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Sample records for rubidium manganese hexacyanoferrate

  1. Concentration dependence of Li+/Na+ diffusion in manganese hexacyanoferrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Masamitsu; Fukuzumi, Yuya; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Manganese hexacyanoferrates (Mn-HCFs) with a jungle-gym-type structure are promising cathode materials for Li+/Na+ secondary batteries (LIBs/SIBs). Here, we investigated the diffusion constants D Li/D Na of Li+/Na+ against the Li+/Na+ concentration x Na/x Li and temperature (T) of A 1.32Mn[Fe(CN)6]0.833.6H2O (A = Li and Na). We evaluated the activation energy E\\text{a}\\text{Li}/E\\text{a}\\text{Na} of D Li/D Na against x Na/x Li. We found that E\\text{a}\\text{Na} steeply increases with x Na from 0.41 eV at x Na = 0.69 to 0.7 eV at 1.1. The increase in E\\text{a}\\text{Na} is ascribed to the occupancy effect of the Na+ site. The increase in E\\text{a}\\text{Li} is suppressed, probably because the number of Li+ sites is three times that of Na+ sites.

  2. Rubidium extraction using an organic polymer encapsulated potassium copper hexacyanoferrate sorbent

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-07-11

    Sea water reverse osmosis (SWRO) brine contains significant quantity of Rb. As an economically valuable metal, extracting Rb using a suitable and selective extraction method would be beneficial. An inorganic sorbent, copper based potassium hexacyanoferrate (KCuFC), exhibited high selectivity to extract Rb compared to potassium hexacyanoferrate consisting of other transition metal combinations such as Ni, Co and Fe. An organic polymer (polyacrylonitrile, PAN) encapsulated KCuFC (KCuFC-PAN) achieved a Langmuir maximum Rb sorption capacity of 1.23 mmol/g at pH 7.0 ± 0.5. KCuFC-PAN showed Rb selectivity over a wide concentration range of co-existing ions and salinity of SWRO brine. High salinity (0.5-2.5 M NaCl) resulted in 12-30% sorption capacity reduction. At a molar ratio of Li:Rb (21:1), Cs:Rb (0.001:1) and Ca:Rb (14,700:1) commonly found in SWRO brine, sorption reduction of only 18% occurred. Nevertheless, at a very high K:Rb molar ratio (7700:1), KCuFC-PAN sorption capacity of Rb reduced significantly by 65-70%. KCuFC-PAN was well suited for column operation. In a fixed-bed KCuFC-PAN column (influent concentration 0.06 mmol Rb/L, flow velocity 2 m/h), two sorption/desorption cycles were successfully achieved with a maximum Rb sorption capacity of 1.01 (closely similar to the batch study) and 0.85 mmol/g in the first and second cycles, respectively. Around 95% of Rb was desorbed from the column with 0.2 M KCl. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) resin showed promising results of separating Rb from K/Rb mixed solution in effluents from a fixed-bed column, and a subsequent sequential acid desorption, producing 68% purified Rb.

  3. Electrocatalytic behaviour of hybrid cobalt–manganese hexacyanoferrate film on glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinu Mohan, A.M., E-mail: vinumohan756@gmail.com; Rambabu, Gutru, E-mail: chinnu.ram09@gmail.com; Aswini, K.K., E-mail: aswinikk@ymail.com; Biju, V.M., E-mail: vmbiju@ymail.com

    2014-08-28

    A thin film of hybrid cobalt–manganese hexacyanoferrate (CoMnHCF), a redox mediator was electrodeposited on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode and was employed as an amperometric sensor towards L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The hybrid film was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction technique (XRD), scanning electron microscope–energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDAX), and electrochemical techniques. The atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis provided the stoichiometry of the hybrid film to be K{sub 1.74-y} Co{sub y} Mn{sub 0.78} [Fe(CN){sub 6}], y ≤ 0.68. The electrochemical impedance study revealed the excellent charge transfer properties of GC/CoMnHCF electrode. The voltammetric investigations demonstrated exceptional electrocatalytic properties of the hybrid film modified electrode when compared to that of bare GC, GC/CoHCF and GC/MnHCF electrodes, towards the L-Trp oxidation. The kinetic parameters such as electron transfer coefficient, the electron transfer rate constant, the diffusion coefficient and the catalytic rate constant for the electrooxidation process of L-Trp were investigated. The amperometric detection of L-Trp employing GC/CoMnHCF electrode possessed a good sensitivity of 10 × 10{sup −2} A M{sup −1} cm{sup −2} in a wide range of detection (2–200 μM) at a reduced overpotential of 680 mV. In addition, the proposed amperometric method was applied to the detection of L-Trp in commercial milk samples with reproducible results. - Highlights: • A hybrid cobalt–manganese hexacyanoferrate film was prepared. • The hybrid film possesses excellent charge transfer properties. • The hybrid film exhibits excellent electrocatalytic properties towards Tryptophan. • Tryptophan detection is possible from commercial milk samples.

  4. Manganese hexacyanoferrate derived Mn3O4 nanocubes-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites and their charge storage characteristics in supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, K; Jeyakumar, D; Sathish, M

    2014-03-14

    Mn3O4-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites were prepared by chemical decomposition of the manganese hexacyanoferrate (MnHCF) complex directly on the graphene surface. XRD studies revealed the formation of crystalline hausmannite Mn3O4 nanocubes in the as-prepared nanocomposites without any heat treatment. The FE-SEM images showed the formation of Mn3O4 nanocubes on the graphene surface in the as-prepared nanocomposites. HR-TEM studies confirmed the homogeneous dispersion of ∼25 nm Mn3O4 nanocubes on graphene nanosheets. The amount of Mn3O4 nanocubes and graphene in the nanocomposites was estimated using TGA analysis from room temperature to 800 °C in air. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed the functional groups in the nanocomposites and defects in graphene nanosheets in the nanocomposites. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge experiments demonstrated a high specific capacitance of 131 F g(-1) in 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1) for the RGM-0.5 nanocomposite. A capacitance retention of 99% was observed for 500 charge-discharge cycles at a current density of 5 A g(-1), which conformed the excellent stability of the RGM electrodes. The prepared Mn3O4-RGO nanocomposites are promising for electrochemical energy storage.

  5. Elements in rice on the Swedish market: part 2. Chromium, copper, iron, manganese, platinum, rubidium, selenium and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorhem, L; Astrand, C; Sundstrom, B; Baxter, M; Stokes, P; Lewis, J; Grawe, K P

    2008-07-01

    A survey of the levels of some essential and non-essential trace elements in different types of rice available on the Swedish retail market was carried out in 2001-03. The types of rice included long and short grain, brown, white, and parboiled white. The mean levels found were: chromium (Cr) = 0.008 mg kg(-1), copper (Cu) = 1.9 mg kg(-1), iron (Fe) = 4.7 mg kg(-1), manganese (Mn) = 16 mg kg(-1), platinum (Pt) < 0.0003 mg kg(-1), rubidium (Rb) = 3.3 mg kg(-1), selenium (Se) =0.1 mg kg(-1); and zinc (Zn) = 15 mg kg(-1). Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for the determination of Pt, Rb, and Se, after acid digestion. All other elements were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after dry ashing. Intake calculations were performed and it was concluded that rice may contribute considerably to the daily requirements of the essential elements Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, and Zn if rice consumption is high. The levels of some elements, e.g. Fe and Mn, were significantly higher in brown compared with white rice.

  6. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese is a mineral that is found in several foods including nuts, legumes, seeds, tea, whole grains, ... body requires it to function properly. People use manganese as medicine. Manganese is used for prevention and ...

  7. Mineral Commodity Profiles -- Rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterman, W.C.; Reese, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Overview -- Rubidium is a soft, ductile, silvery-white metal that melts at 39.3 ?C. One of the alkali metals, it is positioned in group 1 (or IA) of the periodic table between potassium and cesium. Naturally occurring rubidium is slightly radioactive. Rubidium is an extremely reactive metal--it ignites spontaneously in the presence of air and decomposes water explosively, igniting the liberated hydrogen. Because of its reactivity, the metal and several of its compounds are hazardous materials, and must be stored and transported in isolation from possible reactants. Although rubidium is more abundant in the earth?s crust than copper, lead, or zinc, it forms no minerals of its own, and is, or has been, produced in small quantities as a byproduct of the processing of cesium and lithium ores taken from a few small deposits in Canada, Namibia, and Zambia. In the United States, the metal and its compounds are produced from imported raw materials by at least one company, the Cabot Corporation (Cabot, 2003). Rubidium is used interchangeably or together with cesium in many uses. Its principal application is in specialty glasses used in fiber optic telecommunication systems. Rubidium?s photoemissive properties have led to its use in night-vision devices, photoelectric cells, and photomultiplier tubes. It has several uses in medical science, such as in positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging, the treatment of epilepsy, and the ultracentrifugal separation of nucleic acids and viruses. A dozen or more other uses are known, which include use as a cocatalyst for several organic reactions and in frequency reference oscillators for telecommunications network synchronization. The market for rubidium is extremely small, amounting to 1 to 2 metric tons per year (t/yr) in the United States. World resources are vast compared with demand.

  8. Rectified Forces in Rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Timothy Todd

    The forces exerted on a three-level atom by a bichromatic standing-wave field are investigated. A theoretical analysis shows that the standing-wave dipole force can be rectified, i.e., maintain its sign over many optical wavelengths. Three systems in particular are studied: the lambda, the vee, and the cascade. Experimental results for the rubidium 5S --> 5P --> 5D cascade system are used to confirm the theory. The nearly coincident transition wavelengths for this system (780.0 nm and 776.0 nm) provide potential wells repeating at the beat wavelength (71 μm) which can accumulate laser cooled atoms. This force may have future applications in forming deep neutral atom traps as well as in the creation of new elements for atom optics. Two-color, two-photon spectroscopy of the 5D_{5/2}cascade system (5S --> 5P --> 5D) was also performed.

  9. The USNO rubidium fountains

    CERN Document Server

    Peil, Steven; Swanson, Thomas B; Taylor, Jennifer; Ekstrom, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Four rubidium fountains at the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) have been in operation for 4.5 years. Each fountain has demonstrated periods of stability marked by Total or Theo deviation below 10^-16. Occasional frequency changes, on order of 1.5 times per year per fountain, introduce deviations from white-frequency noise behavior. Averaged together, the four fountains form an ensemble with a white-frequency noise level of 10^-13 and excellent long-term stability as compared to the primary frequency standards contributing to TAI. Progress on using the clocks at USNO for improving limits on coupling of fundamental constants to gravity by measuring the universality of the gravitational redshift for different types of clocks is discussed.

  10. Nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate; Nanoparticulas de hexacianoferrato de niquel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicalho, U.O.; Santos, D.C.; Silvestrini, D.R.; Trama, B.; Carmo, D.R. do, E-mail: docarmo@dfq.feis.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia

    2014-07-01

    Nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate (NHNi) were prepared in three medium (aqueous, formamide and aqueous/formamide). The materials were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electronica spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) region and also by cyclic voltammetry (CV). By spectroscopic analysis of X-ray diffraction was possible to estimate the size of the particles obtained by the Scherrer equation. The graphite paste electrodes containing nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate means formamide was sensitive to different concentrations of Dipyrone. (author)

  11. Ultramicrosensors based on transition metal hexacyanoferrates for scanning electrochemical microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Komkova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report here a way for improving the stability of ultramicroelectrodes (UME based on hexacyanoferrate-modified metals for the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The most stable sensors were obtained by electrochemical deposition of six layers of hexacyanoferrates (HCF, more specifically, an alternating pattern of three layers of Prussian Blue and three layers of Ni–HCF. The microelectrodes modified with mixed layers were continuously monitored in 1 mM hydrogen peroxide and proved to be stable for more than 5 h under these conditions. The mixed layer microelectrodes exhibited a stability which is five times as high as the stability of conventional Prussian Blue-modified UMEs. The sensitivity of the mixed layer sensor was 0.32 A·M−1·cm−2, and the detection limit was 10 µM. The mixed layer-based UMEs were used as sensors in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM experiments for imaging of hydrogen peroxide evolution.

  12. Electrochemical Preparation and Characterization of Lanthanum Hexacyanoferrate Modified Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴萍; 蔡称心

    2005-01-01

    An electroactive polynuclear inorganic compound of rare earth metal hexacyanoferrate, lanthanum hexacyanoferrate (LaHCF), was prepared by electrochemical deposition on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode with a potential cycling procedure. The cyclic voltammogram of LaHCF exhibits a pair of well-defined redox peaks with the formal potential of 208 mV (vs. SCE) at a scan rate of 100 mV/s in 0.2 mol/L NaCl solution and the redox peak currents increase linearly with the square root of the scan rate up to 1000 mV/s. The effects of the concentration of supporting electrolyte on the electrochemical characteristics of LaHCF were studied by voltammetry. LaHCF was also characterizated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), FTIR and XPS techniques.

  13. MECHANISM OF CESIUM EXCHANGE WITH POTASSIUM TITANIUM HEXACYANOFERRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuShiping; SunYongxia; 等

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of cesium exchange on potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate (KTiFC) is described in this paper.The dependence of the exchange rate on temperature,particle granule size,and shaking frequency is studied.The results show that ion exchange process is controlled by liquid film diffusion in granule particle.An exchange reaction occurs mainly between K+ in the exchanger and Cs+ in the solution.

  14. Preparation and characterization of osmium hexacyanoferrate films and their electrocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei, Taiwan 106 (China)]. E-mail: smchen78@ms15.hinet.net; Liao, C.-J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei, Taiwan 106 (China)

    2004-11-15

    Osmium hexacyanoferrate films have been prepared using repeated cyclic voltammetry, and the deposition process and the films' electrocatalytic properties in electrolytes containing various cations have been investigated. The cyclic voltammograms recorded the deposition of osmium hexacyanoferrate films directly from the mixing of Os{sup 3+} and Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-} ions from solutions containing various cations. An electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, cyclic voltammetry, and UV-visible spectroscopy were used to study the growth mechanism of the osmium hexacyanoferrate films. The osmium hexacyanoferrate films showed a single redox couple, and the redox reactions included 'electron transfer' and 'proton transfer' with a formal potential that demonstrates a proton effect in acidic solutions up to a 12 M aqueous HCl solution. The electrochemical and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance results indicate that the redox process was confined to the immobilized osmium hexacyanoferrate film. The electrocatalytic reduction of dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and SO{sub 5}{sup 2-} by the osmium hexacyanoferrate films was performed. The preparation and electrochemical properties of co-deposited osmium(III) hexacyanoferrate and copper(II) hexacyanoferrate films were determined, and their two redox couples showed formal potentials that demonstrated a proton effect and an alkaline cation effect, respectively. Electrocatalytic reactions on the hybrid films were also investigated.

  15. Extraction of rubidium from natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertan, Bengü

    2017-04-01

    Rubidium is a rare alkali metal in the first group of periodic table. It has some exclusive properties like softness, ductility, malleability, strong chemical and photo-emissive activity, low melting point, easy ionization. So it is used many of applications such that optical and laser technology, electronics, telecommunications, biomedical, space technology, academic research especially quantum mechanics-based computing devices. Attention of rubidium in relation to its uses will increase in the near future. Rubidium does not have any mineral that is the main component. It is produced as minor quantities from lithium or cesium-rich minerals and natural brines. However, there are a few researches on the extraction of rubidium from mine tailings. It is difficult extraction or concentration of rubidium from these resources. Because they require a series of physical and chemical treatments and cost expensive. Efficient, cheap and friendly of environment methods for the recovery of this metal are being investigated.

  16. Core-shell hexacyanoferrate for superior Na-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Min; Tang, Yang; Wang, Lili; Xiang, Xinghua; Li, Xiaocheng; Chen, Kongyao; Xue, Lihong; Zhang, Wuxing; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-10-01

    Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate (Fe-HCF) is regarded as a potential cathode material for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) due to its high specific capacity, low cost, facile synthesis and environmentally friendly. However, Fe-HCF always suffers from poor electronic conductivity, low crystallinity and side reactions with electrolyte, leading to poor rate performance, low coulombic efficiency and deterioration of cycling stability. Herein, we report a green and facile synthesis to encapsulate Fe-HCF microcubes with potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate (Ni-HCF). The core-shell Fe-HCF@Ni-HCF composite delivers a reversible capacity of 79.7 mAh g-1 at 200 mA g-1 after 800 cycles and a high coulombic efficiency of 99.3%. In addition, Fe-HCF@Ni-HCF exhibits excellent rate performance, retaining 60 mAh g-1 at 2000 mA g-1. The results show that Fe-HCF@Ni-HCF integrates the advantages of both Fe-HCF and Ni-HCF, making it electrochemically stable as cathode material for SIBs.

  17. Parity non-conservation in rubidium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A; Roberts, B

    2012-01-01

    Currently the theoretical uncertainty limits the interpretation of the atomic parity non-conservation (PNC) measurements. We calculate the PNC $5s$ - $6s$ electric dipole transition amplitude in rubidium and demonstrate that rubidium is a good candidate to search for new physics beyond the standard model since accuracy of the atomic calculations in rubidium can be higher than in cesium. PNC in cesium is currently the best low-energy test of the standard model, therefore, similar measurements for rubidium present a good option for further progress in the field. We also calculate nuclear spin-dependent part of the parity non-conserving (PNC) amplitude which is needed for the extraction of the nuclear anapole moment from the PNC measurements.

  18. Cupric Hexacyanoferrate Nanoparticle Modified Carbon Ceramic Composite Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Peng(王鹏); ZHU,Guo-Yi(朱果逸)

    2002-01-01

    Graphite powder-supported cupric hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF)nanoparticles were dispersed into methyltrimethoxysilane-based gels to produce a conducting carbon ceramic composite, which was used as electrode material to fabricate surface-renewable CuHCF-modified electrodes. Electrochemical behavior of the CuHCF-modified carbon ceramic composite electrodes was characterized using cyclic and square-wave voitammetry.Cyclic voltammograms at various scan rates indicated that peak currents were surface-confined at low scan rates. In the presence of glutathione, a clear electrocatalytic response was observed at the CuHCF-modified composite electrodes. In addition, the electrodes exhibited a distinct advantage of reproducible surface-renewal by simple mechanical polishing on emery paper, as well as ease of preparation, and good chemical and mechanical stability in a flowing stream.

  19. Cupric Hexacyanoferrate Nanoparticle Modified Carbon Ceramic Composite Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Peng; ZHU,Guo-Yi

    2002-01-01

    Graphite powder-supported cupric hexacyanoferrate(CuHCF) nanoparticles were dispersed into methyltrimethoxysilane-based gels to produce a conducting carbon ceramic composite,which was used as electrode materials to fabricate surface-renewable CuHCF-modified electrodes.Electrochemical behavior of the CuHCF-modified carbon ceramic composite electrodes was characterized using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. Cyclinc voltammograms at various scan rates indicated that peak currents were suface-confined at low scan rates.In the presence of glutathione,a clear electrocatalytic response was observed at the CuHCF-modified composite electrodes.In addition,the electrodes exhibited a distinct advantage of reproducible surface-renewal by simple mechanical polishing on emery paper,as well as ease of preparation,and good chemical and mechanical stability in a flowing stream.

  20. Synthesis of single crystal manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS) nanostructures with tunable tunnels and shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Na; Yuan, Jikang; Gomez-Mower, Sinue; Sithambaram, Shantakumar; Suib, Steven L

    2006-02-23

    A new and facile route is reported to manipulate the self-assembly synthesis of hierarchically ordered Rb-OMS-2 and pyrolusite with an interesting flowerlike morphology by a direct and mild reaction between rubidium chromateand manganese sulfate without any organic templates. The crystal forms, morphologies, and tunnel sizes of the obtained OMS materials can be controlled. A mechanism for the growth of manganese dioxides with flowerlike architectures was proposed. The obtained products exhibit potential for use in catalysis and other applications.

  1. Phase transitions in mixed-valence potassium manganese hexacyanoferrate Prussian blue analogue: Heat capacity calorimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, A. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)]. E-mail: ashis@vbphysics.net.in; Saha, S. [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Koner, S. [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Miyazaki, Y. [Research Center for Molecular Thermodynamics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)]. E-mail: miyazaki@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-05-15

    Phase transitions in K{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 0.66}{sup II}Mn{sub 1.44}{sup III}[Fe{sub 0.2}{sup II}Fe{sub 0.8}{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]O{sub 0.6}= {sub 6}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 1.32}].7.6H{sub 2}O-a mixed valence PB analogue have been investigated with the help of heat capacity calorimetry under 0-90kOe magnetic fields in the 1.8-300K temperature range. Two heat capacity anomalies at 2.1 and 7.5K have been detected, which correspond to ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic transitions, respectively. The magnitudes as well as the position of these thermal anomalies have varied with changing magnetic field. The estimated zero-field magnetic entropy amounted to 29.2JK{sup -1}mol{sup -1}, which is close to the expected value (33.7JK{sup -1}mol{sup -1}). The uniaxial zero-field splitting parameter is estimated to be D/k{sub B}=14.7K. A comparatively stronger antiferromagnetic interaction seems to lead to the magnetic transition around 7.3K, whereas a weaker ferromagnetic interaction gives rise to the thermal anomaly at 2.1K. The present results on magnetic phase transitions are in complete agreement with the earlier observations made through magnetic studies. Additionally, a glass transition at 194K has been observed in the heat capacity study presumably due to freezing of the orientational motion of the H{sub 2}O molecules present in the material. This phenomenon is reflected into the temperature dependence of the estimated Fe{sup III} and Fe{sup II} concentrations in the present material obtained earlier through Mossbauer spectroscopy.

  2. Hexacyanoferrates and bentonite as binders of radiocaesium for reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Hove

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of varying doses of caesium binders (Bentonite and several forms of iron-hexacyanoferrates on radiocaesium accumulation in red blood cells and on radiocaesium transfer to urine and faeces were studied in feeding experiments with reindeer calves. The caesium binders were added to a ration of lichen (containing 9.5 kBq of 134Cs+137Cs originating from the Chernobyl accident and fed together with a pelleted reindeer feed (RF-71 for 42 days. A 50% reduction in red blood cell radiocaesium concentration was obtained with a daily dose of 1 mg/kg body weigth of ammoniumironhexacyanoferrate (AFCF and with 500 mg/kg of bentonite. Three mg/kg of AFCF or 2 g/kg of bentonite reduced both urinary excretion and RBC concentrations with more than 80%. It is concluded that iron-hexacyanoferrates, as a result of their high caesium binding capacity, are particularly useful as caesium binders for free ranging ruminants like the reindeer.Hexacynoferrater og bentonitt som bindere av radiocesium i reinAbstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Effekten av bentonitt og ulike typer jernhexacyanoferrater (Berlinerblått på akkumulering av radioaktivt cesium i røde blodlegemer og på utskilling av radioaktivt cesium i urin ble undersøkt i foringsforsøk med reinkalver. Cesiumbinderne ble gitt daglig sammen med lav som inneholdt 9.5 kBq 134Cs+137Cs fra Tsjernobyl ulykken, og 1 kg reinfor (RF-71 i en periode på 42 dager. En daglig dose på 1 mg/kg kroppsvekt av ammoniumjernhexacyano-ferrat (AFCF reduserte radiocesiuminnholdet i blodlegemer med 50%, mens en dose pa 500 mg/kg bentonitt var nødvendig for å oppnå samme effekt. Tre mg/kg AFCF eller 2 g/kg/bentonitt var nødvendig for å oppnå mer enn 80% reduksjon i radiocesium konsentrasjonen i blodlegemer og i radiocesium utskilling med urinen. På grunn av de små daglige mengder som kreves er jern-hexacyanoferratene spesielt velegnete som cesiumbindere for beitedyr.

  3. Determination of 137Cs in large volume seawater using Cu-hexacyanoferrate cartridge filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visetpotjanakit, S.; Tumnoi, Y.

    2017-06-01

    A simple method to determine 137Cs in seawater has been developed based on the use of a Cu-hexacyanoferrate scavenger. The Cu-hexacyanoferrate supported on cotton wound cartridge filter was used to absorb 137Cs from seawater by passing large volumes over the cartridge filters with flowrate of 240 L hr-1. Results from the Cu-hexacyanoferrate method were proved acceptable for accuracy with bias below ± 20 % i.e. - 9.16 to + 18.55 % when compared with the traditional ammonium molybdophosphate pre-concentration method. This developed method is cost-effective and less time consuming. In addition it can be easily performed at sampling fields.

  4. Molecular and electronic structure of actinide hexa-cyanoferrates; Structure moleculaire et electronique des hexacyanoferrates d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonhoure, I

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this work is to improve our knowledge on the actinide-ligand bond properties. To this end, the hexacyanoferrate entities have been used as pre-organized ligand. We have synthesized, using mild chemistry, the following series of complexes: An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Th, U, Np, Pu); Am{sup III}[Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O; Pu {sup III}[Co{sup III}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O and K(H?)An{sup III}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Pu, Am). The metal oxidation states have been obtained thanks to the {nu}{sub CN}, stretching vibration and to the actinide L{sub III} absorption edge studies. As Prussian Blue, the An{sup IV}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}].xH{sub 2}O (An = Np, Pu) are class II of Robin and Day compounds. X-ray Diffraction has shown besides that these complexes crystallize in the P6{sub 3}/m space group, as the isomorphic LaKFe(CN){sub 6}.4H{sub 2}O complex used as structural model. The EXAFS oscillations at the iron K edge and at the An L{sub III} edge allowed to determine the An-N, An-O, Fe-C and Fe-N distances. The display of the multiple scattering paths for both edges explains the actinide contribution absence at the iron edge, whereas the iron signature is present at the actinide edge. We have shown that the actinide coordination sphere in actinides hexa-cyanoferrates is comparable to the one of lanthanides. However, the actinides typical behavior towards the lanthanides is brought to the fore by the An{sup IV} versus Ln{sup III} ions presence in this family of complexes. Contrarily to the 4f electrons, the 5f electrons influence the electronic properties of the compounds of this family. However, the gap between the An-N and Ln-N distances towards the corresponding metals ionic radii do not show any covalence bond evolution between the actinide and lanthanide series. (author)

  5. Signal amplification of dopamine using lanthanum hexacyanoferrate-modified electrode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Selvaraju; R Ramaraj

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor has been developed using an electroactive polynuclear lanthanum hexacyanoferrate (LaHCF) complex with counter alkali cation (Na+) deposited on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode (GC/LaHCF). The GC/LaHCF-modified electrode is found to be an excellent transducer in mediating the oxidation of neurotransmitter molecule such as dopamine (DA) at physiological pH 7.2. Interestingly, the GC/LaHCF-modified electrode amplifies a 50-fold enhancement in the oxidation of DA signal compared to the bare GC electrode. Besides, the GC/LaHCF-modified electrode shows excellent selectivity in the voltammetric oxidation of DA in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). Under optimal conditions, the GC/LaHCF modified electrode shows a linear relationship in DA oxidation between 0.1 × 10−6 and 1.0 × 10−6M with the detection limit of 1 × 10−8M (10 nM). Importantly, practical utility of the modified electrode is good in studying the real sample analysis such as dopamine hydrochloride injection assay.

  6. Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Rubidium: An Undergraduate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, V.; Hingant, B.; Allafort, A.; Pigeard, M.; Roch, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe two complementary nonlinear spectroscopy methods which both allow one to achieve Doppler-free spectra of atomic gases. First, saturated absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure of the 5S[subscript 1/2] [right arrow] 5P[subscript 3/2] transition in rubidium. Using a slightly modified experimental…

  7. Hydrocyanation of sulfonylimines using potassium hexacyanoferrate(II) as an eco-friendly cyanide source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Rongzhi; Zheng, Huanhuan; Wen, Fei; Li, Hongbo; Yin, Junjun; Yang, Jingya, E-mail: lizheng@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Gansu (China)

    2013-11-15

    An efficient and eco-friendly method for hydrocyanation of sulfonylimines via one-pot two-step procedure using potassium hexacyanoferrate)II) as cyanide source, benzoyl chloride as a promoter, and potassium carbonate as a base is described. This protocol has the features of using nontoxic, nonvolatile and inexpensive cyanide source, high yield, and simple work-up procedure. (author)

  8. The Effect of Insertion Species on Nanostructured Open Framework Hexacyanoferrate Battery Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wessells, Colin D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent battery research has focused on the high power and energy density needed for portable electronics and vehicles, but the requirements for grid-scale energy storage are different, with emphasis on low cost, long cycle life, and safety. Open framework materials with the Prussian Blue crystal structure offer the high power capability, ultra-long cycle life, and scalable, low cost synthesis and operation that are necessary for storage systems to integrate transient energy sources, such as wind and solar, with the electrical grid. We have demonstrated that two open framework materials, copper hexacyanoferrate and nickel hexacyanoferrate, can reversibly intercalate lithium, sodium, potassium, and ammonium ions at high rates. These materials can achieve capacities of up to 60 mAhg. The porous, nanoparticulate morphology of these materials, synthesized by the use of simple and inexpensive methods, results in remarkable rate capabilities: e.g. copper hexacyanoferrate retains 84 of its maximum capacity during potassium cycling at a very high (41.7C) rate, while nickel hexacyanoferrate retains 66 of its maximum capacity while cycling either sodium or potassium at this same rate. These materials show excellent stability during the cycling of sodium and potassium, with minimal capacity loss after 500 cycles. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  9. Synthesis, structural elucidation and carbon dioxide adsorption on Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate (II) Prussian blue analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lugo, F.; Polanco, R.

    2016-11-01

    In the course of the last years hexacyanoferrates have been widely studied; even though, the adsorption properties of Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II) (labelled here Zn-HII) have not been thoroughly considered. In addition, soft porous crystals, i.e., adsorbents that display structural flexibility have been, as well, extensively studied, however this property has not been reported for Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II). In this regard, the key questions addressed here were the synthesis and structural characterization of Zn-HII together with the investigation of their low (up to 1 bar) and high pressure (up to 30 bar) adsorption properties, to found if these materials show structural flexibility. Then, to attain the anticipated goals, structural characterizations were made with: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), simultaneously, with the investigation of the adsorption of carbon dioxide. As a result of the research process we concluded that the Zn-HII displayed Fm barm space group framework. Besides, the carbon dioxide adsorption investigation demonstrated the presence of the framework expansion effect together with an extremely high adsorption heat, properties that could be useful for the use of Zn(II) hexacyanoferrate(II) as an excellent adsorbent.

  10. Extraction of rubidium by t-BAMBP in cyclohexane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiawei Wang; Dehua Che; Wei Qin

    2015-01-01

    4-Tert-butyl-2-(α-methylbenzyl) phenol (t-BAMBP) was used in cyclohexane in the extraction of rubidium from brine sources containing lithium. The effect of t-BAMBP concentration and aqueous phase pH on the rubidium and lithium extraction equilibrium was studied. t-BAMBP/cyclohexane was efficient and selective for rubidium extraction with optimal operating conditions being pH of 13.0 and initial t-BAMBP concentration of 1.0 mol·L−1. The stoichiometry of the complex of t-BAMBP with rubidium is 4:1. The apparent extraction equilibrium constant of rubidium was calculated by fitting the experimental data.

  11. Rubidium dimers in paraffin-coated cells

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, V M; Windes, D; Corsini, E; Ledbetter, M P; Karaulanov, T; Auzinsh, M; Rangwala, S A; Kimball, D F Jackson; Budker, D

    2010-01-01

    Measurements were made to determine the density of rubidium dimer vapor in paraffin-coated cells. The number density of dimers and atoms in similar paraffin-coated and uncoated cells was measured by optical spectroscopy. Due to the relatively low melting point of paraffin, a limited temperature range of 43-80 deg C was explored, with the lower end corresponding to a dimer density of less than 10^7 cm^(-3). With one-minute integration time, a sensitivity to dimer number density of better than 10^6 cm^(-3) was achieved. No significant difference in dimer density was observed between the cells.

  12. NUCLEAR-NUCLEAR CORRELATIONS IN LIQUID RUBIDIUM

    OpenAIRE

    Egelstaff, P.; Suck, J.; Gläser, W.; McPherson, R.; Teitsma, A.

    1980-01-01

    The neutron diffraction patterns of liquid rubidium have been measured for momentum transfers between 0.4-2.4 Å-1 for twelve states between 328-473 K and 10-1200 atmospheres using the IN4 spectrometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin. These states were chosen to give isothermal, isochoric and isobaric data. In this paper we present the experimental results and the isothermal pressure derivatives of the liquid structure factor. The latter may be predicted from a model in which the electron fluid ...

  13. Copper hexacyanoferrate battery electrodes with long cycle life and high power

    KAUST Repository

    Wessells, Colin D.

    2011-11-22

    Short-term transients, including those related to wind and solar sources, present challenges to the electrical grid. Stationary energy storage systems that can operate for many cycles, at high power, with high round-trip energy efficiency, and at low cost are required. Existing energy storage technologies cannot satisfy these requirements. Here we show that crystalline nanoparticles of copper hexacyanoferrate, which has an ultra-low strain open framework structure, can be operated as a battery electrode in inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. After 40,000 deep discharge cycles at a 17g-C rate, 83% of the original capacity of copper hexacyanoferrate is retained. Even at a very high cycling rate of 83g-C, two thirds of its maximum discharge capacity is observed. At modest current densities, round-trip energy efficiencies of 99% can be achieved. The low-cost, scalable, room-temperature co-precipitation synthesis and excellent electrode performance of copper hexacyanoferrate make it attractive for large-scale energy storage systems. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Precision Control of Cold Rubidium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nic Chormaic, Síle; Deasy, Kieran; Morrissey, Michael; Shortt, Brian; Yarovitskiy, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    Research interest in designing sources of cold atoms has significantly increased during the past 10 years with the development of suitable laser sources for magneto-optical trapping and the further mastering of evaporative cooling in order to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation. The magneto-optical trap is now viewed as a standard research facility worldwide and has opened up many exciting research directions in atomic physics. One area of interest is that of combining spherical microcavities with cold atomic sources in order to achieve efficient photon exchange between the cavity and atom for further understandings of cavity quantum electrodynamics. This could eventually lead to atom entanglement via photon exchange, which would have implications for quantum logic design. However, initial attempts to achieve such interactions have been hindered by inadequate control and manipulation of the cold atom source. Here, we present work on designing and building an ultra-stable source of magneto-optically cooled rubidium atoms with a temperature in the tens of μK range. We present a suitable experimental arrangement including details on the ultra-high vacuum chamber, the laser systems being used, and the source of rubidium vapor. We discuss some future directions for the research, including diffraction of atoms from gratings and micron-sized objects and parameter control of the atom cloud.

  15. Manganese nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Fig. 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published...

  16. Optical pumping of rubidium atoms in a parahydrogen matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Jonathan; Arnott, W. Patrick; Christy, Tim; Hartzell, Chase; Kanagin, Andrew; Momose, Takamasa; Patterson, David; Upadhyay, Sunil

    2016-05-01

    Building on prior work with rubidium atoms in a cryogenic argon matrix, we have grown solid parahydrogen crystals doped with rubidium atoms. Typical rubidium densities are on the order of 1017 cm-3. We have demonstrated optical pumping of the atomic spin of the implanted rubidium atoms; the measured spin polarization signals are roughly one order of magnitude larger than what was achieved in argon matrices. The combination of high atomic densities and optical addressability make this a promising experimental platform for applications such as magnetometry and fundamental physics measurements. Spin lifetimes (T1) on the order of 1 second have been observed. Progress towards measuring coherence times (T2) will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY 1265905.

  17. Monatomic-Molecular Transition in Expanded Rubidium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgrim, W.; Ross, M.; Hensel, F. [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science Centre, Philipps-University of Marburg, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Ross, M.; Yang, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 944551 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    S(Q,{omega}) for liquid rubidium measured along the liquid vapor coexistence line exhibits monatomic behavior from normal density down to twice the critical density. At this density we observe excitations characteristic of a harmonic oscillator. We interpret this as evidence for the passage of the fluid from a monatomic to a molecular state. First principle total energy calculations for lattices of ribidium at 0K predict that expansion favors spin pairing and leads to a lattice of dimers with an increase in vibron energy with decreasing density. The excellent agreement of the calculated vibron energy with the experimental result provides theoretical support for the appearance of molecules. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Manganese Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sousa Galito

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cheickna Bounajim Cissé wrote an article in Mars 2013 in the Journal Les Afriques N. º 237, suggesting a new acronym, MANGANESE, for the nine African countries: Morocco, Angola, Namibia, Ghana, Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, South Africa and Ethiopia. According to Cissé, this group of African nations will be the fastest growing states in the region over the next few years. The purpose of this article is to test the pertinence of the acronym, discuss the credibility and reliability of the future prospects of these countries by comparing selected socioeconomic and sociopolitical indicators based on the latest global rankings and trends. Likewise, the potential of Cissé's claim will be assessed, especially in relationship to drug trafficking and terrorism that may put their recent sustainability in danger now and in the future.

  19. Polynuclear Nickel Hexacyanoferrate/Graphitized Mesoporous Carbon Hybrid Chemically Modified Electrode for Selective Hydrazine Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Palani Barathi; Annamalai Senthil Kumar; Minnal Ranjan Babu Karthick

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid polynuclear nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCFe)/graphitized mesoporous carbon- (GMC-) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE/NiHCFe@GMC) has been prepared by a sequential method using electrodeposited Ni on a GMC-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE/Ni@GMC) as a template and [Fe(CN)6]3− as an in-situ chemical precipitant, without any additional interlinking agent. Physicochemical and electrochemical characterizations reveal the presence of NiHCFe units within the porous sites of the GM...

  20. Potassium Hexacyanoferrate (III-Catalyzed Dimerization of Hydroxystilbene: Biomimetic Synthesis of Indane Stilbene Dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Shan Xie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using potassium hexacyanoferrate (III–sodium acetate as oxidant, the oxidative coupling reaction of isorhapontigenin and resveratrol in aqueous acetone resulted in the isolation of three new indane dimers 4, 6, and 7, together with six known stilbene dimers. Indane dimer 5 was obtained for the first time by direct transformation from isorhapontigenin. The structures and relative configurations of the dimers were elucidated using spectral analysis, and their possible formation mechanisms were discussed. The results indicate that this reaction could be used as a convenient method for the semi-synthesis of indane dimers because of the mild conditions and simple reaction products.

  1. A rechargeable Na-Zn hybrid aqueous battery fabricated with nickel hexacyanoferrate and nanostructured zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ke; Song, Bin; Zhang, Jintao; Ma, Houyi

    2016-07-01

    Rechargeable aqueous batteries are very attractive as a promising alternative energy storage system, although their reversible capacity is typically limited. A new rechargeable Na-Zn hybrid aqueous battery with nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) cathode and the nanostructured zinc anode is fabricated. The rational combination of two materials with mild aqueous electrolyte renders the devices with an average operating voltage close to 1.5 V, higher specific capacity of 76.2 mAh g-1, and a good cycling stability with 81% capacity retention for 1000 cycles. These remarkable features can provide guidance for the development of rechargeable batteries from the naturally abundant electrode materials with neutral aqueous electrolytes.

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of L-Cystine by Hexacyanoferrate(III in Alkaline Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna Nowduri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of oxidation of L-cystine by hexacyanoferrate(III was studied in alkaline medium at 30 °C. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically at λmax = 420 nm. The reaction was found to be first order dependence each on [HCF(III] and [cystine]. It was found that the rate of the reaction increases with increase in [OH-]. The oxidation product of the reaction was found to be cysteic acid. A plausible mechanism has been proposed to account for the experimental results.

  3. Selective Monohydrocyanation of Diimine using Potassium Hexacyanoferrate(II)-Benzoyl Chloride Reagent System as a Cyanide Source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZHENG LI; FEI WEN; JINGYA YANG

    2016-12-01

    The selective monohydrocyanation of diimines using potassium hexacyanoferrate(II)-benzoyl chloride reagent system as a cyanide source under catalyst-free condition is described. The advantages of this protocol are the non-toxic, non-volatile and inexpensive cyanide source, high yield, and simple work-up procedure.

  4. Energy storage in hybrid organic-inorganic materials hexacyanoferrate-doped polypyrrole as cathode in reversible lithium cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Gomez, G,; Skaarup, Steen; West, Keld

    2000-01-01

    A study of the hybrid oganic-inorganic hexacyanoferrate-polypyrrole material as a cathode in rechargeable lithium cells is reported as part of a series of functional hybrid materials that represent a new concept in energy storage. The effect of synthesis temperatures of the hybrid in the specific...

  5. SERS spectroelectrochemical study of electrode processes at copper hexacyanoferrate modified electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mažeikienė, Regina; Niaura, Gediminas; Malinauskas, Albertas

    2017-06-01

    Electrochemical redox processes taking place at copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF) modified electrode have been investigated by near-infrared laser (785 nm) induced surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Raman bands observed within the spectral ranges of 2200-2000 cm- 1 and 500-100 cm- 1, as well as their dependence on electrode potential, have been analysed. The most characteristic Raman bands, related to triple CN bond vibrations and centered at 2187 and 2127 cm- 1 were assigned to the oxidised and the reduced forms of CuHCF, respectively. Time-resolved Raman spectroelectrochemical study shows that the electrochemical redox interconversions between these two forms proceed relatively slow, thus resembling the behaviour of structurally related cobalt hexacyanoferrate, and differing essentially from that of Prussian blue layer studied previously. It has been shown by the time-resolved Raman spectroelectrochemistry that the rate of some redox processes of solute species like the anodic oxidation of ascorbate or cathodic reduction of hydrogen peroxide at CuHCF modified electrode appears to be limited by the slow electrochemical redox transformations within the modifier layer itself rather than by the redox interactions of a modifier with the solute species.

  6. Nickel Hexacyanoferrate Nanoparticle Electrodes For Aqueous Sodium and Potassium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Wessells, Colin D.

    2011-12-14

    The electrical power grid faces a growing need for large-scale energy storage over a wide range of time scales due to costly short-term transients, frequency regulation, and load balancing. The durability, high power, energy efficiency, and low cost needed for grid-scale storage pose substantial challenges for conventional battery technology.(1, 2)Here, we demonstrate insertion/extraction of sodium and potassium ions in a low-strain nickel hexacyanoferrate electrode material for at least five thousand deep cycles at high current densities in inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Its open-framework structure allows retention of 66% of the initial capacity even at a very high (41.7C) rate. At low current densities, its round trip energy efficiency reaches 99%. This low-cost material is readily synthesized in bulk quantities. The long cycle life, high power, good energy efficiency, safety, and inexpensive production method make nickel hexacyanoferrate an attractive candidate for use in large-scale batteries to support the electrical grid. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of ion selectivity traits of nickel hexacyanoferrate thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Xiao-gang; YU Qiu-ming; JIANG Shao-yi; D. T. SCHWARTZ

    2006-01-01

    The ion selectivity of nickel hexacyanoferrate thin film to alkali cations in ESIX (electrochemically switched ion exchange) processes was investigated using molecular dynamics(MD) techniques; water and cation (Na+ and Cs+) intercalation, configuration,and dynamics in reduced nickel hexacyanoferrate structures with different cation combinations were studied and compared with the experimental results. In the simulations, water was represented by an extended simple point-charge(SPC/E) model, and all other atomic interactions were represented by a universal force field(UFF). The potential energies of various cations combination (Cs+ and Na+) in reduced i-NiHCF and 1 mol/L Cs/NaCl mixed solution were obtained. In most cases, the total potential energy of the solid is reduced when water is intercalated into the various reduced NiHCF structures. Combining the solid and the solution simulation results, it is shown that the solid composition of 3Cs+/1Na+ is the stablest structure form (NaCs3Ni4[Fe(CN)6]3) over a range of solution compositions.

  8. Radiative lifetime measurements of rubidium Rydberg states

    CERN Document Server

    Branden, Drew B; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Vesa, Cristian; Wilson, Roy O; Zheng, Mao; Kortyna, Andrew; Tate, Duncan A

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the radiative lifetimes of ns, np and nd Rydberg states of rubidium in the range 28 < n < 45. To enable long-lived states to be measured, our experiment uses slow-moving Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Two experimental techniques have been adopted to reduce random and systematic errors. First, a narrow-bandwidth pulsed laser is used to excite the target Rydberg state, resulting in minimal shot-to-shot variation in the initial state population. Second, we monitor the target state population as a function of time delay from the laser pulse using a short-duration, millimetre-wave pulse that is resonant with a one- or two-photon transition. We then selectively field ionize the monitor state, and detect the resulting electrons with a micro-channel plate. This signal is an accurate mirror of the target state population, and is uncontaminated by contributions from other states which are populated by black body radiation. Our results are generally consistent with other recent experime...

  9. Catalysis of Forster Resonances in Rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, A. L.; Williams, W. D.; Sukenik, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    When two ultracold Rydberg atoms collide they may change their quantum state if the total electronic energy of the two atoms before and after the collision is about the same. This process can be made resonant by tuning the energy levels of the atoms with an electric field, via the Stark shift, so that the energy difference between incoming and outgoing channels vanishes. This condition is known as a ``Forster resonance.'' We have studied a particular Forster resonance in rubidium: 34p + 34p --> 34s + 35s, by investigating the time dependence of the state change in an ultracold environment. Furthermore, we have added 34d state atoms to the mix and observed an enhancement of 34s atom production. We attribute this enhancement to a catalysis effect whereby the 34d atoms alter the spatial distribution of 34p atoms that participate in the energy transfer interaction. We will present results from the experiment and compare them to model calculations. Present address: Department of Physics, Smith College, Northampton, MA.

  10. Study of granitic biotites by X-ray fluorescence analysis: determination of iron, manganese, titanium, calcium, potassium, silicon and aluminium; Estudio de biotitas graniticas por fluorescencia de rayos X: Determinacion de hierro, manganeso, titanio, calcio, potasio, silicio y aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toubes, R. O.; Bermudez Polonio, J.

    1968-07-01

    A method for the quantitative determination of iron, manganese, titanium, calcium potassium, silicon, and aluminium, is reported, Sample preparation is carried out by the miniature flux technique, and rubidium is used as internal standard for silicon and aluminium. (Author) 5 refs.

  11. Radiation hardness of Efratom M-100 rubidium frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, T. C.; Vorwerk, H.; Rudie, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on rubidium gas cell frequency standards and components are presented, including the results of recent tests where a continuously operating rubidium frequency standard (Effratom, Model M-100) was subjected to simultaneous neutron/gamma radiation. At the highest neutron fluence 7.5 10 to the 12th power n/sq cm and total dose 11 krad(Si) tested, the unit operated satisfactorily; the total frequency change over the 2 1/2 hour test period due to all causes, including repeated retraction from and insertion into the reactor, was less than 1 x 10 to the -10th power. The effects of combined neutron/gamma radiation on rubidium frequency standard physics package components were also studied, and the results are presented.

  12. Manganese nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Figure 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published in the journal Economic Geology (Mero, 1962) and later as a book (Mero, 1965). By the mid-1970s, large consortia had formed to search for and mine Mn nodules that occur between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones (CCZ) in the NE Pacific (Figure 2). This is still the area considered of greatest economic potential in the global ocean because of high nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), and Mn contents and the dense distribution of nodules in the area. While the mining of nodules was fully expected to begin in the late 1970s or early 1980s, this never occurred due to a downturn in the price of metals on the global market. Since then, many research cruises have been undertaken to study the CCZ nodules, and now 15 contracts for exploration sites have been given or are pending by the International Seabed Authority (ISA). Many books and science journal articles have been published summarizing the early work (e.g., Baturin, 1988; Halbach et al., 1988), and research has continued to the present day (e.g., ISA, 1999; ISA, 2010). Although the initial attraction for nodules was their high Ni, Cu, and Mn contents, subsequent work has shown that nodules host large quantities of other critical metals needed for high-tech, green-tech, and energy applications (Hein et al., 2013; Hein and Koschinsky, 2014).

  13. Inelastic collisions of excited helium atoms with normal rubidium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagoev, K.B.; Kasyanenko, S.V.; Krauze, U.; Tolmachev, Y.A.

    1986-05-01

    The afterglow of helium lines in a helium--rubidium mixture excited by a pulsed electron beam has been studied. The effective quenching probabilities at different concentrations of rubidium have been measured, and the rate constants and effective quenching cross sections have been determined. An analysis of possible mechanisms of an inelastic collision is given. A major role of the ionic term in the interaction of the particles during collisions is indicated. The experimental values of the cross sections are compared with the results of a calculation in different approximations.

  14. Spontaneous and parametric processes in warm rubidium vapours

    CERN Document Server

    Dąbrowski, Michał; Pęcak, Daniel; Chrapkiewicz, Radosław; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Warm rubidium vapours are known to be a versatile medium for a variety of experiments in atomic physics and quantum optics. Here we present experimental results on producing the frequency converted light for quantum applications based on spontaneous and stimulated processes in rubidium vapours. In particular, we study the efficiency of spontaneously initiated stimulated Raman scattering in the {\\Lambda}-level configuration and conditions of generating the coherent blue light assisted by multi-photon transitions in the diamond-level configuration. Our results will be helpful in search for new types of interfaces between light and atomic quantum memories.

  15. Spontaneuos and Parametric Processes in Warm Rubidium Vapours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Warm rubidium vapours are known to be a versatile medium for a variety of experiments in atomic physics and quantum optics. Here we present experimental results on producing the frequency converted light for quantum applications based on spontaneous and stimulated processes in rubidium vapours. In particular, we study the efficiency of spontaneously initiated stimulated Raman scattering in the Λ-level configuration and conditions of generating the coherent blue light assisted by multi-photon transitions in the diamond-level configuration. Our results will be helpful in search for new types of interfaces between light and atomic quantum memories.

  16. Rubidium atomic line filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Mario E.; Molek, Christopher D.; Vesely, Annamaria L.

    2017-01-01

    We report recent improvements to our Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry apparatus [M.E. Fajardo, C.D. Molek, and A.L. Vesely, J. Appl. Phys. 118, 144901 (2015)]. RALF is a high-velocity and high-acceleration adaptation of the Doppler Global Velocimetry method for measuring multi-dimensional velocity vector flow fields, which was developed in the 1990s by aerodynamics researchers [H. Komine, U.S. Patent #4,919,536]. Laser velocimetry techniques in common use within the shock physics community (e.g. VISAR, Fabry-Pérot, PDV) decode the Doppler shift of light reflected from a moving surface via interference phenomena. In contrast, RALF employs a completely different physical principle: the frequency-dependent near-resonant optical transmission of a Rb/N2 gas cell, to encode the Doppler shift of reflected λ0 ≈ 780.24 nm light directly onto the transmitted light intensity. Thus, RALF is insensitive to minor changes to the optical pathlengths and transit times of the Doppler shifted light, which promises a number of practical advantages in imaging velocimetry applications. The single-point RALF proof-of-concept apparatus described here is fiber optic based, and our most recent modifications include the incorporation of a larger bandwidth detection system, and a second 780 nm laser for simultaneous upshifted-PDV (UPDV) measurements. We report results for the laser driven launch of a 10-μm-thick aluminum flyer which show good agreement between the RALF and UPDV velocity profiles, within the limitations of the admittedly poor signal:noise ratio (SNR) RALF data.

