrons on the wall is strong enough, a sudden drop of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal occurs with the characteristic plasma behaviors such as the positive spike and following decay of the plasma current, Dα spike, big magnetic fluctuation, etc. The visible images at this runaway loss show an evidence of the generation of impurity cloud and the following radiative cooling. When the runaway beam is located on the plasma edge, thermal quenches are expected to occur without global destruction of the magnetic structure up to the core.

  5. Quasi-linear analysis of the extraordinary electron wave destabilized by runaway electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokol, G. I.; Kómár, A.; Budai, A. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary); Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2014-10-15

    Runaway electrons with strongly anisotropic distributions present in post-disruption tokamak plasmas can destabilize the extraordinary electron (EXEL) wave. The present work investigates the dynamics of the quasi-linear evolution of the EXEL instability for a range of different plasma parameters using a model runaway distribution function valid for highly relativistic runaway electron beams produced primarily by the avalanche process. Simulations show a rapid pitch-angle scattering of the runaway electrons in the high energy tail on the 100–1000 μs time scale. Due to the wave-particle interaction, a modification to the synchrotron radiation spectrum emitted by the runaway electron population is foreseen, exposing a possible experimental detection method for such an interaction.

  6. Electromagnetic waves destabilized by runaway electrons in near-critical electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komar, A.; Pokol, G. I. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Fueloep, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology and Euratom-VR Association, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    Runaway electron distributions are strongly anisotropic in velocity space. This anisotropy is a source of free energy that may destabilize electromagnetic waves through a resonant interaction between the waves and the energetic electrons. In this work, we investigate the high-frequency electromagnetic waves that are destabilized by runaway electron beams when the electric field is close to the critical field for runaway acceleration. Using a runaway electron distribution appropriate for the near-critical case, we calculate the linear instability growth rate of these waves and conclude that the obliquely propagating whistler waves are most unstable. We show that the frequencies, wave numbers, and propagation angles of the most unstable waves depend strongly on the magnetic field. Taking into account collisional and convective damping of the waves, we determine the number density of runaways that is required to destabilize the waves and show its parametric dependences.

  7. Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen's (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido's (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care.

  8. Thermonuclear runaways in thick hydrogen rich envelopes of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrfield, S. G.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A Lagrangian, fully implicit, one dimensional hydrodynamic computer code was used to evolve thermonuclear runaways in the accreted hydrogen rich envelopes of 1.0 Msub solar neutron stars with radii of 10 km and 20 km. Simulations produce outbursts which last from about 750 seconds to about one week. Peak effective temeratures and luninosities were 26 million K and 80 thousand Lsub solar for the 10 km study and 5.3 millison and 600 Lsub solar for the 20 km study. Hydrodynamic expansion on the 10 km neutron star produced a precursor lasting about one ten thousandth seconds.

  9. A Search for Pulsar Companions to OB Runaway Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, V. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. Observations were made at 474 and 770 MHz with the NRAO 140 ft telescope. The survey was sensitive to long- period pulsars with flux densities of 1 mJy or more. One previously unknown pulsar was discovered, PSRJ2044+4614, while observing towards target O star BD+45,3260. Follow-up timing observations of the pulsar measured its position to high precision, revealing a 9' separation between the pulsar and the target star, unequivocally indicating they are not associated.

  10. Massive runaway stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2010-09-01

    The origin of massive field stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has long been an enigma. The recent measurements of large offsets (˜ 100 km s-1) between the heliocentric radial velocities of some very massive (O2-type) field stars and the systemic LMC velocity provides a possible explanation of this enigma and suggests that the field stars are runaway stars ejected from their birthplaces at the very beginning of their parent cluster's dynamical evolution. A straightforward way to prove this explanation is to measure the proper motions of the field stars and to show that they are moving away from one of the nearby star clusters or OB associations. This approach is, however, complicated by the long distance to the LMC, which makes accurate proper motion measurements difficult. We used an alternative approach for solving the problem (first applied for Galactic field stars), based on the search for bow shocks produced by runaway stars. The geometry of detected bow shocks would allow us to infer the direction of stellar motion, thereby determining their possible parent clusters. In this paper we present the results of a search for bow shocks around six massive field stars that have been proposed as candidate runaway stars. Using archival Spitzer Space Telescope data, we found a bow shock associated with one of our programme stars, the O2 V((f*)) star BI 237, which is the first-ever detection of bow shocks in the LMC. Orientation of the bow shock suggests that BI 237 was ejected from the OB association LH 82 (located at ≃ 120 pc in projection from the star). A by-product of our search is the detection of bow shocks generated by four OB stars in the field of the LMC and an arc-like structure attached to the candidate luminous blue variable R81 (HD 269128). The geometry of two of these bow shocks is consistent with the possibility that their associated stars were ejected from the 30 Doradus star-forming complex. We discuss implications of our findings for the

  11. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugele, B.; Scheider, J.; Spangl, W.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  12. Bent paths of a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Beloplotov, Dmitry V.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Sorokin, Dmitry A. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons can produce large-area homogeneous discharges at elevated pressures, which is an intriguing phenomenon in the physics of pulsed discharges. In this paper, runaway-electron-preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) was obtained in a wide pressure range (0.05–0.25 MPa), and under certain conditions a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader could be observed to propagate at some angles to the applied (background) electric field lines. For a 16-mm gap at an air pressure of 0.08–0.1 MPa, the percentage of pulses in which such propagation is observed is about 5%–50% of their total number, and in the other pulses such bent paths could not be observed because there is even no streamer or cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges. In our opinion, such propagation of the positive streamer and the cathode-directed spark leader at some angle to the background electric field lines owes to different increase rates of the electron density in different regions of the discharge volume under REP DD conditions. Therefore, during the formation of a REP DD, the increase of the electron density is inhomogeneous and nonsimultaneous, resulting in an electron density gradient at the ionization wave front.

  13. Bent paths of a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao; Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Beloplotov, Dmitry V.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Sorokin, Dmitry A.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons can produce large-area homogeneous discharges at elevated pressures, which is an intriguing phenomenon in the physics of pulsed discharges. In this paper, runaway-electron-preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) was obtained in a wide pressure range (0.05–0.25 MPa), and under certain conditions a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader could be observed to propagate at some angles to the applied (background) electric field lines. For a 16-mm gap at an air pressure of 0.08–0.1 MPa, the percentage of pulses in which such propagation is observed is about 5%–50% of their total number, and in the other pulses such bent paths could not be observed because there is even no streamer or cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges. In our opinion, such propagation of the positive streamer and the cathode-directed spark leader at some angle to the background electric field lines owes to different increase rates of the electron density in different regions of the discharge volume under REP DD conditions. Therefore, during the formation of a REP DD, the increase of the electron density is inhomogeneous and nonsimultaneous, resulting in an electron density gradient at the ionization wave front

  14. The breakdown of COSMOS 1402

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerlund, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Sections of the satellite COSMOS 1402 containing radioactive materials disintegrated in the atmosphere over the Indian and Atlantic oceans Janyary/February 1983. Having the COSMOS 954 incident in mind and taking account of the fact that several satellite orbits crossed Norwegian territory, some preparedness measures were implemented prior to the break-down. The report describes the functions and experiences of an ad hoc satellite counsil which was appointed to take care of data collection, informaton to the public and planning for emergency actions. (RF)

  15. Dielectric breakdown in liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, F.L. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental apparatus consists of a 130 kV dc 80 kV ac intermediate voltage unit and a 600 kV dc 700 kV high voltage unit under construction. The experimental devices consist of an insulated container, or dewar, in which two electrodes are placed, one above the other. A voltage is built up in one electrode until an arc occurs to the other electrode. A typical set of breakdown data is shown. A mathematical analysis is briefly described. (MOW)

  16. Alice Munro's "Runaway" in the Mirror of Sigmund Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Bahador

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mirroring the complexities of the human psyche, literature has received new comprehension through a psychoanalytic lens.  Alice Munro's "Runaway" (2003 is character-based and has the psychological analysis potential but it had never received such kind of study. The objective of the present paper is to read Munro's "Runaway" in the mirror of Sigmund Freud to detect the psychological aspects of its fictional characters. The characters are driven by the Freudian mental agencies and undergo phases of psychic disorder.  In the present paper, Munro's short fiction has been discussed based on Sigmund Freud's theory of the Unconscious and its connection with the interpretation of dreams as well as the symbolization of three main characters based on tripartite agencies of the id, ego and superego. Clarifying the latent and manifest levels of characters and the world of dreams indicates the artistic creation of Alice Munro in handling complex characterization. The unconscious and its connection with the female character's dreams have been discussed. The unconscious of the female character is reflected in her dreams in result of repression and asocial drives and desires. Unconscious through dreams is the mirror of the repressed psyche of the female character. Scrutinizing the three main characters in terms of Freudian psychic trilogy, they prove to fit their psychological Freudian terms.

  17. Resolving runaway electron distributions in space, time, and energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Cooper, C. M.; Aleynikov, P.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lvovskiy, A.; Pace, D. C.; Brennan, D. P.; Hollmann, E. M.; Liu, C.; Moyer, R. A.; Shiraki, D.

    2018-05-01

    Areas of agreement and disagreement with present-day models of runaway electron (RE) evolution are revealed by measuring MeV-level bremsstrahlung radiation from runaway electrons (REs) with a pinhole camera. Spatially resolved measurements localize the RE beam, reveal energy-dependent RE transport, and can be used to perform full two-dimensional (energy and pitch-angle) inversions of the RE phase-space distribution. Energy-resolved measurements find qualitative agreement with modeling on the role of collisional and synchrotron damping in modifying the RE distribution shape. Measurements are consistent with predictions of phase-space attractors that accumulate REs, with non-monotonic features observed in the distribution. Temporally resolved measurements find qualitative agreement with modeling on the impact of collisional and synchrotron damping in varying the RE growth and decay rate. Anomalous RE loss is observed and found to be largest at low energy. Possible roles for kinetic instability or spatial transport to resolve these anomalies are discussed.

  18. SOFT: a synthetic synchrotron diagnostic for runaway electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, M.; Embréus, O.; Tinguely, R. A.; Granetz, R. S.; Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.

    2018-02-01

    Improved understanding of the dynamics of runaway electrons can be obtained by measurement and interpretation of their synchrotron radiation emission. Models for synchrotron radiation emitted by relativistic electrons are well established, but the question of how various geometric effects—such as magnetic field inhomogeneity and camera placement—influence the synchrotron measurements and their interpretation remains open. In this paper we address this issue by simulating synchrotron images and spectra using the new synthetic synchrotron diagnostic tool SOFT (Synchrotron-detecting Orbit Following Toolkit). We identify the key parameters influencing the synchrotron radiation spot and present scans in those parameters. Using a runaway electron distribution function obtained by Fokker-Planck simulations for parameters from an Alcator C-Mod discharge, we demonstrate that the corresponding synchrotron image is well-reproduced by SOFT simulations, and we explain how it can be understood in terms of the parameter scans. Geometric effects are shown to significantly influence the synchrotron spectrum, and we show that inherent inconsistencies in a simple emission model (i.e. not modeling detection) can lead to incorrect interpretation of the images.

  19. Density dependence triggers runaway selection of reduced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Seymour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of exogenous mortality risks, future reproduction by an individual is worth less than present reproduction to its fitness. Senescent aging thus results inevitably from transferring net fertility into younger ages. Some long-lived organisms appear to defy theory, however, presenting negligible senescence (e.g., hydra and extended lifespans (e.g., Bristlecone Pine. Here, we investigate the possibility that the onset of vitality loss can be delayed indefinitely, even accepting the abundant evidence that reproduction is intrinsically costly to survival. For an environment with constant hazard, we establish that natural selection itself contributes to increasing density-dependent recruitment losses. We then develop a generalized model of accelerating vitality loss for analyzing fitness optima as a tradeoff between compression and spread in the age profile of net fertility. Across a realistic spectrum of senescent age profiles, density regulation of recruitment can trigger runaway selection for ever-reducing senescence. This novel prediction applies without requirement for special life-history characteristics such as indeterminate somatic growth or increasing fecundity with age. The evolution of nonsenescence from senescence is robust to the presence of exogenous adult mortality, which tends instead to increase the age-independent component of vitality loss. We simulate examples of runaway selection leading to negligible senescence and even intrinsic immortality.

  20. Very massive runaway stars from three-body encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Gualandris, Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Very massive stars preferentially reside in the cores of their parent clusters and form binary or multiple systems. We study the role of tight very massive binaries in the origin of the field population of very massive stars. We performed numerical simulations of dynamical encounters between single (massive) stars and a very massive binary with parameters similar to those of the most massive known Galactic binaries, WR 20a and NGC 3603-A1. We found that these three-body encounters could be responsible for the origin of high peculiar velocities (≥70 km s-1) observed for some very massive (≥60-70 M⊙) runaway stars in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud (e.g. λ Cep, BD+43°3654, Sk -67°22, BI 237, 30 Dor 016), which can hardly be explained within the framework of the binary-supernova scenario. The production of high-velocity massive stars via three-body encounters is accompanied by the recoil of the binary in the opposite direction to the ejected star. We show that the relative position of the very massive binary R145 and the runaway early B-type star Sk-69°206 on the sky is consistent with the possibility that both objects were ejected from the central cluster, R136, of the star-forming region 30 Doradus via the same dynamical event - a three-body encounter.

  1. On the origin of high-velocity runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Gualandris, Alessia; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2009-06-01

    We explore the hypothesis that some high-velocity runaway stars attain their peculiar velocities in the course of exchange encounters between hard massive binaries and a very massive star (either an ordinary 50-100Msolar star or a more massive one, formed through runaway mergers of ordinary stars in the core of a young massive star cluster). In this process, one of the binary components becomes gravitationally bound to the very massive star, while the second one is ejected, sometimes with a high speed. We performed three-body scattering experiments and found that early B-type stars (the progenitors of the majority of neutron stars) can be ejected with velocities of >~200-400kms-1 (typical of pulsars), while 3-4Msolar stars can attain velocities of >~300-400kms-1 (typical of the bound population of halo late B-type stars). We also found that the ejected stars can occasionally attain velocities exceeding the Milky Ways's escape velocity.

  2. Massive runaway stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Kroupa, P.

    2011-01-01

    Using archival Spitzer Space Telescope data, we identified for the first time a dozen runaway OB stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) through the detection of their bow shocks. The geometry of detected bow shocks allows us to infer the direction of motion of the associated stars and to determine their possible parent clusters and associations. One of the identified runaway stars, AzV 471, was already known as a high-velocity star on the basis of its high peculiar radial velocity, which is offset by ≃ 40 km s-1 from the local systemic velocity. We discuss implications of our findings for the problem of the origin of field OB stars. Several of the bow shock-producing stars are found in the confines of associations, suggesting that these may be “alien” stars contributing to the age spread observed for some young stellar systems. We also report the discovery of a kidney-shaped nebula attached to the early WN-type star SMC-WR3 (AzV 60a). We interpreted this nebula as an interstellar structure created owing to the interaction between the stellar wind and the ambient interstellar medium.

  3. ["Nervous breakdown": a diagnostic characterization study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmán, E; Carrasco, J L; Liebowitz, M; Díaz Marsá, M; Prieto, R; Jusino, C; Cárdenas, D; Klein, D

    1997-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the influence of different psychiatric co-morbidities on the symptoms of the disorder popularly known as "ataque de nervios" (nervous breakdown) among the US Hispanic population. Using a self-completed instrument designed specially for both traditional nervous breakdown and for panic symptoms, and structured or semi-structured psychiatric interviews for Axis I disorders, and evaluation was made of Hispanic subjects who sought treatment for anxiety in a clinic (n = 156). This study centered on 102 subjects who presented symptoms of "nervous breakdown" and comorbidity with panic disorder, other anxiety disorders, or affective disorder. Variations in co-morbidity with "nervous breakdown" enabled the identification of different patterns of "nervous breakdown" presenting symptoms. Individuals with "nervous breakdown" and panic disorder characteristically expressed a greater sense of asphyxiation, fear of dying, and growing fear (panic-like) during their breakdowns. Subjects with "nervous breakdown" and affective disorder had a greater sensation of anger and more tendency toward screaming and aggressive behavior such as breaking things during the breakdown (emotional anger). Finally, subjects with "nervous breakdown" and co-morbidity with another anxiety disorder had fewer "paniclike" or "emotional anger" symptoms. These findings suggest that: a) the widely used term "nervous breakdown" is a popular label for different patterns of loss of emotional control; b) the type of loss of emotional control is influenced by the associated psychiatric disorder; and c) the symptoms characteristics of the "nervous breakdown" can be useful clinical markers for associated psychiatric disorders. Future research is needed to determine whether the known Hispanic entity "ataque de nervios" is simply a popular description for different aspects of well-known psychiatric disorders, or if it reflects specific demographic, environmental, personality and/or clinical

  4. Discharge breakdown in the EXTRAP configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.R.

    1982-02-01

    The breakdown of a discharge in a linear EXTRAP configuration has been studied experimentally. In this configuration the breakdown occurs along the zero B-field line, which is the axis of the linear octupole magnetic field, between the anode and cathode which constitute the ends of the linear device. Breakdown could be described by a modified Townsend criterion which included additional electron losses due to the presence of the B-field transverse to the discharge. (author)

  5. Electrode breakdown potentials in MHD plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M.S.; Raju, G.V.R.; Kumar, A.S.; Gupta, Bhumesh

    1988-01-01

    Electrode breakdown potentials and current densities have been calculated for both the thermionically electron emitting and non-emitting cathodes. Calculated values have been compared with the available experimental results. It is found that the cathode potential drop for the breakdown is almost unaffected by the emission. However, both the total potential difference between the anode and the cathode and the current density at the breakdown are higher for electron-emitting cathodes than for non-emitting cathodes. (author)

  6. The Development of Breakdown in Transformer Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Kudelcik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The conditions under which breakdown of composite liquid - solid insulation can be occurred, e.g. in transformer, play an important role in designing of such insulation. The initial state of breakdown development is explained based on development of streamers in cavitations. The whole breakdown development in transformer oil is represented by RLC circuit and it depends on the parameters of outer circuit.

  7. Multiple helical modes of vortex breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Naumov, I. V.; Okulov, Valery

    2011-01-01

    Experimental observations of vortex breakdown in a rotating lid-driven cavity are presented. The results show that vortex breakdown for cavities with high aspect ratios is associated with the appearance of stable helical vortex multiplets. By using results from stability theory generalizing Kelvi......’s problem on vortex polygon stability, and systematically exploring the cavity flow, we succeeded in identifying two new stable vortex breakdown states consisting of triple and quadruple helical multiplets....

  8. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  9. The Multistability of Technological Breakdowns in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarke Lindsø; Tafdrup, Oliver Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Everyone who is involved with modern technological artefacts such as computers, software and tablets has experienced situations where the artefacts suddenly cease to function properly. This is commonly known as a technological breakdown. Within education and the praxis of teaching...... technological breakdowns become a more and more ubiquitous phenomenon due to the rapid increase of technological artefacts utilized for educational purposes (Riis, 2012). The breakdowns impact the educational practice with consequences ranging from creating small obstacles to rendering it impossible to conduct...... successful teaching. Thus, knowing how to cope with technological breakdowns is a pivotal part of being a technological literate....

  10. Determination of the core temperature of a Li-ion cell during thermal runaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhizi, M.; Ahmed, M. B.; Jain, A.

    2017-12-01

    Safety and performance of Li-ion cells is severely affected by thermal runaway where exothermic processes within the cell cause uncontrolled temperature rise, eventually leading to catastrophic failure. Most past experimental papers on thermal runaway only report surface temperature measurement, while the core temperature of the cell remains largely unknown. This paper presents an experimentally validated method based on thermal conduction analysis to determine the core temperature of a Li-ion cell during thermal runaway using surface temperature and chemical kinetics data. Experiments conducted on a thermal test cell show that core temperature computed using this method is in good agreement with independent thermocouple-based measurements in a wide range of experimental conditions. The validated method is used to predict core temperature as a function of time for several previously reported thermal runaway tests. In each case, the predicted peak core temperature is found to be several hundreds of degrees Celsius higher than the measured surface temperature. This shows that surface temperature alone is not sufficient for thermally characterizing the cell during thermal runaway. Besides providing key insights into the fundamental nature of thermal runaway, the ability to determine the core temperature shown here may lead to practical tools for characterizing and mitigating thermal runaway.

  11. Study of runaway electron generation process during major disruptions in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyusnin, V.V.; Riccardo, V.; Alper, B.; Kiptily, V.G.; Popovichev, S.; Helander, P.; Jaspers, R.; Mlynar, J.; Luna, E. de La; Andersson, F.

