WorldWideScience

Sample records for rtr process silicon

  1. Laser-zone Growth in a Ribbon-to-ribbon (RTR) Process Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, A.; Gurtler, R. W.; Legge, R.; Sopori, B.; Rice, M. J.; Ellis, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for growing limited-length ribbons continually was demonstrated. This Rigid Edge technique can be used to recrystallize about 95% of the polyribbon feedstock. A major advantage of this method is that only a single, constant length silicon ribbon is handled throughout the entire process sequence; this may be accomplished using cassettes similar to those presently in use for processing Czochralski waters. Thus a transition from Cz to ribbon technology can be smoothly affected. The maximum size being considered, 3 inches x 24 inches, is half a square foot, and will generate 6 watts for 12% efficiency at 1 sun. Silicon dioxide has been demonstrated as an effective, practical diffusion barrier for use during the polyribbon formation.

  2. Management of the acceptance process of RTR aluminide type spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auziere, P.; Thomasson, J.

    2002-01-01

    A wide range of Research Test Reactor aluminide type spent fuel is already received for treatment conditioning at the La Hague reprocessing complex. Such a diversity calls for an utmost attention to be paid to all safety-related systems and technical aspects, to all regulatory and administrative constraints. Despite of such multiple data inputs and rigid constraints, a close cooperation between the Research Reactor operator and COGEMA enables to reach adequate and cost effective solutions also relevant to spent fuel having had an uneven history. The acceptance process is primarily based on the client descriptive data and status declaration issued by the Research Reactor (RR) operator under QA. This acceptance process is a key step, to be keenly scheduled as it is directly interactive with the RR evacuation plans and the La Hague industrial plant program. It is also governed by the reviews conducted by the French Safety Authority and generally translated into operational authorisations. Concerned by maintaining high safety standards, reliable and proven operational levels of its nuclear services performed in the La Hague facilities COGEMA includes, all through this acceptance process, the operating, regulatory and administrative requirements. This paper sets forth an overview of the approach implemented in the COGEMA organisation for the management of the acceptance process of RTR aluminide type spent fuel. (author)

  3. Silicon Solar Cell Process Development, Fabrication and Analysis, Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, H. I.; Iles, P. A.; Tanner, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    Solar cells from RTR ribbons, EFG (RF and RH) ribbons, dendritic webs, Silso wafers, cast silicon by HEM, silicon on ceramic, and continuous Czochralski ingots were fabricated using a standard process typical of those used currently in the silicon solar cell industry. Back surface field (BSF) processing and other process modifications were included to give preliminary indications of possible improved performance. The parameters measured included open circuit voltage, short circuit current, curve fill factor, and conversion efficiency (all taken under AM0 illumination). Also measured for typical cells were spectral response, dark I-V characteristics, minority carrier diffusion length, and photoresponse by fine light spot scanning. the results were compared to the properties of cells made from conventional single crystalline Czochralski silicon with an emphasis on statistical evaluation. Limited efforts were made to identify growth defects which will influence solar cell performance.

  4. Silicon integrated circuit process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Duck

    1985-12-01

    This book introduces the process of silicon integrated circuit. It is composed of seven parts, which are oxidation process, diffusion process, ion implantation process such as ion implantation equipment, damage, annealing and influence on manufacture of integrated circuit and device, chemical vapor deposition process like silicon Epitaxy LPCVD and PECVD, photolithography process, including a sensitizer, spin, harden bake, reflection of light and problems related process, infrared light bake, wet-etch, dry etch, special etch and problems of etching, metal process like metal process like metal-silicon connection, aluminum process, credibility of aluminum and test process.

  5. Silicon integrated circuit process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Duck

    1985-12-15

    This book introduces the process of silicon integrated circuit. It is composed of seven parts, which are oxidation process, diffusion process, ion implantation process such as ion implantation equipment, damage, annealing and influence on manufacture of integrated circuit and device, chemical vapor deposition process like silicon Epitaxy LPCVD and PECVD, photolithography process, including a sensitizer, spin, harden bake, reflection of light and problems related process, infrared light bake, wet-etch, dry etch, special etch and problems of etching, metal process like metal process like metal-silicon connection, aluminum process, credibility of aluminum and test process.

  6. Silicon web process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  7. Silicon etch process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.J.; White, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A silicon etch process wherein an area of silicon crystal surface is passivated by radiation damage and non-planar structure produced by subsequent anisotropic etching. The surface may be passivated by exposure to an energetic particle flux - for example an ion beam from an arsenic, boron, phosphorus, silicon or hydrogen source, or an electron beam. Radiation damage may be used for pattern definition and/or as an etch stop. Ethylenediamine pyrocatechol or aqueous potassium hydroxide anisotropic etchants may be used. The radiation damage may be removed after etching by thermal annealing. (author)

  8. Impurity doping processes in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, FFY

    1981-01-01

    This book introduces to non-experts several important processes of impurity doping in silicon and goes on to discuss the methods of determination of the concentration of dopants in silicon. The conventional method used is the discussion process, but, since it has been sufficiently covered in many texts, this work describes the double-diffusion method.

  9. Silicon processing for photovoltaics II

    CERN Document Server

    Khattak, CP

    2012-01-01

    The processing of semiconductor silicon for manufacturing low cost photovoltaic products has been a field of increasing activity over the past decade and a number of papers have been published in the technical literature. This volume presents comprehensive, in-depth reviews on some of the key technologies developed for processing silicon for photovoltaic applications. It is complementary to Volume 5 in this series and together they provide the only collection of reviews in silicon photovoltaics available.The volume contains papers on: the effect of introducing grain boundaries in silicon; the

  10. Process for making silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  11. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing

    1997-01-01

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T.sub.2 gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon.

  12. Simulation of atomistic processes during silicon oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Bongiorno, Angelo

    2003-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) films grown on silicon monocrystal (Si) substrates form the gate oxides in current Si-based microelectronics devices. The understanding at the atomic scale of both the silicon oxidation process and the properties of the Si(100)-SiO2 interface is of significant importance in state-of-the-art silicon microelectronics manufacturing. These two topics are intimately coupled and are both addressed in this theoretical investigation mainly through first-principles calculations....

  13. Broadband Nonlinear Signal Processing in Silicon Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Pu, Minhao; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    The fast non-linearity of silicon allows Tbit/s optical signal processing. By choosing suitable dimensions of silicon nanowires their dispersion can be tailored to ensure a high nonlinearity at power levels low enough to avoid significant two-photon abso We have fabricated low insertion...

  14. RTR spent fuel treatment and final waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.

    2000-01-01

    A number of RTR operators have chosen in the past to send their spent fuel to the US in the framework of the US take back program. However, this possibility ends as of May 12th, 2006. 3 different strategies are left for managing RTR spent fuel: extended storage, direct disposal and treatment-conditioning through reprocessing. Whilst former strategies raise a number of uncertainties, the latter already offers a management solution. It features two advantages. It benefits from the long experience of existing flexible industrial facilities from countries like France. Secondly, it offers a dramatic volume reduction of the ultimate waste to be stored under well-characterized, stable and durable forms. RTR spent fuel management through reprocessing-conditioning offers a durable management solution that can be fully integrated in whatever global radioactive waste management policy, including ultimate disposal

  15. Boro Silicate Glass: The proven Conditioning of RTR ultimate Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartagnon, O.; Petitjean, V.

    2002-01-01

    The possibility to dispose of the RTR spent fuel in a geological repository is neither internationally foreseen nor seems realistic. This due to degradation phenomena and possible criticality incidents. The conditioning by reprocessing is the only solution for back end management of TRT spent fuels

  16. Ultrafast Nonlinear Signal Processing in Silicon Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Hu, Hao

    2012-01-01

    We describe recent demonstrations of exploiting highly nonlinear silicon waveguides for ultrafast optical signal processing. We describe wavelength conversion and serial-to-parallel conversion of 640 Gbit/s data signals and 1.28 Tbit/s demultiplexing and all-optical sampling.......We describe recent demonstrations of exploiting highly nonlinear silicon waveguides for ultrafast optical signal processing. We describe wavelength conversion and serial-to-parallel conversion of 640 Gbit/s data signals and 1.28 Tbit/s demultiplexing and all-optical sampling....

  17. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  18. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  19. A durable and dependable solution for RTR spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.

    1999-01-01

    RTR Operators need efficient and cost-effective services for the management of their spent fuel and this, for the full lifetime of their facility. Thanks to the integration of transport, reprocessing and conditioning services, COGEMA provides a cogent solution, with the utmost respect for safety and preservation of the environment, for the short, medium and long terms. As demonstrated in this paper, this option offers the only durable and dependable solution for the RTR spent fuel management, leading to a conditioning for the final residues directly suitable for final disposal. The main advantage of such an option is obviously the significant reduction in terms of volume and radiotoxicity of the ultimate waste when compared to direct disposal of spent fuels. The efficiency of such a solution has been proven, some RTR operators having already trusted COGEMA for the management of their aluminide fuel. With its commitment in R and D activities for the development of a high performance and reprocessable LEU fuels, COGEMA will be able to propose a solution for all types of fuels, HEU and LEU

  20. The RTR complex as caretaker of genome stability and its unique meiotic function in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eKnoll

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The RTR complex consisting of a RecQ helicase, a type IA topoisomerase and the structural protein RMI1 is involved in the processing of DNA recombination intermediates in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana the complex partners RECQ4A, topoisomerase 3α and RMI1 have been shown to be involved in DNA repair and in the suppression of homologous recombination (HR in somatic cells. Interestingly, mutants of AtTOP3A and AtRMI1 are also sterile due to extensive chromosome breakage in meiosis I, a phenotype that seems to be specific for plants. Although both proteins are essential for meiotic recombination it is still elusive on what kind of intermediates they are acting on. Recent data indicate that the pattern of non-crossover (NCO-associated meiotic gene conversion (GC differs between plants and other eukaryotes, as less NCOs in comparison to crossovers (CO could be detected in Arabidopsis. This indicates that NCOs happen either more rarely in plants or that the conversion tract length is significantly shorter than in other organisms. As the TOP3α/RMI1-mediated dissolution of recombination intermediates results exclusively in NCOs, we suggest that the peculiar GC pattern found in plants is connected to the unique role, members of the RTR complex play in plant meiosis.

  1. Materials issues in silicon integrated circuit processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmer, M.; Stimmell, J.; Strathman, M.

    1986-01-01

    The symposium on ''Materials Issues in Integrated Circuit Processing'' sought to bring together all of the materials issued pertinent to modern integrated circuit processing. The inherent properties of the materials are becoming an important concern in integrated circuit manufacturing and accordingly research in materials science is vital for the successful implementation of modern integrated circuit technology. The session on Silicon Materials Science revealed the advanced stage of knowledge which topics such as point defects, intrinsic and extrinsic gettering and diffusion kinetics have achieved. Adaption of this knowledge to specific integrated circuit processing technologies is beginning to be addressed. The session on Epitaxy included invited papers on epitaxial insulators and IR detectors. Heteroepitaxy on silicon is receiving great attention and the results presented in this session suggest that 3-d integrated structures are an increasingly realistic possibility. Progress in low temperature silicon epitaxy and epitaxy of thin films with abrupt interfaces was also reported. Diffusion and Ion Implantation were well presented. Regrowth of implant-damaged layers and the nature of the defects which remain after regrowth were discussed in no less than seven papers. Substantial progress was also reported in the understanding of amorphising boron implants and the use of gallium implants for the formation of shallow p/sup +/ -layers

  2. Reprocessing RTR fuel in the La Hague plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.; Drain, F.; David, A.

    2001-01-01

    Starting in 2006, research reactors operators will be fully responsible for the back-end management of their spent fuel. It appears that the only solution for this management is treatment-conditioning, which could be done at the La Hague reprocessing complex in France. The fissile material can be separated in the reprocessing plants and the final waste can be encapsulated in a matrix adapted to its potential hazards. RTR reprocessing at La Hague would require some modifications, since the plant had been primarily designed to reprocess fuel from light water reactors. Many provisions have been taken at the plant design stage, however, and the modifications would be feasible even during active operations, as was done from 1993 to 1995 when a new liquid waste management was implemented, and when one of the two vitrification facilities was improved. To achieve RTR back-end management, COGEMA and its partners are also conducting R and D to define a new generation of LEU fuel with performance characteristics approximating those of HEU fuel. This new-generation fuel would be easier to reprocess. (author)

  3. Reprocessing RTR fuel in the La Hague plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasson, J. [Cogema, F-78140 Velizy (France); Drain, F.; David, A. [SGN, F-78182 Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2001-07-01

    Starting in 2006, research reactors operators will be fully responsible for the back-end management of their spent fuel. It appears that the only solution for this management is treatment-conditioning, which could be done at the La Hague reprocessing complex in France. The fissile material can be separated in the reprocessing plants and the final waste can be encapsulated in a matrix adapted to its potential hazards. RTR reprocessing at La Hague would require some modifications, since the plant had been primarily designed to reprocess fuel from light water reactors. Many provisions have been taken at the plant design stage, however, and the modifications would be feasible even during active operations, as was done from 1993 to 1995 when a new liquid waste management was implemented, and when one of the two vitrification facilities was improved. To achieve RTR back-end management, COGEMA and its partners are also conducting R and D to define a new generation of LEU fuel with performance characteristics approximating those of HEU fuel. This new-generation fuel would be easier to reprocess. (author)

  4. Reprocessing RTR fuel in the La Hague plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasson, J. [Cogema, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France); Drain, F.; David, A. [SGN, 78 - Saint Quentin en Yveline (France)

    2001-07-01

    Starting in 2006, research reactors operators will be fully responsible for their research and testing reactors spent fuel back-end management. It appears that the only solution for this management is treatment-conditioning, which could be done at the La Hague reprocessing complex in France. The fissile material can be separated in the reprocessing plants and the final waste can be encapsulated in a matrix adapted to its potential hazards. RTR reprocessing at La Hague would require some modifications, since the plant had been primarily designed to reprocess fuel from light water reactors. Many provisions have been taken at the plant design stage, however, and the modifications would be feasible even during active operations, as was done from 1993 to 1995 when a new liquid waste management was implemented, and when one of the two vitrification facilities was improved. To achieve RTR back-end management, COGEMA and its partners are also conducting R and D to define a new generation of LEU fuel with performance characteristics approximating those of HEU fuel. This new-generation fuel would be easier to reprocess. (author)

  5. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrysalline silicon solar cell research are summarized. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  6. Low cost silicon solar array project large area silicon sheet task: Silicon web process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Blais, P. D.; Davis, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Growth configurations were developed which produced crystals having low residual stress levels. The properties of a 106 mm diameter round crucible were evaluated and it was found that this design had greatly enhanced temperature fluctuations arising from convection in the melt. Thermal modeling efforts were directed to developing finite element models of the 106 mm round crucible and an elongated susceptor/crucible configuration. Also, the thermal model for the heat loss modes from the dendritic web was examined for guidance in reducing the thermal stress in the web. An economic analysis was prepared to evaluate the silicon web process in relation to price goals.

  7. Silicon wafers for integrated circuit process

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy , B.

    1986-01-01

    Silicon as a substrate material will continue to dominate the market of integrated circuits for many years. We first review how crystal pulling procedures impact the quality of silicon. We then investigate how thermal treatments affect the behaviour of oxygen and carbon, and how, as a result, the quality of silicon wafers evolves. Gettering techniques are then presented. We conclude by detailing the requirements that wafers must satisfy at the incoming inspection.

  8. Porous siliconformation and etching process for use in silicon micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Kelly, Michael J.; Martin, Jr., Samuel B.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    A reproducible process for uniformly etching silicon from a series of micromechanical structures used in electrical devices and the like includes providing a micromechanical structure having a silicon layer with defined areas for removal thereon and an electrochemical cell containing an aqueous hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. The micromechanical structure is submerged in the electrochemical cell and the defined areas of the silicon layer thereon are anodically biased by passing a current through the electrochemical cell for a time period sufficient to cause the defined areas of the silicon layer to become porous. The formation of the depth of the porous silicon is regulated by controlling the amount of current passing through the electrochemical cell. The micromechanical structure is then removed from the electrochemical cell and submerged in a hydroxide solution to remove the porous silicon. The process is subsequently repeated for each of the series of micromechanical structures to achieve a reproducibility better than 0.3%.

  9. Process development for high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, J.M.; Basore, P.A.; Buck, M.E.; Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Silva, B.L.; Tingley, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    Fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells in an industrial environment requires a different optimization than in a laboratory environment. Strategies are presented for process development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells, with a goal of simplifying technology transfer into an industrial setting. The strategies emphasize the use of statistical experimental design for process optimization, and the use of baseline processes and cells for process monitoring and quality control. 8 refs.

  10. Laser process for extended silicon thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessmann, M.T.; Kunz, T.; Burkert, I.; Gawehns, N.; Schaefer, L.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.; Meidel, B.; Auer, R.; Brabec, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a large area thin film base substrate for the epitaxy of crystalline silicon. The concept of epitaxial growth of silicon on large area thin film substrates overcomes the area restrictions of an ingot based monocrystalline silicon process. Further it opens the possibility for a roll to roll process for crystalline silicon production. This concept suggests a technical pathway to overcome the limitations of silicon ingot production in terms of costs, throughput and completely prevents any sawing losses. The core idea behind these thin film substrates is a laser welding process of individual, thin silicon wafers. In this manuscript we investigate the properties of laser welded monocrystalline silicon foils (100) by micro-Raman mapping and spectroscopy. It is shown that the laser beam changes the crystalline structure of float zone grown silicon along the welding seam. This is illustrated by Raman mapping which visualizes compressive stress as well as tensile stress in a range of - 147.5 to 32.5 MPa along the welding area.

  11. Nonlinear Silicon Photonic Signal Processing Devices for Future Optical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Lacava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a review on silicon-based nonlinear devices for all optical nonlinear processing of complex telecommunication signals. We discuss some recent developments achieved by our research group, through extensive collaborations with academic partners across Europe, on optical signal processing using silicon-germanium and amorphous silicon based waveguides as well as novel materials such as silicon rich silicon nitride and tantalum pentoxide. We review the performance of four wave mixing wavelength conversion applied on complex signals such as Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK, Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK, 16-Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM and 64-QAM that dramatically enhance the telecom signal spectral efficiency, paving the way to next generation terabit all-optical networks.

  12. Structural modification of silicon during the formation process of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Palma, R.J.; Pascual, L.; Landa-Canovas, A.R.; Herrero, P.; Martinez-Duart, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Direct examination of porous silicon (PS) by the use of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) allowed us to perform a deep insight into the formation mechanisms of this material. In particular, the structure of the PS/Si interface and that of the silicon nanocrystals that compose porous silicon were analyzed in detail. Furthermore, image processing was used to study in detail the structure of PS. The mechanism of PS formation and lattice matching between the PS layer and the Si substrate is analyzed and discussed. Finally, a formation mechanism for PS based on the experimental observations is proposed

  13. Linear signal processing using silicon micro-ring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Ding, Yunhong; Ou, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    We review our recent achievements on the use of silicon micro-ring resonators for linear optical signal processing applications, including modulation format conversion, phase-to-intensity modulation conversion and waveform shaping.......We review our recent achievements on the use of silicon micro-ring resonators for linear optical signal processing applications, including modulation format conversion, phase-to-intensity modulation conversion and waveform shaping....

  14. Microcrystalline silicon deposition: Process stability and process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donker, M.N. van den; Kilper, T.; Grunsky, D.; Rech, B.; Houben, L.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Sanden, M.C.M. van de

    2007-01-01

    Applying in situ process diagnostics, we identified several process drifts occurring in the parallel plate plasma deposition of microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H). These process drifts are powder formation (visible from diminishing dc-bias and changing spatial emission profile on a time scale of 10 0 s), transient SiH 4 depletion (visible from a decreasing SiH emission intensity on a time scale of 10 2 s), plasma heating (visible from an increasing substrate temperature on a time scale of 10 3 s) and a still puzzling long-term drift (visible from a decreasing SiH emission intensity on a time scale of 10 4 s). The effect of these drifts on the crystalline volume fraction in the deposited films is investigated by selected area electron diffraction and depth-profiled Raman spectroscopy. An example shows how the transient depletion and long-term drift can be prevented by suitable process control. Solar cells deposited using this process control show enhanced performance. Options for process control of plasma heating and powder formation are discussed

  15. Optical signal processing by silicon photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Jameel; Adeel, Freeha; Hussain, Ashiq

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this book is to make respective graduate students understand the nonlinear effects inside SOI waveguide and possible applications of SOI waveguides in this emerging research area of optical fibre communication. This book focuses on achieving successful optical frequency shifting by Four Wave Mixing (FWM) in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide by exploiting a nonlinear phenomenon.

  16. Process for forming a porous silicon member in a crystalline silicon member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M. Allen; Yu, Conrad M.; Raley, Norman F.

    1999-01-01

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  17. Silicon Quantum Dots for Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    S. Lai, C. Tahan, A. Morello and A. S. Dzurak, Electron Spin lifetimes in multi-valley sil- icon quantum dots, S3NANO Winter School Few spin solid...lifetimes in multi-valley sil- icon quantum dots, International Workshop on Silicon Quantum Electronics, Grenoble, France, February 2012 (Poster). C...typically plunger gates), PMMA A5 is spun at 5000 rpm for 30 seconds, resulting in a 280 nm resist thickness. The resists are baked for 90 seconds at 180

  18. Development of low cost silicon solar cells by reusing the silicon saw dust collected during wafering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, Z.I.; Raza, B.; Ahmed, M.; Sheikh, H.; Qazi, I.A.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon material due to its abundance in nature and maximum conversion efficiency has been successfully being used for the fabrication of electronic and photovoltaic devices such as ICs, diodes, transistors and solar cells. The 80% of the semiconductor industry is ruled by silicon material. Single crystal silicon solar cells are in use for both space and terrestrial application, due to the well developed technology and better efficiency than polycrystalline and amorphous silicon solar cells. The current research work is an attempt to reduce the cost of single crystal silicon solar cells by reusing the silicon saw dust obtained during the watering process. During the watering process about 45% Si material is wasted in the form of Si powder dust. Various waste powder silicon samples were analyzed using inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) technique, for metallic impurities critical for solar grade silicon material. The results were evaluated from impurity and cost point of view. (author)

  19. Ultra-high-speed Optical Signal Processing using Silicon Photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Ji, Hua; Jensen, Asger Sellerup

    with a photonic layer on top to interconnect them. For such systems, silicon is an attractive candidate enabling both electronic and photonic control. For some network scenarios, it may be beneficial to use optical on-chip packet switching, and for high data-density environments one may take advantage...... of the ultra-fast nonlinear response of silicon photonic waveguides. These chips offer ultra-broadband wavelength operation, ultra-high timing resolution and ultra-fast response, and when used appropriately offer energy-efficient switching. In this presentation we review some all-optical functionalities based...... on silicon photonics. In particular we use nano-engineered silicon waveguides (nanowires) [1] enabling efficient phasematched four-wave mixing (FWM), cross-phase modulation (XPM) or self-phase modulation (SPM) for ultra-high-speed optical signal processing of ultra-high bit rate serial data signals. We show...

  20. The processing and potential applications of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syyuan Shieh.

    1992-07-01

    Stability of a cylindrical pore under the influence of surface energy is important for porous silicon (PS) processing in the integrated circuit industry. Once the zig-zag cylindrical pores of porous silicon or oxidized porous silicon (OPS) are unstable and breakup into rows of isolated spherical pores, oxidation of PS and densification/nitridation of OPS become difficult. Swing to difficulty transport of reactant gas (O{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}) or the trapped gas (for densification of OPS). A first order analysis of the stability of a cylindrical pore or cylinder is considered first. Growth of small sinusoidal perturbations by viscous flow or evaporation/condensation result in dependence of perturbation growth rate on perturbation wavelength. Rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) of porous silicon is proposed as an alternative for the tedious two-step 300 and 800C oxidation process. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy ESCA are used for quality control. Also, rapid thermal nitridation of oxidized porous silicon in ammonia is proposed to enhance OPS resistance to HF solution. Pores breakup of OPS results in a trapped gas problem during densification. Wet helium is proposed as OPS densification ambient gas to shorten densification time. Finally, PS is proposed to be an extrinsic gettering center in silicon wafers. The suppression of oxidation-induced stacking faults is used to demonstrate the gettering ability. Possible mechanism is discussed.

  1. The processing and potential applications of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, Syyuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Stability of a cylindrical pore under the influence of surface energy is important for porous silicon (PS) processing in the integrated circuit industry. Once the zig-zag cylindrical pores of porous silicon or oxidized porous silicon (OPS) are unstable and breakup into rows of isolated spherical pores, oxidation of PS and densification/nitridation of OPS become difficult. Swing to difficulty transport of reactant gas (O2, NH3) or the trapped gas (for densification of OPS). A first order analysis of the stability of a cylindrical pore or cylinder is considered first. Growth of small sinusoidal perturbations by viscous flow or evaporation/condensation result in dependence of perturbation growth rate on perturbation wavelength. Rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) of porous silicon is proposed as an alternative for the tedious two-step 300 and 800C oxidation process. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy ESCA are used for quality control. Also, rapid thermal nitridation of oxidized porous silicon in ammonia is proposed to enhance OPS resistance to HF solution. Pores breakup of OPS results in a trapped gas problem during densification. Wet helium is proposed as OPS densification ambient gas to shorten densification time. Finally, PS is proposed to be an extrinsic gettering center in silicon wafers. The suppression of oxidation-induced stacking faults is used to demonstrate the gettering ability. Possible mechanism is discussed.