  17. Polydopamine / Cobalt Hexacyanoferrate Composite Films and Their Electrochemical Behavior in the Presence of Dpamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hanshuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polydopamine/cobalt hexacyanoferrate (PDA-CoHCF composite films on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE have been electropolymerized by using cyclic voltammetry. The composite films were electrochemically activated in a potassium hydroxide solution and were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM measurements. The electrochemical activation could cause some changes of composite membrane interface structure and improve the electrochemical performance of the corresponding modified electrode in a phosphate buffer solution containing dopamine. The PDA-CoHCF film modified glassy carbon electrode could response dopamine sensitively in cyclic voltammetry measurements for electrochemical oxidation and reduction. The linear response slope and regression coefficient is 1.546 μA/μM and 0.985, respectively, in the concentration range from 2.0 μM to 10 μM dopamine.

  18. Cubic Copper Hexacyanoferrates Nanoparticles: Facile Template-Free Deposition and Electrocatalytic Sensing Towards Hydrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cubic copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF nanoparticles prepared via electrolytic deposition are presented with their morphology and crystalline structure characterized with SEM and XRD. The advantage of this methodology is that it allows the fabrication of uniform cubic nanoparticles with permeable structures onto the desired underlying electrode substrate. It was observed that the CuHCF film acts as a permeable membrane for cations such as K+, Na+, Li+, and NH4+ with a selection order of K+> Li+>NH4+> Na+. Furthermore, the analytical utility of these cubic-like CuHCF morphologies supported on a glassy carbon electrode was evaluated towards the electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine which was found to exhibit a linear response over the range 66 M to 17 mM with a detection limit corresponding to 16.5 M.

  19. Outer-Sphere Mechanism in the Oxidation of Pyrrole-2- Carboxaldehyde by Hexacyanoferrate (III Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd-Alhakeem H. Abu-Nawwas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics and mechanism of base-catalyzed oxidation of pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde with hexacyanoferrate (III is reported. The reaction showed first order with respect to aldahyde , alkali and hexaeyanoferrate(III. The kinetic data suggest that the oxidation involves the formation of an anion of the substrate undergoes oxidation with hexaeyanoferrate(III via outer sphere mechanism process. The free radical thus produced is further oxidized to form the final products. A suitable mechanism was proposed and rate law was derived as − d[Fe CN 6 ] 3− = 2k1k2 RC(OH2 [Fe CN 6 ] 3−[OH−] k−1 H2O

  20. Hybrid electrodes composed of electroactive polymer and metal hexacyanoferrates in aprotic electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilamowska, Monika; Lisowska-Oleksiak, Anna [Gdansk University of Technology, Chemical Faculty, Department of Chemical Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2009-10-20

    In this work hybrid materials composed of electroactive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (pEDOT) and metal hexacyanoferrates (Mehcf) (Me = Fe, Co, Ni) were tested in ethylene carbonate (EC):propylene carbonate (PC) electrolytes containing 0.5 M KPF{sub 6} or 0.5 M LiPF{sub 6} salts. The hybrid materials pEDOT/Mehcf were examined by using: cyclic voltammetry (CVA), potentiometry and impedance spectroscopy (IS). The materials pEDOT/Mehcf exhibit electrode activity, good stability and high electrical capacity in tested nonaqueous electrolytes and they are considered to be suitable active materials for supercapacitors or for positive electrode of secondary cell with lithium and potassium salts. Contrary to the solid Prussian Blue ''PB'' analogues, hybrid pEDOT/Cohcf electrodes work with good efficiency in contact with nonaqueous electrolyte containing lithium salts. (author)

  1. Manganese Oxidation State Assignment for Manganese Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Nathan J; O'Malley, Patrick J

    2016-04-06

    The oxidation state assignment of the manganese ions present in the superoxidized manganese (III/IV) catalase active site is determined by comparing experimental and broken symmetry density functional theory calculated (14)N, (17)O, and (1)H hyperfine couplings. Experimental results have been interpreted to indicate that the substrate water is coordinated to the Mn(III) ion. However, by calculating hyperfine couplings for both scenarios we show that water is coordinated to the Mn(IV) ion and that the assigned oxidation states of the two manganese ions present in the site are the opposite of that previously proposed based on experimental measurements alone.

  2. Low Field Zeeman Magnetometry Using Rubidium Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, Nibedita; Pattabiraman, M; Vijayan, C [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2007-09-15

    We report on the feasibility of utilizing the field dependence of the Doppler-free unresolved absorption line amplitude of Rubidium vapour for magnetic field measurements for fields below 50 G. The field dependence of the saturation absorption and Doppler broadened fluorescence line amplitudes have been systematically analyzed by computing the hyperfine energy eigenvalues and the transition probability among the Zeeman sublevels.

  3. Quenching of excited rubidium (52P) atoms in flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.; Nienhuis, G.

    1968-01-01

    An alternating current photoelectric device (compare the work of Boers,(1) Hooymayers et al(2-4) and Hooymayers(5)) has been used for determining the yield factor p of resonance fluorescence for the infrared rubidium doublet (7800/7947 Å). From the p-values measured in five different hydrogen flames

  4. Synthesis of Nickel Hexacyanoferrate Nanoparticles and Their Potential as Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Solvent-Free Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shah R. ALI; Prakash CHANDRA; Mamta LATWAL; Shalabh K. JAIN; Vipin K. BANSAL; Sudhanshu P. SINGH

    2011-01-01

    Nickel hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis,thermal analysis,infrared spectroscopy,and X-ray diffraction.A FE-SEM image of the nickel hexacyanoferrate showed that it consists of nearly spherical particles with sizes ranging from 30 to 70 nm.The synthesized material was found to be a heterogeneous catalyst useful for the solvent-free oxidation of benzyl alcohol with H2O2 as an oxidant.A 36% conversion of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde was achieved under optimized reaction conditions using specific parameters such as the amount of catalyst,the temperature,the benzyl alcohol to H2O2 molar ratio,and the reaction time.

  5. Amperometric Determination of Ascorbic Acid in Pharmaceutical Formulations by a Reduced Graphene Oxide-cobalt Hexacyanoferrate Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heli, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the redox properties of drugs and their determination are performed by electrochemical techniques. Data obtained from electrochemical techniques are often correlated with molecular structure and pharmacological activity of drugs. In this regard, different modified electrodes were applied as sensors for quantification of different drugs. A nanocomposite of reduced graphene oxide-cobalt hexacyanoferrate was synthesized by a simple precipitation route. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the nanocomposite comprised nanoparticles of cobalt hexacyanoferrate attached to the reduced graphene oxide nanosheets. A nanocomposite-modified carbon paste electrode was then fabricated. It represented prominent activity toward the electrocatalytic oxidation of ascorbic acid, and the kinetics of the electrooxidation process was evaluated. Finally, an amperometric method was developed for the quantification of ascorbic acid in different pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:25901152

  6. Sympathetic cooling of ytterbium with rubidium; Sympathetische Kuehlung von Ytterbium mit Rubidium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassy, S.

    2007-12-14

    Within the scope of this thesis, a mixture of ultracold ytterbium and rubidium atoms was experimentally realized and investigated. For these experiments, a novel trap geometry was developed which allows simultaneous trapping and cooling of diamagnetic and paramagnetic atomic species. The main focus was put on the investigation of the interspecies scattering properties, where sympathetic cooling of ytterbium through elastic collisions with rubidium could be demonstrated. In addition, the interspecies scattering length could be determined. In the current configuration the combined trap allows the preparation of up to 2.10{sup 5} atoms of {sup 170}Yb, {sup 171}Yb, {sup 172}Yb, {sup 174}Yb or {sup 176}Yb at a temperature of 40..60 {mu}K and a density in the range of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, and of about 10{sup 7} {sup 87}Rb atoms at a temperature of 25 {mu}K and a density in the range of 5.10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Detailed studies of the thermalization of bosonic {sup 170}Yb, {sup 172}Yb, {sup 174}Yb and {sup 176}Yb and of fermionic {sup 171}Yb each with {sup 87}Rb were performed under varying experimental conditions. The deduced total scattering cross section was clearly found to increase with higher mass of the ytterbium isotope. In general, a mass scaling of the scattering properties is in agreement with theoretical models and former experimental work. With the assumption of pure s-wave scattering, which is approximately fulfilled for the given experimental parameters, the interspecies scattering length could be derived from the measured thermalization data and was found to be (in units of the Bohr radius a{sub 0}): {sup 170}Yb-{sup 87}Rb:(18{sup +12}{sub -4})a{sub 0}, {sup 171}Yb-{sup 87}Rb:(25{sup +14}{sub -7})a{sub 0}, {sup 172}Yb-{sup 87}Rb:(33{sup +23}{sub -7})a{sub 0}, {sup 174}Yb-{sup 87}Rb:(83{sup +89}{sub -25})a{sub 0}, {sup 176}Yb-{sup 87}Rb:(127{sup +245}{sub -45})a{sub 0}. (orig./HSI)

  7. Light-Shifts of an Integrated Filter-Cell Rubidium Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-25

    rubidium atomic clock and basic research, Phys. Today , 60(11), 33-39 (2007). 2. R. T. Dupuis, T. J. Lynch, and J. R. Vaccaro, Rubidium frequency...AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-02236 Light-Shifts of an Integrated Filter-Cell Rubidium Atomic Clock May 25, 2015 James C. Camparo...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Light-Shifts of an Integrated Filter-Cell Rubidium Atomic Clock 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-14-C-0001 5b

  8. Fiber laser system for cesium and rubidium atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Diboune, Clément; Bidel, Yannick; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative fiber laser system for both cesium and rubidium manipulation. The architecture is based on frequency conversion of two lasers at 1560 nm and 1878 nm. By taking advantage of existing fiber components at these wavelengths, we demonstrate an all fiber laser system delivering 350 mW at 780 nm for rubidium and 210 mW at 852 nm for cesium. This result highlights the promising nature of such laser system especially for Cs manipulation for which no fiber laser system has been reported. It offers new perspectives for the development of atomic instruments dedicated to onboard applications and opens the way to a new generation of atom interferometers involving three atomic species $^{85}$Rb, $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs for which we propose an original laser architecture.

  9. Extreme electron-phonon coupling in magnetic rubidium sesquioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Robert; Attema, Jisk; Riyadi, S.; Blake, Greame; de Wijs, Gilles; Palstra, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Rb2O3 is a black, opaque oxide. Early work suggests that the stability range of the sesquioxide phase in the rubidium-oxygen phase diagram is rather broad. Rb2O3 remains cubic down to the lowest temperature measured (5 K). The oxygens form dumbbells with interatomic distances in between those of peroxide and superoxide anions, and strong athermal motion persists down to low temperatures. [1] Electronic-structure calculations show that the dynamics at low temperature is caused by 6 phonon modes of zero frequency, which induce a very strong electron-phonon interaction. The softness of half of these modes is suppressed by the application of pressure. Calculated using the average oxygen positions, rubidium sesquioxide is a half-metallic ferromagnet. [2] [1] CR CHIM (11-13): 591-594 NOV 1999[2] JACS 127 (46): 16325-16328 NOV 23 2005

  10. Observation of light dragging in rubidium vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Strekalov, D V; Yu, N; Maleki, L; Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey B.; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of light dragging effect due to atomic motion in a rubidium vapor cell. We found that the minimum group velocity is achieved for light red-shifted from the center of the atomic resonance, and that the value of this shift increases with decreasing group velocity, in agreement with the theoretical predictions by Kocharovskaya, Rostovtsev, and Scully [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 86}, 628 (2001)].

  11. Electronically excited rubidium atom in a helium cluster or film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leino, Markku; Viel, Alexandra; Zillich, Robert E.

    2008-11-01

    We present theoretical studies of helium droplets and films doped with one electronically excited rubidium atom Rb∗ (P2). Diffusion and path integral Monte Carlo approaches are used to investigate the energetics and the structure of clusters containing up to 14 helium atoms. The surface of large clusters is approximated by a helium film. The nonpair additive potential energy surface is modeled using a diatomic in molecule scheme. Calculations show that the stable structure of Rb∗Hen consists of a seven helium atom ring centered at the rubidium, surrounded by a tirelike second solvation shell. A very different structure is obtained when performing a "vertical Monte Carlo transition." In this approach, a path integral Monte Carlo equilibration starts from the stable configuration of a rubidium atom in the electronic ground state adsorbed to the helium surface after switching to the electronically excited surface. In this case, Rb∗Hen relaxes to a weakly bound metastable state in which Rb∗ sits in a shallow dimple. The interpretation of the results is consistent with the recent experimental observations [G. Auböck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 035301 (2008)].

  12. Palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidation of L-tryptophan by hexacyanoferrate(III) in perchloric acid medium: a kinetic and mechanistic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmed Fawzy

    2016-02-01

    The catalytic effect of palladium(II) on the oxidation of L-tryptophan by potassium hexacyanoferrate( III) has been investigated spectrophotometrically in aqueous perchloric acid medium. A first order dependence in [hexacyanoferrate(III)] and fractional-first order dependences in both [L-tryptophan] and [palladium(II)] were obtained. The reaction exhibits fractional-second order kinetics with respect to [H+]. Reaction rate increased with increase in ionic strength and dielectric constant of the medium. The effect of temperature on the reaction rate has also been studied and activation parameters have been evaluated and discussed. Initial addition of the reaction product, hexacyanoferrate(II), does not affect the rate significantly. A plausible mechanistic scheme explaining all the observed kinetic results has been proposed. The final oxidation products are identified as indole-3-acetaldehyde, ammonium ion and carbon dioxide. The rate law associated with the reaction mechanism is derived.

  13. Molecule-Based Cobalt Hexacyanoferrate Nanoparticle: Synthesis, Characterization, and Its Electrochemical Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史立红; 吴田; 王美佳; 李迪; 张袁健; 李影虹

    2005-01-01

    Cobalt hexacyanoferrate (CoHCF) nanoparticles, with an average size of less than 50 nm for individual crystalrite, were synthesized by simply mixing appropriate reactants in the absence of surfactant or template. Elemental analysis provided a stoichiometric formula, K0.2CO1.4[Fe(CN)6]·xH2O for this compound. The involvement of both ferromagnetic CoⅢ1.5 [FeⅢ(CN)6] and antiferromagnetic KCoⅢ[FeⅡ(CN)6] species in the CoHCF complex was effectively proved by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, so was the existence of certain amounts of interstitial water molecules. A glassy carbon electrode modified with these CoHCF nanoparticles had high stable and reversible cyclic voltammetric responses even at high scan rates and its electrochemical properties were affected by the nature of counter cations and the concentration of supporting electrolyte. The prepared nanoparticle films, as a mediator on electrode surface, exhibited considerable electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of dopamine.

  14. Reduction of radiocaesium transfer to broiler chicken meat by a clinoptilolite modified with hexacyanoferrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, M.; Balas, J. [Mendel Univ. of Agriculture and Forestry, Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Nuclear Methods

    1999-07-01

    The effect of RADEKONT (a natural clinoptilolite modified by hexacyanoferrate) on {sup 137}Cs uptake into meat was tested in experiments with broiler chickens. Three experiments determined the influence of RADEKONT on radiocaesium transfer after single or repeated applications of artificially contaminated feed mixture and one experiment investigated the effect of RADEKONT when feeding a mixture containing wheat contaminated by the Chernobyl fallout. Independent of the effect of RADEKONT, the uptake of radiocaesium was faster in leg meat than in breast meat. Reduction factors ({sup 137}Cs transfer without the RADEKONT additive compared with those observed after supplementation of the additive into the feed mixture) of 1.1-1.3 and 1.2-2.3, respectively, were achieved after single and repeated administrations of artificially contaminated feed. No significant differences in reduction between breast and leg meat were observed. RADEKONT was more effective when the chickens were fed with Chernobyl-contaminated wheat (reduction factors of up to 3.7) than an artificial {sup 137}Cs source. RADEKONT as a supplement during the decontamination period decreased the biological half-life of {sup 137}C to less than 1 day. The timing of the application of RADEKONT might be important in determining its effectiveness, especially in young, rapidly growing chickens. (orig.)

  15. Preparation,Electrochemical Behavior and Electrocatalytic Activity of a Copper Hexacyanoferrate Modified Ceramic Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU,Hao; ZHENG,Jian-Bin

    2007-01-01

    A copper hexacyanoferrate modified ceramic carbon electrode(CuHCF/CCE)had been prepared by two-step sol-gel technique and characterized using electrochemical methods.The resulting modified electrode showed a pair of well-defined surface waves in the potential range of 0.40 to 1.0 V with the formal potential of 0.682 V (vs.SCE)in 0.050 mol·dm-3 HOAc-NaOAc buffer containing 0.30 mol·dm-3 KCI.The charge transfer coefficient (α) and charge transfer rate constant(Ks)for the modified electrode were calculated.The electrocatalytic activity of this modified electrode to hydrazine was also investigated,and chronoamperometry was exploited to conveniently determine the diffusion coefficient(D)of hydrazine in solution and the catalytic rate constant(Kcat).Finally,hydrazine was determined with amperometry using the resulting modified electrode.The calibration plot for hydrazine determination was linear in 3.0×10-6-7.5×10-4 mol·dm-3 with the detection limit of 8.0×10-7 mol·dm-3.This modified electrode had some advantages over the modified film electrodes constructed by the conventional methods,such as renewable surface,good long-term stability,excellent catalytic activity and short response time to hydrazine.

  16. Synthesis and structure of some nano-sized rare-earth metal ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Himanshu; Alemu, Hailemichael; Nketsa, Pusetso F.; Manatha, Toka J.; Madhavi Thakurdesai, And

    2015-05-01

    Rare-earth ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates (KR-HCF); with the general formula KRFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O [with, R≡Y, Gd and Yb] nanoparticles were synthesized through precipitation. Characterization was done through particle-size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infra-red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD data was analyzed on FullProf Software Suite program and the unit-cell structure and lattice parameters of KR-HCF samples were determined from scratch and refined further. All the three KR-HCF nanoparticles seem to crystallize in the orthorhombic primitive PMMM space-group. Reasonably good agreement was found with the previously reported lattice constants of KGd-HCF and KYb-HCF orthorhombic single-crystals, except that they assume different space-groups. The observed dissimilarity of space-groups may be attributed to the different time scales involved in the synthesis process. Moreover, the crystal structure of KYFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O nanoparticles is being reported for the very first time.

  17. Electrochemical characterization of ion selectivity in electrodeposited nickel hexacyanoferrate thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxia Guo; Xiaogang Hao; Xuli Ma; Zhonglin Zhang; Shibin Liu

    2008-01-01

    The ion selectivity of electrodeposited nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) thin films was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). NiHCF thin films were prepared by cathodic deposition on Pt and AI substrates. EIS and CV curves were determined in 1 mol/L (KNO3+CsNO3) and 1 mol/L (NaNO3+CsNO3) mixture solutions, which were sensitive to the concentration of Cs+ in the electrolytes. Experimental results show that all Nyqnist impedance plots show de-pressed semicircles in the high-frequency range changing over into straight lines at lower frequencies. With increasing amounts of Cs+, the redox potentials in CV curves shift toward more positive values and the redox peaks broaden; the semicircle radius in corre-sponding EIS curves and the charge transfer resistance also increase. EIS combining CV is able to provide valuable insights into the ion selectivity of NiHCF thin films.

  18. The effect of ammonium ferric hexacyanoferrate on reducing radiocaesium transfer from grass silage to sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. PAASIKALLIO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to examine the effect of ammonium ferric hexacyanoferrate (AFCF on the transfer of radiocaesium from grass silage to the tissues of male lambs. During ensiling, a formic acid based additive and AFCF were sprayed on grass contaminated with 134Cs and the mixture was allowed to incubate for 45 days. A dose of 21 mg AFCF d-1, fed to sheep offered contaminated silage for fourteen days, reduced 134Cs transfer to muscle by 45% compared to that of control sheep. An equivalent dose of AFCF administered in a capsule reduced transfer by only 3%. In another experiment, AFCF intake of 50, 100 and 150 mg d-1 for ten days reduced 134Cs transfer to sheep muscle by 75, 82 and 86%, respectively. In control lambs, of average live weight 38 and 47 kg, the feed to muscle 134Cs transfer coefficient averaged 0.15 d kg-1, but equilibrium between tissue and feed 134Cs had probably not been reached due to the short feeding period. Increasing doses of AFCF from 0 to 150 mg d-1 increased the faecal/urinary 134Cs ratio from 2 to 42.;

  19. In situ observation of macroscopic phase separation in cobalt hexacyanoferrate film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Masamitsu; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries (LIBs) store electric energy via Li+ deintercalation from cathode materials. The Li+ deintercalation frequently drives a first-order phase transition of the cathode material as a result of the Li-ordering or Li-concentration effect and causes a phase separation (PS) into the Li-rich and Li-poor phases. Here, we performed an in situ microscopic investigation of the PS dynamics in thin films of cobalt hexacyanoferrate, LixCo[Fe(CN)6]0.9, against Li+ deintercalation. The thick film (d = 1.5 μm) shows a characteristic macroscopic PS of several tens of μm into the green (Li1.6Co[Fe(CN)6]0.9) and black (Li.6Co[Fe(CN)6]0.9) phases in the x range of 1.0 < x < 1.6. Reflecting the substrate strain, the thin film (d = 0.5 μm) shows no trace of the PS in the entire x region. Our observation suggests that the macroscopic PS plays a significant role in the charge/discharge dynamics of the cathode.

  20. Electrochemical oxidation of polyethylene glycol in electroplating solution using paraffin composite copper hexacyanoferrate modified (PCCHM) anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejankiwar, Rajesh S; Basu, Abir; Cementi, Max

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in an acidic (pH 0.18 to 0.42) and high ionic strength electroplating solution was investigated. The electroplating solution is a major source of wastewater in the printing wiring board industry. A paraffin composite copper hexacyanoferrate modified (PCCHM) electrode was used as the anode and a bare graphite electrode was used as the cathode. The changes in PEG and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations during the course of the reaction were monitored. The efficiency of the PCCHM anode was compared with bare graphite anode and it was found that the former showed significant electrocatalytic property for PEG and TOC removal. Chlorides present in the solution were found to contribute significantly in the overall organic removal process. Short chain organic compounds like acetic acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and ethylene glycol formed during electrolysis were identified by HPLC method. Anode surface area and applied current density were found to influence the electro-oxidation process, in which the former was found to be dominating. Investigations of the kinetics for the present electrochemical reaction suggested that the two stage first-order kinetic model provides a much better representation of the overall mechanism of the process if compared to the generalized kinetic model.

  1. Electrochemical oxidation of polyethylene glycol in electroplating solution using paraffin composite copper hexacyanoferrate modified (PCCHM) anode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajesh S. Bejankiwar; Abir Basu; Max Cementi

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of polyethylene glycol(PEG) in an acidic(pH 0.18 to 0.42) and high ionic strength electroplating solution was investigated. The electroplating solution is a major source of wastewater in the printing wiring board industry. A paraffin composite copper hexacyanoferrate modified(PCCHM) electrode was used as the anode and a bare graphite electrode was used as the cathode. The changes in PEG and total organic carbon(TOC) concentrations during the course of the reaction were monitored. The efficiency of the PCCHM anode was compared with bare graphite anode and it was found that the former showed significant electrocatalytic property for PEG and TOC removal. Chlorides present in the solution were found to contribute significantly in the overall organic removal process. Short chain organic compounds like acetic acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and ethylene glycol formed during electrolysis were identified by HPLC method. Anode surface area and applied current density were found to influence the electro-oxidation process, in which the former was found to be dominating. Investigations of the kinetics for the present electrochemical reaction suggested that the two stage first-order kinetic model provides a much better representation of the overall mechanism of the process if compared to the generalized kinetic model.

  2. Copper and nickel hexacyanoferrate nanostructures with graphene-coated stainless steel sheets for electrochemical supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Lyu, Li-Jyun; Syu, Jhih-Hao

    2015-11-01

    Copper and nickel hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF and NiHCF) nanostructures featuring three-dimensional open-framework tunnels are prepared using a solution-based coprecipitation process. CuHCF shows superior supercapacitive behavior than the NiHCF, due to the presence of numerous macropores in CuHCF particles for facilitating the transport of electrolyte. Both CuHCF and NiHCF electrodes with stainless steel (SS) substrate tend to lose their electroactivity towards intercalation/deintercalation of hydrated potassium ions owing to the partial corrosion of SS. Formation of a protective and conductive carbon layer in between SS and CuHCF (NiHCF) film is of paramount importance for improving the irreversible loss of electroactivity. Thin and compact graphene (GN) layer without observable holes in its normal plane is the most effective way to suppress the corrosion of SS compared with porous carbon nanotube and activated carbon layers. Specific capacitance of CuHCF electrode with GN layer (CuHCF/GN/SS) reaches 570 F g-1, which is even better than that of CuHCF with Pt substrate (500 F g-1) at 1 A g-1. The CuHCF/GN/SS exhibits high stability with 96% capacitance retention over 1000 cycles, greater than the CuHCF with Pt (75%).

  3. Absorption Spectroscopy of Rubidium in an Alkali Metal Dispenser Cell and Bleached Wave Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    resulted in a transmission too low below the detection limit of the photodiodes. When the current ceased, the spectrum almost immediately returned to a...absorption spectrum of a rubidium alkali metal dispenser (AMD) cell was obtained in order to determine the system’s suitability for use in a diode ...18 8. Cell Pressure vs. Required Current .............................................................................. 20 9. Time vs. Rubidium

  4. Air Manganese Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2011 US EPA researchers conducted a health study of airborne manganese exposure in East Liverpool, Ohio. This Web site discusses preliminary results of the study and provides background and other related information.

  5. Copper hexacyanoferrate formation on the modified silica surface with DAB-Am-16 dendrimer; Formacao de hexacianoferrato de cobre sobre a superficie da silica modificada com o dendrimero DAB-Am-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Devaney R. do; Gabriel Junior, Suelino; Bicalho, Urquisa O., E-mail: docarmo@dfq.feis.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Paim, Leonardo L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (IQ/UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    The dendrimer hexadecamine poly(propylene)imine (DAB-Am-16) of third generation (G-3) was anchored on the silica gel surface. The modified silica interact easily with Cu{sup 2+} and then with hexacyanoferrate to form copper hexacyanoferrate. The modified silica was characterized by following techniques: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and cyclic voltammetry. As application of the composite obtained, the modified silica containing copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCFSD) was tested for a voltammetric determination of nitrite using a graphite paste modified electrode. The modified graphite paste electrode can be applied also to the determination of others biological substances with success. (author)

  6. [Function and disease in manganese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    Manganese is a metal that has been known named a Greek word "Magnesia" meaning magnesia nigra from Roman Empire. Manganese provide the wide range of metablic function and the multiple abnomalities from its deficiency or toxicity. In 1931, the essentiality of manganese was demonstrated with the authoritative poor growth and declined reproduction in its deficiency. Manganese deficiency has been recognized in a number of species and its signs are impaired growth, impaired reproduction, ataxia, skeletal abnormalities and disorders in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Manganese toxicity is also acknowledged as health hazard for animals and humans. Here manganese nutrition, metabolism and metabolic function are summarized.

  7. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field...

  8. One-pot four-component synthesis of 2-aryl-3,3-dihaloacrylonitriles using potassium hexacyanoferrate(II) as environmentally benign cyanide source

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao,Zhouxing; Li, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    An efficient route to one-pot four-component reactions of aroyl chlorides, potassium hexacyanoferrate(II), triphenylphosphine and carbon tetrahalides to synthesize 2-aryl-3,3-dichloroacrylonitriles and 2-aryl-3,3-dibromoacrylonitriles was described. This protocol has advantages of use of non-toxic cyanide source, high yield and simple work-up procedure.

  9. One-pot four-component synthesis of 2-aryl-3,3-dihaloacrylonitriles using potassium hexacyanoferrate(II) as environmentally benign cyanide source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhouxing; Li, Zheng, E-mail: lizheng@nwnu.edu.c [Northwest Normal Univ., Lanzhou, Gansu (China). Key Lab. of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province

    2011-07-01

    An efficient route to one-pot four-component reactions of aroyl chlorides, potassium hexacyanoferrate(II), triphenylphosphine and carbon tetrahalides to synthesize 2-aryl-3,3-dichloroacrylonitriles and 2-aryl-3,3-dibromoacrylonitriles was described. This protocol has advantages of use of non-toxic cyanide source, high yield and simple work-up procedure. (author)

  10. Preparation, characterization and electrocatalytic behavior of zinc oxide/zinchexacyanoferrate and ruthenium oxide hexacyanoferrate hybrid film-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, H.-W.; Thangamuthu, R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, S.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: smchen78@ms15.hinet.net

    2008-02-15

    Polynuclear mixed-valent hybrid films of zinc oxide/zinchexacyanoferrate and ruthenium oxide hexacyanoferrate (ZnO/ZnHCF-RuOHCF) have been deposited on electrode surfaces from H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution containing Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, RuCl{sub 3} and K{sub 3}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] by potentiodynamic cycling method. Simultaneous cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurements demonstrate the steady growth of hybrid film. Surface morphology of hybrid film was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) data confirm existence of zinc oxide and ruthenium oxide hexacyanoferrate (RuOHCF) in the hybrid film. The effect of type of monovalent cations on the redox behavior of hybrid film was investigated. In pure supporting electrolyte, electrochemical responses of Ru{sup II/III} redox transition occurring at negative potential region resemble with that of a surface immobilized redox couple. The electrocatalytic activity of ZnO/ZnHCF-RuOHCF hybrid film was investigated towards oxidation of epinephrine, dopamine and L-cysteine, and reduction of S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} and SO{sub 5}{sup 2-} as well as IO{sub 3}{sup -} using cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) techniques.

  11. Immobilized nickel hexacyanoferrate on activated carbons for efficient attenuation of radio toxic Cs(I) from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalhmunsiama; Lalhriatpuia, C.; Tiwari, Diwakar; Lee, Seung-Mok

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to immobilize nickel hexacyanoferrate onto the large surface of activated carbons (ACs) precursor to rice hulls and areca nut waste materials. These nickel hexacyanoferrate immobilized materials are then assessed in the effective attenuation of radio logically important cesium ions from aqueous solutions. The solid samples are characterized by the XRD analytical method and surface morphology is obtained from the SEM images. The batch reactor experiments show that an increase in sorptive pH (2.0-10.0) apparently not affecting the high percent uptake of Cs(I). Equilibrium modeling studies suggest that the data are reasonably and relatively fitted well to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Kinetic studies show that sorption process is fairly rapid and the kinetic data are fitted well to the pseudo-second order rate model. Increasing the background electrolyte concentration from 0.001 to 0.1 mol/L NaCl causes insignificant decrease in Cs(I) removal which infers the higher selectivity of these materials for Cs(I) from aqueous solutions. Further, the column reactor operations enable to obtain the breakthrough data which are then fitted to the Thomas non-linear equation as to obtain the loading capacity of column for Cs(I). The results show that the modified materials show potential applicability in the attenuation of radio toxic cesium from aqueous solution.

  12. Water-mediated cation intercalation of open-framework indium hexacyanoferrate with high voltage and fast kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Shao, Hezhu; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-06-01

    Rechargeable aqueous metal-ion batteries made from non-flammable and low-cost materials offer promising opportunities in large-scale utility grid applications, yet low voltage and energy output, as well as limited cycle life remain critical drawbacks in their electrochemical operation. Here we develop a series of high-voltage aqueous metal-ion batteries based on `M+/N+-dual shuttles' to overcome these drawbacks. They utilize open-framework indium hexacyanoferrates as cathode materials, and TiP2O7 and NaTi2(PO4)3 as anode materials, respectively. All of them possess strong rate capability as ultra-capacitors. Through multiple characterization techniques combined with ab initio calculations, water-mediated cation intercalation of indium hexacyanoferrate is unveiled. Water is supposed to be co-inserted with Li+ or Na+, which evidently raises the intercalation voltage and reduces diffusion kinetics. As for K+, water is not involved in the intercalation because of the channel space limitation.

  13. Removal of radiocesium from low level radioactive effluents by hexacyanoferrate loaded synthetic zeolite. Laboratory to pilot plant scale demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Dayamoy; Rao, Manjula A.; Khot, Shantinath A.; Shah, Jayesh G.; Banerjee, Kalyan [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Nuclear Recycle Group; Pawaskar, Chandrahas S.; Gangadharan, Anand; Rao, Shankar N.; Jain, Savita [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-06-01

    Present paper reports removal of radiocesium from low level waste using a modified sorbent (13X-CFC) prepared by in-situ precipitation of potassium copper hexacyanoferrate(II) inside the macropores of a synthetic zeolite. The Cs exchange isotherm of the sorbent is established and it found to follow Fruendlich absorption isotherm equation. It is varified that presence of hexacyanoferrate on zeolite facilitates rapid Cs uptake performance. This is further confirmed in laboratory scale column tests, wherein excellent Cs removal performance from low level waste simulant was observed even at higher flow rates (40 bed volumes per hour). The utility of the sorbent is established through successful demonstration in a pilot scale (50 L) trial with almost complete removal of {sup 137}Cs from more than 14,000 bed volumes of actual low level waste. The sorbent, owing to its low cost and excellent {sup 137}Cs removal performance, is expected to find application in treatment of very low active waste streams.

  14. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  15. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  16. Occupational exposure to manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarić, M; Markićević, A; Hrustić, O

    1977-05-01

    The relationship between the degree of exposure and biological effects of manganese was studied in a group of 369 workers employed in the production of ferroalloys. Two other groups of workers, from an electrode plant and from an aluminium rolling mill, served as controls. Mean manganese concentrations at work places where ferroalloys were produced varied from 0-301 to 20-442 mg/m3. The exposure level of the two control groups was from 2 to 30 microgram/m3 and from 0-05 to 0-07 microgram/m3, in the electrode plant and rolling mill respectively. Sixty-two (16-8%) manganese alloy workers showed some signs of neurological impairment. These signs were noticeably less in the two control groups (5-8% and 0%) than in the occupationally exposed group. Subjective symptoms, which are nonspecific but may be symptoms of subclinical manganism, were not markedly different in the three groups. However, in the manganese alloy workers some of the subjective symptoms occurred more frequently in heavier smokers than in light smokers or nonsmokers. Heavier smokers engaged in manganese alloy production showed some of the subjective symptoms more often than heavier smokers from the control groups.

  17. Rubidium atomic frequency standards for GPS Block IIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William J.

    1990-01-01

    The Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standards (RAFS) were provided for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These satellites will replenish and upgrade the space segment of the Global Positioning System in the mid 1990s. The GPS RAFS Rb clocks are the latest generation of the high-performance rubidium frequency standards. They offer an aging rate in the low pp 10(exp 14)/day range and a drift-corrected 1-day stability in the low pp 10(exp 14) range. The Block IIR version of these devices will have improved performance, higher reliability, smaller size, and greater radiation hardness. The GPS Block IIR atomic clocks have a natural frequency configuration whereby they output a frequency of about 13.4 MHz that is a submultiple of the atomic resonance of Rb (or Cs). The RAFS operates at a low, fixed C-field for increased stability. The GPS Block IIR RAFS design, including the changes and improvements made, and the test results obtained are described.

  18. Sympathetic cooling in a rubidium cesium mixture: Production of ultracold cesium atoms; Sympathetisches Kuehlen in einer Rubidium-Caesium-Mischung: Erzeugung ultrakalter Caesiumatome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, M.

    2007-07-01

    This thesis presents experiments for the production of ultracold rubidium cesium mixture in a magnetic trap. The long-termed aim of the experiment is the study of the interaction of few cesium atoms with a Bose-Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms. Especially by controlled variation of the cesium atom number the transition in the description of the interaction by concepts of the one-particle physics to the description by concepts of the many-particle physics shall be studied. The rubidium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and from there reloaded into a magnetic trap. In this the rubidium atoms are stored in the state vertical stroke f=2,m{sub f}=2 right angle of the electronic ground state and evaporatively cooled by means of microwave-induced transitions into the state vertical stroke f=1,m{sub f}=1] (microwave cooling). The cesium atoms are also trppaed in a MOT and into the same magnetic trap reloaded, in which they are stored in the state vertical stroke f=4,m{sub f}=4 right angle of the electronic ground state together with rubidium. Because of the different hyperfine splitting only rubidium is evaporatively cooled, while cesium is cooled jointly sympathetically - i.e. by theramal contact via elastic collisions with rubidium atoms. The first two chapters contain a description of interatomic interactions in ultracold gases as well as a short summary of theoretical concepts in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates. The chapters 3 and 4 contain a short presentation of the methods applied in the experiment for the production of ultracold gases as well as the experimental arrangement; especially in the framework of this thesis a new coil system has been designed, which offers in view of future experiments additionally optical access for an optical trap. Additionally the fourth chapter contains an extensive description of the experimental cycle, which is applied in order to store rubidium and cesium atoms together into the magnetic trap. The

  19. Sympathetic cooling in a rubidium cesium mixture: Production of ultracold cesium atoms; Sympathetisches Kuehlen in einer Rubidium-Caesium-Mischung: Erzeugung ultrakalter Caesiumatome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, M.

    2007-07-01

    This thesis presents experiments for the production of ultracold rubidium cesium mixture in a magnetic trap. The long-termed aim of the experiment is the study of the interaction of few cesium atoms with a Bose-Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms. Especially by controlled variation of the cesium atom number the transition in the description of the interaction by concepts of the one-particle physics to the description by concepts of the many-particle physics shall be studied. The rubidium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and from there reloaded into a magnetic trap. In this the rubidium atoms are stored in the state vertical stroke f=2,m{sub f}=2 right angle of the electronic ground state and evaporatively cooled by means of microwave-induced transitions into the state vertical stroke f=1,m{sub f}=1] (microwave cooling). The cesium atoms are also trppaed in a MOT and into the same magnetic trap reloaded, in which they are stored in the state vertical stroke f=4,m{sub f}=4 right angle of the electronic ground state together with rubidium. Because of the different hyperfine splitting only rubidium is evaporatively cooled, while cesium is cooled jointly sympathetically - i.e. by theramal contact via elastic collisions with rubidium atoms. The first two chapters contain a description of interatomic interactions in ultracold gases as well as a short summary of theoretical concepts in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates. The chapters 3 and 4 contain a short presentation of the methods applied in the experiment for the production of ultracold gases as well as the experimental arrangement; especially in the framework of this thesis a new coil system has been designed, which offers in view of future experiments additionally optical access for an optical trap. Additionally the fourth chapter contains an extensive description of the experimental cycle, which is applied in order to store rubidium and cesium atoms together into the magnetic trap. The

  20. Manganese in silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.

    2012-02-01

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 °C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [ 1 1 2¯ 3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  1. Manganese in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnarsson, M.K., E-mail: marga@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden); Hallen, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 Degree-Sign C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [112{sup Macron }3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  2. Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H, Brurok; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; G, Hansson

    1999-01-01

    Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate (MnDPDP) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Aims of the study were to examine if MnDPDP possesses superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity in vitro, and if antioxidant protection can be demonstrated in an ex vivo rat heart...

  3. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...

  4. Coherent Dark States of Rubidium 87 in a Buffer Gas using Pulsed Laser Light

    CERN Document Server

    Brattke, S; Hartmann, W D

    1998-01-01

    The coherent dark resonance between the hyperfine levels F=1, m=0 and F=2, m=0 of the rubidium ground state has been observed experimentally with the light of a pulsed mode-locked diode laser operating at the D1 transition frequency. The resonance occurs whenever the pulse repetition frequency matches an integer fraction of the rubidium 87 ground state hyperfine splitting of 6.8 GHz. Spectra have been taken by varying the pulse repetition frequency. Using cells with argon as a buffer gas a linewidth as narrow as 149 Hz was obtained. The rubidium ground state decoherence cross section 1.1*10^(-18) cm^2 for collisions with xenon atoms has been measured for the first time with this method using a pure isotope rubidium vapor cell and xenon as a buffer gas.

  5. Oscillatory oxidation of Mn(II) ions by hexacyanoferrates(III) and bistability in the reductions of MnO 2 by hexacyanoferrates(II) in a CSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olexová, Anna; Melicherčík, Milan; Treindl, L'udovít

    1997-04-01

    A new transition metal oscillator based on the oxidation of Mn 2+ ions by Fe(CN) 3-6 ions in a CSTR has been found. As well as the oscillations of the absorbance of the Mn(IV) species, pH-oscillations have been observed. In the reduction of manganese dioxide by Fe(CN) 4-6 ions a kinetic bistability has been described. A skeleton mechanism described recently for Mn(II)H 2O 2 and Mn(II)Br 2 oscillators has been applied here and further developed by the idea of the catalytic activity of colloidal particles and of the assistance of the pH-value change of both main processes, i.e. of the Mn(II) oxidation by Fe(CN) 3-6 ions and of the Mn(IV) reduction by Fe(CN) 4-6 ions. This appears to be the first case where both sides of a reversible reaction are autocatalytic.

  6. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Anomalous two-photon spectral features in warm rubidium vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, C.; Light, P. S.; Milburn, T. J.; Kielpinski, D.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    We report observation of anomalous fluorescence spectral features in the environs of a two-photon transition in a rubidium vapor when excited with two different wavelength lasers that are both counterpropagating through the vapor. These features are characterized by an unusual trade-off between the detunings of the driving fields. Three different hypothetical processes are presented to explain the observed spectra: a simultaneous three-atom and four-photon collision, a four-photon excitation involving a light field produced via amplified spontaneous emission, and population pumping perturbing the expected steady-state spectra. Numerical modeling of each hypothetical process is presented, supporting the population pumping process as the most plausible mechanism.

  8. Experimental evidence for two different dynamical regimes in liquid rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmel, Franz; Morkel, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    We present evidence for changes in the dynamics of liquid rubidium with rising temperature. The thermal expansion of this liquid alkali metal shows a changing derivative with temperature in a temperature range of about 400-500 K. With neutron scattering the amplitude at the structure factor maximum demonstrates a changing slope with increasing temperature. A derived averaged structural relaxation time can be understood that an additional relaxation process sets in upon cooling. The deduced generalized viscosity and high frequency shear modulus indicate a change in dynamics in the same temperature range. All these findings point to a change in dynamics of the equilibrium liquid metal state with a dynamical crossover from a viscous to a fluid-like liquid metal well above the melting point.

  9. Crystal structure and Raman spectra of rubidium hydrogen squarate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Stéfanos L.; Diniz, Renata; Rodrigues, Bernardo L.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2005-05-01

    Rubidium hydrogen squarate (RbHC 4O 4, RbHSQ) crystallized in monoclinic space group P2 1/ c. This compound form a short asymmetric intermolecular hydrogen bond whose O-O distance is 2.482(4) Å. The hydrogen squarate anions are forming head-to-tail infinite chain hydrogen-bonding motifs. A long interplanar separation (4.15 Å) indicates that a weak π interaction occurs between hydrogen squarate anions in RbHSQ. The hydrogen bond and cation-anion interactions are the predominant driving forces in the crystal packing. The Raman spectrum of RbHSQ shows an average behaviour between squaric acid and squarate dianion, however, the vibrational modes at ca. 1800 cm -1 (CO stretching mode) and in the region 1500-1700 cm -1 (CO+CC stretching modes) are the most affected by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding interactions.

  10. Pre-Excitation Studies for Rubidium-Plasma Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Aladi, M; Barna, I.F.; Czitrovszky, Aladar; Djotyan, Gagik; Dombi, Peter; Dzsotjan, David; FöLdes, Istvan; Hamar, Gergo; Ignacz, Peter; Kedves, Miklos; Kerekes, Attila; Levai, Peter; Marton, Istvan; Nagy, Attila; Oszetzky, Daniel; Pocsai, Mihaly; Racz, Peter; Raczkevi, Bela; Szigeti, Janos; Sörlei, Zsuzsa; Szipöcs, Robert; Varga, Dezso; Varga-Umbrich, Karoly; Varro, Sandor; Vamos, Lenard; Vesztergombi, György

    2014-01-01

    The key element in the Proton-Driven-Plasma-Wake-Field-Accelerator (AWAKE) project is the generation of highly uniform plasma from Rubidium vapor. The standard way to achieve full ionization is to use high power laser which can assure the over-barrier-ionization (OBI) along the 10 meters long active region. The Wigner-team in Budapest is investigating an alternative way of uniform plasma generation. The proposed Resonance Enhanced Multi Photon Ionization (REMPI) scheme probably can be realized by much less laser power. In the following the resonant pre-excitations of the Rb atoms are investigated, theoretically and the status report about the preparatory work on the experiment are presented.

  11. Cavity-enhanced frequency up-conversion in rubidium vapour

    CERN Document Server

    Offer, Rachel F; Riis, Erling; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Arnold, Aidan S

    2016-01-01

    We report the first use of a ring cavity to both enhance the output power and dramatically narrow the linewidth ($<1\\,$MHz) of blue light generated by four wave mixing in a rubidium vapour cell. We find that the high output power available in our cavity-free system leads to power broadening of the generated blue light linewidth. Our ring cavity removes this limitation, allowing high output power and narrow linewidth to be achieved concurrently. As the cavity blue light is widely tunable over the $^{85}$Rb 5S$_{1/2} \\,\\,F=3$ $\\rightarrow$ 6P$_{3/2}$ transition, this narrow linewidth light would be suitable for second-stage laser cooling, which could be valuable for efficient $^{85}$Rb BEC production.

  12. Direct observation of atomic diffusion in warm rubidium ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Parniak, Michal

    2013-01-01

    We present a robust method for measuring the diffusion coefficients of warm atoms in buffer gases. Using optical pumping, we manipulate the atomic spin in a thin cylinder inside the cell. Then we observe the spatial spread of optically pumped atoms in time using a camera, which allows us to determine the diffusion coefficient. As an example, we demonstrate measurements of diffusion coefficients of rubidium in neon, krypton and xenon acting as buffer gases. We have determined the normalized (273 K, 760 Torr) diffusion coefficients to be 0.18\\pm0.03 cm^2/s for neon, 0.07\\pm0.01 cm^2/s for krypton, and 0.052\\pm0.006 cm^2/s for xenon.

  13. Cobalt hexacyanoferrate modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphite composite electrode as electrochemical sensor on microfluidic chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xinchun [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 132 Waihuan East Road of Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen Zuanguang, E-mail: chenzg@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 132 Waihuan East Road of Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhong Yuwen, E-mail: yu0106@163.com [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Guangdong Province, 176 Xingangxi, Guangzhou 510300 (China); Yang Fan; Pan Jianbin; Liang Yajing [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 132 Waihuan East Road of Higher Education Mega Centre, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoHCF nanoparticles modified MWCNTs/graphite electrode use for electrochemistry on electrophoresis microchip for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous, rapid, and sensitive electrochemical detection of hydrazine and isoniazid in real samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An exemplary work of CME sensor assembly onto microchip for determination of analytes with environmental significance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Manifestation of the applicability and flexibility of CME sensor for electroanalysis on microfluidic chip. - Abstract: Nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensor has received significant interest. In this work, cobalt hexacyanoferrate modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphite composite electrode was electrochemically prepared and exploited as an amperometric detector for microchip electrophoresis. The prepared sensor displayed rapid and sensitive response towards hydrazine and isoniazid oxidation, which was attributed to synergetic electrocatalytic effect of cobalt hexacyanoferrate and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The sensitivity enhancement with nearly two orders of magnitude was gained, compared with the bare carbon paste electrode, with the detection limit of 0.91 {mu}M (S/N = 3) for hydrazine. Acceptable repeatability of the microanalysis system was verified by consecutive eleven injections of hydrazine without chip and electrode treatments, the RSDs for peak current and migration time were 3.4% and 2.1%, respectively. Meanwhile, well-shaped electrophoretic peaks were observed, mainly due to fast electron transfer of electroactive species on the modified electrode. The developed microchip-electrochemistry setup was successfully applied to the determination of hydrazine and isoniazid in river water and pharmaceutical preparation, respectively. Several merits of the novel electrochemical sensor coupled with microfluidic platform, such as comparative stability, easy fabrication and

  14. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  15. The positrons emission tomography in cardiology on expecting for the rubidium 82; La tomographie par emission de positons en cardiologie en attendant le rubidium-82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, D. [Societe Francaise de Cardiologie Nucleaire et IRM, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-11-15

    The positron emission tomography in cardiology has an important place in France. A new tracer, the rubidium 82 can be used for the detection of myocardium ischemia among the patients where the SPECT was ineffective or not very useful, it will be necessary to propose a permit to market the tracer in the two next years.Recently, the Food drug administration in Usa has allowed the repayment of the rubidium 82 for the myocardium detection as normal or abnormal in the post myocardium infarction. (N.C.)

  16. A green synthetic strategy of nickel hexacyanoferrate nanoparticals supported on the graphene substrate and its non-enzymatic amperometric sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    xue, Zhonghua; He, Nan; Rao, Honghong; Hu, Chenxian; Wang, Xiaofen; Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiuhui; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2017-02-01

    Rapid glucose detection is a key requirement for both diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. A facile and green strategy to achieve spherical-shaped nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) nanoparticals supported on electrochemical reduction graphene oxide by using electrochemical cyclic voltammetry is explored. As a sensing substrate, electrochemical reduction graphene oxide deposited on a glassy carbon electrode surface exhibited obvious positive effect on the electrodeposition of NiHCF nanoparticals with spherical structure and thus effectively improved the electrical conductivity and electrochemical sensing of the proposed amperometric sensor. Proof-concept experiments demonstrated that the proposed nanocomposites modified electrode exhibited excellent sensitivity toward glucose oxidation as well as with a satisfying detection limit of 0.11 μM. More importantly, we also explore that as a simple, green and facile method, electrochemical technology can be employed and provide a new strategy for developing GO and metal hexacyanoferrate based amperometric sensing platform toward glucose and other biomolecules.

  17. Manganese in Madison's drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Thomas; Hausbeck, John; Sorsa, Kirsti

    2008-12-01

    Public concern over events of manganese-discolored drinking water and the potential for adverse health effects from exposure to excess manganese reached a high level in 2005. In response, Public Health Madison Dane County, together with the Madison Water Utility, conceived and implemented a public health/water utility strategy to quantify the extent of the manganese problem, determine the potential for adverse human health effects, and communicate these findings to the community. This strategy included five basic parts: taking an inventory of wells and their manganese levels, correlating manganese concentration with turbidity, determining the prevalence and distribution of excess manganese in Madison households, reviewing the available scientific literature, and effectively communicating our findings to the community. The year-long public health/water utility strategy successfully resolved the crisis of confidence in the safety of Madison's drinking water.

  18. Filmes de metal-hexacianoferrato: uma ferramenta em química analítica Metal-hexacyanoferrate films: a tool in analytical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanildo Luiz de Mattos

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemically modified electrodes based on hexacyanometalate films are presented as a tool in analytical chemistry. Use of amperometric sensors and/or biosensors based on the metal-hexacyanoferrate films is a tendency. This article reviews some applications of these films for analytical determination of both inorganic (e.g. As3+, S2O3(2- and organic (e.g. cysteine, hydrazine, ascorbic acid, gluthatione, glucose, etc. compounds.

  19. Effect of ferri(IIIcitrate and potassium hexacyanoferrate(III on growth of the moss Bryum argenteum Hedw. (Bryaceae in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukojević Vanja

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the manner of iron uptake from the medium, in vitro culture of moss Bryum argenteum Hedw. (Bryaceae was established. Under controlled conditions (16h light/8h dark, light intensity 47μmol m-2s-1 25±2°C, the moss was grown on basal MS medium or on MS medium enriched with various concentrations of ferri(IIIcitrate or potassium hexacyanoferrate(III. It was expected that with the organic chelate complex, Fe(III ion will be more available for the plant. Sixty days after establishing in vitro culture, the plants grown on MS medium enriched with the ferri(IIIcitrate complex were developed better than plants grown on media with the potassium hexacyanoferrate(III complex. To judge from plant production in vitro and in view of the fact that the two compounds were the only source of Fe(III, it would appear that the citrate complex makes Fe(III ions more available than potassium hexacyanoferrate(III. Further research will examine the concentrations of Fe ion uptake by plants and potential use of these tiny moss plants for the phytomining, phytoremedies and hyperaccumulating purposes.