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of a large number of JET disruptions has provided further data on the trends of the disruption induced runaway process in large tokamaks. The role of primary runaway electrons generated at the thermal quench has been examined to assess their influence on secondary avalanching, which is recognized as a main source of large runaway currents created during disruptions. The tomographic reconstruction of the soft X-ray emission during the thermal quench has made possible the observation of the magnetic flux geometry evolution and the locating of the most probable zones for generation and confinement of the primary runaway electrons. Runaway currents have been found to increase with toroidal magnetic field and pre-disruption plasma current values. The average conversion efficiency is approximately 40-45% at a wide range of plasma currents. This agrees well with results of numerical simulations, which predict similar conversion rates at an assumed post-disruption plasma electron temperature of 10 eV. The experimental trends and numerical simulations show that runaway electrons might be an issue for ITER and therefore it remains prudent to develop mitigation methods, which suppress runaway generation. (author)

  12. Experimental Study of Thermal Runaway Process of 18650 Lithium-Ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the effects of the SOC (State of Charge and the charging–discharging process on the thermal runaway of 18650 lithium-ion batteries. A series of experiments were conducted on an electric heating and testing apparatus. The experimental results indicate that 6 W is the critical heating power for 40% SOC. With a 20 W constant heating rate, the thermal runaway initial temperature of the lithium-ion battery decreases with the increasing SOC. The final thermal runaway temperature increases with the SOC when the SOC is lower than 80%. However, a contrary conclusion was obtained when the SOC was higher than 80%. Significant mass loss, accompanied by an intense exothermic reaction, took place under a higher SOC. The critical charging current, beyond which the thermal runaway occurs, was found to be 2.6 A. The thermal runaway initial temperature decreases with the increasing charging current, while the intensity of the exothermic reaction varies inversely. Mass ejection of gas and electrolytes exists during thermal runaway when the charging current is higher than 10.4 A, below which only a large amount of gas is released. The thermal runaway initial temperature of discharging is higher than that of non-discharging.

  13. Experimental Study of Thermal Runaway Process of 18650 Lithium-Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Wang, Zhirong; Gong, Junhui; Liu, Kai; Wang, Hao; Guo, Linsheng

    2017-02-25

    This study addresses the effects of the SOC (State of Charge) and the charging-discharging process on the thermal runaway of 18650 lithium-ion batteries. A series of experiments were conducted on an electric heating and testing apparatus. The experimental results indicate that 6 W is the critical heating power for 40% SOC. With a 20 W constant heating rate, the thermal runaway initial temperature of the lithium-ion battery decreases with the increasing SOC. The final thermal runaway temperature increases with the SOC when the SOC is lower than 80%. However, a contrary conclusion was obtained when the SOC was higher than 80%. Significant mass loss, accompanied by an intense exothermic reaction, took place under a higher SOC. The critical charging current, beyond which the thermal runaway occurs, was found to be 2.6 A. The thermal runaway initial temperature decreases with the increasing charging current, while the intensity of the exothermic reaction varies inversely. Mass ejection of gas and electrolytes exists during thermal runaway when the charging current is higher than 10.4 A, below which only a large amount of gas is released. The thermal runaway initial temperature of discharging is higher than that of non-discharging.

  14. The runaway greenhouse: implications for future climate change, geoengineering and planetary atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Colin; Watson, Andrew J

    2012-09-13

    The ultimate climate emergency is a 'runaway greenhouse': a hot and water-vapour-rich atmosphere limits the emission of thermal radiation to space, causing runaway warming. Warming ceases only after the surface reaches approximately 1400 K and emits radiation in the near-infrared, where water is not a good greenhouse gas. This would evaporate the entire ocean and exterminate all planetary life. Venus experienced a runaway greenhouse in the past, and we expect that the Earth will in around 2 billion years as solar luminosity increases. But could we bring on such a catastrophe prematurely, by our current climate-altering activities? Here, we review what is known about the runaway greenhouse to answer this question, describing the various limits on outgoing radiation and how climate will evolve between these. The good news is that almost all lines of evidence lead us to believe that is unlikely to be possible, even in principle, to trigger full a runaway greenhouse by addition of non-condensible greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. However, our understanding of the dynamics, thermodynamics, radiative transfer and cloud physics of hot and steamy atmospheres is weak. We cannot therefore completely rule out the possibility that human actions might cause a transition, if not to full runaway, then at least to a much warmer climate state than the present one. High climate sensitivity might provide a warning. If we, or more likely our remote descendants, are threatened with a runaway greenhouse, then geoengineering to reflect sunlight might be life's only hope. Injecting reflective aerosols into the stratosphere would be too short-lived, and even sunshades in space might require excessive maintenance. In the distant future, modifying Earth's orbit might provide a sustainable solution. The runaway greenhouse also remains relevant in planetary sciences and astrobiology: as extrasolar planets smaller and nearer to their stars are detected, some will be in

  15. Generación y dinámica de electrones runaway en plasmas tokamak

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Gómez, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    La dinámica y generación de electrones runaway en plasmas tokamak constituye el tema central de esta tesis. En un tokamak, el fenómeno runaway es el resultado de la existencia de un campo eléctrico en dirección toroidal. Aquellos electrones cuya velocidad excede un cierto valor crítico se aceleran de forma continua, ya que la e ciencia de las colisiones para disipar la energía ganada en el campo disminuye con la velocidad (∼ ⁻¹) . Se tiene entonces lo que se conoce como un electrón runaway. ...

  16. Instability connected with a beam of run-away electrons in the Tokamak TM-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikaev, V.V.; Razumova, K.A.; Sokolov, Yu.A.

    The study of the instability of runaway electrons on the Tokamak TM-3 is continued. The longitudinal energy of runaway electrons that have undergone deceleration during instability is estimated from measurements of superhigh frequency radiation of plasma. A connection was found between the effect of a small fraction of energy protons (observed previously with a low plasma concentration) and the instability being studied. As instability develops, the longitudinal energy of runaway electrons is partially transformed to the transverse degree of freedom of these electrons and is partially transmitted to the basic plasma component

  17. Effects of discharge cleaning on the production of runaway electrons in TORTUS tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, R C; Liu, J R; Giannone, L. (Sydney Univ. (Australia). School of Physics)

    1983-06-01

    Experimental results are presented on the production of runaway electrons as a function of wall cleanliness in the TORTUS tokamak. When the walls are clean, the production rate decreases as the filling pressure increases. When the walls are contaminated by oxygen, the production rate can increase when the filling pressure is increased, owing to the production of water vapour during tokamak discharges. These results resolve the differences reported in the literature on the production of runaways as a function of filling pressure. It is also observed that the runaway electron instability seen in other devices is suppressed when the walls are discharge-cleaned.

  18. Effects of discharge cleaning on the production of runaway electrons in TORTUS tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, R.C.; Liu, J.R.; Giannone, L.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the production of runaway electrons as a function of wall cleanliness in the TORTUS tokamak. When the walls are clean, the production rate decreases as the filling pressure increases. When the walls are contaminated by oxygen, the production rate can increase when the filling pressure is increased, owing to the production of water vapour during tokamak discharges. These results resolve the differences reported in the literature on the production of runaways as a function of filling pressure. It is also observed that the runaway electron instability seen in other devices is suppressed when the walls are discharge-cleaned. (author)

  19. Li-ion battery thermal runaway suppression system using microchannel coolers and refrigerant injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhauer, Todd M.; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-11-08

    A battery management system with thermally integrated fire suppression includes a multiplicity of individual battery cells in a housing; a multiplicity of cooling passages in the housing within or between the multiplicity of individual battery cells; a multiplicity of sensors operably connected to the individual battery cells, the sensors adapted to detect a thermal runaway event related to one or more of the multiplicity of individual battery cells; and a management system adapted to inject coolant into at least one of the multiplicity of cooling passages upon the detection of the thermal runaway event by the any one of the multiplicity of sensors, so that the thermal runaway event is rapidly quenched.

  20. Run-away electrons in relativistic spin (1) /(2) quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, F.E.

    1998-01-01

    The existence of run-away solutions in classical and non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics is reviewed. It is shown that the less singular high energy behavior of relativistic spin (1) /(2) quantum electrodynamics precludes an analogous behavior in that theory. However, a Landau-like anomalous pole in the photon propagation function or in the electron-massive photon forward scattering amplitude would generate a new run-away, characterized by an energy scale ω∼m e thinspexp(1/α). This contrasts with the energy scale ω∼m e /α associated with the classical and non-relativistic quantum run-aways. copyright 1998 Academic Press, Inc

  1. Filament-induced remote surface ablation for long range laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohwetter, Ph.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Woeste, L.; Ackermann, R.; Mejean, G.; Salmon, E.; Kasparian, J.; Yu, J.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate laser induced ablation and plasma line emission from a metallic target at distances up to 180 m from the laser, using filaments (self-guided propagation structures ∼ 100 μm in diameter and ∼ 5 x 10 13 W/cm 2 in intensity) appearing as femtosecond and terawatt laser pulses propagating in air. The remarkable property of filaments to propagate over a long distance independently of the diffraction limit opens the frontier to long range operation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We call this special configuration of remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy 'remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy'. Our results show main features of filament-induced ablation on the surface of a metallic sample and associated plasma emission. Our experimental data allow us to estimate requirements for the detection system needed for kilometer-range remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment

  2. After runaway: The trans-Hill stage of planetesimal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    When planetesimals begin to grow by coagulation, they first enter an epoch of runaway, during which the biggest bodies grow faster than all the others. The questions of how runaway ends and what comes next have not been answered satisfactorily. We show that runaway is followed by a new stage—the 'trans-Hill stage'—that commences when the bodies that dominate viscous stirring ('big bodies') become trans-Hill, i.e., when their Hill velocity matches the random speed of the small bodies they accrete. Subsequently, the small bodies' random speed grows in lockstep with the big bodies' sizes, such that the system remains in the trans-Hill state. Trans-Hill growth is crucial for determining the efficiency of growing big bodies, as well as their growth timescale and size spectrum. Trans-Hill growth has two sub-stages. In the earlier one, which occurs while the stirring bodies remain sufficiently small, the evolution is collisionless, i.e., collisional cooling among all bodies is irrelevant. The efficiency of forming big bodies in this collisionless sub-stage is very low, ∼10α << 1, where α ∼ 0.005(a/AU) –1 is the ratio between the physical size of a body and its Hill radius. Furthermore, the size spectrum is flat (equal mass per size decade, i.e., q = 4). This collisionless trans-Hill solution explains results from previous coagulation simulations for both the Kuiper Belt and the asteroid belt. The second trans-Hill sub-stage commences once the stirring bodies grow big enough (>α –1 × the size of the accreted small bodies). After that time, collisional cooling among small bodies controls the evolution. The efficiency of forming big bodies rises and the size spectrum becomes more top heavy. Trans-Hill growth can terminate in one of two ways, depending on the sizes of the small bodies. First, mutual accretion of big bodies can become significant and conglomeration proceeds until half of the total mass is converted into big bodies

  3. The physics of ''vacuum'' breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirzke, F.

    1993-01-01

    Many discharges form small cathode spots which provide such a high energy density that the cathode material explodes into a dense plasma cloud within a very short time. Despite the fundamental importance of cathode spots for the breakdown process and the formation of a discharge, the structure of the cathode spot plasma and the source of the high energy density were not yet well defined. One model, the whisker explosive emission model, assumes that joule heating by field emitted electrons provides the energy. Current densities of j FE = 10 12 - 10 13 A/m 2 would be required. However, the pre-breakdown j FE is self-limiting. The negative space charge caused by j FE in the cathode-anode gap reduces the effective electric field E on the cathode surface. The maximum current density j CL is space charge limited by Child-Langmuir's law. The field emitting spot cannot deliver j CL without turning itself off, since the negative space charge caused by j CL reduces E congruent 0 at the cathode surface. Hence, it must be that the vacuum j FE CL . The development of a current with j > j FE (vacuum) requires that ions exist in front of the electron emitting spot. Ions cannot be emitted from the surface of the field emitting spot, the enhanced electric field would hold them back. The initial ionization must occur in the cathode-anode gap near the electron emitting spot. Ionization of desorbed neutrals provides the mechanism. This ionization process requires considerably less current than the ionization of solid material by joule heating. Field emission and the impact of ions stimulate desorption of weakly bound adsorbates from the surface of the electron emitting spot. The cross section for ionization of the neutrals has a maximum for ∼ 100 eV electrons

  4. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-02-02

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős-Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis.

  5. Electric field of thunderclouds and cosmic rays: evidence for acceleration of particles (runaway electrons)

    CERN Document Server

    Khaerdinov, N S; Petkov, V B; 12th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    2004-01-01

    We present the data on correlations of the intensity of the soft component of cosmic rays with the local electric field of the near-earth atmosphere during thunderstorm periods at the Baksan Valley (North Caucasus, 1700 m a. s. l.). The large-area array for studying the extensive air showers of cosmic rays is used as a particle detector. An electric field meter of the "electric mill" type (rain-protected) is mounted on the roof of the building in the center of this array. The data were obtained in the summer seasons of 2000-2002. We observe strong enhancements of the soft component intensity before some lightning strokes. At the same time, the analysis of the regression curve "intensity versus field" discovers a bump at the field sign that is opposite to the field sign corresponding to acceleration of electrons. It is interpreted as a signature of runaway electrons from the region of the strong field (with opposite sign) overhead.

  6. Spark discharge formation in an inhomogeneous electric field under conditions of runaway electron generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao Tao; Zhang Cheng; Yan Ping [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tarasenko, Victor F.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Sorokin, Dmitrii A.; Kozyrev, Andrei V.; Baksht, Evgeni Kh. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    In this article we report on work where the formation of a spark in nanosecond high-voltage discharges was studied in nitrogen, nitrogen-methane mixtures, and air at increased pressures under the conditions of runaway electron generation. Voltage pulses of amplitude {approx}90 and {approx}250 kV were applied to a point-to-plane gap with a planar anode and a cathode of small curvature radius. Cathode spots appeared early in the discharge, within {approx}200 ps of a corona discharge at high rate of rise of the voltage ({approx}5 x 10{sup 14} V/s) across centimeter point-to-plane gap spacing. The spark leader that bridged the point-to-plane gap propagated from the planar anode with cathode spots and a voltage pulse rise time of less than 1 ns. The discharge from diffuse clouds took the form of diffuse jets with increasing pulse repetition rate, thus achieving the accumulation effect in a repetitively pulsed discharge. Characteristic emission spectra are presented for spark diffuse and corona discharges.

  7. Spark discharge formation in an inhomogeneous electric field under conditions of runaway electron generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Tao; Zhang Cheng; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Sorokin, Dmitrii A.; Kozyrev, Andrei V.; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we report on work where the formation of a spark in nanosecond high-voltage discharges was studied in nitrogen, nitrogen-methane mixtures, and air at increased pressures under the conditions of runaway electron generation. Voltage pulses of amplitude ∼90 and ∼250 kV were applied to a point-to-plane gap with a planar anode and a cathode of small curvature radius. Cathode spots appeared early in the discharge, within ∼200 ps of a corona discharge at high rate of rise of the voltage (∼5 x 10 14 V/s) across centimeter point-to-plane gap spacing. The spark leader that bridged the point-to-plane gap propagated from the planar anode with cathode spots and a voltage pulse rise time of less than 1 ns. The discharge from diffuse clouds took the form of diffuse jets with increasing pulse repetition rate, thus achieving the accumulation effect in a repetitively pulsed discharge. Characteristic emission spectra are presented for spark diffuse and corona discharges.

  8. A first approach to runaway electron control in FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncagni, L.; Carnevale, D.; Cianfarani, C.; Esposito, B.; Granucci, G.; Maddaluno, G.; Marocco, D.; Martin-Solis, J.R.; Pucella, G.; Sozzi, C.; Varano, G.; Vitale, V.; Zaccarian, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Plasma Control System (PCS) of the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is not equipped with any runaway electron (RE) beam control or suppression tool. In this paper we propose an upgraded PCS including an architecture for the control of disruption-generated REs that, making use of filtering techniques to estimate the onsets of the current quench (CQ) and of the RE beam current plateau, provides a controlled plasma current shut-down and a simultaneous RE position control. The control strategy is based on a nonlinear technique, called Input Allocation, that allows to re-configure the current in the poloidal field (PF) coils and improve the PCS responsiveness needed for RE position control. Preliminary results on the implementation of the Input Allocation and an experimental proposal to test the control scheme architecture are discussed

  9. A first approach to runaway electron control in FTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncagni, L. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Carnevale, D., E-mail: carnevaledaniele@gmail.com [Dipartimento Ing. Civile ed Ing. Informatica Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Cianfarani, C.; Esposito, B. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Granucci, G. [Associazione Euratom-CNR sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Maddaluno, G.; Marocco, D. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Martin-Solis, J.R. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes-Madrid (Spain); Pucella, G. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sozzi, C. [Associazione Euratom-CNR sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Varano, G. [Dipartimento Ing. Civile ed Ing. Informatica Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Vitale, V. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Zaccarian, L. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 av. du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Univ. de Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2013-10-15

    The Plasma Control System (PCS) of the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is not equipped with any runaway electron (RE) beam control or suppression tool. In this paper we propose an upgraded PCS including an architecture for the control of disruption-generated REs that, making use of filtering techniques to estimate the onsets of the current quench (CQ) and of the RE beam current plateau, provides a controlled plasma current shut-down and a simultaneous RE position control. The control strategy is based on a nonlinear technique, called Input Allocation, that allows to re-configure the current in the poloidal field (PF) coils and improve the PCS responsiveness needed for RE position control. Preliminary results on the implementation of the Input Allocation and an experimental proposal to test the control scheme architecture are discussed.

  10. Runaway relativistic electron scattering on the plazma oscillations in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasovitskij, V.B.; Razdorski, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of fast electrons in a tolamak plasma with the presence of the constant external electric field have been inveatigated. It is shown that the occurrence of the relativistic electrons ''tail'' of the distribution function is followed by an intensive plasma oscillation swinging under conditions of the anomalous Doppler effect and their large angle scattering in the momentum space. A part of scattered electrons is captured by tokamak inhomogeneous magnetic field and causes the occurrence of a new low frequency alfven instability under conditions of magnetic drift resonance followed by quasilinear diffusion of relativistic electrons along the small radius of the torus. The flux of runaway electrons scattered on plasma oscillations has been found. A nonlinear diffusion equation has been derived for the flux of captured electrons. The equation defines the carrying out of fast particles from the plasma filament center to its periphery depending on the external magnetic field and plasma parameters

  11. Emission from Crystals Irradiated with a Beam of Runaway Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranchenko, A. G.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Baksht, E. Kh.

    2018-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral and amplitude-temporal characteristics of emission from different crystals, promising in terms of their application as detectors of runaway electrons, is performed. This emission is excited by subnanosecond electron beams generated in a gas diode. It is found out that at the electron energies of tens-hundreds of kiloelectronvolts, the main contribution into the emission from CsI, ZnS, type IIa artificial and natural diamonds, sapphire, CaF2, ZrO2, Ga2O3, CaCO3, CdS, and ZnSe crystals comes from the cathodoluminescence; the radiation pulse duration depends on the crystal used and sufficiently exceeds the Cherenkov radiation pulse duration. It is demonstrated that the latter radiation exhibits low intensity and can be detected in the short-wave region of the spectrum in the cases where a monochromator and a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube (PMT) are used.

  12. Baryogenesis and Gravitational Waves from Runaway Bubble Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Andrey

    2016-11-07

    We propose a novel mechanism for production of baryonic asymmetry in the early Universe. The mechanism takes advantage of the strong first order phase transition that produces runaway bubbles in the hidden sector that propagate almost without friction with ultra-relativistic velocities. Collisions of such bubbles can non-thermally produce heavy particles that further decay out-of-equilibrium into the SM and produce the observed baryonic asymmetry. This process can proceed at the very low temperatures, providing a new mechanism of post-sphaleron baryogenesis. In this paper we present a fully calculable model which produces the baryonic asymmetry along these lines as well as evades all the existing cosmological constraints. We emphasize that the Gravitational Waves signal from the first order phase transition is completely generic and can potentially be detected by the future eLISA interferometer. We also discuss other potential signals, which are more model dependent, and point out the unresolved theoretical q...

  13. Fast Breakdown as Coronal/Ionization Waves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Petersen, D.; da Silva, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Studies of high-power narrow bipolar events (NBEs) have shown they are produced by a newly-recognized breakdown process called fast positive breakdown (FPB, Rison et al., 2016, doi:10.1038/ncomms10721). The breakdown was inferred to be produced by a system of positive streamers that propagate at high speed ( ˜3-6 x 107 m/s) due to occurring in a localized region of strong electric field. The polarity of the breakdown was determined from broadband interferometer (INTF) observations of the propagation direction of its VHF radiation, which was downward into the main negative charge region of a normally-electrified storm. Subsequent INTF observations being conducted in at Kennedy Space Center in Florida have shown a much greater incidence of NBEs than in New Mexico. Among the larger dataset have been clear-cut instances of some NBEs being produced by upward breakdown that would be of negative polarity. The speed and behavior of the negative breakdown is the same as that of the fast positive, leading to it being termed fast negative breakdown (FNB). The similarity (not too mention its occurrence) is surprising, given the fact that negative streamers and breakdown develops much differently than that of positive breakdown. The question is how this happens. In this study, we compare fast breakdown characteristics to well-known streamer properties as inferred from laboratory experiments and theoretical analysis. Additionally, we begin to explore the possibility that both polarities of fast breakdown are produced by what may be called coronal or ionization waves, in which the enhanced electric field produced by streamer or coronal breakdown of either polarity propagates away from the advancing front at the speed of light into a medium that is in a metastable condition of being at the threshold of hydrometeor-mediated corona onset or other ionization processes. The wave would develop at a faster speed than the streamer breakdown that gives rise to it, and thus would be

  14. Breakdown properties of irradiated MOS capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paccagnella, A.; Candelori, A.; Pellizzer, F.; Fuochi, P.G.; Lavale, M.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have studied the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the breakdown properties of different types of MOS capacitors, with thick (200 nm) and thin (down to 8 nm) oxides. In general, no large variations of the average breakdown field, time-to-breakdown at constant voltage, or charge-to-breakdown at constant voltage, or charge-to-breakdown values have been observed after high dose irradiation (20 Mrad(Si) 9 MeV electrons on thin and thick oxides, 17(Si) Mrad Co 60 gamma and 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 only on thick oxides). However, some modifications of the cumulative failure distributions have been observed in few of the oxides tested

  15. Experiments concerning the theories of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panton, Ronald L.; Stifle, Kirk E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental project was undertaken to investigate the character of vortex breakdown with particular regard to the stagnation and wave guide theories of vortex breakdown. Three different wings were used to produce a trailing vortex which convected downstream without undergoing breakdown. Disturbances were then introduced onto the vortex using a moving wire to 'cut' the vortex. The development of upstream and downstream propagating disturbance waves was observed and the propagation velocities measured. A downstream traveling wave was observed to produce a structure similar in appearance to a vortex breakdown. An upstream traveling wave produced a moving turbulent region. The upstream disturbance moved into an axial velocity profile that had a wake-like defect while the downstream moving vortex breakdown moved against a jet-like overshoot. The longitudinal and swirl velocity profiles were documented by LDV measurement. Wave velocities, swirl angles, and swirl parameters are reported.