  2. Effect of Processing Parameters on Thickness of Columnar Structured Silicon Wafers Directly Grown from Silicon Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Seok Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain optimum growth conditions for desired thickness and more effective silicon feedstock usage, effects of processing parameters such as preheated substrate temperatures, time intervals, moving velocity of substrates, and Ar gas blowing rates on silicon ribbon thickness were investigated in the horizontal growth process. Most of the parameters strongly affected in the control of ribbon thickness with columnar grain structure depended on the solidification rate. The thickness of the silicon ribbon decreased with an increasing substrate temperature, decreasing time interval, and increasing moving velocity of the substrate. However, the blowing of Ar gas onto a liquid layer existing on the surface of solidified ribbon contributed to achieving smooth surface roughness but did not closely affect the change of ribbon thickness in the case of a blowing rate of ≥0.65 Nm3/h because the thickness of the solidified layer was already determined by the exit height of the reservoir.

  3. Simple processing of high efficiency silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamammu, I.M.; Ibrahim, K.

    2006-01-01

    Cost effective photovoltaic devices have been an area research since the development of the first solar cells, as cost is the major factor in their usage. Silicon solar cells have the biggest share in the photovoltaic market, though silicon os not the optimal material for solar cells. This work introduces a simplified approach for high efficiency silicon solar cell processing, by minimizing the processing steps and thereby reducing cost. The suggested procedure might also allow for the usage of lower quality materials compared to the one used today. The main features of the present work fall into: simplifying the diffusion process, edge shunt isolation and using acidic texturing instead of the standard alkaline processing. Solar cells of 17% efficiency have been produced using this procedure. Investigations on the possibility of improving the efficiency and using less quality material are still underway

  4. Low energy production processes in manufacturing of silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion implantation and pulsed energy techniques are being combined for fabrication of silicon solar cells totally under vacuum and at room temperature. Simplified sequences allow very short processing times with small process energy consumption. Economic projections for fully automated production are excellent.

  5. All-Optical Signal Processing using Silicon Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Pu, Minhao; Ding, Yunhong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent wo rk on the use of silicon waveguides for processing optical data signals. We will describe ultra-fast, ultra-broadband, polarisation-insensitive and phase-sensitive applications including processing of spectrally-efficient data formats and optical phase...

  6. CURVES AND AESTHETIC SURFACES GENERATED BY THE R-R-RTR MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana LUCA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Let’s consider a mechanism having two driving elements with revolving movements and a RTR dyad, with elements of null length and aesthetic tracks of a point are determined on a rod, for various linear movement laws of driving elements. The generated curves revolve around x and y axes and aesthetic surfaces result.

  7. Evaluation of U-Zr hydride fuel for a thorium fuel cycle in an RTR concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Taek; Cho, Nam Zin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, we performed a design study of a thorium fueled reactor according to the design concept of the Radkowsky Thorium Reactor (RTR) and evaluated its overall performance. To enhance its performance and alleviate its problems, we introduced a new metallic uranium fuel, uranium-zirconium hydride (U-ZrH{sub 1.6}), as a seed fuel. For comparison, typical ABB/CE-type PWR based on SYSTEM 80+and standard RTR-type thorium reactor were also studied. From the results of performance analysis, we could ascertain advantages of RTR-type thorium fueled reactor in proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and back-end fuel cycle. Also, we found that enhancement of proliferation resistance and safer operating conditions may be achieved by using the U-ZrH{sub 1.6} fuel in the seed region without additional penalties in comparison with the standard RTR`s U-Zr fuel. 6 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of U-Zr hydride fuel for a thorium fuel cycle in an RTR concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Taek; Cho, Nam Zin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    In this paper, we performed a design study of a thorium fueled reactor according to the design concept of the Radkowsky Thorium Reactor (RTR) and evaluated its overall performance. To enhance its performance and alleviate its problems, we introduced a new metallic uranium fuel, uranium-zirconium hydride (U-ZrH{sub 1.6}), as a seed fuel. For comparison, typical ABB/CE-type PWR based on SYSTEM 80+and standard RTR-type thorium reactor were also studied. From the results of performance analysis, we could ascertain advantages of RTR-type thorium fueled reactor in proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, and back-end fuel cycle. Also, we found that enhancement of proliferation resistance and safer operating conditions may be achieved by using the U-ZrH{sub 1.6} fuel in the seed region without additional penalties in comparison with the standard RTR`s U-Zr fuel. 6 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  9. Ultra-Fast Optical Signal Processing in Nonlinear Silicon Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Galili, Michael; Pu, Minhao

    2011-01-01

    We describe recent demonstrations of exploiting highly nonlinear silicon nanowires for processing Tbit/s optical data signals. We perform demultiplexing and optical waveform sampling of 1.28 Tbit/s and wavelength conversion of 640 Gbit/s data signals.......We describe recent demonstrations of exploiting highly nonlinear silicon nanowires for processing Tbit/s optical data signals. We perform demultiplexing and optical waveform sampling of 1.28 Tbit/s and wavelength conversion of 640 Gbit/s data signals....

  10. Phase-sensitive optical processing in silicon waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petermann, Klaus; Gajda, A.; Dziallas, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Parametric optical signal processing is reviewed for silicon nano-rib-waveguides with a reverse-biased pin-junction. Phase-sensitive parametric amplification with a phase-sensitive extinction of more than 20 dB has been utilized for the regeneration of DPSK signals...

  11. Process research of non-CZ silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced processing techniques for non-CZ silicon sheet material that might improve the cost effectiveness of photovoltaic module production were investigated. Specifically, the simultaneous diffusion of liquid boron and liquid phosphorus organometallic precursors into n-type dendritic silicon web was examined. The simultaneous junction formation method for solar cells was compared with the sequential junction formation method. The electrical resistivity of the n-n and p-n junctions was discussed. Further research activities for this program along with a program documentation schedule are given.

  12. LSSA large area silicon sheet task continuous Czochralski process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, S. N.

    1978-01-01

    A Czochralski crystal growing furnace was converted to a continuous growth facility by installation of a premelter to provide molten silicon flow into the primary crucible. The basic furnace is operational and several trial crystals were grown in the batch mode. Numerous premelter configurations were tested both in laboratory-scale equipment as well as in the actual furnace. The best arrangement tested to date is a vertical, cylindrical graphite heater containing small fused silicon test tube liner in which the incoming silicon is melted and flows into the primary crucible. Economic modeling of the continuous Czochralski process indicates that for 10 cm diameter crystal, 100 kg furnace runs of four or five crystals each are near-optimal. Costs tend to asymptote at the 100 kg level so little additional cost improvement occurs at larger runs. For these conditions, crystal cost in equivalent wafer area of around $20/sq m exclusive of polysilicon and slicing was obtained.

  13. Amorphous silicon batch process cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whisnant, R.A.; Sherring, C.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the development of baseline manufacturing cost data to assist PVMaT monitoring teams in assessing current and future subcontracts, which an emphasis on commercialization and production. A process for the manufacture of a single-junction, large-area, a Si module was modeled using an existing Research Triangle Institute (RTI) computer model. The model estimates a required, or breakeven, price for the module based on its production process and the financial structure of the company operating the process. Sufficient detail on cost drivers is presented so the relationship of the process features and business characteristics can be related to the estimated required price

  14. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program: implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security

  15. Energy and exergy analysis of the silicon production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takla, M.; Kamfjord, N.E.; Tveit, Halvard; Kjelstrup, S.

    2013-01-01

    We used energy and exergy analysis to evaluate two industrial and one ideal (theoretical) production process for silicon. The industrial processes were considered in the absence and presence of power production from waste heat in the off-gas. The theoretical process, with pure reactants and no side-reactions, was used to provide a more realistic upper limit of performance for the others. The energy analysis documented the large thermal energy source in the off-gas system, while the exergy analysis documented the potential for efficiency improvement. We found an exergetic efficiency equal to 0.33 ± 0.02 for the process without power production. The value increased to 0.41 ± 0.03 when waste heat was utilized. For the ideal process, we found an exergetic efficiency of 0.51. Utilization of thermal exergy in an off-gas of 800 °C increased this exergetic efficiency to 0.71. Exergy destructed due to combustion of by-product gases and exergy lost with the furnace off-gas were the largest contributors to the thermodynamic inefficiency of all processes. - Highlights: • The exergetic efficiency for an industrial silicon production process when silicon is the only product was estimated to 0.33. • With additional power production from thermal energy in the off-gas we estimated the exergetic efficiency to 0.41. • The theoretical silicon production process is established as the reference case. • Exergy lost with the off-gas and exergy destructed due to combustion account for roughly 75% of the total losses. • With utilization of the thermal exergy in the off-gas at a temperature of 800 °C the exergetic efficiency was 0.71

  16. Process Research ON Semix Silicon Materials (PROSSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Warfield, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    A cost effective process sequence was identified, equipment was designed to implement a 6.6 MW per year automated production line, and a cost analysis projected a $0.56 per watt cell add-on cost for this line. Four process steps were developed for this program: glass beads back clean-up, hot spray antireflective coating, wave soldering of fronts, and ion milling for edging. While spray dopants were advertised as an off the shelf developed product, they were unreliable with shorter than advertised shelf life.

  17. Ion beams in silicon processing and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chason, E.; Picraux, S.T.; Poate, J.M.; Borland, J.O.; Current, M.I.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Eaglesham, D.J.; Holland, O.W.; Law, M.E.; Magee, C.W.; Mayer, J.W.; Melngailis, J.; Tasch, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    General trends in integrated circuit technology toward smaller device dimensions, lower thermal budgets, and simplified processing steps present severe physical and engineering challenges to ion implantation. These challenges, together with the need for physically based models at exceedingly small dimensions, are leading to a new level of understanding of fundamental defect science in Si. In this article, we review the current status and future trends in ion implantation of Si at low and high energies with particular emphasis on areas where recent advances have been made and where further understanding is needed. Particularly interesting are the emerging approaches to defect and dopant distribution modeling, transient enhanced diffusion, high energy implantation and defect accumulation, and metal impurity gettering. Developments in the use of ion beams for analysis indicate much progress has been made in one-dimensional analysis, but that severe challenges for two-dimensional characterization remain. The breadth of ion beams in the semiconductor industry is illustrated by the successful use of focused beams for machining and repair, and the development of ion-based lithographic systems. This suite of ion beam processing, modeling, and analysis techniques will be explored both from the perspective of the emerging science issues and from the technological challenges. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Process research on non-CZ silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    High risk, high payoff research areas associated with he process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-CZ sheet material are investigated. All investigations are being performed using dendritic web silicon, but all processes are directly applicable to other ribbon forms of sheet material. The technical feasibility of forming front and back junctions in non-CZ silicon using liquid dopant techniques was determined. Numerous commercially available liquid phosphorus and boron dopant solutions are investigated. Temperature-time profiles to achieve N(+) and P(+) sheet resistivities of 60 + or - 10 and 40 + or - s10 ohms per square centimeter respectively are established. A study of the optimal method of liquid dopant application is performed. The technical feasibility of forming a liquid applied diffusion mask to replace the more costly chemical vapor deposited SiO2 diffusion mask was also determined.

  19. Process research of non-Czochralski silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous diffusion of liquid precursors containing phosphorus and boron into dendritic web silicon to form solar cell structures was investigated. A simultaneous junction formation techniques was developed. It was determined that to produce high quality cells, an annealing cycle (nominal 800 C for 30 min) should follow the diffusion process to anneal quenched-in defects. Two ohm-cm n-base cells were fabricated with efficiencies greater than 15%. A cost analysis indicated that the simultansous diffusion process costs can be as low as 65% of the costs of the sequential diffusion process.

  20. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  1. Transient processes induced by heavy projectiles in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, Ionel; Lazanu, Sorina

    2010-01-01

    The thermal spike model developed for the electronic stopping power regime is extended to consider both ionization and nuclear energy loss processes of the projectile as electronic and atomic heat distinct sources. The time and space dependencies of the lattice and electron temperatures near the projectile trajectory are calculated and discussed for different ions in silicon, at room and cryogenic temperatures, taking into account the peculiarities of electron-phonon interaction in both domains. The model developed contributes to the understanding of transient microscopic processes immediately after the projectile interaction in the target.

  2. Silicon analog components device design, process integration, characterization, and reliability

    CERN Document Server

    El-Kareh, Badih

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern analog components, their characteristics, and interactions with process parameters. It serves as a comprehensive guide, addressing both the theoretical and practical aspects of modern silicon devices and the relationship between their electrical properties and processing conditions. Based on the authors’ extensive experience in the development of analog devices, this book is intended for engineers and scientists in semiconductor research, development and manufacturing. The problems at the end of each chapter and the numerous charts, figures and tables also make it appropriate for use as a text in graduate and advanced undergraduate courses in electrical engineering and materials science.

  3. Plasma processing of microcrystalline silicon films : filling in the gaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronneberg, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si:H) is a mixed-phase material consisting of crystalline silicon grains, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) tissue, and voids. Microcrystalline silicon is extensively used as absorber layer in thin-film tandem solar cells, combining the advantages of a

  4. Surface morphology evolution in silicon during ion beam processing; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedrossian P; Caturla, M; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Johnson, M

    1999-01-01

    The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) projects that the semiconductor chips used in personal computers and scientific workstations will reach five times the speed and ten times the memory capacity of the current pentium-class processor by the year 2007. However, 1 GHz on-chip clock speeds and 64 Gbits/Chip DRAM technology will not come easy and without a price. Such technologies will require scaling the minimum feature size of CMOS devices (the transistors in the silicon chip) down to below 100nm from the current 180 to 250 nm. This requirement has profound implications for device manufacturing. Existing processing techniques must increasingly be understood quantitatively and modeled with unprecedented precision. Indeed, revolutionary advances in the development of physics-based process simulation tools will be required to achieve the goals for cost efficient manufacturing, and to satisfy the needs of the defense industrial base. These advances will necessitate a fundamental improvement in our basic understanding of microstructure evolution during processing. In order to cut development time and costs, the semiconductor industry makes extensive use of simple models of dopant implantation, and of phenomenological models of defect annealing and diffusion. However, the production of a single device often requires more than 200 processing steps, and the cumulative effects of the various steps are far too complex to be treated with these models. The lack of accurate process modeling simulators is proving to be a serious impediment to the development of next generation devices. New atomic-level models are required to describe the point defect distributions produced by the implantation process, and the defect and dopant diffusion resulting from rapid thermal annealing steps. In this LDRD project, we investigated the migration kinetics of defects and dopants in silicon both experimentally and theoretically to provide a fundamental database for use in the development

  5. Process Development in the Preparation and Characterization of Silicon Alkoxide From Rice Husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khin San Win; Toe Shein; Nyunt Wynn

    2011-12-01

    The preparation and characterization of silicon alkoxide (silicon isopropoxide) from rice husk char has been studied. In the investigation, four kinds of Myanmar paddies were chemically assayed. Analyses showed the silicon contend varies from 73-92% . Based on the silicon content, the process development in the production of silicon isopropoxide was carried out. In the process development, silicon isopropoxide with a yield of 44.21% was achieved by the direct reaction of isopropanol in situ by silicon tetrachloride, which was directly produced by the chlorination of rice husk char at the high temperature range of 900-1100 C. The novelity of the process was that, silicon isopropoxide was achieved in situ and not by using the old process, where generally isopropanol was reacted with silicon tetrachloride. The physiochemical properties of silicon isopropoxide was confirmed by conventional and modern techniques. In the investigation, the starting materials, silica in the reaction products were characterized, identified and confirmed by modren techniques. Silicon isopropoxide can be a sources of pore silica whereby silicon of 97-99% of purity can be achieved.

  6. Molecular Surveillance of Viral Processes Using Silicon Nitride Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah F. Kelly

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we present new applications for silicon nitride (SiN membranes to evaluate biological processes. We determined that 50-nanometer thin films of SiN produced from silicon wafers were sufficiently durable to bind active rotavirus assemblies. A direct comparison of SiN microchips with conventional carbon support films indicated that SiN performs equivalent to the traditional substrate to prepare samples for Electron Microscopy (EM imaging. Likewise, SiN films coated with Ni-NTA affinity layers concentrated rotavirus particles similarly to affinity-coated carbon films. However, affinity-coated SiN membranes outperformed glow-discharged conventional carbon films 5-fold as indicated by the number of viral particles quantified in EM images. In addition, we were able to recapitulate viral uncoating and transcription mechanisms directed onto the microchip surfaces. EM images of these processes revealed the production of RNA transcripts emerging from active rotavirus complexes. These results were confirmed by the functional incorporation of radiolabeled nucleotides into the nascent RNA transcripts. Collectively, we demonstrate new uses for SiN membranes to perform molecular surveillance on life processes in real-time.

  7. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  8. Silicon materials task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project: Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Hanes, M. H.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of impurities and processing on the characteristics of silicon and terrestrial silicon solar cells were defined in order to develop cost benefit relationships for the use of cheaper, less pure solar grades of silicon. The amount of concentrations of commonly encountered impurities that can be tolerated in typical p or n base solar cells was established, then a preliminary analytical model from which the cell performance could be projected depending on the kinds and amounts of contaminants in the silicon base material was developed. The impurity data base was expanded to include construction materials, and the impurity performace model was refined to account for additional effects such as base resistivity, grain boundary interactions, thermal processing, synergic behavior, and nonuniform impurity distributions. A preliminary assessment of long term (aging) behavior of impurities was also undertaken.

  9. Simulation of the proton implantation process in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccinelli, Martin; Hadley, Peter [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Solid State Physics (Austria); Jelinek, Moriz; Wuebben, Thomas [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Villach (Austria); Laven, Johannes G.; Schulze, Hans-Joachim [Infineon Technologies AG, Neubiberg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Proton implantation is one of many processes used to ad-just the electronic and mechanical properties of silicon. Though the process has been extensively studied, it is still not clear which exact defects are formed and what their concentration profiles are. In this article, a simulation method is presented, which provides a better understanding of the implantation process. The simulation takes into account the diffusion of mobile point defects and their reactions to defect complexes, as well as the dissociation of defect complexes. Concentration profiles for a set of defect complexes after an implantation at 400 keV and a dose of 5 x 10{sup 14} H{sup +}cm{sup -2} are presented. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Process model for carbothermic production of silicon metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, B.

    1995-09-12

    This thesis discusses an advanced dynamical two-dimensional cylinder symmetric model for the high temperature part of the carbothermic silicon metal process, and its computer encoding. The situation close to that which is believed to exist around one of three electrodes in full-scale industrial furnaces is modelled. This area comprises a gas filled cavity surrounding the lower tip of the electrode, the metal pool underneath and the lower parts of the materials above. The most important phenomena included are: Heterogeneous chemical reactions taking place in the high-temperature zone (above 1860 {sup o}C), Evaporation and condensation of silicon, Transport of materials by dripping, Turbulent or laminar fluid flow, DC electric arcs, Heat transport by convection, conduction and radiation. The results from the calculations, such as production rates, gas- and temperature distributions, furnace- and particle geometries, fluid flow fields etc, are presented graphically. In its present state the model is a prototype. The process is very complex, and the calculations are time consuming. The governing equations are coded into a Fortran 77 computer code applying the commercial 3D code FLUENT as a basis. 64 refs., 110 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. On-chip photonic microsystem for optical signal processing based on silicon and silicon nitride platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Li, Jiachen; Yu, Hongchen; Yu, Hai; Chen, Hongwei; Yang, Sigang; Chen, Minghua

    2018-04-01

    The explosive growth of data centers, cloud computing and various smart devices is limited by the current state of microelectronics, both in terms of speed and heat generation. Benefiting from the large bandwidth, promising low power consumption and passive calculation capability, experts believe that the integrated photonics-based signal processing and transmission technologies can break the bottleneck of microelectronics technology. In recent years, integrated photonics has become increasingly reliable and access to the advanced fabrication process has been offered by various foundries. In this paper, we review our recent works on the integrated optical signal processing system. We study three different kinds of on-chip signal processors and use these devices to build microsystems for the fields of microwave photonics, optical communications and spectrum sensing. The microwave photonics front receiver was demonstrated with a signal processing range of a full-band (L-band to W-band). A fully integrated microwave photonics transceiver without the on-chip laser was realized on silicon photonics covering the signal frequency of up 10 GHz. An all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) de-multiplier was also demonstrated and used for an OFDM communication system with the rate of 64 Gbps. Finally, we show our work on the monolithic integrated spectrometer with a high resolution of about 20 pm at the central wavelength of 1550 nm. These proposed on-chip signal processing systems potential applications in the fields of radar, 5G wireless communication, wearable devices and optical access networks.

  12. Laser Process for Selective Emitter Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poulain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective emitter solar cells can provide a significant increase in conversion efficiency. However current approaches need many technological steps and alignment procedures. This paper reports on a preliminary attempt to reduce the number of processing steps and therefore the cost of selective emitter cells. In the developed procedure, a phosphorous glass covered with silicon nitride acts as the doping source. A laser is used to open locally the antireflection coating and at the same time achieve local phosphorus diffusion. In this process the standard chemical etching of the phosphorous glass is avoided. Sheet resistance variation from 100 Ω/sq to 40 Ω/sq is demonstrated with a nanosecond UV laser. Numerical simulation of the laser-matter interaction is discussed to understand the dopant diffusion efficiency. Preliminary solar cells results show a 0.5% improvement compared with a homogeneous emitter structure.

  13. Study of the processes of carbonization and oxidation of porous silicon by Raman and IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, A. V.; Okholin, P. N.; Verovsky, I. N.; Nazarov, A. N.; Lysenko, V. S.; Kholostov, K. I.; Bondarenko, V. P.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were produced by electrochemical etching of single-crystal silicon wafers with the resistivity 10 Ω cm in the aqueous-alcohol solution of hydrofluoric acid. Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy are used to study the processes of interaction of porous silicon with undiluted acetylene at low temperatures and the processes of oxidation of carbonized porous silicon by water vapors. It is established that, even at the temperature 550°C, the silicon-carbon bonds are formed at the pore surface and the graphite-like carbon condensate emerges. It is shown that the carbon condensate inhibits oxidation of porous silicon by water vapors and contributes to quenching of white photoluminescence in the oxidized carbonized porous silicon nanocomposite layer.

  14. Doping of silicon by carbon during laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Kazlauskiene, V.; Miskinis, J.

    2007-04-01

    Effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material was investigated in silicon. It was established that laser cutting of wafers in air induced doping of silicon by carbon. The effect was found to be more distinct by the use of higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon in the depth of silicon. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion was performed to clarify its depth profile in silicon. Photo-chemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be a reason for the reduced quality of machining. A controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting.

  15. Doping of silicon by carbon during laser ablation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raciukaitis, G; Brikas, M; Kazlauskiene, V; Miskinis, J

    2007-01-01

    Effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material was investigated in silicon. It was established that laser cutting of wafers in air induced doping of silicon by carbon. The effect was found to be more distinct by the use of higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon in the depth of silicon. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion was performed to clarify its depth profile in silicon. Photo-chemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be a reason for the reduced quality of machining. A controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting

  16. Multi-Step Deep Reactive Ion Etching Fabrication Process for Silicon-Based Terahertz Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung-Kubiak, Cecile (Inventor); Reck, Theodore (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Perez, Jose Vicente Siles (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Peralta, Alejandro (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A multi-step silicon etching process has been developed to fabricate silicon-based terahertz (THz) waveguide components. This technique provides precise dimensional control across multiple etch depths with batch processing capabilities. Nonlinear and passive components such as mixers and multipliers waveguides, hybrids, OMTs and twists have been fabricated and integrated into a small silicon package. This fabrication technique enables a wafer-stacking architecture to provide ultra-compact multi-pixel receiver front-ends in the THz range.

  17. Doping of silicon with carbon during laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Račiukaitis, G.; Brikas, M.; Kazlauskienė, V.; Miškinis, J.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of laser ablation on properties of remaining material in silicon was investigated. It was found that laser cutting of wafers in the air induced the doping of silicon with carbon. The effect was more distinct when using higher laser power or UV radiation. Carbon ions created bonds with silicon atoms in the depth of the material. Formation of the silicon carbide type bonds was confirmed by SIMS, XPS and AES measurements. Modeling of the carbon diffusion to clarify its depth profile in silicon was performed. Photochemical reactions of such type changed the structure of material and could be the reason of the reduced machining quality. The controlled atmosphere was applied to prevent carbonization of silicon during laser cutting.

  18. Silicon Photonics for Signal Processing of Tbit/s Serial Data Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Ji, Hua; Galili, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our recent work on signal processing of terabit per second optical serial data signals using pure silicon waveguides. We employ nonlinear optical signal processing in nanoengineered silicon waveguides to perform demultiplexing and optical waveform sampling of 1.28-Tbit/...

  19. Silicon nanowires for ultra-fast and ultrabroadband optical signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Hu, Hao; Pu, Minhao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present recent research on silicon nanowires for ultra-fast and ultra-broadband optical signal processing at DTU Fotonik. The advantages and limitations of using silicon nanowires for optical signal processing are revealed through experimental demonstrations of various optical...