  20. Switching off electron transfer reactions in confined media: reduction of [Co(dipic)2]- and [Co(edta)]- by hexacyanoferrate(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D; Lorenz, Bret B; Wilkins, Patricia C; Lemons, Brant G; Baruah, Bharat; Lamborn, Nathan; Stahla, Michelle; Chatterjee, Pabitra B; Richens, David T; Crans, Debbie C

    2012-03-01

    The kinetics of reduction of two cobalt(III) complexes with similar redox potentials by hexacyanoferrate(II) were investigated in water and in reverse micelle (RM) microemulsions. The RMs were composed of water, surfactant [(sodium(bis(2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate)), NaAOT], and isooctane. Compared to the reaction in water, the reduction rates of (ethylenediaminetetraacetato)cobaltate(III) by hexacyanoferrate(II) were dramatically suppressed in RM microemulsions whereas a slight rate increase was observed for reduction of bis-(2,6-dipicolinato)cobaltate(III). For example, the ferrocyanide reduction of [Co(dipic)(2)](-) increased from 55 M(-1) s(-1)in aqueous media to 85 M(-1) s(-1) in a w(o) = 20 RM. The one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) (1)H NMR and FT-IR studies are consistent with the reduction rate constants of these two complexes being affected by their location within the RM. Since reduction of [Co(edta)](-) is switched off, in contrast to [Co(dipic)(2)](-), these observations are attributed to the penetration of the [Co(edta)](-) into the interfacial region of the RM whereas [Co(dipic)(2)](-) is in a region highly accessible to the water pool and thus hexacyanoferrate(II). These results demonstrated that compartmentalization completely turns off a redox reaction in a dynamic microemulsion system by either reactant separation or alteration of the redox potentials of the reactants.

  1. Cyclohexanone and 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane mediated controlled synthesis of mixed nickel-iron hexacyanoferrate nanosol for selective sensing of glutathione and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Prem Chandra; Pandey, Ashish Kumar

    2013-02-21

    We report the cyclohexanone and 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (3-APTMS) mediated controlled synthesis of mixed nickel-iron hexacyanoferrate (Ni-Fehcf) nanosol of 34 nm average size. The new method allows the synthesis of a variety of mixed metal hexacyanoferrate (Mhcf) nanodispersion along with option for controlling the inversion of electrochemichemical behavior of Prussian blue(PB) into desired Mhcf. The typical process involves the mixing of 3-APTMS treated potassium ferricyanide with desired concentrations of nickel sulfate containing fixed amount of cyclohexanone resulting in a uniform spherical nanodispersion of mixed Ni-Fehcf. The different molar ratio of Ni : Fe (i.e. 1 : 1; 1 : 5 and 1 : 10) yielded a mixed Ni-Fehcf showing three different electrochemical properties ascribed to nickel hexacyanoferrate (Nihcf); both Nihcf and PB, and PB respectively. The mixed Ni-Fehcf resulting from a 1 : 5 Ni : Fe molar ratio has been found to be an excellent material for selective electroanalytic applications attributed to hydrogen peroxide and glutathione sensing due to the presence of PB and Nihcf behaviors respectively. The electrocatalytic property of Nihcf in mixed Ni-Fehcf is significantly better than that of conventional Nihcf for glutathione analysis and further increases on the incorporation of AuNPs.

  2. Measurement and numerical calculation of Rubidium Rydberg Stark spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Grimmel, Jens; Karlewski, Florian; Jessen, Florian; Reinschmidt, Malte; Sándor, Nóra; Fortágh, József

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of Stark shifted energy levels of $^{87}$Rb Rydberg atoms in static electric fields by means of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Electric field strengths of up to 500V/cm, ranging beyond the classical ionisation threshold, were applied using electrodes inside a glass cell with rubidium vapour. Stark maps for principal quantum numbers $n=35$ and $n=70$ have been obtained with high signal-to-noise ratio for comparison with results from ab initio calculations following the method described in [M. L. Zimmerman et al., Phys. Rev. A 20, 2251 (1979)], which was originally only verified for states around $n=15$. We also calculate the dipole matrix elements between low-lying states and Stark shifted Rydberg states to give a theoretical estimate of the relative strength of the EIT signal. The present work significantly extends the experimental verification of this numerical method in the range of both high principal quantum numbers and high electric fields with an accuracy of...

  3. Microresonator Brillouin Laser Stabilization Using a Microfabricated Rubidium Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, William; Leopardi, Holly F; Fortier, Tara M; Quinlan, Frank; Kitching, John; Papp, Scott B; Diddams, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    We frequency stabilize the output of a miniature stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) laser to rubidium atoms in a microfabricated cell to realize a laser system with frequency stability at the $10^{-11}$ level over seven decades in averaging time. In addition, our system has the advantages of robustness, low cost and the potential for integration that would lead to still further miniaturization. The SBS laser operating at 1560 nm exhibits a spectral linewidth of 820 Hz, but its frequency drifts over a few MHz on the 1 hour timescale. By locking the second harmonic of the SBS laser to the Rb reference, we reduce this drift by a factor of $10^3$ to the level of a few kHz over the course of an hour. For our combined SBS and Rb laser system, we measure a frequency noise of $4\\times10^4$ $Hz^2/Hz$ at 10 Hz offset frequency which rapidly rolls off to a level of 0.2 $Hz^2/Hz$ at 100 kHz offset. The corresponding Allan deviation is $\\leq2\\times10^{-11}$ for averaging times spanning $10^{-4}$ to $10^3$ s. By optical...

  4. Quantitative myocardial blood flow with Rubidium-82 PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Christoffer E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1) identificat......Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1...... pretest probability of CAD can support the clinical decision-making in treatment of CAD patients as a complementary tool to the invasive coronary angiography (CAG). Recently, several studies have proven Rubidium-82 ((82)Rb) PET's long-term prognostic value by a significant association between compromised...... global MFR and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), and together with new diagnostic possibilities from measuring the longitudinal myocardial perfusion gradient, cardiac (82)Rb PET faces a promising clinical future. This article reviews current evidence on quantitative (82)Rb PET's ability...

  5. Fabrication of gallium hexacyanoferrate modified carbon ionic liquid paste electrode for sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi, Behzad, E-mail: haghighi@iasbs.ac.ir; Khosravi, Mehdi; Barati, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Gallium hexacyanoferrate (GaHCFe) and graphite powder were homogeneously dispersed into n-dodecylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate and paraffin to fabricate GaHCFe modified carbon ionic liquid paste electrode (CILPE). Mixture experimental design was employed to optimize the fabrication of GaHCFe modified CILPE (GaHCFe-CILPE). A pair of well-defined redox peaks due to the redox reaction of GaHCFe through one-electron process was observed for the fabricated electrode. The fabricated GaHCFe-CILPE exhibited good electrocatalytic activity towards reduction and oxidation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The observed sensitivities for the electrocatalytic oxidation and reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at the operating potentials of + 0.8 and − 0.2 V were about 13.8 and 18.3 mA M{sup −1}, respectively. The detection limit (S/N = 3) for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was about 1 μM. Additionally, glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized on GaHCFe-CILPE using two methodology, entrapment into Nafion matrix and cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin, in order to fabricate glucose biosensor. Linear dynamic rage, sensitivity and detection limit for glucose obtained by the biosensor fabricated using cross-linking methodology were 0.1–6 mM, 0.87 mA M{sup −1} and 30 μM, respectively and better than those obtained (0.2–6 mM, 0.12 mA M{sup −1} and 50 μM) for the biosensor fabricated using entrapment methodology. - Highlights: • Gallium hexacyanoferrate modified carbon ionic liquid paste electrode was fabricated. • Mixture experimental design was used to optimize electrode fabrication. • Response trace plot was used to show the effect of electrode materials on response. • The sensor exhibited electrocatalytic activity towards H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction and oxidation. • Glucose biosensor was fabricated by immobilization of glucose oxidase on sensor.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate (C12H22MnO14... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese sulfate. 184.1461 Section 184.1461 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... manganese compounds with sulfuric acid. It is also obtained as a byproduct in the manufacture...

  8. Continuous generation of Rubidium vapor in hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Donvalkar, Prathamesh S; Clemmen, Stephane; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate high optical depths (50+/-5), lasting for hours in Rubidium-filled hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers, which represents a 1000X improvement over operation times previously reported. We investigate the vapor generation mechanism using both a continuous-wave and a pulsed light source and find that the mechanism for generating the Rubidium atoms is primarily due to thermal vaporization. Continuous generation of large vapor densities should enable measurements at the single-photon level by averaging over longer time scales.

  9. Rubidium isotope effect in superconducting Rb[sub 3]C[sub 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burk, B.; Crespi, V.H.; Zettl, A.; Cohen, M.L. (Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1994-06-06

    We have measured the resistive supercondeucting transition temperature in C[sub 60] single crystals intercalated with isotopically pure [sup 87]Rb and [sup 85]Rb and with natural abundance rubidium. We obtain a rubidium isotope effect exponent of [alpha][sub Rb]=[minus]0.028[plus minus]0.036, a result which implies that the Rb-C[sub 60] optic phonons play at most a minor role in the pairing mechanism of Rb[sub 3]C[sub 60].

  10. Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium-hexacyanoferrate modified glassy carbon electrode and catalytic activity towards ethanol electro oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Wendell M.; Marques, Aldalea L.B., E-mail: aldalea.ufma@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica Tecnologica; Cardoso, William S.; Marques, Edmar P.; Bezerra, Cicero W.B. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Departamento de Qumica; Ferreira, Antonio Ap. P. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Song, Chaojie; Zhang, Jiujun [Energy, Mining and Environment Portfolio, National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Ruthenium-based hexacyanoferrate (RuHCF) thin film modified glassy carbon electrode was prepared by drop evaporation method. The RuHCF modified electrode exhibited four redox couples in strong acidic solution (pH 1.5) attributed to Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-} ion and three ruthenium forms (Ru(II), Ru(III) and Ru(IV)), characteristic of ruthenium oxide compounds. The modified electrode displayed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ethanol oxidation in the potential region where electrochemical processes Ru(III)-O-Ru(IV) and Ru(IV)-O-Ru(VI) occur. Impedance spectroscopy data indicated that the charge transfer resistance decreased with the increase of the applied potential and ethanol concentration, indicating the use of the RuHCF modified electrode as an ethanol sensor. Under optimized conditions, the sensor responded linearly and rapidly to ethanol concentration between 0.03 and 0.4 mol L{sup -1} with a limit of detection of 0.76 mmol L{sup -1}, suggesting an adequate sensitivity in ethanol analyses. (author)

  11. Application of Nation/Cobalt Hexacyanoferrate Chemically Modified Electrodes for the Determination of Electroinactive Cations by Ion Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU,Ji-Ming(徐继明); XIAN,Yue-Zhong(鲜跃仲); SHI,Guo-Yue(施国跃); LI,Jin-Hua(李金花); JIN Li-Tong(金利通)

    2002-01-01

    An amperometric detector based on the chemical modification of Nafion and cobalt(H) hexacyanoferrate(Ⅱ, Ⅲ) thin film (Nafion/Co-CN-Fe) onto a glassy carbon (GC) electrode was firslly developed for the determination of electroinactive cations (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+ and NH4+) in single column ion chromatography. A set of well-defined peaks of electroinactive cation was obtained. The relative standard deviations (RSDs)of - peak height (nA) for these cations were all below 3.8%. The cations were detected conveniently in the linear concentration range of 6.0× 10-6-5.0 × 10-3 mol/L and their correlation coefficients were all above 0.99. Tne detection limiits of the cations were 9.2 × 10- 6 mol/L for Li + , 3.4 ×10-6 mol/L for Na+ , 6.3 × 10-7 mol/L for K+ , 7.8 × 10-7 mol/L for Rb+ , 6.2 × 10-7 mol/L for Cs+ and 6.2 × 10-6 mol/L for NH4+ , at a signal-noise ratio of 3. The method was quick, sensitive, simple and was successfully applied to the analysis of rainwater samples. The electrode was stable for a 2 week period of operation with no evidence of chemical or mechanical deterioration.

  12. In situ synthesis of thulium(III) hexacyanoferrate(II) nanoparticles and its application for glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zuchao; Zheng, Jianbin; Sheng, Qinglin; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2011-03-09

    Thulium hexacyanoferrate (TmHCF) nanoparticles (NPs) were in situ synthesized within the chitosan film on the electrode surface by a biocatalyzed reaction. The properties of the obtained nanoparticles are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The optimized conditions for the formation of TmHCF NPs were 16 mM Fe(CN)(6)(3-) and 1.5 mM Tm(3+) with an accumulation time of 20 min. Based on process of in situ synthesis of TmHCF NPs, a novel biosensor for glucose was designed, and there is a linear relationship between the current response of TmHCF NPs and glucose concentration. The linear range for glucose detection was 0.02-0.4 mM (r=0.9975, n=5) and 0.4-13.6 mM (r=0.9935, n=10) and the detection limit was 6 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

  13. A solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell with a high voltage using indium hexacyanoferrate as a redox mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Y.C.; Chen, L.C.; Ho, K.C. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    In this study, the Prussian blue analogue indium hexacyanoferrate (InHCF) was used as the redox mediator to fabricate a high-voltage solid-state titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The aim of the study was to develop a solid-state TiO{sub 2} solar cell with a high voltage. TiO{sub 2} film was deposited onto a fluoride-doped tin oxide (FTO) conducting glass using a general sol-gel procedure. The solid-state cell was assembled with a KCI-saturated poly-2-acylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) electrolyte (K-PAMPS). Cathodic and anodic peak potentials were average to obtain the formal redox potential of the couple in the K-PAMPS, which was estimated at 0.87 V vs. Ag/AgC1/saturated KCI. A memory effect was attributed to the poor contact between the InHCF mediator and the dye sensitizer. Contact problems and solid-state diffusion were identified as factors causing lower efficiency of 0.15 per cent. It was concluded that the imperfect dye/InHCF contact and the slow diffusion of K{sup +} in the InHCF thin film were responsible for the lower efficiency ratio. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  14. In vivo binding of radiocesium by two forms of Prussian blue and by ammonium iron hexacyanoferrate (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresow, B; Nielsen, P; Fischer, R; Pfau, A A; Heinrich, H H

    1993-01-01

    The effect of two forms of Prussian blue, soluble K3 Fe[Fe(CN)6] and insoluble Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3, and of ammonium iron hexacyanoferrate (II) (NH4Fe[Fe(CN)6] on intestinal radiocesium absorption was investigated in rats, pigs, and humans. In rats 5 mg of antidote administered 2 min before 134Cs tracer reduced radiocesium absorption to 2.4-6.3% of the oral dose. In pigs fed with Chernobyl-contaminated whey under normal feeding conditions for a 27 day period, radiocesium activity concentration was reduced from 360 Bq/kg in control animals to 10-30 Bq/kg by 5 g antidote/d. In man 1 g of oral Prussian blue diminished the cesium absorption from a 134Cs-labelled test meal to 5.6-6.4% of the controls. The inhibitory effects of colloidally soluble K3 Fe[Fe(CN)6] and of (NH4Fe[Fe(CN)6] were similar with slightly less inhibition by the insoluble Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3.

  15. Manganese regulates expression of manganese peroxidase by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J A; Glenn, J K; Gold, M H

    1990-01-01

    The appearance of manganese peroxidase (MnP) activity in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on the presence of manganese. Cultures grown in the absence of Mn developed normally and produced normal levels of the secondary metabolite veratryl alcohol but produced no MnP activity. Immunoblot analysis indicated that appearance of MnP protein in the extracellular medium was also dependent on the presence of Mn. Intracellular MnP protein was detectable only in cel...

  16. Effect of ferri(III)citrate and potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) on growth of the moss Bryum argenteum Hedw. (Bryaceae) in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Vukojević Vanja; Sabovljević Aneta; Sabovljević Marko S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to examine the manner of iron uptake from the medium, in vitro culture of moss Bryum argenteum Hedw. (Bryaceae) was established. Under controlled conditions (16h light/8h dark, light intensity 47μmol m-2s-1 25±2°C), the moss was grown on basal MS medium or on MS medium enriched with various concentrations of ferri(III)citrate or potassium hexacyanoferrate(III). It was expected that with the organic chelate complex, Fe(III) ion will be more available for the plant. Sixty days after es...

  17. Oxidative study of gabapentin by alkaline hexacyanoferrate(III) in room temperature in presence of catalytic amount of Ru(III) a mechanistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Timy P.; Angadi, Mahantesh A.; Salunke, Manjalee S.; Tuwar, Suresh M.

    2008-12-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of gabapentin by hexacyanoferrate(III) in aqueous alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength of 0.5 mol dm -3 was studied spectrophotometrically. The reaction is of first order in [HCF(III)] and of less than unit order in [alkali]. The reaction rate is independent upon [gabapentin]. Effects of added products, ionic strength and dielectric constant of the reaction medium have been investigated. Oxidative product of gabapentin was identified. A suitable mechanism has been proposed. The reaction constants involved in the different steps of mechanism are calculated. The activation parameters of the mechanism are computed and discussed .

  18. Observation of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in a Zeeman-Sublevel System in Rubidium Atomic Vapour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖峰; 郭瑞民; 陈帅; 张宇; 李路明; 陈徐宗

    2003-01-01

    We observed electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a Zeeman-sublevel system using rubidium atomic vapour at the temperature of 75℃, in which the width of the EIT signal is only 0.6 MHz. Two different methods were performed to observe the EIT signal in our experiment.

  19. Zeeman effect and optical pumping in atomic rubidium: a teaching experiment in quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, R.J.; Adams, S.; Seddon, G.; Golby, J.A.; Massey, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe an experiment developed recently in an undergraduate laboratory to measure the Zeeman splitting of the ground state of atomic rubidium. An optical pumping technique is employed and the magnetic field is calibrated by using free-electron spin resonance. Multiphoton absorption and power broadening of transitions are also investigated and a number of quantum principles introduced experimentally.

  20. Tuning single GaAs quantum dots in resonance with a rubidium vapor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Wang, L.; Rastelli, A.; Schmidt, O.G.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We study single GaAs quantum dots with optical transitions that can be brought into resonance with the widely used D2 transitions of rubidium atoms. We achieve resonance by Zeeman or Stark shifting the quantum dot levels. We discuss an energy stabilization scheme based on the absorption of quantum d

  1. Organic electrolyte-based rechargeable zinc-ion batteries using potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate as a cathode material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Munseok S.; Heo, Jongwook W.; Kwak, Hunho H.; Lee, Hochun; Hong, Seung-Tae

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates an organic electrolyte-based rechargeable zinc-ion battery (ZIB) using Prussian blue (PB) analogue potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate K0.86Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 (KNF-086) as the cathode material. KNF-086 is prepared via electrochemical extraction of potassium ions from K1.51Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 (KNF-151). The cell is composed of a KNF-086 cathode, a zinc metal anode, and a 0.5 M Zn(ClO4)2 acetonitrile electrolyte. This cell shows a reversible discharge capacity of 55.6 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C rate with the discharge voltage at 1.19 V (vs. Zn2+/Zn). As evidenced by Fourier electron density analysis with powder XRD data, the zinc-inserted phase is confirmed as Zn0.32K0.86Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 (ZKNF-086), and the position of the zinc ion in ZKNF-086 is revealed as the center of the large interstitial cavities of the cubic PB. Compared to KNF-086, ZKNF-086 exhibits a decreased unit cell parameter (0.9%) and volume (2.8%) while the interatomic distance of d(Fe-C) increased (from 1.84 to 1.98 Å), and the oxidation state of iron decreases from 3 to 2.23. The organic electrolyte system provides higher zinc cycling efficiency (>99.9%) than the aqueous system (ca. 80%). This result demonstrates an organic electrolyte-based ZIB, and offers a crucial basis for understanding the electrochemical intercalation chemistry of zinc ions in organic electrolytes.

  2. Selective removal of cesium from aqueous solutions with nickel (II) hexacyanoferrate (III) functionalized agricultural residue–walnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Dahu, E-mail: dingdahu@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Feng, Chuanping [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Key Laboratory of Groundwater Circulation and Evolution, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Zhenya, E-mail: zhang.zhenya.fu@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Novel biosorbent for cesium removal was derived from agricultural residue. • It could remove cesium effectively from aqueous solution. • Large size of granules makes it easy to be separated from solutions. • The volume of used biosorbent could be significantly reduced after incineration. • Incinerated biosorbent has a low volume and a low cost final disposal. - Abstract: A novel nickel (II) hexacyanoferrate (III) functionalized agricultural residue-walnut shell (Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS) was developed to selectively remove cesium ion (Cs{sup +}) from aqueous solutions. This paper showed the first integral study on Cs{sup +} removal behavior and waste reduction analysis by using biomass adsorption material. The results indicated that the removal process was rapid and reached saturation within 2 h. As a special characteristic of Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS, acidic condition was preferred for Cs{sup +} removal, which was useful for extending the application scope of the prepared biomass material in treating acidic radioactive liquid waste. The newly developed Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS could selectively remove Cs{sup +} though the coexisting ions (Na{sup +} and K{sup +} in this study) exhibited negative effects. In addition, approximately 99.8% (in volume) of the liquid waste was reduced by using Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS and furthermore 91.9% (in volume) of the spent biomass material (Cs-Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS) was reduced after incineration (at 500 °C for 2 h). Due to its relatively high distribution coefficient and significant volume reduction, Ni{sup II}HCF{sup III}-WS is expected to be a promising material for Cs{sup +} removal in practice.

  3. Aegle marmelos Mediated Green Synthesis of Different Nanostructured Metal Hexacyanoferrates: Activity against Photodegradation of Harmful Organic Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhisha Jassal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prussian blue analogue potassium metal hexacyanoferrate (KMHCF nanoparticles Fe4[Fe(CN6]3 (FeHCF, K2Cu3[Fe(CN6]2 (KCuHCF, K2Ni[Fe(CN6]·3H2O (KNiHCF, and K2Co[Fe(CN6] (KCoHCF have been synthesized using plant based biosurfactant Aegle marmelos (Bael and water as a green solvent. It must be emphasized here that no harmful reagent or solvent was used throughout the study. Plant extracts are easily biodegradable and therefore do not cause any harm to the environment. Hence, the proposed method of synthesis of various KMHCF nanoparticles followed a green path. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR. MHCF nanoparticles were used for the photocatalytic degradation of toxic dyes like Malachite Green (MG, Eriochrome Black T (EBT, Methyl Orange (MO, and Methylene Blue (MB. Under optimized reaction conditions, maximum photocatalytic degradation was achieved in case of KCuHCF nanoparticles mediated degradation process (MG: 96.06%, EBT: 83.03%, MB: 94.72%, and MO: 63.71% followed by KNiHCF (MG: 95%, EBT: 80.32%, MB: 91.35%, and MO: 59.42%, KCoHCF (MG: 91.45%, EBT: 78.84%, MB: 89.28%, and MO: 58.20%.

  4. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic Model of Manganese Carbonate Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝瑞霞; 彭省临

    1999-01-01

    Manganese carbonate can be converted to many kinds of manganese oxides when it is aerated in air and oxygen.Pure manganese carbonate can be changed into Mn3O4 and γ-MnOOH,and manganese carbonate ore can be converted to MnO2 under the air-aerating and oxygen-aerating circumstances.The oxidation process of manganese carbonate is a changing process of mineral association,and is also a converting process of valence of manganese itself.Not only equilibrium stat,but also nonequilibrium state are involved in this whole process,This process is an irreversible heterogeneous complex reaction,and oberys the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model,The oxidation rate of manganese cabonate is controlled by many factors,especially nonmanganese metallic ions which play an important role in the oxidation process of manganese carbonate.

  5. Observations of a doubly driven V system probed to a fourth level in laser-cooled rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    D'Echaniz, S R; Durrant, A V; Segal, D M; Marangos, J P; Vaccaro, J A; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2001-01-01

    Observations of a doubly driven V system probed to a fourth level in an N configuration are reported. A dressed state analysis is also presented. The expected three-peak spectrum is explored in a cold rubidium sample in a magneto-optic trap. Good agreement is found between the dressed state theory and the experimental spectra once light shifts and uncoupled absorptions in the rubidium system are taken into account.

  6. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese hypophosphite. 582.5458 Section 582.5458 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 582.5452 Section 582.5452 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese sulfate. 582.5461 Section 582.5461 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese violet. 73.2775 Section 73.2775 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive manganese violet is a violet pigment obtained by reacting phosphoric acid, ammonium...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 582.5449 Section 582.5449 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. Optical cavity for enhanced parametric four-wave mixing in rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    Brekke, E

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the implementation of a ring cavity to enhance the efficiency of parametric four-wave mixing in rubidium. Using an input coupler with 95% reflectance, a finesse of 19.6$\\pm$0.5 is achieved with a rubidium cell inside. This increases the circulating intensity by a factor of 5.6$\\pm$0.5, and through two-photon excitation on the $5s_{1/2}\\rightarrow5d_{5/2}$ transition with a single excitation laser, up to 1.9$\\pm$0.3 mW of power at 420 nm is generated, 50 times what was previously generated with this scheme. The dependence of the output on Rb density and input power has been explored, suggesting the process may be approaching saturation. The blue output of the cavity also shows greatly improved spatial quality, combining to make this a promising source of 420 nm light for future experiments.

  15. Magic wavelengths for lattice trapped Rubidium four-level active optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, Xiaorun; Chen, Jingbiao

    2012-01-01

    After pumped from $5s_{1/2}$ ground state to $6p_{1/2}$ state, the population inversion between $6s_{1/2}$ and $5p_{1/2,3/2}$ will be established for Rubidium four-level active optical clock. In this paper, we calculate AC Stark shift due to lattice trapping laser which dominates the frequency shift of clock transition in lattice trapped Rubidium four-level active optical clock. Several blue detuned magic wavelengths are found that can form desired optical lattice trapping potential. When the trapping laser is tuned to the magic wavelength, with 1 MHz frequency uncertainty and 10 kW$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$ intensity, the frequency uncertainty of clock transition due to AC Stark shift of trapping laser, is estimated to be below 0.05 mHz.

  16. Autonomous Rubidium Clock Weak Frequency Jump Detector for Onboard Navigation Satellite System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Akshay; Arora, Rajat; Banik, Alak; Mehta, Sanjay D

    2016-02-01

    Frequency jumps are common in rubidium frequency sources. They affect the estimation of user position in navigational satellite systems. These jumps must be detected and corrected immediately as they have direct impact on the navigation system integrity. A novel weak frequency jump detector is proposed based on a Kalman filter with a multi-interval approach. This detector can be applied for both "sudden" and "slow" frequency transitions. In this detection method, noises of clock data are reduced by Kalman filtering, for accurate estimation of jump size with less latency. Analysis on in-orbit rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS) phase telemetry data shows that the detector can be used for fast detection and correction of weak frequency jumps. Furthermore, performance comparison of different existing frequency jump detection techniques with the proposed detector is discussed. A multialgorithm-based strategy is proposed depending on the jump size and latency for onboard navigation satellites having RAFS as the primary frequency source.

  17. Generation and delayed retrieval of spatially multimode Raman scattering in warm rubidium vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Chrapkiewicz, Radoslaw

    2014-01-01

    We apply collective Raman scattering to create, store and retrieve spatially multimode light in warm rubidium-87 vapors. The light is created in a spontaneous Stokes scattering process. This is accompanied by the creation of counterpart collective excitations in the atomic ensemble -- the spin waves. After a certain storage time we coherently convert the spin waves into the light in deterministic anti-Stokes scattering. The whole process can be regarded as a delayed four-wave mixing which produces pairs of correlated, delayed random images. Storage of higher order spatial modes up to microseconds is possible owing to usage of a buffer gas. We study the performance of the Raman scattering, storage and retrieval of collective excitations focusing on spatial effects and the influence of decoherence caused by diffusion of rubidium atoms in different buffer gases. We quantify the number of modes created and retrieved by analyzing statistical correlations of intensity fluctuations between portions of the light scat...

  18. Generation and delayed retrieval of spatially multimode Raman scattering in warm rubidium vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapkiewicz, Radosław; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2012-12-31

    We apply collective Raman scattering to create, store and retrieve spatially multimode light in warm rubidium-87 vapors. The light is created in a spontaneous Stokes scattering process. This is accompanied by the creation of counterpart collective excitations in the atomic ensemble - the spin waves. After a certain storage time we coherently convert the spin waves into the light in deterministic anti-Stokes scattering. The whole process can be regarded as a delayed four-wave mixing which produces pairs of correlated, delayed random images. Storage of higher order spatial modes up to microseconds is possible owing to usage of a buffer gas. We study the performance of the Raman scattering, storage and retrieval of collective excitations focusing on spatial effects and the influence of decoherence caused by diffusion of rubidium atoms in different buffer gases. We quantify the number of modes created and retrieved by analyzing statistical correlations of intensity fluctuations between portions of the light scattered in the far field.

  19. 86Rubidium uptake in mononuclear leucocytes from young subjects at increased risk of developing essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Johansen, Torben; Pedersen, K E

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to assess any changes in mononuclear leucocytes from young men at increased risk of developing essential hypertension and to determine whether any changes found were associated with borderline hypertension and/or heredity. To this end we used mononuclear leucocytes...... as a cellular model for in vitro measurement of total 86rubidium uptake to give an index of sodium-potassium pump activity. Four groups of subjects were evaluated, 28 normotensive and 20 borderline hypertensive offspring of hypertensives, and 12 borderline hypertensives and 28 normotensives with normotensive...... parents. 86Rubidium uptake was significantly increased in the borderline hypertensive subjects, especially in the borderline hypertensive offspring of hypertensive patients. Our results indicate that the sodium-potassium pump is activated in mononuclear leucocytes from borderline hypertensives...

  20. The electron electric dipole moment enhancement factors of Rubidium and Caesium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nataraj, H S [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Sahoo, B K [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Das, B P [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Chaudhuri, R K [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Mukherjee, D [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Sciences, Calcutta 700 032 (India)

    2007-09-15

    The enhancement factors of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the ground states of two paramagnetic atoms; rubidium (Rb) and caesium (Cs) which are sensitive to the electron EDM are computed using the relativistic coupled-cluster theory and our results are compared with the available calculations and measurements. The possibility of improving the limit for the electron EDM using the results of our present work is pointed out.

  1. The electron electric dipole moment enhancement factors of Rubidium and Caesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Nataraj, H S; Das, B P; Chaudhuri, R K; Mukherjee, D

    2007-01-01

    The enhancement factors of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the ground states of two paramagnetic atoms; rubidium (Rb) and caesium (Cs) which are sensitive to the electron EDM are computed using the relativistic coupled-cluster theory and our results are compared with the available calculations and measurements. The possibility of improving the limit for the electron EDM using the results of our present work is pointed out.

  2. Absolute Frequency Measurement of Rubidium 5S-7S Two-Photon Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Morzynski, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Gartman, Rafal; Gawlik, Wojciech; Maslowski, Piotr; Nagorny, Bartlomiej; Ozimek, Filip; Radzewicz, Czeslaw; Witkowski, Marcin; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2013-01-01

    We report the absolute frequency measurements of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions with a cw laser digitally locked to an atomic transition and referenced to an optical frequency comb. The narrow, two-photon transition, 5S-7S (760 nm) insensitive to first order in a magnetic field, is a promising candidate for frequency reference. The performed tests yield the transition frequency with accuracy better than reported previously.

  3. Calculation of the Spin-Dependent Optical Lattice in Rubidium Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ming-Tao; HAN Liang; QI Yue-Rong; ZHANG Shou-Gang; GAO Hong; LI Fu-Li

    2012-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study to calculate the spin-dependent optical lattice with rubidium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a steady magnetic field.The optical dipole potential variation at different Zeeman levels are obtained.We also show that atoms can be transported in three dimensions by changing the polarization of the trapping field.An explanation of this transportation process in an atomic coordinate is presented.

  4. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    North, P.; Cescutti, G.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Lemasle, B.; Venn, K. A.; Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Primas, F.; Francois, P.

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other

  5. Synthesis, characterization, optical and sensing property of manganese oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigandan, R.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate. Manganese oxalate was synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of manganese acetate and ammonium oxalate along with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The structural characterization of manganese oxalate and manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by XRD. The XRD spectrum confirms the crystal structure of the manganese oxide and manganese oxalate. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD spectrum. Moreover, the diffraction peaks were broadened due to the smaller size of the particle. The band gap of manganese oxide was calculated from optical absorption, which was carried out by DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. The morphology of manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by SEM images. The FT-IR analysis confirms the formation of the manganese oxide from manganese oxalate nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated using hydrogen peroxide by cyclic voltammetry.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of uncatalyzed and ruthenium(III)-catalyzed oxidation of formamidine derivative by hexacyanoferrate(III) in aqueous alkaline medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AHMED FAWZY

    2016-05-01

    The catalytic effect of ruthenium(III) on the oxidation of N,N-dimethyl-N-(4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl) formamidine (ATF) by hexacyanoferrate(III) (HCF) was studied spectrophotometrically in aqueous alkalinemedium. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions showed first order kinetics with respect to [HCF],whereas the reaction orders with respect to [ATF] and $[OH^{-}]$ were apparently less than unity over the concentrationrange studied. A first order dependence with respect to $[Ru^{III}]$ was obtained. Increasing ionic strengthincreased the rate of uncatalyzed reaction and decreased the rate of the catalyzed one Plausible mechanisticschemes of oxidation reactions have been proposed. In both cases, the final oxidation products are identifiedas aminotriazole, dimethyl amine and carbon dioxide. The rate laws associated with the reaction mechanismsare derived. The reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanisms were calculated. Theactivation and thermodynamic parameters have been computed and discussed.

  7. Determination of rutin by flow injection chemiluminescence method using the reaction of luminol and potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) with the aid of response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Li, Haiyun; Li, Ziyuan; Hao, Zaibin; Li, Jianping

    2010-01-01

    A novel flow injection chemiluminescence (CL) method for the determination of rutin was reported. The proposed method was based on the enhanced effect of rutin on the chemiluminescence intensity of luminol and potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) reaction in NaOH medium. The variables of reaction system, such as luminol concentration, potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) concentration and NaOH concentration, were optimized with the aid of response surface methodology. For the responses prediction, a second-order polynomial model (SOPM) was applied. The optimal conditions for determination of rutin estimated by the model equation were as follows: NaOH concentration of 0.13 mol/L luminol concentration of 0.94 × 10(-6)  mol/L, and K(3) Fe(CN)(6) concentration of 1.09 × 10(-4)  mol/L. The theoretical increased ratio of CL intensity (IRI) predicted and actual IRI for 0.05 mg/L rutin under the above conditions were 99.40 and 99.74%, respectively. The SOPM model proved to be powerful for navigating the design space. Under the above optimum conditions, the increased IRI was linearly related to the concentration of rutin in the range from 0.008 to 0.100 mg/L with the regression equation IRI = 1948.20c + 5.24 (r = 0.9994) and in the range from 0.100 to 1.000 mg/L with the regression equation IRI = 1362.50 c + 61.94 (r = 0.9996). The detection limit (3σ) was of 1.95 × 10(-3)  mg/L. The sampling frequency of this method was 72/h. The method was used directly to determine rutin in tablets. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mineral resource of the month: manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corathers, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is a silver-colored metal resembling iron and often found in conjunction with iron. The earliest-known human use of manganese compounds was in the Stone Age, when early humans used manganese dioxide as pigments in cave paintings. In ancient Rome and Egypt, people started using it to color or remove the color from glass - a practice that continued to modern times. Today, manganese is predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production. Steel and cast iron together provide the largest market for manganese (historically 85 to 90 percent), but it is also alloyed with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Its importance to steel cannot be overstated, as almost all types of steel contain manganese and could not exist without it.

  11. Manganese Research Health Project (MHRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    of a GLP compliant micronucleus assay in mice according to the OECD Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals, OECD 474: Mammalian Erythrocyte... Micronucleus Test . Experimental Design The basic experimental design used at ILS and proposed for the definitive in vivo micronucleus assay in manganese...regimen, would be expected to produce lethality”. The limit dose for the in vivo micronucleus assay based on OECD 474 is 2000 mg/kg and testing in a

  12. DETERMINATION OF STABILITY CONSTANTS OF MANGANESE (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Keywords: Amino acids, dissociation constant, potentiometry, stability constant. INTRODUCTION ... constants of manganese (II) amino acid complexes using potentiometer. .... Principles of Biochemistry Third Edition,. Worth publishers, 41 ...

  13. Crystal Structure and Ionic Conductivity of Three Polymorphic Phases of Rubidium Trefluoromethyl Sulfonate, RbSO3CF3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt,L.; Dinnebier, R.; Jansen, M.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of three polymorphic phases of rubidium trifluoromethyl sulfonate (RbSO{sub 3}CF{sub 3}, rubidium 'triflate') were solved from X-ray powder diffraction data. At room temperature, rubidium triflate crystallizes in the monoclinic space group Cm with lattice parameters of a = 19.9611(5) Angstroms, b = 23.4913(7) Angstroms, c = 5.1514(2) Angstroms, = 102.758(2); Z = 16. At T = 321 K, a first-order phase transition occurs toward a monoclinic phase in space group P2{sub 1} with lattice parameters at T = 344 K of a = 10.3434(5) Angstroms, b = 5.8283(3) Angstroms, c = 5.1982(3) Angstroms, = 104.278(6); Z = (2). At T = 461 K, another phase transition, this time of second order, occurs toward an orthorhombic phase in space group Cmcm with lattice parameters at T = 510 K of a = 5.3069(2) Angstroms, b = 20.2423(10) Angstroms, c = 5.9479(2) Angstroms; Z = 4. As a common feature within all three crystal structures of rubidium triflate, the triflate anions are arranged in double layers with the lipophilic CF{sub 3} groups facing each other. The rubidium ions are located between the SO{sub 3} groups. The general packing is similar to the packing in cesium triflate. Rubidium triflate can be classified as a solid electrolyte with a specific ionic conductivity of = 9.89 x 10{sup -9} S/cm at T = 384 K and = 3.84 x 10{sup -6} S/cm at T = 481 K.

  14. Crystal structure and ionic conductivity of three polymorphic phases of rubidium trifluoromethyl sulfonate, RbSO3CF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Lars; Dinnebier, Robert; Jansen, Martin

    2006-04-17

    The crystal structures of three polymorphic phases of rubidium trifluoromethyl sulfonate (RbSO3CF3, rubidium 'triflate') were solved from X-ray powder diffraction data. At room temperature, rubidium triflate crystallizes in the monoclinic space group Cm with lattice parameters of a = 19.9611(5) A, b = 23.4913(7) A, c = 5.1514(2) A, beta = 102.758(2) degrees; Z = 16. At T = 321 K, a first-order phase transition occurs toward a monoclinic phase in space group P2(1) with lattice parameters at T = 344 K of a = 10.3434(5) A, b = 5.8283(3) A, c = 5.1982(3) A, beta = 104.278(6) degrees; Z = 2). At T = 461 K, another phase transition, this time of second order, occurs toward an orthorhombic phase in space group Cmcm with lattice parameters at T = 510 K of a = 5.3069(2) A, b = 20.2423(10) A, c = 5.9479(2) A; Z = 4. As a common feature within all three crystal structures of rubidium triflate, the triflate anions are arranged in double layers with the lipophilic CF3 groups facing each other. The rubidium ions are located between the SO3 groups. The general packing is similar to the packing in cesium triflate. Rubidium triflate can be classified as a solid electrolyte with a specific ionic conductivity of sigma = 9.89 x 10(-9) S/cm at T = 384 K and sigma = 3.84 x 10(-6) S/cm at T = 481 K.

  15. Battles with Iron: Manganese in Oxidative Stress Protection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, J. Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2012-01-01

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton chemistry, iron may counteract the benefits of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants. In this minireview, we highlight ways in which cells maximize the efficacy of manganese as an antioxidant in the midst of pro-oxidant iron. PMID:22247543

  16. Rubidium-rich feldspars and associated minerals from the Luolamäki pegmatite, Somero, Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerstra, D.K.

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubidium feldspar occurs near the core zone of the highly fractionated petalite-subtype Luolamäki granitic pegmatite in intimate intergrowth with other feldspars which are part of a characteristic sequence of alteration of pollucite. Pods of pollucite are cut by 5-20 cm-wide veins of albite, petalite, non-perthitic microcline, lepidolite and quartz, by thinner veins of fine-grained micas and spodumene, and are replaced by metasomatic adularia. Grains of rubidium feldspar occur as a potentially ordered phase in the vein microcline in association with earlier-exsolved albite, and also as late thin (< 5 μm veinlets. Rubidium feldspar also occurs as a potentially disordered phase which crystallized along with metasomatic adularia. Both generations of (Rb,K-feldspar have a similar compositional range, close to the join KAlSi3O8-RbAlSi3O8, typically with up to ~21 wt.% Rb2O (~70 mol.% Rbf and with minor Cs, but neglible Na, Ca, Fe or P. Extreme compositions have 26.0 wt.% Rb2O (89.0 mol.% Rbf and 1.26 wt.% Cs2O (2.8 mol.% Csf. The diffuse compositional gradients from microcline to rubicline are consistent with a solid-state exsolution origin, followed by fluid-assisted textural coarsening which generates distinct phase boundaries. In contrast, metasomatic adularian (Rb,K-feldspar was precipitated at low temperature (250-150°C and fine-scale zoning with variable K/Rb is preserved as a growth feature.

  17. The physics of the environmental sensitivity of rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental sensitivity is often the most significant limitation to the practical stability of rubidium frequency standards (RFS). For example, temperature sensitivity can cause a rapid frequency change of several parts in 10(exp 10) for a tactical RFS that has an aging of only 1 times 10(exp -11)/month. Other important environmental factors are barometric pressure, vibration, magnetic field, and nuclear radiation. The physical mechanisms that lie behind these environmental sensitivities are considered. These physical mechanisms are related to the performance of actual rubidium frequency standards. For the user of these devices, a better knowledge of the causes for Rb clock instability will aid in their testing and proper application. For the time frequency specialist, a review of these factors may prove useful toward improving RFS design. Some of the RFS environmental sensitivities are due to simple physical mechanisms like the effect of dc magnetic field on the Rb hyperfine resonance frequency. For these, an analysis can be based on physical principles and straightforward design factors. Other environment factors, like temperature sensitivity, are more complex combinations of many effects, both physical and practical, and the analysis often takes the form of an error budget with large unit-to-unit variations. Today's rubidium frequency standards span a wide performance range from small, inexpensive units with pp 10(exp 10) error budgets to larger, higher performance versions offering pp 10(exp 10) stabilities. For both extremes, however, environmental sensitivity can be the most significant performance limitation. Why this is the case and how to make improvements are discussed.

  18. 28W average power hydrocarbon-free rubidium diode pumped alkali laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweiback, Jason; Krupke, William F

    2010-01-18

    We present experimental results for a high-power diode pumped hydrocarbon-free rubidium laser with a scalable architecture. The laser consists of a liquid cooled, copper waveguide which serves to both guide the pump light and to provide a thermally conductive surface near the gain volume to remove heat. A laser diode stack, with a linewidth narrowed to approximately 0.35 nm with volume bragg gratings, is used to pump the cell. We have achieved 24W average power output using 4 atmospheres of naturally occurring helium ((4)He) as the buffer gas and 28W using 2.8 atmospheres of (3)He.

  19. Measurement of the hyperfine splitting of the 6S$_{1/2}$ level in rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    Galvan, A Perez; Orozco, L A

    2008-01-01

    We present a measurement of the hyperfine splitting of the 6S$_{1/2}$ excited level of rubidium using two photon absorption spectroscopy in a glass cell. The values we obtain for the magnetic dipole constant A are 239.18(03) MHz and 807.66(08) MHz for $^{85}$Rb and $^{87}$Rb, respectively. The combination of the magnetic moments of the two isotopes and our measurements show a hyperfine anomaly in this atomic excited state. The observed hyperfine anomaly difference has a value of $_{87}\\delta_{85}=-0.0036(2)$ due to the finite distribution of nuclear magnetization, the Bohr-Weisskopf effect.

  20. Magic wavelengths for the $5s-18s$ transition in rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    Goldschmidt, E A; Koller, S B; Wyllie, R; Brown, R C; Porto, J V; Safronova, U I; Safronova, M S

    2015-01-01

    Magic wavelengths, for which there is no differential ac Stark shift for the ground and excited state of the atom, allow trapping of excited Rydberg atoms without broadening the optical transition. This is an important tool for implementing quantum gates and other quantum information protocols with Rydberg atoms, and reliable theoretical methods to find such magic wavelengths are thus extremely useful. We use a high-precision all-order method to calculate magic wavelengths for the $5s-18s$ transition of rubidium, and compare the calculation to experiment by measuring the light shift for atoms held in an optical dipole trap at a range of wavelengths near a calculated magic value.

  1. Degenerate mixtures of rubidium and ytterbium for engineering open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Varun Dilip

    In the last two decades, experimental progress in controlling cold atoms and ions now allows us to manipulate fragile quantum systems with an unprecedented degree of precision. This has been made possible by the ability to isolate small ensembles of atoms and ions from noisy environments, creating truly closed quantum systems which decouple from dissipative channels. However in recent years, several proposals have considered the possibility of harnessing dissipation in open systems, not only to cool degenerate gases to currently unattainable temperatures, but also to engineer a variety of interesting many-body states. This thesis will describe progress made towards building a degenerate gas apparatus that will soon be capable of realizing these proposals. An ultracold gas of ytterbium atoms, trapped by a species-selective lattice will be immersed into a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of rubidium atoms which will act as a bath. Here we describe the challenges encountered in making a degenerate mixture of rubidium and ytterbium atoms and present two experiments performed on the path to creating a controllable open quantum system. The first experiment will describe the measurement of a tune-out wavelength where the light shift of 87Rb vanishes. This wavelength was used to create a species-selective trap for ytterbium atoms. Furthermore, the measurement of this wavelength allowed us to extract the dipole matrix element of the 5s → 6p transition in 87Rb with an extraordinary degree of precision. Our method to extract matrix elements has found use in atomic clocks where precise knowledge of transition strengths is necessary to account for minute blackbody radiation shifts. The second experiment will present the first realization of a degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of rubidium and ytterbium atoms. Using a three-color optical dipole trap (ODT), we were able to create a highly-tunable, species-selective potential for rubidium and ytterbium atoms which allowed us to use 87

  2. Saturation of atomic transitions using sub-wavelength diameter tapered optical fibers in rubidium vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, D E; Pittman, T B

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate ultralow-power saturation of the rubidium D2 transitions using a tapered optical fiber (TOF) suspended in a warm Rb vapor. A direct comparison of nonlinear absorption measurements for the TOF system with those obtained in a standard free-space vapor cell system highlights the differences in saturation behavior for the two systems. The effects of hyperfine pumping in the TOF system are found to be minimized due to the short atomic transit times through the highly confined evanescent optical mode guided by the TOF. The TOF system data is well-fit by a relatively simple empirical absorption model that indicates nanoWatt-level saturation powers.

  3. Methane-based in situ temperature rise measurement in a diode-pumped rubidium laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Yang, Zining; Wang, Hongyan; Xu, Xiaojun

    2017-02-15

    We measured active zone temperature rise of an operational diode-pumped rubidium laser non-perturbatively with methane-based near-infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS). For a Rb+ methane diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL), the temperature rise was obtained. Especially, the temperature differences (∼10  K) between lasing and un-lasing cases were well identified, which demonstrated a high sensitivity of the method. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of extending the methane-based TDLAS method to DPAL study.

  4. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  5. Story of rubidium-82 and advantages for myocardial perfusion PET imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Francois eChatal; François eRouzet; Ferid eHaddad; Cécile eBourdeau; Cédric eMathieu; Dominique eLe Guludec

    2015-01-01

    Rubidium-82 has a long story, starting in 1954. After preclinical studies in dogs showing that myocardial uptake of this radionuclide was directly proportional to myocardial blood flow, clinical studies were performed in the 80s leading to an approval in the USA in 1989. From that time thousands of patients have been tested and their results have been reported in 3 meta-analyses. Pooled patient-based sensitivity and specificity were respectively 0.91 and 0.90. By comparison with 99mTc-SPECT, ...

  6. Story of Rubidium-82 and Advantages for Myocardial Perfusion PET Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Chatal, Jean-François; Rouzet, François; HADDAD, Ferid; Bourdeau, Cécile; Mathieu, Cédric; Le Guludec, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Rubidium-82 has a long story, starting in 1954. After preclinical studies in dogs showing that myocardial uptake of this radionuclide was directly proportional to myocardial blood flow (MBF), clinical studies were performed in the 80s leading to an approval in the USA in 1989. From that time, thousands of patients have been tested and their results have been reported in three meta-analyses. Pooled patient-based sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 0.91 and 0.90. By comparison with ...

  7. Control of bacterial iron homeostasis by manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sumant; Hohle, Thomas H.; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Perception and response to nutritional iron availability by bacteria are essential to control cellular iron homeostasis. The Irr protein from Bradyrhizobium japonicum senses iron through the status of heme biosynthesis to globally regulate iron-dependent gene expression. Heme binds directly to Irr to trigger its degradation. Here, we show that severe manganese limitation created by growth of a Mn2+ transport mutant in manganese-limited media resulted in a cellular iron deficiency. In wild-type cells, Irr levels were attenuated under manganese limitation, resulting in reduced promoter occupancy of target genes and altered iron-dependent gene expression. Irr levels were high regardless of manganese availability in a heme-deficient mutant, indicating that manganese normally affects heme-dependent degradation of Irr. Manganese altered the secondary structure of Irr in vitro and inhibited binding of heme to the protein. We propose that manganese limitation destabilizes Irr under low-iron conditions by lowering the threshold of heme that can trigger Irr degradation. The findings implicate a mechanism for the control of iron homeostasis by manganese in a bacterium. PMID:20498065

  8. Preparation of Manganese Oxide Nanobelts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jisen WANG; Jinquan SUN; Ying BAO; Xiufang BIAN

    2003-01-01

    Oriented nanobelts of manganese oxide have been firstly and successfully prepared by a microemulsion techniqueunder controlled circumstances. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronmicroscope (TEM). Influences of sodium chloride and annealed temperature on the synthesis of Mn3O4 nanobeltswere investigated. It was found that NaCl is the key factor to synthesize oriented Mn3O4 nanobelts and 827 K isoptimum temperature to produce fine nanobelts. Oriented growth mechanism of Mn3O4 nanobelts was discussed.

  9. Reagent removal of manganese from ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayalovsky, G.; Migalaty, E.; Naschetnikova, O.

    2017-06-01

    The study is aimed at the technology development of treating drinking water from ground waters with high manganese content and oxidizability. Current technologies, physical/chemical mechanisms and factors affecting in ground treatment efficiency are reviewed. Research has been conducted on manganese compound removal from ground waters with high manganese content (5 ppm) and oxidizability. The studies were carried out on granular sorbent industrial ODM-2F filters (0.7-1.5 mm fraction). It was determined that conventional reagent oxidization technologies followed by filtration do not allow us to obtain the manganese content below 0.1 ppm when treating ground waters with high oxidizability. The innovative oxidation-based manganese removal technology with continuous introduction of reaction catalytic agent is suggested. This technology is effective in alkalization up to pH 8.8-9. Potassium permanganate was used as a catalytic agent, sodium hypochlorite was an oxidizer and cauistic soda served an alkalifying agent.