  16. Dynamics of runaway tails with time-dependent sub-Dreicer dc fields in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of runaway tails driven by sub-Dreicer time-dependent dc fields in a magnetized plasma are studied numerically using a quasilinear code based on the Ritz--Galerkin method and finite elements. It is found that the runaway tail maintained a negative slope during the dc field increase. Depending on the values of the dc electric field at t = 0 and the electron gyrofrequency to the plasma frequency ratio the runaway tail became unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance or remained stable before the saturation of the dc field at some maximum value. The systems that remained stable during this stage became unstable to the anomalous Doppler or the Cerenkov resonances when the dc field was kept at the saturation level or decreased. Once the instability is triggered, the runaway tail is isotropized

  17. Dynamics of runaway tails with time-dependent sub-Dreicer dc fields in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of runaway tails driven by sub-Dreicer time-dependent dc fields in a magnetized plasma are studied numerically using a quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. It is found that the runaway tail maintained a negative slope during the dc field increase. Depending on the values of the dc electric field at t = 0 and the electron gyrofrequency to the plasma frequency ratio the runaway tail became unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance or remained stable before the saturation of the dc field at some maximum value. The systems that remained stable during this stage became unstable to the anomalous Doppler or the Cerenkov resonances when the dc field was kept at the saturation level or decreased. Once the instability is triggered, the runaway tail is isotropized.

  18. Temporal and spatial evolution of runaway electrons at the instability moments in Damavand tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourshahab, B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Advance Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, P.O. Box 81747-73441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdi, M. R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, P.O. Box 81747-73441, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadighzadeh, A.; Rasouli, C. [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The time and position behavior of runaway electrons at the Parail–Pogutse instability moments has been investigated using experimental observations in plasma current, loop voltage, the Hard X-ray (HXR) radiations, and 18 poloidal pickup coils signals received by data acquisition system simultaneously. The conditional average sampling (CAS) method was used to analyze the output data. Moreover, a filament current code was modified to study the runaway electrons beam movement in the event of instabilities. The results display a rapid drift of runaway beam toward the inner wall of the vacuum vessel and the collision with the wall components at the instability moments. The existence of the collisions in these experiments is evident in the HXR bursts which are considered as the main trigger for CAS Analysis. Also, the variation of HXR bursts with the toroidal magnetic field shows that the hard X-ray bursts drop with increase in the toroidal magnetic field and runaway electrons confinement quality.

  19. Runaway electron damage to the Tore Supra Phase III outboard pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.; Lutz, T.; Walsh, D.; Martin, G.; Chatelier, M.; Loarer, T.; Guilhem, D.

    1996-01-01

    Operation of the Phase III outboard pump limiter (OPL) in Tore Supra in 1994 was terminated prematurely when runaway electrons during the current decay following a disruption pierced leading edge tube on the electron side and caused a water leak. The location, about 20 mm outside the last closed flux surface during normal operation, and the infrared (IR) images of the limiter indicate that the runaways moved in large outward steps, i.e. tens of millimeters, in one toroidal revolution. For plasma (runaway) currents in the range of 155 to 250 kA, the drift orbits open to the outside. Basic trajectory computations suggest that such motion is possible under the conditions present for this experiment. Activation measurements made on sections of the tube to indicate the area of local damage are presented here. An understanding of this event may provide important guidance regarding the potential damage from runaways in future tokamaks

  20. Two-year predictors of runaway and homeless episodes following shelter services among substance abusing adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Natasha; Guo, Xiamei; Brakenhoff, Brittany; Feng, Xin

    2013-10-01

    Given high levels of health and psychological costs associated with the family disruption of homelessness, identifying predictors of runaway and homeless episodes is an important goal. The current study followed 179 substance abusing, shelter-recruited adolescents who participated in a randomized clinical trial. Predictors of runaway and homeless episodes were examined over a two year period. Results from the hierarchical linear modeling analysis showed that family cohesion and substance use, but not family conflict or depressive symptoms, delinquency, or school enrollment predicted future runaway and homeless episodes. Findings suggest that increasing family support, care and connection and reducing substance use are important targets of intervention efforts in preventing future runaway and homeless episodes amongst a high risk sample of adolescents. Copyright © 2013 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Run-away electrons and plasma pinching in a high-current diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenkov, G.V.

    1984-01-01

    The electrons run-away process in space-confined plasma with current is considered. It has been found that the effect of the proper magnetic field of a current leads to appearance, in add tion to the Dreicer mechanism, of other run-away mechanism in the process of radial oscillations of electrons accelerating near the axis. The appearance of run-away electrons from a thermal velocities region occurs in the course of collisions as well as radial drift. The thresholds of Dreicer run-away and drift are determined. The conditions of formation of Z-pinch current envelope and its collisionless compression by the ''snow plough'' type for the 10-100 ns of high-current accelerator pulse duration are elucidated

  2. On the effect of electron's runaway in partially ionized hydrogen semiclassical nonideal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turekhanova, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The effect of runaway electrons occurs frequently in tokamak plasmas. The majority of experiments in tokamak research have been devoted to the study of confinement properties of runaway electrons. Runaway electrons are reason of various destroying untolarance in tokamak plasmas. At high plasma density, when the critical energy is comparable with the rest energy the multiplication of runaway electrons accelerate at the sacrifice of increase of plasma density. The plasma conductivity is determined by electrons with energy several times higher than the thermal one and does not practically depend on slower electrons distribution. It is important to analyze the probability of runaway electrons at investigation of physical properties of nonideal plasmas under external electric field and running numerical simulations of their. The present paper is devoted to the investigation of effect of runaway electrons in partially ionized hydrogen dense plasma using the effective potentials of particle's interaction. At the investigation of composition of plasma we used the Saha equation with corrections to nonideality (lowering of ionization potentials). The Saha equation was solved for obtaining of plasma ionization stages at the different number density and temperature. As well, when take into account quantum-mechanical diffraction and screening effects, whereas free path of electrons increases with increase of plasma coupling parameter. The condition for appearance of runaway electrons in semiclassical partially ionized plasma is more favorable in regime of dense plasma. In summary it means that the probability of runaway electron in dense plasma is more than the same in rarified plasma that is possibly connected with formation of some ordered structures in dense plasma.

  3. Time and energy resolved runaway measurements in TFR from induced radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    A time and energy resolved measurement of the radioactivity induced by runaway electrons in proper samples has been developped in TFR. The data give an information on the confinement time of these electrons, which appears to be strongly dependent on the toroidal field, suggesting the onset of a magnetic turbulence at lower fields. Observations showing that the runaway electrons deeply penetrate into the limiter shadow are also reported

  4. Runaway reactions. Part 2 Causes of Accidents in selected CSB case histories Part 2

    OpenAIRE

    GYENES ZSUZSANNA; CARSON PHILLIP

    2017-01-01

    Part 1 briefly discussed the basic thermochemistry of reactive chemicals, the statistics of accidents involving runaway reactions, and general control measures to minimise risk and mitigate the consequences. The present paper highlights the main causes of major accidents from runaway reactions with illustrative case histories to link theory and practice. It also discusses lessons learned from these accidents, which are very similar in the cases studied. The main causes are management deficien...

  5. The Origin of B-type Runaway Stars: Non-LTE Abundances as a Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, Catherine M.; Dufton, Philip L.; Smoker, Jonathan V.; Keenan, Francis P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Lambert, David L. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Astronomy, RLM 16.316, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Schneider, Fabian R. N. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); De Wit, Willem-Jan [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2017-06-10

    There are two accepted mechanisms to explain the origin of runaway OB-type stars: the binary supernova (SN) scenario and the cluster ejection scenario. In the former, an SN explosion within a close binary ejects the secondary star, while in the latter close multibody interactions in a dense cluster cause one or more of the stars to be ejected from the region at high velocity. Both mechanisms have the potential to affect the surface composition of the runaway star. tlusty non-LTE model atmosphere calculations have been used to determine the atmospheric parameters and the C, N, Mg, and Si abundances for a sample of B-type runaways. These same analytical tools were used by Hunter et al. for their analysis of 50 B-type open-cluster Galactic stars (i.e., nonrunaways). Effective temperatures were deduced using the Si-ionization balance technique, surface gravities from Balmer line profiles, and microturbulent velocities derived using the Si spectrum. The runaways show no obvious abundance anomalies when compared with stars in the open clusters. The runaways do show a spread in composition that almost certainly reflects the Galactic abundance gradient and a range in the birthplaces of the runaways in the Galactic disk. Since the observed Galactic abundance gradients of C, N, Mg, and Si are of a similar magnitude, the abundance ratios (e.g., N/Mg) are as obtained essentially uniform across the sample.

  6. Fokker-Planck simulation of runaway electron generation in disruptions with the hot-tail effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuga, H., E-mail: nuga@p-grp.nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fukuyama, A. [Department of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Yagi, M. [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To study runaway electron generation in disruptions, we have extended the three-dimensional (two-dimensional in momentum space; one-dimensional in the radial direction) Fokker-Planck code, which describes the evolution of the relativistic momentum distribution function of electrons and the induced toroidal electric field in a self-consistent manner. A particular focus is placed on the hot-tail effect in two-dimensional momentum space. The effect appears if the drop of the background plasma temperature is sufficiently rapid compared with the electron-electron slowing down time for a few times of the pre-quench thermal velocity. It contributes to not only the enhancement of the primary runaway electron generation but also the broadening of the runaway electron distribution in the pitch angle direction. If the thermal energy loss during the major disruption is assumed to be isotropic, there are hot-tail electrons that have sufficiently large perpendicular momentum, and the runaway electron distribution becomes broader in the pitch angle direction. In addition, the pitch angle scattering also yields the broadening. Since the electric field is reduced due to the burst of runaway electron generation, the time required for accelerating electrons to the runaway region becomes longer. The longer acceleration period makes the pitch-angle scattering more effective.

  7. A Comparison of Religious Orientation and General Health in Runaway Girls and Normal Ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Due to the negative consequence of girls’ escape, this study was conducted to compare personality, demographic, and religious characteristics of runaway girls and normal ones in Qom city. Methods: In a case control study, 66 single runaway girls and 66 normal girls were selected as experimental group and control group, respectively. Data was culled using interview method, demographic information questionnaire, Allport religious orientation, and general health questionnaires (GHQ. Chi square and independent t-test were applied to analyze final data. Results: Average general health scores were calculated to be 13.9±11 and 9±6.2 in runaway and normal girls, respectively. The score of religious orientation is significantly lower in runaway girls than normal girls (p0.05. Conclusion: Religious orientation was found to be lower in runaway girls than in normal ones. Since runaway girls are subject to physical and sexual abuse, their psychological health is highly vulnerable—the fact which might pave the way for other social abnormalities.

  8. Probing the heat sources during thermal runaway process by thermal analysis of different battery chemistries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Siqi; Wang, Li; Feng, Xuning; He, Xiangming

    2018-02-01

    Safety issue is very important for the lithium ion battery used in electric vehicle or other applications. This paper probes the heat sources in the thermal runaway processes of lithium ion batteries composed of different chemistries using accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The adiabatic thermal runaway features for the 4 types of commercial lithium ion batteries are tested using ARC, whereas the reaction characteristics of the component materials, including the cathode, the anode and the separator, inside the 4 types of batteries are measured using DSC. The peaks and valleys of the critical component reactions measured by DSC can match the fluctuations in the temperature rise rate measured by ARC, therefore the relevance between the DSC curves and the ARC curves is utilized to probe the heat source in the thermal runaway process and reveal the thermal runaway mechanisms. The results and analysis indicate that internal short circuit is not the only way to thermal runaway, but can lead to extra electrical heat, which is comparable with the heat released by chemical reactions. The analytical approach of the thermal runaway mechanisms in this paper can guide the safety design of commercial lithium ion batteries.

  9. 2d axisymmetric "beam-bulk" modelling of the generation of runaway electrons by streamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanrion, Olivier; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Bourdon, Anne; Neubert, Torsten

    2017-04-01

    We present results from a 2d axisymmetric numerical model of streamers based on a "beam-bulk" approach which describes cold electrons with a fluid model and high energy electrons with a particle model. The interest is motivated by the generation of runaway electrons by streamers which may participate in the recently observed TGFs and which challenge the modelling. Runaway electrons are known to be generated from streamers when the electric field in its negative tip is of sufficient magnitude. After overtaking the streamer tip, runaways can affect the streamer propagation ahead and may produce high energy photons through the bremsstrahlung process. In conventional model of streamers, the evolution of the streamer discharge is mostly governed by cold electrons. By including runaway electrons, we model their production, their impact on the discharge propagation and can address their role in TGFs. Results of streamer propagation in leader electric field show that the runaway electrons accelerate the streamers, reduce the electric field in its tip and enlarge its radius by pre-ionizing the gas ahead. We observed that if we increase the electric field, the discharge is getting more diffuse, with a pattern driven by the increase in runaway induced ionisation.

  10. Vorticity generation and jetting caused by a laser-induced optical breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jonathan; Buchta, David; Freund, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    A focused laser can cause optical breakdown of a gas that absorbs energy and can seed ignition. The local hydrodynamics are complex. The breakdown is observed to produce vorticity that subsequently collects into a jetting flow towards the laser source. The strength and the very direction of the jet is observed to be sensitive to the plasma kernel geometry. We use detailed numerical simulations to examine the short-time (inverse Bremsstrahlung, and 11 charged and neutral species for air. We quantify the early-time contributions of different thermodynamic and gas-dynamic effects to the baroclinic torque. It is found that the breakdown produces compression waves within the plasma kernel, and that the mismatch in their strengths precipitates the involution of the plasma remnants and yields the net vorticity that ultimately develops into the jet. We also quantify the temperature distribution and local strain rates and demonstrate their importance in seeding ignition in non-homogeneous hydrogen/air mixtures.

  11. The Work Breakdown Structure in an Acquisition Reform Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albert, Neil

    1997-01-01

    These viewgraphs discuss acquisition reform, costs, provide a definition for work breakdown structure, development process of work breakdown, an overview of contract business management, a GAO review...

  12. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  13. Breakdown Cause and Effect Analysis. Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biały, Witold; Ružbarský, Juraj

    2018-06-01

    Every company must ensure that the production process proceeds without interferences. Within this article, the author uses the term "interferences" in reference to unplanned stoppages caused by breakdowns. Unfortunately, usually due to machine operators' mistakes, machines break, which causes stoppages thus generating additional costs for the company. This article shows a cause and effect analysis of a breakdown in a production process. The FMEA as well as quality management tools: the Ishikawa diagram and Pareto chart were used for the analysis. Correction measures were presented which allowed for a significant reduction in the number of stoppages caused by breakdowns.

  14. Electrical breakdown phenomena of dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

    Silicone elastomers have been heavily investigated as candidates for dielectric elastomers and are as such almost ideal candidates with their inherent softness and compliance but they suffer from low dielectric permittivity. This shortcoming has been sought optimized by many means during recent...... years. However, optimization with respect to the dielectric permittivity solely may lead to other problematic phenomena such as premature electrical breakdown. In this work, we investigate the electrical breakdown phenomena of various types of permittivity-enhanced silicone elastomers. Two types...... of silicone elastomers are investigated and different types of breakdown are discussed. Furthermore the use of voltage stabilizers in silicone-based dielectric elastomers is investigated and discussed....

  15. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ''point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies

  16. Optimization of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for coal powder analysis with different particle flow diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Shunchun, E-mail: epscyao@scut.edu.cn [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power Laser Technology, Electronic Engineering Institute, Hefei 230037 (China); Xu, Jialong; Dong, Xuan; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Jianping [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China); Lu, Jidong, E-mail: jdlu@scut.edu.cn [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China)

    2015-08-01

    The on-line measurement of coal is extremely useful for emission control and combustion process optimization in coal-fired plant. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was employed to directly analyze coal particle flow. A set of tapered tubes were proposed for beam-focusing the coal particle flow to different diameters. For optimizing the measurement of coal particle flow, the characteristics of laser-induced plasma, including optical breakdown, the relative standard deviation of repeated measurement, partial breakdown spectra ratio and line intensity, were carefully analyzed. The comparison of the plasma characteristics among coal particle flow with different diameters showed that air breakdown and the random change in plasma position relative to the collection optics could significantly influence on the line intensity and the reproducibility of measurement. It is demonstrated that the tapered tube with a diameter of 5.5 mm was particularly useful to enrich the coal particles in laser focus spot as well as to reduce the influence of air breakdown and random changes of plasma in the experiment. - Highlights: • Tapered tube was designed for beam-focusing the coal particle flow as well as enriching the particles in laser focus spot. • The characteristics of laser-induced plasma of coal particle flow were investigated carefully. • An appropriate diameter of coal particle flow was proven to benefit for improving the performance of LIBS measurement.

  17. Conditioning and breakdown phenomena in accelerator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorka, S.J.

    1979-01-01

    Important breakdown mechanisms in accelerator tubes are reviewed, and discharge phenomena in NEC tubes are deduced from the surface appearance of the electrodes and insulators of a used tube. Microphotos of these surfaces are shown

  18. Inter-machine comparison of the termination phase and energy conversion in tokamak disruptions with runaway current plateau formation and implications for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Solís, J.R.; Loarte, A.; Hollmann, E.M.; Esposito, B.; Riccardo, V.

    2014-01-01

    The termination of the current and the loss of runaway electrons following runaway current plateau formation during disruptions have been investigated in the JET, DIII-D and FTU tokamaks. Substantial conversion of magnetic energy into runaway kinetic energy, up to ∼10 times the initial plateau runaway kinetic energy, has been inferred for the slowest current terminations. Both modelling and experiment suggest that, in present devices, the efficiency of conversion into runaway kinetic energy is determined to a great extent by the characteristic runaway loss time, τ diff , and the resistive time of the residual ohmic plasma after the disruption, τ res , increasing with the ratio τ diff /τ res . It is predicted that, in large future devices such as ITER, the generation of runaways by the avalanche mechanism will play an important role, particularly for slow runaway discharge terminations, increasing substantially the amount of energy deposited by the runaways onto the plasma-facing components by the conversion of magnetic energy of the runaway plasma into runaway kinetic energy. Estimates of the power fluxes on the beryllium plasma-facing components during runaway termination in ITER indicate that for runaway currents of up to 2 MA no melting of the components is expected. For larger runaway currents, minimization of the effects of runaway impact on the first wall requires a reduction in the kinetic energy of the runaway beam before termination and, in addition, high plasma density n e and low ohmic plasma resistance (long τ res ) to prevent large conversion of magnetic into runaway kinetic energy during slow current terminations. (paper)

  19. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  20. Modeling Covariance Breakdowns in Multivariate GARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xin; Maheu, John M

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a flexible way of modeling dynamic heterogeneous covariance breakdowns in multivariate GARCH (MGARCH) models. During periods of normal market activity, volatility dynamics are governed by an MGARCH specification. A covariance breakdown is any significant temporary deviation of the conditional covariance matrix from its implied MGARCH dynamics. This is captured through a flexible stochastic component that allows for changes in the conditional variances, covariances and impl...

  1. Skin breakdown in acute care pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suddaby, Elizabeth C; Barnett, Scott D; Facteau, Lorna

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simple, single-page measurement tool that evaluates risk of skin breakdown in the peadiatric population and apply it to the acutely hospitalized child. Data were collected over a 15-month period from 347 patients on four in-patient units (PICU, medical-surgical, oncology, and adolescents) on skin breakdown using the AHCPR staging guidelines and compared to the total score on the Starkid SkinScale in order to determine its ability to predict skin breakdown. The inter-rater reliability of the Starkid Skin Scale was r2 = 0.85 with an internal reliablity of 0.71. The sensitivity of the total score was low (17.5%) but highly specific (98.5%). The prevalence of skin breakdown in the acutely hospitalized child was 23%, the majority (77.5%) occurring as erythema of the skin. Buttocks, perineum, and occiput were the most common locations of breakdown. Occiput breakdown was more common in critically ill (PICU) patients while diaper dermatitis was more common in the general medical-surgical population.