  20. Preparation of silicon carbide nanowires via a rapid heating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xintong; Chen Xiaohong; Song Huaihe

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires were fabricated in a large quantity by a rapid heating carbothermal reduction of a novel resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF)/SiO 2 hybrid aerogel in this study. SiC nanowires were grown at 1500 deg. C for 2 h in an argon atmosphere without any catalyst via vapor-solid (V-S) process. The β-SiC nanowires were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) facility, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The analysis results show that the aspect ratio of the SiC nanowires via the rapid heating process is much larger than that of the sample produced via gradual heating process. The SiC nanowires are single crystalline β-SiC phase with diameters of about 20-80 nm and lengths of about several tens of micrometers, growing along the [1 1 1] direction with a fringe spacing of 0.25 nm. The role of the interpenetrating network of RF/SiO 2 hybrid aerogel in the carbothermal reduction was discussed and the possible growth mechanism of the nanowires is analyzed.

  1. Silicon Web Process Development. [for solar cell fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Silicon dendritic web, ribbon form of silicon and capable of fabrication into solar cells with greater than 15% AMl conversion efficiency, was produced from the melt without die shaping. Improvements were made both in the width of the web ribbons grown and in the techniques to replenish the liquid silicon as it is transformed to web. Through means of improved thermal shielding stress was reduced sufficiently so that web crystals nearly 4.5 cm wide were grown. The development of two subsystems, a silicon feeder and a melt level sensor, necessary to achieve an operational melt replenishment system, is described. A gas flow management technique is discussed and a laser reflection method to sense and control the melt level as silicon is replenished is examined.

  2. Process for making silicon from halosilanes and halosilicons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  3. Amorphous silicon passivation for 23.3% laser processed back contact solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Kai; Dahlinger, Morris; Hoffmann, Erik; Zapf-Gottwick, Renate; Werner, Jürgen H.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents amorphous silicon deposited at temperatures below 200 °C, leading to an excellent passivation layer for boron doped emitter and phosphorus doped back surface field areas in interdigitated back contact solar cells. A higher deposition temperature degrades the passivation of the boron emitter by an increased hydrogen effusion due to lower silicon hydrogen bond energy, proved by hydrogen effusion measurements. The high boron surface doping in crystalline silicon causes a band bending in the amorphous silicon. Under these conditions, at the interface, the intentionally undoped amorphous silicon becomes p-type conducting, with the consequence of an increased dangling bond defect density. For bulk amorphous silicon this effect is described by the defect pool model. We demonstrate, that the defect pool model is also applicable to the interface between amorphous and crystalline silicon. Our simulation shows the shift of the Fermi energy towards the valence band edge to be more pronounced for high temperature deposited amorphous silicon having a small bandgap. Application of optimized amorphous silicon as passivation layer for the boron doped emitter and phosphorus doped back surface field on the rear side of laser processed back contact solar cells, fabricated using four laser processing steps, yields an efficiency of 23.3%.

  4. Evolutionary process development towards next generation crystalline silicon solar cells : a semiconductor process toolbox application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tous L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bulk crystalline Silicon solar cells are covering more than 85% of the world’s roof top module installation in 2010. With a growth rate of over 30% in the last 10 years this technology remains the working horse of solar cell industry. The full Aluminum back-side field (Al BSF technology has been developed in the 90’s and provides a production learning curve on module price of constant 20% in average. The main reason for the decrease of module prices with increasing production capacity is due to the effect of up scaling industrial production. For further decreasing of the price per wattpeak silicon consumption has to be reduced and efficiency has to be improved. In this paper we describe a successive efficiency improving process development starting from the existing full Al BSF cell concept. We propose an evolutionary development includes all parts of the solar cell process: optical enhancement (texturing, polishing, anti-reflection coating, junction formation and contacting. Novel processes are benchmarked on industrial like baseline flows using high-efficiency cell concepts like i-PERC (Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell. While the full Al BSF crystalline silicon solar cell technology provides efficiencies of up to 18% (on cz-Si in production, we are achieving up to 19.4% conversion efficiency for industrial fabricated, large area solar cells with copper based front side metallization and local Al BSF applying the semiconductor toolbox.

  5. Optoelectronic properties of Black-Silicon generated through inductively coupled plasma (ICP) processing for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Jens, E-mail: J.Hirsch@emw.hs-anhalt.de [Anhalt University of Applied Sciences, Faculty EMW, Bernburger Str. 55, DE-06366 Köthen (Germany); Fraunhofer Center for Silicon Photovoltaics CSP, Otto-Eißfeldt-Str. 12, DE-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Gaudig, Maria; Bernhard, Norbert [Anhalt University of Applied Sciences, Faculty EMW, Bernburger Str. 55, DE-06366 Köthen (Germany); Lausch, Dominik [Fraunhofer Center for Silicon Photovoltaics CSP, Otto-Eißfeldt-Str. 12, DE-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Fabrication of black silicon through inductively coupled plasma (ICP) processing. • Suppressed formation a self-bias and therefore a reduced ion bombardment of the silicon sample. • Reduction of the average hemispherical reflection between 300 and 1120 nm up to 8% within 5 min ICP process time. • Reflection is almost independent of the angle of incidence up to 60°. • 2.5 ms effective lifetime at 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} MCD after ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation. - Abstract: The optoelectronic properties of maskless inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated black silicon through SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} are analyzed by using reflection measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quasi steady state photoconductivity (QSSPC). The results are discussed and compared to capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and industrial standard wet chemical textures. The ICP process forms parabolic like surface structures in a scale of 500 nm. This surface structure reduces the average hemispherical reflection between 300 and 1120 nm up to 8%. Additionally, the ICP texture shows a weak increase of the hemispherical reflection under tilted angles of incidence up to 60°. Furthermore, we report that the ICP process is independent of the crystal orientation and the surface roughness. This allows the texturing of monocrystalline, multicrystalline and kerf-less wafers using the same parameter set. The ICP generation of black silicon does not apply a self-bias on the silicon sample. Therefore, the silicon sample is exposed to a reduced ion bombardment, which reduces the plasma induced surface damage. This leads to an enhancement of the effective charge carrier lifetime up to 2.5 ms at 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} minority carrier density (MCD) after an atomic layer deposition (ALD) with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Since excellent etch results were obtained already after 4 min process time, we conclude that the ICP generation of black silicon is a promising technique

  6. Linear all-optical signal processing using silicon micro-ring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Ou, Haiyan; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Silicon micro-ring resonators (MRRs) are compact and versatile devices whose periodic frequency response can be exploited for a wide range of applications. In this paper, we review our recent work on linear all-optical signal processing applications using silicon MRRs as passive filters. We focus...

  7. LSA Large Area Silicon Sheet Task Continuous Czochralski Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A commercial Czochralski crystal growing furnace was converted to a continuous growth facility by installation of a small, in-situ premelter with attendant silicon storage and transport mechanisms. Using a vertical, cylindrical graphite heater containing a small fused quartz test tube linear from which the molten silicon flowed out the bottom, approximately 83 cm of nominal 5 cm diamter crystal was grown with continuous melt addition furnished by the test tube premelter. High perfection crystal was not obtained, however, due primarily to particulate contamination of the melt. A major contributor to the particulate problem was severe silicon oxide buildup on the premelter which would ultimately drop into the primary melt. Elimination of this oxide buildup will require extensive study and experimentation and the ultimate success of continuous Czochralski depends on a successful solution to this problem. Economically, the continuous Czochralski meets near-term cost goals for silicon sheet material.

  8. Thermal processing and native oxidation of silicon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, Brandon J.; Holm, Jason; Roberts, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to investigate in-air oxidation of silicon nanoparticles ca. 11 nm in diameter. Particle samples were prepared first by extracting them from an RF plasma synthesis reactor, and then heating them in an inert carrier gas stream. The resulting particles had varying surface hydrogen coverages and relative amounts of SiH x (x = 1, 2, and 3), depending on the temperature to which they had been heated. The particles were allowed to oxidize in-air for several weeks. FTIR, XPS, and EELS analyses that were performed during this period clearly establish that adsorbed hydrogen retards oxidation, although in complex ways. In particular, particles that have been heated to intermediate hydrogen coverages oxidize more slowly in air than do freshly generated particles that have a much higher hydrogen content. In addition, the loss of surface hydride species at high processing temperatures results in fast initial oxidation and the formation of a self-limiting oxide layer. Analogous measurements made on deuterium-covered particles show broadly similar behavior; i.e., that oxidation is the slowest at some intermediate coverage of adsorbed deuterium.

  9. Processes and applications of silicon carbide nanocomposite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, D G; Cho, K Y; Riu, D H; Jin, E J

    2011-01-01

    Various types of SiC such as nanowires, thin films, foam, and continuous fibers have been developed since the early 1980s, and their applications have been expanded into several new applications, such as for gas-fueled radiation heater, diesel particulate filter (DPF), ceramic fiber separators and catalyst/catalyst supports include for the military, aerospace, automobile and electronics industries. For these new applications, high specific surface area is demanded and it has been tried by reducing the diameter of SiC fiber. Furthermore, functional nanocomposites show potentials in various harsh environmental applications. In this study, silicon carbide fiber was prepared through electrospinning of the polycarbosilane (PCS) with optimum molecular weight distribution which was synthesized by new method adopting solid acid catalyst such as ZSM-5 and γ-Al 2 O 3 . Functional elements such as aluminum, titanium, tungsten and palladium easily doped in the precursor fiber and remained in the SiC fiber after pyrolysis. The uniform SiC fibers were produced at the condition of spinning voltage over 20 kV from the PCS solution as the concentration of 1.3 g/ml in DMF/Toluene (3:7) and pyrolysis at 1200deg. C. Pyrolyzed products were processed into several interesting applications such as thermal batteries, hydrogen sensors and gas filters.

  10. Processes and applications of silicon carbide nanocomposite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, D G; Cho, K Y; Riu, D H [Nanomaterials Team, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, 233-5 Gasan-dong, Guemcheon-gu, Seoul 153-801 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, E J, E-mail: dhriu15@seoultech.ac.kr [Battelle-Korea Laborotary, Korea University, Anamdong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-29

    Various types of SiC such as nanowires, thin films, foam, and continuous fibers have been developed since the early 1980s, and their applications have been expanded into several new applications, such as for gas-fueled radiation heater, diesel particulate filter (DPF), ceramic fiber separators and catalyst/catalyst supports include for the military, aerospace, automobile and electronics industries. For these new applications, high specific surface area is demanded and it has been tried by reducing the diameter of SiC fiber. Furthermore, functional nanocomposites show potentials in various harsh environmental applications. In this study, silicon carbide fiber was prepared through electrospinning of the polycarbosilane (PCS) with optimum molecular weight distribution which was synthesized by new method adopting solid acid catalyst such as ZSM-5 and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Functional elements such as aluminum, titanium, tungsten and palladium easily doped in the precursor fiber and remained in the SiC fiber after pyrolysis. The uniform SiC fibers were produced at the condition of spinning voltage over 20 kV from the PCS solution as the concentration of 1.3 g/ml in DMF/Toluene (3:7) and pyrolysis at 1200deg. C. Pyrolyzed products were processed into several interesting applications such as thermal batteries, hydrogen sensors and gas filters.

  11. Processes and applications of silicon carbide nanocomposite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. G.; Cho, K. Y.; Jin, E. J.; Riu, D. H.

    2011-10-01

    Various types of SiC such as nanowires, thin films, foam, and continuous fibers have been developed since the early 1980s, and their applications have been expanded into several new applications, such as for gas-fueled radiation heater, diesel particulate filter (DPF), ceramic fiber separators and catalyst/catalyst supports include for the military, aerospace, automobile and electronics industries. For these new applications, high specific surface area is demanded and it has been tried by reducing the diameter of SiC fiber. Furthermore, functional nanocomposites show potentials in various harsh environmental applications. In this study, silicon carbide fiber was prepared through electrospinning of the polycarbosilane (PCS) with optimum molecular weight distribution which was synthesized by new method adopting solid acid catalyst such as ZSM-5 and γ-Al2O3. Functional elements such as aluminum, titanium, tungsten and palladium easily doped in the precursor fiber and remained in the SiC fiber after pyrolysis. The uniform SiC fibers were produced at the condition of spinning voltage over 20 kV from the PCS solution as the concentration of 1.3 g/ml in DMF/Toluene (3:7) and pyrolysis at 1200°C. Pyrolyzed products were processed into several interesting applications such as thermal batteries, hydrogen sensors and gas filters.

  12. Global optimization of silicon nanowires for efficient parametric processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vukovic, Dragana; Xu, Jing; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We present a global optimization of silicon nanowires for parametric single-pump mixing. For the first time, the effect of surface roughness-induced loss is included in the analysis, significantly influencing the optimum waveguide dimensions.......We present a global optimization of silicon nanowires for parametric single-pump mixing. For the first time, the effect of surface roughness-induced loss is included in the analysis, significantly influencing the optimum waveguide dimensions....

  13. Silicon-Carbide Power MOSFET Performance in High Efficiency Boost Power Processing Unit for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide device technology has generated much interest in recent years. With superior thermal performance, power ratings and potential switching frequencies over its Silicon counterpart, Silicon-Carbide offers a greater possibility for high powered switching applications in extreme environment. In particular, Silicon-Carbide Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors' (MOSFETs) maturing process technology has produced a plethora of commercially available power dense, low on-state resistance devices capable of switching at high frequencies. A novel hard-switched power processing unit (PPU) is implemented utilizing Silicon-Carbide power devices. Accelerated life data is captured and assessed in conjunction with a damage accumulation model of gate oxide and drain-source junction lifetime to evaluate potential system performance at high temperature environments.

  14. Silicon Nanowires for All-Optical Signal Processing in Optical Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Hu, Hao; Ji, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Silicon (Si), the second most abundant element on earth, has dominated in microelectronics for many decades. It can also be used for photonic devices due to its transparency in the range of optical telecom wavelengths which will enable a platform for a monolithic integration of optics...... and microelectronics. Silicon photonic nanowire waveguides fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates are crucial elements in nano-photonic integrated circuits. The strong light confinement in nanowires induced by high index contrast SOI material enhances the nonlinear effects in the silicon nanowire core...... such as four-wave mixing (FWM) which is an imperative process for optical signal processing. Since the current mature silicon fabrication technology enables a precise dimension control on nanowires, dispersion engineering can be performed by tailoring nanowire dimensions to realize an efficient nonlinear...

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW Textured silicon nitride: processing and anisotropic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwen Zhu and Yoshio Sakka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Textured silicon nitride (Si3N4 has been intensively studied over the past 15 years because of its use for achieving its superthermal and mechanical properties. In this review we present the fundamental aspects of the processing and anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4, with emphasis on the anisotropic and abnormal grain growth of β-Si3N4, texture structure and texture analysis, processing methods and anisotropic properties. On the basis of the texturing mechanisms, the processing methods described in this article have been classified into two types: hot-working (HW and templated grain growth (TGG. The HW method includes the hot-pressing, hot-forging and sinter-forging techniques, and the TGG method includes the cold-pressing, extrusion, tape-casting and strong magnetic field alignment techniques for β-Si3N4 seed crystals. Each processing technique is thoroughly discussed in terms of theoretical models and experimental data, including the texturing mechanisms and the factors affecting texture development. Also, methods of synthesizing the rodlike β-Si3N4 single crystals are presented. Various anisotropic properties of textured Si3 N4 and their origins are thoroughly described and discussed, such as hardness, elastic modulus, bending strength, fracture toughness, fracture energy, creep behavior, tribological and wear behavior, erosion behavior, contact damage behavior and thermal conductivity. Models are analyzed to determine the thermal anisotropy by considering the intrinsic thermal anisotropy, degree of orientation and various microstructure factors. Textured porous Si3N4 with a unique microstructure composed of oriented elongated β-Si3N4 and anisotropic pores is also described for the first time, with emphasis on its unique mechanical and thermal-mechanical properties. Moreover, as an important related material, textured α-Sialon is also reviewed, because the presence of elongated α-Sialon grains allows the production of textured

  16. Silicon Carbide (SiC) Power Processing Unit (PPU) for Hall Effect Thrusters, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR project, APEI, Inc. is proposing to develop a high efficiency, rad-hard 3.8 kW silicon carbide (SiC) Power Processing Unit (PPU) for Hall Effect...

  17. Mathematical model of silicon smelting process basing on pelletized charge from technogenic raw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinova, N. V.; Tyutrin, A. A.; Salov, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    The silicon production process in the electric arc reduction furnaces (EAF) is studied using pelletized charge as an additive to the standard on the basis of the generated mathematical model. The results obtained due to the model will contribute to the analysis of the charge components behavior during melting with the achievement of optimum final parameters of the silicon production process. The authors proposed using technogenic waste as a raw material for the silicon production in a pelletized form using liquid glass and aluminum production dust from the electrostatic precipitators as a binder. The method of mathematical modeling with the help of the ‘Selector’ software package was used as a basis for the theoretical study. A model was simulated with the imitation of four furnace temperature zones and a crystalline silicon phase (25 °C). The main advantage of the created model is the ability to analyze the behavior of all burden materials (including pelletized charge) in the carbothermic process. The behavior analysis is based on the thermodynamic probability data of the burden materials interactions in the carbothermic process. The model accounts for 17 elements entering the furnace with raw materials, electrodes and air. The silicon melt, obtained by the modeling, contained 91.73 % wt. of the target product. The simulation results showed that in the use of the proposed combined charge, the recovery of silicon reached 69.248 %, which is in good agreement with practical data. The results of the crystalline silicon chemical composition modeling are compared with the real silicon samples of chemical analysis data, which showed the results of convergence. The efficiency of the mathematical modeling methods in the studying of the carbothermal silicon obtaining process with complex interphase transformations and the formation of numerous intermediate compounds using a pelletized charge as an additive to the traditional one is shown.

  18. Development of a process for high capacity arc heater production of silicon for solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T. N.

    1980-01-01

    A high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology is discussed. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant, liquid sodium, were injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction occurred, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon were developed. The desired degree of separation was not achieved. The electrical, control and instrumentation, cooling water, gas, SiCl4, and sodium systems are discussed. The plasma reactor, silicon collection, effluent disposal, the gas burnoff stack, and decontamination and safety are also discussed. Procedure manuals, shakedown testing, data acquisition and analysis, product characterization, disassembly and decontamination, and component evaluation are reviewed.

  19. Characterization of the silicon/hydrofluoric acid interface: electrochemical processes under weak potential disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagna, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Within the frame of the increase of the density of integrated circuits, of simplification of cleaning processes and of improvement of control of surface reactions (for a better control of the elimination of defects and contamination risks), this research thesis first gives a large overview of previous works in the fields of silicon electrochemistry in hydrofluoric environment, of silicon chemical condition after treatment by a diluted hydrofluoric acid, of metallic contamination of silicon during cleaning with a diluted hydrofluoric acid, and of theoretical models of interpretation. Then, the author reports the development of a new electrochemical cell, and the detailed study of mono-crystalline silicon in a diluted hydrofluoric environment (electrochemical investigation, modelling of charge transfer at the interface, studies by atomic force microscopy, contamination of silicon by copper)

  20. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon in volume at low cost were studied. Experiments were performed to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, determine the effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction, and make preliminary engineering and economic analyses of a scaled-up process.

  1. Process Characterization of Electrical Discharge Machining of Highly Doped Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    of mechanism is shown in Figure 2 showing the wire feed panel where the spool of 5 (DiBitonto, et...Uno High efficiency boring of monocrystalline silicon ingot by EDM RAM Si (P-type) conductivity 0.01 ohm-cm 1mm Cu pipe electrode, rotating at

  2. Thermal processing of strained silicon-on-insulator for atomically precise silicon device fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.C.T.; Bishop, N.; Thompson, D.L.; Xue, K.; Scappucci, G.; Cederberg, J.G.; Gray, J.K.; Han, S.M.; Celler, G.K.; Carroll, M.S.; Simmons, M.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) samples were flash-annealed at high temperature under ultra-high vacuum conditions. ► The extend of surface strain relaxation depends on the annealing temperature with no strain relaxation observed below 1020 °C. ► A 2 × 1 reconstructed surface with low defect density can be achieved. ► The annealed sSOI surface shows enhanced step undulations due to the unique energetics caused by surface strain. - Abstract: We investigate the ability to reconstruct strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) substrates in ultra-high vacuum for use in atomic scale device fabrication. Characterisation of the starting sSOI substrate using μRaman shows an average tensile strain of 0.8%, with clear strain modulation in a crosshatch pattern across the surface. The surfaces were heated in ultra-high vacuum from temperatures of 900 °C to 1100 °C and subsequently imaged using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The initial strain modulation on the surface is observed to promote silicon migration and the formation of crosshatched surface features whose height and pitch increases with increasing annealing temperature. STM images reveal alternating narrow straight S A steps and triangular wavy S B steps attributed to the spontaneous faceting of S B and preferential adatom attachment on S B under biaxial tensile strain. Raman spectroscopy shows that despite these high temperature anneals no strain relaxation of the substrate is observed up to temperatures of 1020 °C. Above 1100 °C, strain relaxation is evident but is confined to the surface.

  3. Characteristics of fracture during the approach process and wear mechanism of a silicon AFM tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Ha; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2005-01-01

    The wear of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is one of the crucial issues in AFM as well as in other probe-based applications. In this work, wear tests under extremely low normal load using an AFM were conducted. Also, in order to understand the nature of silicon tip wear, the wear characteristics of crystal silicon and amorphous silicon oxide layer were investigated by a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). It was found that fracture of the tip readily occurred due to impact during the approach process. Experimental results showed that the impact should be below 0.1 nN s to avoid significant fracture of the tip. Also, it was observed that wear of the amorphous layer, formed at the end of the tip, occurred at the initial stage of the silicon tip damage process. Based on Archard's wear law, the wear coefficient of the amorphous layer was in the range of 0.009-0.014. As for the wear characteristics of the silicon tip, it was shown that wear occurred gradually under light normal load and the wear rate decreased with increase in the sliding distance. As for the wear mechanism of the silicon tip, oxidation wear was identified to be the most significant. It was shown that the degree of oxidation was higher under high normal load and in a nitrogen environment, oxidation of the silicon tip was reduced

  4. Structural and photoluminescence properties of silicon nanowires extracted by means of a centrifugation process from plasma torch synthesized silicon nanopowder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Borgne, Vincent; Agati, Marta; Boninelli, Simona; Castrucci, Paola; De Crescenzi, Maurizio; Dolbec, Richard; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-07-01

    We report on a method for the extraction of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) from the by-product of a plasma torch based spheroidization process of silicon. This by-product is a nanopowder which consists of a mixture of SiNWs and silicon particles. By optimizing a centrifugation based process, we were able to extract substantial amounts of highly pure Si nanomaterials (mainly SiNWs and Si nanospheres (SiNSs)). While the purified SiNWs were found to have typical outer diameters in the 10-15 nm range and lengths of up to several μm, the SiNSs have external diameters in the 10-100 nm range. Interestingly, the SiNWs are found to have a thinner Si core (2-5 nm diam.) and an outer silicon oxide shell (with a typical thickness of ˜5-10 nm). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations revealed that many SiNWs have a continuous cylindrical core, whereas others feature a discontinuous core consisting of a chain of Si nanocrystals forming a sort of ‘chaplet-like’ structures. These plasma-torch-produced SiNWs are highly pure with no trace of any metal catalyst, suggesting that they mostly form through SiO-catalyzed growth scheme rather than from metal-catalyzed path. The extracted Si nanostructures are shown to exhibit a strong photoluminescence (PL) which is found to blue-shift from 950 to 680 nm as the core size of the Si nanostructures decreases from ˜5 to ˜3 nm. This near IR-visible PL is shown to originate from quantum confinement (QC) in Si nanostructures. Consistently, the sizes of the Si nanocrystals directly determined from HRTEM images corroborate well with those expected by QC theory.

  5. Development of a Process for a High Capacity Arc Heater Production of Silicon for Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant (sodium) are injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection were developed. Included in this report are: test system preparation; testing; injection techniques; kinetics; reaction demonstration; conclusions; and the project status.

  6. Dominant rate process of silicon surface etching by hydrogen chloride gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habuka, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Sunao; Nakamura, Akio; Takeuchi, Takashi; Aihara, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    Silicon surface etching and its dominant rate process are studied using hydrogen chloride gas in a wide concentration range of 1-100% in ambient hydrogen at atmospheric pressure in a temperature range of 1023-1423 K, linked with the numerical calculation accounting for the transport phenomena and the surface chemical reaction in the entire reactor. The etch rate, the gaseous products and the surface morphology are experimentally evaluated. The dominant rate equation accounting for the first-order successive reactions at silicon surface by hydrogen chloride gas is shown to be valid. The activation energy of the dominant surface process is evaluated to be 1.5 x 10 5 J mol - 1 . The silicon deposition by the gaseous by-product, trichlorosilane, is shown to have a negligible influence on the silicon etch rate

  7. Preservative loss from silicone tubing during filling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saller, Verena; Matilainen, Julia; Rothkopf, Christian; Serafin, Daniel; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Friess, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Significant loss of preservative was observed during filling of drug products during filling line stops. This study evaluated the losses of three commonly used preservatives in protein drugs, i.e. benzyl alcohol, phenol, and m-cresol. Concentration losses during static incubation were quantified and interpreted with regard to the potential driving forces for the underlying sorption, diffusion, and desorption steps. Partitioning from the solution into the silicone polymer was identified as the most decisive parameter for the extent of preservative loss. Additionally, the influence of tubing inner diameter, starting concentration as well as silicone tubing type was evaluated. Theoretical calculations assuming equilibrium between solution and tubing inner surface and one-directional diffusion following Fick's first law were used to approximate experimental data. Since significant losses were found already after few minutes, adequate measures must be taken to avoid deviations during filling of preservative-containing protein solutions that may impact product quality or antimicrobial efficacy. As a possible alternative to the highly permeable silicone tubing, a specific make of fluoropolymer tubing was identified being suitable for peristaltic pumps and not showing any preservative losses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Silicon web process development. [for low cost solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Hopkins, R. H.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Silicon dendritic web, a single crystal ribbon shaped during growth by crystallographic forces and surface tension (rather than dies), is a highly promising base material for efficient low cost solar cells. The form of the product smooth, flexible strips 100 to 200 microns thick, conserves expensive silicon and facilitates automation of crystal growth and the subsequent manufacturing of solar cells. These characteristics, coupled with the highest demonstrated ribbon solar cell efficiency-15.5%-make silicon web a leading candidate to achieve, or better, the 1986 Low Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project cost objective of 50 cents per peak watt of photovoltaic output power. The main objective of the Web Program, technology development to significantly increase web output rate, and to show the feasibility for simultaneous melt replenishment and growth, have largely been accomplished. Recently, web output rates of 23.6 sq cm/min, nearly three times the 8 sq cm/min maximum rate of a year ago, were achieved. Webs 4 cm wide or greater were grown on a number of occassions.