  10. RNASeq in C. elegans Following Manganese Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmalee, Nancy L; Maqbool, Shahina B; Ye, Bin; Calder, Brent; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-06

    Manganese is a metal that is required for optimal biological functioning of organisms. Absorption, cellular import and export, and excretion of manganese are all tightly regulated. While some genes involved in regulation, such as DMT-1 and ferroportin, are known, it is presumed that many more are involved and as yet unknown. Excessive exposure to manganese, usually in industrial settings such as mining or welding, can lead to neurotoxicity and a condition known as manganism that closely resembles Parkinson's disease. Elucidating transcriptional changes following manganese exposure could lead to the development of biomarkers for exposure. This unit presents a protocol for RNA sequencing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans to assay for transcriptional changes following exposure to manganese. This protocol is adaptable to any environmental exposure in C. elegans. The protocol results in counts of gene transcripts in control versus exposed conditions and a ranked list of differentially expressed genes for further study.

  11. Absolute absorption on rubidium D1 line: including resonant dipole-dipole interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Weller, Lee; Siddons, Paul; Adams, Charles S; Hughes, Ifan G

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on measurements of the absolute absorption spectra of dense rubidium vapour on the D1 line in the weak-probe regime for temperatures up to 170 C and number densities up to 3 \\times 10^14 cm^-3. In such vapours, modifications to the homogeneous linewidth of optical transitions arise due to dipole-dipole interactions between identical atoms, in superpositions of the ground and excited states. Absolute absorption spectra were recorded with deviation of 0.1% between experiment and a theory incorporating resonant dipole-dipole interactions. The manifestation of dipole-dipole interactions is a self-broadening contribution to the homogeneous linewidth, which grows linearly with number density of atoms. Analysis of the absolute absorption spectra allow us to ascertain the value of the self-broadening coefficient for the rubidium D1 line: \\beta/2\\pi = (0.69 \\pm 0.04) \\times 10^-7 Hz cm^3, in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  12. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Basudev [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata (India); University of Maryland, MD (United States); Scholten, Michael [University of Maryland, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D{sup +} magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 10{sup 10} atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  13. Construction and Implementation of a Low-Cost Rubidium Magneto-Optical Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Judith

    2011-03-01

    A low-cost magneto-optical trap (MOT) for ultra-cold atoms is a wonderful tool for undergraduate research and teaching laboratories that highlights many topics in modern physics. We researched and created such a MOT using two external-cavity diode lasers, two laser locking systems, optics, magnetic coils, and Rubidium vapor cells. At our undergraduate institution, we chose a combination of equipment that we fabricated ourselves together with some purchased items as an optimum balance between cost and building time. However, an emphasis was placed upon self-construction of components, such as machining the laser cavities and constructing the majority of the circuitry within the institution. The total cost of our MOT was about 25,000. We were successfully able to trap more than 10 million Rubidium atoms in 1 cubic centimeter. Such a MOT is a feasible addition to any undergraduate course of study. The theory of operation and construction methods of our MOT will be presented along with our first measurement results. Many thanks to Ithaca College and the Ithaca College Department of Physics.

  14. Hydrothermal descriptive chemistry and single crystal structure determination of cesium and rubidium thorium fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Christopher C; Mann, Matthew; McMillen, Colin D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2011-11-21

    Two new cesium thorium fluorides and three new rubidium thorium fluorides have been synthesized hydrothermally and structurally characterized. The structures of two polymorphs of CsTh(3)F(13) are described in space group P6/mmm with a = 8.2608(14) and c = 8.6519(17) and space group Pmc2(1) with a = 8.1830(16), b = 7.5780(15), and c = 8.6244(17). The analogous orthorhombic compound RbTh(3)F(13), with a = 8.1805(16), b = 7.4378(15), and c = 8.6594(17) in space group Pmc2(1), is also reported. Two other rubidium thorium fluorides are also described: RbTh(2)F(9) crystallizes in the space group Pnma where a = 8.9101(18), b = 11.829(2), and c = 7.4048(15), and Rb(7)Th(6)F(31) crystallizes in the space group R3 where a = 15.609(2) and c = 10.823(2). Comparison of these materials was made on the basis of their structures and synthesis conditions. The formation of these species in hydrothermal fluids appears to be dependent upon the concentration of the alkali fluoride mineralizer solution and, thus, the ratio of alkali ions to thorium in the system.

  15. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulaei, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moody, J. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Berti, N.; Kasparian, J. [University of Geneva (Switzerland); Mirzanejhad, S. [University of Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muggli, P. [Max-Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment. - Highlights: • Discussion the AWAKE plasma source based on photoionization of rubidium vapor with a TW/cm^2 Intensity laser with a spectrum across valence ground state transition resonances. • Examines the propagation of the AWAKE ionization laser through rubidium vapor at design density on a small scale and reduced intensity with a linear numerical model compared to experimental results. • Discusses physics of pulse propagation through the vapor at high intensity regime where strong ionization occurs within the laser pulse.

  16. Precision control of magneto-optically cooled rubidium atoms (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nic Chormaic, S.; Yarovitskiy, A.; Shortt, B.; Deasy, K.; Morrissey, M.

    2005-06-01

    Research interest in designing sources of cold atoms has significantly increased during the past ten years with the development of suitable laser sources for magneto-optical trapping and the further mastering of evaporative cooling in order to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation. The magneto-optical trap is now viewed as a standard research facility worldwide and has opened up many new exciting research directions in atomic physics. One area of interest is that of combining spherical microcavities with cold atomic sources in order to achieve efficient photon exchange between the cavity and atom for further understandings of cavity quantum electrodynamics. This could eventually lead to atom entanglement via photon exchange which would have implications for quantum logic design. However, initial attempts to achieve such interactions have been hindered by inadequate control and manipulation of the cold atom source. Here, we present work on designing and building an ultra-stable source of magneto-optically cooled rubidium atoms with a temperature in the tens of microKelvin range. We discuss the different cooling mechanisms involved in the process and present a suitable experimental arrangement including details on the ultra-high vacuum chamber, the laser systems being used and the source of rubidium vapour. Finally, we discuss some future direction for the research including the diffraction of atoms from gratings and micron-sized objects and the parameter control of the cloud of atoms.

  17. Rubidium uptake of mononuclear leukocytes from normotensive and borderline hypertensive first degree relatives to patients with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben; Nielsen, J R; Poulsgård, L

    1985-01-01

    Uptake of 86Rubidium of mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) was used as a measure of cellular sodium-potassium pump activity. 86Rb-uptake was determined with the pump stimulated mainly from inside the cells by sodium as well as with a combined stimulation from inside by sodium and from outside by Rb. In...

  18. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes.

  19. Revision of the Export Tax Rebate Policy for Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>According to a newly released circular by the Finance Ministry and the State Administration of Taxation, the export tax rebate policy for the manganese products under the tax code No. 811100100 is eliminated as from August 1, 2005. These products mainly include un-wrought manganese, manganese scrap and manganese powder.

  20. Geochemical Characteristics of Sinian Manganese Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Sinian is one of the main periods of the formation of manganese deposits in China. Sinian manganese deposits are mainly hosted in carbon-rich black shale and siliceous shale formed during the Sinian interglacial period. The composition of manganese ore is simple. The main ore mineral is manganiferous carbonates. The grade of manganese ore is about 16- 25%, with Mn/Fe>5 and P/Mn=0.006- 0.14. Based on the tectonic setting and geological and geochemical characteristics of manganese deposits, this paper discusses the process of migration and concentration of manganese and ore-forming conditions of Sinian manganese deposits in China.

  1. A non-invasive method of measuring concentrations of rubidium in rat skeletal muscle in vivo by 87Rb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: implications for the measurement of cation transport activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syme, P D; Dixon, R M; Allis, J L; Aronson, J K; Grahame-Smith, D G; Radda, G K

    1990-03-01

    1. We have used n.m.r. spectroscopy to measure rubidium concentrations in the skeletal muscle of live intact rats. Using a 1.9 T superconducting magnet and an ear-phone coil tuned to both protons (1H) and rubidium (87Rb), it was possible to make measurements of both tissue rubidium content and water content, and from these measurements to obtain the rubidium concentration. 2. The n.m.r. estimate of rubidium concentration in muscle in vivo was found to be a constant 31% (SEM 4%) of that estimated by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy in an extract of excised muscle. This is close to the predicted theoretical n.m.r. visibility of 33%. The visibility was constant for muscle rubidium concentrations ranging between 10 and 34 mmol/l. 3. Rubidium concentration measurement by this method is unaffected by variations in sample geometry, sample volume, tissue conductivity, coil tuning and amplifier gain. 4. By using this method to measure changes in tissue rubidium concentration with time in the same animal, it should now be possible to assess the activity of ion transport systems, such as sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase in vivo, by measuring the rates of change of tissue rubidium concentrations during the administration of rubidium salts. 5. This method could also be used to measure the absolute concentration of any n.m.r.-visible nucleus and could be applied to man.

  2. [Tongue play and manganese deficiency in dairy cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzias, H; Roubies, N; Polizopoulou, Z; Papasteriades, A

    1995-09-01

    The present paper discusses "tongue rolling" observed in dairy cattle farms of a region in northern Greece associated with manganese deficiency. In these animals total body manganese status was evaluated by determining hair, as well as feed manganese content. Cows exhibiting tongue rolling had significantly lower hair manganese content, compared to non-tongue rolling control animals from other farms; in addition, feedstuff analysis demonstrated that manganese and inorganic phosphorus intake of affected cows was also significantly lower.

  3. EFFECTS OF MANGANESE ON THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS: POTENTIAL LINKS

    OpenAIRE

    Soldin, OP; Aschner, M.

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace nutrient that is potentially toxic at high levels of exposure. As a constituent of numerous enzymes and a cofactor, manganese plays an important role in a number of physiologic processes in mammals. The manganese-containing enzyme, manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), is the principal antioxidant enzyme which neutralizes the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species. Other manganese-containing enzymes include oxidoreductases, transferases, hydrolases, l...

  4. Manganese oxide nanoparticles, methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruna, Hector D.; Gao, Jie; Lowe, Michael A.

    2017-08-29

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles having a chemical composition that includes Mn.sub.3O.sub.4, a sponge like morphology and a particle size from about 65 to about 95 nanometers may be formed by calcining a manganese hydroxide material at a temperature from about 200 to about 400 degrees centigrade for a time period from about 1 to about 20 hours in an oxygen containing environment. The particular manganese oxide nanoparticles with the foregoing physical features may be used within a battery component, and in particular an anode within a lithium battery to provide enhanced performance.

  5. Neurotoxicity of manganese oxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Diana M.; Khoshnan, Ali; Patterson, Paul H.; Hering, Janet G.

    2009-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity in humans has been observed as manganism, a disease that resembles Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of Mn toxicity and the chemical forms that may be responsible for its neurotoxicity are not well understood. We examined the toxicity of Mn oxide nanomaterials in a neuronal precursor cell model, using the MTS assay to evaluate mitochondrial function in living cells and the LDH assay to quantify the release of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase as a result of damage to the cell membrane. Both assays show that the toxicity of Mn is dependent on the type of Mn oxide nanomaterial and its concentration as well as on the state of cell differentiation. Following exposure to Mn oxide nanomaterials, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated, and flow cytometry experiments suggest that cell death occurred through apoptosis. During exposure to Mn oxide nanomaterials, increased levels of the transcription factor NF-κB (which mediates the cellular inflammatory response) were observed.

  6. Manganese-based Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Baker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant gap between the energy product, BH, where B is the magnetic flux density and H is the magnetic field strength, of both the traditional ferrite and AlNiCo permanent magnets of less than 10 MGOe and that of the rare earth magnets of greater than 30 MGOe. This is a gap that Mn-based magnets could potentially, inexpensively, fill. This Special Issue presents work on the development of both types of manganese permanent magnets. Some of the challenges involved in the development of these magnets include improving the compounds’ energy product, increasing the thermal stability of these metastable compounds, and producing them in quantity as a bulk material.[...

  7. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Hasbak, Philip; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent ...

  8. Manganese ferrite thin films Part II: Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, W.S.

    1972-01-01

    Some properties of evaporated manganese ferrite thin films are investigated, e.g. resistivity, magnetization reversal, Curie temperature, Faraday rotation and optical absorption. The properties are partly related to the partial oxygen pressure present during a preceding annealing process.

  9. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  10. MANGANESE DIOXIDE METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzin, L.I.

    1958-08-12

    A method of obtaining U/sup 233/ is described. An aqueous solution of neutriln irradiated thoriunn is treated by forming tberein a precipitate of manganese dioxide which carries and thus separates the Pa/sup 233/ from the solution. The carrier precipitate so formed is then dissolved in an acidic solution containing a reducing agent sufficiently electronegative to reduce the tetravalent manganese to the divalent state. Further purification of the Pa/sup 233/ may be obtained by forming another manganese dioxide carrier precipitate and subsequently dissolving it. Ater a sufficient number of such cycles have brought the Pa/sup 233/ to the desired purity, the solution is aged, allowing the formation ot U/sup 233/ by radioaetive decay. A manganese dioxide precipitate is then formed in the U/sup 233/ containing solution. This precipitate carries down any remaining Pa/sup 233/ thus leaving the separated U/sup 233/solution, from whieh it may be easily recovered.

  11. Przebieg mitozy w korzeniach siewek pszenicy pod wpływem rubidu [Course of mitosis in root seedlings of Triticum aestivum L. under the influence of rubidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Olech

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The depresion of mitosis as a result of rubidium action illustrated by the lower frequency of mitosis was found in an investigation made on roots of wheat seedlings grown on a nutrient medium which the total amount of potassium or a half of it was replaced by rubidium. The lower mitotic activity was caused by limited number of nuclei beginning prophase and by a prolonged duration of metaphase.

  12. The blue light indicator in rubidium 5S-5P-5D cascade excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem; Ali, Md. Sabir; Chakrabarti, Alok; Ray, Ayan

    2017-07-01

    The cascade system has played an important role in contemporary research areas related to fields like Rydberg excitation, four wave mixing and non-classical light generation, etc. Depending on the specific objective, co or counter propagating pump-probe laser experimental geometry is followed. However, the stepwise excitation of atoms to states higher than the first excited state deals with increasingly much fewer number of atoms even compared to the population at first excited level. Hence, one needs a practical indicator to study the complex photon-atom interaction of the cascade system. Here, we experimentally analyze the case of rubidium 5S → 5P → 5D as a specimen of two-step excitation and highlight the efficacy of monitoring one branch, which emits 420 nm, of associated cascade decay route 5D → 6P → 5S, as an effective monitor of the coherence in the system.

  13. Growth and characterization of semiorganic nonlinear optical rubidium bis-DL-malato borate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, D. [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Pachaiyappa' s College, Chennai 600030 (India); Sankar, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); Shankar, V. Siva [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Pachaiyappa' s College, Chennai 600030 (India); Murugakoothan, P. [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Pachaiyappa' s College, Chennai 600030 (India)], E-mail: pmurugakoothan@yahoo.com; Arulmozhichelvan, P. [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Pachaiyappa' s College, Chennai 600030 (India); Jayavel, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2008-01-15

    A new semiorganic nonlinear optical rubidium bis-DL-malato borate (RBMB) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow cooling technique from aqueous solution. The grown crystals have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (single crystal XRD) to confirm the formation of the crystalline phases. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic analyses confirm the presence of all the functional groups in the grown crystals. TG-DTA studies reveal that the material is stable up to 230 deg. C. The UV-vis transmission spectrum shows a lower cutoff wavelength of 230 nm. The emission of SHG using Nd:YAG laser is confirmed by a modified Kurtz and Perry powder setup.

  14. Suppression of Penning ionization in a spin-polarized mixture of rubidium and He*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, L. J.; Dall, R. G.; Rugway, Wu; Truscott, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first study of the collision dynamics of an ultra-cold spin-polarized mixture of rubidium and metastable helium (He*) atoms. Our experiment monitors ion production from the mixture for both magnetically polarized and unpolarized cases. In the unpolarized case, we observe an increase in our background ion rate. However, in the completely polarized sample the ion production is below the sensitivity of our experiment. Nonetheless, we determine an upper limit of 5×10-12 cm3 s-1 for the polarized rate constant (βRb-He*), which is two orders of magnitude below the unpolarized rate constant. Such a suppression of the He*-87Rb polarized rate was not apparent a priori and opens the intriguing possibility of creating a dual Bose-Einstein condensate comprising an alkali ground-state atom and an excited-state noble-gas atom.

  15. Trap loss in a metastable helium-rubidium magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, L. J.; Dall, R. G.; Truscott, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    We present results of the study of a simultaneously confined metastable helium (He*) and rubidium magneto-optical trap (MOT). By monitoring the trap decay of the Rb87 MOT with and without a He* MOT present, we find the light-assisted, two-body loss rate to be βRb-He*=(6±2)×10-10cm3/s. Moreover, we find that it is possible to create a large, robust Rb87-He* MOT, opening the possibility of creating a Rb87-He* Bose-Einstein condensate. This would be the first dual-species condensate incorporating an alkali metal ground-state atom and an excited-state noble gas atom.

  16. Extraction of rubidium from the concentrated brine rejected by integrated nuclear desalination systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisan, S.; Laffore, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN DER SESI, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Poletiko, C.; Simon, N. [CEA Cadarache, DTN STPA LPC, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    Rubidium is one of the elements present in the concentrated brine rejected by desalination systems. In view of the potentially high price of the pore metal, it is worthwhile to investigate its extraction, even though presently the available Rb resources are adequate enough to meet the current demands. Two methods have been reported. The first makes use of the ion-exchange resins and the second of the complexation of Rb with specific molecules (calixarenes) followed by one or more nano-filtration/reverse osmosis (NF/RO) stages. First results of calculations indicate that the two methods would be technically very attractive but much experimentation would still be required before an industrial scale extraction process can be evolved. (authors)

  17. Efficient light storage with reduced energy loss via nonlinear compensation in rubidium vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Hong-Li; Xue, Yan; Wu, Jin-Hui; Xu, Huai-Liang; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2016-06-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of efficient light storage based on a modified technique of electromagnetically induced transparency in hot rubidium vapor. By introducing an auxiliary pump field to go beyond the Λ -type configuration, we find that the undesired four-wave mixing can be greatly suppressed to result in sufficiently reduced energy loss of a probe pulse. The light storage efficiency can be as high as  ∼80% within the storage time of 100 ns with the pump field applied, which is almost 6 times larger than that in the absence of the pump field. We may also amend the light storage efficiency in a linear way by increasing the optical depth of our atomic vapor even without saturation effect. We obtain, in fact, an amplified probe pulse via Raman gain during light storage and retrieval, which should have practical applications in classical and quantum information processing.

  18. Neutron powder diffraction and theory-aided structure refinement of rubidium and cesium ureate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterri, Kjersti B.; Deringer, Volker L.; Houben, Andreas; Jacobs, Philipp [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Kumar, Chogondahalli M.N. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS), Outstation at SNS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States). Chemical and Engineering Materials Div.; Dronskowski, Richard [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA-HPC)

    2016-08-01

    Urea (CN{sub 2}H{sub 4}O) is a fundamental biomolecule whose derivatives are abundant throughout chemistry. Among the latter, rubidium ureate (RbCN{sub 2}H{sub 3}O) and its cesium analog (CsCN{sub 2}H{sub 3}O) have been described only very recently and form the first structurally characterized salts of deprotonated urea. Here, we report on a neutron diffraction study on the aforementioned alkaline-metal ureates, which affords the positions for all hydrogen atoms (including full anisotropic displacement tensors) and thus allows us to gain fundamental insights into the hydrogen-bonding networks in the title compounds. The structure refinements of the experimental neutron data proceeded successfully using starting parameters from ab initio simulations of atomic positions and anisotropic displacement parameters. Such joint experimental-theoretical refinement procedures promise significant practical potential in cases where complex solids (organic, organometallic, framework materials) are studied by powder diffraction.

  19. High-precision masses of neutron-deficient rubidium isotopes using a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Bollen, G; Guénaut, C; Herfurth, F; Herlert, A; Kluge, H J; Lunney, D; Schwarz, S; Schweikhard, L; Weber, C; Yazidjian, C

    2007-01-01

    The atomic masses of the neutron-deficient radioactive rubidium isotopes $^{74-77,79,80,83}$Rb have been measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. Using the time-of-flight cyclotron resonance technique, relative mass uncertainties ranging from $1.6 \\times 10^{-8}$ to $5.6 \\times 10^{-8}$ were achieved. In all cases, the mass precision was significantly improved as compared with the prior Atomic-Mass Evaluation; no significant deviations from the literature values were observed. The exotic nuclide $^{74}$Rb with a half-life of only 65 ms, is the shortest-lived nuclide on which a high-precision mass measurement in a Penning trap has been carried out. The significance of these measurements for a check of the conserved-vector-current hypothesis of the weak interaction and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is discussed.

  20. Crystal and molecular structure of rubidium peroxodicarbonate Rb2[C2O6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnebier, Robert E; Vensky, Sascha; Jansen, Martin

    2003-09-22

    We report the crystal structure of rubidium peroxodicarbonate, which was synthesized by electrocrystallization at T=257 K, from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with four formula units per unit cell and cell parameters of a=7.9129(1), b=10.5117(1), c=7.5559(1) A, beta=102.001(1) degrees, and V=614.75(1) A(3). The packing can be considered as a strongly distorted CsCl type of structure. The conformation of the peroxodicarbonate anion was found to be planar (C(2h) symmetry), in contrast to the staggered conformation of the peroxodicarbonate anion in the respective potassium peroxodicarbonate. The different conformation is attributed to packing effects.

  1. A rubidium Mx-magnetometer for measurements on solid state spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel; Siegel, Steven; Grisanti, Emily; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2017-02-01

    The detection of environmental magnetic fields is well established by optically pumped atomic magnetometers. Another focus of magnetometry can be the research on magnetic or spin-active solid-state samples. Here we introduce a simple and compact design of a rubidium-based Mx magnetometer, which allows for hosting solid-state samples. The optical, mechanical, and electrical design is reported, as well as simple measurements which introduce the ground-state spin-relaxation time, the signal-to-noise ratio of a measurement, and subsequently the overall sensitivity of the magnetometer. The magnetometer is optimized for the most sensitive operation with respect to laser power and magnetic field excitation at the Larmor frequency.

  2. Laboratory evaluation of rubidium as a long-lasting marker for bloodfeeding sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Stout, R W; Foil, L D

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of the trace element rubidium (Rb) as a long-lasting systemic biomarker for bloodfeeding females of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli. Baits containing Rb chloride were found to be palatable to hamsters in this study. We were able to detect Rb using a portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer in all sand flies that fed on Rb-treated hamsters for at least 14 d postbloodmeal. We also detected Rb in sand flies that took a bloodmeal from hamsters up to 10 d after the hamsters were withdrawn from a Rb-treated diet. Results of this study constitute proof of concept for the incorporation of Rb chloride into rodent baits for marking bloodfeeding sand flies, and suggest that Rb marking could be used as a technique for evaluating rodent-targeted sand fly control methods and in ecological studies on sand flies.

  3. A Rubidium M$_{\\mathrm{x}}$-magnetometer for Measurements on Solid State Spins

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Daniel; Grisanti, Emily; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2016-01-01

    The detection of environmental magnetic fields is well established by optically pumped atomic magnetometers. Another focus of magnetometry can be the research on magnetic or spin-active solid-state samples. Here we introduce a simple and compact design of a rubidium-based M$_{\\mathrm{x}}$-magnetometer, which allows for hosting solid-state samples. The optical, mechanical and electrical design is reported, as well as simple measurements which introduce the ground-state spin-relaxation time, the signal-to-noise ratio of a measurement, and subsequently the overall sensitivity of the magnetometer. The magnetometer is optimized for the most sensitive operation with respect to laser power and magnetic field excitation at the Larmor frequency.

  4. Production of rubidium Bose-Einstein condensate in an optically-plugged magnetic quadrupole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Dong-Fang; Kong, Ling-Ran; Li, Kai; Jiang, Kai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We have experimentally produced rubidium Bose-Einstein condensate in an optically-plugged magnetic quadrupole (OPQ) trap. A far blue-detuned focused laser beam with a wavelength of 532 nm is plugged in the center of the magnetic quadrupole trap to increase the number of trapped atoms and suppress the heating. A radio frequency (RF) evaporative cooling in the magneto-optical hybrid trap is applied to decrease the atom temperature into degeneracy. The atom number of the condensate is $1.2(0.4)\\times10^5$ and the temperature is below 100 nK. We have also studied characteristic behaviors of the condensate, such as phase space density (PSD), condensate fraction and anisotropic expansion.

  5. Pulse reshaping in nearly resonant interaction of femtosecond pulses with dense rubidium vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdović, Silvije; Skenderović, Hrvoje; Pichler, Goran

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of intense femtosecond pulses resonant with the atomic rubidium vapor results in phenomenon known as conical emission. The origin of this phenomenon is connected with self-phase modulation in time domain accompanied with spatial self-focusing for blue-detuned pulses. When the laser central wavelength is red-detuned the self-defocusing occurs. Using frequency-resolved optical gating measurements and simple modeling of pulse propagation within the linear dispersion theory it is shown that the retrieved phase of the propagated pulse, and the associated instantaneous frequency, shows evidence of both linear dispersion and self-phase modulation. These results are consistent with the theory of the intensity dependent nonlinear refraction index in medium where linear dispersion contributes significantly to pulse reshaping.

  6. Manganese: Its Speciation, Pollution and Microbial Mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Sinha; Sunil Kumar Khare

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is known to be one of the essential trace elements and has plenty of applications. Inspite of its essential nature, concerns are arising due to its toxic nature at higher concentration. Several methods of removing manganese from environment have been proposed during the last few decades. However, the most favourable option based on cost-effectiveness, performance, and simplicity is still under investigation. The current review summarizes updated information on various technical aspe...

  7. The impact of prompt gamma compensation on myocardial blood flow measurements with rubidium-82 dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Ian S; Memmott, Matthew J; Tonge, Christine M; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2016-09-13

    Rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion imaging is a well-established technique for assessing myocardial ischemia. With continuing interest on myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements, there is a requirement to fully appreciate the impact of technical aspects of the process. One such factor for rubidium-82 is prompt gamma compensation (PGC). This study aims to assess the impact of PGC on MBF and MFR calculated from dynamic Rb-82 data. Dynamic rest and stress images were acquired on a Siemens Biograph mCT and reconstructed with and without PGC in 50 patients (29 male). MBF and MFR were measured in the three main coronary territories as well as globally. With PGC, statistically significant reductions in MBF were observed in LAD (-6.9%), LCx (-4.8%), and globally (-6.5%) but only in obese patients. Significant increases in MBF were observed in RCA (+6.4%) in only nonobese patients. In very obese patients, differences of up to 40% in MBF were observed between PGC and non-PGC images. In nearly all cases, similar PGC differences were observed at stress and rest so there were no significant differences in MFR; however, in a small number of very obese patients, differences in excess of 20% were observed. PGC results in statistically significant changes in MBF, with the greatest reductions observed in the LAD and LCx territories of obese patients. In most cases, the impact on stress and rest data is of similar relative magnitudes and changes to MFR are small.

  8. Solvent extraction of rubidium from gold waste using conventional SX and new CFE methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Reza Tavakoli Mohammadi; Seyed Mohammad Javad Koleini; Sepideh Javanshir; Hossein Abolghasemi; Mahmoud Abdollahy

    2015-01-01

    Solvent extraction (SX) of rubidium (Rb) from leaching filtrate of gold waste (GW) in Mouteh Processing Plant by 18-crown-6 (18C6) was studied.High potential of new column flotoextraction (CFE) method in extraction of Rb from dilute solutions was also demonstrated.First,the factors affecting SX of Rb from a synthetic rubidium sulfate solution (containing 100 mg·L-1 Rb) were identified.0.05 mol·L-1 18C6 in kerosene,0.02 mol·L-1 picric acid in aqueous phase,aqueous to organic (A/O) ratio of 1,pH 7 and mixing time of 15 min are the optimum values for affective factors.The three-stage precipitation with sodium carbonate,pH adjustment with sulfuric acid and two-stage evaporation and crystallization were conducted to purify the leaching from impurities such as Fe,Al,Mn,Ca and especially competing cations of K and Na.Almost complete extraction of Rb and K from final filtrate containing 0.08 mol·L-1 picric acid was performed using 0.2 mol·L-1 18C6 in kerosene.The Rb and K strippings of 99.12 % and 9.93 %,respectively,are obtained with 2 mol·L-1 nitric acid with A/O ratio of 2.Finally,the performance comparison of the CFE and SX methods in similar conditions shows increased extraction of K and Rb by 16 % and 5 %,respectively,using CFE method.

  9. 2011 investigation of internal contamination with radioactive strontium following rubidium Rb 82 cardiac PET scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Satish K; Chang, Arthur; Murphy, Matthew W; Buzzell, Jennifer; Ansari, Armin; Whitcomb, Robert C; Miller, Charles; Jones, Robert; Saunders, David P; Cavicchia, Philip; Watkins, Sharon M; Blackmore, Carina; Williamson, John A; Stephens, Michael; Morrison, Melissa; McNees, James; Murphree, Rendi; Buchanan, Martha; Hogan, Anthony; Lando, James; Nambiar, Atmaram; Torso, Lauren; Melnic, Joseph M; Yang, Lucie; Lewis, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    During routine screening in 2011, US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) identified 2 persons with elevated radioactivity. CBP, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, informed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that these people could have increased radiation exposure as a result of undergoing cardiac Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans several months earlier with rubidium Rb 82 chloride injection from CardioGen-82. We conducted a multistate investigation to assess the potential extent and magnitude of radioactive strontium overexposure among patients who had undergone Rb 82 PET scans. We selected a convenience sample of clinical sites in 4 states and reviewed records to identify eligible study participants, defined as people who had had an Rb 82 PET scan between February and July 2011. All participants received direct radiation screening using a radioisotope identifier able to detect the gamma energy specific for strontium-85 (514 keV) and urine bioassay for excreted radioactive strontium. We referred a subset of participants with direct radiation screening counts above background readings for whole body counting (WBC) using a rank ordering of direct radiation screening. The rank order list, from highest to lowest, was used to contact and offer voluntary enrollment for WBC. Of 308 participants, 292 (95%) had direct radiation screening results indistinguishable from background radiation measurements; 261 of 265 (98%) participants with sufficient urine for analysis had radioactive strontium results below minimum detectable activity. None of the 23 participants who underwent WBC demonstrated elevated strontium activity above levels associated with routine use of the rubidium Rb 82 generator. Among investigation participants, we did not identify evidence of strontium internal contamination above permissible levels. This investigation might serve as a model for future investigations of radioactive internal contamination incidents.

  10. The KLM + KLN Auger electron spectrum of rubidium in different matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoyatov, A. Kh; Kovalík, A.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Filosofov, D. V.; Vénos, D.; Lee, B. Q.; Ekman, J.; Baimukhanova, A.

    2017-08-01

    The KLM + KLN Auger electron spectrum of rubidium (Z = 37) emitted in the electron capture decay of radioactive 83Sr in a polycrystalline platinum matrix and also 85Sr in polycrystalline platinum and carbon matrices as well as in an evaporated layer onto a carbon backing were experimentally studied in detail for the first time using a combined electrostatic electron spectrometer. Energies, relative intensities, and natural widths of fifteen basic spectrum components were determined and compared with both theoretical predictions and experimental data for krypton (Z = 36). Relative spectrum line energies obtained from the semi-empirical calculations in intermediate coupling scheme were found to agree within 3σ with the measured values while disagreement with experiment exceeding 3σ was often observed for values obtained from our multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations. The absolute energy of the dominant spectrum component given by the semi-empirical approach agrees within 1σ with the measured value. Shifts of +(0.2 ± 0.2) and -(1.9 ± 0.2) eV were measured for the dominant KLM spectrum components between the 85Sr sources prepared by vacuum evaporation on and implanted into the carbon foil, respectively, relative to 85Sr implanted into the platinum foil. A value of (713 ± 2) eV was determined for the energy difference of the dominant components of the KLM + KLN Auger electron spectra of rubidium and krypton generated in the polycrystalline platinum matrix. From the detailed analysis of the measured data and available theoretical results, the general conclusion can be drawn that the proper description of the KLM + KLN Auger electron spectrum for Z around 37 should still be based on the intermediate coupling of angular momenta taking into account relativistic effects.

  11. Story of rubidium-82 and advantages for myocardial perfusion PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois eChatal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubidium-82 has a long story, starting in 1954. After preclinical studies in dogs showing that myocardial uptake of this radionuclide was directly proportional to myocardial blood flow, clinical studies were performed in the 80s leading to an approval in the USA in 1989. From that time thousands of patients have been tested and their results have been reported in 3 meta-analyses. Pooled patient-based sensitivity and specificity were respectively 0.91 and 0.90. By comparison with 99mTc-SPECT, 82Rb-PET had a much better diagnostic accuracy, especially in obese patients with BMI (Body Mass Index ≥30 kg/m2 (85% versus 67% with SPECT and in women with large breasts. A great advantage of 82Rb-PET is its capacity to accurately quantify myocardial blood flow. Quite importantly it has been recently shown that coronary flow reserve is associated with adverse cardiovascular events independently of luminal angiographic severity. Moreover coronary flow reserve is a functional parameter particularly useful in the estimate of microvascular dysfunction such as in diabetes mellitus. Due to the very short half-life of rubidium-82, the effective dose calculated for a rest/stress test is roughly equivalent to the annual natural exposure and even less when stress-only is performed with a low activity compatible with a good image quality with the last generation 3D PET scanners.There is still some debate on the relative advantages of 82Rb-PET with regard to 99mTc-SPECT. For the last ten years, great technological advances substantially improved performances of SPECT with its accuracy getting closer to this of 82Rb/PET. Currently the main advantages of PET are its capacity to accurately quantify myocardial blood flow and to deliver a low radiation exposure.

  12. Story of Rubidium-82 and Advantages for Myocardial Perfusion PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, Jean-François; Rouzet, François; Haddad, Ferid; Bourdeau, Cécile; Mathieu, Cédric; Le Guludec, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Rubidium-82 has a long story, starting in 1954. After preclinical studies in dogs showing that myocardial uptake of this radionuclide was directly proportional to myocardial blood flow (MBF), clinical studies were performed in the 80s leading to an approval in the USA in 1989. From that time, thousands of patients have been tested and their results have been reported in three meta-analyses. Pooled patient-based sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 0.91 and 0.90. By comparison with (99m)Tc-SPECT, (82)Rb PET had a much better diagnostic accuracy, especially in obese patients with body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (85 versus 67% with SPECT) and in women with large breasts. A great advantage of (82)Rb PET is its capacity to accurately quantify MBF. Quite importantly, it has been recently shown that coronary flow reserve is associated with adverse cardiovascular events independently of luminal angiographic severity. Moreover, coronary flow reserve is a functional parameter particularly useful in the estimate of microvascular dysfunction, such as in diabetes mellitus. Due to the very short half-life of rubidium-82, the effective dose calculated for a rest/stress test is roughly equivalent to the annual natural exposure and even less when stress-only is performed with a low activity compatible with a good image quality with the last generation 3D PET scanners. There is still some debate on the relative advantages of (82)Rb PET with regard to (99m)Tc-SPECT. For the last 10 years, great technological advances substantially improved performances of SPECT with its accuracy getting closer to this of (82)Rb/PET. Currently, the main advantages of PET are its capacity to accurately quantify MBF and to deliver a low radiation exposure.

  13. Composition and recovery method for electrolytic manganese residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶长元; 李明艳; 刘作华; 杜军

    2009-01-01

    According to the statistic analysis,the reserve of manganese in electrolytic manganese residue deposit is over 780 kt. The average contents of available manganese and ammonium reach 3.90% and 1.68% (mass fraction),respectively. Large amount of manganese compounds and ammonium sulfate are detruded without any treatment or recovery. The compositions of the main elements in electrolytic manganese residue were analyzed comprehensively based on the extensive research data. According to the new development of electrolytic manganese residue comprehensively used in recent years,a water washing residue-twice precipitation process was also proposed. The experimental results indicate that manganese dioxide silicon dioxide and calcium sulfate are presented as amorphous state in the manganese residues. The recovery rates of manganese and nitrogen reach up to 99.5% and 94.5 %,respectively. The recovery process can be easily implemented,environment-friendly and fitting for industrial production.

  14. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  15. Biogeochemical cycling of manganese in Oneida Lake, New York: whole lake studies of manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    Oneida Lake, New York is a eutrophic freshwater lake known for its abundant manganese nodules and a dynamic manganese cycle. Temporal and spatial distribution of soluble and particulate manganese in the water column of the lake were analyzed over a 3-year period and correlated with other variables such as oxygen, pH, and temperature. Only data from 1988 are shown. Manganese is removed from the water column in the spring via conversion to particulate form and deposited in the bottom sediments. This removal is due to biological factors, as the lake Eh/pH conditions alone can not account for the oxidation of the soluble manganese Mn(II). During the summer months the manganese from microbial reduction moves from the sediments to the water column. In periods of stratification the soluble Mn(II) builds up to concentrations of 20 micromoles or more in the bottom waters. When mixing occurs, the soluble Mn(II) is rapidly removed via oxidation. This cycle occurs more than once during the summer, with each manganese atom probably being used several times for the oxidation of organic carbon. At the end of the fall, whole lake concentrations of manganese stabilize, and remain at about 1 micromole until the following summer, when the cycle begins again. Inputs and outflows from the lake indicate that the active Mn cycle is primarily internal, with a small accumulation each year into ferromanganese nodules located in the oxic zones of the lake.

  16. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future.

  17. Manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen and scrap recycling workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, F; Kristiansen, J; Lauritsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Cast iron products are alloyed with small quantities of manganese, and foundry furnacemen are potentially exposed to manganese during tapping and handling of smelts. Manganese is a neurotoxic substance that accumulates in the central nervous system, where it may cause a neurological disorder...... that bears many similarities to Parkinson's disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen by a combined measuring of blood-manganese (B-Mn) and manganese in ambient air (air-Mn)....

  18. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, W W; Angle, C R; Willcockson, N K; Padula, M A; Korn, T

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a "frog shop" for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6-10 years before and 1.2-3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m3 in 29% and 0.2 mg/m3 in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR' interval) and the rates of change at low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (0.15-0.40 Hz). MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used. The five frog shop workers had abnormal sympathovagal balance with decreased high frequency variability (increased ln LF/ln HF). Seven of the eight workers had symptoms of autonomic dysfunction and significantly decreased heart rate variability (rMSSD) but these did not distinguish the relative exposure. Mood or affect was disturbed in all with associated changes in short-term memory and attention in four of the subjects. There were no significant correlations with serum or urine manganese. Power spectrum analysis of 24-h ambulatory ECG indicating a decrease in parasympathetic high frequency activation of heart rate variability may provide a sensitive index of central autonomic dysfunction reflecting increased exposure to manganese, although the contribution of exposures to solvents and other metals cannot be excluded. Neurotoxicity due to the gouging

  19. Leaching of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by electro-reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Chen, Hongliang; Tao, Changyuan

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an improved process for leaching manganese from electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) by electro-reduction was developed. The mechanisms of the electro-reduction leaching were investigated through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and Brunauer Emmett Teller. The results show that the electric field could change the surface charge distribution of EMR particles, and the high-valent manganese can be reduced by electric field. The leaching efficient of manganese reached 84.1% under the optimal leaching condition: 9.2 wt% H2SO4, current density of 25 mA/cm(2), solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:5, and leaching time for 1 h. It is 37.9% higher than that attained without an electric field. Meanwhile, the manganese content in EMR decreased from 2.57% to 0.48%.

  20. Direct Measurement of Light Speed Reduction in a Rubidium Vapour Medium Coherently Prepared by Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂鲜花; 王谨; 江开军; 何明; 李可; 仲嘉琪; 詹明生

    2003-01-01

    We have experimentally observed the reduction of light speed in a rubidium vapour medium coherently prepared by electromagnetically induced transparency.The light speed reduction was deduced by directly measuring the time delay of a probe light when it passed through the medium.The time delay varies with the intensity of the coupling laser,and the typical time delay we recorded was 1.8 μs,corresponding to a light speed of 56000m/s.

  1. Effects of water concentration in the coating solution on the wall relaxation rate of octadecyltrichlorosilane coated rubidium vapor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guiying; Wei, Lihua; Wang, Meiling; Zhao, Kaifeng, E-mail: zhaokf@fudan.edu.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China and Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-01-28

    High quality anti-relaxation surface coatings for atomic vapor cells are essential for the preservation of atomic spin coherence and the enhancement of measurement sensitivity. In this paper, we studied the effects of water concentration in octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) coating solution on the relaxation rate and its reproducibility of OTS coated Rubidium vapor cells. We found that appropriate water concentration can improve the anti-relaxation performance of OTS coated cells.

  2. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    North, P; Jablonka, P; Hill, V; Shetrone, M; Letarte, B; Lemasle, B; Venn, K A; Battaglia, G; Tolstoy, E; Irwin, M J; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2012-01-01

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other elements in these galaxies, including alpha and iron-peak ones, which allowed us to build [Mn/Fe] and [Mn/alpha] versus [Fe/H] diagrams. The Mn abundances imply sub-solar [Mn/Fe] ratios for the stars in all four galaxies examined. In Sculptor, [Mn/Fe] stays roughly constant between [Fe/H]\\sim -1.8 and -1.4 and decreases at higher iron abundance. In Fornax, [Mn/Fe] does not vary in any significant way with [Fe/H]. The relation between [Mn/alpha] and [Fe/H] for the dSph galaxies is clearly systematically offset from that for the Milky Way, which reflects the different star formation histories of the respective galaxies. The [Mn/alpha] behavior can be interpreted as a result of the metal-dependent Mn yields of type II and ...

  3. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  4. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); H.J. Kuijpers (Harold)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instabi

  5. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Kuijpers, H.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later,

  6. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. Essentiality, Toxicity and Uncertainty in the Risk Assessment of Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk assessments of manganese by inhalation or oral routes of exposure typically acknowledge the duality of manganese as an essential element at low doses and a toxic metal at high doses. Previously, however, risk assessors were unable to describe manganese pharmacokinetics quant...

  9. Kinetics of Nitrogen Diffusion in Granular Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-zhu; XU Chu-shao; ZHAO Yue-ping

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and the influence of time on granular manganese nitriding were studied by means of a vacuum resistance furnace, X-ray diffraction technique, and LECO TC-436 oxygen/nitrogen determinator. The longer the nitriding time, the more the nitrogen pickup. Except for a trace of oxide MnO that developed, the metal manganese could thoroughly be nitrided to form Mn4N and a little ζ-phase (the stoichiometric components as Mn2N) with the nitriding time lasting. A kinetic model is developed to reveal the nitriding situation and agrees well with the experimental results.

  10. Miniature atomic scalar magnetometer for space based on the rubidium isotope 87Rb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Haje; Strohbehn, Kim; Tejada, Francisco; Andreou, Andreas G.; Kitching, John; Knappe, Svenja; Lehtonen, S. John; London, Shaughn M.; Kafel, Matiwos

    2016-08-01

    A miniature atomic scalar magnetometer based on the rubidium isotope 87Rb was developed for operation in space. The instrument design implements both Mx and Mz mode operation and leverages a novel microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabricated vapor cell and a custom silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit. The vapor cell has a volume of only 1 mm3 so that it can be efficiently heated to its operating temperature by a specially designed, low-magnetic-field-generating resistive heater implemented in multiple metal layers of the transparent sapphire substrate of the SOS-CMOS chips. The SOS-CMOS chip also hosts the Helmholtz coil and associated circuitry to stimulate the magnetically sensitive atomic resonance and temperature sensors. The prototype instrument has a total mass of fewer than 500 g and uses less than 1 W of power, while maintaining a sensitivity of 15 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, comparable to present state-of-the-art absolute magnetometers.

  11. Two-Photon Absorption Spectroscopy of Rubidium with a Dual-Comb Tequnique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Akiko; Yoshida, Satoru; Hariki, Takuya; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2017-06-01

    Dual-comb spectroscopies have great potential for high-resolution molecular and atomic spectroscopies, thanks to the broadband comb spectrum consisting of dense narrow modes. In this study, we apply the dual-comb system to Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectroscopy. The outputs of two frequency combs excite several two-photon transitions of rubidium, and we obtained broadband Doppler-free spectra from dual-comb fluorescence signals. The fluorescence detection scheme circumvents the sensitivity limit which is effectively determined by the dynamic range of photodetectors in absorption-based dual-comb spectroscopies. Our system realized high-sensitive, Doppler-free high-resolution and broadband atomic spectroscopy. A part of observed spectra of 5S_{1/2} - 5D_{5/2} transition is shown in the figure. The hyperfine structures of the F" = 1 - F' = 3,2,1 transitions are fully-resolved and the spectral widths are approximately 5 MHz. The absolute frequency axis is precisely calibrated from comb mode frequencies which were stabilized to a GPS-disciplined clock. This work was supported by JST through the ERATO MINOSHIMA Intelligent Optical Synthesizer Project and Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows (16J02345). A. Nishiyama, S. Yoshida, Y. Nakajima, H. Sasada, K. Nakagawa, A. Onae, K. and Minoshima, Opt. Express 24, 25894 (2016). A. Hipke, S. A. Meek, T. Ideguchi, T.W. Hänsch, and N. Picqué, Phys. Rev. A 90, 011805(R) (2014).

  12. Magic-wavelength optical dipole trap of cesium and rubidium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmin; Cheng, Yongjie; Guo, Shanlong; Yang, Baodong; He, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Optical dipole traps (ODT) with far-off-resonance laser are important tools in more and more present cold-atom experiments, which allow confinement of laser-cooled atoms with a long storage time. Particularly, the magic wavelength ODT can cancel the position-dependent spatially inhomogeneous light shift of desired atomic transition, which is introduced by the ODT laser beam. Now it plays an important role in the state-insensitive quantum engineering and the atomic optical clock. To verify the magic wavelength or the magic wavelength combination for D2 line transition of cesium (Cs) and rubidium (Rb) atoms, we calculated and analyzed the light shift of the 133Cs 6S1/2 - 6P3/2 transition for a monochromatic ODT, and also the 87Rb 5S1/2 - 5P3/2 transition for a dichromatic ODT with a laser frequency ratio of 2:1. Also a dichromatic magic-wavelength ODT laser system for 87Rb atoms is proposed and experimentally realized by employing the quasi-phase-matched frequency doubling technique with telecom laser and fiber amplifier.

  13. Nuclear structure studies of the neutron-rich Rubidium isotopes using Coulomb excitation

    CERN Multimedia

    Reiter, P; Blazhev, A A; Voulot, D; Meot, V H; Simpson, G S; Georgiev, G P; Gaudefroy, L; Roig, O

    We propose to study the properties of odd-mass neutron-rich rubidium isotopes by the Coulomb-excitation technique, using the Miniball array coupled to the REX-ISOLDE facility. The results from similar measurements from the recent years (e.g. for the odd-mass and the odd-odd Cu isotopes, IS435) have shown the strong potential in such measurements for gaining information both for single-particle-like and collective states in exotic nuclei. Since there is practically no experimental information for excited states in the odd-mass Rb isotopes beyond $^{93}$Rb, the present study should be able to provide new data in a region of spherical ($^{93}$Rb and $^{95}$Rb) as well as well-deformed nuclei ($^{97}$Rb and $^{99}$Rb). Of particular interest is the rapid shape change that occurs when going from $^{95}$Rb (${\\varepsilon}_{2}$=0.06) to $^{97}$Rb (${\\varepsilon}_{2}$=0.3). These results should be of significant astrophysical interest as well, due to the close proximity of the r-process path.

  14. Modeling and Estimation of Stationary and Non-stationary Noises of Rubidium Atomic Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Mishra,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Noise estimation of atomic clock is one of the important research areas in the field of atomic clock development and application. Most of the atomic clocks are having random-stochastic noises and periodic noises due to temperature variation. Random-stochastic noises have a well identified signature in time domain but periodic noises are difficult to analyze in time domain. However, in this paper, an effort is made to identify and analyze the deterministic trends of both random-stochastic noises and periodic noises due to variation in temperature using an alternate approach of least-squares normalized-error (LSNE regression algorithm. A MATLAB based application with graphical user interface (GUI is developed to estimate and analyze random-stochastic noises and periodic noises and re-estimate the stability of rubidium atomic clock after removing these noises from the raw phase data. The estimation of stationary noises are done using Allan variance from time domain data and noise profile is calculated using curve fit method. The estimation of periodic noises due to temperature variation is carried in frequency domain through spurious analysis of the frequency data of atomic clock.

  15. Effects of dc electric fields on multiphoton ionization of rubidium atoms at low and high densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Nathan I.; Compton, Robert N.

    2001-08-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) of rubidium atoms at both low (atomic beam) and high (heat pipe) densities is studied using a tunable OPO laser. At high Rb densities ionization of the laser excited ns, np, and nd states occurs both through photoionization and collisional ionization. Excitation of the np states is found to be induced by the external electric field at both low and high densities. In addition, np signal is also seen at very low (E→0) fields in the heat pipe, providing evidence for collision mixing as well as field mixing. At low densities, signal for the high np states initially increases with applied field, but soon saturates (i.e. becomes field independent) while the signal for high nd states decreases with increasing field. At low Rb densities strong resonance features are observed in the energy region between the zero field limit (IP) and the field ionization limit. These features, as well as the field ionization threshold, are found to be dependent upon the angle between the laser polarization and the direction of the applied dc field. Evidence for tunneling through the barrier created by the -e2/r-eEr potential is also presented for ns and nd states.

  16. Effects of electric fields and collisions on highly excited rubidium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, N.I.; Compton, R.N. [Tennessee Univ., Dept. of Chemistry and Physics, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The effects of static and pulsed electric fields on the multiphoton ionization (MPI) of rubidium atoms at both low (atomic beam) and high (heat pipe) densities are studied using tunable OPO lasers. Two-photon excitation of np states is induced by the external electric field at both low and high densities. In addition, np signal is also seen at very low electric fields in the heat pipe, providing evidence for collision mixing as well as field mixing. At low Rb densities strong resonance features are observed in the energy region between the zero field limit (IP) and the field ionization limit. In addition, collisional detachment and charge transfer between excited ns and nd Rb Rydberg states and nozzle-jet cooled polar molecules (acetonitrile and acetone) are studied under crossed-beam conditions. The formation of dipole bound anions for acetone is only seen under nozzle jet expansion conditions and the maximum in the Rydberg electron transfer (RET) rate versus n depends upon the expansion gas (n{sub max} increases in the order H{sub 2}, He, Ne, Ar, Xe). For acetone (low dipole moment and large n{sub max}), collisional detachment dominates the charge transfer, whereas for acetonitrile (high dipole moment and low n{sub max}), charge transfer is seen to dominate the creation of Rb{sup +}. (authors)

  17. Effects of electric fields and collisions on highly excited rubidium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, N. I.; Compton, R. N.