  2. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  3. Off-axis vortex breakdown in a shallow whirlpool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrada, Miguel A; Shtern, Vladimir N; López-Herrera, José María

    2013-06-01

    The off-axis emergence of vortex breakdown (VB) is revealed. The steady axisymmetric flow in a vertical sealed cylinder, which is partially filled with water and the rest is filled with air, is driven by the rotating bottom disk. The numerical simulations show that VB can emerge away from the rotation axis, interface, and walls. As the rotation intensifies, VB first develops in the water region. If the water height is less (larger) than nearly one half of the cylinder radius, VB emerges off (on) the axis. As the rotation further increases, the off-axis VB ring touches the interface and then a thin countercirculation layer develops in the air flow above the water VB domain. This two-fluid VB ring shrinks (it even disappears in a very shallow whirlpool) as the interface approaches the bottom disk.

  4. Measuring protein breakdown rate in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo.......To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo....

  5. Runaway chemical reaction exposes community to highly toxic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszniak, Mark; Vorderbrueggen, John

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) conducted a comprehensive investigation of a runaway chemical reaction at MFG Chemical (MFG) in Dalton, Georgia on April 12, 2004 that resulted in the uncontrolled release of a large quantity of highly toxic and flammable allyl alcohol and allyl chloride into the community. Five people were hospitalized and 154 people required decontamination and treatment for exposure to the chemicals. This included police officers attempting to evacuate the community and ambulance personnel who responded to 911 calls from residents exposed to the chemicals. This paper presents the findings of the CSB report (U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB), Investigation Report: Toxic Chemical Vapor Cloud Release, Report No. 2004-09-I-GA, Washington DC, April 2006) including a discussion on tolling practices; scale-up of batch reaction processes; Process Safety Management (PSM) and Risk Management Plan (RMP) implementation; emergency planning by the company, county and the city; and emergency response and mitigation actions taken during the incident. The reactive chemical testing and atmospheric dispersion modeling conducted by CSB after the incident and recommendations adopted by the Board are also discussed

  6. Master equation and runaway speed of the Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zh.

    2018-04-01

    The master equation of the Francis turbine is derived based on the combination of the angular momentum (Euler) and the energy laws. It relates the geometrical design of the impeller and the regulation settings (guide vane angle and rotational speed) to the discharge and the power output. The master equation, thus, enables the complete characteristics of a given Francis turbine to be easily computed. While applying the energy law, both the shock loss at the impeller inlet and the swirling loss at the impeller exit are taken into account. These are main losses which occur at both the partial load and the overloads and, thus, dominantly influence the characteristics of the Francis turbine. They also totally govern the discharge of the water through the impeller when the impeller is found in the standstill. The computations have been performed for the discharge, the hydraulic torque and the hydraulic efficiency. They were also compared with the available measurements on a model turbine. Excellent agreement has been achieved. The computations also enable the runaway speed of the Francis turbine and the related discharge to be determined as a function of the setting angle of the guide vanes.

  7. Baryogenesis and gravitational waves from runaway bubble collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Andrey [Theory Division, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics (CAP),Université de Genève, 24 quai Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Riotto, Antonio [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics (CAP),Université de Genève, 24 quai Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland)

    2016-11-07

    We propose a novel mechanism for production of baryonic asymmetry in the early Universe. The mechanism takes advantage of the strong first order phase transition that produces runaway bubbles in the hidden sector that propagate almost without friction with ultra-relativistic velocities. Collisions of such bubbles can non-thermally produce heavy particles that further decay out-of-equilibrium into the SM and produce the observed baryonic asymmetry. This process can proceed at the very low temperatures, providing a new mechanism of post-sphaleron baryogenesis. In this paper we present a fully calculable model which produces the baryonic asymmetry along these lines as well as evades all the existing cosmological constraints. We emphasize that the Gravitational Waves signal from the first order phase transition is completely generic and can potentially be detected by the future eLISA interferometer. We also discuss other potential signals, which are more model dependent, and point out the unresolved theoretical questions related to our proposal.

  8. Studies of runaway electrons via Cherenkov effect in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowski, J.; Jakubowski, L.; Rabinski, M.; Sadowski, M. J.; Jakubowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Mirowski, R.; Mlynar, J.; Ficker, O.; Weinzettl, V.; Causa, F.; COMPASS; FTU Teams

    2018-01-01

    The paper concerns measurements of runaway electrons (REs) which are generated during discharges in tokamaks. The control of REs is an important task in experimental studies within the ITER-physics program. The NCBJ team proposed to study REs by means of Cherenkov-type detectors several years ago. The Cherenkov radiation, induced by REs in appropriate radiators, makes it possible to identify fast electron beams and to determine their spatial- and temporal-characteristics. The results of recent experimental studies of REs, performed in two tokamaks - COMPASS in Prague and FTU in Frascati, are summarized and discussed in this paper. Examples of the electron-induced signals, as recorded at different experimental conditions and scenarios, are presented. Measurements performed with a three-channel Cherenkov-probe in COMPASS showed that the first fast electron peaks can be observed already during the current ramp-up phase. A strong dependence of RE-signals on the radial position of the Cherenkov probe was observed. The most distinct electron peaks were recorded during the plasma disruption. The Cherenkov signals confirmed the appearance of post-disruptive RE beams in circular-plasma discharges with massive Ar-puffing. During experiments at FTU a clear correlation between the Cherenkov detector signals and the rotation of magnetic islands was identified.

  9. Albedo matters: Understanding runaway albedo variations on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard P.; Young, Leslie A.; Stern, S. A.; Ennico, K.; Grundy, W.; Olkin, C. B.; Weaver, H. A.; New Horizons Surface Composition Theme

    2018-03-01

    The data returned from NASA's New Horizons reconnaissance of the Pluto system show striking albedo variations from polar to equatorial latitudes as well as sharp longitudinal boundaries. Pluto has a high obliquity (currently 119°) that varies by 23° over a period of less than 3 million years. This variation, combined with its regressing longitude of perihelion (360° over 3.7 million years), creates epochs of "Super Seasons" where one pole is pointed at the Sun at perihelion, thereby experiencing a short, relatively warm summer followed by its longest possible period of winter darkness. In contrast, the other pole experiences a much longer, less intense summer and a short winter season. We use a simple volatile sublimation and deposition model to explore the relationship between albedo variations, latitude, and volatile sublimation and deposition for the current epoch as well as historical epochs during which Pluto experienced these "Super Seasons." Our investigation quantitatively shows that Pluto's geometry creates the potential for runaway albedo and volatile variations, particularly in the equatorial region, which can sustain stark longitudinal contrasts like the ones we see between Tombaugh Regio and the informally named Cthulhu Regio.

  10. Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1989-01-01

    The hard and soft x ray and microwave emissions from a solar flare (May 14, 1980) were analyzed and interpreted in terms of Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in one or more current sheets. It is found that all three emissions can be generated with sub-Dreicer electric fields. The soft x ray emitting plasma can only be heated by a single current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is well above the classical, collisional resistivity of 10(exp 7) K, 10(exp 11)/cu cm plasma. If the hard x ray emission is from thermal electrons, anomalous resistivity or densities exceeding 3 x 10(exp 12)/cu cm are required. If the hard x ray emission is from nonthermal electrons, the emissions can be produced with classical resistivity in the current sheets if the heating rate is approximately 4 times greater than that deduced from the soft x ray data (with a density of 10(exp 10)/cu cm in the soft x ray emitting region), if there are at least 10(exp 4) current sheets, and if the plasma properties in the sheets are characteristic of the superhot plasma observed in some flares by Lin et al., and with Hinotori. Most of the released energy goes directly into bulk heating, rather than accelerated particles.

  11. The Influence of Stellar Spin on Ignition of Thermonuclear Runaways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Duncan K.; in ’t Zand, Jean J. M.; Chenevez, Jérôme; Keek, Laurens; Sanchez-Fernandez, Celia; Worpel, Hauke; Lampe, Nathanael; Kuulkers, Erik; Watts, Anna; Ootes, Laura; The MINBAR collaboration

    2018-04-01

    Runaway thermonuclear burning of a layer of accumulated fuel on the surface of a compact star provides a brief but intense display of stellar nuclear processes. For neutron stars accreting from a binary companion, these events manifest as thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts, and recur on typical timescales of hours to days. We measured the burst rate as a function of accretion rate, from seven neutron stars with known spin rates, using a burst sample accumulated over several decades. At the highest accretion rates, the burst rate is lower for faster spinning stars. The observations imply that fast (>400 Hz) rotation encourages stabilization of nuclear burning, suggesting a dynamical dependence of nuclear ignition on the spin rate. This dependence is unexpected, because faster rotation entails less shear between the surrounding accretion disk and the star. Large-scale circulation in the fuel layer, leading to enhanced mixing of the burst ashes into the fuel layer, may explain this behavior; further numerical simulations are required to confirm this.

  12. E-ELT constraints on runaway dilaton scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, M. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Calabrese, E. [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Martins, C.J.A.P., E-mail: m.martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de, E-mail: erminia.calabrese@physics.ox.ac.uk, E-mail: carlos.martins@astro.up.pt [Centro de Astrofìsica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-11-01

    We use a combination of simulated cosmological probes and astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant α, as expected from the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), to constrain the class of string-inspired runaway dilaton models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We consider three different scenarios for the dark sector couplings in the model and discuss the observational differences between them. We improve previously existing analyses investigating in detail the degeneracies between the parameters ruling the coupling of the dilaton field to the other components of the universe, and studying how the constraints on these parameters change for different fiducial cosmologies. We find that if the couplings are small (e.g., α{sub b} = α{sub V} ∼ 0) these degeneracies strongly affect the constraining power of future data, while if they are sufficiently large (e.g., α{sub b} ∼> 10{sup −5}−α{sub V} ∼> 0.05, as in agreement with current constraints) the degeneracies can be partially broken. We show that E-ELT will be able to probe some of this additional parameter space.

  13. Runaway electrons dynamics and confinement in TORE-SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.; Geraud, A.; Joyer, P.; Martin, G.; Rax, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Ohmic discharges in TORE-SUPRA are sufficiently long (∼ 6 s) for runaway electrons (R.E.) to reach a steady energy state: their energy limit is determined by the balance between parallel electric field acceleration (20 MeV/V.s in TORE-SUPRA) and radiation losses due to the curvature of the trajectories. When R.E. energy is supposed to be only parallel, this provides estimate of order of 70 MeV (value usually called 'synchrotron limit') reached in less than 2 seconds. Experimental observations on TORE-SUPRA of photoneutron emission together with residual induced radioactivity in the first wall components tend to prove that the actual value is much lower than 70 MeV (i.e. 15-35 MeV). Earlier observations in ORMAK, PLT and TFR already showed R.E. energy a slightly less than expected from standard loop voltage acceleration calculations. Explanations given for this lack of energy (as skin-effect lowering the electric field during the ramp-up phase or balance between continuous creation and losses) seems not to hold on TORE-SUPRA and therefore another mechanism must be considered to explain the R.E. energy limitation. 4 refs., 2 figs

  14. TYC 3159-6-1: a runaway blue supergiant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.; Zharikov, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of optical spectroscopy of a candidate evolved massive star in the Cygnus-X region, TYC 3159-6-1, revealed via detection of its curious circumstellar nebula in archival data of the Spitzer Space Telescope. We classify TYC 3159-6-1 as an O9.5-O9.7 Ib star and derive its fundamental parameters by using the stellar atmosphere code FASTWIND. The He and CNO abundances in the photosphere of TYC 3159-6-1 are consistent with the solar abundances, suggesting that the star only recently evolved off the main sequence. Proper motion and radial velocity measurements for TYC 3159-6-1 show that it is a runaway star. We propose that Dolidze 7 is its parent cluster. We discuss the origin of the nebula around TYC 3159-6-1 and suggest that it might be produced in several successive episodes of enhanced mass-loss rate (outbursts) caused by rotation of the star near the critical Ω limit.

  15. Runaways and weathervanes: The shape of stellar bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henney, W. J.; Tarango-Yong, J. A.

    2017-11-01

    Stellar bow shocks are the result of the supersonic interaction between a stellar wind and its environment. Some of these are "runaways": high-velocity stars that have been ejected from a star cluster. Others are "weather vanes", where it is the local interstellar medium itself that is moving, perhaps as the result of a champagne flow of ionized gas from a nearby HII region. We propose a new two-dimensional classification scheme for bow shapes, which is based on dimensionless geometric ratios that can be estimated from observational images. The two ratios are related to the flatness of the bow’s apex, which we term "planitude" and the openness of its wings, which we term "alatude". We calculate the inclination-dependent tracks on the planitude-alatude plane that are predicted by simple models for the bow shock shape. We also measure the shapes of bow shocks from three different observational datasets: mid-infrared arcs around hot main-sequence stars, far-infrared arcs around luminous cool stars, and emission-line arcs around proplyds and other young stars in the Orion Nebula. Clear differences are found between the different datasets in their distributions on the planitude-alatude plane, which can be used to constrain the physics of the bow shock interaction and emission mechanisms in the different classes of object.

  16. Numerical simulation of runaway electrons: 3-D effects on synchrotron radiation and impurity-based runaway current dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Carbajal, L.; Spong, D.; Izzo, V.

    2018-05-01

    Numerical simulations of runaway electrons (REs) with a particular emphasis on orbit dependent effects in 3-D magnetic fields are presented. The simulations were performed using the recently developed Kinetic Orbit Runaway electron Code (KORC) that computes the full-orbit relativistic dynamics in prescribed electric and magnetic fields including radiation damping and collisions. The two main problems of interest are synchrotron radiation and impurity-based RE dissipation. Synchrotron radiation is studied in axisymmetric fields and in 3-D magnetic configurations exhibiting magnetic islands and stochasticity. For passing particles in axisymmetric fields, neglecting orbit effects might underestimate or overestimate the total radiation power depending on the direction of the radial shift of the drift orbits. For trapped particles, the spatial distribution of synchrotron radiation exhibits localized "hot" spots at the tips of the banana orbits. In general, the radiation power per particle for trapped particles is higher than the power emitted by passing particles. The spatial distribution of synchrotron radiation in stochastic magnetic fields, obtained using the MHD code NIMROD, is strongly influenced by the presence of magnetic islands. 3-D magnetic fields also introduce a toroidal dependence on the synchrotron spectra, and neglecting orbit effects underestimates the total radiation power. In the presence of magnetic islands, the radiation damping of trapped particles is larger than the radiation damping of passing particles. Results modeling synchrotron emission by RE in DIII-D quiescent plasmas are also presented. The computation uses EFIT reconstructed magnetic fields and RE energy distributions fitted to the experimental measurements. Qualitative agreement is observed between the numerical simulations and the experiments for simplified RE pitch angle distributions. However, it is noted that to achieve quantitative agreement, it is necessary to use pitch angle

  17. A computational study of the topology of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been performed. Solutions to four distinct types of breakdown are identified and compared with experimental results. The computed solutions include weak helical, double helix, spiral, and bubble-type breakdowns. The topological structure of the various breakdowns as well as their interrelationship are studied. The data reveal that the asymmetric modes of breakdown may be subject to additional breakdowns as the vortex core evolves in the streamwise direction. The solutions also show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown.

  18. Empirical links between the local runaway greenhouse, super-greenhouse, and deep convection in Earth's tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, M. C.; Goldblatt, C.

    2017-12-01

    Energy balance requires that energy absorbed and emitted at the top of the atmosphere equal; this is maintained via the Planck feedback whereby outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) increases as surface temperature increases. There are two cases where this breaks down: the runaway greenhouse (known from planetary sciences theory) characterized by an asymptotic limit on OLR from moist atmospheres, and the super-greenhouse (known from tropical meteorology observations) where OLR decreases with surface temperature when the atmosphere is moist aloft. Here we show that the runaway greenhouse limit can be empirically observed and constrained in Earth's tropics, that the runaway and super-greenhouse occur as part of the same physical phenomenon, and that the transition through the super-greenhouse to a local runaway greenhouse is intimately linked to the onset of deep convection. A runaway greenhouse occurs when water vapour causes the troposphere to become optically thick to thermal radiation from the surface and a limit on OLR emerges as thermal emission is from a constant temperature level aloft. This limit is modelled as 282 W/m/m [Goldblatt et al, 2013]. Using satellite data from Earth's tropics, we find an empirical value of this limit of 280 W/m/m, in excellent agreement with the model.A column transitioning to a runaway greenhouse typically overshoots the runaway limit and then OLR decreases with increasing surface temperature until the runaway limit is reached after which OLR remains constant. The term super-greenhouse effect (SGE) has been used to describe OLR decreasing with surface warming, observed in these satellite measurements. We show the SGE is one and the same as the transition to a local runaway greenhouse, and represents a fundamental shift in the radiation response of the earth system, rather than simply an extension of water vapour feedback. This transition via SGE from an optically thin to optically thick troposphere is facilitated by enhanced

  19. dc breakdown conditioning and breakdown rate of metals and metallic alloys under ultrahigh vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Descoeudres

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The rf accelerating structures of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC require a material capable of sustaining high electric field with a low breakdown rate and low induced damage. Because of the similarity of many aspects of dc and rf breakdown, a dc breakdown study is underway at CERN in order to test candidate materials and surface preparations, and have a better understanding of the breakdown mechanism under ultrahigh vacuum in a simple setup. Conditioning speeds and breakdown fields of several metals and alloys have been measured. The average breakdown field after conditioning ranges from 100  MV/m for Al to 850  MV/m for stainless steel, and is around 170  MV/m for Cu which is the present base-line material for CLIC structures. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. The presence of a thin cuprous oxide film at the surface of copper electrodes significantly increases the breakdown field. On the other hand, the conditioning speed of Mo is improved by removing oxides at the surface with a vacuum heat treatment, typically at 875°C for 2 hours. Surface finishing treatments of Cu samples only affect the very first breakdowns. More generally, surface treatments have an effect on the conditioning process itself, but not on the average breakdown field reached after the conditioning phase. In analogy to rf, the breakdown probability has been measured in dc with Cu and Mo electrodes. The dc data show similar behavior as rf as a function of the applied electric field.

  20. Anti-Runaway Prevention System with Wireless Sensors for Intelligent Track Skates at Railway Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chaozhe; Xu, Yibo; Wen, Chao; Chen, Dilin

    2017-12-19

    Anti-runaway prevention of rolling stocks at a railway station is essential in railway safety management. The traditional track skates for anti-runaway prevention of rolling stocks have some disadvantages since they are operated and monitored completely manually. This paper describes an anti-runaway prevention system (ARPS) based on intelligent track skates equipped with sensors and real-time monitoring and management system. This system, which has been updated from the traditional track skates, comprises four parts: intelligent track skates, a signal reader, a database station, and a monitoring system. This system can monitor the real-time situation of track skates without changing their workflow for anti-runaway prevention, and thus realize the integration of anti-runaway prevention information management. This system was successfully tested and practiced at Sunjia station in Harbin Railway Bureau in 2014, and the results confirmed that the system showed 100% accuracy in reflecting the usage status of the track skates. The system could meet practical demands, as it is highly reliable and supports long-distance communication.

  1. Anti-Runaway Prevention System with Wireless Sensors for Intelligent Track Skates at Railway Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaozhe Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-runaway prevention of rolling stocks at a railway station is essential in railway safety management. The traditional track skates for anti-runaway prevention of rolling stocks have some disadvantages since they are operated and monitored completely manually. This paper describes an anti-runaway prevention system (ARPS based on intelligent track skates equipped with sensors and real-time monitoring and management system. This system, which has been updated from the traditional track skates, comprises four parts: intelligent track skates, a signal reader, a database station, and a monitoring system. This system can monitor the real-time situation of track skates without changing their workflow for anti-runaway prevention, and thus realize the integration of anti-runaway prevention information management. This system was successfully tested and practiced at Sunjia station in Harbin Railway Bureau in 2014, and the results confirmed that the system showed 100% accuracy in reflecting the usage status of the track skates. The system could meet practical demands, as it is highly reliable and supports long-distance communication.

  2. Family Functioning and Predictors of Runaway Behavior Among At-Risk Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Stephanie Brooks; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Tucker, Joan S

    2017-06-01

    Adolescent runaway behavior is associated with a host of negative outcomes in young adulthood. Therefore, it is important to understand the factors that predict running away in youth. Longitudinal data from 111 at-risk families were used to identify proximal predictors of runaway behavior over a 12-week period. On average, youth were 14.96 years old, and 45% were female. Ten percent of youth ran away during the 12-week follow-up period. In bivariate analyses, running away was predicted by poorer youth- and parent-rated family functioning, past runaway behavior, and other problem behaviors (e.g., substance use, delinquency), but not poorer perceived academic functioning. Results of a hierarchical logistic regression revealed a relationship between youth-rated family functioning and runaway behavior. However, this effect became non-significant after accounting for past runaway behavior and other problem behaviors, both of which remained significant predictors in the multivariable model. These findings suggest that youth who run away may be engaged in a more pervasive pattern of problematic behavior, and that screening and prevention programs need to address the cycle of adolescent defiant behavior associated with running away. Recommendations for clinical practice with this at-risk population are discussed.