  9. Scaling of black silicon processing time by high repetition rate femtosecond lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface texturing of silicon substrates is performed by femtosecond laser irradiation at high repetition rates. Various fabrication parameters are optimized in order to achieve very high absorptance in the visible region from the micro-structured silicon wafer as compared to the unstructured one. A 70-fold reduction of the processing time is demonstrated by increasing the laser repetition rate from 1 kHz to 200 kHz. Further scaling up to 1 MHz can be foreseen.

  10. Phosphatase Rtr1 Regulates Global Levels of Serine 5 RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation and Cotranscriptional Histone Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gerald O; Fox, Melanie J; Smith-Kinnaman, Whitney R; Gogol, Madelaine; Fleharty, Brian; Mosley, Amber L

    2016-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1 contains a heptapeptide repeat sequence of (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7)n that undergoes reversible phosphorylation through the opposing action of kinases and phosphatases. Rtr1 is a conserved protein that colocalizes with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and has been shown to be important for the transition from elongation to termination during transcription by removing RNAPII CTD serine 5 phosphorylation (Ser5-P) at a selection of target genes. In this study, we show that Rtr1 is a global regulator of the CTD code with deletion of RTR1 causing genome-wide changes in Ser5-P CTD phosphorylation and cotranscriptional histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-resolution microarrays, we show that RTR1 deletion results in global changes in RNAPII Ser5-P levels on genes with different lengths and transcription rates consistent with its role as a CTD phosphatase. Although Ser5-P levels increase, the overall occupancy of RNAPII either decreases or stays the same in the absence of RTR1 Additionally, the loss of Rtr1 in vivo leads to increases in H3K36me3 levels genome-wide, while total histone H3 levels remain relatively constant within coding regions. Overall, these findings suggest that Rtr1 regulates H3K36me3 levels through changes in the number of binding sites for the histone methyltransferase Set2, thereby influencing both the CTD and histone codes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Properties and behavior of quartz for the silicon process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasly, Kurt

    2008-07-01

    This PhD-thesis is a result of the study on important properties of quartz as a raw material for the metallurgical production of ferrosilicon and silicon metal. This includes defining mechanical properties important for the size reduction experienced during transport and storage and thermo-mechanical properties of quartz that is important for how the quartz reacts to the high temperatures experienced as it is charged on the furnace. Additionally, softening properties of quartz have been briefly discussed in some of the papers. Another important goal has been to test analytical and experimental methods for investigating the various properties. The investigations of important factors for the mechanical properties of ores and industrial minerals have been carried out as a literature study. The mining operation and transport from mine to smelter has been discussed and several factors that are significant for achieving best possible mechanical properties of the quartz have been identified. The most important factors are related to production in the mine and processing plant, which should be carefully planned to minimize the amount of blast-induced damage in the rock and thus achieve the best possible mechanical strength of the raw material. The amount of fines can be minimized by controlling the handling of the raw materials during the transport and storage. It is especially important to avoid high drops, both high single drops and accumulated height of all the drops in total. Investigations of the thermo-mechanical properties of quartz have been carried out by using different experimental and characterization methods. The petrographic investigations of the raw materials by polarized light microscopy have been important. Thermo-mechanical investigations have been high-temperature microthermometry and shock heating of quartz samples in an induction furnace with subsequent investigations of the heated material. The subsequent investigation included polarized- and

  12. Multivariate data analysis of process control data from neutron transmutation doping of silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, K.; Hegaard, N.

    1994-01-01

    Final resistivities obtained by neutron transmutation doping (NTD) of silicon can be measured only after an annealing process has been carried out at the manufacturer's plant. The reactor centre carrying out the neutron doping process by irradiation under selected conditions must control the proc......Final resistivities obtained by neutron transmutation doping (NTD) of silicon can be measured only after an annealing process has been carried out at the manufacturer's plant. The reactor centre carrying out the neutron doping process by irradiation under selected conditions must control...

  13. STM-excited luminescence of porous and spark-processed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrienko, I.; Kuznetsov, V.; Yuan, J.; Haneman, D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) permits highly local electronic excitation of light emission (LE) from the surface of silicon. Measuring STM LE, one can study simultaneously both the topography and the luminescence properties of areas down to nm dimensions and thus make conclusions about the luminescence mechanism of the material. We have built an STM spectroscopy system which allows measurement of spectra of visible light emitted from areas as small as 13 x 13 nm 2 (porous silicon) and 10 x 10 nm 2 (spark-processed silicon). Porous silicon shows a broad emission band centered at 630 nm, and spark-processed silicon, one at 690 nm. The STM LE spectra of spark-processed silicon obtained for the first time. We have found that visible light is emitted only from areas containing nanometer-scale structures down to around 2 nm in diameter. STM LE occurs under negative bias voltage applied to the tip, i.e. when electrons are injected into the sample. Other workers used p-type silicon for the sample preparations, but it has been found that STM LE can be induced also from n-type silicon. Furthermore, we have shown that STM LE spectra can be resolved using much lover voltages and tunneling currents: -(7-9) V and 25 - 50 nA vs -(25-50) V and 100 nA. To consider different excitation mechanisms, the STM LE measurements are compared with photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra of similar samples. We suggest that excitation of individual quantum confinement structures has been observed

  14. The RTR Complex Partner RMI2 and the DNA Helicase RTEL1 Are Both Independently Involved in Preserving the Stability of 45S rDNA Repeats in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Röhrig

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stability of repetitive sequences in complex eukaryotic genomes is safeguarded by factors suppressing homologues recombination. Prominent in this is the role of the RTR complex. In plants, it consists of the RecQ helicase RECQ4A, the topoisomerase TOP3α and RMI1. Like mammals, but not yeast, plants harbor an additional complex partner, RMI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, RMI2 is involved in the repair of aberrant replication intermediates in root meristems as well as in intrastrand crosslink repair. In both instances, RMI2 is involved independently of the DNA helicase RTEL1. Surprisingly, simultaneous loss of RMI2 and RTEL1 leads to loss of male fertility. As both the RTR complex and RTEL1 are involved in suppression of homologous recombination (HR, we tested the efficiency of HR in the double mutant rmi2-2 rtel1-1 and found a synergistic enhancement (80-fold. Searching for natural target sequences we found that RTEL1 is required for stabilizing 45S rDNA repeats. In the double mutant with rmi2-2 the number of 45S rDNA repeats is further decreased sustaining independent roles of both factors in this process. Thus, loss of suppression of HR does not only lead to a destabilization of rDNA repeats but might be especially deleterious for tissues undergoing multiple cell divisions such as the male germline.

  15. The RTR Complex Partner RMI2 and the DNA Helicase RTEL1 Are Both Independently Involved in Preserving the Stability of 45S rDNA Repeats in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrig, Sarah; Schröpfer, Susan; Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The stability of repetitive sequences in complex eukaryotic genomes is safeguarded by factors suppressing homologues recombination. Prominent in this is the role of the RTR complex. In plants, it consists of the RecQ helicase RECQ4A, the topoisomerase TOP3α and RMI1. Like mammals, but not yeast, plants harbor an additional complex partner, RMI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, RMI2 is involved in the repair of aberrant replication intermediates in root meristems as well as in intrastrand crosslink repair. In both instances, RMI2 is involved independently of the DNA helicase RTEL1. Surprisingly, simultaneous loss of RMI2 and RTEL1 leads to loss of male fertility. As both the RTR complex and RTEL1 are involved in suppression of homologous recombination (HR), we tested the efficiency of HR in the double mutant rmi2-2 rtel1-1 and found a synergistic enhancement (80-fold). Searching for natural target sequences we found that RTEL1 is required for stabilizing 45S rDNA repeats. In the double mutant with rmi2-2 the number of 45S rDNA repeats is further decreased sustaining independent roles of both factors in this process. Thus, loss of suppression of HR does not only lead to a destabilization of rDNA repeats but might be especially deleterious for tissues undergoing multiple cell divisions such as the male germline.

  16. Preliminary assessment of RTR and visual characterization for selected waste categories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The first transuranic (TRU) waste shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be for the WIPP Experimental Program. The purpose of the Experimental Program is to determine the gas generation rates and potential for gas generation by the waste after it has been permanently stored at the WIPP. The first phase of these tests will be performed at WIPP with test bins that have been filled and sealed in accordance with the test plan for bin scale tests. A second phase of the testing, the Alcove Test, will involve drummed waste placed in sealed rooms within WIPP. A preliminary test was conducted at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) to evaluate potential methods for use in the characterization of waste. The waste material types to be identified were as defined in the bin-scale test plan -- Cellulosics, Plastic, Rubber, Corroding Metal/Steel, Corroding Metal/Aluminum, Non-corroding Metal, Solid Inorganic, Inorganic Sludges, other organics and Cements. A total of 19 drums representing eleven different waste types (Rocky Flats Plant -- Identification Description Codes (IDC)) and seven different TRUCON Code materials were evaluated. They included Dry Combustibles, Wet Combustibles, Plastic, light Metal, Glass (Non-Raschig Ring). Raschig Rings, M g O crucibles, HEPA Filters, Insulation, Leaded Dry Box Gloves, and Graphite. These Identification Description Codes were chosen because of their abundance on plant, as well as the variability in drum loading techniques. The goal of this test was to evaluate the effectiveness of RTR inspection and visual inspection as characterization methods for waste. In addition, gas analysis of the head space was conducted to provide an indication of the types of gas generated

  17. Effect of silicon solar cell processing parameters and crystallinity on mechanical strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, V.A.; Yunus, A.; Janssen, M.; Richardson, I.M. [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Bennett, I.J. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Solar Energy, PV Module Technology, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Silicon wafer thickness reduction without increasing the wafer strength leads to a high breakage rate during subsequent handling and processing steps. Cracking of solar cells has become one of the major sources of solar module failure and rejection. Hence, it is important to evaluate the mechanical strength of solar cells and influencing factors. The purpose of this work is to understand the fracture behavior of silicon solar cells and to provide information regarding the bending strength of the cells. Triple junctions, grain size and grain boundaries are considered to investigate the effect of crystallinity features on silicon wafer strength. Significant changes in fracture strength are found as a result of metallization morphology and crystallinity of silicon solar cells. It is observed that aluminum paste type influences the strength of the solar cells. (author)

  18. Development of processes for the production of low cost silicon dendritic web for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hill, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    High area output rates and continuous, automated growth are two key technical requirements for the growth of low-cost silicon ribbons for solar cells. By means of computer-aided furnace design, silicon dendritic web output rates as high as 27 sq cm/min have been achieved, a value in excess of that projected to meet a $0.50 per peak watt solar array manufacturing cost. The feasibility of simultaneous web growth while the melt is replenished with pelletized silicon has also been demonstrated. This step is an important precursor to the development of an automated growth system. Solar cells made on the replenished material were just as efficient as devices fabricated on typical webs grown without replenishment. Moreover, web cells made on a less-refined, pelletized polycrystalline silicon synthesized by the Battelle process yielded efficiencies up to 13% (AM1).

  19. Thermal system design and modeling of meniscus controlled silicon growth process for solar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenlei

    The direct conversion of solar radiation to electricity by photovoltaics has a number of significant advantages as an electricity generator. That is, solar photovoltaic conversion systems tap an inexhaustible resource which is free of charge and available anywhere in the world. Roofing tile photovoltaic generation, for example, saves excess thermal heat and preserves the local heat balance. This means that a considerable reduction of thermal pollution in densely populated city areas can be attained. A semiconductor can only convert photons with the energy of the band gap with good efficiency. It is known that silicon is not at the maximum efficiency but relatively close to it. There are several main parts for the photovoltaic materials, which include, single- and poly-crystalline silicon, ribbon silicon, crystalline thin-film silicon, amorphous silicon, copper indium diselenide and related compounds, cadmium telluride, et al. In this dissertation, we focus on melt growth of the single- and poly-crystalline silicon manufactured by Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth process, and ribbon silicon produced by the edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) process. These two methods are the most commonly used techniques for growing photovoltaic semiconductors. For each crystal growth process, we introduce the growth mechanism, growth system design, general application, and progress in the numerical simulation. Simulation results are shown for both Czochralski and EFG systems including temperature distribution of the growth system, velocity field inside the silicon melt and electromagnetic field for the EFG growth system. Magnetic field is applied on Cz system to reduce the melt convection inside crucible and this has been simulated in our numerical model. Parametric studies are performed through numerical and analytical models to investigate the relationship between heater power levels and solidification interface movement and shape. An inverse problem control scheme is developed to

  20. Additive advantage in characteristics of MIMCAPs on flexible silicon (100) fabric with release-first process

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.

    2013-11-20

    We report the inherent increase in capacitance per unit planar area of state-of-the art high-κ integrated metal/insulator/metal capacitors (MIMCAPs) fabricated on flexible silicon fabric with release-first process. We methodically study and show that our approach to transform bulk silicon (100) into a flexible fabric adds an inherent advantage of enabling higher integration density dynamic random access memory (DRAM) on the same chip area. Our approach is to release an ultra-thin silicon (100) fabric (25 μm thick) from the bulk silicon wafer, then build MIMCAPs using sputtered aluminium electrodes and successive atomic layer depositions (ALD) without break-ing the vacuum of a high-κ aluminium oxide sandwiched between two tantalum nitride layers. This result shows that we can obtain flexible electronics on silicon without sacrificing the high density integration aspects and also utilize the non-planar geometry associated with fabrication process to obtain a higher integration density compared to bulk silicon integration due to an increased normalized capacitance per unit planar area. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Silicon Nano fabrication by Atomic Force Microscopy-Based Mechanical Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Sh.; Wang, M.; Kim, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews silicon nano fabrication processes using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In particular, it summarizes recent results obtained in our research group regarding AFM-based silicon nano fabrication through mechanochemical local oxidation by diamond tip sliding, as well as mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical processing using an electrically conductive diamond tip. Microscopic three-dimensional manufacturing mainly relies on etching, deposition, and lithography. Therefore, a special emphasis was placed on nano mechanical processes, mechanochemical reaction by potassium hydroxide solution etching, and mechanical and electrical approaches. Several important surface characterization techniques consisting of scanning tunneling microscopy and related techniques, such as scanning probe microscopy and AFM, were also discussed.

  2. A high volume cost efficient production macrostructuring process. [for silicon solar cell surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitre, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents an experimentally developed surface macro-structuring process suitable for high volume production of silicon solar cells. The process lends itself easily to automation for high throughput to meet low-cost solar array goals. The tetrahedron structure observed is 0.5 - 12 micron high. The surface has minimal pitting with virtually no or very few undeveloped areas across the surface. This process has been developed for (100) oriented as cut silicon. Chemi-etched, hydrophobic and lapped surfaces were successfully texturized. A cost analysis as per Samics is presented.

  3. Key Processes of Silicon-On-Glass MEMS Fabrication Technology for Gyroscope Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhibo; Wang, Yinan; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Han; Guo, Xuetao

    2018-04-17

    MEMS fabrication that is based on the silicon-on-glass (SOG) process requires many steps, including patterning, anodic bonding, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), and chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). The effects of the process parameters of CMP and DRIE are investigated in this study. The process parameters of CMP, such as abrasive size, load pressure, and pH value of SF1 solution are examined to optimize the total thickness variation in the structure and the surface quality. The ratio of etching and passivation cycle time and the process pressure are also adjusted to achieve satisfactory performance during DRIE. The process is optimized to avoid neither the notching nor lag effects on the fabricated silicon structures. For demonstrating the capability of the modified CMP and DRIE processes, a z-axis micro gyroscope is fabricated that is based on the SOG process. Initial test results show that the average surface roughness of silicon is below 1.13 nm and the thickness of the silicon is measured to be 50 μm. All of the structures are well defined without the footing effect by the use of the modified DRIE process. The initial performance test results of the resonant frequency for the drive and sense modes are 4.048 and 4.076 kHz, respectively. The demands for this kind of SOG MEMS device can be fulfilled using the optimized process.

  4. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals, phase 1 and phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.; Felder, W.

    1981-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon are described. Product separation and collection processes were evaluated, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes and effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction were determined, and preliminary engineering and economic analysis of a scaled up process were made. The feasibility of the basic process to make and collect silicon was demonstrated. The jet impaction/separation process was demonstrated to be a purification process. The rate at which gas phase species from silicon particle precursors, the time required for silane decomposition to produce particles, and the competing rate of growth of silicon seed particles injected into a decomposing silane environment were determined. The extent of silane decomposition as a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure was measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. A simplistic model is presented to explain the growth of silicon in a decomposing silane enviroment.

  5. Comparison of silicon pin diode detector fabrication processes using ion implantation and thermal doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, C.Z.; Warburton, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    Two processes for the fabrication of silicon p-i-n diode radiation detectors are described and compared. Both processes are compatible with conventional integrated-circuit fabrication techniques and yield very low leakage currents. Devices made from the process using boron thermal doping have about a factor of 2 lower leakage current than those using boron ion implantation. However, the boron thermal doping process requires additional process steps to remove boron skins. (orig.)

  6. Analysis of heating effect on the process of high deposition rate microcrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Dan, Zhang; He, Zhang; Chang-Chun, Wei; Jian, Sun; Guo-Fu, Hou; Shao-Zhen, Xiong; Xin-Hua, Geng; Ying, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    A possible heating effect on the process of high deposition rate microcrystalline silicon has been studied. It includes the discharge time-accumulating heating effect, discharge power, inter-electrode distance, and total gas flow rate induced heating effect. It is found that the heating effects mentioned above are in some ways quite similar to and in other ways very different from each other. However, all of them will directly or indirectly cause the increase of the substrate surface temperature during the process of depositing microcrystalline silicon thin films, which will affect the properties of the materials with increasing time. This phenomenon is very serious for the high deposition rate of microcrystalline silicon thin films because of the high input power and the relatively small inter-electrode distance needed. Through analysis of the heating effects occurring in the process of depositing microcrystalline silicon, it is proposed that the discharge power and the heating temperature should be as low as possible, and the total gas flow rate and the inter-electrode distance should be suitable so that device-grade high quality deposition rate microcrystalline silicon thin films can be fabricated

  7. Experimental Demonstration of Phase Sensitive Parametric Processes in a Nano-Engineered Silicon Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Ning; Fadil, Ahmed; Pu, Minhao

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally phase-sensitive processes in nano-engineered silicon waveguides for the first time. Furthermore, we highlight paths towards the optimization of the phase-sensitive extinction ratio under the impact of two-photon and free-carrier absorption.......We demonstrate experimentally phase-sensitive processes in nano-engineered silicon waveguides for the first time. Furthermore, we highlight paths towards the optimization of the phase-sensitive extinction ratio under the impact of two-photon and free-carrier absorption....

  8. The silicon sensor for the compact muon solenoid tracker. Control of the fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolescu, Florentina; Mihul, Alexandru; Macchiolo, Anna

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN. The inner tracking system of this experiment consists of the world largest Silicon Strip Tracker (SST). In total, 24,244 silicon sensors are implemented covering an area of 206 m 2 . To construct this large system and to ensure its functionality for the full lifetime of ten years under the hard LHC condition, a detailed quality assurance program has been developed. This paper describes the strategy of the Process Qualification Control to monitor the stability of the fabrication process throughout the production phase and the results obtained are shown. (authors)

  9. Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckabee, M.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

    1991-09-10

    A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength is disclosed. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12 m[sup 2]/g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

  10. Kinetic Modeling of a Silicon Refining Process in a Moist Hydrogen Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Morita, Kazuki

    2018-06-01

    We developed a kinetic model that considers both silicon loss and boron removal in a metallurgical grade silicon refining process. This model was based on the hypotheses of reversible reactions. The reaction rate coefficient kept the same form but error of terminal boron concentration could be introduced when relating irreversible reactions. Experimental data from published studies were used to develop a model that fit the existing data. At 1500 °C, our kinetic analysis suggested that refining silicon in a moist hydrogen atmosphere generates several primary volatile species, including SiO, SiH, HBO, and HBO2. Using the experimental data and the kinetic analysis of volatile species, we developed a model that predicts a linear relationship between the reaction rate coefficient k and both the quadratic function of p(H2O) and the square root of p(H2). Moreover, the model predicted the partial pressure values for the predominant volatile species and the prediction was confirmed by the thermodynamic calculations, indicating the reliability of the model. We believe this model provides a foundation for designing a silicon refining process with a fast boron removal rate and low silicon loss.

  11. Temperature dependent investigation on optically active process of higher-order bands in irradiated silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yi; Nanjing Univ., JS; Wu Fengmei; Nanjing Univ., JS; Zheng Youdou; Nanjing Univ., JS; Suezawa, M.; Imai, M.; Sumino, K.

    1996-01-01

    Optically active processes of the higher-order bands (HOB) are investigated at different temperatures in fast neutron irradiated silicon using Fourier transform infrared absorption measurement. It is shown that the optically active process is nearly temperature independent below 80 K, the slow decay process remains up to a heating temperature of 180 K. The observations are analyzed in terms of the relaxation behavior of photoexcited carriers governed by fast neutron radiation induced defect clusters. (orig.)

  12. Design rules for RCA self-aligned silicon-gate CMOS/SOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The CMOS/SOS design rules prepared by the RCA Solid State Technology Center (SSTC) are described. These rules specify the spacing and width requirements for each of the six design levels, the seventh level being used to define openings in the passivation level. An associated report, entitled Silicon-Gate CMOS/SOS Processing, provides further insight into the usage of these rules.

  13. Construction process and read-out electronics of amorphous silicon position detectors for multipoint alignment monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, C.; Schubert, M.B.; Lutz, B.; Werner, J.H. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M.G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria IFCA/CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)] (and others)

    2009-09-01

    We describe the construction process of large-area high-performance transparent amorphous silicon position detecting sensors. Details about the characteristics of the associated local electronic board (LEB), specially designed for these sensors, are given. In addition we report on the performance of a multipoint alignment monitoring application of 12 sensors in a 13 m long light path.

  14. Additive advantage in characteristics of MIMCAPs on flexible silicon (100) fabric with release-first process

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Hussain, Aftab M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    We report the inherent increase in capacitance per unit planar area of state-of-the art high-κ integrated metal/insulator/metal capacitors (MIMCAPs) fabricated on flexible silicon fabric with release-first process. We methodically study and show

  15. Silicon Carbide (SiC) Power Processing Unit (PPU) for Hall Effect Thrusters, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR project, APEI, Inc. is proposing to develop a high efficiency, rad-hard 3.8 kW silicon carbide (SiC) power supply for the Power Processing Unit (PPU) of...

  16. Evaluation of selected chemical processes for production of low-cost silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, J. M., Jr.; Browning, M. F.; Wilson, W. J.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Plant construction costs and manufacturing costs were estimated for the production of solar-grade silicon by the reduction of silicon tetrachloride in a fluidized bed of seed particles, and several modifications of the iodide process using either thermal decomposition on heated filaments (rods) or hydrogen reduction in a fluidized bed of seed particles. Energy consumption data for the zinc reduction process and each of the iodide process options are given and all appear to be acceptable from the standpoint of energy pay back. Information is presented on the experimental zinc reduction of SiCl4 and electrolytic recovery of zinc from ZnCl2. All of the experimental work performed thus far has supported the initial assumption as to technical feasibility of producing semiconductor silicon by the zinc reduction or iodide processes proposed. The results of a more thorough thermodynamic evaluation of the iodination of silicon oxide/carbon mixtures are presented which explain apparent inconsistencies in an earlier cursory examination of the system.