    2003-10-01

    The effects of static and pulsed electric fields on the multiphoton ionization (MPI) of rubidium atoms at both low (atomic beam) and high (heat pipe) densities are studied using tunable OPO lasers. Two-photon excitation of np states is induced by the external electric field at both low and high densities. In addition, np signal is also seen at very low electric fields in the heat pipe, providing evidence for collision mixing as well as field mixing. At low Rb densities strong resonance features are observed in the energy region between the zero field limit (IP) and the field ionization limit. In addition, collisional detachment and charge transfer between excited ns and nd Rb Rydberg states and nozzle-jet cooled polar molecules (acetonitrile and acetone) are studied under crossed-beam conditions. The formation of dipole bound anions for acetone is only seen under nozzle jet expansion conditions and the maximum in the Rydberg electron transfer (RET) rate versus n depends upon the expansion gas (n_max increases in the order H{2}, He, Ne, Ar, Xe). For acetone (low dipole moment and large n_max), collisional detachment dominates the charge transfer, whereas for acetonitrile (high dipole moment and low n_max), charge transfer is seen to dominate the creation of Rb+.

  18. Solid-state ensemble of highly entangled photon sources at rubidium atomic transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Robert; Zopf, Michael; Chen, Yan; Höfer, Bianca; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2017-05-01

    Semiconductor InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown by the Stranski-Krastanov method are among the leading candidates for the deterministic generation of polarization-entangled photon pairs. Despite remarkable progress in the past 20 years, many challenges still remain for this material, such as the extremely low yield, the low degree of entanglement and the large wavelength distribution. Here, we show that with an emerging family of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet etching and nanohole infilling, it is possible to obtain a large ensemble of polarization-entangled photon emitters on a wafer without any post-growth tuning. Under pulsed resonant two-photon excitation, all measured quantum dots emit single pairs of entangled photons with ultra-high purity, high degree of entanglement and ultra-narrow wavelength distribution at rubidium transitions. Therefore, this material system is an attractive candidate for the realization of a solid-state quantum repeater--among many other key enabling quantum photonic elements.

  19. A Subfemtotesla Atomic Magnetometer Based on Hybrid Optical Pumping of Potassium and Rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Cai, Hongwei; Ding, Ming; Quan, Wei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-05-01

    Atomic magnetometers, based on detection of Larmor spin precession of optically pumped atoms, have been researched and applied extensively. Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution combined with no cryogenic cooling of atomic magnetometers would enable many applications with low cost, including the magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ultrahigh sensitivity atomic magnetometer is considered to be the main development direction for the future. Hybrid optical pumping has been proposed to improve the efficiency of nuclear polarization. But it can also be used for magnetic field measurement. This method can control absorption of optical pumping light, which is benefit for improving the uniformity of alkali metal atoms polarization and the sensitivity of atomic magnetometer. In addition, it allows optical pumping in the absence of quenching gas. We conduct experiments with a hybrid optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a cell containing potassium and rubidium. By adjusting the density ratio of alkali metal and the pumping laser conditions, we measured the magnetic field sensitivity better than 0.7 fT/sqrt(Hz).

  20. Structural, thermal and electrical studies of a novel rubidium phosphite tellurate compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyribey, Didem Berceste; Hallinder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Structural, thermal and electrical properties studies of rubidium phosphite tellurate, RbH(PO3H)·Te(OH)6, were performed. An endothermic peak, which reached a completion at about 315 °C accompanied with a weight loss of 4.6 wt.%, was attributed to dehydration. Four types of pellets were produced...... to room temperature, a second measurement with pellet C was carried out under the same conditions as used for pellets A and B. Pellet D, on the other hand, was heated up to 450 °C, kept at that temperature for 2 h and then cooled down to room temperature prior to the conductivity measurements....... It was observed that the conductivities of pellets A and B decreased to values of 5.2 × 10−8 S cm−1 and 6.6 × 10−7 S cm−1 at 317 °C, respectively, and an unexpected rise in the conductivity (9.89 × 10−6 S cm−1 at 317 °C) was seen with pellet C. Dehydration of RbH(PO3H)·Te(OH)6 might be responsible...

  1. Miniature atomic scalar magnetometer for space based on the rubidium isotope (87)Rb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Haje; Strohbehn, Kim; Tejada, Francisco; Andreou, Andreas G; Kitching, John; Knappe, Svenja; Lehtonen, S John; London, Shaughn M; Kafel, Matiwos

    2016-08-01

    A miniature atomic scalar magnetometer based on the rubidium isotope (87)Rb was developed for operation in space. The instrument design implements both Mx and Mz mode operation and leverages a novel microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabricated vapor cell and a custom silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit. The vapor cell has a volume of only 1 mm(3) so that it can be efficiently heated to its operating temperature by a specially designed, low-magnetic-field-generating resistive heater implemented in multiple metal layers of the transparent sapphire substrate of the SOS-CMOS chips. The SOS-CMOS chip also hosts the Helmholtz coil and associated circuitry to stimulate the magnetically sensitive atomic resonance and temperature sensors. The prototype instrument has a total mass of fewer than 500 g and uses less than 1 W of power, while maintaining a sensitivity of 15 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, comparable to present state-of-the-art absolute magnetometers.

  2. A waveguide frequency converter connecting rubidium-based quantum memories to the telecom C-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Boris; Farrera, Pau; Fernandez-Gonzalvo, Xavier; Cristiani, Matteo; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    Coherently converting the frequency and temporal waveform of single and entangled photons will be crucial to interconnect the various elements of future quantum information networks. Of particular importance is the quantum frequency conversion of photons emitted by material systems able to store quantum information, so-called quantum memories. There have been significant efforts to implement quantum frequency conversion using nonlinear crystals, with non-classical light from broadband photon-pair sources and solid-state emitters. However, solid state quantum frequency conversion has not yet been achieved with long-lived optical quantum memories. Here we demonstrate an ultra-low-noise solid state photonic quantum interface suitable for connecting quantum memories based on atomic ensembles to the telecommunication fibre network. The interface is based on an integrated-waveguide nonlinear device. We convert heralded single photons at 780 nm from a rubidium-based quantum memory to the telecommunication wavelength of 1,552 nm, showing significant non-classical correlations between the converted photon and the heralding signal.

  3. Rubidium abundances in the globular clusters NGC 6752, NGC 1904 and NGC 104 (47 Tuc)

    CERN Document Server

    D'Orazi, Valentina; Campbell, Simon W; Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio; Gratton, Raffaele G; Lucatello, Sara; D'Antona, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Large star-to-star variations of the abundances of proton-capture elements, such as Na and O, in globular clusters (GCs) are interpreted as the effect of internal pollution resulting from the presence of multiple stellar populations. To better constrain this scenario we investigate the abundance distribution of the heavy element rubidium (Rb) in NGC 6752, NGC 1904, and NGC 104 (47 Tuc). Combining the results from our sample with those in the literature, we found that Rb exhibits no star-to-star variations, regardless the cluster metallicity, with the possible intriguing, though very uncertain, exception of the metal-rich bulge cluster NGC 6388. If no star-to-star variations will be confirmed for all GCs, it implies that the stellar source of the proton-capture element variations must not have produced significant amounts of Rb. This element is observed to be enhanced at extremely high levels in intermediate-mass AGB (IM-AGB) stars in the Magellanic Clouds (i.e., at a metallicity similar to 47 Tuc and NGC 6388...

  4. Positronium Formation Cross-Sections for Positron Scattering by Rubidium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bakry, Salah Yaseen

    Cross-sections for positron-rubidium (37Rb) scattering have been calculated using the Clementi-Roetti wavefunctions and a combination of the coupled-static and frozen-core approximations. The total cross-sections, calculated with eight partial waves corresponding to the total angular momentum ℓ=0 to ℓ=7, are determined over a wide region of scattering energies ranging from 2.7 to 300 eV. The resulting total cross-sections are compared with experimental results and those calculated by other authors. Our total collisional cross-sections display a pronounced peak at 5 eV, nearly consistent with the measurements of Parikh et al. [Phys. Rev. A 47, 1535 (1993)] and also reveal another peak at 7 eV, consistent with the experimental cross-section of Stein et al.23 in the neighborhood of 7 eV. The oscillating behavior of our total collisional cross-sections supports the possible existence of resonance, especially at low energy region. The effect of positronium formation on the total collisional cross-sections diminishes when the incident energy is larger than 100 eV.

  5. Solid-state ensemble of highly entangled photon sources at rubidium atomic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Robert; Chen, Yan; Hoefer, Bianca; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown by the Stranski-Krastanov method are among the leading candidates for the deterministic generation of polarization entangled photon pairs. Despite remarkable progress in the last twenty years, many challenges still remain for this material, such as the extremely low yield (<1% quantum dots can emit entangled photons), the low degree of entanglement, and the large wavelength distribution. Here we show that, with an emerging family of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet etching and nanohole infilling, it is possible to obtain a large ensemble (close to 100%) of polarization-entangled photon emitters on a wafer without any post-growth tuning. Under pulsed resonant two-photon excitation, all measured quantum dots emit single pairs of entangled photons with ultra-high purity, high degree of entanglement (fidelity up to F=0.91, with a record high concurrence C=0.90), and ultra-narrow wavelength distribution at rubidium transitions. Therefore, a solid-state quantum...

  6. Ferroportin is a manganese-responsive protein that decreases manganese cytotoxicity and accumulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Zhaobao; Jiang, Haiyan; Lee, Eun-Sook Y; Ni, Mingwei; Erikson, Keith M; Milatovic, Dejan; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Although manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element for human development and growth, chronic exposure to excessive Mn levels can result in psychiatric and motor disturbances, referred to as manganism...

  7. Manganese ore tailing: optimization of acid leaching conditions and recovery of soluble manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Olívia de Souza Heleno; Carvalho, Cornélio de Freitas; Silva, Gilmare Antônia da; Santos, Cláudio Gouvêa Dos

    2015-01-01

    Manganese recovery from industrial ore processing waste by means of leaching with sulfuric acid was the objective of this study. Experimental conditions were optimized by multivariate experimental design approaches. In order to study the factors affecting leaching, a screening step was used involving a full factorial design with central point for three variables in two levels (2(3)). The three variables studied were leaching time, concentration of sulfuric acid and sample amount. The three factors screened were shown to be relevant and therefore a Doehlert design was applied to determine the best working conditions for leaching and to build the response surface. By applying the best leaching conditions, the concentrations of 12.80 and 13.64 %w/w of manganese for the global sample and for the fraction -44 + 37 μm, respectively, were found. Microbeads of chitosan were tested for removal of leachate acidity and recovering of soluble manganese. Manganese recovery from the leachate was 95.4%. Upon drying the leachate, a solid containing mostly manganese sulfate was obtained, showing that the proposed optimized method is efficient for manganese recovery from ore tailings.

  8. DETERMINATION OF ACETAMINOPHEN BY COBAL HEXACYANOFERRATE MODIFIED ELECTRODE%铁氰化钴修饰电极测定对乙酰氨基酚

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐雯

    2014-01-01

    A stable electroactive thin film of cobalt hexacyanoferrate (CoHCF) was deposited on the surface of carbon paste electrode using cyclic voltammetry, and the electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen (ACOP) in the modified electrode was investigated. The modified electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic effect for acetaminophen with the negative oxidation peak shift of 100 mV and the markedly enhanced peak currents. The experimental parameters, such as the supporting electrolyte and pH of the supporting electrolyte, scan rate were optimized. The oxidation peak current is well proportional to the concentration of acetaminophen over the range of 3.4×10-6~1.0×10-3 mol/L with the detection limit of 1.6×10-6 mol/L. The established method could be applied in determining ACOP in acetaminophen tablet with the recovery of 102.4%~103.0%.%利用循环伏安法通过电聚合在碳糊电极上制备了铁氰化钴薄膜,得到了铁氰化钴修饰碳糊电极,并研究了对乙酰氨基酚在铁氰化钴修饰电极上的电化学行为。结果表明,该修饰电极对对乙酰氨基酚显示出良好的电催化效果,不仅使氧化峰电位负移100 mV,而且峰电流明显增加。实验考察了底液与底液的pH、扫描速率等的影响。在优化的条件下,对乙酰氨基酚浓度在3.4×10-6~1.0×10-3 mol/L 范围内呈良好的线性关系;检测下限为1.6×10-6 mol/L。该法可用于对乙酰氨基酚片中对乙酰氨基酚含量的测定,回收率为102.4%~103.0%,测定结果良好。

  9. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varghese Mathew; Jochan Joseph; Sabu Jacob; K E Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The preparation of manganese malonate crystals by gel method and its spectroscopic studies are reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern reveals the crystalline nature. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the crystals are recorded and the vibrational assignments are given with possible explanations. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is used to measure the bandgap (g) of the material.

  10. Mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Jriuan; Shafi, Kurikka V.P.M.; Ulman, Abraham; Loos, Katja; Yang, Nan-Loh; Cui, Min-Hui; Vogt, Thomas; Estournès, Claude; Locke, Dave C.

    2004-01-01

    Designing nanoparticles for practical applications requires knowledge and control of how their desired properties relate to their composition and structure. Here, we present a detailed systematic study of mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles, showing that ultrasonication provides the high-energy

  11. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast...

  12. Manganese homeostasis in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Lee, Eunsook; Paoliello, Monica M B; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal that is naturally found in the environment. Daily intake through dietary sources provides the necessary amount required for several key physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, energy metabolism, immune function and others. However, overexposure from environmental sources can result in a condition known as manganism that features symptomatology similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). This disorder presents with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits that arise from a neurodegenerative process. In order to maintain a balance between its essentiality and neurotoxicity, several mechanisms exist to properly buffer cellular Mn levels. These include transporters involved in Mn uptake, and newly discovered Mn efflux mechanisms. This review will focus on current studies related to mechanisms underlying Mn import and export, primarily the Mn transporters, and their function and roles in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Though and essential metal, overexposure to manganese may result in neurodegenerative disease analogous to Parkinson's disease. Manganese homeostasis is tightly regulated by transporters, including transmembrane importers (divalent metal transporter 1, transferrin and its receptor, zinc transporters ZIP8 and Zip14, dopamine transporter, calcium channels, choline transporters and citrate transporters) and exporters (ferroportin and SLC30A10), as well as the intracellular trafficking proteins (SPCA1 and ATP12A2). A manganese-specific sensor, GPP130, has been identified, which affords means for monitoring intracellular levels of this metal.

  13. ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE EXPOSURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ubiquitous element, manganese (Mn), is an essential nutrient, but toxic at excessive exposure levels. Therefore, the US EPA set guideline levels for Mn exposure through inhalation (reference concentration-RfC=0.05 ?g/m3) and ingestion (reference dose-RfD=0.14 mg/kg/day (10 mg...

  14. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina-Maria Bordean

    Full Text Available Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  15. Soil Manganese Enrichment from Industrial Inputs: A Gastropod Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordean, Despina-Maria; Nica, Dragos V.; Harmanescu, Monica; Banatean-Dunea, Ionut; Gergen, Iosif I.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems. PMID:24454856

  16. Interface between light coupled to excited-states transition and ground-state coherence of rubidium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an interface between light coupled to transition between excited states of rubidium and long-lived ground-state atomic coherence. In our proof-of-principle experiment a non-linear process of four-wave mixing in an open-loop configuration is used to achieve light emission proportional to independently prepared ground-state atomic coherence. We demonstrate strong correlations between Raman light heralding generation of ground-state coherence and the new four-wave mixing signal. Dependance of the efficiency of the process on laser detunings is studied.

  17. Removal of Iron Impurity in Acidic Zinc Plating Bath Using Potassium Hexacyanoferrate%采用铁氰化钾去除酸性镀锌液中的铁杂质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭崇武; 李建强

    2011-01-01

    A method for treatment of ferrous ions in the acidic zinc plating bath with the use of potassium hexacyanoferrate was tested. Potassium hexacyanoferrate solution was added to the acidic zinc plating solution. Fe2 + ions in the solution reacted with K3 [ Fe(CN) 6 ] forming K4 [Fe(CN) 6 ] and Fe3+ ions. The K4 [ Fe(CN) 6 ] reacted with Zn2+ ions to produce Zn2 [ Fe(CN) 6 ] precipitates. The Fe3+ ions hydrolysed forming Fe ( OH ) 3 precipitates. The excessive K3 [Fe ( CN ) 6 ] reacted with Zn2 + inos and forming Zn3 [Fe(CN) 6 ] precipitates. Experiments indicate that the utilization ratio of K3 [Fe (CN) 6 ] ranging from 65.9% to 87.6% when treating iron impurities in the acidic zinc plating bath with this method.%采用铁氰化钾处理酸性镀锌溶液中二价铁杂质的方法为:向镀液中加铁氰化钾,Fe2+离子与铁氰化钾反应生成亚铁氰化钾和三价铁,亚铁氰化钾与锌离子反应生成亚铁氰化锌沉淀,三价铁水解生成氢氧化铁,过量的铁氰化钾与锌离子生成铁氰化锌.实验表明,用这种方法处理酸性镀锌液中的铁杂质,铁氰化钾的利用率为65.9%~87.6%.

  18. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  19. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-quan Lin; Guo-hua Gu; Hui Wang; Ren-feng Zhu; You-cai Liu; and Jian-gang Fu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leach-ing efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sul-furic acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respec-tively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent ac-tivation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol−1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  20. Manganese Abnormity in Holocene Sediments of the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Manganese abnormity has been observed in the Holocene sediments of the mud area of Bohai Sea. On the basis of grain size, chemical composition, heavy mineral content and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating of foraminifer, relationships between manganese abnormity and sedimentation rates, material source, hydrodynamic conditions are probed. Manganese abnormity occurred during the Middle Holocene when sea level and sedimentation rates were higher than those at present. Sedimentary hiatus was not observed when material sources and hydrodynamic conditions were quite similar. Compared with the former period, the latter period showed a decrease in reduction environment and an inclination toward oxidation environment with high manganese content, whereas provenance and hydrodynamic conditions showed only a slight change. From the above observations, it can be concluded that correlation among manganese abnormity, material source, and hydrodynamic conditions is not obvious. Redox environment seems to be the key factor for manganese enrichment, which is mainly related to marine authigenic process.

  1. Spin dependent calculation of calcium manganese oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Ruchi; Kansara, Shivam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh

    2017-05-01

    Particularly interesting as candidates for technological applications are the manganese perovskites with AMnO3 formula. In this paper, we investigated the ground states properties of the CaMnO3 perovskite oxide. Our structural properties are given using GGA in the aim to introduce the exchange correlation potential using density functional calculation. Generally, the perovskites materials of ABO3-type are well known with their anti/ferroelectric, piezoelectric and anti/ferromagnetism properties applied in remarkable technological studies.

  2. Manganese concentration in human saliva using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewgoy, Hugo R., E-mail: hugorl@usp.br [Universidade Bandeirante Anhanguera (UNIBAN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B.; Medeiros, Ilca M.M.A.; Medeiros, Jose A.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this investigation the Manganese levels in human whole saliva were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering gender and lifestyle factors of Brazilian inhabitants (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure). The results emphasize that the indicative interval is statistically different by gender. These data are useful for identifying or preventing some diseases in the Brazilian population. (author)

  3. Near infrared rubidium 62P3/2,1/2→62S1/2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Paul J.; Richards, Ryan M.; Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2016-09-01

    An optically pumped near infrared rubidium (Rb) pulsed, mirrorless laser has been demonstrated in a heat pipe along both the 62P3/2-62S1/2 transition at 2.73 μm and the 62P1/2-62S1/2 transition at 2.79 μm. The bleached limit, slope efficiency, and maximum laser output energy of the near infrared Rb laser scale linearly with increasing Rb density, contrary to prior results. Previously, a maximum output energy of ~5 nJ had been observed before a rollover occurred in the scaling of output energy with rubidium concentration. In this experiment, the maximum laser output energy observed was ~100 nJ, with no indication of any scaling limitation. A maximum slope efficiency of 1.7×10-4 was observed. A small percentage of the pump photons were absorbed even at the maximum Rb density attainable in the heat pipe, indicating that laser efficiency could be scaled to near the quantum efficiency. Additionally, the hyperfine structure and absorption spectral profile of the 52S1/2-62P1/2 and 52S1/2-62P3/2 (blue) pump transitions were studied using a cw pump source.

  4. Solubilities ,Densities and Refractive Indices of Rubidium Chloride or Cesium Chloride in Ethanol Aqueous Solutions at Different Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO,Wen-Xia; HU,Man-Cheng; JIANG,Yu-Cheng; LI,Shu-Ni

    2007-01-01

    The data of solubilities.densities and refractive indices of rubidium chloride or cesium chloride in the system C2H5OH-H2O were measured by using a simple accurate analytical method at different temperatures,with mass fractions of ethanol in the range of O to 1.0.In all cases,the presence of ethanol significantly reduced the solubility of rubidium chloride and cesium chloride in aqueous solution.The solubilities of the saturated solutions were fitted via polynomial equations as a function of the mass fraction of ethanol.The CsCl-C2H5OH-H2O temary system appeared in two liquid phases:alcoholic phase and water phase.when the mass fractions of ethanol were in the range of 10.37% to 49.59%at 35℃.Density and refractive index were also determined for the same ternary systems with varied unsaturated salt concentrations.Values for both experiment and theory were correlated with the salt concentrations and proportions of alcohol in the solutions.The equations proposed could also account for the saturated solutions.

  5. 40 CFR 424.60 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electrolytic manganese products subcategory. 424.60 Section 424.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Electrolytic Manganese Products Subcategory § 424.60 Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  6. MANGANESE SPECIATION IN SELECTED AGRICULTURAL SOILS OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    J. Habibah; J. Khairiah; Ismail, B.S.; M.D. Kadderi

    2014-01-01

    Manganese speciation in selected agricultural soils of Peninsular Malaysia is discussed in this study. Manganese concentration in the Easily Leacheable and Ion Exchangeable (ELFE), Acid Reducible (AR), Organic Oxidizable (OO) and Resistant (RR) fractions of soils developed on weathered rocks, soils of mixed nature, alluvium and peat deposits are described. The total manganese concentration in soils developed on weathered rocks was found to be higher than that in soils of mixed nature, alluviu...

  7. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suib, Steven Lawrence [Storrs, CT; Yuan, Jikang [Storrs, CT

    2011-02-15

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves and methods of making the same are disclosed. A method for forming nanowires includes hydrothermally treating a chemical precursor composition in a hydrothermal treating solvent to form the nanowires, wherein the chemical precursor composition comprises a source of manganese cations and a source of counter cations, and wherein the nanowires comprise ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves.

  8. Manganese-induced turnover of TMEM165.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potelle, Sven; Dulary, Eudoxie; Climer, Leslie; Duvet, Sandrine; Morelle, Willy; Vicogne, Dorothée; Lebredonchel, Elodie; Houdou, Marine; Spriet, Corentin; Krzewinski-Recchi, Marie-Ange; Peanne, Romain; Klein, André; de Bettignies, Geoffroy; Morsomme, Pierre; Matthijs, Gert; Marquardt, Thorsten; Lupashin, Vladimir; Foulquier, François

    2017-04-19

    TMEM165 deficiencies lead to one of the congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases where the glycosylation process is altered. We recently demonstrated that the Golgi glycosylation defect due to TMEM165 deficiency resulted from a Golgi manganese homeostasis defect and that Mn(2+) supplementation was sufficient to rescue normal glycosylation. In the present paper, we highlight TMEM165 as a novel Golgi protein sensitive to manganese. When cells were exposed to high Mn(2+) concentrations, TMEM165 was degraded in lysosomes. Remarkably, while the variant R126H was sensitive upon manganese exposure, the variant E108G, recently identified in a novel TMEM165-CDG patient, was found to be insensitive. We also showed that the E108G mutation did not abolish the function of TMEM165 in Golgi glycosylation. Altogether, the present study identified the Golgi protein TMEM165 as a novel Mn(2+)-sensitive protein in mammalian cells and pointed to the crucial importance of the glutamic acid (E108) in the cytosolic ELGDK motif in Mn(2+)-induced degradation of TMEM165. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  10. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality.

  11. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Tammie L., E-mail: Tammie.Gerke@miamioh.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States); Little, Brenda J., E-mail: brenda.little@nrlssc.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 (United States); Barry Maynard, J., E-mail: maynarjb@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+}) and hollandite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. - Highlights: • Oxidation and deposition of Mn deposits in drinking water distribution pipes • In-situ synchrotron-based μ-XANES and μ-XRF mapping • Toxic metal sorption in Mn deposits.

  12. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli – Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and accelerated the dissolution of manganese in acidic media.

  13. A survey of neurobehavioral symptoms of welders exposed to manganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hassani

    2013-05-01

    Conclusion: Welders’ exposure to manganese and its potential health effects should be evaluated periodically and effective control measures should be applied in order to to prevent neurobehavioral symptoms.

  14. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a New Manganese Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; LIU Ping; CHEN Yun

    2003-01-01

    @@ In order to study the relationship between the manganese ion and the biological coordination agent, the role ofmanganese ion in the active sites and the structure of the active sites in the manganese enzymes, small molecule complexes are often applied to modeling the structure and the properties of reaction in the active centers. In this pa per, we will report the synthesis and crystal structure of a new manganese(Ⅱ) complex, catena[ aqua-(p-methoxybenzoato- O, O′ ) - (p-methoxybenzoato- O )- (2,2′-bipyridine)-manganese (Ⅱ) ] (p-methoxybenzoic acid). The crystal structure was confirmeded by X-ray crystallography analysis.

  16. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese......-uptake systems relevant for growth in defined medium. Based on these results an exit strategy enabling the cell to cope with iron depletion and use of manganese as an alternative for iron could be shown. Such a strategy would also explain why E. coli harbors some iron- or manganese-dependent iso......-enzymes such as superoxide dismutases or ribonucleotide reductases. The benefits for gaining a means for survival would be bought with the cost of less efficient metabolism as indicated in our experiments by lower cell densities with manganese than with iron. In addition, this strain was extremely sensitive to the metalloid...

  17. Analysis of the near-resonant fluorescence spectra of a single rubidium atom localized in a three-dimensional optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Wookrae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Lee, Yea-Lee; Ihm, Jisoon; An, Kyungwon

    2010-01-01

    Supplementary information is presented on the recent work by W. Kim et al. on the matter-wave-tunneling-induced broadening in the near-resonant spectra of a single rubidium atom localized in a three-dimensional optical lattice in a strong Lamb-Dicke regime.

  18. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1water oxidation in the presence of [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) as a sensitizer and peroxodisulfate as an electron acceptor was carried out for all three manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. [Early Detection of Manganese Intoxication Based on Occupational History and T1-weighted MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Toshio; Yano, Hajime; Kushida, Ryutaro; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2016-02-01

    Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal cell function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course terminating to atypical parkinsonism with little therapeutic efficacy. For subjects with chronic manganese exposure such as welders, manganese intoxication can be detected early based on the presence of hyperintensity in the globus pallidus on T(1)-weighted MRI and abnormally high urinary excretion of manganese with a chelating agent even in cases of normal serum/urine level of manganese.

  20. VERTEX: manganese transport through oxygen minima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John H.; Knauer, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Manganese transport through a well-developed oxygen minimum was studied off central Mexico (18°N, 108°W) in October-November 1981 as part of the VERTEX (Vertical Transport and Exchange) research program. Refractory, leachable and dissolved Mn fractions associated with particulates caught in traps set at eight depths (120-1950 m) were analyzed. Particles entering the oxygen minimum had relatively large Mn loads; however, as the particulates sank further into the minimum, total Mn fluxes steadily decreased from 190 nmol m -2 day -1 at 120 m to 36 nmol m -2 day -1 at 400 m. Manganese fluxes then steadily increased in the remaining 800-1950 m, reaching rates of up to 230 nmol m -2 day -1 at 1950 m. Manganese concentrations were also measured in the water column. Dissolved Mn levels Rate-of-change estimates based on trap flux data yield regeneration rates of up to 0.44 nmol kg -1 yr -1 in the upper oxygen minimum (120-200 m). However, only 30% of the dissolved Mn in the oxygen minimum appears to be from sinking particulate regeneration; the other 70% probably results from continental-slope-release-horizontal-transport processes. Dissolved Mn scavenges back onto particles as oxygen levels begin to increase with depth. Scavenging rates ranging from -0.03 to -0.09 nmol kg -1 yr -1 were observed at depths from 700 to 1950 m. These scavenging rates result in Mn residence times of 16-19 years, and scavenging rate constants on the order of 0.057 yr -1. Manganese removal via scavenging on sinking particles below the oxygen minimum is balanced by Mn released along continental boundaries and transported horizontally via advective-diffusive processes. Manganese appears to be very weakly associated with particulates. Nevertheless, the amounts of Mn involved with sinking biogenic particles are large, and the resulting fluxes are on the same order of magnitude as those necessary to explain the excess Mn accumulating on the sea floor. The overall behavior of Mn observed in this, and

  1. 量热技术在铷光谱灯中的应用研究%The Application Study of Differential Scanning Calorimetry Technique in Rubidium Discharge Lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯浩; 崔敬忠

    2014-01-01

    铷光谱灯是铷原子钟的核心部件。在铷光谱灯的研制中差式扫描量热技术( DSC)是不可或缺的测量手段和研究方法之一。本文通过对长期老化跟踪测量的铷量消耗数据拟合,得到了目前使用的铷灯的铷量消耗模型。分析结果显示:铷与灯泡内的杂质反应消耗了约37.5μg金属铷,铷的消耗率稳定在0.23μg/ hr ,预计10年使用寿命期内铷的消耗量约106μg。铷熔融曲线的熔点和纯度测量结果显示:铷的熔点和纯度在老化开始前2个月变化明显,具有较好的相关性。老化6个月以后铷的熔点和纯度从老化开始前的36℃和99.56%提高到39.5℃和99.84%,并趋于稳定,其变化趋势与老化初期铷量的消耗规律较好地吻合。%The rubidium ( Rb ) spectral lamp is the critical component of Rb gas cell atomic fre-quency standard. As a measuring tool and research method the differential scanning calorimetry technique was indispensable in the manufacture of rubidium spectral lamp. Through fitting the rubidium consump-tion data obtained by Long-term tracing measurement, the consumption model of a rubidium spectral lamp used currently was established. The analysis result shows that the reactive loss of Rb consume about 37. 5μg metal rubidium, The speed of rubidium consumption maintain constant at 0. 23 microgram per square root of hour. The predicted total rubidium consumption in the ten years lifetime is about 106μg. The measurment result of melting point and purity of rubidium in lamp show that in the first two months, the melting point and purity change sharply with close relativity. After six months aging time, the melting point and purity of rubidium reach at 39 . 5℃ and 99 . 8% from initial 36℃ and 99 . 5% which is fit to the trend of rubidium consumption.

  2. Manganese Catalyzed C-H Halogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C-H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon-halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds to C-Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L-Mn(V)═O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn-F fluorine source, effecting carbon-fluorine bond formation. Indeed, this idea

  3. Coherent optical transients observed in rubidium atomic line filtered Doppler velocimetry experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Mario E., E-mail: mario.fajardo@eglin.af.mil; Molek, Christopher D.; Vesely, Annamaria L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, Ordnance Division, Energetic Materials Branch, AFRL/RWME, 2306 Perimeter Road, Eglin AFB, Florida 32542-5910 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We report the first successful results from our novel Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry apparatus, along with unanticipated oscillatory signals due to coherent optical transients generated within pure Rb vapor cells. RALF is a high-velocity and high-acceleration extension of the well-known Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) technique for constructing multi-dimensional flow velocity vector maps in aerodynamics experiments [H. Komine, U.S. Patent No. 4,919,536 (24 April 1990)]. RALF exploits the frequency dependence of pressure-broadened Rb atom optical absorptions in a heated Rb/N{sub 2} gas cell to encode the Doppler shift of reflected near-resonant (λ{sub 0} ≈ 780.24 nm) laser light onto the intensity transmitted by the cell. The present RALF apparatus combines fiber optic and free-space components and was built to determine suitable operating conditions and performance parameters for the Rb/N{sub 2} gas cells. It yields single-spot velocities of thin laser-driven-flyer test surfaces and incorporates a simultaneous Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) channel [Strand et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 083108 (2006)] for validation of the RALF results, which we demonstrate here over the v = 0 to 1 km/s range. Both RALF and DGV presume the vapor cells to be simple Beer's Law optical absorbers, so we were quite surprised to observe oscillatory signals in experiments employing low pressure pure Rb vapor cells. We interpret these oscillations as interference between the Doppler shifted reflected light and the Free Induction Decay (FID) coherent optical transient produced within the pure Rb cells at the original laser frequency; this is confirmed by direct comparison of the PDV and FID signals. We attribute the different behaviors of the Rb/N{sub 2} vs. Rb gas cells to efficient dephasing of the atomic/optical coherences by Rb-N{sub 2} collisions. The minimum necessary N{sub 2} buffer gas density ≈0.3 amagat translates into a

  4. Optically Pumped Atomic Rubidium Lasers: Two-Photon and Exciplex Excitation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jeffrey E.

    The Doppler-broadened two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section for the 52S1/2 → 52 D5/2 transition in Rb is measured using direct absorption methods. The selection rule |DeltaF| ≤ 2 applied to both isotopes yields 17 transitions in 3 Doppler limited lines. A detailed model of the intensity profile was also developed to account for a focused Gaussian beam (with an M2 value of 1.09) propagating through a two-photon absorption medium. A peak absorbance of 24% was observed for an intensity of 6.28 kWcm2 at the focus, a Rb density of 4.6x1015 cm-3 , and a path length of 15 cm. Alkali concentrations from 1.61 - 8.52x1015 cm -3 were monitored in the far wing of the D 2 line. Extracting the hyperfine-broadened TPA cross-section from 87 test configurations, while varying the pump power, alkali concentration and focal length, yielded an error-weighted average of 6.75x10^-21 cm4W with a standard deviation of 3.61x10-21 cm4W. This cross-section is sufficient for a pulsed dye laser to bleach the pump transition in the Two-Photon Pumped Alkali Laser (TPAL) that lases at 420 nm and 5.2 microm. Optically pumped atomic rubidium lasers pumped in the blue satellite of the D2 line from the ground Rb-Ar or Rb-Kr collision pair to the dissociative B2S+1/2 state produce laser emission at 780.2 nm. Lasing is achieved for pump wavelengths of 752.3 to greater than 760 nm for the Rb-Ar system and 757.1 -- 760.4 nm for the Rb-Kr system. Slope efficiencies increase with both Rb and Ar concentrations and exceed 0.25% using a heat pipe configuration. The gain is very high with photon build-up times of 1--3.7 ns. Laser induced heating and subsequent condensation of alkali vapor in the heat pipe configuration currently limits operation to less than 2500 Torr.

  5. Role of Amorphous Manganese Oxide in Nitrogen Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LILIANG-MO; WUQI-TU

    1991-01-01

    Studies have been made,by 15N-tracer technique on nitrogen loss resulting from adding amorphous manganese oxide to NH4+-N medium under anaerobic conditions.The fact that the total nitrogen recovery was decreased and that 15NO2,15N2O,15N14NO,15NO,15N2 and 15N14N were emitted has proved that,like amorphous iron oxide,amorphous manganese oxide can also act as an electron acceptor in the oxidation of NH4+-N under anaerobic conditions and give rise to nitrogen loss.This once again illustrates another mechanism by which the loss of ammonium nitrogen in paddy soils is brought about by amorphous iron and manganese oxides.The quantity of nitrogen loss by amorphous manganese oxide increased with an increase in the amount of amorphous manganese oxide added and lessened with time of its aging.The nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss by cooperation of amorphous manganese oxide and microorganisms (soil suspension) was larger than that by amorphous manganese oxide alone.In the system,nitrogen loss was associated with the specific surface ares and oxidation-reduction of amorphous manganese oxide.However,their quantitative relationship and the exact reaction processes of nitrogen loss induced by amorphous manganese oxide remain to be further studied.

  6. Molecular identification of indigenous manganese solubilising bacterial biodiversity from manganese mining deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shreya; Mohanty, Sansuta; Nayak, Sanghamitra; Sukla, Lala B; Das, Alok P

    2016-03-01

    Manganese (Mn) ranks twelfth among the most exuberant metal present in the earth's crust and finds its imperative application in the manufacturing steel, chemical, tannery, glass, and battery industries. Solubilisation of Mn can be performed by several bacterial strains which are useful in developing environmental friendly solutions for mining activities. The present investigation aims to isolate and characterize Mn solubilising bacteria from low grade ores from Sanindipur Manganese mine of Sundargh district in Odisha state of India. Four morphologically distinct bacterial strains showing visible growth on Mn supplemented plates were isolated. Mn solubilising ability of the bacterial strains was assessed by visualizing the lightening of the medium appearing around the growing colonies. Three isolates were gram negative and rod shaped while the remaining one was gram positive, coccobacilli. Molecular identification of the isolates was carried out by 16S rRNA sequencing and the bacterial isolates were taxonomically classified as Bacillus anthrasis MSB 2, Acinetobacter sp. MSB 5, Lysinibacillus sp. MSB 11, and Bacillus sp. MMR-1 using BLAST algorithm. The sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank with the accession number KP635223, KP635224, KP635225 and JQ936966, respectively. Manganese solubilisation efficiency of 40, 96, 97.5 and 48.5% were achieved by MMR-1, MSB 2, MSB 5 and MSB 11 respectively. The efficiency of Mn solubilisation is suggested with the help of a pH variation study. The results are discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms involved in Manganese solubilisation efficiency of bacterial isolates.

  7. Manganese Loading and Photosystem II Stability are Key Components of Manganese Efficiency in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency constitutes a major plant nutritional problem in commercial crop production of winter cereals. In plants, Mn has an indispensable role in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Hence, the consequences of Mn deficiency are reduced plant growth...

  8. A laser system for the spectroscopy on highly charged ions, tellurium molecules, and Rydberg states of rubidium atoms; Ein Lasersystem zur Spektroskopie von hochgeladenen Ionen, Tellurmolekuelen und Rubidium-Rydberg-Zustaenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Sebastian

    2014-08-15

    Optical measuring methods allow the detection and identification of the atomic structure with extraordinary precision. Deviations to theoretical predictions can indicate unknown physical effects. Therefore, precise measurements on the atomic structure continue to be of large relevance. In this work, a laser system for precision spectroscopy on Bismuth ({sup 209}Bi{sup 82+}), Tellurium ({sup 130}Te{sub 2}) and Rydberg states of Rubidium ({sup 85}Rb) has been built and characterized. Spectroscopic measurements on Tellurium and Rubidium have been achieved with this setup. The system consists of a two-stage frequency doubled diode laser, stabilized via a cavity and an RF-offsetlock to arbitrary wavelengths with absolute high stability. The setup of the laser system will be presented and the systematic error caused by the refractive index of air inside the transfer cavity will be discussed. A stability of better then 6.14 MHz at 244 nm is obtained for planned experiments on the ground state hyperfine splitting of {sup 209}Bi{sup 82+}. This will allow an increase in precision of more then four orders of magnitude for this measurement. Further increase in precision can be achieved by using an evacuated cavity. The obtained stability is measured by comparison of the laser frequency to absorption lines of Tellurium ({sup 130}Te{sub 2}). Eight reference lines, known from literature, spanning the region from 613720.717 GHz to 616803.545 GHz have been measured. The frequency measurements of three lines, coinciding with the emission spectrum of an argon-ion-laser, show deviations with respect to the published frequencies. Further inconsistencies in literature are cleared. Part of this work is also the precise measurement of 843 Doppler-free {sup 130}Te{sub 2} reference lines spanning the frequency range from 613881.150 GHz to 616614.258 GHz at a precision of better then 4 MHz for most lines. Additionally, measurements on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using

  9. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been

  10. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been inve

  11. Identification and Characterization of a Putative Manganese Export Protein in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carolyn R; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Peng, Eric D; Payne, Shelley M

    2016-10-15

    Manganese plays an important role in the cellular physiology and metabolism of bacterial species, including the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae The intracellular level of manganese ions is controlled through coordinated regulation of the import and export of this element. We have identified a putative manganese exporter (VC0022), named mneA (manganese exporter A), which is highly conserved among Vibrio spp. An mneA mutant exhibited sensitivity to manganese but not to other cations. Under high-manganese conditions, the mneA mutant showed an almost 50-fold increase in intracellular manganese levels and reduced intracellular iron relative to those of its wild-type parent, suggesting that the mutant's manganese sensitivity is due to the accumulation of toxic levels of manganese and reduced iron. Expression of mneA suppressed the manganese-sensitive phenotype of an Escherichia coli strain carrying a mutation in the nonhomologous manganese export gene, mntP, further supporting a manganese export function for V. cholerae MneA. The level of mneA mRNA was induced approximately 2.5-fold after addition of manganese to the medium, indicating regulation of this gene by manganese. This study offers the first insights into understanding manganese homeostasis in this important pathogen. Bacterial cells control intracellular metal concentrations by coordinating acquisition in metal-limited environments with export in metal-excess environments. We identified a putative manganese export protein, MneA, in Vibrio cholerae An mneA mutant was sensitive to manganese, and this effect was specific to manganese. The mneA mutant accumulated high levels of intracellular manganese with a concomitant decrease in intracellular iron levels when grown in manganese-supplemented medium. Expression of mneA in trans suppressed the manganese sensitivity of an E. coli mntP mutant. This study is the first to investigate manganese export in V. cholerae. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology

  12. Biodistribution and PET Imaging of pharmacokinetics of manganese in mice using Manganese-52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, A Lake; Aweda, Tolulope A; Lewis, Benjamin C; Gross, Rebecca B; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2017-01-01

    Manganese is essential to life, and humans typically absorb sufficient quantities of this element from a normal healthy diet; however, chronic, elevated ingestion or inhalation of manganese can be neurotoxic, potentially leading to manganism. Although imaging of large amounts of accumulated Mn(II) is possible by MRI, quantitative measurement of the biodistribution of manganese, particularly at the trace level, can be challenging. In this study, we produced the positron-emitting radionuclide 52Mn (t1/2 = 5.6 d) by proton bombardment (EpManganese is known to cross the blood-brain barrier, as confirmed in our studies following IV injection (0.86%ID/g, 1 d p.i.) and following inhalation of aerosol, (0.31%ID/g, 1 d p.i.). Uptake in salivary gland and pancreas were observed at 1 d p.i. (0.5 and 0.8%ID/g), but to a much greater degree from IV injection (6.8 and 10%ID/g). In a separate study, mice received IV injection of an imaging dose of [52Mn]MnCl2, followed by in vivo imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo biodistribution. The results from this study supported many of the results from the biodistribution-only studies. In this work, we have confirmed results in the literature and contributed new results for the biodistribution of inhaled radiomanganese for several organs. Our results could serve as supporting information for environmental and occupational regulations, for designing PET studies utilizing 52Mn, and/or for predicting the biodistribution of manganese-based MR contrast agents.

  13. Manganese accumulation in the brain: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Nomiyama, K.; Takase, Y.; Nakazono, T.; Nojiri, J.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan); Noguchi, T. [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    Manganese (Mn) accumulation in the brain is detected as symmetrical high signal intensity in the globus pallidi on T1-weighted MR images without an abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. In this review, we present several cases of Mn accumulation in the brain due to acquired or congenital diseases of the abdomen including hepatic cirrhosis with a portosystemic shunt, congenital biliary atresia, primary biliary cirrhosis, congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt without liver dysfunction, Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome with a diffuse intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and patent ductus venosus. Other causes of Mn accumulation in the brain are Mn overload from total parenteral nutrition and welding-related Mn intoxication. (orig.)

  14. Preparation of highly efficient manganese catalase mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, Michael U; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-10-21

    The series of compounds [Mn(bpia)(mu-OAc)](2)(ClO(4))(2) (1), [Mn(2)(bpia)(2)(muO)(mu-OAc)](ClO(4))(3).CH(3)CN (2), [Mn(bpia)(mu-O)](2)(ClO(4))(2)(PF(6)).2CH(3)CN (3), [Mn(bpia)(Cl)(2)](ClO)(4) (4), and [(Mn(bpia)(Cl))(2)(mu-O)](ClO(4))(2).2CH(3)CN (5) (bpia = bis(picolyl)(N-methylimidazol-2-yl)amine) represents a structural, spectroscopic, and functional model system for manganese catalases. Compounds 3 and 5 have been synthesized from 2 via bulk electrolysis and ligand exchange, respectively. All complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. The different bridging ligands including the rare mono-mu-oxo and mono-mu-oxo-mono-mu-carboxylato motifs lead to a variation of the Mn-Mn separation across the four binuclear compounds of 1.50 A (Mn(2)(II,II) = 4.128 A, Mn(2)(III,III) = 3.5326 and 3.2533 A, Mn(2)(III,IV) = 2.624 A). Complexes 1, 2, and 3 are mimics for the Mn(2)(II,II), the Mn(2)(III,III), and the Mn(2)(III,IV) oxidation states of the native enzyme. UV-vis spectra of these compounds show similarities to those of the corresponding oxidation states of manganese catalase from Thermus thermophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Compound 2 exhibits a rare example of a Jahn-Teller compression. While complexes 1 and 3 are efficient catalysts for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide and contain an N(4)O(2) donor set, 4 and 5 show no catalase activity. These complexes have an N(4)Cl(2) and N(4)OCl donor set, respectively, and serve as mimics for halide inhibited manganese catalases. Cyclovoltammetric data show that the substitution of oxygen donor atoms with chloride causes a shift of redox potentials to more positive values. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the most efficient binuclear functional manganese catalase mimic exhibiting saturation kinetics to date.

  15. Toxicity of manganese metallodrugs toward Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Anderson; Borella, Maria Inês; Espósito, Breno Pannia

    2014-02-01

    Manganese is an essential metal which can be neurotoxic in some instances. As Mn-based metallodrugs are ever more prevalent in clinical practice, concern regarding the toxic effects of Mn discharges to water bodies on the biota prompted us to study the physicochemical parameters of these complexes and to assess their acute toxicity toward adult Danio rerio individuals, particularly in terms of brain tissue damage. Our results show that the Mn(III)-salen acetate complex EUK108 is toxic, which can be rationalized in terms of its lipophilicity, stability and redox activity.

  16. Thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Chih; Venkataraman, Vijay Shankar; Kee, Hae-Young

    2015-03-01

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) are promising thermoelectric materials that may be broadly deployable because of the abundance of the constituent elements and their non-toxic nature. We study the thermoelectric properties of HMS using density functional theory calculations and tight-binding models to fit these calculations. We estimate charge carrier density and mobility, and compare with experimental data. Theoretically obtained thermal and electrical conductivities, and the Seebeck coefficients are presented. Possible scattering mechanisms and relations to figure of merit are also discussed. NSERC CREATE - HEATER Program.

  17. Diffusion abnormalities of the globi pallidi in manganese neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Alexander M.; Filice, Ross W.; Teksam, Mehmet; Casey, Sean; Truwit, Charles; Clark, H. Brent; Woon, Carolyn; Liu, Hai Ying [Department of Radiology, Medical School, Box 292, 420 Delaware Street S.E., 55455, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Manganese is an essential trace metal required for normal central nervous system function, which is toxic when in excess amounts in serum. Manganese neurotoxicity has been demonstrated in patients with chronic liver/biliary failure where an inability to excrete manganese via the biliary system causes increased serum levels, and in patients on total parenteral nutrition (TPN), occupational/inhalational exposure, or other source of excess exogenous manganese. Manganese has been well described in the literature to deposit selectively in the globi pallidi and to induce focal neurotoxicity. We present a case of a 53-year-old woman who presented for a brain MR 3 weeks after liver transplant due to progressively decreasing level of consciousness. The patient had severe liver failure by liver function tests and bilirubin levels, and had also been receiving TPN since the transplant. The MR demonstrated symmetric hyperintensity on T1-weighted images in the globi pallidi. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map indicated restricted diffusion in the globi pallidi bilaterally. The patient eventually succumbed to systemic aspergillosis 3 days after the MR. The serum manganese level was 195 mcg/l (micrograms per liter) on postmortem exam (over 20 times the upper limits of normal). The patient was presumed to have suffered from manganese neurotoxicity since elevated serum manganese levels have been shown in the literature to correlate with hyperintensity on T1-weighted images, neurotoxicity symptoms, and focal concentration of manganese in the globi pallidi. Neuropathologic sectioning of the globi pallidi at autopsy was also consistent with manganese neurotoxicity. (orig.)

  18. Reduction of ripening time of full-scale manganese removal filters with manganese oxide-coated media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, J.H.; Petrusevski, B.; Slokar, Y.M.; Huysman, K.; Joris, K.; Kruithof, J.C.; Kennedy, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Effective manganese removal by conventional aeration-filtration with virgin filter media requires a long ripening time. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of manganese oxide-coated media to shorten the ripening time of filters with virgin media, under practical conditions. A full

  19. Reduction of ripening time of full-scale manganese removal filters with manganese oxide-coated media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, J.H.; Petrusevski, B.; Slokar, Y.M.; Huysman, K.; Joris, K.; Kruithof, J.C.; Kennedy, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Effective manganese removal by conventional aeration-filtration with virgin filter media requires a long ripening time. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of manganese oxide-coated media to shorten the ripening time of filters with virgin media, under practical conditions. A full scal

  20. Enhancement of level-crossing resonances in rubidium atoms by frequency control of the exciting radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Ferber, Ruvin; Gahbauer, Florian; Kalvans, Linards; Mozers, Arturs; Spiss, Agris

    2013-01-01

    We studied magneto-optical resonances caused by excited-state level crossings in a nonzero magnetic field. Experimental measurements were performed on the transitions of the $D_2$ line of rubidium. These measured signals were described by a theoretical model that takes into account all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, the coherence properties of the exciting laser radiation, and the Doppler effect. Good agreement between the experimental measurements and the theoretical model could be achieved over a wide range of laser power densities. We further showed that the contrasts of the level-crossing peaks can be sensitive to changes in the frequency of the exciting laser radiation as small as several tens of megahertz when the hyperfine splitting of the exciting state is larger than the Doppler broadening.

  1. Evaluation of the frequency stability of a VCSEL locked to a micro-fabricated Rubidium vapour cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, J.; Gruet, F.; Schori, C.; Affolderbach, C.; Matthey, R.; Mileti, G.; Salvadé, Y.; Petremand, Y.; De Rooij, N.

    2010-04-01

    We present our evaluation of a compact laser system made of a 795 nm VCSEL locked to the Rubidium absorption line of a micro-fabricated absorption cell. The spectrum of the VCSEL was characterised, including its RIN, FM noise and line-width. We optimised the signal-to-noise ratio and determined the frequency shifts versus the cell temperature and the incident optical power. The frequency stability of the laser (Allan deviation) was measured using a high-resolution wavemeter and an ECDL-based reference. Our results show that a fractional instability of anodic bonding. The overall thickness of the reference cell is 1.5 mm. No buffer gas was added. The potential applications of this compact and low-consumption system range from optical interferometers to basic laser spectroscopy. It is particularly attractive for mobile and space instruments where stable and accurate wavelength references are needed.