  3. Can Increased CO2 Levels Trigger a Runaway Greenhouse on the Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, R.

    2014-04-01

    Recent one-dimensional (globally averaged) climate model calculations suggest that increased atmospheric CO2 could conceivably trigger a runaway greenhouse if CO2 concentrations were approximately 100 times higher than today. The new prediction runs contrary to previous calculations, which indicated that CO2 increases could not trigger a runaway, even at Venus-like CO2 concentrations. Goldblatt et al. argue that this different behavior is a consequence of updated absorption coefficients for H2O that make a runaway more likely. Here, we use a 1-D cloud-free climate model with similar, up-to-date absorption coefficients, but with a self-consistent methodology, to demonstrate that CO2 increases cannot induce a runaway greenhouse on the modern Earth. However, these initial calculations do not include cloud feedback, which may be positive at higher temperatures, destabilizing Earth's climate. We then show new calculations demonstrating that cirrus clouds cannot trigger a runaway, even in the complete absence of low clouds. Thus, the habitability of an Earth-like planet at Earth's distance appears to be ensured, irrespective of the sign of cloud feedback. Our results are of importance to Earth-like planets that receive similar insolation levels as does the Earth and to the ongoing question about cloud response at higher temperatures.

  4. Fast Thermal Runaway Detection for Lithium-Ion Cells in Large Scale Traction Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Koch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal runaway of single cells within a large scale lithium-ion battery is a well-known risk that can lead to critical situations if no counter measures are taken in today’s lithium-ion traction batteries for battery electric vehicles (BEVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs. The United Nations have published a draft global technical regulation on electric vehicle safety (GTR EVS describing a safety feature to warn passengers in case of a thermal runaway. Fast and reliable detection of faulty cells undergoing thermal runaway within the lithium-ion battery is therefore a key factor in battery designs for comprehensive passenger safety. A set of various possible sensors has been chosen based on the determined cell thermal runaway impact. These sensors have been tested in different sized battery setups and compared with respect to their ability of fast and reliable thermal runaway detection and their feasibility for traction batteries.

  5. On the generation of runaway electrons and their impact to plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Takaichi; Obayashi, Haruo; Miyahara, Akira.

    1988-06-01

    Runaway electrons accompanied by inductive or non-inductive plasma currents in a tokamak have severe interactions with plasma facing materials of a first wall, and influence the first wall structure due to activation and damage. In this paper, modelling of runaway electron generation near the wall in a tokamak is carried out. This includes the evaluation of acceleration along magnetic surfaces for relativistic electrons with energies larger than the runaway threshold. Penetration of runaway electrons of energy ranges from a few MeV to several ten MeV leads to gamma ray photon production by bremsstrahlung. One of the specific features of the impact on the first wall technology is that they give rise to activation due to giant resonance of the (γ,n) nuclear reaction and, as a consequence, cause a requirement of remote maintenance. The other is that they bring energy deposition at brazing areas between low Z material and metal, or at a metal itself, and they result in melting, cracking and grain growth. The methods to estimate these effects using nuclear data and material data on the basis of runaway flux modelling are introduced and examples of estimation are given. (author)

  6. Investigation of a High Head Francis Turbine at Runaway Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag Trivedi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic turbines exhibit total load rejection during operation because of high fluctuations in the grid parameters. The generator reaches no-load instantly. Consequently, the turbine runner accelerates to high speed, runaway speed, in seconds. Under common conditions, stable runaway is only reached if after a load rejection, the control and protection mechanisms both fail and the guide vanes cannot be closed. The runner life is affected by the high amplitude pressure loading at the runaway speed. A model Francis turbine was used to investigate the consequences at the runaway condition. Measurements and simulations were performed at three operating points. The numerical simulations were performed using standard k-ε, k-ω shear stress transport (SST and scale-adaptive simulation (SAS models. A total of 12.8 million hexahedral mesh elements were created in the complete turbine, from the spiral casing inlet to the draft tube outlet. The experimental and numerical analysis showed that the runner was subjected to an unsteady pressure loading up to three-times the pressure loading observed at the best efficiency point. Investigates of unsteady pressure pulsations at the vaneless space, runner and draft tube are discussed in the paper. Further, unsteady swirling flow in the blade passages was observed that was rotating at a frequency of 4.8-times the runaway runner angular speed. Apart from the unsteady pressure loading, the development pattern of the swirling flow in the runner is discussed in the paper.

  7. Successes and Problems of Conventional Breakdown Theory of Sprites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasko, V. P.

    2004-12-01

    Sprite phenomenon is one of the most frequently observed forms of transient luminous events occurring at mesospheric/lower ionospheric altitudes, which is directly related to the lightning activity in underlying thunderstorms [Sentman et al., GRL, 22, 1205, 1995]. In this talk we will provide overview of conventional breakdown theory of sprites, which is build on original ideas advanced by C.T.R. Wilson [Wilson, Proc. Phys. Soc. Lond., 37, 32D, 1925]. We will discuss similarity properties of electrical discharges as a function of gas pressure and a selected set of results of recent laboratory studies of filamentary channels of ionization (termed streamers) [e.g., van Veldhuizen et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 30, 162, 2002; Yi and Williams, J. Phys. D. Appl. Phys., 35, 205, 2002], which are directly applicable for understanding of high spatial resolution imagery of sprites revealing many internal filamentary features with transverse spatial scales ranging from tens to a few hundreds of meters [Gerken and Inan, JASTP, 65, 567, 2003]. The specific set of features, which can be successfully explained by existing conventional theory of sprites and which we will discuss in this talk, include: (1) sprite halos [Barrington-Leigh et al., 106, 1741, 2001]; (2) the observed diffuse and streamer regions of sprites [Pasko and Stenbaek-Nielsen, GRL, 29, 1440, doi:10.1029/2001GL014241, 2002]; (3) the observed ELF radiation from sprites [Cummer et al., GRL, 25, 1281, 1998; Pasko et al., GRL, 25, 3493, 1998]; (4) the observed spatial transverse scales of streamers in sprites; (5) the observed high-speed vertical development of sprites; and (6) the detections of short bursts of blue emissions from sprites (see [Liu and Pasko, JGR, 109, A04301, doi:10.1029/2003JA010064, 2004] for experimental references and recent modeling results pertaining to items (4), (5) and (6)). The talk will be concluded with a discussion of a set of unsolved problems in exiting sprite theory, which include

  8. dc breakdown conditioning and breakdown rate of metals and metallic alloys under ultrahigh vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Descoeudres, A; Calatroni, S; Taborelli, M; Wuensch, W

    2009-01-01

    RF accelerating structures of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) require a material capable of sustaining high electric field with a low breakdown rate and low induced damage. Because of the similarity of many aspects of DC and RF breakdown, a DC breakdown study is underway at CERN in order to test candidate materials and surface preparations, and have a better understanding of the breakdown mechanism under ultra-high vacuum in a simple setup. Conditioning speeds and breakdown fields of several metals and alloys have been measured. The average breakdown field after conditioning ranges from 100 MV/m for Al to 850 MV/m for stainless steel, and is around 170 MV/m for Cu which is the present base-line material for CLIC structures. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. The presence of a thin cuprous oxide film at the surface of copper electrodes significantly increases the breakdown field. On the other hand, the conditioning speed of Mo is improved by removing oxides at t...

  9. Comparison of thermal runaway limits under different test conditions based on a 4.5 kV IGBT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Prindle, D.; Pâques, Gontran

    2016-01-01

    runaway takes place. In this paper guidelines are proposed based on the correlation among short circuit withstand capability and off-state leakage current for guarantying reliable operation and ensuring that they are thermally stable under parameter variations. This study is helpful to facilitate...... application engineers for defining the correct stability criteria and/or margins in respect of thermal runaway....

  10. Effect of magnetic fluctuations on the confinement and dynamics of runaway electrons in the HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, R.J.; Hu, L.Q.; Li, E.Z.; Xu, M.; Zhong, G.Q.; Xu, L.Q.; Lin, S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental results in the HT-7 tokamak indicated significant losses of runaway electrons due to magnetic fluctuations, but the loss processes did not only rely on the fluctuation amplitude. Efficient radial runaway transport required that there were no more than small regions of the plasma volume in which there was very low transport of runaways. A radial runaway diffusion coefficient of D_r ≈ 10 m"2s"-"1 was derived for the loss processes, and diffusion coefficient near the resonant magnetic surfaces and shielding factor ϒ = 0.8 were deduced. Test particle equations were used to analyze the effect of magnetic fluctuations on runaway dynamics. It was found that the maximum energy that runaways can gain is very sensitive to the value of a_s. a_s = (0.28 - 0.33) was found for the loss processes in the experiment, and maximum runaway energy could be controlled in the range of E = (4 MeV - 6 MeV) in this case. Additionally, to control the maximum runaway energy below 5 MeV, the normalized electric field needed to be under a critical value D_a = 6.8, and the amplitude normalized magnetic fluctuations b tilde needed to be at least of the order of b tilde ≈ 3 x 10"-"5. (author)

  11. Onset of Conduct Disorder, Use of Delinquent Subsistence Strategies, and Street Victimization among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojin; Thrane, Lisa; Whitbeck, Les B.; Johnson, Kurt D.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effects of childhood-onset conduct disorder on later antisocial behavior and street victimization among a group of homeless and runaway adolescents. Four hundred twenty-eight homeless and runaway youth were interviewed directly on the streets and in shelters from four Midwestern states. Key findings include the following.…

  12. Do cosmic ray air showers initiate lightning? : A statistical analysis of cosmic ray air showers and lightning mapping array data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hare, B. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Winner, L. H.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Caicedo, J. A.; Wilkes, R. A.; Carvalho, F. L.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T. K.; Gamerota, W. R.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    It has been argued in the technical literature, and widely reported in the popular press, that cosmic ray air showers (CRASs) can initiate lightning via a mechanism known as relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA), where large numbers of high-energy and low-energy electrons can, somehow,

  13. 45 CFR 1351.13 - What are the Federal and non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant? 1351.13 Section 1351.13 Public Welfare Regulations... SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.13 What are the Federal and non...

  14. Three-dimensional supersonic vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional supersonic vortex-breakdown problems in bound and unbound domains are solved. The solutions are obtained using the time-accurate integration of the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The computational scheme is an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. Two vortex-breakdown applications are considered in the present paper. The first is for a supersonic swirling jet which is issued from a nozzle into a supersonic uniform flow at a lower Mach number than that of the swirling jet. The second is for a supersonic swirling flow in a configured circular duct. In the first application, an extensive study of the effects of grid fineness, shape and grid-point distribution on the vortex breakdown is presented. Four grids are used in this study and they show a substantial dependence of the breakdown bubble and shock wave on the grid used. In the second application, the bubble-type and helix-type vortex breakdown have been captured.

  15. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  16. Electrical breakdown of water in microgaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbach, Karl; Kolb, Juergen; Xiao Shu; Katsuki, Sunao; Minamitani, Yasushi; Joshi, Ravindra

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and modeling studies on electrical breakdown in water in submillimeter gaps between pin and plane electrodes have been performed. Prebreakdown, breakdown and recovery of the water gaps were studied experimentally by using optical and electrical diagnostics with a temporal resolution on the order of one nanosecond. By using Mach-Zehnder interferometry, the electric field distribution in the prebreakdown phase was determined by means of the Kerr effect. Electric fields values in excess of the computed electric fields, which reach >4 MV cm -1 for applied electrical pulses of 20 ns duration, were recorded at the tip of the pin electrode, an effect which can be explained by a reduced permittivity of water at high electric fields. Breakdown of the gaps, streamer-to-arc transition, was recorded by means of high-speed electrical diagnostics, and through high-speed photography. It was shown, through simulations, that breakdown is initiated by field emission at the interface of preexisting microbubbles. Impact ionization within the micro-bubble's gas then contributes to plasma development. Experiments using pulse-probe methods and Schlieren diagnostics allowed us to follow the development of the disturbance caused by the breakdown over a time of more than milliseconds and to determine the recovery time of a water switch. In order to trigger water switches a trigger electrode with a triple point has been utilized. The results of this research have found application in the construction of compact pulse power generators for bioelectric applications.

  17. Modelling Venting and Pressure Build-up in a 18650 LCO Cell during Thermal Runaway (ABSTRACT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu; Veje, Christian; White, Ralph

    Li-ion batteries are a very popular type of electric storage devices that possess high energy density when compared to the other battery chemistries. Due to this property, when operating under abusive conditions such as high ambient temperature, the batteries can experience thermal runaway, which...... may lead to fires and explosions. To prevent this, it is therefore important to model thermal runaway considering different events such as venting and the pressure development inside the battery cell, which makes the main purpose of this paper. A model consisting of the different decomposition....... By fitting the activation energies, and measuring experimentally the mass of the ejecta during thermal runaway, the model is compared and validated against an extensive experiment performed by Golukbov et al. [1] during oven heating. When analysing the results, it is found that by including the venting...

  18. Big-Data-Based Thermal Runaway Prognosis of Battery Systems for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichao Hong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A thermal runaway prognosis scheme for battery systems in electric vehicles is proposed based on the big data platform and entropy method. It realizes the diagnosis and prognosis of thermal runaway simultaneously, which is caused by the temperature fault through monitoring battery temperature during vehicular operations. A vast quantity of real-time voltage monitoring data is derived from the National Service and Management Center for Electric Vehicles (NSMC-EV in Beijing. Furthermore, a thermal security management strategy for thermal runaway is presented under the Z-score approach. The abnormity coefficient is introduced to present real-time precautions of temperature abnormity. The results illustrated that the proposed method can accurately forecast both the time and location of the temperature fault within battery packs. The presented method is flexible in all disorder systems and possesses widespread application potential in not only electric vehicles, but also other areas with complex abnormal fluctuating environments.

  19. On the relativistic large-angle electron collision operator for runaway avalanches in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embréus, O.; Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.

    2018-02-01

    Large-angle Coulomb collisions lead to an avalanching generation of runaway electrons in a plasma. We present the first fully conservative large-angle collision operator, derived from the relativistic Boltzmann operator. The relation to previous models for large-angle collisions is investigated, and their validity assessed. We present a form of the generalized collision operator which is suitable for implementation in a numerical kinetic equation solver, and demonstrate the effect on the runaway-electron growth rate. Finally we consider the reverse avalanche effect, where runaways are slowed down by large-angle collisions, and show that the choice of operator is important if the electric field is close to the avalanche threshold.

  20. A Thermal Runaway Simulation on a Lithium Titanate Battery and the Battery Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the electrochemical and thermal model, a coupled electro-thermal runaway model was developed and implemented using finite element methods. The thermal decomposition reactions when the battery temperature exceeds the material decomposition temperature were embedded into the model. The temperature variations of a lithium titanate battery during a series of charge-discharge cycles under different current rates were simulated. The results of temperature and heat generation rate demonstrate that the greater the current, the faster the battery temperature is rising. Furthermore, the thermal influence of the overheated cell on surrounding batteries in the module was simulated, and the variation of temperature and heat generation during thermal runaway was obtained. It was found that the overheated cell can induce thermal runaway in other adjacent cells within 3 mm distance in the battery module if the accumulated heat is not dissipated rapidly.

  1. Evaluation of runaway-electron effects on plasma-facing components for NET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, H.; Calén, H.

    1991-03-01

    Runaway electrons which are generated during disruptions can cause serious damage to plasma facing components in a next generation device like NET. A study was performed to quantify the response of NET plasma facing components to runaway-electron impact. For the determination of the energy deposition in the component materials Monte Carlo computations were performed. Since the subsurface metal structures can be strongly heated under runaway-electron impact from the computed results damage threshold values for the thermal excursions were derived. These damage thresholds are strongly dependent on the materials selection and the component design. For a carbonmolybdenum divertor with 10 and 20 mm carbon armour thickness and 1 degree electron incidence the damage thresholds are 100 MJ/m 2 and 220 MJ/m 2. The thresholds for a carbon-copper divertor under the same conditions are about 50% lower. On the first wall damage is anticipated for energy depositions above 180 MJ/m 2.

  2. The OB run-away stars from Sco-Cen and Orion reviewed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaauw, A.

    1989-01-01

    The author studies the past paths of the run-away star Zeta Oph from the OB association Sco-Cen, and of the run-away stars AE Aur, Mu Col and 53 Ari from the OB association Ori OB1, in connection with the question of the origin of these high velocities. Should the binary-hypothesis be adhered to (supernova explosion of one of the components) or, perhaps, dynamical evolution in young, dense clusters offer a clue to this phenomenon? It is shown that the latter hypothesis is very unlikely to apply to Zeta Oph. For the run-away stars from Orion conclusive evidence may well be obtained in the course of the next decade, from improved accuracy of the proper motions

  3. Numerical study of the generation of runaway electrons in a gas diode with a hot channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisenkov, V. V., E-mail: lisenkov@iep.uran.ru [Institute of Electrophysics UrB RAS, 106 Amundsena St., Ekaterinburg 620012 (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 19 Mira St., Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation); Shklyaev, V. A., E-mail: shklyaev@to.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SD RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    A new method for increasing the efficiency of runaway electron beam generation in atmospheric pressure gas media has been suggested and theoretically proved. The method consists of creating a hot region (e.g., a spark channel or a laser plume) with a decreased numerical density of gas molecules (N) near the cathode. In this method, the ratio E/N (E—electric field strength) is increased by decreasing N instead of increasing E, as has been done in the past. The numerical model that is used allows the simultaneous calculation of the formation of a subnanosecond gas discharge and the generation of runaway electrons in gas media. The calculations have demonstrated the possibility of obtaining current pulses of runaway electrons with amplitudes of hundred of amperes and durations of more than 100 ps. The influence of the hot channel geometry on the parameters of the generated beam has been investigated.

  4. Predicted space motions for hypervelocity and runaway stars: proper motions and radial velocities for the Gaia Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bromley, Benjamin C., E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Rm 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We predict the distinctive three-dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10 kpc, unbound stars are rare; proper motions alone rarely isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. At large distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS and runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g ≲ 20 stars with Gaia should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.

  5. A kinetic model for runaway electrons in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garcia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrodynamic models and measurements with satellites and incoherent scatter radars predict large field aligned current densities on one side of the auroral arcs. Different authors and different kinds of studies (experimental or modeling agree that the current density can reach up to hundreds of µA/m2. This large current density could be the cause of many phenomena such as tall red rays or triggering of unstable ion acoustic waves. In the present paper, we consider the issue of electrons moving through an ionospheric gas of positive ions and neutrals under the influence of a static electric field. We develop a kinetic model of collisions including electrons/electrons, electrons/ions and electrons/neutrals collisions. We use a Fokker-Planck approach to describe binary collisions between charged particles with a long-range interaction. We present the essential elements of this collision operator: the Langevin equation for electrons/ions and electrons/electrons collisions and the Monte-Carlo and null collision methods for electrons/neutrals collisions. A computational example is given illustrating the approach to equilibrium and the impact of the different terms (electrons/electrons and electrons/ions collisions on the one hand and electrons/neutrals collisions on the other hand. Then, a parallel electric field is applied in a new sample run. In this run, the electrons move in the z direction parallel to the electric field. The first results show that all the electron distribution functions are non-Maxwellian. Furthermore, runaway electrons can carry a significant part of the total current density, up to 20% of the total current density.

  6. A kinetic model for runaway electrons in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garcia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrodynamic models and measurements with satellites and incoherent scatter radars predict large field aligned current densities on one side of the auroral arcs. Different authors and different kinds of studies (experimental or modeling agree that the current density can reach up to hundreds of µA/m2. This large current density could be the cause of many phenomena such as tall red rays or triggering of unstable ion acoustic waves. In the present paper, we consider the issue of electrons moving through an ionospheric gas of positive ions and neutrals under the influence of a static electric field. We develop a kinetic model of collisions including electrons/electrons, electrons/ions and electrons/neutrals collisions. We use a Fokker-Planck approach to describe binary collisions between charged particles with a long-range interaction. We present the essential elements of this collision operator: the Langevin equation for electrons/ions and electrons/electrons collisions and the Monte-Carlo and null collision methods for electrons/neutrals collisions. A computational example is given illustrating the approach to equilibrium and the impact of the different terms (electrons/electrons and electrons/ions collisions on the one hand and electrons/neutrals collisions on the other hand. Then, a parallel electric field is applied in a new sample run. In this run, the electrons move in the z direction parallel to the electric field. The first results show that all the electron distribution functions are non-Maxwellian. Furthermore, runaway electrons can carry a significant part of the total current density, up to 20% of the total current density.

  7. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy library for the Martian environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousin, A.; Forni, O.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry the first Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy experiment in space: ChemCam. We have developed a laboratory model which mimics ChemCam's main characteristics. We used a set of target samples relevant to Mars geochemistry, and we recorded individual spectra. We propose a data reduction scheme for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy data incorporating de-noising, continuum removal, and peak fitting. Known effects of the Martian atmosphere are confirmed with our experiment: better Signal-to-Noise Ratio on Mars compared to Earth, narrower peak width, and essentially no self-absorption. The wavelength shift of emission lines from air to Mars pressure is discussed. The National Institute of Standards and Technology vacuum database is used for wavelength calibration and to identify the elemental lines. Our Martian database contains 1336 lines for 32 elements: H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ar, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Cs, Ba, and Pb. It is a subset of the National Institute of Standards and Technology database to be used for Martian geochemistry. Finally, synthetic spectra can be built from the Martian database. Correlation calculations help to distinguish between elements in case of uncertainty. This work is used to create tools and support data for the interpretation of ChemCam results. - Highlights: ► Chemcam: first Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy technique on Mars. ► Creation of a LIBS specific database to ChemCam on Mars. ► Data reduction scheme is proposed. ► Best signal under Martian conditions. ► LIBS emission lines database: subset of NIST database for Martian geochemistry.