  17. Laboratory evaluation of hot metal de siliconizing process in ladle; Avaliacao laboratorial do processo de dessiliciacao do gusa na panela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos, Sergio R.M.; Furtado, Henrique S.; Bentes, Miguel A.G.; Almeida, Pedro S. de [Companhia Siderurgica Nacional, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1996-12-31

    The attractiveness of hot metal de siliconizing in ladle, relative to the process in blast furnace runner, is the previous knowledge of silicon content of hot metal, without the constraints of slag removing by skimmer met in torpedo car, and the better efficiency in low range silicon content, making easier the process controllability. Meanwhile, the main question about this technology is the extent of the resulfurization of hot metal that may occur due to process be performed after the desulfurization. This work simulates de de siliconizing process in ladle by experiments in induction furnace to compare the efficiencies of various de siliconizing agents available at CSN iron and steel making plant, and to evaluate the resulfurization intensity able to occur during the process, as well as, unexpected increasing of refractory wear. (author) 4 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Non-fossil reduction materials in the silicon process - properties and behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrhaug, Edin Henrik

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this work has been to clarify the effect of using biocarbon as a reduction material in the silicon process. It was decided to compare the biocarbon with fossil carbon and find possible differences both on process performance and eventually on product quality. The elements in the raw materials added to the silicon process goes into three different products: silicon metal, silica dust and into open air. Based on analysis of raw materials and of produced silicon metal and microsilica extensive material balances have been established. One important result from these are the distribution factors that indicate how much of the trace elements that goes into each medium. Another result is that the boiling point of an element or a compound gives a good indication of were it ends. A high boiling point indicates that the element ends up in the silicon metal, while a low boiling point indicates that the element goes with off-gas into air. With an intermediate boiling point, the element goes into the silica dust. The SiO-reactivity of the reduction materials are commonly acknowledged to affect strongly the productivity and consumption figures of the silicon process. Based on data from thermogravimetric experiments with chemical reaction between carbonaceous spheres and SiO-gas, kinetic parameters have been estimated from the shrinking core model for some selected reduction materials of various sizes and spanning a wide range of SiO-reactivity figures. This model describes the degree of conversion versus time for a single sphere where the chemical reaction progresses in a topochemical manner from the outer surface of the solid towards the centre forming a porous product layer around an unreacted shrinking core. This behaviour is for the selected reduction materials to a large extent supported by an investigation of cross section pictures of fully and 50% converted spheres obtained with a microprobe. The estimated kinetic parameters obtained from the

  19. Process controls for radiation hardened aluminum gate bulk silicon CMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, B.L.

    1975-01-01

    Optimized dry oxides have recently yielded notable improvements in CMOS radiation-hardness. By following the proper procedures and recipes, it is now possible to produce devices which will function satisfactorily after exposure to a total ionizing dose in excess of 10 6 RADS (Si). This paper is concerned with the controls required on processing parameters once the optimized process is defined. In this process, the pre-irradiation electrical parameters must be closely controlled to insure that devices will function after irradiation. In particular, the specifications on n- and p-channel threshold voltages require tight control of fixed oxide charge, surface-state density, oxide thickness, and substrate and p-well surface concentrations. In order to achieve the above level of radiation hardness, certain processing procedures and parameters must also be closely controlled. Higher levels of cleanliness are required in the hardened process than are commonly required for commercial CMOS since, for hardened dry oxides, no impurity gettering can be employed during or after oxidation. Without such gettering, an unclean oxide is unacceptable due to bias-temperature instability. Correct pre-oxidation cleaning, residual surface damage removal, proper oxidation and annealing temperatures and times, and the correct metal sintering cycle are all important in determining device hardness. In a reproducible, hardened process, each of these processing steps must be closely controlled. (U.S.)

  20. 13th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes: Extended Abstracts and Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B. L.; Rand, J.; Saitoh, T.; Sinton, R.; Stavola, M.; Swanson, D.; Tan, T.; Weber, E.; Werner, J.; Al-Jassim, M.

    2003-08-01

    The 13th Workshop will provide a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. It will offer an excellent opportunity for researchers in private industry and at universities to prioritize mutual needs for future collaborative research. The workshop is intended to address the fundamental aspects of impurities and defects in silicon: their properties, the dynamics during device processing, and their application for developing low-cost processes for manufacturing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. A combination of oral, poster, and discussion sessions will review recent advances in crystal growth, new cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and cell fabrication approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands.

  1. Process control of high rate microcrystalline silicon based solar cell deposition by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilper, T.; Donker, M.N. van den; Carius, R.; Rech, B.; Braeuer, G.; Repmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon thin-film solar cells based on microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) were prepared in a 30 x 30 cm 2 plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor using 13.56 or 40.68 MHz plasma excitation frequency. Plasma emission was recorded by optical emission spectroscopy during μc-Si:H absorber layer deposition at deposition rates between 0.5 and 2.5 nm/s. The time course of SiH * and H β emission indicated strong drifts in the process conditions particularly at low total gas flows. By actively controlling the SiH 4 gas flow, the observed process drifts were successfully suppressed resulting in a more homogeneous i-layer crystallinity along the growth direction. In a deposition regime with efficient usage of the process gas, the μc-Si:H solar cell efficiency was enhanced from 7.9 % up to 8.8 % by applying process control

  2. An amorphous silicon photodiode with 2 THz gain-bandwidth product based on cycling excitation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lujiang; Yu, Yugang; Zhang, Alex Ce; Hall, David; Niaz, Iftikhar Ahmad; Raihan Miah, Mohammad Abu; Liu, Yu-Hsin; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2017-09-01

    Since impact ionization was observed in semiconductors over half a century ago, avalanche photodiodes (APDs) using impact ionization in a fashion of chain reaction have been the most sensitive semiconductor photodetectors. However, APDs have relatively high excess noise, a limited gain-bandwidth product, and high operation voltage, presenting a need for alternative signal amplification mechanisms of superior properties. As an amplification mechanism, the cycling excitation process (CEP) was recently reported in a silicon p-n junction with subtle control and balance of the impurity levels and profiles. Realizing that CEP effect depends on Auger excitation involving localized states, we made the counter intuitive hypothesis that disordered materials, such as amorphous silicon, with their abundant localized states, can produce strong CEP effects with high gain and speed at low noise, despite their extremely low mobility and large number of defects. Here, we demonstrate an amorphous silicon low noise photodiode with gain-bandwidth product of over 2 THz, based on a very simple structure. This work will impact a wide range of applications involving optical detection because amorphous silicon, as the primary gain medium, is a low-cost, easy-to-process material that can be formed on many kinds of rigid or flexible substrates.

  3. Evaluation of selected chemical processes for production of low-cost silicon phase 2. silicon material task, low-cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, J. M., Jr.; Browning, M. F.; Rose, E. E.; Thompson, W. B.; Schmitt, W. A.; Fippin, J. S.; Kidd, R. W.; Liu, C. Y.; Kerbler, P. S.; Ackley, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Progress from October 1, 1977, through December 31, 1977, is reported in the design of the 50 MT/year experimental facility for the preparation of high purity silicon by the zinc vapor reduction of silicon tetrachloride in a fluidized bed of seed particles to form a free flowing granular product.

  4. Eighth Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes; Summary Discussion Sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopori, B.; Swanson, D.; Sinton, R.; Stavola, M.; Tan, T.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a summary of the panel discussions included with the Eighth Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes. The theme of the workshop was ''Supporting the Transition to World Class Manufacturing.'' This workshop provided a forum for an informal exchange of information between researchers in the photovoltaic and nonphotovoltaic fields on various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon, their dynamics during device processing, and their application in defect engineering. This interaction helped establish a knowledge base that can be used for improving device-fabrication processes to enhance solar-cell performance and reduce cell costs. It also provided an excellent opportunity for researchers from industry and universities to recognize mutual needs for future joint research

  5. Thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, 1 April 1980-30 June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, K. R.; Rice, M. J.; Legge, R.; Ellis, R. J.

    1980-06-01

    During this third quarter of the program, the high pressure plasma (hpp) deposition process has been thoroughly evaluated using SiHCl/sub 3/ and SiCl/sub 4/ silicon source gases, by the gas chromatographic analysis of the effluent gases from the reactor. Both the deposition efficiency and reactor throughput rate were found to be consistently higher for hpp mode of operation compared to conventional CVD mode. The figure of merit for various chlorosilanes as a silicon source gas for hpp deposition is discussed. A new continuous silicon film deposition scheme is developed, and system design is initiated. This new system employs gas interlocks and eliminates the need for gas curtains which have been found to be problematic. Solar cells (2 cm x 2 cm area) with AM1 efficiencies of up to 12% were fabricated on RTR grain enhanced hpp deposited films. The parameters of a 12% cell under simulated AM1 illumination were: V/sub OC/ = 0.582 volts, J/sub SC/ = 28.3 mA/cm/sup 2/ and F.F. = 73.0%.

  6. Simple processing of back-contacted silicon heterojunction solar cells using selective-area crystalline growth

    KAUST Repository

    Tomasi, Andrea; Paviet-Salomon, Bertrand; Jeangros, Quentin; Haschke, Jan; Christmann, Gabriel; Barraud, Loris; Descoeudres, Antoine; Seif, Johannes Peter; Nicolay, Sylvain; Despeisse, Matthieu; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    For crystalline-silicon solar cells, voltages close to the theoretical limit are nowadays readily achievable when using passivating contacts. Conversely, maximal current generation requires the integration of the electron and hole contacts at the back of the solar cell to liberate its front from any shadowing loss. Recently, the world-record efficiency for crystalline-silicon single-junction solar cells was achieved by merging these two approaches in a single device; however, the complexity of fabricating this class of devices raises concerns about their commercial potential. Here we show a contacting method that substantially simplifies the architecture and fabrication of back-contacted silicon solar cells. We exploit the surface-dependent growth of silicon thin films, deposited by plasma processes, to eliminate the patterning of one of the doped carrier-collecting layers. Then, using only one alignment step for electrode definition, we fabricate a proof-of-concept 9-cm2 tunnel-interdigitated back-contact solar cell with a certified conversion efficiency >22.5%.

  7. Simple processing of back-contacted silicon heterojunction solar cells using selective-area crystalline growth

    KAUST Repository

    Tomasi, Andrea

    2017-04-24

    For crystalline-silicon solar cells, voltages close to the theoretical limit are nowadays readily achievable when using passivating contacts. Conversely, maximal current generation requires the integration of the electron and hole contacts at the back of the solar cell to liberate its front from any shadowing loss. Recently, the world-record efficiency for crystalline-silicon single-junction solar cells was achieved by merging these two approaches in a single device; however, the complexity of fabricating this class of devices raises concerns about their commercial potential. Here we show a contacting method that substantially simplifies the architecture and fabrication of back-contacted silicon solar cells. We exploit the surface-dependent growth of silicon thin films, deposited by plasma processes, to eliminate the patterning of one of the doped carrier-collecting layers. Then, using only one alignment step for electrode definition, we fabricate a proof-of-concept 9-cm2 tunnel-interdigitated back-contact solar cell with a certified conversion efficiency >22.5%.

  8. Visualization of nanosecond laser-induced dewetting, ablation and crystallization processes in thin silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dongfeng; Zhang, Zifeng; Yu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yawen

    2018-06-01

    In the present work, nanosecond pulsed laser crystallization, dewetting and ablation of thin amorphous silicon films are investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 7 ns temporal width are irradiated on silicon film. Below the dewetting threshold, crystallization process happens after 400 ns laser irradiation in the spot central region. With the increasing of laser fluence, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 300 ns after the laser irradiation, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to solidification of transported matter at about 500 ns following the laser pulse exposure.

  9. Microstructure and wear behavior of friction stir processed cast hypereutectic aluminum silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rosli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypereutectic as-cast Al-18Si-Cu-Ni alloy was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP. The resultant effect of FSP on the alloy was evaluated by microstructure analysis and wear tests (dry sliding. A significant microstructural modification and enhancement in wear behavior of Al-18Si-Cu-Ni alloy was recorded after friction stir processing. Wear resistance improvement was related to considerable modification in size, morphology and distribution of silicon particles, and hardness improvement. It was found that lower tool rotation speed was more effective to refine silicon particles and in turn increase wear resistance. Minimum Si particle mean area of about 47.8 µm2, and wear rate of 0.0155 mg/m was achieved.

  10. Impact of the brewing process on the concentration of silicon in lager beer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krausová, Ivana; Cejnar, R.; Kučera, Jan; Dostálek, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2014), s. 433-437 ISSN 0046-9750 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : beer * brewing * hops * INAA * malt * silicon Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2014

  11. 17th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B. L.

    2007-08-01

    The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 17th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells & Modules: Materials and Processes, held in Vail, CO, August 5-8, 2007. This meeting provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The theme of this year's meeting was 'Expanding Technology for a Future Powered by Si Photovoltaics.'

  12. Gamma radiation processing dosimetry with commercial silicon diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Danilo Cardenuto

    2009-01-01

    This work envisages the development of dosimeters based on Si diodes for gamma radiation dosimetry from 1 Gy up to 100 Gy. This dose range is frequently utilized in radiation processing of crystal modifications, polymers crosslinking and biological studies carried out in the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP. The dosimeter was constructed by a commercial SFH00206 (Siemens) Si diode, operating in a photovoltaic mode, whose electrical characteristics are suitable for this application. The current generated in the device by the Cobalt-60 gamma radiation from the Irradiators types I and II was registered with a digital electrometer and stored during the exposure time. In all measurements, the current signals of the diode registered as a function of the exposure time were very stable. Furthermore, the device photocurrent was linearly dependent on the dose rate within a range of 6.1x10 -2 Gy/min up to 1.9x10 2 Gy/min. The calibration curves of the dosimeters, e.g., the average charge registered as a function of the absorbed dose were obtained by the integration of the current signals as a function of the exposure time. The results showed a linear response of the dosimeter with a correlation coefficient better than 0.998 for total absorbed dose up to 120 Gy. Finally, due to the small experimental errors 5 % it was also possible to measure the transit dose due to the movement of the Cobalto- 60 radioactive sources in irradiation facilities used in this work. (author)

  13. Achievement Report for fiscal 1997 on developing a silicon manufacturing process with reduced energy consumption. Development of silicon mass-production manufacturing technology for solar cells; 1997 nendo energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu. Taiyo denchiyo silicon ryosanka seizo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In order to manufacture silicon for solar cells, development is intended on a technology to manufacture silicon (SOG-Si) for solar cells by means of metallurgical methods using metallic silicon with purity generally available as an interim starting material. The silicon is required of p-type electric conductivity characteristics with specific resistance of 0.5 to 1.5 ohm per cm, to be sufficient even with 6-7N as compared to silicon for semiconductors (11-N), and to be low in cost. While the NEDO fluid bed process and the metallurgical NEDO direct reduction process have been developed based on the technology to manufacture silicon for semiconductors, the basic policy was established to develop a new manufacturing method using commercially available high-purity metallic silicon as an interim starting material, with an objective to achieve cost as low as capable of responding to small-quantity phase production for proliferation purpose. Removal of boron and phosphor has been the main issue in the development, whereas SOG-Si was manufactured in a laboratory scale by combining with the conventional component technologies in fiscal 1991 and 1992. The scale was expanded to 20 kg since fiscal 1993, and a five year plan starting fiscal 1996 was decided to develop the technology for industrial scale. Fiscal 1997 has promoted the development by using the 20-kg scale device, and introduced facilities to develop technology for mass-production scale. (NEDO)

  14. Plasma monitoring and PECVD process control in thin film silicon-based solar cell manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Onno

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A key process in thin film silicon-based solar cell manufacturing is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD of the active layers. The deposition process can be monitored in situ by plasma diagnostics. Three types of complementary diagnostics, namely optical emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and non-linear extended electron dynamics are applied to an industrial-type PECVD reactor. We investigated the influence of substrate and chamber wall temperature and chamber history on the PECVD process. The impact of chamber wall conditioning on the solar cell performance is demonstrated.

  15. Integrated porous-silicon light-emitting diodes: A fabrication process using graded doping profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillaro, G.; Diligenti, A.; Pieri, F.; Fuso, F.; Allegrini, M.

    2001-01-01

    A fabrication process, compatible with an industrial bipolar+complementary metal - oxide - semiconductor (MOS)+diffusion MOS technology, has been developed for the fabrication of efficient porous-silicon-based light-emitting diodes. The electrical contact is fabricated with a double n + /p doping, achieving a high current injection efficiency and thus lower biasing voltages. The anodization is performed as the last step of the process, thus reducing potential incompatibilities with industrial processes. The fabricated devices show yellow-orange electroluminescence, visible with the naked eye in room lighting. A spectral characterization of light emission is presented and briefly discussed. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  16. Process research of non-cz silicon material. Low cost solar array project, cell and module formation research area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid diffusion masks and liquid applied dopants to replace the CVD Silox masking and gaseous diffusion operations specified for forming junctions in the Westinghouse baseline process sequence for producing solar cells from dendritic web silicon were investigated.

  17. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  18. Process Research On Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM). [flat plate solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culik, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    The performance-limiting mechanisms in large-grain (greater than 1 to 2 mm in diameter) polycrystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by fabricating a matrix of 4 sq cm solar cells of various thickness from 10 cm x 10 cm polycrystalline silicon wafers of several bulk resistivities. Analysis of the illuminated I-V characteristics of these cells suggests that bulk recombination is the dominant factor limiting the short-circuit current. The average open-circuit voltage of the polycrystalline solar cells is 30 to 70 mV lower than that of co-processed single-crystal cells; the fill-factor is comparable. Both open-circuit voltage and fill-factor of the polycrystalline cells have substantial scatter that is not related to either thickness or resistivity. This implies that these characteristics are sensitive to an additional mechanism that is probably spatial in nature. A damage-gettering heat-treatment improved the minority-carrier diffusion length in low lifetime polycrystalline silicon, however, extended high temperature heat-treatment degraded the lifetime.

  19. Study of nano-metric silicon carbide powder sintering. Application to fibers processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinge, A.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide ceramic matrix composites (SiCf/SiCm) are of interest for high temperature applications in aerospace or nuclear components for their relatively high thermal conductivity and low activation under neutron irradiation. While most of silicon carbide fibers are obtained through the pyrolysis of a poly-carbo-silane precursor, sintering of silicon carbide nano-powders seems to be a promising route to explore. For this reason, pressureless sintering of SiC has been studied. Following the identification of appropriate sintering aids for the densification, optimization of the microstructure has been achieved through (i) the analysis of the influence of operating parameters and (ii) the control of the SiC β a SiC α phase transition. Green fibers have been obtained by two different processes involving the extrusion of SiC powder dispersion in polymer solution or the coagulation of a water-soluble polymer containing ceramic particles. Sintering of these green fibers led to fibers of around fifty microns in diameter. (author) [fr

  20. Non-Vacuum Processed Polymer Composite Antireflection Coating Films for Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Uzum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A non-vacuum processing method for preparing polymer-based ZrO2/TiO2 multilayer structure antireflection coating (ARC films for crystalline silicon solar cells by spin coating is introduced. Initially, ZrO2, TiO2 and surface deactivated-TiO2 (SD-TiO2 based films were examined separately and the effect of photocatalytic properties of TiO2 film on the reflectivity on silicon surface was investigated. Degradation of the reflectance performance with increasing reflectivity of up to 2% in the ultraviolet region was confirmed. No significant change of the reflectance was observed when utilizing SD-TiO2 and ZrO2 films. Average reflectance (between 300 nm–1100 nm of the silicon surface coated with optimized polymer-based ZrO2 single or ZrO2/SD-TiO2 multilayer composite films was decreased down to 6.5% and 5.5%, respectively. Improvement of photocurrent density (Jsc and conversion efficiency (η of fabricated silicon solar cells owing to the ZrO2/SD-TiO2 multilayer ARC could be confirmed. The photovoltaic properties of Jsc, the open-circuit photo voltage (VOC, the fill factor (FF, and the η were 31.42 mA cm−2, 575 mV, 71.5% and 12.91%. Efficiency of the solar cells was improved by the ZrO2-polymer/SD-TiO2 polymer ARC composite layer by a factor of 0.8% with an increase of Jsc (2.07 mA cm−2 compared to those of fabricated without the ARC.

  1. Optimization of oxidation processes to improve crystalline silicon solar cell emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Shen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Control of the oxidation process is one key issue in producing high-quality emitters for crystalline silicon solar cells. In this paper, the oxidation parameters of pre-oxidation time, oxygen concentration during pre-oxidation and pre-deposition and drive-in time were optimized by using orthogonal experiments. By analyzing experimental measurements of short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, series resistance and solar cell efficiency in solar cells with different sheet resistances which were produced by using different diffusion processes, we inferred that an emitter with a sheet resistance of approximately 70 Ω/□ performed best under the existing standard solar cell process. Further investigations were conducted on emitters with sheet resistances of approximately 70 Ω/□ that were obtained from different preparation processes. The results indicate that emitters with surface phosphorus concentrations between 4.96 × 1020 cm−3 and 7.78 × 1020 cm−3 and with junction depths between 0.46 μm and 0.55 μm possessed the best quality. With no extra processing, the final preparation of the crystalline silicon solar cell efficiency can reach 18.41%, which is an increase of 0.4%abs compared to conventional emitters with 50 Ω/□ sheet resistance.

  2. Subsurface damage mechanism of high speed grinding process in single crystal silicon revealed by atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Zhang, Liangchi; Liu, Youwen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular dynamic model of nanoscale high speed grinding of silicon workpiece has been established. • The effect of grinding speed on subsurface damage and grinding surface integrity by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and phase transformation during high speed grinding process are thoroughly investigated. • Subsurface damage is studied by the evolution of surface area at first time for more obvious observation on transition from ductile to brittle. • The hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress by the established analytical model are studied subsurface damage mechanism during nanoscale grinding. - Abstract: Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the nanoscale grinding process of single crystal silicon using diamond tool. The effect of grinding speed on subsurface damage and grinding surface integrity by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and phase transformation are studied. We also establish an analytical model to calculate several important stress fields including hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress for studying subsurface damage mechanism, and obtain the dislocation density on the grinding subsurface. The results show that a higher grinding velocity in machining brittle material silicon causes a larger chip and a higher temperature, and reduces subsurface damage. However, when grinding velocity is above 180 m s −1 , subsurface damage thickness slightly increases because a higher grinding speed leads to the increase in grinding force and temperature, which accelerate dislocation nucleation and motion. Subsurface damage is studied by the evolution of surface area at first time for more obvious observation on transition from ductile to brittle, that provides valuable reference for machining nanometer devices. The von Mises stress and the hydrostatic stress play an important role in the grinding process, and explain the subsurface damage though dislocation mechanism under high

  3. Comparison of laser chemical processing and lasermicrojet for structuring and cutting silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopman, Sybille; Fell, Andreas; Mayer, Kuno; Mesec, Matthias; Rodofili, Andreas; Kray, Daniel [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    This paper deals with the development of a new cutting method for thin silicon solar wafers with liquid-jet-guided lasers (lasermicrojet {sup registered}, LMJ, and laser chemical processing, LCP). Several laser systems with different wavelengths were tested to find the optimum laser system and processing parameters in terms of efficient material removal and deep laser cutting. Water and potassium hydroxide were used as carrier liquids to enhance laser ablation. The ablation efficiency was defined as a target parameter and experimentally determined by performing single laser grooves. It is demonstrated that the ablation process of LMJ is mainly affected by silicon melting and then removing by the liquid-jet momentum for single laser grooves. Best result for deep laser grooves is achieved if evaporation dominates the ablation process. Better surface quality referred to laser-induced crystalline damage is presented for a cut wafer with LMJ in comparison to a standard multiwire slurry saw. This shows a great potential of wafering with liquid-jet-guided lasers although no optimal liquid media was used. (orig.)

  4. Ultra-high speed all-optical signal processing using silicon waveguides and a carbon nanotubes based mode-locked laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua

    This thesis concerns the use of nano-engineered silicon waveguides for ultra-high speed optical serial data signal processing. The fundamental nonlinear properties of nano-engineered silicon waveguides are characterized. Utilizing the nonlinear effect in nano-engineered silicon waveguides for dem...

  5. Optimization of a plasma immersion ion implantation process for shallow junctions in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Ashok; Nori, Rajashree; Bhatt, Piyush; Lodha, Saurabh; Pinto, Richard, E-mail: rpinto@ee.iitb.ac.in; Rao, Valipe Ramgopal [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Jomard, François; Neumann-Spallart, Michael [Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée, C.N.R.S./Université de Versailles-St.Quentin, 45, Avenue des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01

    A plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process has been developed for realizing shallow doping profiles of phosphorus and boron in silicon using an in-house built dual chamber cluster tool. High Si etch rates observed in a 5% PH{sub 3} in H{sub 2} plasma have been ascribed to high concentration of H(α) radicals. Therefore, subsequent work was carried out with 5% PH{sub 3} in He, leading to much smaller etch rates. By optical emission spectroscopy, the radical species H(α), PH*{sub 2}, and PH* have been identified. The concentration of all three species increased with pressure. Also, ion concentrations increased with pressure as evidenced by Langmuir data, with a maximum occurring at 0.12 mbar. The duty cycle of pulsed DC bias has a significant bearing on both the implantation and the etching process as it controls the leakage of positive charge collected at the surface of the silicon wafer during pulse on-time generated primarily due to secondary electron emission. The P implant process was optimized for a duty cycle of 10% or less at a pressure of 0.12 mbar with implant times as low as 30 s. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed a P dopant depth of 145 nm after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 950 °C for 5 s, resulting in a sheet resistance of 77 Ω/◻. Si n{sup +}/p diodes fabricated with phosphorus implantation using optimized PIII and RTA conditions exhibit J{sub on}/J{sub off} > 10{sup 6} with an ideality factor of nearly 1.2. Using similar conditions, shallow doping profiles of B in silicon have also been realized.

  6. Development of processing procedures for advanced silicon solar cells. [antireflection coatings and short circuit currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Stella, P. M.; Avery, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Ten ohm-cm silicon solar cells, 0.2 mm thick, were produced with short circuit current efficiencies up to thirteen percent and using a combination of recent technical advances. The cells were fabricated in conventional and wraparound contact configurations. Improvement in cell collection efficiency from both the short and long wavelengths region of the solar spectrum was obtained by coupling a shallow junction and an optically transparent antireflection coating with back surface field technology. Both boron diffusion and aluminum alloying techniques were evaluated for forming back surface field cells. The latter method is less complicated and is compatible with wraparound cell processing.