  2. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Elena Pascu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering bothlocal economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption methods have been applied to determine metals content in accordance to reports of National Water Agency from Romania (ANAR. Every water source contains dissolved or particulate compounds. The concentrations of these compounds can affect health, productivity, compliance requirements, or serviceability and cannot be economically removed by conventional filtration means. In this study, we made a comparison between the electrochemical and adsorption methods (using membranes. Both methods have been used to evaluate the efficiency of iron and manganese removal at various times and temperatures. We used two membrane types: composite and cellulose, respectively. Different approaches, including lowering the initial current density and increasing the initial pH were applied. Reaction kinetics was achieved using mathematical models: Jura and Temkin.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Manganese Ferrite Aluminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Dhiman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum doped manganese ferrites MnAlxFe2−xO4 with 0.0≤x≤1.0 have been prepared by the double ceramic route. The formation of mixed spinel phase has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The unit cell parameter `aO' is found to decrease linearly with aluminum concentration due to smaller ionic radius of aluminum. The cation distributions were estimated from X-ray diffraction intensities of various planes. The theoretical lattice parameter, X-ray density, oxygen positional parameter, ionic radii, jump length, and bonds and edges lengths of the tetrahedral (A and octahedral (B sites were determined. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra recorded at room temperature were fitted with two sextets corresponding to Fe3+ ions at A- and B-sites. In the present ferrite system, the area ratio of Fe3+ ions at the A- and B-sites determined from the spectral analysis of Mössbauer spectra gives evidence that Al3+ ions replace iron ions at B-sites. This change in the site preference reflects an abrupt change in magnetic hyperfine fields at A- and B-sites as aluminum concentration increases, which has been explained on the basis of supertransferred hyperfine field. On the basis of estimated cation distribution, it is concluded that aluminum doped manganese ferrites exhibit a 55% normal spinel structure.

  4. Environmental Exposure to Manganese in Air: Associations ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Manganese (Mn) inhalation has been associated with neuropsychological and neurological sequelae in exposed workers. Few environmental epidemiologic studies have examined the potentialy neurotoxic effects of Mn exposure in ambient air on motor function and hand tremor in adult community residents. Mn exposed residents were recruited in two Ohio towns: Marietta, a town near a ferro-manganese smelter, and East Liverpool, a town adjacent to a facility processing, crushing, screening, and packaging Mn products.METHODS: Chronic (≥10years) exposure to ambient air Mn in adult residents and effects on neuropsychological and neurological outcomes were investigated. Participants from Marietta (n=100) and East Liverpool (n=86) were combined for analyses. AERMOD dispersion modeling of fixed-site outdoor air monitoring data estimated Mn inhalation over a ten year period. Adult Mn­ exposed residents' psychomotor ability was assessed using Finger Tapping, Hand Dynamometer, Grooved Pegbcard, and the Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS) Tremor system.Bayesian structural equation modeling was used to assess associations between air-Mn and motor function and tremor .RESULTS: Air-Mn exposure was significantly correlated in bivariate analyses with the tremor test (CATSYS) for intensity, center frequency and harmonic index. The Bayesian path analysis model showed associations of air-Mn with the CATSYS non-dominant center frequency and harmonic ind

  5. Down-regulation of a manganese transporter in the face of metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Laran T; Carroll, Mark C; Hall, Matthew D; Harvey, Christopher J; Beese, Sara E; Culotta, Valeria C

    2009-06-01

    The yeast Smf1p Nramp manganese transporter is posttranslationally regulated by environmental manganese. Smf1p is stabilized at the cell surface with manganese starvation, but is largely degraded in the vacuole with physiological manganese through a mechanism involving the Rsp5p adaptor complex Bsd2p/Tre1p/Tre2p. We now describe an additional level of Smf1p regulation that occurs with toxicity from manganese, but not other essential metals. This regulation is largely Smf1p-specific. As with physiological manganese, toxic manganese triggers vacuolar degradation of Smf1p by trafficking through the multivesicular body. However, regulation by toxic manganese does not involve Bsd2p/Tre1p/Tre2p. Toxic manganese triggers both endocytosis of cell surface Smf1p and vacuolar targeting of intracellular Smf1p through the exocytic pathway. Notably, the kinetics of vacuolar targeting for Smf1p are relatively slow with toxic manganese and require prolonged exposures to the metal. Down-regulation of Smf1p by toxic manganese does not require transport activity of Smf1p, whereas such transport activity is needed for Smf1p regulation by manganese starvation. Furthermore, the responses to manganese starvation and manganese toxicity involve separate cellular compartments. We provide evidence that manganese starvation is sensed within the lumen of the secretory pathway, whereas manganese toxicity is sensed within an extra-Golgi/cytosolic compartment of the cell.

  6. Early Postnatal Blood Manganese Levels and Children’s Neurodevelopment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Birgit Claus; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Schwartz, Joel; Téllez-Rojo, Martha María; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio; Schnaas, Lourdes; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Bellinger, David C.; Hu, Howard; Wright, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that low-level environmental exposure to manganese adversely affects child growth and neurodevelopment. Previous studies have addressed the effects of prenatal exposure, but little is known about developmental effects of early postnatal exposure. Methods We studied 448 children born in Mexico City from 1997 through 2000, using a longitudinal study to investigate neurotoxic effects of early life manganese exposure. Archived blood samples, collected from children at 12 and 24 months of age, were analyzed for manganese levels using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Mental and psychomotor development were scored using Bayley Scales of Infant Development at 6-month intervals between 12 and 36 months of age. Results At 12 months of age, the mean (SD) blood manganese level was 24.3 (4.5) μg/l and the median was 23.7 μg/l; at 24 months, these values were 21.1 (6.2) μg/l and 20.3 μg/l, respectively. Twelve- and 24-month manganese concentrations were correlated (Spearman correlation = 0.55) and levels declined over time (β = −5.7 [95% CI = −6.2 to −5.1]). We observed an inverted U-shaped association between 12-month blood manganese and concurrent mental development scores (compared with the middle 3 manganese quintiles, for the lowest manganese quintile, β = −3.3 [−6.0 to −0.7] and for the highest manganese quintile, β = −2.8 [−5.5 to −0.2]). This 12-month manganese effect was apparent but diminished with mental development scores at later ages. The 24-month manganese levels were not associated with neurodevelopment. Conclusions These results suggest a possible biphasic dose-response relationship between early-life manganese exposure at lower exposure levels and infant neurodevelopment. The data are consistent with manganese as both an essential nutrient and a toxicant. PMID:20549838

  7. Production of Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Shewanella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Saad M.; White, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several species of the bacterial genus Shewanella are well-known dissimilatory reducers of manganese under anaerobic conditions. In fact, Shewanella oneidensis is one of the most well studied of all metal-reducing bacteria. In the current study, a number of Shewanella strains were tested for manganese-oxidizing capacity under aerobic conditions. All were able to oxidize Mn(II) and to produce solid dark brown manganese oxides. Shewanella loihica strain PV-4 was the strongest oxidizer, producing oxides at a rate of 20.3 mg/liter/day and oxidizing Mn(II) concentrations of up to 9 mM. In contrast, S. oneidensis MR-1 was the weakest oxidizer tested, producing oxides at 4.4 mg/liter/day and oxidizing up to 4 mM Mn(II). Analysis of products from the strongest oxidizers, i.e., S. loihica PV-4 and Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, revealed finely grained, nanosize, poorly crystalline oxide particles with identical Mn oxidation states of 3.86. The biogenic manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced within 2 days by all of the Shewanella strains when culture conditions were made anoxic and an appropriate nutrient (lactate) was added. While Shewanella species were detected previously as part of manganese-oxidizing consortia in natural environments, the current study has clearly shown manganese-reducing Shewanella species bacteria that are able to oxidize manganese in aerobic cultures. IMPORTANCE Members of the genus Shewanella are well known as dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacteria. This study shows that a number of species from Shewanella are also capable of manganese oxidation under aerobic conditions. Characterization of the products of the two most efficient oxidizers, S. loihica and S. putrefaciens, revealed finely grained, nanosize oxide particles. With a change in culture conditions, the manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced by the same bacteria. The ability of Shewanella species both to oxidize and to reduce manganese indicates

  8. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, D.; Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-09-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E.T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}/O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This presentation gives the thermodynamic background for consideration of manganese-based sorbents as an alternative to zinc ferrite. To date the work which has been in progress for nine months is limited at this stage to thermogravimetric testing of four formulations of manganese-alumina sorbents to determine the optimum conditions of pelletization and induration to produce reactive pellets.

  9. Manganese carbonates as possible biogenic relics in Archean settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Tomás, Blanca; Khonsari, Bahar; Mühlen, Dominik; Wickbold, Christian; Schäfer, Nadine; Hause-Reitner, Dorothea; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate minerals such as dolomite, kutnahorite or rhodochrosite are frequently, but not exclusively generated by microbial processes. In recent anoxic sediments, Mn(II)carbonate minerals (e.g. rhodochrosite, kutnahorite) derive mainly from the reduction of Mn(IV) compounds by anaerobic respiration. The formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling in an oxygenated atmosphere. However, putative anaerobic pathways such as microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation, anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxidation in ultraviolet light may facilitate manganese cycling even in an early Archean environment, without the availability of oxygen. In addition, manganese carbonates precipitate by microbially induced processes without change of the oxidation state, e.g. by pH shift. Hence, there are several ways how these minerals could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. We will summarize microbially induced manganese carbonate deposition in the presence and absence of atmospheric oxygen and we will make some considerations about the biogenic deposition of manganese carbonates in early Archean settings.

  10. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  11. Selection and Use of Manganese Dioxide by Neanderthals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Peter J.; Anastasakis, Konstantinos; de Jong, Wiebren; van Hoesel, Annelies; Roebroeks, Wil; Soressi, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these ‘manganese oxides’ were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they needed black material for decoration, soot and charcoal were readily available, whereas obtaining manganese oxides would have incurred considerably higher costs. Compositional analyses lead us to infer that late Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I were deliberately selecting manganese dioxide. Combustion experiments and thermo-gravimetric measurements demonstrate that manganese dioxide reduces wood’s auto-ignition temperature and substantially increases the rate of char combustion, leading us to conclude that the most beneficial use for manganese dioxide was in fire-making. With archaeological evidence for fire places and the conversion of the manganese dioxide to powder, we argue that Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I used manganese dioxide in fire-making and produced fire on demand.

  12. Methanogenesis from wastewater stimulated by addition of elemental manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Sen; Tian, Tian; Qi, Benyu; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-08-05

    This study presents a novel procedure for accelerating methanogenesis from wastewater by adding elemental manganese into the anaerobic digestion system. The results indicated that elemental manganese effectively enhanced both the methane yield and the production rate. Compared to the control test without elemental manganese, the total methane yield and production rate with 4 g/L manganese addition increased 3.4-fold (from 0.89 ± 0.03 to 2.99 ± 0.37 M/gVSS within 120 h) and 4.4-fold (from 6.2 ± 0.1 to 27.2 ± 2.2 mM/gVSS/h), respectively. Besides, more acetate consumption and less propionate generation were observed during the methanogenesis with manganese. Further studies demonstrated that the elemental manganese served as electron donors for the methanogenesis from carbon dioxide, and the final proportion of methane in the total generated gas with 4 g/L manganese addition reached 96.9%, which was 2.1-fold than that of the control (46.6%).

  13. Effect of manganese on the secretion of manganese-peroxidase by the basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Rodrigo A; Canessa, Paulo; Manubens, Augusto; Vicuña, Rafael

    2010-07-01

    The ligninolytic machinery of the widely used model fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes the enzymes manganese-peroxidase (MnP) and laccase (Lcs). In this work the effect of Mn(II) on the secretion of MnP was studied. Cultures grown in the absence of Mn(II) showed high levels of mnp transcripts. However, almost no MnP enzyme was detected in the extracellular medium, either by enzymatic activity assays or Western blot hybridizations. In the corresponding mycelia, immuno-electron microscopy experiments showed high levels of MnP enzyme within intracellular compartments. These results suggest that in addition to its well-known effect on transcription regulation of mnp genes, manganese influences secretion of MnP to the extracellular medium. Experiments carried out in the presence of cycloheximide confirmed that the metal is required to secrete MnP already synthesized and retained within the cell.

  14. Multi-V-type and Λ-type electromagnetically induced transparency experiments in rubidium atoms with low-power low-cost free running single mode diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavín Varela, S.; León Suazo, J. A.; Gutierrez González, J.; Vargas Roco, J.; Buberl, T.; Aguirre Gómez, J. G.

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present the experimental realization of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in A-type and multi-V-type configurations in a sample of rubidium atoms inside a vapor cell at room temperature. Typical EIT windows are clearly visible in the Doppler- broadened absorption signal of the weak probe beam. The coherent optical pump and probe fields are produced by two tunable low-cost, low-power, continuous-wave (cw), free-running and single mode operated diode laser systems, temperature stabilized and current controlled, tuned to the D2 line of rubidium atoms at 780.2 nm wavelength. The continuum wave and single mode operation of our laser systems are confirmed by direct and saturated absorption spectroscopy techniques. Among other applications, these simple experiments can be used as a low-cost undergraduate laboratory in atomic physics, laser physics, coherent light-atom interaction, and high resolution atomic spectroscopy.

  15. A dual-isotope rubidium comagnetometer to search for anomalous long-range spin-mass (spin-gravity) couplings of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Kimball, D F Jackson; Valdez, J; Swiatlowski, J; Rios, C; Peregrina-Ramirez, R; Montcrieffe, C; Kremer, J; Dudley, J; Sanchez, C

    2013-01-01

    The experimental concept of a search for a long-range coupling between rubidium (Rb) nuclear spins and the mass of the Earth is described. The experiment is based on simultaneous measurement of the spin precession frequencies for overlapping ensembles of Rb-85 and Rb-87 atoms contained within an evacuated, antirelaxation-coated vapor cell. Rubidium atoms are spin-polarized in the presence of an applied magnetic field by synchronous optical pumping with circularly polarized laser light. Spin precession is probed by measuring optical rotation of far-off-resonant, linearly polarized laser light. Simultaneous measurement of Rb-85 and Rb-87 spin precession frequencies enables suppression of magnetic-field-related systematic effects. The nuclear structure of the Rb isotopes makes the experiment particularly sensitive to anomalous spin-dependent interactions of the proton. Experimental sensitivity and a variety of systematic effects are discussed, and initial data are presented.

  16. Alignment-to-orientation conversion in a magnetic field at nonlinear excitation of the $D_2$ line of rubidium: experiment and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, M; Ferber, R; Gahbauer, F; Kalvans, L; Mozers, A; Spiss, A

    2015-01-01

    We studied alignment-to-orientation conversion caused by excited-state level crossings in a nonzero magnetic field of both atomic rubidium isotopes. Experimental measurements were performed on the transitions of the $D_2$ line of rubidium. These measured signals were described by a theoretical model that takes into account all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, the coherence properties of the exciting laser radiation, and the Doppler effect. In the experiments laser induced fluorescence (LIF) components were observed at linearly polarized excitation and their difference was taken afterwards. By observing the two oppositely circularly polarized components we were able to see structures not visible in the difference graphs, which yields deeper insight into the processes responsible for these signals. We studied how these signals are dependent on laser power density and how they are affected when the exciting laser is tuned to different hyperfine tr...

  17. Iron, zinc, and manganese distribution in mature soybean seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta

    2009-01-01

    to reveal the distribution of iron, zinc, manganese and phosphorus within soybean seeds. We show that high concentrations of iron accumulate in the seed coats of mature soybean seeds. This iron accounted for 20 to 40% of the total seed iron. Furthermore, manganese and iron accumulated in close proximity...... to each other in the provascular tissue of the soybean radicle. No regions with increased accumulation of iron, zinc, or manganese were observed in the cotyledons. The concentrations of both phosphorus and zinc were higher in the radicle compared to the cotyledons, and zinc accumulated primarily near...

  18. Hydrothermal Manganese Mineralization Near the Samoan Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Hart, S. R.; Dunham, R.

    2006-12-01

    The thickest beds of hydrothermal manganese oxides recovered to date from the global ocean were collected from a volcanic cone in the south Pacific. In April 2005, samples were dredged aboard the R.V. Kilo Moana from a volcanic cone on the lower flank of Tulaga seamount (about 2,700 m water depth; 14° 39.222' S; 170° 1.730' W), located 115 km SW of Vailulu'u, the volcanically and hydrothermally active center of the Samoan hotspot. Additional hydrothermal manganese samples were collected off Ofu Island (dredge Alia 107), 72 km to the WSW of Vailulu'u. Manganese-oxide beds up to 9 cm thick are composed of birnessite and 10 Å manganates. Some layers consist of Mn-oxide columnar structures 4 cm long and 1 cm wide, which have not been described previously. The mean Mn and Fe contents of 18 samples are 51 weight percent and 0.76 weight percent, respectively. Elevated concentrations of Li (mean 0.11 wt. percent) are indicators of a hydrothermal origin, and distinguishes these samples, along with the high Mn and low Fe contents, from hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts. Other enriched elements include Ba (mean 0.14 percent), Cu (249 ppm), Mo (451 ppm), Ni (400 ppm), Zn (394 ppm), V (214 ppm), and W (132 ppm). Chondrite-normalized REE patterns show large negative Ce anomalies and LREE enrichments, both characteristic of hydrothermal Mn deposits. Small negative Eu anomalies are not typical of hydrothermal deposits and can be explained either by the absence of leaching of plagioclase by the hydrothermal fluids or by the precipitation of Eu-rich minerals, such as barite and anhydrite, at depth. The high base-metal contents indicate that sulfides are not forming deeper in the hydrothermal system or that such deposits are being leached by the ascending fluids. Textures of the thickest Mn deposits indicate that the Mn oxides formed below the seabed from ascending fluids during multiple phases of waxing and waning hydrothermal pulses. The deposits were later exposed at the seafloor by

  19. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Correlation between airborne manganese concentration at the workstations in the iron foundry and manganese concentration in workers' blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmohammadi, Seyedtaghi; Moghaddasi, Yosef; Yazdani, Jamshid; Yousefinejad, Razyeh; Esfandyari, Yahya; Gorgani, Mohsen; Habibpour, Manijeh

    2017-06-27

    Manganese (Mn) used as raw material for melting process in the ferrous foundry is considered as hazardous neurotoxic substance because it accumulates in the central nervous system and may cause neurological disorders. The furnace-men and melting department workers are potentially exposed to manganese particles or fume in the workplace. The objective of the research has been to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in the foundry by correlation of blood-manganese (B-Mn) and air-manganese (air-Mn) measurement. Air-Mn and Mn of blood serum were measured involving workers who worked in a big-sized foundry during 1 year. The standard method of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ID-121 was used for air and blood assessment and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was carried out for air and blood sample analysis. The air sampling results have revealed that there is a high exposure to manganese (4.5 mg/m3) in the workplace as compared to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's (NIOSH) time weighted average (the reference time-weighted average (TWA) = 1 mg/m3). The average blood serum Mn concentration was 2.745 μg/l for subjects working for shorter than 3 months and 274.85 μg/l for subjects working 3-12 months. Against the research hypothesis there was no correlation between the air-Mn concentration and the B-Mn (serum) level of manganese in the serum of the exposed subjects. It may be due to short time of air sampling of manganese airborne particles, and a real-time monitoring of airborne manganese particles is suggested for any future study. Med Pr 2017;68(4):449-458.

  1. Correlation between airborne manganese concentration at the workstations in the iron foundry and manganese concentration in workers’ blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedtaghi Mirmohammadi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Manganese (Mn used as raw material for melting process in the ferrous foundry is considered as hazardous neurotoxic substance because it accumulates in the central nervous system and may cause neurological disorders. The furnace-men and melting department workers are potentially exposed to manganese particles or fume in the workplace. The objective of the research has been to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in the foundry by correlation of blood-manganese (B-Mn and air-manganese (air-Mn measurement. Material and Methods: Air-Mn and Mn of blood serum were measured involving workers who worked in a big-sized foundry during 1 year. The standard method of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA ID-121 was used for air and blood assessment and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS was carried out for air and blood sample analysis. Results: The air sampling results have revealed that there is a high exposure to manganese (4.5 mg/m3 in the workplace as compared to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH time weighted average (the reference time-weighted average (TWA = 1 mg/m3. The average blood serum Mn concentration was 2.745 μg/l for subjects working for shorter than 3 months and 274.85 μg/l for subjects working 3–12 months. Conclusions: Against the research hypothesis there was no correlation between the air-Mn concentration and the B-Mn (serum level of manganese in the serum of the exposed subjects. It may be due to short time of air sampling of manganese airborne particles, and a real-time monitoring of airborne manganese particles is suggested for any future study. Med Pr 2017;68(4:449–458

  2. Manganese inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in human cells: a possible mechanism behind manganese-induced toxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhorst, Julia; Ebert, Franziska; Hartwig, Andrea; Michalke, Bernhard; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2010-11-01

    For humans manganese is both an essential trace element and, at higher doses, a toxic metal. Due to the ubiquitous occurrence of manganese in foodstuff, in industrial countries daily dietary uptake is higher as compared to the estimated daily requirement. Therefore manganese deficiency is extremely rare. In contrast chronic manganese toxicity, affecting primarily the central nervous system, is more prevalent. Thus manganese occupational and dietary overexposure has been shown to cause progressive, permanent, neurodegenerative damage, resulting in syndromes similar to idiopathic Parkinson's disease. To date modes of manganese neurotoxic action are poorly understood and in most studies oxidative stress is postulated as the underlying mechanism. The present study searched on the cellular level for a molecular mechanism behind manganese-induced neurotoxicity and investigated bioavailability, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of MnCl(2), as well as its impact on the DNA damage response in human cells (HeLa S3) in culture. Whereas up to 10 µM MnCl(2) showed no induction of DNA strand breaks after 24 h incubation, manganese strongly inhibited H(2)O(2)-stimulated poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation at low, completely non-cytotoxic, for certain human exposure, relevant concentrations starting at 1 µM. Thereby inhibition of this essential DNA damage response signalling reaction was not due to a reduced gene expression or protein level of the responsible polymerase PARP-1. Taken together, the results indicate that manganese, under conditions of either overload due to high exposure or disturbed homeostasis, can disturb the cellular response to DNA strand breaks, which has been shown before (S. Katyal and P. J. McKinnon, Mech. Ageing Dev., 2008, 129, 483-491) to result in neurological diseases.

  3. A physics package for rubidium atomic frequency standard with a short-term stability of 2.4 × 10-13 τ-1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiang; Li, Wenbing; He, Shengguo; Lv, Jianfeng; Wang, Pengfei; Mei, Ganghua

    2016-12-01

    In this article, a new type of physics package with high signal to noise ratio for a rubidium atomic frequency standard is reported. To enhance the clock transition signal, a slotted tube microwave cavity with a field orientation factor of 0.93 and an absorption cell with the diameter of 30 mm were utilized in design of the cavity-cell assembly. Based on the spectral analysis of the three commonly used rubidium spectral lamps, the spectral lamp filled with Xe gas was chosen as the optical pumping source for its small line shape distortion. To suppress the shot noise of the signal, a band pass interference filter was used to filter out Xe spectral lines from the pumping light. A desk system of the rubidium frequency standard with the physics package was realized, and the short-term stability of the system was predicted and tested. The measured result is 2.4 × 10-13 τ-1/2 up to 100 s averaging time, in good agreement with the predicted one.

  4. Study of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium using optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ponciano-Ojeda, Francisco; López-Hernández, Oscar; Mojica-Casique, Cristian; Colín-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Ramírez-Martínez, Fernando; Flores-Mijangos, Jesús; Sahagún, Daniel; Jáuregui, Rocío; Jiménez-Mier, José

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of excitation of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium is presented. The experiments were performed in a room temperature rubidium cell with continuous wave extended cavity diode lasers. Optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy with counterpropagating beams allows the detection of the non-dipole transition free of Doppler broadening. The 5p3/2 state is prepared by excitation with a laser locked to the maximum F cyclic transition of the D2 line, and the forbidden transition is produced by excitation with a 911 nm laser. Production of the forbidden transition is monitored by detection of the 420 nm fluorescence that results from decay of the 6p3/2 state. Spectra with three narrow lines (~ 13 MHz FWHM) with the characteristic F - 1, F and F + 1 splitting of the 6p3/2 hyperfine structure in both rubidium isotopes were obtained. The results are in very good agreement with a direct calculation that takes into account the 5s -> 5p3/2 preparation dynamics, the...

  5. Dermal administration of manganese porphyrin by iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Fuminori; Imamura, Shinya; Asayama, Shoichiro; Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The present study describes a technique for dermal administration of cationic manganese porphyrin (Mn-porphyrin), an antioxidant with superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in hairless mouse. In general, the stratum corneum on the surface of the skin represents a barrier to passive diffusion of therapeutic agents by standard dermal administration. The present study investigated whether, dermal administration of Mn-porphyrin solution using iontophoresis, the electrical dermal administration technique, could overcome this barrier. We visually confirmed that Mn-porphyrin had penetrated to the reverse side of the hairless mouse skin after iontophoresis for a short period. With prolonged iontophoresis, the ratio of detectable Mn-porphyrin solution on the reverse side of the hairless mouse skin increased. In the future, this technique could provide an innovative approach for delivery of this antioxidant in intractable disease.

  6. Hybrid molecular materials based upon organic pi-electron donors and inorganic metal complexes. Conducting salts of bis(ethylenediseleno)tetrathiafulvalene (BEST) with the octahedral anions hexacyanoferrate(III) and nitroprusside

    CERN Document Server

    Clemente-Leon, M; Galan-Mascaros, J R; Giménez-Saiz, C; Gómez-García, C J; Fabre, J M; Mousdis, G A; Papavassiliou, G C

    2002-01-01

    The synthesis, structure and physical characterization of three new radical salts formed by the organic donor bis(ethylenediseleno)tetrathiafulvalene (BEDS-TTF or BEST) and the paramagnetic hexacyanoferrate(III) anion [Fe(CN) sub 6] sup 3 sup - or the photochromic nitroprusside anion [Fe(CN) sub 5 NO] sup 2 sup - are reported: (BEST) sub 4 [Fe(CN) sub 6] (1), (BEST) sub 3 [Fe(CN) sub 6] sub 2 centre dot H sub 2 O (2) and (BEST) sub 2 [Fe(CN) sub 5 NO] (3). Salts 1 and 3 show a layered structure with alternating organic (beta-type packing) and inorganic slabs. Salt 2 shows an original interpenetrated structure probably due to the unprecedented presence of (BEST) sup 2 sup + dications. The three salts are semiconductors although salt 1 exhibits a high room temperature conductivity and a semiconducting-semiconducting transition at ca. 150 K which has been attributed to a dimerization in the organic sublattice.

  7. 固定床煅烧炉中载铯亚铁氰化钛钾的热分解研究%Thermal Decomposition of Potassium Titanium Hexacyanoferrate (Ⅱ) Loaded with Cesium in a Fixed Bed Calciner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯孝贵; 景山; 吴秋林; 陈靖; 宋崇立

    2007-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of potassium titanium hexacyanoferrate(Ⅱ) (KTiFC) loaded with cesium (referred to as Used Exchanget,or UE) was studied at different flow rate of air in a fixed bed calciner.The calcination process consisted of four stages:ambient temperature-180℃ (stage Ⅰ),180-250℃ (stage Ⅱ),250-400℃ (stage Ⅲ),and constant 400℃ (stage Ⅳ).The most intense reaction occurred in stage Ⅱ.The rate of thermal decomposition was controlled,depending on the O2 flux,by O2 or CN concentration in different stages.Results from differential thermal analysis (DTA) showed that the calcination reaction of the anhydrous UE was exotlaemic, with an approximate heat output of 4.6kJ·g-1,which was so large to cause the possible agglomeration of calcined residues.The agglomeration could be avoided by enhancing heat transfer and controlling the O2 flux.It was found that there was no cyanides in the calcined residues and no CN-bearing gases such as HCN and (CN)2 in the off-gas.It seemed that the catalytic oxidation furnace behind the fixed bed calciner could be cancelled.

  8. Gastroprotective Properties of Manganese Chloride on Acetic Acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    factors causes ulcer, gastric acid secretion still remains an important factor in ... acid hyper secretion can also cause problems such as ... and many diseases including osteoporosis, ..... amount of manganese delivered in children's parenteral.

  9. Status and Role of Manganese in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RK Kamble

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is the second most abundant heavy metal, and in frequency list of elements it occupies 12th place. The Earth’s core contains about 1.5% manganese. According to Indian Standards for Drinking water (IS 10500:2012 manganese concentration in drinking water is 0.1 ppm (acceptable limit and 0.3 ppm as permissible limit. An attempt has been made to record the presence of manganese in different environmental matrices such as air, water, soil, food, its effects on plants, animals including human beings. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11081 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 222-234

  10. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  11. Sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R.V. Smotraiev; E.O. Sorochkina; А.V. Dzuba; Y.D. Galivets

    2016-01-01

    ...: The aim of this work is to determine the impact of aluminum and manganese ions additives on surface and sorption properties of zirconium oxyhydroxide based sorbents during their production process...

  12. Manganese Concentrations In Hair and Fingernail of Some Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    sonic bath and on drying were stored in small plastic tubes ... using three different washing methods. Distilled ..... Derivation of manganese safe an adequate daily intakes. In .... Nuclear Chemistry 236(1-2):25-28. ... Hazardous Waste Site.

  13. India's manganese nodule mine site in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.

    This commentary highlights the activities of massive exploration programme for manganese nodule deposits in the Central Indian Basin located 5 km below the ocean surface and India's claim for mine site development and registration with UNCLOS...

  14. Manganese nodules in the Exclusive Economic Zone of Mauritius

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; ShyamPrasad, M.

    The distribution of manganese nodules in the Exclusive Economic Zone of the island nation Mauritius was delineated during cruise SK-35 of ORV Sagar Kanya in 1987. The areas surveyed included Saya de Malha and Nazareth Banks, the Cargados Carajos...

  15. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  16. By lithology Zbruch deposits (Lower Sarmatian Nikopol manganese ore Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanovich V.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on lithologic-paleogeographic study Zbruch layers of Nikopol manganese ore Basin sediments described lithological and genetic types of rocks and facies conditions of formation of deposits.

  17. Oxygen toxicity in Streptococcus mutans: manganese, iron and superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.E.; Strachan, R.C.; Aranha, H.; Evans, S.L.; Salin, M.L.; Welch, B.; Arceneaux, J.E.L.; Byers, B.R.

    1984-07-01

    When cultured anaerobically in a chemically defined medium that was treated with Chelex-100 to lower its trace metal content, Streptococcus mutans OMZ176 had no apparent requirement for manganese or iron. Manganese or iron was necessary for aerobic cultivation in deep static cultures. During continuous aerobic cultivation in a stirred chemostat, iron did not support the growth rate achieved with manganese. Since the dissolved oxygen level in the chemostat cultures was higher than the final level in the static cultures, manganese may be required for growth at elevated levels. In medium supplemented with manganese, cells grown anaerobically contained a low level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity; aerobic cultivation increased SOD activity at least threefold. In iron-supplemented medium, cells grown anaerobically also had low SOD activity; aerobic incubation resulted in little increase in SOD activity. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell extracts revealed a major band and a minor band of SOD activity in the cells grown with manganese; however, cells grown with iron contained a single band of SOD activity with an R/sub f/ value similar to that of the major band found in cells grown with manganese. None of the SOD activity bands were abolished by the inclusion of 2 mM hydrogen peroxide in the SOD activity strain. S. mutans may not produce a separate iron-containing SOD but may insert either iron or manganese into an apo-SOD protein. Alternatively, iron may function in another activity (not SOD) that augments the defense against oxygen toxicity at low SOD levels. 28 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Iron and manganese contamination: sources, adverse effects and control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Y V V; Saraf, Renu

    2007-10-01

    This article discusses the problem of iron and manganese contamination, the adverse effects and available control methods. The presence of iron and manganese in water causes serious commercial and health problems. Various treatment methods are available to treat water contaminated with these elements. However, catalytic media is an excellent choice particularly increasing given the preference for non-chemical water treatment. INDION ISR and BIRM are the most popularly used synthetically manufactured catalytic media.

  19. Carbon Nanotube/Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    electrolytes : 0.5 M K2SO4, 1 M sodium chloride (NaCl), and 1 M calcium chloride (CaCl2). The qualitative CV behavior of the three electrolytes can be seen...Carbon Nanotube/ Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Matthew Ervin, Vinay Raju, Mary Hendrickson, and...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6289 December 2012 Carbon Nanotube/ Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide

  20. Magnesium-dependent processes are targets of bacterial manganese toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohle, Thomas H.; O’Brian, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    A Bradyrhizobium japonicum mutant defective in the gene encoding the high affinity Mn2+ transporter MntH has a severe growth phenotype under manganese limitation. Here, we isolated suppressor mutants of an mntH strain that grew under manganese limitation, and activities of high affinity Mn2+ transport and Mn2+-dependent enzymes were partially rescued. The suppressor strains harbor gain-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the Mg2+ channel MgtE. The MgtE variants likely allow Mn2+ entry via loss of a gating mechanism that normally holds the transporter in the closed state when cellular Mg2+ levels are high. Both MgtE-dependent and -independent suppressor phenotypes were recapitulated by magnesium-limited growth of the mntH strain. Growth studies of wild type cells suggest that manganese is toxic to cells when environmental magnesium is low. Moreover, extracellular manganese and magnesium levels were manipulated to inhibit growth without substantially altering the intracellular content of either metal, implying that manganese toxicity depends on its cellular distribution rather than the absolute concentration. Mg2+-dependent enzyme activities were found to be inhibited or stimulated by Mn2+. We conclude that Mn2+ can occupy Mg2+-binding sites in cells, and suggest that Mg2+-dependent processes are targets of manganese toxicity. PMID:24975873

  1. Spatial and temporal variations of manganese concentrations in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Benoit; Carrière, Annie; Bouchard, Maryse F

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the variability of manganese concentrations in drinking water (daily, seasonal, spatial) for eight communities who participated in an epidemiological study on neurotoxic effects associated with exposure to manganese in drinking water. We also assessed the performance of residential point-of-use and point-of-entry devices (POE) for reducing manganese concentrations in water. While the total Mn concentrations measured during this study were highly variable depending on the location (manganese concentration for 4 out of 5 sampling locations. The efficiency of reverse osmosis and ion exchange for total Mn removal was consistently high while activated carbon provided variable results. The four POE greensand filters investigated all increased (29 to 199%) manganese concentration, indicating deficient operation and/or maintenance practices. Manganese concentrations in the distribution system were equal or lower than at the inlet, indicating that sampling at the inlet of the distribution system is conservative. The decline in total Mn concentration was linked to higher water residence time in the distribution system.

  2. Permanganate-based synthesis of manganese oxide nanoparticles in ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Cameron R.; Smith, Trevor J.; Embley, Jacob S.; Maxfield, Jake H.; Hansen, Kameron R.; Peterson, J. Ryan; Henrichsen, Andrew M.; Erickson, Stephen D.; Buck, David C.; Colton, John S.; Watt, Richard K.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the comproportionation reaction of MnII with {{{{MnO}}}4}- as a route for manganese oxide nanoparticle synthesis in the protein ferritin. We report that {{{{MnO}}}4}- serves as the electron acceptor and reacts with MnII in the presence of apoferritin to form manganese oxide cores inside the protein shell. Manganese loading into ferritin was studied under acidic, neutral, and basic conditions and the ratios of MnII and permanganate were varied at each pH. The manganese-containing ferritin samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis absorption, and by measuring the band gap energies for each sample. Manganese cores were deposited inside ferritin under both the acidic and basic conditions. All resulting manganese ferritin samples were found to be indirect band gap materials with band gap energies ranging from 1.01 to 1.34 eV. An increased UV/Vis absorption around 370 nm was observed for samples formed under acidic conditions, suggestive of MnO2 formation inside ferritin.

  3. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  4. Magnesium-dependent processes are targets of bacterial manganese toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohle, Thomas H; O'Brian, Mark R

    2014-08-01

    A Bradyrhizobium japonicum mutant defective in the gene encoding the high-affinity Mn(2+) transporter MntH has a severe growth phenotype under manganese limitation. Here, we isolated suppressor mutants of an mntH strain that grew under manganese limitation, and activities of high-affinity Mn(2+) transport and Mn(2+) -dependent enzymes were partially rescued. The suppressor strains harbour gain-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the Mg(2+) channel MgtE. The MgtE variants likely allow Mn(2+) entry via loss of a gating mechanism that normally holds the transporter in the closed state when cellular Mg(2+) levels are high. Both MgtE-dependent and MgtE-independent suppressor phenotypes were recapitulated by magnesium-limited growth of the mntH strain. Growth studies of wild-type cells suggest that manganese is toxic to cells when environmental magnesium is low. Moreover, extracellular manganese and magnesium levels were manipulated to inhibit growth without substantially altering the intracellular content of either metal, implying that manganese toxicity depends on its cellular distribution rather than the absolute concentration. Mg(2+) -dependent enzyme activities were found to be inhibited or stimulated by Mn(2+) . We conclude that Mn(2+) can occupy Mg(2+) binding sites in cells, and suggest that Mg(2+) -dependent processes are targets of manganese toxicity.

  5. Failure of manganese to protect from Shiga toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha A Gaston

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx, the main virulence factor of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, is a major public health threat, causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Currently, there are no approved therapeutics for these infections; however manganese has been reported to provide protection from the Stx1 variant isolated from Shigella dysenteriae (Stx1-S both in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the efficacy of manganese protection from Stx1-S and the more potent Stx2a isoform, using experimental systems well-established for studying Stx: in vitro responses of Vero monkey kidney cells, and in vivo toxicity to CD-1 outbred mice. Manganese treatment at the reported therapeutic concentration was toxic to Vero cells in culture and to CD-1 mice. At lower manganese concentrations that were better tolerated, we observed no protection from Stx1-S or Stx2a toxicity. The ability of manganese to prevent the effects of Stx may be particular to certain cell lines, mouse strains, or may only be manifested at high, potentially toxic manganese concentrations.

  6. Failure of manganese to protect from Shiga toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Marsha A; Pellino, Christine A; Weiss, Alison A

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), the main virulence factor of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, is a major public health threat, causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Currently, there are no approved therapeutics for these infections; however manganese has been reported to provide protection from the Stx1 variant isolated from Shigella dysenteriae (Stx1-S) both in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the efficacy of manganese protection from Stx1-S and the more potent Stx2a isoform, using experimental systems well-established for studying Stx: in vitro responses of Vero monkey kidney cells, and in vivo toxicity to CD-1 outbred mice. Manganese treatment at the reported therapeutic concentration was toxic to Vero cells in culture and to CD-1 mice. At lower manganese concentrations that were better tolerated, we observed no protection from Stx1-S or Stx2a toxicity. The ability of manganese to prevent the effects of Stx may be particular to certain cell lines, mouse strains, or may only be manifested at high, potentially toxic manganese concentrations.

  7. An 80-W Laser Diode Array with 0.1 nm Linewidth for Rubidium Vapor Laser Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zi-Ning; WANG Hong-Yan; LU Qi-Sheng; HUA Wei-Hong; XU Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The spectral linewidth of a 64-emitter laser-diode array is effectively suppressed by using a volume Bragg grating (VBG) based external cavity.At a maximal driven current of 90 A,the device produces a cw output of 80 W with 1.2 W/A slope efficiency and 0.1 nm spectral linewidth (FWHM) centered at 780 nm.The power extraction efficiency reaches 90% as compared with the free running case.The central wavelength of the narrowed spectrum is tuned over a 0.3nm range by adjusting the VBG's temperature.The absorption of 45% laser radiation by a 5-mm-long rubidium vapor cell with 150Torr ethane and 450 Torr helium at 383K is demonstrated.Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPALs) have attracted much attention and have developed quickly in recent years due to their great potential in the high power laser field.[1-4] The efficient operation of DPALs requires pump sources with a linewidth that matches the pressure-broadened absorption band of alkali atoms.In moderate (~5 atm buffer gas) and low (~1 atm buffer gas) pressure operating regimes,the required pump linewidths should be 0.4 nm and less than 0.1 nm,respectively,[5] while the typical linewidth of commercial laser diode arrays (LDAs) is 2-4 nm.%The spectral linewidth of a 64-emitter laser-diode array is effectively suppressed by using a volume Bragg grating (VBG) based external cavity. At a maximal driven current of 90 A, the device produces a cw output of80W with 1.2 W/A slope efficiency and 0.1 nm spectral linewidth (FWHM) centered at 780 nm. The power extraction efficiency reaches 90% as compared with the free running case. The central wavelength of the narrowed spectrum is tuned over a 0.3nm range by adjusting the VBG's temperature. The absorption of 45% laser radiation by a 5-mm-long rubidium vapor cell with 150 Torr ethane and 450 Torr helium at 383 K is demonstrated.

  8. Six-coordinate manganese(3+) in catalysis by yeast manganese superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Yuewei; Gralla, Edith Butler; Schumacher, Mikhail; Cascio, Duilio; Cabelli, Diane E.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone (EWHA); (UCLA); (BNL)

    2012-10-10

    Reduction of superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}) by manganese-containing superoxide dismutase occurs through either a 'prompt protonation' pathway, or an 'inner-sphere' pathway, with the latter leading to formation of an observable Mn-peroxo complex. We recently reported that wild-type (WT) manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans are more gated toward the 'prompt protonation' pathway than human and bacterial MnSODs and suggested that this could result from small structural changes in the second coordination sphere of manganese. We report here that substitution of a second-sphere residue, Tyr34, by phenylalanine (Y34F) causes the MnSOD from S. cerevisiae to react exclusively through the 'inner-sphere' pathway. At neutral pH, we have a surprising observation that protonation of the Mn-peroxo complex in the mutant yeast enzyme occurs through a fast pathway, leading to a putative six-coordinate Mn3+ species, which actively oxidizes O{sub 2}{sup -} in the catalytic cycle. Upon increasing pH, the fast pathway is gradually replaced by a slow proton-transfer pathway, leading to the well-characterized five-coordinate Mn{sup 3+}. We here propose and compare two hypothetical mechanisms for the mutant yeast enzyme, diffeeing in the structure of the Mn-peroxo complex yet both involving formation of the active six-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} and proton transfer from a second-sphere water molecule, which has substituted for the -OH of Tyr34, to the Mn-peroxo complex. Because WT and the mutant yeast MnSOD both rest in the 2+ state and become six-coordinate when oxidized up from Mn{sup 2+}, six-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} species could also actively function in the mechanism of WT yeast MnSODs.

  9. Manganese Loading and Photosystem II Stability are Key Components of Manganese Efficiency in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency constitutes a major plant nutritional problem in commercial crop production of winter cereals. In plants, Mn has an indispensable role in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Hence, the consequences of Mn deficiency are reduced plant growth......, and eventually substantial yield losses. It is well known, that genotypes within plant species differ considerably in tolerance to growth under Mn limiting conditions, a phenomenon designated as Mn efficiency. However, the physiological responses reflecting the underlying mechanisms of Mn efficiency are still...... is related to Mn efficiency in plants....

  10. Testing the universality of free fall with rubidium and ytterbium in a very large baseline atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Hartwig, Jonas; Schubert, Christian; Schlippert, Dennis; Ahlers, Holger; Posso-Trujillo, Katerine; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

    2015-01-01

    We propose a very long baseline atom interferometer test of Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) with ytterbium and rubidium extending over 10m of free fall. In view of existing parametrizations of EEP violations, this choice of test masses significantly broadens the scope of atom interferometric EEP tests with respect to other performed or proposed tests by comparing two elements with high atomic numbers. In a first step, our experimental scheme will allow reaching an accuracy in the E\\"otv\\"os ratio of $7\\times 10^{-13}$. This achievement will constrain violation scenarios beyond our present knowledge and will represent an important milestone for exploring a variety of schemes for further improvements of the tests as outlined in the paper. We will discuss the technical realisation in the new infrastructure of the Hanover Institute of Technology (HITec) and give a short overview of the requirements to reach this accuracy. The experiment will demonstrate a variety of techniques which will be employed in fut...

  11. Robust and Efficient Population Transfer in Ultracold Rubidium Using A Single Linearly Chirped Laser Pulse With a Novel Pulse Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Thomas; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2012-06-01

    The ability to manipulate the state of a quantum system is the at very heart of the field of quantum control. As quantum control is an essential aspect of the emerging field of quantum computing, it is necessary to find techniques for manipulating quantum systems that are both robust and efficient to implement industrially. In this work the population dynamics of the valence electron of Rubidium, interacting with a single linearly chirped laser pulse, are studied. The pulse envelope is constructed from overlapping Gaussian waveforms and is described analytically by the formula: E0∑β=-n^nExp-[t-(T-n*ɛ)]^22τ0^2 with the parameter ɛ being the separation in time between each peak with the oscillating electric field is phase locked to the central peak. The response of the quantum yield obtained at the end of the pulse to changes in the parameters of the oscillating electric field and pulse envelope are studied. For certain values of these parameters, achievement of a transfer of over 99% of the population to a desired quantum state within the hyperfine structure of the 5S shell via adiabatic passage using beam intensities which are on the order of 100W/cm^2 is demonstrated. Results are robust in the adiabatic regime.

  12. A rubidium-traced white-light etalon calibrator for radial velocity measurements at the cm/s level

    CERN Document Server

    Stürmer, Julian; Schwab, Christian; Bean, Jacob L

    2016-01-01

    We report on the construction and testing of a vacuum-gap Fabry-P\\'erot etalon calibrator for high precision radial velocity spectrographs. Our etalon is traced against a rubidium frequency standard to provide a cost effective, yet ultra-precise wavelength reference. We describe here a turn-key system working at 500 nm to 900 nm, ready to be installed at any current and next generation radial velocity spectrograph that requires calibration over a wide spectral bandpass. Where appropriate, we have used off-the-shelf, commercial components with demonstrated long-term performance to accelerate the development timescale of this instrument. Our system combines for the first time the advantages of passively stabilized etalons for optical and near-infrared wavelengths with the laser-locking technique demonstrated for single-mode fiber etalons. We realize uncertainties in the position of one etalon line at the 10 cm/s level in individual measurements taken at 4 Hz. When binning the data over 10 s, we are able to trac...

  13. Associations of Early Childhood Manganese and Lead Coexposure with Neurodevelopment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaas, Lourdes; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Schwartz, Joel; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Hu, Howard; Bellinger, David C.; Wright, Robert O.; Téllez-Rojo, Martha María

    2011-01-01

    Background: Most toxicologic studies focus on a single agent, although this does not reflect real-world scenarios in which humans are exposed to multiple chemicals. Objectives: We prospectively studied manganese–lead interactions in early childhood to examine whether manganese–lead coexposure is associated with neurodevelopmental deficiencies that are more severe than expected based on effects of exposure to each metal alone. Methods: Four hundred fifty-five children were enrolled at birth in an longitudinal cohort study in Mexico City, provided blood samples, and were followed until 36 months of age. We measured lead and manganese at 12 and 24 months and assessed neurodevelopment at 6-month intervals from 12 to 36 months of age using Bayley Scales of Infant Development–II. Results: Mean (± SD) blood concentrations at 12 and 24 months were, respectively, 24.7 ± 5.9 μg/L and 21.5 ± 7.4 μg/L for manganese and 5.1 ± 2.6 μg/dL and 5.0 ± 2.9 μg/dL for lead. Mixed-effects models, including Bayley scores at five time points, showed a significant interaction over time: highest manganese quintile × continuous lead; mental development score, β = –1.27 [95% confidence interval (CI): –2.18, –0.37]; psychomotor development score, β = –0.92 (95% CI: –1.76, –0.09). Slopes for the estimated 12-month lead effect on 18-month mental development and 24- through 36-month psychomotor development scores were steeper for children with high manganese than for children with midrange manganese levels. Conclusions: We observed evidence of synergism between lead and manganese, whereby lead toxicity was increased among children with high manganese coexposure. Findings highlight the importance of understanding health effects of mixed exposures, particularly during potentially sensitive developmental stages such as early childhood. PMID:21885384

  14. Iron-Manganese Redox Processes and Synergism in the Mechanism for Manganese-Catalyzed Autoxidation of Hydrogen Sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronaeus, Sture; Berglund, Johan; Elding, Lars I.

    1998-09-21

    The mechanism for manganese-catalyzed aqueous autoxidation of hydrogen sulfite at pH 2.4 has been revised on the basis of previous comprehensive kinetic studies and thermodynamic data for iron-manganese redox processes and manganese(II) and -(III) protolysis equilibria. The catalytically active manganese species is concluded to be an oxo- (or hydroxo-) bridged mixed-valence complex of composition (OH)Mn(III)OMn(II)(aq) with a formation constant beta' of (3 +/- 1) x 10(4) M(-)(1) from kinetics or ca. 7 x 10(4) M(-)(1) from thermodynamics. It is formed via rapid reaction between Mn(H(2)O)(6)(2+) and hydrolyzed manganese(III) aqua hydroxo complexes, and it initiates the chain reaction via formation of a precursor complex with HSO(3)(-), within which fast bridged electron transfer from S(IV) to Mn(III) takes place, resulting in formation of chain propagating sulfite radicals, SO(3)(*)(-). The very high acidity of Mn(3+)(aq), indicating a strong bond Mn(III)-OH(2) in hydrolyzed manganese(III), makes an attack by HSO(3)(-) on substitution labile Mn(II) in the bridged complex more favorable than one directly on manganese(III). The synergistic effect observed in systems containing iron as well as manganese and the chain initiation by trace concentrations of iron(III) of ca. 5 x 10(-)(8) M can also be rationalized in terms of formation of this bridged mixed-valence dimanganese(II,III) complex. The presence of iron(III) in a Mn(II)/HSO(3)(-) system results in rapid establishment of an iron-manganese redox equilibrium, increasing the concentration of manganese(III) and of the catalytically active bridged complex. The bridged complex oxidizes HSO(3)(-) several orders of magnitude faster than does iron(III) itself. Comparison with some previous studies shows that the different experimental rate laws reported do not necessarily indicate different reaction mechanisms. Instead, they can be rationalized in terms of different rate-determining steps within the same complex chain

  15. Validation of tractography: Comparison with manganese tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösche, Thomas R.; Anwander, Alfred; Liptrot, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we used invasive tracing to evaluate white matter tractography methods based on ex vivo diffusion‐weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dwMRI) data. A representative selection of tractography methods were compared to manganese tracing on a voxel‐wise basis, and a more qualitative assessment examined whether, and to what extent, certain fiber tracts and gray matter targets were reached. While the voxel‐wise agreement was very limited, qualitative assessment revealed that tractography is capable of finding the major fiber tracts, although there were some differences between the methods. However, false positive connections were very common and, in particular, we discovered that it is not possible to achieve high sensitivity (i.e., few false negatives) and high specificity (i.e., few false positives) at the same time. Closer inspection of the results led to the conclusion that these problems mainly originate from regions with complex fiber arrangements or high curvature and are not easily resolved by sophisticated local models alone. Instead, the crucial challenge in making tractography a truly useful and reliable tool in brain research and neurology lies in the acquisition of better data. In particular, the increase of spatial resolution, under preservation of the signal‐to‐noise‐ratio, is key. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4116–4134, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26178765

  16. Submicron Features in Higher Manganese Silicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatir Sadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world energy crisis had increased the demand for alternative energy sources and as such is one of the topics at the forefront of research. One way for reducing energy consumption is by thermoelectricity. Thermoelectric effects enable direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy. Higher manganese silicide (HMS, MnSi1.75 is one of the promising materials for applications in the field of thermoelectricity. The abundance and low cost of the elements, combined with good thermoelectric properties and high mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, make it very attractive for thermoelectric applications. Recent studies have shown that Si-rich HMS has improved thermoelectric properties. The most interesting of which is the unusual reduction in thermal conductivity. In the current research, transmission (TEM and scanning (SEM electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction methods were applied for investigation of the govern mechanisms resulting in very low thermal conductivity values of an Si-rich HMS composition, following arc melting and hot-pressing procedures. In this paper, it is shown that there is a presence of sub-micron dislocations walls, stacking faults, and silicon and HMS precipitates inside each other apparent in the matrix, following a high temperature (0.9 Tm hot pressing for an hour. These are not just responsible for the low thermal conductivity values observed but also indicate the ability to create complicate nano-structures that will last during the production process and possibly during the application.