  8. Impact of Machine Breakdowns on Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwaruddin Tanwari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the machine breakdowns and their impact on the total productivity for the FMCGs (Fast Moving Consumer Goods industry because higher productivity rate is important factor on which the customer services largely depend in this competitive business world. This paper also suggests that the machine breakdowns and other related problems within the plant are due to improper care, keeping the plant operative for twenty four hours a day, seven days a week without any break and lack of management\\'s concentration towards these issues. These break-downs results in un-timely closure of the plant and very poor production performance is achieved in the plant that affects the service level at great level. Realising the importance of maintenance in improving productivity and service, an attempt has been made in this paper to study the scope of maintenance with the help of a case study.

  9. The Electrical Breakdown of Thin Dielectric Elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakaria, Shamsul Bin; Morshuis, Peter H. F.; Yahia, Benslimane Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Dielectric elastomers are being developed for use in actuators, sensors and generators to be used in various applications, such as artificial eye lids, pressure sensors and human motion energy generators. In order to obtain maximum efficiency, the devices are operated at high electrical fields....... This increases the likelihood for electrical breakdown significantly. Hence, for many applications the performance of the dielectric elastomers is limited by this risk of failure, which is triggered by several factors. Amongst others thermal effects may strongly influence the electrical breakdown strength....... In this study, we model the electrothermal breakdown in thin PDMS based dielectric elastomers in order to evaluate the thermal mechanisms behind the electrical failures. The objective is to predict the operation range of PDMS based dielectric elastomers with respect to the temperature at given electric field...

  10. NASA Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Stefanie M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements.

  11. Project management strategies for prototyping breakdowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granlien, Maren Sander; Pries-Heje, Jan; Baskerville, Richard

    2009-01-01

    , managing the explorative and iterative aspects of prototyping projects is not a trivial task. We examine the managerial challenges in a small scale prototyping project in the Danish healthcare sector where a prototype breakdown and project escalation occurs. From this study we derive a framework...... of strategies for coping with escalation in troubled prototyping projects; the framework is based on project management triangle theory and is useful when considering how to manage prototype breakdown and escalation. All strategies were applied in the project case at different points in time. The strategies led...

  12. Control of leading edge vortex breakdown by blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, K. D.; Iwanski, K. P.; Nelson, R. C.; Ng, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation into the effects of using a jet of air to control the vortex breakdown position on a 70 degree delta wing is presented. The specific objectives focused on optimizing the blowing positions in terms of maximum lift increments obtained for minimum blowing rates. The tests were conducted at chord Reynolds numbers of 150,000, 200,000, and 250,000 at angles of incidence of 30 and 35 degrees. Visualization and force data is presented to show the effect of the jet on the wing aerodynamic characteristics. The results indicate a jet position located at and aligned parallel to the leading edge to be the optimum. Nearness to the apex and tangency to the upper surface were also crucial factors. The influence of the jet on the leading edge vortex structure was examined using laser Doppler anemometry. Velocity surveys through the vortex showed that at high blowing rates the parallel velocity in the outer swirling region of the vortex increased and the normal velocity decreased. This resulted in a decrease in the swirling angle in the outer region. The peak core velocity was reduced and the vortex breakdown was delayed.

  13. Structure of a swirling jet with vortex breakdown and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaborin, D. K.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    An experimental investigation is performed in order to compare the time-averaged spatial structure of low- and high-swirl turbulent premixed lean flames by using the particle image velocimetry and spontaneous Raman scattering techniques. Distributions of the time-average velocity, density and concentration of the main components of the gas mixture are measured for turbulent premixed swirling propane/air flames at atmospheric pressure for the equivalence ratio Φ = 0.7 and Reynolds number Re = 5000 for low- and high-swirl reacting jets. For the low-swirl jet (S = 0.41), the local minimum of the axial mean velocity is observed within the jet center. The positive value of the mean axial velocity indicates the absence of a permanent recirculation zone, and no clear vortex breakdown could be determined from the average velocity field. For the high-swirl jet (S = 1.0), a pronounced vortex breakdown took place with a bubble-type central recirculation zone. In both cases, the flames are stabilized in the inner mixing layer of the jet around the central wake, containing hot combustion products. O2 and CO2 concentrations in the wake of the low-swirl jet are found to be approximately two times smaller and greater than those in the recirculation zone of the high-swirl jet, respectively.

  14. Measurement of runaway electron energy distribution function during high-Z gas injection into runaway electron plateaus in DIII-Da)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmann, E. M. [University of California—San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093, USA; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Commaux, N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA; Eidietis, N. W. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Moyer, R. A. [University of California—San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093, USA; Shiraki, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA; Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas—Austin, 2100 San Jacinto Blvd, Austin, Texas 78712, USA; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186, USA; Rudakov, D. L. [University of California—San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093, USA

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of the runaway electron (RE) energy distribution function fεfε during massive gas injection into centered post-disruption runaway electron plateaus has been reconstructed. Overall, fεfε is found to be much more skewed toward low energy than predicted by avalanche theory. The reconstructions also indicate that the RE pitch angle θ is not uniform, but tends to be large at low energies and small θ ~0.1–0.2 at high energies. Overall power loss from the RE plateau appears to be dominated by collisions with background free and bound electrons, leading to line radiation. However, the drag on the plasma current appears to be dominated by collisions with impurity ions in most cases. Synchrotron emission appears not to be significant for overall RE energy dissipation but may be important for limiting the peak RE energy.

  15. Measurement of runaway electron energy distribution function during high-Z gas injection into runaway electron plateaus in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Rudakov, D. L.; Parks, P. B.; Eidietis, N. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Austin, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of the runaway electron (RE) energy distribution function f ε during massive gas injection into centered post-disruption runaway electron plateaus has been reconstructed. Overall, f ε is found to be much more skewed toward low energy than predicted by avalanche theory. The reconstructions also indicate that the RE pitch angle θ is not uniform, but tends to be large at low energies and small θ ∼ 0.1–0.2 at high energies. Overall power loss from the RE plateau appears to be dominated by collisions with background free and bound electrons, leading to line radiation. However, the drag on the plasma current appears to be dominated by collisions with impurity ions in most cases. Synchrotron emission appears not to be significant for overall RE energy dissipation but may be important for limiting the peak RE energy

  16. A Model for the Onset of Vortex Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, K.

    1996-01-01

    A large body of information exists on the breakdown of incompressible streamwise vortices. Less is known about vortex breakdown at high speeds. An interesting example of supersonic vortex breakdown is the breakdown induced by the interaction of vortices with shock waves. The flow in supersonic engine inlets and over high-speed delta wings constitute technologically important examples of this phenomenon, which is termed 'shock-induced vortex breakdown'. In this report, we propose a model to predict the onset of shock-induced vortex breakdown. The proposed model has no adjustable constants, and is compared to both experiment and computation. The model is then extended to consider two other problems: the breakdown of a free compressible vortex, and free incompressible vortex breakdown. The same breakdown criterion is used in all three problems to predict the onset of breakdown. Finally, a new breakdown map is proposed that allows the simultaneous comparison of data from flows ranging from incompressible breakdown to breakdown induced by a shock wave.

  17. Spontaneous symmetry breakdown in gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scadron, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamical theory of spontaneous breakdown correctly predicts the bound states and relates the order parameters of electron-photon superconductivity and quark-gluon chiral symmetry. A similar statement cannot be made for the standard electro-weak gauge symmetry. (author)

  18. Investigation of multipactor breakdown in communication satellite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Multipactor breakdown or multipactor discharge is a form of high frequency discharge that may occur in microwave components operating at very low pressures. Some RF components of multi-channel communication satellites have co-axial geometry and handle high RF power under near-vacuum conditions.

  19. Breakdown and bad luck in Biblis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randow, G. von.

    1994-01-01

    Five minor breakdowns within a month have heated up the dispute between the ministries of the environment of the Federation and the Land of Hesse. Biblis A is to be shut down at all costs. As yet, however, the Hessian Ministry of the Environment has not solved the question of how to compensate the power cut. (DG) [de

  20. Electrical breakdown phenomena of dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

    years. However, optimization with respect to the dielectric permittivity solely may lead to other problematic phenomena such as premature electrical breakdown. In this work, we focus on the chloro propyl functionalized silicone elastomers prepared in Madsen et al[2] and we investigate the electrical...

  1. Fear of breakdown and the unlived life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2014-04-01

    Winnicott's Fear of breakdown is an unfinished work that requires that the reader be not only a reader, but also a writer of this work which often gestures toward meaning as opposed to presenting fully developed ideas. The author's understanding of the often confusing, sometimes opaque, argument of Winnicott's paper is as follows. In infancy there occurs a breakdown in the mother-infant tie that forces the infant to take on, by himself, emotional events that he is unable to manage. He short-circuits his experience of primitive agony by generating defense organizations that are psychotic in nature, i.e., they substitute self-created inner reality for external reality, thus foreclosing his actually experiencing critical life events. By not experiencing the breakdown of the mother-infant tie when it occurred in infancy, the individual creates a psychological state in which he lives in fear of a breakdown that has already happened, but which he did not experience. The author extends Winnicott's thinking by suggesting that the driving force of the patient's need to find the source of his fear is his feeling that parts of himself are missing and that he must find them if he is to become whole. What remains of his life feels to him like a life that is mostly an unlived life. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  2. Numerical Borehole Breakdown Investigations using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhuis, Sven; Leonhart, Dirk; Meschke, Günther

    2016-04-01

    During pressurization of a wellbore a typical downhole pressure record shows the following regimes: first the applied wellbore pressure balances the reservoir pressure, then after the compressive circumferential hole stresses are overcome, tensile stresses are induced on the inside surface of the hole. When the magnitude of these stresses reach the tensile failure stress of the surrounding rock medium, a fracture is initiated and propagates into the reservoir. [1] In standard theories this pressure, the so called breakdown pressure, is the peak pressure in the down-hole pressure record. However experimental investigations [2] show that the breakdown did not occur even if a fracture was initiated at the borehole wall. Drilling muds had the tendency to seal and stabilize fractures and prevent fracture propagation. Also fracture mechanics analysis of breakdown process in mini-frac or leak off tests [3] show that the breakdown pressure could be either equal or larger than the fracture initiation pressure. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the breakdown process in reservoir rock, numerical investigations using the extended finite element method (XFEM) for hydraulic fracturing of porous materials [4] are discussed. The reservoir rock is assumed to be pre-fractured. During pressurization of the borehole, the injection pressure, the pressure distribution and the position of the highest flux along the fracture for different fracturing fluid viscosities are recorded and the influence of the aforementioned values on the stability of fracture propagation is discussed. [1] YEW, C. H. (1997), "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing", Gulf Publishing Company [2] MORITA, N.; BLACK, A. D.; FUH, G.-F. (1996), "Borehole Breakdown Pressure with Drilling Fluids". International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 33, pp. 39-51 [3] DETOURNAY, E.; CARBONELL, R. (1996), "Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Breakdown Process in Minifrac or Leakoff Test", Society of Petroleum

  3. How to prevent runaways in trickle-bed reactors for Pygas hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Kronberg, Alexandre E.

    2002-01-01

    In the past, several runaways have occurred in Trickle-Bed Reactors (TBR) used for the hydrogenation of pyrolysis gasoline as produced in ethylene cracking installations. This phenomenon has been studied in the framework of a special program in the Netherlands, which is administered by the National

  4. Predictors of Substance Use and Family Therapy Outcome among Physically and Sexually Abused Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Gangamma, Rashmi

    2006-01-01

    There is a dearth of research that examines the impact of family systems therapy on problems among sexually and/or physically abused youth. Given this void, differential outcome and predictors of substance use change were evaluated for abused, as compared with nonabused, runaway adolescents who were randomly assigned to family therapy or treatment…

  5. Constructing the Runaway Youth Problem: Boy Adventurers to Girl Prostitutes, 1960-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Karen M.

    2003-01-01

    Examines, using a qualitative case study of stories printed in "The New York Times," the social construction of "runaway youth" in print media during 1960-1978. Finds that running away was an unconstructed problem (or simmering social condition) in the early 1960s and featured harmless adventures. Contributes to the…

  6. On the Absence of Non-thermal X-Ray Emission around Runaway O Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toalá, J. A. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Oskinova, L. M. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical models predict that the compressed interstellar medium around runaway O stars can produce high-energy non-thermal diffuse emission, in particular, non-thermal X-ray and γ -ray emission. So far, detection of non-thermal X-ray emission was claimed for only one runaway star, AE Aur. We present a search for non-thermal diffuse X-ray emission from bow shocks using archived XMM-Newton observations for a clean sample of six well-determined runaway O stars. We find that none of these objects present diffuse X-ray emission associated with their bow shocks, similarly to previous X-ray studies toward ζ Oph and BD+43°3654. We carefully investigated multi-wavelength observations of AE Aur and could not confirm previous findings of non-thermal X-rays. We conclude that so far there is no clear evidence of non-thermal extended emission in bow shocks around runaway O stars.

  7. Mental Disorders, Comorbidity, and Postrunaway Arrests among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojin; Thrane, Lisa; Whitbeck, Les B.; Johnson, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the associations between lifetime mental disorder, comorbidity, and self-reported postrunaway arrests among 428 (187 males, 241 females) homeless and runaway youth. The analysis examined the pattern of arrests across five lifetime mental disorders (alcohol abuse, drug abuse, conduct disorder, major depressive episode, and…

  8. Runaway and thermally safe operation of a nitric acid oxidation in a semi-batch reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woezik, B.A.A.

    2000-01-01

    A number of serious accidents has occurred due to a runaway reaction of a heterogeneous liquid-liquid reaction whereby a secondary side reaction was triggered. A basic lack of proper knowledge of all the phenomena, occurring in such a system, is one of the prime causes that may lead to overheating

  9. Halting a Runaway Train: Reforming Teacher Pensions for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to public-sector pensions, writes lead author Michael B. Lafferty in this report, "A major public-policy (and public-finance) problem has been defined and measured, debated and deliberated, but not yet solved. Except where it has been." As recounted in "Halting a Runaway Train: Reforming Teacher Pensions for the 21st…

  10. Analyses of electron runaway in front of the negative streamer channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2017-01-01

    X-and γ-ray emissions, observed in correlation with negative leaders of lightning and long sparks of high-voltage laboratory experiments, are conventionally connected with the bremsstrahlung of high-energy runaway electrons (REs). Here we extend a focusing mechanism, analyzed in our previous paper...

  11. Evaluation of a Peer-Led Drug Abuse Risk Reduction Project for Runaway/Homeless Youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Stuart W.; Jarvis, Sara

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates the Drug Prevention in Youth risk reduction program that was implemented in shelters for runaway/homeless youths in the southeastern United States. An evaluation strategy was developed allowing for comparisons between peer-led, adult-led and nonintervention groups. Well-trained and motivated peer/near-peer leaders made particularly…

  12. Using Amines and Alkanes as Thermal-Runaway Retardants for Lithium-Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yang

    Thermal runaway imposes major challenges to large-scale lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The working temperature of a LIB is usually around room temperature. However, upon mechanical abuse such as an impact or nail penetration, LIB cell components may fail and internal short circuits could be formed. As a result, a series of exothermic electrochemical reactions and decompositions would take place and the local temperature can rapidly increase. In this thesis, a few novel techniques are investigated to mitigate thermal runaway of LIBs. Mechanically triggered approach has been employed. Thermal-runaway retardant (TRR) is encapsulated in mechanically responsive packages made of materials inert to the battery environment, and upon external mechanical loadings the packages can be broken apart and release the TRR. This mechanism allows for the use of aggressive chemicals to suppress the short circuit discharge and reduce the subsequent exothermic phenomena, immediately after the battery is damaged even before temperature increase begins. The best TRR candidates are identified to be amines and alkanes. Among amines, secondary amines and tertiary amines perform better than primary amines. The reduction in electrolyte ionic conductivity and the displacement of electrolyte are the thermal-runaway-mitigation mechanisms of the secondary and the tertiary amines, respectively. Pentadecane is the best candidate among the alkanes under investigation, with the major working mechanism being electrolyte displacement. Impact tests on large pouch cells and high-energy battery chemistry were also performed; the results were quite encouraging.

  13. On-line runaway detection in batch reactors using chaos theory techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strozzi, F.; Strozzi, F.; Zaldivar, J.M.; Zaldivar, J.M.; Kronberg, Alexandre E.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    In this work nonlinear time-series analysis using delay coordinate embedding was applied to simulated temperature data from isoperibolic batch reactors to develop an early-warning detection system of the runaway. In the first part of this study an early-warning detection criterion, that is, when the

  14. Models of the circumstellar medium of evolving, massive runaway stars moving through the Galactic plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, D.M.-A.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.; Gvaramadze, V.V.; Mignone, A.; Izzard, R.G.; Kaper, L.

    2014-01-01

    At least 5 per cent of the massive stars are moving supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM) and are expected to produce a stellar wind bow shock. We explore how the mass-loss and space velocity of massive runaway stars affect the morphology of their bow shocks. We run two-dimensional

  15. Collisions Between Single Stars in Dense Clusters: Runaway Formation of a Massive Object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitag, M.; Gürkan, M.A.; Rasio, F.A.

    2007-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo codes, we follow the collisional evolution of clusters in a variety of scenarios. We consider the conditions under which a cluster of main-sequence stars may undergo rapid core collapse due to mass segregation, thus entering a phase of runaway collisions, forming a very massive

  16. Can Cell to Cell Thermal Runaway Propagation be Prevented in a Li-ion Battery Module?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Judith; Lopez, Carlos; Orieukwu, Josephat

    2014-01-01

    Increasing cell spacing decreased adjacent cell damage center dotElectrically connected adjacent cells drained more than physically adjacent cells center dotRadiant barrier prevents propagation when fully installed between BP cells center dotBP cells vent rapidly and expel contents at 100% SOC -Slower vent with flame/smoke at 50% -Thermal runaway event typically occurs at 160 degC center dotLG cells vent but do not expel contents -Thermal runaway event typically occurs at 200 degC center dotSKC LFP modules did not propagate; fuses on negative terminal of cell may provide a benefit in reducing cell to cell damage propagation. New requirement in NASA-Battery Safety Requirements document: JSC 20793 Rev C 5.1.5.1 Requirements - Thermal Runaway Propagation a. For battery designs greater than a 80-Wh energy employing high specific energy cells (greater than 80 watt-hours/kg, for example, lithium-ion chemistries) with catastrophic failure modes, the battery shall be evaluated to ascertain the severity of a worst-case single-cell thermal runaway event and the propensity of the design to demonstrate cell-to-cell propagation in the intended application and environment. NASA has traditionally addressed the threat of thermal runaway incidents in its battery deployments through comprehensive prevention protocols. This prevention-centered approach has included extensive screening for manufacturing defects, as well as robust battery management controls that prevent abuse-induced runaway even in the face of multiple system failures. This focused strategy has made the likelihood of occurrence of such an event highly improbable. b. The evaluation shall include all necessary analysis and test to quantify the severity (consequence) of the event in the intended application and environment as well as to identify design modifications to the battery or the system that could appreciably reduce that severity. In addition to prevention protocols, programs developing battery designs with

  17. A computational study of the taxonomy of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are presented. The solutions show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown. Common features between bubble-type and spiral-type breakdown are identified and the role of flow stagnation and the critical state are discussed as complimentary ideas describing the initiation of breakdown.

  18. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-01-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ∼5 × 10 10 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  19. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ˜5 × 1010 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  20. On the synchrotron emission in kinetic simulations of runaway electrons in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal, L.; del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2017-12-01

    Developing avoidance or mitigation strategies of runaway electrons (REs) in magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) plasmas is of crucial importance for the safe operation of ITER. In order to develop these strategies, an accurate diagnostic capability that allows good estimates of the RE distribution function in these plasmas is needed. Synchrotron radiation (SR) of RE in MCF, besides of being one of the main damping mechanisms for RE in the high energy relativistic regime, is routinely used in current MCF experiments to infer the parameters of RE energy and pitch angle distribution functions. In the present paper we address the long standing question about what are the relationships between different REs distribution functions and their corresponding synchrotron emission simultaneously including: full-orbit effects, information of the spectral and angular distribution of SR of each electron, and basic geometric optics of a camera. We study the spatial distribution of the SR on the poloidal plane, and the statistical properties of the expected value of the synchrotron spectra of REs. We observe a strong dependence of the synchrotron emission measured by the camera on the pitch angle distribution of runaways, namely we find that crescent shapes of the spatial distribution of the SR as measured by the camera relate to RE distributions with small pitch angles, while ellipse shapes relate to distributions of runaways with larger the pitch angles. A weak dependence of the synchrotron emission measured by the camera with the RE energy, value of the q-profile at the edge, and the chosen range of wavelengths is observed. Furthermore, we find that oversimplifying the angular dependence of the SR changes the shape of the synchrotron spectra, and overestimates its amplitude by approximately 20 times for avalanching runaways and by approximately 60 times for mono-energetic distributions of runaways1.