  7. Silicon scaffolds promoting three-dimensional neuronal web of cytoplasmic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Evie L; Samara, Athina; Barberoglou, Marios; Manousaki, Aleka; Pagakis, Stamatis N; Anastasiadou, Ema; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2010-06-01

    Primary neurons were grown on structured silicon (Si) substrates, in the absence of chemotropic factors or synthetic extracellular matrix. The Si substrates used for the study comprise hierarchical structures in the micro- and nanolength scales. The substrates were structured via femtosecond laser irradiation of the Si wafer, in a reactive SF(6) environment. Electron microscopy revealed that the neurons formed an elaborate web of cytoplasmic processes in the absence of glial elements. The neuronal cytoplasm autografted the depth of the spikes, and the neurite sprouting took place over the spikes surface. Here we demonstrate how microfabrication of a Si surface provides an excellent platform for multifaceted studies of neuronal specimens.

  8. Thin film silicon solar cells: advanced processing and characterization - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballif, Ch.

    2008-04-15

    This final report elaborated for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the results of a project carried out at the photovoltaics laboratory at the University of Neuchatel in Switzerland. The project aimed to demonstrate the production of high-efficiency thin-film silicon devices on flexible substrates using low cost processes. New ways of improving processing and characterisation are examined. The process and manufacturing know-how necessary to provide support for industrial partners within the framework of further projects is discussed. The authors state that the efficiency of most devices was significantly improved, both on glass substrates and on flexible plastic foils. The process reproducibility was also improved and the interactions between the different layers in the device are now said to be better understood. The report presents the results obtained and discusses substrate materials, transparent conductors, defect analyses and new characterisation tools. Finally, the laboratory infrastructure is described.

  9. Nanocomposited coatings produced by laser-assisted process to prevent silicone hydogels from protein fouling and bacterial contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Guobang; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nanocomposited-coating was deposited on silicone hydrogel by using the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) process. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel, and can inhibit the bacterial growth efficiently. - Highlights: • We developed a nanocomposited coating to prevent silicone hydrogel from biofouling. • Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation can deposit inorganic–organic nanomaterials. • The designed nanocomposited coating reduces protein absorption by over 50%. • The designed nanocomposited coating shows significant antimicrobial efficiency. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles incorporating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were deposited together on the surface of silicone hydrogel through matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). In this process, frozen nanocomposites (ZnO–PEG) in isopropanol were irradiated under a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm for 1 h. Our results indicate that the MAPLE process is able to maintain the chemical backbone of polymer and prevent the nanocomposite coating from contamination. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel. The cytotoxicity study shows that the ZnO–PEG nanocomposites deposited on silicone hydrogels do not impose the toxic effect on mouse NIH/3T3 cells. In addition, MAPLE-deposited ZnO–PEG nanocomposites can inhibit the bacterial growth significantly.

  10. Single Side Electrolytic In-Process Dressing (ELID) Grinding with Lapping Kinematics of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshaim, Ahmed Bakr

    The demand for Silicon Carbide ceramics (SiC) has increased significantly in the last decade due to its reliable physical and chemical properties. The silicon carbide is widely used for aerospace segments in addition to many uses in the industry. Sometimes, a single side grinding is preferable than conventional grinding, for it has the ability to produce flat ceramics. However, the manufacturing cost is still high because of the high tool wear and long machining time. Part of the solution is to use electrolytic in process dressing (ELID) to reduce the processing time. The study on ELID single side grinding of ceramics has never been attempted before. The study involves four variables with three levels each. One of the variables, which is the eccentricity, is being investigated for the first time on ceramics. A full factorial design, for both the surface roughness and material removal rate, guides to calculate mathematical models that can predict future results. Three grinding wheel mesh sizes are used. An investigation of the influence of different grain size on the results can then be evaluated. The kinematics of the process was studied based on eccentricity in order to optimize the pattern of the diamond grains. The experiment is performed with the assist of the proposed specialized ELID fluid, TRIM C270E.

  11. Effects of processing and dopant on radiation damage removal in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Swartz, C. K.; Mehta, S.

    1982-01-01

    Gallium and boron doped silicon solar cells, processed by ion-implantation followed by either laser or furnace anneal were irradiated by 1 MeV electrons and their post-irradiation recovery by thermal annealing determined. During the post-irradiation anneal, gallium-doped cells prepared by both processes recovered more rapidly and exhibited none of the severe reverse annealing observed for similarly processed 2 ohm-cm boron doped cells. Ion-implanted furnace annealed 0.1 ohm-cm boron doped cells exhibited the lowest post-irradiation annealing temperatures (200 C) after irradiation to 5 x 10 to the 13th e(-)/sq cm. The drastically lowered recovery temperature is attributed to the reduced oxygen and carbon content of the 0.1 ohm-cm cells. Analysis based on defect properties and annealing kinetics indicates that further reduction in annealing temperature should be attainable with further reduction in the silicon's carbon and/or divacancy content after irradiation.

  12. Development of a Self Aligned CMOS Process for Flash Lamp Annealed Polycrystalline Silicon TFTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Paul

    The emerging active matrix liquid crystal (AMLCD) display market requires a high performing semiconductor material to meet rising standards of operation. Currently amorphous silicon (a-Si) dominates the market but it does not have the required mobility for it to be used in AMLCD manufacturing. Other materials have been developed including crystallizing a-Si into poly-silicon. A new approach to crystallization through the use of flash lamp annealing (FLA) decreases manufacturing time and greatly improves carrier mobility. Previous work on FLA silicon for the use in CMOS transistors revealed significant lateral dopant diffusion into the channel greatly increasing the minimum channel length required for a working device. This was further confounded by the gate overlap due to misalignment during lithography patterning steps. Through the use of furnace dopant activation instead of FLA dopant activation and a self aligned gate the minimum size transistor can be greatly reduced. A new lithography mask and process flow were developed for the furnace annealing and self aligned gate. Fabrication of the self aligned devices resulted in oxidation of the Molybdenum self aligned gate. Further development is needed to successfully manufacture these devices. Non-self aligned transistors were made simultaneously with self aligned devices and used the furnace activation. These devices showed an increase in sheet resistance from 250 O to 800 O and lower mobility from 380 to 40.2 V/cm2s. The lower mobility can be contributed to an increase in implanted trap density indicating furnace annealing is an inferior activation method over FLA. The minimum transistor size however was reduced from 20 to 5 mum. With improvements in the self aligned process high performing small devices can be manufactured.

  13. Ninth workshop on crystalline silicon solar cell materials and processes: Summary discussion sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Swanson, D.; Rosenblum, M.; Sinton, R.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a summary of the panel discussions included with the Ninth Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes. The theme for the workshop was ''R and D Challenges and Opportunities in Si Photovoltaics''. This theme was chosen because it appropriately reflects a host of challenges that the growing production of Si photovoltaics will be facing in the new millennium. The anticipated challenges will arise in developing strategies for cost reduction, increased production, higher throughput per manufacturing line, new sources of low-cost Si, and the introduction of new manufacturing processes for cell production. At the same time, technologies based on CdTe and CIS will come on line posing new competition. With these challenges come new opportunities for Si PV to wean itself from the microelectronics industry, to embark on a more aggressive program in thin-film Si solar cells, and to try new approaches to process monitoring

  14. Geochemistry of silicon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Tiping; Li, Yanhe; Gao, Jianfei; Hu, Bin [Chinese Academy of Geological Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Mineral Resources; Jiang, Shaoyong [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China).

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and silicon isotope geochemistry is important in identifying the silicon source for various geological bodies and in studying the behavior of silicon in different geological processes. This book starts with an introduction on the development of silicon isotope geochemistry. Various analytical methods are described and compared with each other in detail. The mechanisms of silicon isotope fractionation are discussed, and silicon isotope distributions in various extraterrestrial and terrestrial reservoirs are updated. Besides, the applications of silicon isotopes in several important fields are presented.

  15. Polycrystalline silicon ring resonator photodiodes in a bulk complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karan K; Orcutt, Jason S; Shainline, Jeffrey M; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Meade, Roy; Popović, Miloš A; Ram, Rajeev J

    2014-02-15

    We present measurements on resonant photodetectors utilizing sub-bandgap absorption in polycrystalline silicon ring resonators, in which light is localized in the intrinsic region of a p+/p/i/n/n+ diode. The devices, operating both at λ=1280 and λ=1550  nm and fabricated in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) dynamic random-access memory emulation process, exhibit detection quantum efficiencies around 20% and few-gigahertz response bandwidths. We observe this performance at low reverse biases in the range of a few volts and in devices with dark currents below 50 pA at 10 V. These results demonstrate that such photodetector behavior, previously reported by Preston et al. [Opt. Lett. 36, 52 (2011)], is achievable in bulk CMOS processes, with significant improvements with respect to the previous work in quantum efficiency, dark current, linearity, bandwidth, and operating bias due to additional midlevel doping implants and different material deposition. The present work thus offers a robust realization of a fully CMOS-fabricated all-silicon photodetector functional across a wide wavelength range.

  16. Densification of silicon and zirconium carbides by a new process: spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillard, F.

    2006-12-01

    Materials research for suitable utilization in 4. generation nuclear plants needs new ways to densify testing components. Two carbides, silicon and zirconium carbide seems to be the most suitable choice due to their mechanical, thermal and neutron-transparency properties against next nuclear plant specifications. Nevertheless one main difficulty remains, which is densifying them even at high temperature. Spark Plasma Sintering a new metal-, ceramic- and composite-sintering process has been used to densify both SiC and ZrC. Understanding bases of mass transport mechanisms in SPS have been studied. Composites and interfaces have been processed and analyzed. This manuscript reports original results on SiC and ZrC ceramics sintered with commercial powder started, without additives. (author)

  17. Eighth workshop on crystalline silicon solar cell materials and processes: Extended abstracts and papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The theme of this workshop is Supporting the Transition to World Class Manufacturing. This workshop provides a forum for an informal exchange of information between researchers in the photovoltaic and non-photovoltaic fields on various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon, their dynamics during device processing, and their application in defect engineering. This interaction helps establish a knowledge base that can be used for improving device fabrication processes to enhance solar-cell performance and reduce cell costs. It also provides an excellent opportunity for researchers from industry and universities to recognize mutual needs for future joint research. The workshop format features invited review presentations, panel discussions, and two poster sessions. The poster sessions create an opportunity for both university and industrial researchers to present their latest results and provide a natural forum for extended discussions and technical exchanges.

  18. CMOS compatible generic batch process towards flexible memory on bulk monocrystalline silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.

    2014-12-01

    Today\\'s mainstream flexible electronics research is geared towards replacing silicon either totally, by having organic devices on organic substrates, or partially, by transferring inorganic devices onto organic substrates. In this work, we present a pragmatic approach combining the desired flexibility of organic substrates and the ultra-high integration density, inherent in silicon semiconductor industry, to transform bulk/inflexible silicon into an ultra-thin mono-crystalline fabric. We also show the effectiveness of this approach in achieving fully flexible electronic systems. Furthermore, we provide a progress report on fabricating various memory devices on flexible silicon fabric and insights for completely flexible memory modules on silicon fabric.

  19. CMOS compatible generic batch process towards flexible memory on bulk monocrystalline silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Kutbee, Arwa T.; Hanna, Amir; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Today's mainstream flexible electronics research is geared towards replacing silicon either totally, by having organic devices on organic substrates, or partially, by transferring inorganic devices onto organic substrates. In this work, we present a pragmatic approach combining the desired flexibility of organic substrates and the ultra-high integration density, inherent in silicon semiconductor industry, to transform bulk/inflexible silicon into an ultra-thin mono-crystalline fabric. We also show the effectiveness of this approach in achieving fully flexible electronic systems. Furthermore, we provide a progress report on fabricating various memory devices on flexible silicon fabric and insights for completely flexible memory modules on silicon fabric.

  20. Enhancing shelf life of minimally processed multiplier onion using silicone membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ravindra; Ambrose, Dawn C P; Raghavan, G S Vijaya; Annamalai, S J K

    2014-12-01

    The aim of storage of minimal processed product is to increase the shelf life and thereby extend the period of availability of minimally processed produce. The silicone membrane makes use of the ability of polymer to permit selective passage of gases at different rates according to their physical and chemical properties. Here, the product stored maintains its own atmosphere by the combined effects of respiration process of the commodity and the diffusion rate through the membrane. A study was undertaken to enhance the shelf life of minimally processed multiplier onion with silicone membrane. The respiration activity was recorded at a temperature of 30 ± 2 °C (RH = 60 %) and 5 ± 1 °C (RH = 90 %). The respiration was found to be 23.4, 15.6, 10 mg CO2kg(-1)h(-1) at 5 ± 1 °C and 140, 110, 60 mg CO2kg(-1) h(-1) at 30 ± 2° for the peeled, sliced and diced multiplier onion, respectively. The respiration rate for the fresh multiplier onion was recorded to be 5, 10 mg CO2kg(-1) h(-1) at 5 ± 1 °C and 30 ± 1 ° C, respectively. Based on the shelf life studies and on the sensory evaluation, it was found that only the peeled multiplier onion could be stored. The sliced and diced multiplier onion did not have the required shelf life. The shelf life of the multiplier onion in the peel form could be increased from 4-5 days to 14 days by using the combined effect of silicone membrane (6 cm(2)/kg) and low temperature (5 ± 1 °C).

  1. Process design and simulation for optimizing the oxygen concentration in Czochralski-grown single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y. J.; Kim, W. K.; Jung, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The highest-concentration impurity in a single-crystal silicon ingot is oxygen, which infiltrates the ingot during growth stage. This oxygen adversely affects the wafer is quality. This study was aimed at finding an optimal design for the Czochralski (Cz) process to enable high-quality and low cost (by reducing power consumption) wafer production by controlling the oxygen concentration in the silicon ingots. In the Cz process, the characteristics of silicon ingots during crystallization are greatly influenced by the design and the configuration of the hot zone, and by crystallization rate. In order to identify process conditions for obtaining an optimal oxygen concentration of 11 - 13 ppma (required for industrial-grade ingots), designed two shield shapes for the hot zone. Furthermore, oxygen concentrations corresponding to these two shapes were compared by evaluating each shape at five different production speeds. In addition, simulations were performed to identify the optimal shield design for industrial applications.

  2. Process design and simulation for optimizing the oxygen concentration in Czochralski-grown single-crystal silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Y. J.; Kim, W. K.; Jung, J. H. [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The highest-concentration impurity in a single-crystal silicon ingot is oxygen, which infiltrates the ingot during growth stage. This oxygen adversely affects the wafer is quality. This study was aimed at finding an optimal design for the Czochralski (Cz) process to enable high-quality and low cost (by reducing power consumption) wafer production by controlling the oxygen concentration in the silicon ingots. In the Cz process, the characteristics of silicon ingots during crystallization are greatly influenced by the design and the configuration of the hot zone, and by crystallization rate. In order to identify process conditions for obtaining an optimal oxygen concentration of 11 - 13 ppma (required for industrial-grade ingots), designed two shield shapes for the hot zone. Furthermore, oxygen concentrations corresponding to these two shapes were compared by evaluating each shape at five different production speeds. In addition, simulations were performed to identify the optimal shield design for industrial applications.

  3. Large-scale membrane transfer process: its application to single-crystal-silicon continuous membrane deformable mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tong; Sasaki, Takashi; Hane, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a large-scale membrane transfer process developed for the construction of large-scale membrane devices via the transfer of continuous single-crystal-silicon membranes from one substrate to another. This technique is applied for fabricating a large stroke deformable mirror. A bimorph spring array is used to generate a large air gap between the mirror membrane and the electrode. A 1.9 mm × 1.9 mm × 2 µm single-crystal-silicon membrane is successfully transferred to the electrode substrate by Au–Si eutectic bonding and the subsequent all-dry release process. This process provides an effective approach for transferring a free-standing large continuous single-crystal-silicon to a flexible suspension spring array with a large air gap. (paper)

  4. Charge transfer processes in hybrid solar cells composed of amorphous silicon and organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Sebastian; Neher, Dieter [Universitaet Potsdam, Inst. Physik u. Astronomie, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, 14467 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Schulze, Tim; Korte, Lars [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Inst. fuer Silizium Photovoltaik, Kekulestrasse 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The efficiency of hybrid solar cells composed of organic materials and amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) strongly depends upon the efficiency of charge transfer processes at the inorganic-organic interface. We investigated the performance of devices comprising an ITO/a-Si:H(n-type)/a-Si:H(intrinsic)/organic/metal multilayer structure and using two different organic components: zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The results show higher power conversion- and quantum efficiencies for the P3HT based cells, compared to ZnPc. This can be explained by larger energy-level offset at the interface between the organic layer and a-Si:H, which facilitates hole transfer from occupied states in the valence band tail to the HOMO of the organic material and additionally promotes exciton splitting. The performance of the a-Si:H/P3HT cells can be further improved by treatment of the amorphous silicon surface with hydrofluoric acid (HF) and p-type doping of P3HT with F4TCNQ. The improved cells reached maximum power conversion efficiencies of 1%.

  5. High resolution deep level transient spectroscopy and process-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans-Freeman, J.H.; Emiroglu, D.; Vernon-Parry, K.D.

    2004-01-01

    High resolution, or Laplace, deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) enables the identification of very closely spaced energetic levels in a semiconductor bandgap. DLTS may resolve peaks with a separation of tens of electron volts, but LDLTS can resolve defect energy separations as low as a few MeV. In this paper, we present results from LDLTS applied to ion implantation-induced defects in silicon, with particular emphasis on characterisation of end-of-range interstitial type defects. Silicon was implanted with a variety of ions from mass 28 to 166. A combination of LDLTS and direct capture cross-section measurements was employed to show that electrically active small extended defects were present in the as-implanted samples. Larger dislocations were then generated in Si by oxygenation to act as a control sample. These stacking faults had typical lengths of microns, and their electrical activity was subsequently characterised by LDLTS. This was to establish the sensitivity of LDLTS to defects whose carrier capture is characterised by a non-exponential filling process and an evolving band structure as carrier capture proceeds. The LDLTS spectra show several components in capacitance transients originating from both the end-of-range defects, and the stacking faults, and also clearly show that the carrier emission rates reduce as these extended defects fill with carriers. The end-of-range defects and the stacking faults are shown to have the same electrical behaviour

  6. Towards a utilisation of transient processing in the technology of high efficiency silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhammer, W.

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of transient processing in the technology of high efficient silicon solar cells is investigated. An ultraviolet laser (an ArF pulsed excimer laser working at 193 nm) is applied. Laser processing induces only a short superficial melting of the material and does not modify the transport properties in the base of the material. This mode of processing associated to ion implantation to form the junction as well as an oxide layer in an atmosphere of oxygen. The volume was left entirely cold in this process. The results of the investigation show: that an entirely cold process of solar cell fabrication needs a thermal treatment at a temperature around 600 C; that the oxides obtained are not satisfying as passivating layers; and that the Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) induced recombination centers are not directly related to the quenching step but a consequence of the presence of metal impurities. The utilisation of transient processing in the adiabatic regime (laser) and in the rapid isothermal regime (RTP) are possible as two complementary techniques for the realization of high efficiency solar cells

  7. Processing of Phosphorus Slag with Recovery of Rare Earth Metals and Obtaining Silicon Containing Cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshigina, Zaure; Abisheva, Zinesh; Bochevskaya, Yelena; Akcil, Ata; Sharipova, Aynash; Sargelova, Elmira

    2016-10-01

    The present research is devoted to the processing of slag generating during the yellow phosphorus production. In this paper are presented studies on leaching of phosphorus production slag by nitric acid with recovery of rare earth metals (REMs) into solution. REMs recovery into the solution achieved 98 % during the leaching process with using 7.5 mol/L of HNO3, liquid-to-solid ratio is 2.6:1, temperature is 60°C, process duration is 1 hour and stirrer speed is 500 rpm. Behaviour during the leaching of associated components such as calcium, aluminium, and iron was studied. After the leaching cake contains ∼⃒75-85 % of SiO2 and it might be useful for obtaining of precipitated silicon dioxide. With the purpose of separation from the impurities, recovery and concentrating of REMs, the obtained solution after leaching was subjected to extraction processing methods. The influence of ratio of organic and aqueous phases (O: A) on the extraction of rare earth metals by tributyl phosphate (TBP) with concentrations from 20 up to 100 % was studied. The REMs extraction with increasing TBP concentration under changes O:A ratio from 1:20 down to 1:1 into the organic phase from the solutions after nitric acid leaching increased from 22.2 up to 99.3%. The duration effect of REMs extraction process was studied by tributyl phosphate. It is revealed that with increasing of duration of the extraction process from 10 to 30 minutes REMs recovery into the organic phase almost did not changed. The behaviour of iron in the extraction process by TBP was studied. It was found that such accompanying components as calcium and aluminium by tributyl phosphate didn't extracted. To construct isotherm of REMs extraction of by tributyl phosphate was used variable volume method. It was calculated three-step extraction is needed for REMs recovery from the solutions after nitric acid leaching of phosphorus production slag. The process of the three-steps counter current extraction of rare earth

  8. Tenth Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes: A Summary of Discussion Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, T.; Swanson, D.; Sinton, R.; Sopori, B.

    2001-01-22

    The 10th Workshop on Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes was held in Copper Mountain, Colorado, on August 13-16, 2000. The workshop was attended by 85 scientists and engineers from 15 international photovoltaic (PV) companies and 24 research institutions. Review and poster presentations were augmented by discussion sessions to address the recent progress and critical issues in meeting the goals for Si in the PV Industry Roadmap. The theme of the workshop was Si Photovoltaics: 10 Years of Progress and Opportunities for the Future. Two special sessions were held: Advanced Metallization and Interconnections - covering recent advances in solar cell metallization, printed contacts and interconnections, and addressing new metallization schemes for low-cost cell interconnections; and Characterization Methods - addressing the growing need for process monitoring techniques in the PV industry. The following major issues emerged from the discussion sessions: (1) Mechanical breakage in the P V industry involves a large fraction, about 5%-10%, of the wafers. (2) The current use of Al screen-printed back-contacts appears to be incompatible with the PV Industry Roadmap requirements. (3) The PV manufacturers who use hydrogen passivation should incorporate the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) nitride for antireflection coating and hydrogenation. (4) There is an imminent need to dissolve metallic precipitates to minimize the electrical shunt problem caused by the ''bad'' regions in wafers. (5) Industry needs equipment for automated, in-line monitoring and testing. There are simply not many tools available to industry. (6) In the Wrap-Up Session of the workshop, there was consensus to create four industry/university teams that would address critical research topics in crystalline silicon. (7) The workshop attendees unanimously agreed that the workshop has served well the PV community by promoting the fundamental understanding of industrial

  9. Report on achievements in fiscal 1999. Development of energy usage rationalizing silicon manufacturing process (Development of manufacturing technology for mass production of silicon for solar cells); 1999 nendo energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Taiyo denchiyo silicon ryosanka seizo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Discussions were given on manufacture of raw material silicon for solar cells with regard to boron removal, solidification, finishing and refining of metallic impurities, refining of unutilized silicon scraps, and making them into wafers and solar cells after refining. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1999. With regard to purity deterioration due to contamination by boron containing silica powder generated during the boron removal in the manufacturing process, the facilities were modified resulting in the reduction thereof to 0.04 ppmw or less. Regarding the repetitive use of boron removing crucibles, the experiment identified the possibility of using them for more than three times. In trial fabrication of samples by using the solidification refining and cast integrated process, ingots of 550 mm square and about 300 mm high were obtained, which were sliced into 10-cm square materials for use as wafers. Measurement of the conversion efficiency has resulted in 13% or more which is almost equivalent in the center and edges of the ingot. It was revealed that solar cell wafers may be fabricated by using this process, which can use either the p-type low-resistance silicon scraps or the metallic silicon as the starting material. (NEDO)

  10. Achievement report for fiscal 1997 on developing a silicon manufacturing process with reduced energy consumption. Investigation and research on analyzing practical application of a technology to manufacture solar cell silicon raw materials; 1997 nendo energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu. Taiyo denchi silicon genryo seizo gijutsu no jitsuyoka kaiseki ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes the achievement in fiscal 1997 of analyzing practical application of a technology to manufacture solar cell silicon raw materials. Silicon consumption for solar cells in fiscal 1997 has increased to 2000-ton level, and the supply has been very tight. For drastic improvement in the demand and supply situation, development of SOG-Si manufacturing technology and its early practical application are desired. The development of the NEDO mass-production technology using melting and refining has completed constructing the process facilities in fiscal 1998, and will enter the stage of operational research. However, insufficiency in the basic data about behavior of impurities is inhibiting the development. In the substrate manufacturing technology, discussions have shown progress on use of diversifying silicons outside the standard by using the electromagnetic casting process. For slicing and processing the substrates, development of a high-performance slicing equipment and automatic rough rinsing machine is under way. Properties required on silicon raw materials vary considerably widely because of difference in cell making systems and conditions, which is attributable to unknown impurity behavior. When 1GW production is assumed, the cell module manufacturing cost is calculated as 137 yen/W, for which low-cost mass production for its realization, slicing productivity enhancement, and cost reduction are required. The paper also describes site surveys in overseas countries. (NEDO)

  11. Fast Formation of Conductive Material by Simultaneous Chemical Process for Infilling Through-Silicon Via

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Jin; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2012-06-01

    It is necessary to develop a fast and inexpensive fabrication process of vertical electric wiring by through-silicon via (TSV) technology for advanced three-dimensional semiconductor devices. In this research, a fast-forming conductive composite was successfully developed by simultaneous deposition of conductive organic polymer (polypyrrole) and metal (silver) from the liquid phase, accelerated by photoirradiation. The growth rate of the composite was 38 nm·s-1, which is more than 10 times higher than that of copper by conventional plating. The electric conductivity of the composite was 2.1×104 Ω-1·cm-1, which is on the same level as general metal conductors. In addition, the effects of reaction conditions on the growth rate and the conductivity of the composites were revealed. From these results, the infilling time of the TSV was expected to shorten from the present 2-10 h to 5-10 m.