  17. Redundancy among manganese peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-04-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn(2+) amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn(2+)-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn(2+)-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn(2+)-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members.

  18. Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dworetsky, M M; Patel, K

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic...

  19. Impact wear behaviors of Hadfield manganese steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XU Yun-hua; CEN Qi-hong; ZHU Jin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Impact wear behaviors of Hadfield manganese steel at different impact angles were investigated. The results of impact wear tests show that there exists a critical impact load for Hadfield steel. The wear rate suddenly turns down after some impact cycles when the impact load is greater than the critical load. The critical impact load is smaller than 8.2 J in this research because the nano-sized austenitic grains embedded in amorphous delay the crack propagation in subsurface. From high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) examination of subsurface microstructure, it is found that a large amount of nano-sized grains embedded in bulk amorphous matrix are fully developed and no martensitic transformation occurs during the impact wear process. The analytical results of worn surface morphology and debris indicate that the initiation of crack, propagation and spalling are restricted in the amorphous phase, resulting in the size distribution of debris in nano-sizes, which is the reason why the wear rate of Hadfield steel is greatly decreased at high impact load.

  20. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase: Guardian of the Powerhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daret K. St. Clair

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrion is vital for many metabolic pathways in the cell, contributing all or important constituent enzymes for diverse functions such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, the urea cycle, the citric acid cycle, and ATP synthesis. The mitochondrion is also a major site of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in the cell. Aberrant production of mitochondrial ROS can have dramatic effects on cellular function, in part, due to oxidative modification of key metabolic proteins localized in the mitochondrion. The cell is equipped with myriad antioxidant enzyme systems to combat deleterious ROS production in mitochondria, with the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD acting as the chief ROS scavenging enzyme in the cell. Factors that affect the expression and/or the activity of MnSOD, resulting in diminished antioxidant capacity of the cell, can have extraordinary consequences on the overall health of the cell by altering mitochondrial metabolic function, leading to the development and progression of numerous diseases. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which MnSOD protects cells from the harmful effects of overproduction of ROS, in particular, the effects of ROS on mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, may contribute to the development of novel treatments for various diseases in which ROS are an important component.

  1. Exposure to Environmental Air Manganese and Medication ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element with natural low levels found in water, food, and air, but due to industrialized processes, both workplace and the environmental exposures to Mn have increased. Recently, environmental studies have reported physical and mental health problems associated with air-Mn exposure, but medical record reviews for exposed residents are rare in the literature. When medical records and clinical testing are unavailable, examination of residents’ prescribed medication use may be used as a surrogate of health effects associated with Mn. We examined medication use among adult Ohio residents in two towns with elevated air-Mn (n=185) and one unexposed control town (n=90). Study participants recorded medication use in a health questionnaire and brought their currently prescribed medication, over-the-counter and supplement lists to their interview. Two physicians (family and psychiatric medicine) reviewed the provided medication list and developed medical categories associated with the medications used. The exposed (E) and control (C) groups were compared on the established 12 medication and 1 supplement categories using chi-square tests. The significant medication categories were further analyzed using hierarchical binomial logistic regression adjusting for education, personal income, and years of residency. The two groups were primarily white (E:94.6%; C:96.7%) but differed on education (E:13.8; C:15.2 years), residence length in their re

  2. Cerium, manganese and cerium/manganese ceramic monolithic catalysts. Study of VOCs and PM removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    COLMAN-LERNER Esteban; PELUSO Miguel Andrs; SAMBETH Jorge; THOMAS Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic supported cerium, manganese and cerium-manganese catalysts were prepared by direct impregnation of aqueous precursor, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method (BET), temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) acidity measurements and electrical conductivity. The catalytic activity was evaluated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) (ethanol, methyl ethyl ketone and toluene) oxidation. Additionally, catalysts were tested in particulate matter (PM) combustion. The characterization results indicated that Ce was in the form of Ce4+ and Ce3+, and Mn existed in the form of Mn4+and Mn3+on the surface of the Mn/AC sample and in the form of Mn4+ in the Ce/Mn/AC monolith. VOC oxidation results revealed that the Ce/Mn/AC sample showed an excellent performance compared with ceramic supported CeO2 (Ce/AC) and MnOx (Mn/AC) samples. The PM combustion was also higher on Ce/Mn/AC monoliths. The enhanced catalytic activity was mainly attributed to the Ce and Mn interaction which enhanced the acidity, conductiv-ity and the reducibility of the oxides.

  3. Nanoflake Manganese Oxide and Nickel-Manganese Oxide Synthesized by Electrodeposition for Electrochemical Capacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoflake structures of electrochemical manganese oxide (EMD and nickel mixed manganese oxide (NiMD were directly deposited on a stainless steel by using Chronoamperometry and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV techniques. The structure, morphology, and capacitive behavior of EMD or NIMD nanoflake were affected by the electrodeposition modes and deposition time. The highest specific capacitance (Csp was obtained for only two-minute deposition by both methods. EMD nanoflakes electrodeposited by CV technique show higher specific capacitance values than those prepared by Chronoamperometry owing to its homogenous and highly porous surface. All EMD samples exhibited excellent cycle behavior, less than 5% capacitance loss after 1000 cycles. Ni mixed MnO2 was prepared at different Mn2+/Ni2+ ratios for 2 minutes of electrodeposition. The presence of Ni2+ ion enhanced the Csp value at high charge-discharge rate due to the decrease of the charge transfer resistance. The supercapacitor prototype of 2 cm × 2 cm was assembled using EMD and NiMD as electrode material and tested at 1 A·g−1.

  4. Effects of manganese on the microstructures of Chenopodium ambrosioides L., A manganese tolerant plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shengguo; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Chuan; Lei, Jie; Hartley, William; Pan, Weisong

    2016-01-01

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. can tolerate high concentrations of manganese and has potential for its use in the revegetation of manganese mine tailings. Following a hydroponic investigation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) was used to study microstructure changes and the possible accumulation of Mn in leaf cells of C. ambrosioides in different Mn treatments (200, 1000, 10000 μmol·L(-1)). At 200 μmol·L(-1), the ultrastructure of C. ambrosioides was clearly visible without any obvious damage. At 1000 μmol·L(-1), the root, stem and leaf cells remained intact, and the organelles were clearly visible without any obvious damage. However, when the Mn concentration exceeded 1000 μmol·L(-1) the number of mitochondria in root cells decreased and the chloroplasts in stem cells showed a decrease in grana lamellae and osmiophilic granules. Compared to controls, treatment with 1000 μmol·L(-1) or 10000 μmol·L(-1) Mn over 30 days, gave rise to black agglomerations in the cells. At 10000 μmol·L(-1), Mn was observed to form acicular structures in leaf cells and intercellular spaces, which may be a form of tolerance and accumulation of Mn in C. ambrosioides. This study has furthered the understanding of Mn tolerance mechanisms in plants, and is potential for the revegetation of Mn-polluted soils.

  5. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egger Jos I

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later, several organ systems may be affected and, due to neurotoxicity, an atypical parkinsonian syndrome may emerge. With regard to neuropsychiatry, an array of symptoms may develop up to 30 years after intoxication, of which gait and speech abnormalities, cognitive and motor slowing, mood changes and hallucinations are the most common. Psychotic phenomena are rarely reported. Case presentation We describe the case of a 49-year-old Caucasian man working as a welder who was referred to our facility for evaluation of acute paranoid psychotic behavior. Our patient's medical history made no mention of any somatic complaints or psychiatric symptoms, and he had been involved in a professional career as a metalworker. On magnetic resonance imaging scanning of his brain, a bilateral hyperdensity of the globus pallidus, suggestive for manganese intoxication, was found. His manganese serum level was 52 to 97 nmol/L (range: 7 to 20 nmol/L. A diagnosis of organic psychotic disorder due to manganese overexposure was made. His psychotic symptoms disappeared within two weeks of treatment with low-dose risperidone. At three months later, serum manganese was decreased to slightly elevated levels and the magnetic resonance imaging T1 signal intensity was reduced. No signs of Parkinsonism were found and a definite diagnosis of manganese-induced apathy syndrome was made. Conclusion Although neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms caused by (chronic manganese exposure have been reported frequently in the past, in the present day the disorder is rarely diagnosed. In this report we stress that manganese intoxication can still occur, in our case in a confined

  6. Silsesquioxane organofunctionalized with 4-amino-3-hydrazino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole: Preparation and subsequent reaction with silver and potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) for detection of L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Devaney R. do, E-mail: docarmo@dfq.feis.unesp.br; Silvestrini, Daniela R.; Silveira, Tayla F.S. da; Cumba, Loanda R.; Dias Filho, Newton L.; Soares, Layciane A.

    2015-12-01

    The octakis(3-chloropropyl)octasilsesquioxane (SS) was organofunctionalized with 4-amino-3-hydrazino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole (Purpald). The functionalized silsesquioxane with Purpald (SP) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). After functionalized, silsesquioxane can interact with silver nitrate and subsequently with potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) (AgHSP). The novel hybrid composite formed (AgHSP) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). AgHSP was electrochemically characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using graphite paste electrode. The AgHSP incorporated into a graphite paste electrode (20% w/w) was tested for detection of L-cysteine. The modified electrode showed a linear response from 9.0 × 10{sup −5} to 5.0 × 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} with the corresponding equation Y(A) = 0.01315 + 1.865 [L-cysteine], and a correlation coefficient of r{sup 2} = 0.9995. The method showed a detection limit of 1.76 × 10{sup −4} mol L{sup −1} with a relative standard deviation of ± 2% (n = 3) and amperometric sensitivity of 1.865 A/mol L{sup −1}. - Highlights: • Functionalization of silsesquioxane with Purpald compound • Characterization of silsesquioxane was done with FT-IR, NMR, SEM, EDX and VC. • The modified silsesquioxane was interacted with AgNO{sub 3} and K{sub 3}[Fe(CN){sub 6}]. • The composite was tested by cyclic voltammetry for detection of L-cysteine.

  7. Motoric impairment following manganese exposure in asteroid echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Baden, Susanne P; Looström, Jakob; Eriksson, Susanne P; Hernroth, Bodil E

    2015-10-01

    In the oceans, naturally occurring manganese (Mn) is released from the sediments during events of hypoxia. While neuro- and immuno-toxic effects of bioavailable manganese are well documented for crustaceans, studies of similar effects of manganese on other marine invertebrates are comparatively few. Here, we developed a new functional test "the repeated turning assay" to investigate if manganese exposure at ∼12 mg L(-1) affected motoric behaviour of two asteroid echinoderms, the Common sea star, Asterias rubens, and the Black brittle star, Ophiocomina nigra. By measuring of the turning-over capacity, from dorsal to ventral position, after one and two weeks of manganese exposure, we showed that for both species Mn exposure significantly delayed the ability to turn. After a recovery period of two weeks, the capacity of turning-over was not restored to that of unexposed animals neither for A. rubens nor for O. nigra. Further investigation of sea stars showed that Mn accumulated ∼5 fold in the tube feet, organs involved in their turning-over activity, and the high concentration remained after the recovery period. In the tube feet we also recorded an increased activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), here used as a proxy for neuromuscular disturbances. The results indicated that Mn induces neuromuscular disturbance in echinoderms which is important news, given that previous studies have concluded that adult echinoderms are relatively tolerant to Mn.

  8. Manganese, iron, and total particulate exposures to welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael R; Susi, Pam

    2010-02-01

    Welders are exposed to a variety of metal fumes, including manganese, that may elevate the risk for neurological disease. This study examines several large data sets to characterize manganese, iron, and total particulate mass exposures resulting from welding operations. The data sets contained covariates for a variety of exposure modifiers, including the presence of ventilation, the degree of confinement, and the location of the personal sampler (i.e., behind or in front of the welding helmet). The analysis suggests that exposures to manganese are frequently at or above the current ACGIH(R) threshold limit value of 0.2 mg/m(3). In addition, there is evidence that local exhaust ventilation can control the exposures to manganese and total fume but that mechanical ventilation may not. The data suggest that higher exposures are associated with a greater degree of enclosure, particularly when local exhaust ventilation is absent. Samples taken behind the helmet were, in general, lower than those measured outside of it. There were strong correlations among manganese, iron, and total particulate mass exposures, suggesting simple equations to estimate one fume component from any of the others.

  9. Manganese tolerance in yeasts involves polyphosphate, magnesium, and vacuolar alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazanova, Lubov; Zvonarev, Anton; Rusakova, Tatiana; Dmitriev, Vladimir; Kulakovskaya, Tatiana

    2016-07-01

    Basidiomycetous and ascomycetous yeast species were tested for manganese tolerance. Basidiomycetous Cryptococcus humicola, Cryptococcus terricola, Cryptococcus curvatus and ascomycetous Candida maltosa, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Kuraishia capsulata, Lindnera fabianii and Sacharomyces cerevisiae were able to grow at manganese excess (2.5 mmol/L), while the growth of basidiomycetous Rhodotorula bogoriensis was completely suppressed. The lag phase duration increased and the exponential growth rate decreased at manganese excess. The increase of cell size and enlargement of vacuoles were characteristics for the cells grown at manganese excess. The alterations in inorganic polyphosphate content and cellular localization were studied. L. fabianii, K. capsulata, C. maltosa, and Cr. humicola accumulated the higher amounts of inorganic polyphosphates, while Cr. terricola and Cr. curvatus demonstrated no such accumulation. The polyphosphate content in the cell wall tested by DAPI staining increased in all species under the study; however, this effect was more pronounced in Cr. terricola and Cr. curvatus. The accumulation of Mg(2+) in the cell wall under Mn(2+) excess was observed in Cr. humicola, Cr. curvatus and Cr. terricola. The accumulation of polyphosphate and magnesium in the cell wall was supposed to be a factor of manganese tolerance in yeasts.

  10. Intellectual Impairment in School-Age Children Exposed to Manganese from Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, Maryse F.; Sauvé, Sébastien; Barbeau, Benoit; Legrand, Melissa; Brodeur, Marie-Ève; Bouffard, Thérèse; Limoges, Elyse; Bellinger, David C.; Mergler, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Background Manganese is an essential nutrient, but in excess it can be a potent neurotoxicant. Despite the common occurrence of manganese in groundwater, the risks associated with this source of exposure are largely unknown. Objectives Our first aim was to assess the relations between exposure to manganese from drinking water and children’s intelligence quotient (IQ). Second, we examined the relations between manganese exposures from water consumption and from the diet with children’s hair ma...

  11. Analysis of numerical simulations and influencing factors of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Xilai; Chen, Lei; Wei, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal manganese pollution has become an increasingly pressing water quality issue for water supply reservoirs in recent years. Manganese is a redox-sensitive element and is released from sediment under anoxic conditions near the sediment-water interface during summer and autumn, when water temperature stratification occurs. The reservoir water temperature and water dynamic conditions directly influence the formation of manganese pollution. Numerical models are useful tools to quantitatively evaluate manganese pollution and its influencing factors. This paper presents a reservoir manganese pollution model by adding a manganese biogeochemical module to a water quality model-CE-QUAL-W2. The model is applied to the Wangjuan reservoir (Qingdao, China), which experiences manganese pollution during summer and autumn. Field data are used to verify the model, and the results show that the model can reproduce the main features of the thermal stratification and manganese distribution. The model is used to evaluate the manganese pollution process and its four influencing factors, including air temperature, water level, wind speed, and wind directions, through different simulation scenarios. The results show that all four factors can influence manganese pollution. High air temperature, high water level, and low wind speed aggravate manganese pollution, while low air temperature, low water level, and high wind speed reduce manganese pollution. Wind that travels in the opposite direction of the flow aggravates manganese pollution, while wind in the same direction as the flow reduces manganese pollution. This study provides useful information to improve our understanding of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs, which is important for reservoir manganese pollution warnings and control.

  12. Manganese transport via the transferrin mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Thomas E; Gerstner, Brent; Gunter, Karlene K; Malecki, Jon; Gelein, Robert; Valentine, William M; Aschner, Michael; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) uptake by brain cells, particularly in regions like the basal ganglia, can lead to toxicity. Mn(2+) is transported into cells via a number of mechanisms, while Mn(3+) is believed to be transported similarly to iron (Fe) via the transferrin (Tf) mechanism. Cellular Mn uptake is therefore determined by the activity of the mechanisms transporting Mn into each type of cell and by the amounts of Mn(2+), Mn(3+) and their complexes to which these cells are exposed; this complicates understanding the contributions of each transporter to Mn toxicity. While uptake of Fe(3+) via the Tf mechanism is well understood, uptake of Mn(3+) via this mechanism has not been systematically studied. The stability of the Mn(3+)Tf complex allowed us to form and purify this complex and label it with a fluorescent (Alexa green) tag. Using purified and labeled Mn(3+)Tf and biophysical tools, we have developed a novel approach to study Mn(3+)Tf transport independently of other Mn transport mechanisms. This approach was used to compare the uptake of Mn(3+)Tf into neuronal cell lines with published descriptions of Fe(3+) uptake via the Tf mechanism, and to obtain quantitative information on Mn uptake via the Tf mechanism. Results confirm that in these cell lines significant Mn(3+) is transported by the Tf mechanism similarly to Fe(3+)Tf transport; although Mn(3+)Tf transport is markedly slower than other Mn transport mechanisms. This novel approach may prove useful for studying Mn toxicity in other systems and cell types.

  13. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Woodward W; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet-it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn(2+), and ultimately water.

  14. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  15. New insights into manganese toxicity and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalke, Bernhard; Fernsebner, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Manganese (Mn) is known to be a neurotoxic agent for nearly 175 years now. A lot of research has therefore been carried out over the last century. From preliminary describing only symptoms of Mn-(over)exposed workers, research was preceded to more detail on toxic mechanisms of Mn. Unraveling those neurotoxic mechanisms implicated a number of studies, which were summarized partly in several reviews (e.g. Yokel RA. Neuromol Med 2009;11(4):297-310; Aschner M, et al. Toxicology Appl Pharmacol 2007;221(2):131-47; Michalke B, et al. J Environ Monit 2007;9(7):650). Since our recent review on Mn-speciation in 2007 (Michalke B, et al. J Environ Monit 2007;9(7):650), Mn-research was considerably pushed forward and several new research articles were published. The very recent years though, Mn toxicity investigating science is spreading into different fields with very detailed and complex study designs. Especially the mechanisms of Mn-induced neuronal injury on cellular and molecular level was investigated in more detail, discussing neurotransmitter and enzyme interactions, mechanisms of action on DNA level and even inclusion of genetic influences. Depicting the particular Mn-species was also a big issue to determine which molecule is transporting Mn at the cell membranes and which one is responsible for the injury of neuronal tissue. Other special foci on epidemiologic studies were becoming more and more important: These foci were directed toward environmental influences of Mn on especially Parkinson disease prevalence and the ability to carry out follow-up studies about Mn-life-span exposure. All these very far-reaching research applications may finally lead to a suitable future human Mn-biomonitoring for being able to prevent or at least detect the early onset of manganism at the right time.

  16. Substantial increase in the price of electrolytic manganese as an alternative to nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>A roaring price of nickel and a shortage of the raw material of electrolytic manganese have intensified the demand for electrolytic manganese in China. As an alternative to nickel, electrolytic manganese has been consumed at a quickened speed, which boosts the continuous increase in export quotation. On the third

  17. 75 FR 70665 - Proposed Significant New Use Rule for Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Proposed Significant New Use Rule for Cobalt Lithium Manganese...) for the chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (CAS No. 182442-95-1... substance identified as cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1). This...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  20. Daxin County in Guangxi will Build China’s Largest Manganese Industry Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The western border county of Daxin County,Chongzuo City,Guangxi,which enjoys the reputation of "Hometown of China’s Manganese Ore",by relying on rich Manganese ore resources and its advantages of direct land access to ASEAN countries,is dedicated to build-ing up China’s largest Manganese industry

  1. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  4. 75 FR 70583 - Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide; Withdrawal of Significant New Use Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide; Withdrawal of... Control Act (TSCA) for the chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (CAS No... cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) at 40 CFR 721.10201 because...

  5. Contribution of arginase to manganese metabolism of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keni, Sarita; Punekar, Narayan S

    2016-02-01

    Aspects of manganese metabolism during normal and acidogenic growth of Aspergillus niger were explored. Arginase from this fungus was a Mn[II]-enzyme. The contribution of the arginase protein towards A. niger manganese metabolism was investigated using arginase knockout (D-42) and arginase over-expressing (ΔXCA-29) strains of A. niger NCIM 565. The Mn[II] contents of various mycelial fractions were found in the order: D-42 strain niger mycelia harvested from acidogenic growth media contain substantially less Mn[II] as compared to those from normal growth media. Nevertheless, acidogenic mycelia harbor considerable Mn[II] levels and a functional arginase. Altered levels of mycelial arginase protein did not significantly influence citric acid production. The relevance of arginase to cellular Mn[II] pool and homeostasis was evaluated and the results suggest that arginase regulation could occur via manganese availability.

  6. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  7. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gac, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.gac@umcs.lublin.pl; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • Formation of MnO with regular rippled-like surface patterns. • Synthesis of copper nanorods supported on MnO nanoparticles. • Hydrogen production in steam methanol reforming over supported copper nanorods. - Abstract: The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper–manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  8. Supported lipid bilayers as templates to design manganese oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Maheshkumar; B Sreedhar; B U Nair; A Dhathathreyan

    2012-09-01

    This work reports on the preparation of nanoclusters of manganese oxide using biotemplating techniques. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on quartz using cationic lipid [Dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DOMA)] and mixed systems with neutral phospholipids dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) have been used as templates to synthesize these nanoparticles in a waterbased medium at room temperature. The Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show manganese oxide nanostructures that are composed of crystals or small clusters in the size range of 20-50 nm in diameter. Small angle XRD showed that template removal through calcining process results in nanostructures of the manganese oxide in sizes from 30 to 50 nm. Using these organized assemblies it is possible to control the nano and mesoscopic morphologies of particles and both rod-like and spherical particles can be synthesized.

  9. Manganese detection in marine sediments: anodic vs. cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Craig E; Kruusma, Jaanus; Moore, Ryan R; Tomcík, Peter; Peters, Judith; Davis, James; Komorsky-Lovrić, Sebojka; Compton, Richard G

    2005-01-30

    Three different electroanalytical techniques for the detection of manganese in marine sediments are evaluated. The anodic stripping voltammetry of manganese at an in situ bismuth-film-modified boron-doped diamond electrode and cathodic stripping voltammetry at a carbon paste electrode are shown to lack the required sensitivity and reproducibility whereas cathodic stripping voltammetry at a bare boron-doped diamond electrode is shown to be reliable and selective with a limit of detection, from applying a 60s accumulation period of 7.4 x 10(-7)M and a sensitivity of 0.24AM(-1). The method was used to evaluate the manganese content of marine sediments taken from Sibenik, Croatia.

  10. MODULATED STRUCTURES AND ORDERING STRUCTURES IN ALLOYING AUSTENITIC MANGANESE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. He; Z.H. Jin; J.D. Lu

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of Fe-10Mn-2Cr-1.5C alloy has been investigated with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. The superlattice diffraction spots and satellite reflection pattrens have been observed in the present alloy, which means the appearence of the ordering structure and modulated structure in the alloy. It is also proved by X-ray diffraction analysis that the austenite in the alloy is more stable than that in traditional austenitic manganese steel. On the basis of this investigation,it is suggested that the C-Mn ordering clusters exist in austenitic manganese steel and the chromium can strengthen this effect by linking the weaker C-Mn couples together,which may play an important role in work hardening of austenitic manganese steel.

  11. High manganese concentrations in rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Nina L.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Wiens, Roger C.; Grotzinger, John; Ollila, Ann M.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Clark, Benton C.; Gellert, Ralf; Mangold, Nicolas; Maurice, Sylvestre; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Nachon, Marion; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Berger, Jeffrey; Clegg, Samuel M.; Forni, Olivier; Hardgrove, Craig; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton E.; Sautter, Violaine

    2014-01-01

    The surface of Mars has long been considered a relatively oxidizing environment, an idea supported by the abundance of ferric iron phases observed there. However, compared to iron, manganese is sensitive only to high redox potential oxidants, and when concentrated in rocks, it provides a more specific redox indicator of aqueous environments. Observations from the ChemCam instrument on the Curiosity rover indicate abundances of manganese in and on some rock targets that are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than previously observed on Mars, suggesting the presence of an as-yet unidentified manganese-rich phase. These results show that the Martian surface has at some point in time hosted much more highly oxidizing conditions than has previously been recognized.

  12. Computation of the Fractal Pattern in Manganese Dendrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Merdan; M. Bayirli

    2005-01-01

    @@ The images of manganese flowers (clusters) on the surface of the natural magnesium silicate substance are scanned and the pictures of them are transferred to computer atmosphere. By using these scanning parameters, the exponents of density correlation function and fractal dimension values are calculated. For all different groups between the least and the most dense in the samples, the correlation function exponents may range from 0.141 to 0.178 and the fractal dimension values may vary between 1.61 and 1.88. In addition, the manganese flowers are divided into seven different groups according to their smallest- and largest-density features. The formation of the natural manganese clusters (flowers, dendrites) on the surface of the magnesium silicate substance can be defined by using the deposition, diffusion and aggregation model.

  13. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  14. Limitation on the accelerating gradient of a wakefield excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam in rubidium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; An, W.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Clarke, C. I.; Litos, M.; Green, S. Z.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Fisher, A. S.; Wu, Z.; Walz, D.; Hogan, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the viability of using plasmas formed by ionization of high Z, low ionization potential element rubidium (Rb) for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The Rb vapor column confined by argon (Ar) buffer gas was used to reduce the expected limitation on the beam propagation length due to head erosion that was observed previously when a lower Z but higher ionization potential lithium vapor was used. However, injection of electrons into the wakefield due to ionization of Ar buffer gas and nonuniform ionization of Rb1 + to Rb2 + was a possible concern. In this paper we describe experimental results and the supporting simulations which indicate that such ionization of Ar and Rb1 + in the presence of combined fields of the beam and the wakefield inside the wake does indeed occur. Some of this charge accumulates in the accelerating region of the wake leading to the reduction of the electric field—an effect known as beam loading. The beam-loading effect is quantified by determining the average transformer ratio ⟨R ⟩ which is the maximum energy gained divided by the maximum energy lost by the electrons in the bunch used to produce the wake. ⟨R ⟩ is shown to depend on the propagation length and the quantity of the accumulated charge, indicating that the distributed injection of secondary Rb electrons is the main cause of beam loading in this experiment. The average transformer ratio is reduced from 1.5 to less than 1 as the excess charge from secondary ionization increased from 100 to 700 pC. The simulations show that while the decelerating field remains constant, the accelerating field is reduced from its unloaded value of 82 to 46 GeV /m due to this distributed injection of dark current into the wake.

  15. Limitation on the accelerating gradient of a wakefield excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam in rubidium plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vafaei-Najafabadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the viability of using plasmas formed by ionization of high Z, low ionization potential element rubidium (Rb for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The Rb vapor column confined by argon (Ar buffer gas was used to reduce the expected limitation on the beam propagation length due to head erosion that was observed previously when a lower Z but higher ionization potential lithium vapor was used. However, injection of electrons into the wakefield due to ionization of Ar buffer gas and nonuniform ionization of Rb^{1+} to Rb^{2+} was a possible concern. In this paper we describe experimental results and the supporting simulations which indicate that such ionization of Ar and Rb^{1+} in the presence of combined fields of the beam and the wakefield inside the wake does indeed occur. Some of this charge accumulates in the accelerating region of the wake leading to the reduction of the electric field—an effect known as beam loading. The beam-loading effect is quantified by determining the average transformer ratio ⟨R⟩ which is the maximum energy gained divided by the maximum energy lost by the electrons in the bunch used to produce the wake. ⟨R⟩ is shown to depend on the propagation length and the quantity of the accumulated charge, indicating that the distributed injection of secondary Rb electrons is the main cause of beam loading in this experiment. The average transformer ratio is reduced from 1.5 to less than 1 as the excess charge from secondary ionization increased from 100 to 700 pC. The simulations show that while the decelerating field remains constant, the accelerating field is reduced from its unloaded value of 82 to 46  GeV/m due to this distributed injection of dark current into the wake.

  16. Low-temperature phases of rubidium silver iodide: crystal structures and dynamics of the mobile silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Klaus; Banhatti, Radha D; Wilmer, Dirk; Dinnebier, Robert; Fitch, Andrew; Jansen, Martin

    2006-03-09

    Recently, broad-band conductivity spectra have been taken in the low-temperature gamma-phase of the archetypal fast ion conductor RbAg4I5. Attempts to reproduce the experimental data in a simple model calculation have led to the conclusion that strictly localized displacive movements of interacting ionic charge carriers should play an important role in the low-temperature phase. However, with no detailed structural study of gamma-RbAg4I5 available, the relevant processes could not be identified within the crystal structure. This state of affairs has triggered the present investigation of the structures of all three phases of rubidium silver iodide. Powder diffraction data of RbAg4I5 have been collected at the high-resolution powder diffractometer at ID31 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The structure of the gamma-phase has been solved by successive Rietveld refinements in combination with difference Fourier analyses. The same structural principle is found to prevail in all three phases, interconnected distorted RbI6 octahedra forming a three-dimensional framework, which undergoes only displacive structural changes during the alpha-beta and beta-gamma phase transitions. With decreasing temperature, the disorder in the silver sublattice is found to decrease, and a clustering of the disordered silver ions is found to develop. In the gamma-phase, "pockets" containing partially occupied silver sites have been identified, and it is suggested that the localized displacive motion detected by conductivity spectroscopy is performed by the silver ions located within these pockets.

  17. Soybean nitrate reductase activity influenced by manganese nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Damien P., Heenan; Lindsay C., Campbell; Department of Agronomy and Horticultural Science, University of Sydney

    1980-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation by soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merrill cvv. Lee and Bragg] was investigated in plants grown in solution culture at manganese concentrations of 0, 1.8 and 275 μM and at day-night temperatures of 33-28℃ and 22-17℃. Manganese deficiency occurred in plants of both cultivars grown at 0 μM Mn; under these conditions, leaf nitrate concentration increased in both cultivars and nitrate reductase activity in vivo but not in vitro was reduced. High solution Mn (275 μM) produced sympt...

  18. Manganese-Induced Parkinsonism due to Ephedrone Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sikk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, a syndrome of hypokinesia, dysarthria, dystonia, and postural impairment, related to intravenous use of a “designer” psychostimulant derived from pseudoephedrine using potassium permanganate as the oxidant, has been observed in drug addicts in several countries in Eastern Europe with some cases also in Western countries. A levodopa unresponsive Parkinsonian syndrome occurs within a few months of abusing the homemade drug mixture containing ephedrone (methcathinone and manganese. The development of this neurological syndrome has been attributed to toxic effects of manganese, but the role of the psychostimulant ephedrone is unclear. This paper describes the clinical syndrome, results of neuroimaging, and therapeutic attempts.

  19. Uranium in Pacific Deep-Sea Sediments and Manganese Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Pluger, W. L.; Friedrich, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A total of 1344 manganese nodules and 187 pelagic sediments from 9 areas in the North and the South Pacific were analyzed for U by the delayed-neutron counting technique. A strong positive correlation between U and Fe in nodules and sediments suggests a co-precipitative removal from sea water...... to the flow. Economically important nodule deposits from the nodule belt and the Peru Basin have generally low U contents, between 3 and 5 ppm. Insignificant resources of U of about 4 × 105 in the Pacific manganese nodules are estimated....

  20. Biological removal of iron and manganese in rapid sand filters - Process understanding of iron and manganese removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Katie

    -filter, where iron is removed. Step 2: Filtration in an after-filter where e.g. ammonium and manganese is removed. The treatment relies on microbial processes and may present an alternative, greener and more sustainable approach for drinking water production spending less chemicals and energy than chemical (e.......g. flocculation) and physical (e.g. membrane filtration) based technologies. The removal of dissolved manganese and iron is important. If manganese and iron enter the distribution system, the water will become coloured and have a metallic taste, and it may cause problems in the distribution network due......, it is essential to ensure that the required microorganisms are present and that both the physical and the nutritional requirements of those organisms are fulfilled. However, the knowledge on the microbiology and processes in rapid sand filters is limited, especially on which parameters that affect the biological...

  1. Observation of ferromagnetic semiconductor behavior in manganese-oxide doped graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Soo Park

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We have doped manganese-oxide onto graphene by an electrochemical method. Graphene showed a clear ferromagnetic semiconductor behavior after doping of manganese-oxide. The manganese-oxide doped graphene has a coercive field (Hc of 232 Oe at 10 K, and has the Curie temperature of 270 K from the temperature-dependent resistivity using transport measurement system. The ferromagnetism of manganese-oxide doped graphene attributes to the double-exchange from the coexistence of Mn3+ and Mn4+ on the surface of graphene. In addition, the semiconducting behavior is caused by the formation of manganese-oxide on graphene.

  2. Down-Regulation of a Manganese Transporter in the Face of Metal Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Laran T.; Carroll, Mark C.; Hall, Matthew D.; Harvey, Christopher J; Beese, Sara E.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast Smf1p Nramp manganese transporter is posttranslationally regulated by environmental manganese. Smf1p is stabilized at the cell surface with manganese starvation, but is largely degraded in the vacuole with physiological manganese through a mechanism involving the Rsp5p adaptor complex Bsd2p/Tre1p/Tre2p. We now describe an additional level of Smf1p regulation that occurs with toxicity from manganese, but not other essential metals. This regulation is largely Smf1p-specific. As with p...

  3. Time to re-evaluate the guideline value for manganese in drinking water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Karin; Vahter, Marie

    2007-11-01

    We reviewed the scientific background for the current health-based World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value for manganese in drinking water. The initial starting point was the background document for the development of the WHO's guideline value for manganese in drinking water as well as other regulations and recommendations on manganese intake levels. Data referred to in these documents were traced back to the original research papers. In addition, we searched for scientific reports on manganese exposure and health effects. The current health-based guideline value for manganese in drinking water is based partly on debatable assumptions, where information from previous reports has been used without revisiting original scientific articles. Presently, preparation of common infant formulas with water containing manganese concentrations equivalent to the WHO guideline value will result in exceeding the maximum manganese concentration for infant formula. However, there are uncertainties about how this maximum value was derived. Concurrently, there is increasing evidence of negative neurologic effects in children from excessive manganese exposure. The increasing number of studies reporting associations between neurologic symptoms and manganese exposure in infants and children, in combination with the questionable scientific background data used in setting the manganese guideline value for drinking water, certainly warrant a re-evaluation of the guideline value. Further research is needed to understand the causal relationship between manganese exposure and children's health, and to enable an improved risk assessment.

  4. Electrochemical Property Bundles with of Manganese Oxide Nanobelt Layered Structure%Electrochemical Property Bundles with of Manganese Oxide Nanobelt Layered Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang, Liping; Jiang, Yishu; Tang, Xiuhua; Yang, Mingyang; Liu, Zonghuai

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional manganese oxide nanobelt bundles with birnessite-type structure have been synthesized by a hydrothermal process in a NaOH solution employing K-type layered manganese oxide as a precursor. The obtained manganese oxide nanobelt bundles exhibit excellent discharge properties and cycle stability. The initial capacity is 376 mAh-g-1 and the reversible capacity of 243 mAhog-1 is maintained after the 50th cycle at a current density of 20 mA·g-t. Meanwhile, the manganese oxide nanobelt bundles show an excellent cycle performance even if at relative high current density.

  5. A dual-isotope rubidium comagnetometer to search for anomalous long-range spin-mass (spin-gravity) couplings of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, Derek F.J.; Lacey, Ian; Valdez, Julian; Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Rios, Cesar; Peregrina-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kremer, Jackie; Dudley, Jordan; Sanchez, C. [Department of Physics, California State University - East Bay, Hayward, California, 94542-3084 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The experimental concept of a search for a long-range coupling between rubidium (Rb) nuclear spins and the mass of the Earth is described. The experiment is based on simultaneous measurement of the spin precession frequencies for overlapping ensembles of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb atoms contained within an evacuated, antirelaxation-coated vapor cell. Rubidium atoms are spin-polarized in the presence of an applied magnetic field by synchronous optical pumping with circularly polarized laser light. Spin precession is probed by measuring optical rotation of far-off-resonant, linearly polarized laser light. Simultaneous measurement of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb spin precession frequencies enables suppression of magnetic-field-related systematic effects. The nuclear structure of the Rb isotopes makes the experiment particularly sensitive to anomalous spin-dependent interactions of the proton. Experimental sensitivity and a variety of systematic effects are discussed, and initial data are presented. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Alignment-to-orientation conversion in a magnetic field at nonlinear excitation of the D2 line of rubidium: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzinsh, M.; Berzins, A.; Ferber, R.; Gahbauer, F.; Kalvans, L.; Mozers, A.; Spiss, A.

    2015-05-01

    We studied alignment-to-orientation conversion caused by excited-state level crossings in a nonzero magnetic field of both atomic rubidium isotopes. Experimental measurements were performed on the transitions of the D2 line of rubidium. These measured signals were described by a theoretical model that takes into account all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, the coherence properties of the exciting laser radiation, and the Doppler effect. In the experiments, laser-induced fluorescence components were observed at linearly polarized excitation and their difference was taken afterwards. By observing the two oppositely circularly polarized components, we were able to see structures not visible in the difference graphs, which give deeper insight into the processes responsible for these signals. We studied how these signals are dependent on intensity and how they are affected when the exciting laser is tuned to different hyperfine transitions. The comparison between experiment and theory was carried out fulfilling the nonlinear absorption conditions. The theoretical curves described the experimental measurements satisfactorily, reproducing even small features in the shapes of the curves.

  7. Mineralogy, paragenesis and genesis of the braunite deposits of the Mary Valley Manganese Belt, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, J.

    1992-09-01

    The Mary Valley manganese deposits exhibit mineralogy and textures characteristic of at least four parageneses. The deposits consist mainly of isolated occurrences of braunite, together with a number of lower and higher valency manganese oxides, and manganese silicates, in bedded radiolarian cherts and jaspers of Permian age. The parageneses are: (a) Braunite — quartz (primary), (b) Braunite — hausmannite — spessartine — tephroite — quartz (metamorphic). (c) Hydrated manganese silicates — barite — braunite — hausmannite (hydrothermal veins), (d) Tetravalent manganese oxides (pyrolusite, cryptomelane, manjiroite, nsutite) (supergene). The primary mineralisation is interpreted as the result of the geochemical separation of Mn from Fe in a submarine exhalative system, and the precipitation of Mn as oxide within bedded radiolarian oozes and submarine lavas. During diagenesis this hydrothermal manganese oxide reacted with silica to produce primary braunite. The later geological of evolution of this volcanogenicsedimentary deposit involved metamorphism, hydrothermal veining by remobilised manganese, and supergene enrichment.

  8. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Bastida, C. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Paseo Colón y Tollocan s/n, C.P. 50000, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Martínez-Miranda, V.; Vázquez-Mejía, G. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Solache-Ríos, M., E-mail: marcos.solache@inin.gob.mx [Departamento de Química, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandón, Delegación Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 México, D.F. (Mexico); Fonseca-Montes de Oca, G. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Trujillo-Flores, E. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Cerro de Coatepec s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 50130, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems. - Highlights: ► Corrosion of distribution systems affects the quality of drinking water. ► Corrosion in water distribution systems is related to acidity and carbon dioxide. ► Pipes are corroded and manganese is deposited on pipes and dissolved in water. ► The deterioration of the pipes and the corrosion products were determined. ► Nitrate ions increase the acidity of water in the wells.

  9. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the scale of the problem of arsenic, iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Ghana a survey was performed in the first phase of the research to provide in depth information with respect to these contaminants. Presence of these mentioned contaminants in groundwater is not pecu

  10. Magnetism in bcc and fcc Fe with carbon and manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedeva, N I [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Yekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Van Aken, D [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Medvedeva, J E [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2010-08-11

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to study the structure and magnetic properties of bcc ({alpha}) and fcc ({gamma}) Fe with 3 at.% carbon and manganese impurities. We find that all bcc-based Fe, Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C phases exhibit a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state, while the antiferromagnetic double-layer (AFMD) state is lowest in energy within the collinear spin approach in fcc Fe, Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C phases. However, the carbon and manganese impurities affect the local magnetic interactions significantly. The states with opposite manganese magnetic moments are quasi-degenerate in bcc Fe-Mn alloy, whereas octa-site carbon stabilizes ferromagnetic coupling of the nearest manganese atom with the Fe host. We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic (AFM) fcc Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C alloys are intrinsically inhomogeneous magnetic systems. Carbon frustrates the local magnetic order by reorientation of magnetic moments of the nearest Mn and Fe atoms, and favors their ferromagnetic coupling. The competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic Fe-Fe and Fe-Mn interactions and the local magnetovolume instability near carbon may give rise to the spin-glass-like regions observed in austenitic Fe-Mn-C alloys.

  11. Effect of Copper, Manganese and Zinc With Antioxidant Vitamins on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Basic and Applied Science (2011), 19 (1): 151- 154. ISSN 0794-5698. Effect of Copper, Manganese and Zinc With Antioxidant Vitamins on Pulse ..... human microvasculature,. Hypertension. 36: 941-944. Piece, J.D, Cackler ...

  12. Fluvial and hydrothermal input of manganese into the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Laan, P.; Klunder, M. B.; Shaw, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 773 samples were analysed for dissolved manganese (Mn) in the Arctic Ocean aboard R. V. Polarstern during expedition ARK XXII/2 from 28 July until 07 October 2007 from Tromso (Norway) to Bremerhaven. Concentrations of Mn were elevated in the surface layer with concentrations of up to 6 nM

  13. Selection and use of manganese dioxide by Neanderthals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyes, P.J.; Anastasakis, K.; De Jong, W.; Van Hoesel, A.; Roebroeks, W.; Soressi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these ‘manganese oxides’ were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they

  14. Discovery of Chromium, Manganese, Nickel, and Copper Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Garofali, K; Thoennessen, M

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-seven chromium, twenty-five manganese, thirty-one nickel and twenty-six copper isotopes have so far been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Latent manganese deficiency increases transpiration in barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebbern, Christopher Alan; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Ladegaard, Anne Hald

    2009-01-01

    To investigate if latent manganese (Mn) deficiency leads to increased transpiration, barley plants were grown for 10 weeks in hydroponics with daily additions of Mn in the low nM range. The Mn-starved plants did not exhibit visual leaf symptoms of Mn deficiency, but Chl a fluorescence measurements...

  16. Exposure to Environmental Air Manganese and Medication Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element with natural low levels found in water, food, and air, but due to industrialized processes, both workplace and the environmental exposures to Mn have increased. Recently, environmental studies have reported physical and mental health problem...

  17. Estimating Air-Manganese Exposures in Two Ohio Towns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn), a nutrient required for normal metabolic function, is also a persistent air pollutant and a known neurotoxin at high concentrations. Elevated exposures can result in a number of motor and cognitive deficits. Quantifying chronic personal exposures in residential po...

  18. Selective Synthesis of Manganese/Silicon Complexes in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of manganese salts (Mn(NO32, MnCl2, MnSO4, and Mn(Ac2 and silicon materials (silica sand, silica sol, and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used to synthesize Mn/Si complexes in supercritical water using a tube reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of the solid products. It was found that MnO2, Mn2O3, and Mn2SiO4 could be obtained in supercritical water at 673 K in 5 minutes. The roles of both anions of manganese salts and silicon species in the formation of manganese silicon complexes were discussed. The inorganic manganese salt with the oxyacid radical could be easily decomposed to produce MnO2/SiO2 and Mn2O3/SiO2. It is interesting to found that Mn(Ac2 can react with various types of silicon to produce Mn2SiO4. The hydroxyl groups of the SiO2 surface from different silicon sources enhance the reactivity of SiO2.

  19. Structural Characterization of Biogenic Manganese Oxides Produced in Sea Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. M.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2003-12-01

    Manganese oxides have been coined as the "scavengers of the sea" and play important roles in both marine and freshwater systems. Natural manganese oxide nanoparticles and grain coatings are ubiquitous in the environment and profoundly impact the quality of sediments via their ability to degrade and sequester contaminants. These oxides are believed to form dominantly via oxidation of Mn(II) by marine and freshwater bacteria and have extremely high sorptive capacities for heavy metals. We have used XANES, EXAFS, and synchrotron (SR)-XRD techniques to study biogenic manganese oxides produced by spores of the marine Bacillus sp., strain SG-1 in seawater as a function of reaction time under fully in-situ conditions. The primary biogenic solid-phase Mn oxide product is a hexagonal layered phyollomanganate with an oxidation state similar to that in delta-MnO2. XRD data show the biooxides to have a phyllomanganate 10 basal plane spacing, suggesting the interlayer is hydrated and contains calcium. As the experiment continues, the initial biooxide changes to show triclinic symmetry. Fits to these EXAFS spectra suggest the octahedral layers have low Mn octahedral site vacancies in the lattice and the latyers bend to accommodate Jahn-Teller distortions creating the change in symmetry. The oxides observed in this study as models of Mn(II) bio-oxidation may be representative of the most abundant manganese oxide phase suspended in the oxic and sub-oxic zones of the oceanic water column.

  20. Magnetism in bcc and fcc Fe with carbon and manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, N I; Van Aken, D; Medvedeva, J E

    2010-08-11

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to study the structure and magnetic properties of bcc (α) and fcc (γ) Fe with 3 at.% carbon and manganese impurities. We find that all bcc-based Fe, Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C phases exhibit a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state, while the antiferromagnetic double-layer (AFMD) state is lowest in energy within the collinear spin approach in fcc Fe, Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C phases. However, the carbon and manganese impurities affect the local magnetic interactions significantly. The states with opposite manganese magnetic moments are quasi-degenerate in bcc Fe-Mn alloy, whereas octa-site carbon stabilizes ferromagnetic coupling of the nearest manganese atom with the Fe host. We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic (AFM) fcc Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C alloys are intrinsically inhomogeneous magnetic systems. Carbon frustrates the local magnetic order by reorientation of magnetic moments of the nearest Mn and Fe atoms, and favors their ferromagnetic coupling. The competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic Fe-Fe and Fe-Mn interactions and the local magnetovolume instability near carbon may give rise to the spin-glass-like regions observed in austenitic Fe-Mn-C alloys.

  1. Fluvial and hydrothermal input of manganese into the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Laan, P.; Klunder, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 773 samples were analysed for dissolved manganese (Mn) in the Arctic Ocean aboard R. V. Polarstern during expedition ARK XXII/2 from 28 July until 07 October 2007 from Tromso (Norway) to Bremerhaven. Concentrations of Mn were elevated in the surface layer with concentrations of up to 6 nM

  2. Plastic deformation wear in modified medium manganese steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUAN Hai-lun

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A medium manganese steel with high wear-resistance, strength and toughness has been produced with addition of a complex modifier (or refining agent containing Nb, N, RE and Si-Ca. The results showed that the wear resistance, strength and toughness of the modified medium manganese steel are respectively 1.92 times, 1.45 times and 3.63 times as high as that of the referenced unmodified medium manganese steel. The plastic deformation characteristic involved in the wear mechanism of the modified medium manganese steel was investigated by means of plastic-elasticity calculation and TEM electro-microscopy. The relationship between wear resistance and yield strength of the steel was established. Since the wear volume W is proportional to the square of the loading and to the numbers of the abrasives, and inversely proportional to the square of the yield strength of the materials, the wear resistance can be substantially improved by the enhancement of yield strength of the materials. The calculation results generally agreed with the experimental results.

  3. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the scale of the problem of arsenic, iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Ghana a survey was performed in the first phase of the research to provide in depth information with respect to these contaminants. Presence of these mentioned contaminants in groundwater is not

  4. New manganese-based catalyst systems for alkyd paint drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Z.; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Bouwman, E.

    2007-01-01

    The autoxidation and oligomerisation of ethyl linoleate (EL) catalyzed by manganese salts in combination with several Schiff-base ligands has been studied making use of time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy. The results indicate that several of the combinations exhibit relatively high catalytic activity

  5. The search for magnetic fields in mercury-manganese stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makaganiuk, V.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.; Jeffers, S.V.; Johns-Krull, C. M.; Keller, C.U.; Rodenhuis, M.; Snik, F.; Stempels, H. C.; Valenti, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    A subclass of the upper main-sequence chemically peculiar stars, mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars were traditionally considered to be non-magnetic, showing no evidence of variability in their spectral line profiles. However, discoveries of chemical inhomogeneities on their surfaces imply that this ass

  6. Plastic deformation wear in modified medium manganese steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A medium manganese steel with high wear-resistance, strength and toughness has been produced with addition of a complex modifier (or refining agent) containing Nb, N, RE and Si-Ca. The results showed that the wear resistance, strength and toughness of the modified medium manganese steel are respectively 1.92 times, 1.45times and 3.63 times as high as that of the referenced unmodified medium manganese steel. The plastic deformation characteristic involved in the wear mechanism of the modified medium manganese steel was investigated by means of plastic-elasticity calculation and TEM electro-microscopy. The relationship between wear resistance and yield strength of the steel was established. Since the wear volume W is proportional to the square of the loading and to the numbers of the abrasives, and inversely proportional to the square of the yield strength of the materials, the wear resistance can be substantially improved by the enhancement of yield strength of the materials. The calculation results generally agreed with the experimental results.

  7. Community Exposure to Air Manganese and Motor and Cognitive Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient, occupational studies have shown inhaling high levels of Mn can lead to adverse nervous system health effects. Few studies have examined the health effects of air-Mn exposure on adults in a community. We conducted a cross-sectional...

  8. Estimating Air-Manganese Exposures in Two Ohio Towns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn), a nutrient required for normal metabolic function, is also a persistent air pollutant and a known neurotoxin at high concentrations. Elevated exposures can result in a number of motor and cognitive deficits. Quantifying chronic personal exposures in residential po...

  9. Exposure to Environmental Air Manganese and Medication Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element with natural low levels found in water, food, and air, but due to industrialized processes, both workplace and the environmental exposures to Mn have increased. Recently, environmental studies have reported physical and mental health problem...

  10. Selection and use of manganese dioxide by Neanderthals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyes, P.J.; Anastasakis, K.; De Jong, W.; Van Hoesel, A.; Roebroeks, W.; Soressi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these ‘manganese oxides’ were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they

  11. Manganese toxicity hardly affects sulfur metabolism in Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neves, M.I.; Prajapati, D.H.; Parmar, S.; Aghajanzadeh, T.; Hawkesford, M.J.; De Kok, L.J.; De Kok, L.J.; Haneklaus, S.H.; Hawkesford, M.J.; Schnug, E.