  1. Electrical breakdown studies with Mycalex insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.

    2003-01-01

    Insulating materials such as alumina and glass-bonded mica (Mycalex) are used in accelerator systems for high voltage feedthroughs, structural supports, and barriers between high voltage insulating oil and the vacuum beam pipe in induction accelerator cells. Electric fields in the triple points should be minimized to prevent voltage breakdown. Mechanical stress can compromise seals and result in oil contamination of the insulator surface. We have tested various insulator cleaning procedures including ultrasonic cleaning with a variety of aqueous-based detergents, and manual scrubbing with various detergents. Water sheeting tests were used to determine the initial results of the cleaning methods. Ultimately, voltage breakdown tests will be used to quantify the benefits of these cleaning procedures

  2. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF 6 . The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs

  3. Supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    An extensive computational study of supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown in a configured circular duct is presented. The unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used. The NS equations are solved for the quasi-axisymmetric flows using an implicit, upwind, flux difference splitting, finite volume scheme. The quasi-axisymmetric solutions are time accurate and are obtained by forcing the components of the flowfield vector to be equal on two axial planes, which are in close proximity of each other. The effect of Reynolds number, for laminar flows, on the evolution and persistence of vortex breakdown, is studied. Finally, the effect of swirl ration at the duct inlet is investigated.

  4. Breakdown Studies for the CLIC Accelerating

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, S; Kovermann, J; Taborelli, M; Timko, H; Wuensch, W; Durabekova, F; Nordlund, K; Pohjonen, A; Kuronen, A

    2010-01-01

    Optimizing the design and the manufacturing of the CLIC RF accelerating structures for achieving the target value of breakdown rate at the nominal accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m requires a detailed understanding of all the steps involved in the mechanism of breakdown. These include surface modification under RF fields, electron emission and neutral evaporation in the vacuum, arc ignition and consequent surface modification due to plasma bombardment. Together with RF tests, experiments are conducted in a simple DC test set-up instrumented with electrical diagnostics and optical spectroscopy. The results are also used for validating simulations which are performed using a wide range of numerical tools (MD coupled to electrostatic codes, PIC plasma simulations) able to include all the above phenomena. Some recent results are presented in this paper

  5. Bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barba Orellana, Francisco Jose; Nikmaram, Nooshin; Roohinejad, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects, and are mainly found in cruciferous plants. After ingestion, glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. However, the largest fraction is metabolized ...... the bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products. This review paper summarizes the assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability....

  6. Topology hidden behind the breakdown of adiabaticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, L.-B.; Chen, S.-G.

    2005-01-01

    For classical Hamiltonian systems, the adiabatic condition may fail at some critical points. However, the breakdown of the adiabatic condition does not always cause the adiabatic evolution to be destroyed. In this paper, we suggest a supplemental condition of the adiabatic evolution for the fixed points of classical Hamiltonian systems when the adiabatic condition breaks down at the critical points. As an example, we investigate the adiabatic evolution of the fixed points of a classical Hamiltonian system which has a number of applications

  7. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  8. Breakdown localization in the fixed gap system

    CERN Document Server

    Rajamaki, Robin; Wuensch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Accurate localization of breakdowns in vacuum could help shed light on breakdown related processes that are not yet fully understood. At the DC spark lab at CERN, an instrument called the Fixed Gap System (FGS) has been developed partially for this purpose. Among other things, the FGS has four built-in antennas, which are intended for breakdown localization. The capability of this aspect of the FGS was explored in this report. Specifically, the feasibility of using a method similar to that which is used in cavity Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) was investigated. The usable frequency range of the current experimental setup was also studied. Firstly, a modal analysis of the inner geometry of the FGS was done in HFSS. This showed that the two first modes to be expected in the spark gap quite differ from those of the ideal pillbox – both in field pattern and in frequency ( 4 and 6 GHz vs. 0.2 and 3 GHz). Secondly, S-parameters of the system were measured. These showed that the coupling between antennas is weak...

  9. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Dispersion of breakdown voltage of liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Itaru; Noguchi, Takuya

    1978-01-01

    As for the electrical insulation characteristics of liquid helium, the discrepancy among the measured values by each person is very large even in the fundamental DC breakdown voltage in uniform electric field. The dispersion of experimental values obtained in the experiments by the same person is also large. Hereafter, the difference among the mean values obtained by each experimenter will be referred to as ''deviation of mean values'', and the dispersion of measured values around the mean value obtained by the same person as ''deviation around the man value''. The authors have mainly investigated on the latter experimentally. The cryostat was made of stainless steel, and the innermost helium chamber was of 500 mm I.D. and approximately 1200 mm deep. The high voltage electrode was of brass sphere of 25 mm diameter, and the low voltage electrode was of brass plate. The experiment was conducted for liquid helium boiling at 4.2 K and 1 atm, and the breakdown voltage and time lag were measured by applying the approximately square wave impulses of fast rise and long tail, ramp and DC voltages. The cause of the deviation of mean values may be the presence of impurity particles or the effect of electrode shape. As for the deviation around the mean value, the dispersion is large, and its standard deviation may amount to 10 to 20% of the man value. The dispersion is not due to the statistical time lag, but is due to parameters that vary with breakdown. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. Conceptual design of the Radial Gamma Ray Spectrometers system for α particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nocente, Massimo; Tardocchi, Marco; Barnsley, Robin

    2017-01-01

    We here present the principles and main physics capabilities behind the design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers (RGRS) system for alpha particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER. The diagnostic benefits from recent advances in gamma-ray spectrometry for tokamak plasmas and combines...... the measurements sensitive to α particles at characteristic resonant energies and to possible anisotropies of their slowing down distribution function. An independent assessment of the neutron rate by gamma-ray emission is also feasible. In case of runaway electrons born in disruptions with a typical duration...... of 100ms, a time resolution of at least 10ms for runaway electron studies can be achieved depending on the scenario and down to a current of 40 kA by use of external gas injection. We find that the bremsstrahlung spectrum in the MeV range from confined runaways is sensitive to the electron velocity space...

  12. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  13. Comparative Studies of High-Gradient Rf and Dc Breakdowns

    CERN Document Server

    Kovermann, Jan Wilhelm; Wuensch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC project is based on normal-conducting high-gradient accelerating structures with an average accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m. The maximum achievable gradient in these structures is limited by the breakdown phenomenon. The physics of breakdowns is not yet fully understood quantitatively. A full knowledge could have strong impact on the design, material choice and construction of rf structures. Therefore, understanding breakdowns has great importance to reaching a gradient of 100MV/m with an acceptable breakdown probability. This thesis addresses the physics underlying the breakdown effect, focusing on a comparison of breakdowns in rf structures and in a dc spark setup. The dc system is simpler, easier to benchmark against simulations, with a faster turnaround time, but the relationship to rf breakdown must be established. To do so, an experimental approach based on optical diagnostics and electrical measurements methods was made. Following an introduction into the CLIC project, a general theoretical ...

  14. Anomalous resistivity due to low-frequency turbulence. [of collisionless plasma with limited acceleration of high velocity runaway electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, H. L.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Large amplitude ion cyclotron waves have been observed on auroral field lines. In the presence of an electric field parallel to the ambient magnetic field these waves prevent the acceleration of the bulk of the plasma electrons leading to the formation of a runaway tail. It is shown that low-frequency turbulence can also limit the acceleration of high-velocity runaway electrons via pitch angle scattering at the anomalous Doppler resonance.

  15. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  16. Microstructural Analysis of the Effects of Thermal Runaway on Li-Ion and Na-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finegan, Donal [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robinson, James B. [University College London; Heenan, Thomas M. M. [University College London; Smith, Katherine [Sharp Laboratories of Europe; Kendrick, Emma [Sharp Laboratories of Europe; University College London; Brett, Daniel J. L. [University College London; Shearing, Paul R. [University College London

    2017-12-06

    Thermal runaway is a phenomenon that occurs due to self-sustaining reactions within batteries at elevated temperatures resulting in catastrophic failure. Here, the thermal runaway process is studied for a Li-ion and Na-ion pouch cells of similar energy density (10.5 Wh, 12 Wh, respectively) using accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC). Both cells were constructed with a z-fold configuration, with a standard shutdown separator in the Li-ion and a low-cost polypropylene (PP) separator in the Na-ion. Even with the shutdown separator, it is shown that the self-heating rate and rate of thermal runaway in Na-ion cells is significantly slower than that observed in Li-ion systems. The thermal runaway event initiates at a higher temperature in Na-ion cells. The effect of thermal runaway on the architecture of the cells is examined using X-ray microcomputed tomography, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to examine the failed electrodes of both cells. Finally, from examination of the respective electrodes, likely due to the carbonate solvent containing electrolyte, it is suggested that thermal runaway in Na-ion batteries (NIBs) occurs via a similar mechanism to that reported for Li-ion cells.

  17. Family functioning and mental health in runaway youth: association with posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sanna J; Cochran, Gerald; Barczyk, Amanda N

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the direct effects of physical and sexual abuse, neglect, poor family communication and worries concerning family relationships, depression, anxiety, and dissociation on posttraumatic stress symptoms. Runaway youth were recruited from emergency youth shelters in New York and Texas. Interviews were completed with 350 youth who averaged 15 years of age. Structural equation modeling was used to examine family functioning, maltreatment, depression, dissociation, and anxiety in relation to posttraumatic stress symptoms. Results indicated that direct effects of family relationship worry to dissociation, β = .77, p family communication and youth dissociation, β = .42, p stress symptoms, but depression was not. Findings underscore the critical role of family relationships in mental health symptoms experienced by runaway adolescents. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  18. Measurement of the internal magnetic fluctuation by the transport of runaways on J-TEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Jiang, Z. H.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chen, Z. P.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The measurement of internal magnetic fluctuation is important for the study of transport in tokamak plasmas. The runaway electron transport induced by the sawtooth crash can be used to obtain the internal magnetic fluctuation. Inversed sawtooth-like activities on hard x-ray (HXR) fluxes following sawtooth activities were observed after the application of electrode biasing on J-TEXT tokamak. The runaway diffusion coefficient D{sub r} is deduced to be about 30 m{sup 2}/s according to the time delay of HXR flux peaks to the sawtooth crashes. The averaged value of normalized magnetic fluctuation in the discharges with electrode biasing was increased to the order of 1 × 10{sup −4}.

  19. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour after ITER transient heat loads and runaway electrons action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylev, B., E-mail: boris.bazylev@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Igitkhanov, Yu.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loarte, A. [ITER Organisation, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-10-01

    Beryllium is foreseen as plasma facing armour for the first wall (FW) in ITER in form of Be-clad blanket modules in macrobrush design with brush size about 8-10 cm. In ITER significant heat loads during transient events (TE) and runaway electrons impact are expected at the main chamber wall that may leads to the essential damage of the Be armour. The main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting, evaporation, and melt motion, which determine the life-time of the plasma facing components. The melt motion damages of Be macrobrush armour caused by the tangential friction force and the J x B forces are analyzed for bulk Be and different sizes of Be-brushes. The damage of the FW due to heat loads caused by runaway electrons is numerically simulated.

  20. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour after ITER transient heat loads and runaway electrons action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B.; Igitkhanov, Yu.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Loarte, A.

    2011-01-01

    Beryllium is foreseen as plasma facing armour for the first wall (FW) in ITER in form of Be-clad blanket modules in macrobrush design with brush size about 8-10 cm. In ITER significant heat loads during transient events (TE) and runaway electrons impact are expected at the main chamber wall that may leads to the essential damage of the Be armour. The main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting, evaporation, and melt motion, which determine the life-time of the plasma facing components. The melt motion damages of Be macrobrush armour caused by the tangential friction force and the J x B forces are analyzed for bulk Be and different sizes of Be-brushes. The damage of the FW due to heat loads caused by runaway electrons is numerically simulated.

  1. The energy spectrum of the 'runaway' electrons from a high voltage pulsed discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruset, C.

    1985-01-01

    Some experimental results are presented on the influence of the pressure upon the energy spectrum of the runaway electrons generated into a pulsed high voltage argon discharge. These electrons enter a state of continuous acceleration between two collisions with rapidly increasing free path. The applied discharge current varies from 10 to 300 A, the pulse time is about 800 ns. Relativistic effects are taken into consideration. Theoretical explanation is based on the pnenomenon of electron spreading on plasma oscillations. (D.Gy.)

  2. Hydrodynamic simulations of a combined hydrogen, helium thermonuclear runaway on a 10-km neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    We have used a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic stellar-evolution computer code to evolve a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen rich envelope of a 1.0M, 10-km neutron star. Our simulation produced an outburst which lasted about 2000 sec and peak effective temperature was 3 keV. The peak luminosity exceeded 2 x 10 5 L. A shock wave caused a precursor in the light curve which lasted 10 -5 sec

  3. The historical record for Sirius - Evidence for a white-dwarf thermonuclear runaway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Kondo, Yoji; Sion, Edward M.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence was recently presented that in medieval times Sirius was a bright red star, rather than the present bluish-white star. Here, the results of attempts to detect possible planetary nebula ejecta toward Sirius using data obtained by the IUE are presented. Based on these results and in the light of recent advances in understanding white-dwarf evolution, it is proposed that Sirius B underwent a recent thermonuclear runaway event triggered by a diffusion-induced CN reaction.

  4. Magnetic field effects on runaway electron energy deposition in plasma facing materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemer, K.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports magnetic field effects on runaway electron energy deposition in plasma facing materials and components is investigated using the Integrated TIGER Series. The Integrated TIGER Series is a set of time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes which perform photon and electron transport, with or without macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. A three-dimensional computational model of 100 MeV electrons incident on a graphite block was used to simulate runawayelectrons striking a plasma facing component at the edge of a tokamak. Results show that more energy from runaway electrons will be deposited in a material that is in the presence of a magnetic field than in a material that is in the presence of no field. For low angle incident runaway electrons in a strong magnetic field, the majority of the increased energy deposition is near the material surface with a higher energy density. Electrons which would have been reflected with no field, orbit the magnetic field lines and are redeposited in the material surface, resulting in a substantial increase in surface energy deposition. Based on previous studies, the higher energy deposition and energy density will result in higher temperatures which are expected to cause more damage to a plasma facing component

  5. Study of runaway electrons using dosimetry of hard x-ray radiations in Damavand tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasouli, C.; Pourshahab, B.; Rasouli, H. [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, PO Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Orouji, T. [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, PO Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this work several studies have been conducted on hard x-ray emissions of Damavand tokamak based on radiation dosimetry using the Thermoluminescence method. The goal was to understand interactions of runaway electrons with plasma particles, vessel wall, and plasma facing components. Total of 354 GR-200 (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) crystals have been placed on 118 points – three TLDs per point – to map hard x-ray radiation doses on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Results show two distinctive levels of x-ray radiations doses on the exterior of the vessel. The low-dose area on which measured dose is about 0.5 mSv/shot. In the low-dose area there is no particular component inside the vessel. On the contrary, on high-dose area of the vessel, x-ray radiations dose exceeds 30 mSv/shot. The high-dose area coincides with the position of limiters, magnetic probe ducts, and vacuum vessel intersections. Among the high-dose areas, the highest level of dose is measured in the position of the limiter, which could be due to its direct contact with the plasma column and with runaway electrons. Direct collisions of runaway electrons with the vessel wall and plasma facing components make a major contribution for production of hard x-ray photons in Damavand tokamak.

  6. Measurements of fluctuations in the flux of runaway electrons to the PLT limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D.

    1982-07-01

    Fluctuations in the flux of runaway electrons to the limiter have been measured during many PLT discharges. Oscillations at 60, 120, and 720 Hz are driven by variations in the vertical magnetic field which moves the plasma major radius. Fluctuations are seen in the range of 2 → 20 kHz due to MHD magnetic islands which extend to the plasma surface. A continuous spectrum of fluctuations is observed up to 200 kHz which correlates with drift-wave turbulence. The magnitude of the driven fluctuations can be used to measure transport properties of the runaway electrons. The amplitude of electron motion due to the MHD and drift-wave oscillations, and hence a measure of the radial size of the instability, can be determined as a function of frequency. The slope of the frequency power spectrum of the drift-wave-induced fluctuations steepens with increasing runaway electron drift orbit displacement during the current drop at the end of the discharge, and as the power in the MHD oscillations increases. A magnetic probe was used to confirm the presence of oscillating magnetic fields capable of perturbing the electron orbits

  7. High performance gamma-ray spectrometer for runaway electron studies on the FT-2 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevelev, A.E., E-mail: Shevelev@cycla.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Khilkevitch, E.M.; Lashkul, S.I.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Altukhov, A.B.; Chugunov, I.N.; Doinikov, D.N.; Esipov, L.A.; Gin, D.B.; Iliasova, M.V.; Naidenov, V.O.; Nersesyan, N.S.; Polunovsky, I.A.; Sidorov, A.V. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kiptily, V.G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon X14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-11

    A gamma-ray spectrometer based on LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator has been used for measurements of hard X-ray emission generated by runaway electrons in the FT-2 tokamak plasmas. Using of the fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) has allowed extending count rate range of the spectrometer by a factor of 10. A developed digital processing algorithm of the detector signal recorded with a digitizer sampling rate of 250 MHz has provided a pulse height analysis at count rates up to 10{sup 7} s{sup −1}. A spectrum deconvolution code DeGaSum has been applied for inferring the energy distribution of runaway electrons escaping from the plasma and interacting with materials of the FT-2 limiter in the vacuum chamber. The developed digital signal processing technique for LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) spectrometer has allowed studying the evolution of runaways energy distribution in the FT-2 plasma discharges with time resolution of 1–5 ms.

  8. Healthcare Barriers and Utilization Among Adolescents and Young Adults Accessing Services for Homeless and Runaway Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelvakumar, Gayathri; Ford, Nancy; Kapa, Hillary M; Lange, Hannah L H; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Bonny, Andrea E

    2017-06-01

    Homeless and runaway youth are at disproportionate risk for adverse health outcomes. Many barriers to accessing healthcare have been documented; however, the relative impact of discrete barriers on homeless youth healthcare utilization behavior is not firmly established. We administered a survey examining reported barriers and healthcare utilization among adolescents and young adults accessing services at three community centers for homeless and runaway youth. Of 180 respondents, 57 % were male, 80 % non-White, and 21 % identified as a sexual minority. Stepwise logistic regression models, controlling for age and study site, explored associations between barriers and 3 healthcare utilization outcomes (doctor visit in past 12 months; regular care provider; frequent emergency department (ED) visits). The most commonly reported barriers were "don't have a ride" (27.2 %), "no insurance" (23.3 %), and "costs too much" (22.8 %). All fear-based barriers (e.g., "I don't trust the doctors") were reported by runaway youth as the impact of discrete barriers varies depending on outcome of focus.

  9. Intense microwave pulse propagation through gas breakdown plasmas in a waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    High-power microwave pulse-compression techniques are used to generate 2.856 GHz pulses which are propagated in a TE 10 mode through a gas filled section of waveguide, where the pulses interact with self-generated gas-breakdown plasmas. Pulse envelopes transmitted through the plasmas, with duration varying from 2 ns to greater than 1 μs, and peak powers of a few kW to nearly 100 MW, are measured as a function of incident pulse and gas pressure for air, nitrogen, and helium. In addition, the spatial and temporal development of the optical radiation emitted by the breakdown plasmas are measured. For transmitted pulse durations ≥ 100 ns, good agreement is found with both theory and existing measurements. For transmitted pulse duration as short as 2 ns (less than 10 rf cycles), a two-dimensional model is used in which the electrons in the plasma are treated as a fluid whose interactions with the microwave pulse are governed by a self-consistent set of fluid equations and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. The predictions of this model for air are compared with the experimental results over a pressure range of 0.8 torr to 300 torr. Good agreement is obtained above about 1 torr pressure, demonstrating that microwave pulse propagation above the breakdown threshold can be accurately modeled on this time scale. 63 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs

  10. A Cost Model for Air Force Institute of Technology Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    Patterson AFB OH, September 1977. ADA 047662. 16. Horngren , Charles T. Cost Accounting , A Managerial Emphasis. Englewood Cliffs NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc...25 S . Categorical Breakdown of AFIT Cost Matrix ....... .................. . 26 6. Elemental Breakdown of AFIT Direct Cost Category...maximum use of existing data sources such as the Air Force Accounting System for Operations. Justification for Research In past years, cost studies

  11. Need for spontaneous breakdown of chiral symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomone, A.; Schechter, J.; Tudron, T.