  12. Performance of Silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic inserts on Inconel 718 in end milling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, M M; Joshua, C X H

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation is planned in order to study the machinability of Inconel 718 with silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic inserts in end milling process. The relationship between the cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut against the response factors are studied to show the level of significance of each parameter. The cutting parameters are optimized by using Taguchi method. Implementing analysis of variance, the parameter which influences the surface roughness the most is determined to be the cutting speed, followed by the feed rate and depth of cut. Meanwhile, the optimal cutting condition is determined to have high cutting speed, low feed rate, and high depth of cut in the range of selected parameters. (paper)

  13. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Microstructural examination of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has shown that there is often a region adjacent to the as-nitrided surfaces that is even more porous than the interior of this already quite porous material. Because this layer of large porosity is considered detrimental to both the strength and oxidation resistance of RBSN, a study was undertaken to determine if its formation could be prevented during processing. All test bars studied were made from a single batch of Si powder which was milled for 4 hours in heptane in a vibratory mill using high density alumina cylinders as the grinding media. After air drying the powder, bars were compacted in a single acting die and hydropressed.

  14. Diorganosilacetylene-alt-diorganosilvinylene polymers and a process densifying porous silicon-carbide bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1994-05-17

    The present invention provides linear organosilicon polymers including acetylene and vinylene moieties, and a process for their preparation. These diorganosilacetylene-alt-diorganosilvinylene linear polymers can be represented by the formula: --[--(R.sup.1)(R.sup.2)Si--C.tbd.C--(R.sup.3)(R.sup.4)Si--CH=CH--].sub.n-- , wherein n.gtoreq.2; and each R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 is independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, halogen, alkyl, alkenyl, aryl, and aralkyl radicals. The polymers are soluble in organic solvents, air stable, and can be pulled into fibers or cast into films. They can be thermally converted into silicon carbide ceramic materials.

  15. Influence of Crucible Thermal Conductivity on Crystal Growth in an Industrial Directional Solidification Process for Silicon Ingots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaoyang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We carried out transient global simulations of heating, melting, growing, annealing, and cooling stages for an industrial directional solidification (DS process for silicon ingots. The crucible thermal conductivity is varied in a reasonable range to investigate its influence on the global heat transfer and silicon crystal growth. It is found that the crucible plays an important role in heat transfer, and therefore its thermal conductivity can influence the crystal growth significantly in the entire DS process. Increasing the crucible thermal conductivity can shorten the time for melting of silicon feedstock and growing of silicon crystal significantly, and therefore large thermal conductivity is helpful in saving both production time and power energy. However, the high temperature gradient in the silicon ingots and the locally concave melt-crystal interface shape for large crucible thermal conductivity indicate that high thermal stress and dislocation propagation are likely to occur during both growing and annealing stages. Based on the numerical simulations, some discussions on designing and choosing the crucible thermal conductivity are presented.

  16. Design and fabrication process of silicon micro-calorimeters on simple SOI technology for X-ray spectral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliane, A.; Agnese, P.; Pigot, C.; Sauvageot, J.-L.; Moro, F. de; Ribot, H.; Gasse, A.; Szeflinski, V.; Gobil, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Several successful development programs have been conducted on infra-red bolometer arrays at the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (CEA-LETI Grenoble) in collaboration with the CEA-SAp (Saclay); taking advantage of this background, we are now developing an X-ray spectro-imaging camera for next generation space astronomy missions, using silicon only technology. We have developed monolithic silicon micro-calorimeters based on implanted thermistors in an improved array that could be used for future space missions. The 8x8 array consists of a grid of 64 suspended pixels fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer. Each pixel of this detector array is made of a tantalum (Ta) absorber, which is bound by means of indium bump hybridization, to a silicon thermistor. The absorber array is bound to the thermistor array in a collective process. The fabrication process of our detector involves a combination of standard technologies and silicon bulk micro-machining techniques, based on deposition, photolithography and plasma etching steps. Finally, we present the results of measurements performed on these four primary building blocks that are required to create a detector array up to 32x32 pixels in size

  17. Flat-plate solar array project process development area: Process research of non-CZ silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Several different techniques to simultaneously diffuse the front and back junctions in dendritic web silicon were investigated. A successful simultaneous diffusion reduces the cost of the solar cell by reducing the number of processing steps, the amount of capital equipment, and the labor cost. The three techniques studied were: (1) simultaneous diffusion at standard temperatures and times using a tube type diffusion furnace or a belt furnace; (2) diffusion using excimer laser drive-in; and (3) simultaneous diffusion at high temperature and short times using a pulse of high intensity light as the heat source. The use of an excimer laser and high temperature short time diffusion experiment were both more successful than the diffusion at standard temperature and times. The three techniques are described in detail and a cost analysis of the more successful techniques is provided.

  18. 14th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells& Modules: Materials and Processes; Extended Abstracts and Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B. L.

    2004-08-01

    The 14th Workshop will provide a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. It will offer an excellent opportunity for researchers in private industry and at universities to prioritize mutual needs for future collaborative research. The workshop is intended to address the fundamental properties of PV silicon, new solar cell designs, advanced solar cell processing techniques, and cell-related module issues. A combination of oral presentations by invited speakers, poster sessions, and discussion sessions will review recent advances in crystal growth, new cell designs, new processes and process characterization techniques, cell fabrication approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands, and solar cell encapsulation. This year's theme, ''Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Leapfrogging the Barriers,'' reflects the continued success of crystalline Si PV in overcoming technological barriers to improve solar cell performance and lower the cost of Si PV. The workshop will consist of presentations by invited speakers, followed by discussion sessions. In addition, there will be two poster sessions presenting the latest research and development results. Some presentations will address recent technologies in the microelectronics field that may have a direct bearing on PV. The sessions will include: Advances in crystal growth and material issues; Impurities and defects; Dynamics during device processing; Passivation; High-efficiency Si solar cells; Advanced processing; Thin Si solar cells; and Solar cell reliability and module issues.

  19. Interaction between rare-earth ions and amorphous silicon nanoclusters produced at low processing temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meldrum, A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2J1 (Canada)]. E-mail: ameldrum@ualberta.ca; Hryciw, A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2J1 (Canada); MacDonald, A.N. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2J1 (Canada); Blois, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2J1 (Canada); Clement, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2V4 (Canada); De Corby, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G2V4 (Canada); Wang, J. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Li Quan [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-12-15

    Temperatures of 1000 deg. C and higher are a significant problem for the incorporation of erbium-doped silicon nanocrystal devices into standard silicon technology, and make the fabrication of contacts and reflectors in light emitting devices difficult. In the present work, we use energy-filtered TEM imaging techniques to show the formation of size-controlled amorphous silicon nanoclusters in SiO films annealed between 400 and 500 deg. C. The PL properties of such films are characteristic of amorphous silicon, and the spectrum can be controlled via a statistical size effect-as opposed to quantum confinement-that has previously been proposed for porous amorphous silicon. Finally, we show that amorphous nanoclusters sensitize the luminescence from the rare-earth ions Er, Nd, Yb, and Tm with excitation cross-sections similar in magnitude to erbium-doped silicon nanocrystal composites, and with a similar nonresonant energy transfer mechanism.

  20. Development in fiscal 1998 of silicon manufacturing process to rationalize energy usage. Surveys and researches on analysis of practical application of technology to manufacture silicon raw materials for solar cells; 1998 nendo energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Taiyo denchi silicon genryo seizo gijutsu no jitsuyoka kaiseki ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    With an objective to develop a mass production technology to manufacture silicon raw materials for solar cells, and assist its practical application, surveys and analyses were performed on trends in development of the related technologies, the problems therein , market trends and industrial trends thereof. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1998. The worldwide production amount of solar cells in 1998 is estimated to have achieved 150 MW, and the silicon consumption reached the level of 2,300 tons. In spite of the economic recession environment, there was no change in the expansion trend. In developing an SOG-Si mass production and manufacturing technology, construction of pilot plants for each process has been completed, and entered into the operation research phase. In developing a technology to manufacture high quality poly-crystalline silicon substrates, fabrication has been completed on the on-line ingot cutting equipment and the plasma heating equipment, and the stage is now in operation research of continuous electromagnetic casting process. The conversion efficiency of the poly-crystalline silicon solar cells is 14 to 16% at the mass production level, whose enhancement requires indispensably the improvement in quality of the substrate. Discussions are required on the ingot manufacturing conditions in coordination with improvement in the cell manufacturing technology. (NEDO)

  1. Seventh workshop on the role of impurities and defects in silicon device processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    This workshop is the latest in a series which has looked at technological issues related to the commercial development and success of silicon based photovoltaic (PV) modules. PV modules based on silicon are the most common at present, but face pressure from other technologies in terms of cell performance and cell cost. This workshop addresses a problem which is a factor in the production costs of silicon based PV modules.

  2. Fabrication and Characterisation of Silicon Waveguides for High-Speed Optical Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Asger Sellerup

    This Ph.D. thesis treats various aspects of silicon photonics. From the limitations of silicon as a linear and nonlinear waveguide medium to its synergy with other waveguide materials. Various methods for reducing sidewall roughness and line edge roughness of silicon waveguides are attempted...... was too high for any practical applications. It is speculated that the attempt at creating a material with low density of dangling bonds was unsuccessful. Nevertheless, linear losses of 2.4dB/cm at 1550nm wavelength in the silicon waveguides remained sufficiently low that high speed nonlinear optical...

  3. Optimization of heat transfer during the directional solidification process of 1600 kg silicon feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chieh; Chen, Jyh Chen; Nguyen, Thi Hoai Thu; Hou, Zhi Zhong; Chen, Chun Hung; Huang, Yen Hao; Yang, Michael

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the power ratio between the top and side heaters and the moving velocity of the side insulation are designed to control the shape of the crystal-melt interface during the growth process of a 1600 kg multi-crystalline silicon ingot. The power ratio and insulation gap are adjusted to ensure solidification of the melt. To ensure that the crystal-melt interface is slightly convex in relation to the melt during the entire solidification process, the power ratio should be augmented gradually in the initial stages while being held to a constant value in the middle stages. Initially the gap between the side and the bottom insulation is kept small to reduce thermal stress inside the seed crystals. However, the growth rate will be slow in the early stages of the solidification process. Therefore, the movement of the side insulation is fast in the initial stages but slower in the middle stages. In the later stages, the side insulation gap is fixed. With these modifications, the convexity of the crystal-melt interface in relation to the melt can be maintained during the growth process with an approximately 41% reduction in the thermal stress inside the growing ingot and an 80% reduction in dislocation density along the center line of the ingot compared with the original case.

  4. Implementation of Statistical Process Control: Evaluating the Mechanical Performance of a Candidate Silicone Elastomer Docking Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravec, Heather Ann; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been developing a novel docking system to meet the requirements of future exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and beyond. A dynamic gas pressure seal is located at the main interface between the active and passive mating components of the new docking system. This seal is designed to operate in the harsh space environment, but is also to perform within strict loading requirements while maintaining an acceptable level of leak rate. In this study, a candidate silicone elastomer seal was designed, and multiple subscale test articles were manufactured for evaluation purposes. The force required to fully compress each test article at room temperature was quantified and found to be below the maximum allowable load for the docking system. However, a significant amount of scatter was observed in the test results. Due to the stochastic nature of the mechanical performance of this candidate docking seal, a statistical process control technique was implemented to isolate unusual compression behavior from typical mechanical performance. The results of this statistical analysis indicated a lack of process control, suggesting a variation in the manufacturing phase of the process. Further investigation revealed that changes in the manufacturing molding process had occurred which may have influenced the mechanical performance of the seal. This knowledge improves the chance of this and future space seals to satisfy or exceed design specifications.

  5. Using a novel spectroscopic reflectometer to optimize a radiation-hardened submicron silicon-on-sapphire CMOS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, N.T.; Zawaideh, E.; Vu, T.Q.; Warren, G.; Mead, D.; Do, N.T.; Li, G.P.; Tsai, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation-hardened sub-micron silicon-on-sapphire CMOS process is monitored and optimized using a novel optical technique based on spectroscopic reflectometry. Quantitative measurements of the crystal quality, surface roughness, and device radiation hardness show excellent correlation between this technique and the Atomic Force Microscopy. (authors)

  6. The influence of processing conditions on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of reaction sintered silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, J.

    1979-09-01

    The microstructure of reaction sintered silicon nitride (RBSN) was changed in a wide range of varying green density, grain size of the silicon starting powder, nitriding conditions, and by introducing artificial pores. The influence of single microstructural parameters on mechanical properties like room temperature strength, creep behaviour, and resistance to thermal shock has been investigated. The essential factors influencing these properties were found to be total porosity, pore size distribution, and the fractions of α- and β-Si 3 N 4 . In view of high temperature engineering applications of RBSN possibilities to optimize the material's properties by controlled processing are discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. Design of experiment characterization of microneedle fabrication processes based on dry silicon etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, J.; Gaspar, J.; Ruther, P.; Hagner, M.; Cismak, A.; Heilmann, A.; Paul, O.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of dry etching-based processes for the fabrication of silicon microneedles using a design of experiment (DoE) approach. The possibility of using such microneedles as protruding microelectrodes able to electroporate adherently growing cells and record intracellular potentials motivates the systematic analysis of the influence of etching parameters on the needle shape. Two processes are characterized: a fully isotropic etch process and a three-step etching approach. In the first case, the shape of the microneedles is defined by a single etch step. For the stepped method, the structures are realized using the following sequence: a first, isotropic step defines the tip; this is followed by anisotropic etching that increases the height of the needle; a final isotropic procedure thins the microneedle and sharpens its tip. From the various process parameters tested, it is concluded that the isotropic fabrication is influenced mostly by four process parameters, whereas six parameters dominantly govern the outcome of the stepped etching technique. The dependence of the needle shape on the etch mask diameter is also investigated. Microneedles with diameters down to the sub-micrometer range and heights below 10 µm are obtained. The experimental design is performed using the D-optimal method. The resulting geometry, i.e. heights, diameters and radii of curvature measured at different positions, is extracted from scanning electron micrographs of needle cross-sections obtained from cuts by focused ion beam. The process parameters are used as inputs and the geometry features of the microneedles as outputs for the analysis of the process.

  8. Design of experiment characterization of microneedle fabrication processes based on dry silicon etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, J; Gaspar, J; Ruther, P; Paul, O; Hagner, M; Cismak, A; Heilmann, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of dry etching-based processes for the fabrication of silicon microneedles using a design of experiment (DoE) approach. The possibility of using such microneedles as protruding microelectrodes able to electroporate adherently growing cells and record intracellular potentials motivates the systematic analysis of the influence of etching parameters on the needle shape. Two processes are characterized: a fully isotropic etch process and a three-step etching approach. In the first case, the shape of the microneedles is defined by a single etch step. For the stepped method, the structures are realized using the following sequence: a first, isotropic step defines the tip; this is followed by anisotropic etching that increases the height of the needle; a final isotropic procedure thins the microneedle and sharpens its tip. From the various process parameters tested, it is concluded that the isotropic fabrication is influenced mostly by four process parameters, whereas six parameters dominantly govern the outcome of the stepped etching technique. The dependence of the needle shape on the etch mask diameter is also investigated. Microneedles with diameters down to the sub-micrometer range and heights below 10 µm are obtained. The experimental design is performed using the D-optimal method. The resulting geometry, i.e. heights, diameters and radii of curvature measured at different positions, is extracted from scanning electron micrographs of needle cross-sections obtained from cuts by focused ion beam. The process parameters are used as inputs and the geometry features of the microneedles as outputs for the analysis of the process.

  9. Oxygen and carbon transfer during solidification of semiconductor grade silicon in different processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeyron, P. J.; Durand, F.

    2000-03-01

    A model is established for comparing the solute distribution resulting from four solidification processes currently applied to semiconductor grade silicon: Czochralski pulling (CZ), floating zone (FZ), 1D solidification and electromagnetic continuous pulling (EMCP). This model takes into account solid-liquid interface exchange, evaporation to or contamination by the gas phase, container dissolution, during steady-state solidification, and in the preliminary preparation of the melt. For simplicity, the transfers are treated in the crude approximation of perfectly mixed liquid and boundary layers. As a consequence, only the axial ( z) distribution can be represented. Published data on oxygen and carbon transfer give a set of acceptable values for the thickness of the boundary layers. In the FZ and EMCP processes, oxygen evaporation can change the asymptotic behaviour of the reference Pfann law. In CZ and in 1D-solidification, a large variety of solute profile curves can be obtained, because they are very sensitive to the balance between crucible dissolution and evaporation. The CZ process clearly brings supplementary degrees of freedom via the geometry of the crucible, important for the dissolution phenomena, and via the rotation rate of the crystal and of the crucible, important for acting on transfer kinetics.

  10. An integrated nonlinear optical loop mirror in silicon photonics for all-optical signal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zifei Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM has been studied for several decades and has attracted considerable attention for applications in high data rate optical communications and all-optical signal processing. The majority of NOLM research has focused on silica fiber-based implementations. While various fiber designs have been considered to increase the nonlinearity and manage dispersion, several meters to hundreds of meters of fiber are still required. On the other hand, there is increasing interest in developing photonic integrated circuits for realizing signal processing functions. In this paper, we realize the first-ever passive integrated NOLM in silicon photonics and demonstrate its application for all-optical signal processing. In particular, we show wavelength conversion of 10 Gb/s return-to-zero on-off keying (RZ-OOK signals over a wavelength range of 30 nm with error-free operation and a power penalty of less than 2.5 dB, we achieve error-free nonreturn to zero (NRZ-to-RZ modulation format conversion at 10 Gb/s also with a power penalty of less than 2.8 dB, and we obtain error-free all-optical time-division demultiplexing of a 40 Gb/s RZ-OOK data signal into its 10 Gb/s tributary channels with a maximum power penalty of 3.5 dB.

  11. Report on achievements in fiscal 1998. Development of silicon manufacturing process to rationalize energy usage (Development of mass production technology for solar-grade silicon); 1998 nendo energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Taiyo denchiyo silicon ryosanka seizo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In the proliferation stage of solar cells, a technology is required to manufacture low-cost SOG-Si that can handle small quantity production. Development is being made on a manufacturing technology using high purity metallic silicon (99.5%) as the raw material. Considering that the subject impurities are P, B and metallic impurities (Fe, Ti and Al), a manufacturing method consisting of the following processes is being developed: metallic silicon/phosphorus removal, solidification and rough refining/boron removal, solidification and fine refining. Discussions are being advanced on phosphorus removal by using a large electron beam fusion equipment, and at the same time, the discussions are supported by fabricating and installing a large equipment intended of removing boron and the metallic impurities. Boron is removed by oxidizing it with steam. Therefore, the basic mechanism of the equipment is to spray argon plasma added with steam onto the molten silicon surface. In boron removal, diffusion of boron onto the reaction interface in the primary reaction determines the rate. A boron removal rate for B/10 to 0.1 ppm of 45 kg/h as maximum was achieved. The derived silicon has met the requirement. (NEDO)

  12. Supercritical fluid extraction of silicone oil from uranate microspheres prepared by sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Venkatakrishnan, R.; Sivaraman, N.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction of silicone oil from urania microspheres prepared through sol-gel route was investigated. The influence of pressure, temperature, and flow rate on the extraction efficiency was studied. Experimental conditions were optimised for the complete removal of silicone oil from urania microspheres. (author)

  13. Research of high speed data readout and pre-processing system based on xTCA for silicon pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingzhou; Lin Haichuan; Guo Fang; Liu Zhen'an; Xu Hao; Gong Wenxuan; Liu Zhao

    2012-01-01

    As the development of the detector, Silicon pixel detectors have been widely used in high energy physics experiments. It needs data processing system with high speed, high bandwidth and high availability to read data from silicon pixel detectors which generate more large data. The same question occurs on Belle II Pixel Detector which is a new style silicon pixel detector used in SuperKEKB accelerator with high luminance. The paper describes the research of High speed data readout and pre-processing system based on xTCA for silicon pixel detector. The system consists of High Performance Computer Node (HPCN) based on xTCA and ATCA frame. The HPCN consists of 4XFPs based on AMC, 1 AMC Carrier ATCA Board (ACAB) and 1 Rear Transmission Module. It characterized by 5 high performance FPGAs, 16 fiber links based on RocketIO, 5 Gbit Ethernet ports and DDR2 with capacity up to 18GB. In a ATCA frame, 14 HPCNs make up a system using the high speed backplane to achieve the function of data pre-processing and trigger. This system will be used on the trigger and data acquisition system of Belle II Pixel detector. (authors)

  14. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert® software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H2O2 concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R2 is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant concentration or the etching time. This lack of uniformity could be attributed to the surface condition of the wafer. Optimization of the process parameters show adequate accuracy of the model with acceptable percentage errors of 6%, 59%, 1.8%, 38% and 61% for determination of the height, separation, size, the pore size and the etching rate respectively.

  15. Process Simulation and Characterization of Substrate Engineered Silicon Thin Film Transistor for Display Sensors and Large Area Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, S M; Ahmed, S

    2013-01-01

    Design, simulation, fabrication and post-process qualification of substrate-engineered Thin Film Transistors (TFTs) are carried out to suggest an alternate manufacturing process step focused on display sensors and large area electronics applications. Damage created by ion implantation of Helium and Silicon ions into single-crystalline n-type silicon substrate provides an alternate route to create an amorphized region responsible for the fabrication of TFT structures with controllable and application-specific output parameters. The post-process qualification of starting material and full-cycle devices using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Proton or Particle induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) techniques also provide an insight to optimize the process protocols as well as their applicability in the manufacturing cycle

  16. Warpage Characteristics and Process Development of Through Silicon Via-Less Interconnection Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wen-Wei; Lin, Yu-Min; Wu, Sheng-Tsai; Lee, Chia-Hsin; Huang, Shin-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Hung; Chang, Tao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Neng

    2018-08-01

    In this study, through silicon via (TSV)-less interconnection using the fan-out wafer-level-packaging (FO-WLP) technology and a novel redistribution layer (RDL)-first wafer level packaging are investigated. Since warpage of molded wafer is a critical issue and needs to be optimized for process integration, the evaluation of the warpage issue on a 12-inch wafer using finite element analysis (FEA) at various parameters is presented. Related parameters include geometric dimension (such as chip size, chip number, chip thickness, and mold thickness), materials' selection and structure optimization. The effect of glass carriers with various coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) is also discussed. Chips are bonded onto a 12-inch reconstituted wafer, which includes 2 RDL layers, 3 passivation layers, and micro bumps, followed by using epoxy molding compound process. Furthermore, an optical surface inspector is adopted to measure the surface profile and the results are compared with the results from simulation. In order to examine the quality of the TSV-less interconnection structure, electrical measurement is conducted and the respective results are presented.

  17. Market Opportunity of Some Aluminium Silicon Alloys Materials through Changing the Casting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfim SOARES

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is considered to be the most common mechanism by which engineering components fail, and it accounts for at least 90% of all service failures attributed to mechanical causes. Mechanical properties (tensile strength, tensile strain, Young modulus, etc as well as fatigue properties (fatigue life are very dependent on casting method. The most direct effects of casting techniques are on the metallurgical microstructure that bounds the mechanical properties. One of the important variables affected by the casting technique is the cooling rate which is well known to strongly restrict the microstructure. In the present research has been done a comparison of fatigue properties of two aluminum silicon alloys obtained by two casting techniques. It was observed that the fatigue life is increasing with 24% for Al12Si and 31% for AL18Si by using centrifugal casting process instead of gravity casting. This increasing in fatigue life means that a component tailored from materials obtained by centrifugal casting will stay longer in service. It was made an estimation of the time required to recover the costs of technology in order to use the centrifuge process that will allow to obtain materials with improved properties. The amortization can be achieved by using two different marketing techniques: through the release of the product at the old price and with much longer life of the component which means "same price - longer life", or increasing price, by highlighting new product performance which means "higher price - higher properties".

  18. Treatment of transparent conductive oxides by laser processes for the development of Silicon photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canteli Perez-Caballero, D.