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant nutrient, though at elevated levels in plant tissues it may become toxic. The physiological basis for phytotoxicity is largely unclear. Exposure of Brassica rapa to elevated levels of Mn2+ in the nutrient solution resulted in decreased biomass production at ≥ 20

  12. Sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Smotraiev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The actual problem of water supply in the world and in Ukraine, in particular, is a high level of pollution in water resources and an insufficient level of drinking water purification. With industrial wastewater, a significant amount of pollutants falls into water bodies, including suspended particles, sulfates, iron compounds, heavy metals, etc. Aim: The aim of this work is to determine the impact of aluminum and manganese ions additives on surface and sorption properties of zirconium oxyhydroxide based sorbents during their production process. Materials and Methods: The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were prepared by sol-gel method during the hydrolysis of metal chlorides (zirconium oxychloride ZrOCl2, aluminum chloride AlCl3 and manganese chloride MnCl2 with carbamide. Results: The surface and sorption properties of sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were investigated. X-ray amorphous structure and evolved hydroxyl-hydrate cover mainly characterize the obtained xerogels. The composite sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide doped with aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 537 m2/g and manganese oxyhydroxide (aS = 356 m2/g have more developed specific surface area than single-component xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide (aS = 236 m2/g and aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 327 m2/g. The sorbent based on the xerogel of zirconium and manganese oxyhydroxides have the maximum SO42--ions sorption capacity. It absorbs 1.5 times more SO42–-ions than the industrial anion exchanger AN-221. The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide has the sorption capacity of Fe3+-ions that is 1.5…2 times greater than the capacity of the industrial cation exchanger KU-2-8. The Na+-ions absorption capacity is 1.47…1.56 mmol/g for each sorbent. Conclusions: Based on these data it can be concluded that the proposed method is effective for sorbents production based on

  13. Fluxes of dissolved aluminum and manganese to the Weddell Sea and indications for manganese co-limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, Rob; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Klunder, Maarten B.; Laan, Patrick

    The trace metals aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) were studied in the Weddell Sea in March 2008. Concentrations of dissolved Al ([Al]) were slightly elevated (0.23-0.35 nmol L-1) in the surface layer compared to the subsurface minimum (0.07-0.21 nmol L-1) observed in the winter water. Atmospheric

  14. Fluxes of dissolved aluminum and manganese to the Weddell Sea and indications for manganese co-limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Klunder, M.B.; Laan, P.

    2013-01-01

    The trace metals aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) were studied in the Weddell Sea in March 2008. Concentrations of dissolved Al ([Al]) were slightly elevated (0.23-0.35 nmol L-1) in the surface layer compared to the subsurface minimum (0.07-0.21 nmol L-1) observed in the winter water. Atmospheric

  15. Manganese in the west Atlantic Ocean in the context of the first global ocean circulation model of manganese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, Marco; Middag, Rob; Dutay, Jean-Claude; de Baar, Hein; Roy-Barman, Matthieu; Gehlen, Marion; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Sterl, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Dissolved manganese (Mn) is a biologically essential element. Moreover, its oxidised form is involved in removing itself and several other trace elements from ocean waters. Here we report the longest thus far (17 500 km length) full-depth ocean section of dissolved Mn in the west Atlantic Ocean,

  16. Subchronic, Low-Level Intraperitoneal Injections of Manganese (IV) Oxide and Manganese (II) Chloride Affect Rat Brain Neurochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian S.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Ladefoged, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Cl2)/kg bw/day for 7 d/wk for 8 or 12 weeks. This dosing regimen adds relevant new knowledge about Mn neurotoxicity as a consequence of low-dose subchronic Mn dosing. Manganese concentrations increased in the striatum, the rest of the brain, and in plasma, and regional brain neurotransmitter...

  17. Myocardial blood flow assessment with {sup 82}rubidium-PET imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Andrea; Chalela, William; Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Imada, Rodrigo; Soares Junior, Jose; Do Val, Renata; Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Izaki, Marisa; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Meneghetti, Jose C., E-mail: andrea.falcao@incor.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (InCor/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Instituto do Coracao

    2015-11-15

    Objectives: Perfusion abnormalities are frequently seen in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) when a left bundle branch block is present. A few studies have shown decreased coronary flow reserve in the left anterior descending territory, regardless of the presence of coronary artery disease. Objective: we sought to investigate rubidium-82 ({sup 82}Rb) positron emission tomography imaging in the assessment of myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve in patients with left bundle branch block. Methods: thirty-eight patients with left bundle branch block (GI), median age 63.5 years, 22 (58%) female, 12 with coronary artery disease (≥70%; GI-A) and 26 with no evidence of significant coronary artery disease (GI-B), underwent rest-dipyridamole stress {sup 82}Rb-positron emission tomography with absolute quantitative flow measurements using Cedars-Sinai software (mL/min/g). The relative myocardial perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction were assessed in 17 segments. These parameters were compared with those obtained from 30 patients with normal {sup 82}Rb-positron emission tomography studies and without left bundle branch block (GII). Results: stress myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve were significantly lower in GI than in GII (p>0.05). The comparison of coronary flow reserve between GI-A and GI-B showed that it was different from the global coronary flow reserve (p<0.05) and the stress flow was significantly lower in the anterior than in the septal wall for both groups. Perfusion abnormalities were more prevalent in GI-A (p=0.06) and the left ventricular ejection fraction was not different between GI-A and GI-B, whereas it was lower in GI than in GII (p<0.001). Conclusion: the data confirm that patients with left bundle branch block had decreased myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve and coronary flow reserve assessed by {sup 82}Rb-positron emission tomography imaging may be useful in identifying coronary artery

  18. Microbial Manganese Oxidation in Saltmarsh Surface Sediments Using a Leuco Crystal Violet Manganese Oxide Detection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Henry G.; Siekmann, Ellen C.; Hodson, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Microbial manganese (Mn) oxide production in surface sediments of a Georgia saltmarsh was directly measured using an assay involving the oxidation of 4,4',4″-methylidynetris (N,N-dimethylaniline), leuco crystal violet (LCV), by Mn oxides to produce crystal violet. The assay exhibits high specificity for Mn oxides without interference by Mn(II) and is sufficiently sensitive to determine rates of Mn oxidation in surface sediment or saltmarsh creek water suspensions. Sample salinity affects crystal violet absorbance in the 0-25 salinity range and must be corrected for in Mn oxide determinations for estuarine samples of variable salinity. Other oxidants found to oxidize LCV slowly included Cl(I), Cr(III), I(V), Fe(III), and Mn(III), although the sensitivity of the assay for Mn(IV) oxides was found to be seven times greater than for Mn(III), and at least 100 times greater than for any of the other oxidants. Rates of abiotic Mn oxide production in sediment suspensions treated with either sodium azide or formalin, or autoclaved, were much slower than rates determined for untreated sediments. Sodium azide (7·7 mM) inhibited Mn oxide production in these sediment suspensions to rates between 5 and 10% of the rates of Mn oxidation determined for unamended suspensions. Manganese oxidation was highly temperature dependent, with maximal rates on a dry weight basis (8·9 nmol mg dwt -1 h -1), occurring at 60°C, and negligible activity at 100 and 0°C. Rates were also dependent on sample pH, with maximal rates at pH 6·7, decreasing to near 0 as the pH was lowered to approximately 3·0. For Mn(II) concentrations ranging from 9 to 91 μM, rates of Mn oxide production were independent of Mn(II) concentration, while Mn oxide production was inhibited at concentrations greater than 91 μM (e.g. by 25-40% at 450 μM). Rates of microbial Mn oxide production in surface sediment/saltmarsh creek water suspensions incubated under natural conditions of temperature, pH, and Mn

  19. Sorption behaviour of manganese-coated calcined-starfish and manganese-coated sand for Mn(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Mok; Kim, Won-Gee; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Tiwari, Diwakar

    2010-04-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to explore the sorption behaviour of manganese-coated samples of calcined starfish (MCCSF) (i.e. the impregnation of calcined starfish with manganese) for the removal of low levels of an important heavy metal toxic ion, Mn(II), from aqueous solutions. The suitability of this solid was further compared with two different samples of manganese-coated sands (MCS): MCS4 and MCS9 impregnated at pH 4.0 and pH 9.0, respectively. These comparative studies were performed in both batch and column experiments. Batch data indicated that a fairly good stability of the coating was obtained for these three samples in the pH region 2.5 to 10.0. The removal efficiency of MCCSF was fairly good in comparison with the MCS4 and MCS9 samples. These last two samples possessed similar Mn(II) removal capacities. Moreover, a small dose of sodium hypochlorite further enhanced the uptake of Mn(II) by these solids. The sorbate concentration dependence data fitted reasonably well to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The column data indicated that MCCSF possessed a relatively higher adsorption capacity compared with the MCS4 and MCS9 samples. The breakthrough curves obtained were then used to evaluate the apparent removal capacity of these solids under the dynamic conditions using the Thomas equation. The SEM images obtained for these manganese-coated solids along with the virgin base materials, i.e. sand and calcined starfish, showed that manganese oxides occupied the surfaces or pores of the base materials and formed clusters on the base surface.

  20. Neuroimaging identifies increased manganese deposition in infants receiving parenteral nutrition12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschner, Judy L; Anderson, Adam; Slaughter, James Christopher; Aschner, Michael; Steele, Steven; Beller, Amy; Mouvery, Amanda; Furlong, Heather M; Maitre, Nathalie L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Manganese, an essential metal for normal growth and development, is neurotoxic on excessive exposure. Standard trace element–supplemented neonatal parenteral nutrition (PN) has a high manganese content and bypasses normal gastrointestinal absorptive control mechanisms, which places infants at risk of manganese neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry demonstrating short T1 relaxation time (T1R) in the basal ganglia reflects excessive brain manganese accumulation. Objective: This study tested the hypothesis that infants with greater parenteral manganese exposure have higher brain manganese accumulation, as measured by MR imaging, than do infants with lower parenteral manganese exposure. Design: Infants exposed to parenteral manganese were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Infants classified as having high manganese exposure received >75% of their nutrition in the preceding 4 wk as PN. All others were classified as having low exposure. Daily parenteral and enteral manganese intakes were calculated. Whole-blood manganese was measured by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Brain MR relaxometry was interpreted by a masked reviewer. Linear regression models, adjusted for gestational age (GA) at birth, estimated the association of relaxometry indexes with total and parenteral manganese exposures. Results: Seventy-three infants were enrolled. High-quality MR images were available for 58 infants, 39 with high and 19 with low manganese exposure. Four infants with a high exposure had blood manganese concentrations >30 μg/L. After controlling for GA, higher parenteral and total manganese intakes were associated with a lower T1R (P = 0.01) in the globus pallidus and putamen but were not associated with whole-blood manganese (range: 3.6–56.6 μg/L). Elevated conjugated bilirubin magnified the association between parenteral manganese and decreasing T1R. Conclusion: A short T1R for GA identifies infants at risk of

  1. Intellectual Impairment in School-Age Children Exposed to Manganese from Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Maryse F.; Sauvé, Sébastien; Barbeau, Benoit; Legrand, Melissa; Brodeur, Marie-Ève; Bouffard, Thérèse; Limoges, Elyse; Bellinger, David C.; Mergler, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Background Manganese is an essential nutrient, but in excess it can be a potent neurotoxicant. Despite the common occurrence of manganese in groundwater, the risks associated with this source of exposure are largely unknown. Objectives Our first aim was to assess the relations between exposure to manganese from drinking water and children’s intelligence quotient (IQ). Second, we examined the relations between manganese exposures from water consumption and from the diet with children’s hair manganese concentration. Methods This cross-sectional study included 362 children 6–13 years of age living in communities supplied by groundwater. Manganese concentration was measured in home tap water (MnW) and children’s hair (MnH). We estimated manganese intake from water ingestion and the diet using a food frequency questionnaire and assessed IQ with the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. Results The median MnW in children’s home tap water was 34 μg/L (range, 1–2,700 μg/L). MnH increased with manganese intake from water consumption, but not with dietary manganese intake. Higher MnW and MnH were significantly associated with lower IQ scores. A 10-fold increase in MnW was associated with a decrease of 2.4 IQ points (95% confidence interval: −3.9 to −0.9; p manganese at levels common in groundwater is associated with intellectual impairment in children. PMID:20855239

  2. Assessment of the manganese content of the drinking water source in Yancheng, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinnan; Li, Aimin; Wang, Qiongjie; Zhou, Yang; Fu, Lichun; Li, Yan

    2010-10-15

    Excessive intake of manganese can damage the nervous system of the human body. In August 2009, the manganese content of the drinking water source in Yancheng exceeded the national standard of drinking water source, which influenced the daily life of the local residents. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors leading to the manganese content of river water in Yancheng exceeding the national standard. To the data, the manganese content of surface water in Yancheng already met the national standard of drinking water source in September 2009, but the manganese content of river sediment was relatively high, especially in Mangshe River and Tongyu River. It was worthwhile to note that the soluble manganese content of the sediment in Mangshe River was even as high as 270 mg kg(-1), which suggested that the release of manganese from the sediment was the major cause of the pollution. The manganese content of the soil near the rivers was also determined, and the results indicated that the wastewater and waste slag discharged by the stainless steel factories nearby were the main pollution sources of manganese. Furthermore, the environmental factors affecting the release of manganese from the sediment were also investigated. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intellectual impairment in school-age children exposed to manganese from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Maryse F; Sauvé, Sébastien; Barbeau, Benoit; Legrand, Melissa; Brodeur, Marie-Ève; Bouffard, Thérèse; Limoges, Elyse; Bellinger, David C; Mergler, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Manganese is an essential nutrient, but in excess it can be a potent neurotoxicant. Despite the common occurrence of manganese in groundwater, the risks associated with this source of exposure are largely unknown. Our first aim was to assess the relations between exposure to manganese from drinking water and children's intelligence quotient (IQ). Second, we examined the relations between manganese exposures from water consumption and from the diet with children's hair manganese concentration. This cross-sectional study included 362 children 6-13 years of age living in communities supplied by groundwater. Manganese concentration was measured in home tap water (MnW) and children's hair (MnH). We estimated manganese intake from water ingestion and the diet using a food frequency questionnaire and assessed IQ with the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. The median MnW in children's home tap water was 34 µg/L (range, 1-2,700 µg/L). MnH increased with manganese intake from water consumption, but not with dietary manganese intake. Higher MnW and MnH were significantly associated with lower IQ scores. A 10-fold increase in MnW was associated with a decrease of 2.4 IQ points (95% confidence interval: -3.9 to -0.9; p manganese at levels common in groundwater is associated with intellectual impairment in children.

  4. Interactive effects of manganese and/or iron supplementation in adult women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C.D.; Greger, J.L. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Evaluation of the practical significance of manganese-iron interactions has been hampered by the limited methodologies available to assess manganese status. Manganese status has not been monitored longitudinally in control studies with humans. Forty-eight women were recruited for a double blind 125-day supplementation study. After an initial 5-day baseline period, subjects were assigned to one of four treatments: placebo; 30 mg iron as ferrous fumarate daily; 15 mg manganese as an amino acid chelated manganese supplement daily or both the iron and manganese supplements daily. Dietary information, blood and 3-day urine samples were collected during the baseline period and after 20, 55, 85 and 120 days of consuming the supplements. Urinary manganese excretion ranged from 0.11 to 1.40 {mu}g/day. Serum manganese ranged from 0.16 to 1.92 {mu}g/l. Serum was also analyzed for iron, zinc, copper, ferritin and transferrin concentrations. Lymphocytes were isolated and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase activity was determined as a new method to assess manganese status. Plasma cholesterol ranged from 126 to 229 mg/dl and HDL cholesterol ranged from 31 to 84 mg/dl. Plasma triglycerides were determined and LDL cholesterol was calculated by difference.

  5. Biological and physico-chemical formation of Birnessite during the ripening of manganese removal filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, Jantinus H; Petrusevski, Branislav; Slokar, Yness M; Huysman, Koen; Joris, Koen; Kruithof, Joop C; Kennedy, Maria D

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of manganese removal in conventional groundwater treatment consisting of aeration followed by rapid sand filtration, strongly depends on the ability of filter media to promote auto-catalytic adsorption of dissolved manganese and its subsequent oxidation. Earlier studies have shown that the compound responsible for the auto-catalytic activity in ripened filters is a manganese oxide called Birnessite. The aim of this study was to determine if the ripening of manganese removal filters and the formation of Birnessite on virgin sand is initiated biologically or physico-chemically. The ripening of virgin filter media in a pilot filter column fed by pre-treated manganese containing groundwater was studied for approximately 600 days. Samples of filter media were taken at regular time intervals, and the manganese oxides formed in the coating were analysed by Raman spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the EPR analyses, it was established that the formation of Birnessite was most likely initiated via biological activity. With the progress of filter ripening and development of the coating, Birnessite formation became predominantly physico-chemical, although biological manganese oxidation continued to contribute to the overall manganese removal. The knowledge that manganese removal in conventional groundwater treatment is initiated biologically could be of help in reducing typically long ripening times by creating conditions that are favourable for the growth of manganese oxidizing bacteria.

  6. Maternal Blood Manganese and Early Neurodevelopment: The Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soo Eun; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Ha, Eun-Hee; Kim, Boong-Nyun; Ha, Mina; Kim, Yangho; Hong, Yun-Chul; Park, Hyesook; Oh, Se-Young

    2015-07-01

    Manganese is an essential trace element and common component of water, soil, and air. Prenatal manganese exposure may affect fetal and infantile neurodevelopment, but reports on in utero manganese exposure and infant neurodevelopment are rare. This study was conducted to investigate a relationship between maternal blood manganese level and neurodevelopment of infants at 6 months of age. Data were obtained from the Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) birth cohort study. The study population included 232 pairs of pregnant women and their infants at 6 months of age. Maternal blood manganese was measured at term, just before delivery. Mental and psychomotor development in infancy was assessed at 6 months of age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. The relationship between maternal blood manganese level and the mental and psychomotor development indexes (MDI and PDI) was estimated for manganese modeled as a linear and as a categorical variable and using penalized splines for nonlinear modeling. Mean ± SD maternal blood manganese concentration was 22.5 ± 6.5 μg/L. After adjustment for potential confounders, blood manganese was used as a continuous variable in a linear and nonlinear model. Associations between maternal blood manganese and MDI and PDI scores followed an inverted U-shape dose-response curve after adjustment for potential confounders, with lower scores associated with both low and high blood concentrations [MDI: likelihood-ratio test (LRT) p = 0.075, PDI: LRT p = 0.038]. Associations of both outcomes with increasing blood manganese shifted from positive to negative at concentrations of 24-28 μg/L in this cohort of term, normal birth weight children. Although no cut-off point has been established to define manganese toxicity, both high and low blood manganese levels may be associated with neurobehavioral function in infants.

  7. Comparative evaluation of oxidative stress status and manganese availability in plants growing on manganese mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boojar, Massod Mashhadi Akbar; Goodarzi, Faranak

    2008-11-01

    This study pioneered an approach that determined the effects of excess manganese (Mn) on three species; Datura stramonium, Alhagi camelthorn and Chenopodium ambrosioides. We investigated their levels of Mn, antioxidative enzymes and oxidative damage biomarkers in plants (zone 1) in and outside (zone 2) the Mn mine. The results showed that total and available Mn were at toxic levels for plants growing on zone 1. The Mn levels in each plant species were higher in leaves, stems and roots. Mn was only accumulated significantly in leaf vacuoles of A. camelthorn. Antioxidative enzyme activities of C. ambrosioides and/or D. stramonium in zone 1 were higher in leaves, stems and then in their roots. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and dityrosine levels were insignificantly higher in tissues of the studied plants in zone 1 with respect to zone 2. The roots of studied plants showed significantly higher levels of these biomarkers in comparison with their leaves in zone 1. Accordingly, antioxidative enzymatic response to Mn-stress in D. stramonium and C. ambrosioides and possibly accumulation of Mn in leaf vacuoles of A. camelthorn, protected them from oxidative damages and involved in their tolerance in Mn mine.

  8. Arsenite oxidation by a poorly-crystalline manganese oxide. 3. Arsenic and manganese desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Brandon J; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Sparks, Donald L

    2011-11-01

    Arsenic (As) mobility in the environment is greatly affected by its oxidation state and the degree to which it is sorbed on metal oxide surfaces. Manganese oxides (Mn oxides) have the ability to decrease overall As mobility both by oxidizing toxic arsenite (As(III)) to less toxic arsenate (As(V)), and by sorbing As. However, the effect of competing ions on the mobility of As sorbed on Mn-oxide surfaces is not well understood. In this study, desorption of As(V) and As(III) from a poorly crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO(2)) by two environmentally significant ions is investigated using a stirred-flow technique and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). As(III) is not observed in solution after desorption under any conditions used in this study, agreeing with previous studies showing As sorbed on Mn-oxides exists only as As(V). However, some As(V) is desorbed from the δ-MnO(2) surface under all conditions studied, while neither desorptive used in this study completely removes As(V) from the δ-MnO(2) surface.

  9. Direct Comparison of Manganese Detoxification/Efflux Proteins and Molecular Characterization of ZnT10 Protein as a Manganese Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishito, Yukina; Tsuji, Natsuko; Fujishiro, Hitomi; Takeda, Taka-Aki; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Teranishi, Fumie; Okazaki, Fumiko; Matsunaga, Ayu; Tuschl, Karin; Rao, Rajini; Kono, Satoshi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Narita, Hiroshi; Himeno, Seiichiro; Kambe, Taiho

    2016-07-08

    Manganese homeostasis involves coordinated regulation of specific proteins involved in manganese influx and efflux. However, the proteins that are involved in detoxification/efflux have not been completely resolved nor has the basis by which they select their metal substrate. Here, we compared six proteins, which were reported to be involved in manganese detoxification/efflux, by evaluating their ability to reduce manganese toxicity in chicken DT40 cells, finding that human ZnT10 (hZnT10) was the most significant contributor. A domain swapping and substitution analysis between hZnT10 and the zinc-specific transporter hZnT1 showed that residue Asn(43), which corresponds to the His residue constituting the potential intramembranous zinc coordination site in other ZnT transporters, is necessary to impart hZnT10's unique manganese mobilization activity; residues Cys(52) and Leu(242) in transmembrane domains II and V play a subtler role in controlling the metal specificity of hZnT10. Interestingly, the His → Asn reversion mutant in hZnT1 conferred manganese transport activity and loss of zinc transport activity. These results provide important information about manganese detoxification/efflux mechanisms in vertebrate cells as well as the molecular characterization of hZnT10 as a manganese transporter.

  10. Manganese reduction and its stabilization in the rock record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. E.; Savalia, P.; Kocar, B. D.; Webb, S. M.; Nealson, K. H.; Fischer, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese oxides are abundant and highly reactive electron acceptors present within many environments. Their occurance is intimately tied to the availability of oxygen, as only O2 and oxygen-derived species such as superoxide and peroxide can oxidize reduced Mn(II). Because Mn2+ is soluble and Mn3+ and Mn4+ readily undergo hydrolysis to form insoluble precipitates, the record of manganese in sedimentary deposits can yield interesting insights into the history of atmospheric oxygen--the largest manganese deposits in Earth history (approximately 2.2 billion years ago) are associated with the rise of oxygen. From studying modern environments, we understand that manganese is concentrated in sediments by the oxidation and deposition of Mn(IV) minerals; however, our observations of the geologic record show diagenetic stabilization of only Mn(II) carbonate or mixed Mn(II)-Mn(III) oxide minerals--all Mn(IV)-oxide phases in ancient samples are associated with modern weathering and oxidation processes. Reduction is a key element within the manganese cycle, yet the (bio)geochemical processes responsible for the formation of mixed Mn(II)-Mn(III) minerals have not been fully elucidated. To better understand how manganese is converted from insoluble Mn(IV) oxide to these Mn(II/III)-bearing phases, we investigated secondary mineral precipitates which form during and after Mn(IV)-oxide reduction using a well-studied metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. To examine changes in Mn mineralogy and oxidation state during the progression of Mn(IV) reductive dissolution/transformation by S. oneidensis, we utilized a flow through reactor system allowing for in-situ and real time x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. We also confirmed mineral phases using XRD and FTIR spectrometry. Our experiments reveal that when solution phosphate concentrations are high, a Mn(II) phosphate phase quickly forms as a secondary precipitate during complete reduction of Mn(IV) oxides

  11. Effect of olfactory manganese exposure on anxiety-related behavior in a mouse model of iron overload hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-07-01

    Manganese in excess promotes unstable emotional behavior. Our previous study showed that olfactory manganese uptake into the brain is altered in Hfe(-/-) mice, a model of iron overload hemochromatosis, suggesting that Hfe deficiency could modify the neurotoxicity of airborne manganese. We determined anxiety-related behavior and monoaminergic protein expression after repeated intranasal instillation of MnCl2 to Hfe(-/-) mice. Compared with manganese-instilled wild-type mice, Hfe(-/-) mice showed decreased manganese accumulation in the cerebellum. Hfe(-/-) mice also exhibited increased anxiety with decreased exploratory activity and elevated dopamine D1 receptor and norepinephrine transporter in the striatum. Moreover, Hfe deficiency attenuated manganese-associated impulsivity and modified the effect of manganese on the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter and serotonin transporter. Together, our data indicate that loss of HFE function alters manganese-associated emotional behavior and further suggest that HFE could be a potential molecular target to alleviate affective disorders induced by manganese inhalation.

  12. Modeling of some biochemical mechanisms of development of manganese hypermicroelementosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Goncharenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the mechanisms of action of sub-toxic dose (LD50 of the manganese chloride on cell metabolism in rats’ organs and tissues under model conditions. A model of assessment of integral response of an organism to exogenous manganese at exposure levels close to the threshold that was realized as the repeated impact of sub-toxic doses. White Wistar rats aged 3 months were injected intramuscularly with MnCl2 with the metal concentration of 50 mg/kg for 8 days. Effect of exogenous manganese load on the content of macro- and microelements, such as Ca, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, and Pb, was studied in liver, heart, spleen, kidneys, muscles and bones of experimental animals the use of C-115-M1 atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Study of enzymes activity and lipid peroxidation products in serum and liver homogenates of experimental animals was conducted on a spectrophotometer Spekord UV/VIS. Hemolysis of red blood cells was determined by the Yacher method. Sorption capacity of the erythrocytes glycocalyx to alcian blue was determined by the Artsishevsky method. A study of the influence of Mn-load on the functional activity of energy metabolism was performed on a model system of rat liver mitochondria by the polarography. Intake of MnCl2 in a dose of LD50 generates weight loss of the rats by 44%, hemoglobin level decrease by 25%, and reduction of the transaminases activity by 40%. That indicates serious disorders in ions homeostasis and metabolic processes. MnCl2 load leads to a significant increase in the content of manganese in all tissues tested: the largest amount was found in the spleen (600% increase, liver (300% and muscles (240% as compared with the initial state. Apparently, these organs are depots of manganese. It was established that the introduction of MnCl2 in a dose of LD50 causes a redistribution of elements in the body, resulting in a significant reduction in the concentration of magnesium ions in heart, bones

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of manganese lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennman, Anneli; Oliw, Ernst H; Karkehabadi, Saeid

    2014-04-01

    Lipoxygenases constitute a family of nonhaem metal enzymes with catalytic iron or, occasionally, catalytic manganese. Lipoxygenases oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids with position specificity and stereospecificity to hydroperoxides, which contribute to inflammation and the development of cancer. Little is known about the structural differences between lipoxygenases with Fe or Mn and the metal-selection mechanism. A Pichia pastoris expression system was used for the production of the manganese lipoxygenase of the take-all fungus of wheat, Gaeumannomyces graminis. The active enzyme was treated with α-mannosidase, purified to apparent homogeneity and subjected to crystal screening and X-ray diffraction. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 226.6, b = 50.6, c = 177.92 Å, β = 91.70°.

  14. Manganese Dioxide with High Specific Surface Area for Alkaline Battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG You-ju; LIN Yu-li; LI Wei-shan

    2012-01-01

    The authors reported a facile method for the synthesis of manganese dioxide without any template and catalyst at a low-temperature.The prepared sample was characterized with X-ray diffraction(XRD),scanning electron microscopy(SEM),Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET) surface analysis,Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectrometry,cyclic voltammetry,altemative current(AC) impedance test and battery discharge test.It is found that the prepared sample belongs to α-MnO2 and has a microsphere morphology and a large BET surface area.The electrochemical characterization indicates that the prepared sample displays a larger electrochemical capacitance than the commercial electrolytic manganese dioxides(EMD) in Na2SO4 solution,and exhibits larger discharge capacity than EMD,especially at a high rate discharge condition when it is used as cathode of alkaline Zn/MnO2 battery.

  15. Compositions containing nucleosides and manganese and their uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Levine, Rodney L.; Wehr, Nancy B.

    2015-11-17

    This invention encompasses methods of preserving protein function by contacting a protein with a composition comprising one or more purine or pyrimidine nucleosides (such as e.g., adenosine or uridine) and an antioxidant (such as e.g., manganese). In addition, the invention encompasses methods of treating and/or preventing a side effect of radiation exposure and methods of preventing a side effect of radiotherapy comprising administration of a pharmaceutically effective amount of a composition comprising one or more purine or pyrimidine nucleosides (such as e.g., adenosine or uridine) and an antioxidant (such as e.g., manganese) to a subject in need thereof. The compositions may comprise D. radiodurans extracts.

  16. Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), plant uptake and effects on metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.R.; Lytle, C.M.; Stone, R.L.; Smith, B.N [Department of Botany and Range Science, Brigham Young University, Provo (United States); Hansen, L.D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo (United States)

    2000-04-01

    In the USA and Canada, methylcyclopentadienyl manganese (MMT) is currently added to gasoline to replace tetraethyl lead as an antiknock fuel additive. Manganese concentrations in roadside soil and plants are increasing and correlated with distance from the roadway, traffic volume, plant type, and microhabitat. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings were treated for either five or thirty-five days with different levels of manganous chloride (0-1000ppm). Metabolic heat rates (q) and respiration rates (R{sub CO{sub 2}}), measured calorimetrically, indicated severe stress at Mn concentrations between 10 and 100ppm and at temperatures above 20C. Predicted growth rates (R{sub SG}) also decreased in these circumstances.

  17. Giant Magnetic Entropy Change in Manganese Perovskites near Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟伟; 王锦辉; 都有为; 陈伟

    2001-01-01

    A large magnetic entropy change about twice as high as that of pure gadolinium metal near room temperature has been discovered in manganese perovskites La0.837Ca0.098Na0.03sMn0.987O3.00(8.3 J. kg-1.K-1, at 256 K) and La0.s22Ca0.096K0.043Mn0.974O3.00 (6.8 J. kg-1.K-1, at 265K) under a magnetic field of 1.5 T. This phenomenon indicates that manganese perovskites have potential applications for magnetic refrigerants in an extended temperature range even near room temperature.

  18. Characterization of carbon nanomaterial formation and manganese oxide reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumlas, Samantha Lyn

    Characterization of a material's surface, structural and physical properties is essential to understand its chemical reactivity. Control over these properties helps tailor a material to a particular application of interest. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on characterizing a synthetic method for carbon nanomaterials and the determination of structural properties of manganese oxides that contribute to its reactivity for environmental chemistry. In particular, one research effort was focused on the tuning of synthetic parameters towards the formation of carbon nanomaterials from gaseous methane and gaseous mixtures containing various mixtures of methane, argon and hydrogen. In a second research effort, photochemical and water oxidation chemistry were performed on the manganese oxide, birnessite, to aid in the remediation of arsenic from the environment and provide more options for alternative energy catalysts, respectively. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  19. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-01-30

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  20. Complexation of Manganese with Glutarimidedioxime: Implication for Extraction Uranium from Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiang; Tian, Yin; Qin, Zhen; Yu, Qianhong; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Dongqi; Li, Xingliang; Wang, Xiaolin

    2017-03-01

    The molecule of glutaroimidedioxime, a cyclic imidedioxime moiety that can form during the synthesis of the poly(amidoxime)sorbent and is reputedly responsible for the extraction of uranium from seawater. Complexation of manganese (II) with glutarimidedioxime in aqueous solutions was investigated with potentiometry, calorimetry, ESI-mass spectrometry, electrochemical measurements and quantum chemical calculations. Results show that complexation reactions of manganese with glutarimidedioxime are both enthalpy and entropy driven processes, implying that the sorption of manganese on the glutarimidedioxime-functionalized sorbent would be enhanced at higher temperatures. Complex formation of manganese with glutarimidedioxime can assist redox of Mn(II/III). There are about ~15% of equilibrium manganese complex with the ligand in seawater pH(8.3), indicating that manganese could compete to some degree with uranium for sorption sites.

  1. Manganese and welding fume exposure and control in construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, John D; Susi, Pam; Flynn, Michael R

    2007-12-01

    Overexposure to welding fume constituents, particularly manganese, is of concern in the construction industry due to the prevalence of welding and the scarcity of engineering controls. The control effectiveness of a commercially available portable local exhaust ventilation (LEV) unit was assessed. It consisted of a portable vacuum and a small bell-shaped hood connected by a flexible 2 inch (50.8 mm) diameter hose, in both experimental and field settings. The experimental testing was done in a semienclosed booth at a pipefitter training facility. Five paired trials of LEV control vs. no control, each approximately 1 hr in duration and conducted during two successive welds of 6 inch (152.4 mm) diameter carbon steel pipe were run in random order. Breathing zone samples were collected outside the welding hood during each trial. In the field scenario, full-shift breathing zone samples were collected from two pipefitters welding carbon steel pipe for a chiller installation on a commercial construction project. Eight days of full-shift sampling were conducted on both workers (n = 16), and the LEV was used by one of the two workers on an alternating basis for 7 of the days. All samples were collected with personal sample pumps calibrated at 2 L/min. Filter cassettes were analyzed for total particulate and manganese concentration by a certified laboratory. In the experimental setting, use of the portable LEV resulted in a 75% reduction in manganese exposure (mean 13 microg/m(3) vs. 51 microg/m(3); p 0.05). These results demonstrate that LEV use can reduce manganese exposure associated with welding tasks in construction.

  2. Recent Development of Air-Cooled Bainitic Steels Containing Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Hong-sheng; YANG Fu-bao; BAI Bing-zhe; YANG Zhi-gang; YIN Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The superiorities of air-cooled bainitic steels were described.A series of air-cooled bainitic steels containing manganese were developed and presented,which include low carbon granular bainitic steels,low carbon grain-boundary allotriomorphic ferrite/granular bainite dual phase steels,medium and medium high carbon bainite/martensite dual phase steels and casting bainitic steels.The development of ultra-low carbon bainitic steels in China was also introduced.

  3. High-valent imido complexes of manganese and chromium corroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicola Y; Eikey, Rebecca A; Loring, Megan I; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2005-05-16

    The oxidation reaction of M(tpfc) [M = Mn or Cr and tpfc = tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole] with aryl azides under photolytic or thermal conditions gives the first examples of mononuclear imido complexes of manganese(V) and chromium(V). These complexes have been characterized by NMR, mass spectrometry, UV-vis, EPR, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry. Two X-ray structures have been obtained for Mn(tpfc)(NMes) and Cr(tpfc)(NMes) [Mes = 2,4,6-(CH(3))(3)C(6)H(2)]. Short metal-imido bonds (1.610 and 1.635 Angstroms) as well as nearly linear M-N-C angles are consistent with triple M triple-bond NR bond formation. The kinetics of nitrene [NR] group transfer from manganese(V) corroles to various organic phosphines have been defined. Reduction of the manganese(V) corrolato complex affords phosphine imine and Mn(III) with reaction rates that are sensitive to steric and electronic elements of the phosphine substrate. An analogous manganese complex with a variant corrole ligand containing bromine atoms in the beta-pyrrole positions, Mn(Br(8)tpfc)(NAr), has been prepared and studied. Its reaction with PEt(3) is 250x faster than that of the parent tpfc complex, and its Mn(V/IV) couple is shifted by 370 mV to a more positive potential. The EPR spectra of chromium(V) imido corroles reveal a rich signal at ambient temperature consistent with Cr(V) triple-bond NR (d(1), S = 1/2) containing a localized spin density in the d(xy) orbital, and an anisotropic signal at liquid nitrogen temperature. Our results demonstrate the synthetic utility of organic aryl azides in the preparation of mononuclear metal imido complexes previously considered elusive, and suggest strong sigma-donation as the underlying factor in stabilizing high-valent metals by corrole ligands.

  4. Toxicity of manganese to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Bogenrieder, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    Manganese is a toxic element frequently overlooked when assessing toxicity of effluents, sediments and pore waters. Manganese can be present at toxic levels in anoxic solutions due to its increased solubility under chemically-reducing conditions, and it can remain at those levels for days in aerated test waters due to slow precipitation kinetics. Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca are freshwater organisms often used for toxicity testing and recommended for assessments of effluents and pore waters. Lethal and reproductive-inhibition concentrations of Mn were determined for C. dubia in acute 48h tests and chronic 3-brood tests using animals Manganese concentrations were measured analytically at test initiation and after 96 h for calculations of toxicity endpoints and determinations of Mn precipitation during the tests. Minimal amounts of Mn (below 3%) precipitated within 96 h. LC50s determined for H. azteca progressively increased from 3.0 to 8.6 to 13.7 mg Mn/L in soft, moderately-hard and hard waters, respectively. The tolerance of C. dubia to Mn was not significantly different between moderately-hard and hard waters, but was significantly lower in soft water. There was no significant difference in Mn sensitivity between the ages of C. dubia tested. Acute LC50 values for C. dubia averaged 6.2, 14.5 and 15.2 mg Mn/L and chronic IC50 values averaged 3.9, 8.5 and 11.5 mg Mn/L for soft, moderately-hard and hard waters, respectively. Manganese toxicity should be considered when assessing solutions with concentrations near these levels.

  5. Direct observation of an isomeric state in {sup 98}Rb and nuclear properties of exotic rubidium isotopes measured by laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, T.J.; Garnsworthy, A.B.; Levy, C.D.P.; Pearson, M.R. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Behr, J.A.; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Billowes, J. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J.E.; Leary, A.; Shelbaya, O.; Al Tamimi, W. [McGill University, Physics Department, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cheal, B. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mane, E. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ministry of External Relations, Rio Bianco Institute, Brasilia (Brazil); Stolz, M. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Voss, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2015-02-01

    Fast-beam collinear laser spectroscopy experiments on rubidium have been performed at the ISAC radioactive ion beam facility at TRIUMF. Most recently, the neutron-rich {sup 98}Rb isotope has been studied for the investigation of shape coexistence. Two long-lived nuclear states in {sup 98}Rb have been clearly observed for the first time: a low-spin state, assigned a spin of I = 0, and a high-spin state. The high-spin state is tentatively assigned a spin of I = 3 based on this analysis in combination with gamma decay results. The measured nuclear properties of the two states are presented, alongside unpublished values of the neutron-deficient isotopes investigated previously. The mean-square charge radii of both states in {sup 98}Rb are observed to continue along the isodeformation line present after the N = 60 onset of deformation. (orig.)

  6. Determination of urinary manganese by the direct chelation-extraction method and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Tokunaga, R; Iwahana, T; Tati, M; Ikeda, M

    1978-01-01

    The direct chelation-extraction method, originally developed by Hessel (1968) for blood lead analysis, has been successfully applied to urinalysis for manganese. The analyses of 35 urine samples containing up to 100 microgram/1 of manganese from manganese-exposed workers showed that the data obtained by this method agree well with those by wet digestion-flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and also by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. PMID:629893

  7. Changes in the Iron and Manganese Content and Turbidity in the Vilnius City Water Supply System

    OpenAIRE

    Ramunė Albrektienė

    2011-01-01

    The water of Vilnius boreholes contains excessive quantities of natural iron and manganese, the insoluble forms of which increase the turbidity of the water. Therefore, a ISC Vilniaus Vandenys installed water treatment equipment that remove iron and manganese from drinking water, and decrease the turbidity of the water. Water samples were taken at different points of the water supply network, total iron, manganese content, and turbidity analyses were carried out, and the changes in indicators...

  8. The influence of environmental conditions on kinetics of arsenite oxidation by manganese-oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Fischel, Matthew H. H.; Fischel, Jason S.; Lafferty, Brandon J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Manganese-oxides are one of the most important minerals in soil due to their widespread distribution and high reactivity. Despite their invaluable role in cycling many redox sensitive elements, numerous unknowns remain about the reactivity of different manganese-oxide minerals under varying conditions in natural systems. By altering temperature, pH, and concentration of arsenite we were able to determine how manganese-oxide reactivity changes with simulated environmental conditions...

  9. Air Manganese Levels and Chronic Liver Disease Mortality in North Carolina Counties: An Ecological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Spangler, John G.

    2012-01-01

    A Manganese is an essential trace element which is toxic in high doses. Over the past several decades, manganese has replaced lead as the anti-knock agent in gasoline, raising concern about air and road-side contamination with this element. In addition, manganese is absorbed by the liver, making specific populations (e.g., pregnant women, infants and children, and patients with liver disease) susceptible to its toxic effects. Using data from the US Census Bureau, the North Carolina State Cent...

  10. New generation of the zinc - manganese dioxide cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogulski, Z.; Chotkowski, M.; Czerwinski, A. [Warsaw Univ., Warsaw (Poland). Dept. of Chemistry; Industrial Chemistry Research Inst., Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-10-15

    Zinc chloride and alkaline system cells are the 2 most popular types of zinc manganese dioxide cells. They offer excellent shelf life, high-temperature performance, low cost, and favourable charge density and electrode potential. They are also environmentally sound. However, zinc corrosion and the formation of electrochemically inactive products of manganese dioxide reduction are some of the main problems with the storage and operation of rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide (RAM) batteries. Studies have shown that reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can be used as reactive mass carrier and the current collector in lead-acid batteries, zinc-carbon batteries, and secondary cells with NiOOH/Ni(OH){sub 2} cathodes. This paper demonstrated the behaviour of the primary zinc-carbon cell and a secondary battery system (Zn/ZnSO{sub 4}/MnO{sub 2}) with a new current collector. The commonly used graphic rod in the cell for the cathodic current collector was substituted by RVC. This modification enhanced all of the operational parameters of the cell, including voltage stability during discharge and electrical capacity of the cathode. In addition, the application of RVC as both anode and cathode active mass holders in the battery system made it possible to develop a new rechargeable battery system. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  11. A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for Manganese 2016A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) pharmacokinetic data under Section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)William K BoyesBackground. In the 1990’s, the use of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) as an octane-enhancing gasoline fuel additive led to concerns for potential public health consequences from exposure to Mn combustion products in automotive exhaust. Methods: After a series of regulatory / legal actions and negotiations, the EPA issued under CAA 211(b) an Alternative Tier 2 Test Rule that required development of scientific information intended to help resolve uncertainties in exposure or health risk estimates associated with MMT use. Among the uncertainties identified were: the chemical forms of Mn emitted in automotive exhaust; the relative toxicity of different Mn species; the potential for sensitive subpopulations including females, the young and elderly; differences in sensitivity between test species and humans; differences between inhalation and oral exposures; and the influence of dose rate and exposure duration on tissue accumulation of Mn. It was determined that development of specific sets of pharmacokinetic information and models regarding Mn could help resolve much of the uncertainties identified. Results. The results of the test program included development of several unique Mn PK datasets, and a series of increasingly sophisticated Mn physiologically-based pharmacokinetic

  12. Interactional effect of cerium and manganese on NO catalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanli; Huang, Yufen; Zhang, Hailong; Lan, Li; Zhao, Ming; Gong, Maochu; Chen, Yaoqiang; Wang, Jianli

    2017-04-01

    To preferably catalyze the oxidation of NO to NO2 in diesel after-treatment system, a series of CeO2-MnO x composite oxides was supported on silica-alumina material by the co-impregnation method. The maximum conversion of NO of the catalyst with a Ce/Mn weight ratio of 5:5 was improved by around 40%, compared to the supported manganese-only or cerium-only sample. And its maximum reaction rate was 0.056 μmol g(-1) s(-1) at 250 °C at the gas hourly space velocity of 30,000 h(-1). The experimental results suggested that Ce-Mn solid solution was formed, which could modulate the valence state of cerium and manganese and exhibit great redox properties. Moreover, the strong interaction between ceria and manganese resulted in the largest desorption amount of strong chemical oxygen and oxygen vacancies, leading to the maximum O α area ratio of 62.26% from the O 1s result. These effective oxygen species could be continually transferred to the surface, leading to the best NO catalytic activity of 5Ce5Mn/SA catalyst. Graphical abstract.

  13. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Bastida, C; Martínez-Miranda, V; Vázquez-Mejía, G; Solache-Ríos, M; Fonseca-Montes de Oca, G; Trujillo-Flores, E

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Titanium-Manganese Oxides. Optical and Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Chernyak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline titanium-manganese mixed oxides (ТМО with the Mn content of 13÷16 % at. were first synthesized by manganese hydroxide precipitation on anatase or rutile particles. The structure, morphology and chemical composition of the samples were characterized using XRD and XRF methods showing that the synthesized mixed oxides are the polydisperse materials of different phase composition containing TiO2, Mn2O3 and MnTiO3. The phase transformations and structure defects of the prepared compounds were characterized by FTIR, FT-FIR, FT-Raman spectroscopies. UV-VIS absorption spectra were investigated in 2,4÷6,0 eV region, and it was revealed that the presence of manganese oxides results in absorption increase and significant red shift of the ТМО absorption edge in comparison with pure TiO2. Photocatalytic activity of pure TiO2, Mn2+-doped TiO2 and ТМО during the photocatalytic decomposition of the safranine dye under UV irradiation was studied. A great improvement of photocatalytic activity is registered for Mn2+-doped TiO2 (anatase and rutile, and rutile-based ТМО sample.

  15. Diode laser heat treatment of lithium manganese oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proell, J., E-mail: johannes.proell@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kohler, R.; Mangang, A.; Ulrich, S.; Bruns, M.; Seifert, H.J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Pfleging, W. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility, H.-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Egg.-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of lithium manganese oxide thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on stainless steel substrates under 10 Pa argon pressure is demonstrated by a laser annealing technique. Laser annealing processes were developed as a function of annealing time and temperature with the objective to form an electrochemically active lithium manganese oxide cathode. It is demonstrated, that laser annealing with 940 nm diode laser radiation and an annealing time of 2000 s at 600 Degree-Sign C delivers appropriate parameters for formation of a crystalline spinel-like phase. Characteristic features of this phase could be detected via Raman spectroscopy, showing the characteristic main Raman band at 627 cm{sup -1}. Within cyclic voltammetric measurements, the two characteristic redox pairs for spinel lithium manganese oxide in the 4 V region could be detected, indicating that the film was well-crystallized and de-/intercalation processes were reversible. Raman post-analysis of a cycled cathode showed that the spinel-like structure was preserved within the cycling process but mechanical degradation effects such as film cracking were observed via scanning electron microscopy. Typical features for the formation of an additional surface reaction layer could be detected using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Autoradiography of manganese: accumulation and retention in the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyden, A.; Lindquist, N.G. (National Board of Health and Welfare, Department of Drugs, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Uppsala, Sweden); Larsson, B.S. (Department of Toxicology, University of Uppsala, Biomedical Center, Uppsala, Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    By means of whole-body autoradiography, the general distribution of /sup 54/MnCl/sub 2/ was studied in mice and a Marmoset monkey. High accumulation and retention were observed in the pancreas in both species. Gamma counting experiments in mice after a single intravenous injection of /sup 54/MnCl/sub 2/ showed that the level in the pancreas exceeded that of the liver at all survival times (20 min. - 30 days). Also in the monkey, the concentration in the pancreas exceeded that of the liver, and the pancreas had the highest tissue/liver ratio of the organs measured at 24 hours after injection. The high uptake and long retention in the pancreas suggest that manganese is of importance for the pancreatic function but also that the pancreas may be a target organ for manganese toxicity. Positron tomography, using /sup 11/C-labelled amino acids, has been found to be a promising diagnostic technique for the study of pancreatic disease. Positron emitting manganese isotopes may be worth further studies as possible agents for pancreatic imaging.

  17. Mercury distribution characteristics in primary manganese smelting plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Seung-Ki; Sung, Jin-Ho; Moon, Young-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hee; Seok, Kwang-Seol; Song, Geum-Ju; Seo, Yong-Chil

    2017-08-01

    The mercury (Hg) distribution characteristics were investigated in three primary manganese smelting plants in Korea for the assessment of anthropogenic Hg released. Input and output materials were sampled from each process, and Hg concentrations in the samples were analyzed. Among the input materials, the most mercury was found in the manganese ore (83.1-99.7%) and mercury was mainly released through fly ash or off gas, depending on the condition of off gas cleaning system. As off gas temperature decreases, proportion and concentration of emitted gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in off gas decreases. Based on mass balance study from these three plants and national manganese production data, the total amount of mercury released from those Korean plants was estimated to 644 kg/yr. About half of it was emitted into the air while the rest was released to waste as fly ash. With the results of this investigation, national inventory for Hg emission and release could be updated for the response to Minamata Convention on Mercury. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Characterization of Synthetic and Natural Manganese Oxides as Martian Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, V. K.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Carpenter, P. K.; Catalano, J. G.; Hinkle, M. A. G.; Morris, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of highly concentrated manganese oxides in Gale Crater and on the rim of Endeavour Crater by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity and Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, respectively, imply more highly oxidizing aqueous conditions than previously recognized. Manganese oxides are a significant environmental indicator about ancient aqueous conditions, provided the phases can be characterized reliably. Manganese oxides are typically fine-grained and poorly crystalline, making the mineral structures difficult to determine, and they generally have very low visible reflectance with few distinctive spectral features in the visible to near infrared, making them a challenge for interpretation from remote sensing data. Therefore, these recent discoveries motivate better characterization using methods available on Mars, particularly visible to near infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and compositional measurements. Both rovers have complementary instruments in this regard. Opportunity is equipped with its multispectral visible imager, Pancam, and an Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), and Curiosity has the multispectral Mastcam, ChemCam (laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and passive spectroscopy), and APXS for in situ characterization, and ChemMin (XRD) for collected samples.

  19. A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for Manganese 2016A historical overview of the development of manganese (Mn) pharmacokinetic data under Section 211(b) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)William K BoyesBackground. In the 1990’s, the use of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) as an octane-enhancing gasoline fuel additive led to concerns for potential public health consequences from exposure to Mn combustion products in automotive exhaust. Methods: After a series of regulatory / legal actions and negotiations, the EPA issued under CAA 211(b) an Alternative Tier 2 Test Rule that required development of scientific information intended to help resolve uncertainties in exposure or health risk estimates associated with MMT use. Among the uncertainties identified were: the chemical forms of Mn emitted in automotive exhaust; the relative toxicity of different Mn species; the potential for sensitive subpopulations including females, the young and elderly; differences in sensitivity between test species and humans; differences between inhalation and oral exposures; and the influence of dose rate and exposure duration on tissue accumulation of Mn. It was determined that development of specific sets of pharmacokinetic information and models regarding Mn could help resolve much of the uncertainties identified. Results. The results of the test program included development of several unique Mn PK datasets, and a series of increasingly sophisticated Mn physiologically-based pharmacokinetic

  20. BUILDING MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS BASED ON SILICON MANGANESE SLAGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Currently of particular relevance was given to the matter of introduction in manufacture of building materials and products, resource-saving techniques and technologies; integrated use of raw materials and materials that prevent or significantly reduce their harmful impact on the environment. This allows you to recycle hundreds of thousands of tons of the fiery liquid slags of silicon manganese and to develop effective structural materials that can replace metals, non-metallic building materials of natural origin, concretes, cast stone, plastics and refractories. Purpose. The study of the structure and properties of building materials and products from electric furnace slag of silicon manganese. Conclusion. Slags from the smelting of silicon manganese are classified as acidic. Their lime factor is in the range of 0.47–0.52. The composition of the slag located in the heterogeneous region SiO2 near the line of separation of cristobalite spread to the crystallization of wollastonite, according to the ternary system MnO-CaO-SiO2, which in consideration of their stability, allows the development of technology of building materials (gravel, sand, granulated slag, etc. and products (foundation blocks, road slabs, containers for transportation and storage of hazardous waste, and others.