    1981-01-01

    The question of whether the chiral symmetry of the theory of strong interactions (with massless quarks) is required to be spontaneously broken is examined in the framework of a previously discussed effective Lagrangian for quantum chromodynamics. The assumption that physical masses of the theory be finite leads in a very direct way to the necessity of spontaneous breakdown. This result holds for all N/sub F/> or =2, where N/sub F/ is the number of different flavors of light quarks. The atypical cases N/sub F/ = 1,2 are discussed separately

  12. Criteria for vacuum breakdown in rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.; Faehl, R.J.; Kadish, A.; Thode, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    A new high-voltage scaling based on Kilpatrick's criterion is presented that suggests that voltages more than twice the Kilpatrick limit can be obtained with identical initial conditions of vacuum and surface cleanliness. The calculations are based on the experimentally observed decrease in secondary electron emission with increasing ion-impact energy above 100 keV. A generalized secondary-emission package has been developed to simulate actual cavity dynamics in conjunction with our 2 1/2-dimensional fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code CEMIT. The results are discussed with application to the suppression of vacuum breakdown in rf accelerator devices

  13. On spontaneous breakdown in Σ-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    The group theory aspects of spontaneous breakdown in linear Σ-models are discussed. General conditions are formulated under which multiplet of group G (compact or noncompact) is suitable for constructing the Σ-model with a given subgroup of stability of vacuum. It is shown that the Σ-models of spontaneously broken space-time symmetries can be constructed in general only if some extra coordinates are introduced in addition to an ordinary 4-coordinate xsub(μ). The connection between Σ-models of internal symmetries and appropriate nonlinear realizations has also been investigated

  14. Ergodicity breakdown and scaling from single sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalashyan, Armen K. [Center for Nonlinear Science, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 311427, Denton, TX 76203-1427 (United States); Buiatti, Marco [Laboratoire de Neurophysique et Physiologie, CNRS UMR 8119 Universite Rene Descartes - Paris 5 45, rue des Saints Peres, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France); Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit - INSERM U562, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DRM/DSV, 4 Place du general Leclerc, 91401 Orsay Cedex (France); Grigolini, Paolo [Center for Nonlinear Science, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 311427, Denton, TX 76203-1427 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' - Universita di Pisa and INFM, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto dei Processi Chimico, Fisici del CNR Area della Ricerca di Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: grigo@df.unipi.it

    2009-01-30

    In the ergodic regime, several methods efficiently estimate the temporal scaling of time series characterized by long-range power-law correlations by converting them into diffusion processes. However, in the condition of ergodicity breakdown, the same methods give ambiguous results. We show that in such regime, two different scaling behaviors emerge depending on the age of the windows used for the estimation. We explain the ambiguity of the estimation methods by the different influence of the two scaling behaviors on each method. Our results suggest that aging drastically alters the scaling properties of non-ergodic processes.

  15. Ergodicity breakdown and scaling from single sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashyan, Armen K.; Buiatti, Marco; Grigolini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In the ergodic regime, several methods efficiently estimate the temporal scaling of time series characterized by long-range power-law correlations by converting them into diffusion processes. However, in the condition of ergodicity breakdown, the same methods give ambiguous results. We show that in such regime, two different scaling behaviors emerge depending on the age of the windows used for the estimation. We explain the ambiguity of the estimation methods by the different influence of the two scaling behaviors on each method. Our results suggest that aging drastically alters the scaling properties of non-ergodic processes.

  16. Numerical simulation and physical aspects of supersonic vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.; Kandil, O. A.; Kandil, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    Existing numerical simulations and physical aspects of subsonic and supersonic vortex-breakdown modes are reviewed. The solution to the problem of supersonic vortex breakdown is emphasized in this paper and carried out with the full Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flows. Numerical simulations of vortex-breakdown modes are presented in bounded and unbounded domains. The effects of different types of downstream-exit boundary conditions are studied and discussed.

  17. Pressurized-helium breakdown at very low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metas, R J

    1972-06-01

    An investigation of the electrical-breakdown behavior of helium at very low temperatures has been carried out to assist the design and development of superconducting power cables. At very high densities, both liquid and gaseous helium showed an enhancement in electric strength when pressurized to a few atmospheres; conditioned values of breakdown fields then varied between 30 and 45 MV/m. Breakdown processes occurring over a wide range of helium densities are discussed. 24 references.

  18. Measurement of skeletal muscle collagen breakdown by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, B F; Ellis, D; Robinson, M M

    2011-01-01

    Exercise increases the synthesis of collagen in the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle. Breakdown of skeletal muscle collagen has not yet been determined because of technical limitations. The purpose of the present study was to use local sampling to determine skeletal muscle collagen breakdown...... collagen breakdown 17–21 h post-exercise, and our measurement of OHP using GC–MS was in agreement with traditional assays....

  19. Analysis on X-band structure breakdown at GLCTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehara, T.; Sanuki, T.; Komamiya, S.; Higo, T.; Hayano, H.; Terunuma, N.; Saeki, T.; Watanabe, K.; Hayakawa, A.; Tsukada, Y.

    2004-01-01

    We have built a new monitoring system for accelerator structure breakdown in the X-band high-gradient test facility at KEK (GLCTA: Global Linear Collider Test Accelerator). An X-band test structure KX01 (made by KEK) has been processed at GLCTA and we have been collecting data for about 3 months using this breakdown monitoring system. We describe overview of the monitoring system and preliminary result of breakdown analysis of the structure. (author)

  20. Breakdown of highly excited oxygen in a DC electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, N.P.; Ionin, A.A.; Klimachev, Yu.M.; Sinitsin, D.V.; Yuryshev, N.N.; Deryugin, A.A.; Kochetov, I.V.; Napartovich, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    The breakdown of oxygen in a dc electric field is studied. A high concentration of oxygen molecules in the a 1 Δ g excited state is obtained in a purely chemical reactor. A decrease in the breakdown voltage at degrees of excitation exceeding 50% is observed. The theoretical decrement in the breakdown voltage obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation is in good agreement with the experimental data

  1. Studies of RF Breakdown of Metals in Dense Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanlet, Pierrick M; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Johnson, Rolland P; Kaplan, Daniel; Kuchnir, Moyses; Moretti, Alfred; Paul, Kevin; Popovic, Milorad; Yarba, Victor; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    A study of RF breakdown of metals in gases has begun as part of a program to develop RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas to be used for muon ionization cooling. A pressurized 800 MHz test cell has been used at Fermilab to compare the conditioning and breakdown behavior of copper, molybdenum, chromium, and beryllium electrodes as functions of hydrogen and helium gas density. These results are compared to the predicted or known RF breakdown behavior of these metals in vacuum.

  2. Vortex breakdown in a cylinder with a rotating bottom and a flat stress-free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, E.; Bontoux, P.

    2007-01-01

    Vortex breakdown and transition to time-dependent regimes are investigated in a cylinder (H/R = 4) with a rotating disk and a free-surface. The aim of this study is to show how, by changing upstream conditions it is possible to alter on the flow, particularly the vortex breakdown process. The understanding of such effects on vortex breakdown is very useful in the development of a control strategy in order to intensify or remove the phenomenon. The flow dynamics are explored through numerical solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations based on high-order spectral approximations. The use of a flat, stress-free model for the air/water interface is shown to be entirely satisfactory at least for moderate Reynolds numbers. A particular interest of these results is to show how the bubble related to the vortex breakdown becomes attached to the free-surface and grows in diameter as the Reynolds number is increased, Re ≥ 2900. Such a phenomenon removes the cylindrical vortex core upstream of the breakdown which is usually included in classical theories based on idealized models of vortex flows. The flow is shown to be unstable to three-dimensional perturbations for sufficiently large rotation rates. The bifurcated state takes the form of a k = 3 rotating wave at Re = 3000. The existence of the free-surface promotes the onset of periodicity, with a critical Reynolds number about 15% lower than in the case with a rigid cover. Moreover, the successive bifurcations occur over a much shorter range of Reynolds numbers and lead rapidly to a multi-frequency regime with more than five different frequencies. In the unsteady regime, the vortex breakdown is characterized by an elongated, asymmetric recirculation zone, attached to the free-surface and precessing around the axis of the container. By increasing the rotation, the circular stagnation line on the free-surface takes a more irregular form and starts to move around the axis of the cylinder in the same sense as

  3. Numerical simulation of a precessing vortex breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochmann, P.; Sinigersky, A.; Hehle, M.; Schaefer, O.; Koch, R.; Bauer, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the results of time-dependent numerical predictions of a turbulent symmetry breaking vortex breakdown in a realistic gas turbine combustor. The unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations are solved by using the k-ε two-equation model as well as by a full second-order closure using the Reynolds stress model of Speziale, Sarkar and Gatski (SSG). The results for a Reynolds number of 5.2 x 10 4 , a swirl number of 0.52 and an expansion ratio of 5 show that the flow is emerging from the swirler as a spiral gyrating around a zone of strong recirculation which is also asymmetric and precessing. These flow structures which are typical for the spiral type (S-type) vortex breakdown have been confirmed by PIV and local LDA measurements in a corresponding experimental setup. Provided that high resolution meshes are employed the calculations with both turbulence models are capable to reproduce the spatial and temporal dynamics of the flow

  4. Microemulsion systems applied to breakdown petroleum emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuma de Castro Dantas, Tereza; Avelino Dantas Neto, Afonso; Ferreira Moura, Everlane [Deptos de Quimica e Eng. Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitario s/n, 59072.970, Natal/RN Campinas (Brazil)

    2001-12-29

    Microemulsion systems obtained using commercial surfactants with demulsifier and emulsion prevention properties have been employed to break down Brazilian crude water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions. These crude oils were supplied by the Brazilian oil company-PETROBRAS-and were characterized by the different Balance sheet of Sediment and Water (BSW) values of 48%, 36%, and 32%. The microemulsion systems formed in this study were composed of an aqueous phase (HCl 5.2% solution); an oil phase (toluene); a cosurfactant/surfactant (C/S) phase (isopropyl alcohol (C)/surfactants (S) with a ratio C/S of 9.0). The microemulsion efficiency to break down oil emulsions was evaluated by a direct contact method between the microemulsions and crude (W/O) emulsions. The Scheffe net statistical planning for mixtures was used to relate the component mass fractions to the relative breakdown of petroleum emulsions. The best composition of the microemulsion system for the complete breakdown of oil emulsions with high BSW values had the lowest C/S phase percentage.

  5. Second harmonic electron cyclotron breakdown in stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; England, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    In linear wave-particle interaction models, the coupling between cold electrons and microwaves with frequency equal to twice the electron gyrofrequency is so weak that the ionization of a significant number of neutral hydrogen atoms would seem impossible in practical applications. However, the non-linear interaction of a cold electron with the wave is very large if the electron becomes trapped near resonance in a shallow, static magnetic well. A model has been developed to describe the breakdown of a neutral gas when these non-linear interactions are considered, and it is in reasonable agreement with the limited amount of available experimental data. For gas pressures that are too large, electron-neutral collisions inhibit the non-linear interaction and prevent breakdown. For gas pressures that are too low, the growth rate of the free electron population is limited because electrons capable of causing ionization are lost before suffering a collision with a neutral. Quantitative growth rate predictions are presented for stellarators, and formulae for rough estimates are given. (author)

  6. Electrical strength of vacuum gap at repetitive breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinin, N.P.; Chistyakov, N.P.

    1983-01-01

    The investigation of repetitive pulse breakdown of vacuum space, which electrodes have been subjected to various treatment in vacuum and inert gas, is carried out. In case of electrode warm-up in vacuum up to 400 deg C as well as electronic heating up to 900 deg C the voltage in case of repetitive breakdown hasncreased approximately twice and in case of a through treatment, which is accomplished by a high-current glow discharge in inert gas, the maximum high voltage in case of the first breakdown at repetitive breakdown has decreased by 30...40%, remaining 2-3 times higher than in the first case

  7. Conceptual design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers system for α particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Barnsley, R.; Bertalot, L.; Brichard, B.; Croci, G.; Brolatti, G.; Di Pace, L.; Fernandes, A.; Giacomelli, L.; Lengar, I.; Moszynski, M.; Krasilnikov, V.; Muraro, A.; Pereira, R. C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rigamonti, D.; Rebai, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Salewski, M.; Santosh, P.; Sousa, J.; Zychor, I.; Gorini, G.

    2017-07-01

    We here present the principles and main physics capabilities behind the design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers (RGRS) system for alpha particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER. The diagnostic benefits from recent advances in gamma-ray spectrometry for tokamak plasmas and combines space and high energy resolution in a single device. The RGRS system as designed can provide information on α ~ particles on a time scale of 1/10 of the slowing down time for the ITER 500 MW full power DT scenario. Spectral observations of the 3.21 and 4.44 MeV peaks from the 9\\text{Be}≤ft(α,nγ \\right){{}12}\\text{C} reaction make the measurements sensitive to α ~ particles at characteristic resonant energies and to possible anisotropies of their slowing down distribution function. An independent assessment of the neutron rate by gamma-ray emission is also feasible. In case of runaway electrons born in disruptions with a typical duration of 100 ms, a time resolution of at least 10 ms for runaway electron studies can be achieved depending on the scenario and down to a current of 40 kA by use of external gas injection. We find that the bremsstrahlung spectrum in the MeV range from confined runaways is sensitive to the electron velocity space up to E≈ 30 -40 MeV, which allows for measurements of the energy distribution of the runaway electrons at ITER.

  8. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq W A; Atif M; Tawfik W; Alsalhi M S; Alahmed Z A; Sarfraz M; Singh J P

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria. (plasma technology)

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of femtosecond laser-induced gas breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, J.; Bruneau, S.; Sentis, M.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma generated by the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with gas has been analyzed using time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The laser beam has been focused with a microscope objective into different gases (air, Ar, He) at pressures ranging from 10 2 to 10 5 Pa. From the analysis of spectral line emission from ions and neutral atoms, the plasma parameters and the plasma composition have been determined as a function of time and space. Furthermore, the generation of fast electrons and/or VUV radiation by the femtosecond laser interaction with the gas was brought to the fore. From the time- and space-evolution of the plasma parameters, a rough estimation of initial values of electron density and refraction index in the focal volume has been performed. These results are compared to analysis of the laser beam transmitted by the plasma. The latter show that only a small fraction of the laser energy is absorbed by the plasma while the spatial distribution of the transmitted laser beam is strongly perturbed by the plasma, which acts like a defocusing lens. However, in ambient helium, the plasma defocusing is weak due to the high ionization potential of helium. The understanding of femtosecond laser-induced gas breakdown is useful for process optimization in femtosecond laser applications like micromachining or surface microanalysis, etc

  10. Robust AIC with High Breakdown Scale Estimate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokrya Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Akaike Information Criterion (AIC based on least squares (LS regression minimizes the sum of the squared residuals; LS is sensitive to outlier observations. Alternative criterion, which is less sensitive to outlying observation, has been proposed; examples are robust AIC (RAIC, robust Mallows Cp (RCp, and robust Bayesian information criterion (RBIC. In this paper, we propose a robust AIC by replacing the scale estimate with a high breakdown point estimate of scale. The robustness of the proposed methods is studied through its influence function. We show that, the proposed robust AIC is effective in selecting accurate models in the presence of outliers and high leverage points, through simulated and real data examples.

  11. Vortex breakdown in simple pipe bends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Jesse; Shin, Sangwoo; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Pipe bends and elbows are one of the most common fluid mechanics elements that exists. However, despite their ubiquity and the extensive amount of research related to these common, simple geometries, unexpected complexities still remain. We show that for a range of geometries and flow conditions, these simple flows experience unexpected fluid dynamical bifurcations resembling the bubble-type vortex breakdown phenomenon. Specifically, we show with simulations and experiments that recirculation zones develop within the bends under certain conditions. As a consequence, fluid and particles can remain trapped within these structures for unexpectedly-long time scales. We also present simple techniques to mitigate this recirculation effect which can potentially have impact across industries ranging from biomedical and chemical processing to food and health sciences.

  12. Development of Electrical Breakdown in Transformer Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Kudelcik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Power transformers are key equipment for transfer and distribution of the electric power. Considering the significance of the power transformers in the electric system, their price and possible damages occurred by accidents, it is necessary to pay attention to their higher prevention. To prevent failure states of transformers, we perform different types ofmeasurements. They shall illustrate a momentary state of the measured equipment and if necessary to draw attention in advance to changes of parameters, which have specific relationship to no-failure operation of the equipment. The conditions under which breakdown of composite liquid/ solid insulation can occur, e.g. in transformer, play an important role in designing such insulation. The liquid, mainly mineral oil, generally constitutes the weakest part of insulation and a great amount of work has been devoted to the study of streamers, which appear in the gaseous phase, and most often are triggering the failure of insulation.

  13. Junction depth dependence of breakdown in silicon detector diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, G.A.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Greenwood, N.M.; Lucas, A.D.; Munday, D.J.; Pritchard, T.W.; Robinson, D.; Wilburn, C.D.; Wyllie, K.

    1996-01-01

    The high voltage capability of detector diodes fabricated in the planar process is limited by the high field generated at the edge of the junction.We have fabricated diodes with increased junction depth with respect to our standard process and find a significantly higher breakdown voltage,in reasonable agreement with previous studies of junction breakdown. (orig.)

  14. Breakdown Breakthrough: NREL Finds Easier Ways to Deconstruct Biomass |

    Science.gov (United States)

    News | NREL Breakdown Breakthrough: NREL Finds Easier Ways to Deconstruct Biomass Breakdown Breakthrough: NREL Finds Easier Ways to Deconstruct Biomass May 22, 2018 Roman Brunecky (left), Yannick Bomble soften biomass. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL If there's an easier, more efficient method, science will

  15. Simulation of a three-dimensional vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.; Menne, Stefan

    1989-01-01

    The breakdown of a vortex flow in a tube is studied for a slightly diverging tube by means of a numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for a quasi-stationary, incompressible, laminar flow. Numerical results are compared to experiments of Faler and Leibovich. The numerical data display features similar to the experimental results concerning breakdown conditions, location, and structure.

  16. Formation of vortex breakdown in conical–cylindrical cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Diego Alves de Moro; Souza, Francisco José de; Salvo, Ricardo de Vasconcelos

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Rotating flows in conical–cylindrical cavities were simulated via an in-house code using unstructured meshes. • The vortex breakdown phenomenon was verified in the geometries analyzed. • The influence of Stewartson and Bödewadt layers was observed in the vortex breakdown formation. • A curve of stability and number of breakdowns was obtained as a function of Reynolds number. • Spiral vortex breakdown was observed in some situations. - Abstract: Numerical simulations in confined rotating flows were performed in this work, in order to verify and characterize the formation of the vortex breakdown phenomenon. Cylindrical and conical–cylindrical geometries, both closed, were used in the simulations. The rotating flow is induced by the bottom wall, which rotates at constant angular velocity. Firstly the numerical results were compared to experimental results available in references, with the purpose to verify the capacity of the computational code to predict the vortex breakdown phenomenon. Further, several simulations varying the parameters which govern the characteristics of the flows analyzed in this work, i.e., the Reynolds number and the aspect ratio, were performed. In these simulations, the limits for the transitional regime and the vortex breakdown formation were verified. Steady and transient cases, with and without turbulence modeling, were simulated. In general, some aspects of the process of vortex breakdown in conical–cylindrical geometries were observed to be different from that in cylinders

  17. Electric field measurements in moving ionization fronts during plasma breakdown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaars, E.; Bowden, M.D.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed time-resolved, direct measurements of electric field strengths in moving ionization fronts during the breakdown phase of a pulsed plasma. Plasma breakdown, or plasma ignition, is a highly transient process marking the transition from a gas to a plasma. Some aspects of plasma

  18. Quasiparticle Breakdown in a Quantum Spin Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, Matthew B.; Zalinznyak, I.; Hong, T.; Broholm, C.L.; Reich, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Much of modern condensed matter physics is understood in terms of elementary excitations, or quasiparticles -- fundamental quanta of energy and momentum. Various strongly interacting atomic systems are successfully treated as a collection of quasiparticles with weak or no interactions. However, there are interesting limitations to this description: in some systems the very existence of quasiparticles cannot be taken for granted. Like unstable elementary particles, quasiparticles cannot survive beyond a threshold where certain decay channels become allowed by conservation laws; their spectrum terminates at this threshold. Such quasiparticle breakdown was first predicted for an exotic state of matter -- super-fluid 4 He at temperatures close to absolute zero, a quantum Bose liquid where zero-point atomic motion precludes crystallization. Here we show, using neutron scattering, that quasiparticle breakdown can also occur in a quantum magnet and, by implication, in other systems with Bose quasiparticles. We have measured spin excitations in a two-dimensional quantum magnet, piperazinium hexachlorodicuprate (PHCC), in which spin-1/2 copper ions form a non-magnetic quantum spin liquid, and find remarkable similarities with excitations in superfluid 4 He. We observe a threshold momentum beyond which the quasiparticle peak merges with the two-quasiparticle continuum. It then acquires a finite energy width and becomes indistinguishable from a leading-edge singularity, so that excited states are no longer quasiparticles but occupy a wide band of energy. Our findings have important ramifications for understanding excitations with gapped spectra in many condensed matter systems, ranging from band insulators to high-transition-temperature superconductors.

  19. Determining the mode of high voltage breakdowns in vacuum devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.C.; Furno, E.J.; Sturtz, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Devices were constructed which were essentially vacuum diodes equipped with windows allowing observation of high voltage breakdowns. The waveform of the applied voltage was photographed, and the x-ray output was monitored to investigate electrical breakdown in these vacuum diodes. Results indicate that breakdowns may be divided into two types: (1) vacuum (interelectrode) breakdown - characterized by a diffuse moderately bright discharge, a relative slow and smooth voltage collapse, and a large burst of x-rays, and (2) surface (insulator) flashover - characterized by a bright discharge with a very bright filamentary core, a relatively fast and noisy voltage collapse and no x-ray burst. Useful information concerning the type of breakdown in a vacuum device can be obtained by monitoring the voltage (current) waveform and the x-ray output

  20. Observation of a periodic runaway in the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedmohammad Shayestehaminzadeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the observation of a periodic runaway of plasma to a higher density for the reactive discharge of the target material (Ti with moderate sputter yield. Variable emission of secondary electrons, for the alternating transition of the target from metal mode to oxide mode, is understood to be the main reason for the runaway occurring periodically. Increasing the pulsing frequency can bring the target back to a metal (or suboxide mode, and eliminate the periodic transition of the target. Therefore, a pulsing frequency interval is defined for the reactive Ar/O2 discharge in order to sustain the plasma in a runaway-free mode without exceeding the maximum power that the magnetron can tolerate.