    2015-01-01

    Transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) are heavily doped oxides with high transparency in the visible range of the spectrum and a very low sheet resistance, making them very attractive for applications in optoelectronic devices. TCOs are widely found in many different areas such as low emissivity windows, electric contacts in computers, televisions or portable devices, and, specially, in the photovoltaic (PV) industry. PV industry is mainly based on mono- and multicrystalline silicon, where TCOs are used as anti-reflective coatings, but the search for cheaper, alternative technologies has led to the development of thin film PV technologies, where TCOs are used as transparent contacts. With the maturation of the thin film PV industry, laser sources have become an essential tool, allowing the improvement of some industrial processes and the development of new ones. Because of the interest on a deeper understanding of the interaction processes between laser light and TCOs, the laser ablation of three of the most important TCOs has been studied in depth in the present work. (Author)

  19. Processing and characterization of diatom nanoparticles and microparticles as potential source of silicon for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Thi Duy Hanh [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Bonani, Walter [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy); Speranza, Giorgio [Center for Materials and Microsystems, PAM-SE, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento (Italy); Sglavo, Vincenzo; Ceccato, Riccardo [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Maniglio, Devid; Motta, Antonella [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy); Migliaresi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.migliaresi@unitn.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    Silicon plays an important role in bone formation and maintenance, improving osteoblast cell function and inducing mineralization. Often, bone deformation and long bone abnormalities have been associated with silica/silicon deficiency. Diatomite, a natural deposit of diatom skeleton, is a cheap and abundant source of biogenic silica. The aim of the present study is to validate the potential of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons as silicon-donor materials for bone tissue engineering applications. Raw diatomite (RD) and calcined diatomite (CD) powders were purified by acid treatments, and diatom microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by fragmentation of purified diatoms under alkaline conditions. The influence of processing on the surface chemical composition of purified diatomites was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Diatoms NPs were also characterized in terms of morphology and size distribution by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS), while diatom MPs morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface area and microporosity of the diatom particles were evaluated by nitrogen physisorption methods. Release of silicon ions from diatom-derived particles was demonstrated using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES); furthermore, silicon release kinetic was found to be influenced by diatomite purification method and particle size. Diatom-derived microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) showed limited or no cytotoxic effect in vitro depending on the administration conditions. - Highlights: • Diatomite is a natural source of silica and has a potential as silicon-donor for bone regenerative applications. • Diatom particles derived from purified diatom skeletons were prepared by fragmentation under extreme alkaline condition. • Dissolution of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons in DI water depend on purification method

  20. Role of masking oxide on silicon in processes of defect generation at formation of SIMOX structures

    CERN Document Server

    Askinazi, A Y; Miloglyadova, L V

    2002-01-01

    One investigated into Si-SiO sub 2 structures formed by implantation of oxygen ions into silicon (SIMOX-technology) by means of techniques based on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics and by means of electroluminescence. One determined existence of electrically active centres and of luminescence centres in the formed oxide layer near boundary with silicon. One clarified the role SiO sub 2 masking layer in silicon in defect generation under formation of the masked oxide layer. One established dependence of concentration of electrically active and luminescence centres on thickness of masking layer

  1. Fifth workshop on the role of impurities and defects in silicon device processing. Extended abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Luque, A.; Sopori, B.; Swanson, D.; Gee, J.; Kalejs, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Tan, T.

    1995-08-01

    This workshop dealt with engineering aspects and material properties of silicon electronic devices. Crystalline silicon growth, modeling, and properties are discussed in general and as applied to solar cells. Topics considered in discussions of silicon growth include: casting, string ribbons, Al backside contacts, ion implantation, gettering, passivation, and ultrasound treatments. Properties studies include: Electronic properties of defects and impurities, dopant and carrier concentrations, structure and bonding, nitrogen effects, degradation of bulk diffusion length, and recombination parameters. Individual papers from the workshop are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases.

  2. Numerical and experimental study of a solid pellet feed continuous Czochralski growth process for silicon single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, A.; Prasad, V.; Koziol, J.; Gupta, K. P.

    1993-07-01

    A polysilicon pellets (≅1 mm diameter) feed continuous Czochralski (CCZ) growth process for silicon single crystals is proposed and investigated. Experiments in an industrial puller (14-18 inch diameter crucible) successfully demonstrate the feasibility of this process. The advantages of the proposed scheme are: a steady state growth process, a low aspect ratio melt, uniformity of heat addition and a growth apparatus with single crucible and no baffle(s). The addition of dopant with the solid charge will allow a better control of oxygen concentration leading to crystals of uniform properties and better quality. This paper presents theoretical results on melting of fully and partially immersed silicon spheres and numerical solutions on temperature and flow fields in low aspect ration melts with and without the addition of solid pellets. The theoretical and experimental results obtained thus far show a great promise for the proposed scheme.

  3. Low cost solar array project cell and module formation research area: Process research of non-CZ silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Liquid diffusion masks and liquid applied dopants to replace the CVD Silox masking and gaseous diffusion operations specified for forming junctions in the Westinghouse baseline process sequence for producing solar cells from dendritic web silicon were investigated. The baseline diffusion masking and drive processes were compared with those involving direct liquid applications to the dendritic web silicon strips. Attempts were made to control the number of variables by subjecting dendritic web strips cut from a single web crystal to both types of operations. Data generated reinforced earlier conclusions that efficiency levels at least as high as those achieved with the baseline back junction formation process can be achieved using liquid diffusion masks and liquid dopants. The deliveries of dendritic web sheet material and solar cells specified by the current contract were made as scheduled.

  4. Study on structural design technique of silicon carbide applied for thermochemical hydrogen production IS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takegami, Hiroaki; Terada, Atsuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Ishikura, Syuichi

    2011-03-01

    The IS process is the hydrogen production method which used the thermochemical reaction cycle of sulfuric acid and iodyne. Therefore, the design to endure the high temperature and moreover corrode-able environment is required to the equipment. Specifically, the sulfuric acid decomposer which is one of the main equipment of the IS process is the equipment to heat with hot helium and for the sulfuric acid of 90 wt% to evaporate. Moreover, it is the important equipment to supply the SO 3 decomposer which is the following process, resolving the part of sulfuric acid vapor into SO 3 with. The heat exchanger that sulfuric acid evaporates must be made pressure-resistant structure because it has the high-pressure helium of 4 MPa and the material that the high temperature and the corrosion environment of equal to or more than 700degC can be endured must be used. As the material, it is selected from the corrosion experiment and so on when SiC which is carbonization silicone ceramics is the most excellent material. However, even if it damages the ceramic block which is a heat exchanger because it becomes the structure which is stored in pressure-resistant metallic container, fluid such as sulfuric acid becomes the structure which doesn't leak out outside. However, the structure design technique to have been unified when using ceramics as the structure part isn't serviced as the standard. This report is the one which was studied about the structural design technique to have taken the material strength characteristic of the ceramics into consideration, refer to existing structural design standard. (author)

  5. Characterization of 10 μm thick porous silicon dioxide obtained by complex oxidation process for RF application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a 10 μm thick oxide layer structure, which can be used as a substrate for RF circuits. The structure has been fabricated by anodic reaction and complex oxidation, which is a combined process of low temperature thermal oxidation (500 deg. C, for 1 h at H 2 O/O 2 ) and a rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) process (1050 deg. C, for 1 min). The electrical characteristics of oxidized porous silicon layer (OPSL) were almost the same as those of standard thermal silicon dioxide. The leakage current through the OPSL of 10 μm was about 100-500 pA in the range of 0-50 V. The average value of breakdown field was about 3.9 MV cm -1 . From the X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, surface and internal oxide films of OPSL, prepared by complex process were confirmed to be completely oxidized and also the role of RTO process was important for the densification of porous silicon layer (PSL) oxidized at a lower temperature. For the RF-test of Si substrate with thick silicon dioxide layer, we have fabricated high performance passive devices such as coplanar waveguide (CPW) on OPSL substrate. The insertion loss of CPW on OPSL prepared by complex oxidation process was -0.39 dB at 4 GHz and similar to that of CPW on OPSL prepared by a temperature of 1050 deg. C (1 h at H 2 O/O 2 ). Also the return loss of CPW on OPSL prepared by complex oxidation process was -23 dB at 10 GHz, which is similar to that of CPW on OPSL prepared by high temperature

  6. Image Processing of Porous Silicon Microarray in Refractive Index Change Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiqing; Jia, Zhenhong; Yang, Jie; Kasabov, Nikola; Li, Chuanxi

    2017-06-08

    A new method for extracting the dots is proposed by the reflected light image of porous silicon (PSi) microarray utilization in this paper. The method consists of three parts: pretreatment, tilt correction and spot segmentation. First, based on the characteristics of different components in HSV (Hue, Saturation, Value) space, a special pretreatment is proposed for the reflected light image to obtain the contour edges of the array cells in the image. Second, through the geometric relationship of the target object between the initial external rectangle and the minimum bounding rectangle (MBR), a new tilt correction algorithm based on the MBR is proposed to adjust the image. Third, based on the specific requirements of the reflected light image segmentation, the array cells are segmented into dots as large as possible and the distance between the dots is equal in the corrected image. Experimental results show that the pretreatment part of this method can effectively avoid the influence of complex background and complete the binarization processing of the image. The tilt correction algorithm has a shorter computation time, which makes it highly suitable for tilt correction of reflected light images. The segmentation algorithm makes the dots in a regular arrangement, excludes the edges and the bright spots. This method could be utilized in the fast, accurate and automatic dots extraction of the PSi microarray reflected light image.

  7. Investigation of silicon sensors quality as a function of the ohmic side processing technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, P; Golubkov, S A; Golutvin, I A; Egorov, N; Konjkov, K; Kozlov, Y; Peisert, Anna; Sidorov, A; Zamiatin, N I; Cheremuhin, A E

    2002-01-01

    Silicon sensors designed for the CMS Preshower detector must have a high breakdown voltage in order to be fully efficient after a strong irradiation. Studies made by several groups left bracket 1,2,3 right bracket have underlined the importance of the p**+ side geometrical parameters, such as the metal width and the number and spacing of guard rings. We have in addition investigated the effects related to the ohmic side processing and found that the breakdown voltage depends strongly on the depth of the effective "dead" n**+ layer. By increasing this thickness from mum to 2.5mum, the fraction of sensors with breakdown voltage higher than 500V increased from 22% to more than 80%. On the other hand, it was noticed that the starting surface quality of the wafer (double side polished or single side polished) does not affect the detectors parameters for a given production technology. The thick n**+-layer protects against initial wafer surface and defects caused by the technological treatment during the detector pr...

  8. Image Processing of Porous Silicon Microarray in Refractive Index Change Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method for extracting the dots is proposed by the reflected light image of porous silicon (PSi microarray utilization in this paper. The method consists of three parts: pretreatment, tilt correction and spot segmentation. First, based on the characteristics of different components in HSV (Hue, Saturation, Value space, a special pretreatment is proposed for the reflected light image to obtain the contour edges of the array cells in the image. Second, through the geometric relationship of the target object between the initial external rectangle and the minimum bounding rectangle (MBR, a new tilt correction algorithm based on the MBR is proposed to adjust the image. Third, based on the specific requirements of the reflected light image segmentation, the array cells are segmented into dots as large as possible and the distance between the dots is equal in the corrected image. Experimental results show that the pretreatment part of this method can effectively avoid the influence of complex background and complete the binarization processing of the image. The tilt correction algorithm has a shorter computation time, which makes it highly suitable for tilt correction of reflected light images. The segmentation algorithm makes the dots in a regular arrangement, excludes the edges and the bright spots. This method could be utilized in the fast, accurate and automatic dots extraction of the PSi microarray reflected light image.

  9. UV laser incorporation of dopants in silicon: comparison of two processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogarassy, E.P.; Narayan, J.; Lowndes, D.H.; White, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The rapid deposition of pulsed-laser energy into the near-surface region of silicon leads to melting of crystal, followed by liquid phase epitaxial regrowth from the underlying substrate at a growth velocity of several meters per second. During rapid solidification, implanted or deposited group III and V impurities can be incorporated into substitutional sites in the silicon lattice with concentrations far in excess of their equilibrium solubility limit. The authors have investigated and compared the incorporation of implanted or deposited antimony into the silicon lattice during laser annealing with a pulsed KrF UV laser (lambda = 0.249 μm, Z = 35 ns). The surface melting dynamics resulting from laser irradiation have been studied by time-resolved reflectivity. In the two cases, the sharp transition to the high reflectivity phase (R = 72%, at lambda = 0.633 μm of the HeNe laser probe) is characteristic of molten silicon. Surface melt durations measured on implanted Sb (150 KeV, 5 x 10 16 cm -2 ) and deposited Sb (80 A thick on crystalline silicon) are significantly larger than those for virgin silicon

  10. Influence of silicon on hot-dip aluminizing process and subsequent oxidation for preparing hydrogen/tritium permeation barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Shilei; Li, Hualing; Wang, Shumao; Jiang, Lijun; Liu, Xiaopeng [Energy Materials and Technology Research Institute, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) requires the production of a material capable of acting as a hydrogen/tritium permeation barrier on low activation steel. It is well known that thin alumina layer can reduce the hydrogen permeation rate by several orders of magnitude. A technology is introduced here to form a ductile Fe/Al intermetallic layer on the steel with an alumina over-layer. This technology, consisting of two main steps, hot-dip aluminizing (HDA) and subsequent oxidation behavior, seems to be a promising coating method to fulfill the required goals. According to the experiments that have been done in pure Al, the coatings were inhomogeneous and too thick. Additionally, a large number of cracks and porous band could be observed. In order to solve these problems, the element silicon was added to the aluminum melt with a nominal composition. The influence of silicon on the aluminizing and following oxidation process was investigated. With the addition of silicon into the aluminum melt, the coating became thinner and more homogeneous. The effort of the silicon on the oxidation behavior was observed as well concerning the suppression of porous band and cracks. (author)

  11. Kerfless epitaxial silicon wafers with 7 ms carrier lifetimes and a wide lift-off process window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmel, Catherin; Hensen, Jan; David, Lasse; Kajari-Schröder, Sarah; Brendel, Rolf

    2018-04-01

    Silicon wafers contribute significantly to the photovoltaic module cost. Kerfless silicon wafers that grow epitaxially on porous silicon (PSI) and are subsequently detached from the growth substrate are a promising lower cost drop-in replacement for standard Czochralski (Cz) wafers. However, a wide technological processing window appears to be a challenge for this process. This holds in particularly for the etching current density of the separation layer that leads to lift-off failures if it is too large or too low. Here we present kerfless PSI wafers of high electronic quality that we fabricate on weakly reorganized porous Si with etch current densities varying in a wide process window from 110 to 150 mA/cm2. We are able to detach all 17 out of 17 epitaxial wafers. All wafers exhibit charge carrier lifetimes in the range of 1.9 to 4.3 ms at an injection level of 1015 cm-3 without additional high-temperature treatment. We find even higher lifetimes in the range of 4.6 to 7.0 ms after applying phosphorous gettering. These results indicate that a weak reorganization of the porous layer can be beneficial for a large lift-off process window while still allowing for high carrier lifetimes.

  12. A comparison between rad-hard float zone silicon diodes as gamma dosimeter in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, Fábio de; Gonçalves, Josemary A.C.; Bueno, Carmen C.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report on the results obtained with rad-hard Standard Float Zone (STFZ) and Diffused Oxygenated Float Zone (DOFZ) silicon diodes in radiation processing dosimetry. The dosimetric probes were designed to operate in the direct current mode, as on-line radiation dosimeter. The irradiation of the samples was performed using a 60 Co source with a dose rate of almost 2.4 kGy/h. The current response of each diode was measured as a function of the exposure time in steps from 5 kGy up to 50 kGy to achieve a total absorbed dose of 275 kGy. In this dose range it is observed a significant decrease in the photocurrent generated in both devices due to gamma radiation defects produced in their active volumes. To mitigate this effect, the samples were pre-irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays at 700 kGy. Despite of being less sensitive, these devices presented stable and reproducible current signals with a relative sensitivity decrease of about 19% within the whole range of dose studied. The dose-response curves of the pre-irradiated diodes showed quadratic behavior with correlation coefficient higher than 0.9999 for total absorbed dose up to 275 kGy. The comparison of the FZ and DOFZ responses evidenced that the latter was slightly superior to the first. However, it is important to note that all pre-irradiated diodes can be used as gamma dosimeters in radiation processing applications. (author)

  13. A comparison between rad-hard float zone silicon diodes as gamma dosimeter in radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Fábio de [Amazônia Azul Tecnologias de Defesa S.A. (AMAZUL), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gonçalves, Josemary A.C.; Bueno, Carmen C., E-mail: dcamargo@gmail.com, E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we report on the results obtained with rad-hard Standard Float Zone (STFZ) and Diffused Oxygenated Float Zone (DOFZ) silicon diodes in radiation processing dosimetry. The dosimetric probes were designed to operate in the direct current mode, as on-line radiation dosimeter. The irradiation of the samples was performed using a {sup 60}Co source with a dose rate of almost 2.4 kGy/h. The current response of each diode was measured as a function of the exposure time in steps from 5 kGy up to 50 kGy to achieve a total absorbed dose of 275 kGy. In this dose range it is observed a significant decrease in the photocurrent generated in both devices due to gamma radiation defects produced in their active volumes. To mitigate this effect, the samples were pre-irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays at 700 kGy. Despite of being less sensitive, these devices presented stable and reproducible current signals with a relative sensitivity decrease of about 19% within the whole range of dose studied. The dose-response curves of the pre-irradiated diodes showed quadratic behavior with correlation coefficient higher than 0.9999 for total absorbed dose up to 275 kGy. The comparison of the FZ and DOFZ responses evidenced that the latter was slightly superior to the first. However, it is important to note that all pre-irradiated diodes can be used as gamma dosimeters in radiation processing applications. (author)

  14. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hancu, Dan; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    This report presents system and economicanalysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO₂ capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. Forcomparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO₂ for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO₂ as compared to $60.25/ton of CO₂ when MEA is used. The aminosilicone- based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO₂ decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higherthermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lowervapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lowerheat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages overconventional systems using MEA.

  15. Low cost solar array project. Cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Liquid diffusion masks and liquid dopants to replace the more expensive CVD SiO2 mask and gaseous diffusion processes were investigated. Silicon pellets were prepared in the silicon shot tower; and solar cells were fabricated using web grown where the pellets were used as a replenishment material. Verification runs were made using the boron dopant and liquid diffusion mask materials. The average of cells produced in these runs was 13%. The relationship of sheet resistivity, temperature, gas flows, and gas composition for the diffusion of the P-8 liquid phosphorus solution was investigated. Solar cells processed from web grown from Si shot material were evaluated, and results qualified the use of the material produced in the shot tower for web furnace feed stock.

  16. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Statistical analysis for synthesis of nano-pillar in crystalline Si substrates is presented. • Model is in good agreement with experimental for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. • Optimum values for all parameters in fabrication of nanostructured Si are attained. - Abstract: In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box–Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert ® software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H 2 O 2 concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R 2 is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant concentration or the etching time

  17. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira, E-mail: ayuwazira@unimap.edu.my [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor 43650 (Malaysia); School of Environmental Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Sopian, Kamaruzzaman [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor 43650 (Malaysia); Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang, 14300 (Malaysia); Zaidi, Saleem H. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor 43650 (Malaysia)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Statistical analysis for synthesis of nano-pillar in crystalline Si substrates is presented. • Model is in good agreement with experimental for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. • Optimum values for all parameters in fabrication of nanostructured Si are attained. - Abstract: In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box–Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert{sup ®} software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R{sup 2} is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant

  18. Investigation of Low-Cost Surface Processing Techniques for Large-Size Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuang-Tung Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the present work is to develop a simple and effective method of enhancing conversion efficiency in large-size solar cells using multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si wafer. In this work, industrial-type mc-Si solar cells with area of 125×125 mm2 were acid etched to produce simultaneously POCl3 emitters and silicon nitride deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD. The study of surface morphology and reflectivity of different mc-Si etched surfaces has also been discussed in this research. Using our optimal acid etching solution ratio, we are able to fabricate mc-Si solar cells of 16.34% conversion efficiency with double layers silicon nitride (Si3N4 coating. From our experiment, we find that depositing double layers silicon nitride coating on mc-Si solar cells can get the optimal performance parameters. Open circuit (Voc is 616 mV, short circuit current (Jsc is 34.1 mA/cm2, and minority carrier diffusion length is 474.16 μm. The isotropic texturing and silicon nitride layers coating approach contribute to lowering cost and achieving high efficiency in mass production.

  19. Corrosion Processes of the CANDU Steam Generator Materials in the Presence of Silicon Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucan, Dumitra; Fulger, Manuela; Velciu, Lucian; Lucan, Georgiana; Jinescu, Gheorghita

    2006-01-01

    The feedwater that enters the steam generators (SG) under normal operating conditions is extremely pure but, however, it contains low levels (generally in the μg/l concentration range) of impurities such as iron, chloride, sulphate, silicate, etc. When water is converted into steam and exits the steam generator, the non-volatile impurities are left behind. As a result of their concentration, the bulk steam generator water is considerably higher than the one in the feedwater. Nevertheless, the concentrations of corrosive impurities are in general sufficiently low so that the bulk water is not significantly aggressive towards steam generator materials. The impurities and corrosion products existing in the steam generator concentrate in the porous deposits on the steam generator tubesheet. The chemical reactions that take place between the components of concentrated solutions generate an aggressive environment. The presence of this environment and of the tubesheet crevices lead to localized corrosion and thus the same tubes cannot ensure the heat transfer between the fluids of the primary and secondary circuits. Thus, it becomes necessary the understanding of the corrosion process that develops into SG secondary side. The purpose of this paper is the assessment of corrosion behavior of the tubes materials (Incoloy-800) at the normal secondary circuit parameters (temperature = 2600 deg C, pressure = 5.1 MPa). The testing environment was demineralized water containing silicon compounds, at a pH=9.5 regulated with morpholine and cyclohexyl-amine (all volatile treatment - AVT). The paper presents the results of metallographic examinations as well as the results of electrochemical measurements. (authors)

  20. Growth of carbon nanotubes by Fe-catalyzed chemical vapor processes on silicon-based substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Renato; Rizzoli, Rita; Vinciguerra, Vincenzo; Fortuna Bevilacqua, Maria; Guerri, Sergio; Corticelli, Franco; Passini, Mara

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, a site-selective catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes on silicon-based substrates has been developed in order to get horizontally oriented nanotubes for field effect transistors and other electronic devices. Properly micro-fabricated silicon oxide and polysilicon structures have been used as substrates. Iron nanoparticles have been obtained both from a thin Fe film evaporated by e-gun and from iron nitrate solutions accurately dispersed on the substrates. Single-walled nanotubes with diameters as small as 1 nm, bridging polysilicon and silicon dioxide “pillars”, have been grown. The morphology and structure of CNTs have been characterized by SEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Investigation of Low-Cost Surface Processing Techniques for Large-Size Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Yuang-Tung; Ho, Jyh-Jier; Lee, William J.; Tsai, Song-Yeu; Lu, Yung-An; Liou, Jia-Jhe; Chang, Shun-Hsyung; Wang, Kang L.

    2010-01-01

    The subject of the present work is to develop a simple and effective method of enhancing conversion efficiency in large-size solar cells using multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafer. In this work, industrial-type mc-Si solar cells with area of 125×125 mm2 were acid etched to produce simultaneously POCl3 emitters and silicon nitride deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD). The study of surface morphology and reflectivity of different mc-Si etched surfaces has also been d...

  2. Research of the voltage and current stabilization processes by using the silicon field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimov, A.V.; Yodgorova, D.M.; Kamanov, B.M.; Giyasova, F.A.; Yakudov, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The silicon field-effect transistors were investigated to use in circuits for stabilization of current and voltage. As in gallium arsenide field-effect transistors, in silicon field-effect transistors with p-n-junction a new mechanism of saturation of the drain current is experimentally found out due to both transverse and longitudinal compression of channel by additional resistance between the source and the gate of the transistor. The criteria for evaluating the coefficients of stabilization of transient current suppressors and voltage stabilizator based on the field-effect transistor are considered. (authors)

  3. Development of an SU-8 MEMS process with two metal electrodes using amorphous silicon as a sacrificial material

    KAUST Repository

    Ramadan, Khaled S.

    2013-02-08

    This work presents an SU-8 surface micromachining process using amorphous silicon as a sacrificial material, which also incorporates two metal layers for electrical excitation. SU-8 is a photo-patternable polymer that is used as a structural layer for MEMS and microfluidic applications due to its mechanical properties, biocompatibility and low cost. Amorphous silicon is used as a sacrificial layer in MEMS applications because it can be deposited in large thicknesses, and can be released in a dry method using XeF2, which alleviates release-based stiction problems related to MEMS applications. In this work, an SU-8 MEMS process was developed using ;-Si as a sacrificial layer. Two conductive metal electrodes were integrated in this process to allow out-of-plane electrostatic actuation for applications like MEMS switches and variable capacitors. In order to facilitate more flexibility for MEMS designers, the process can fabricate dimples that can be conductive or nonconductive. Additionally, this SU-8 process can fabricate SU-8 MEMS structures of a single layer of two different thicknesses. Process parameters were optimized for two sets of thicknesses: thin (5-10 m) and thick (130 m). The process was tested fabricating MEMS switches, capacitors and thermal actuators. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Processing development for ceramic structural components: the influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    The influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride has been studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, 4 pt. bend test, and mecury intrusion porosimetry. It has been shown that presintering at 1050/sup 0/C will not affect the final nitrided properties. At 1200/sup 0/C, the oxide layer is removed, promoting the formation of B-phase silicon nitride. Presintering at 1200/sup 0/C also results in compact weight loss due to the volatilization of silicon, and the formation of large pores which severely reduce nitrided strength. The development of the structure of sintered silicon compacts appears to involve a temperature gradient, with greater sintering observed near the surface.

  5. Towards Ordered Silicon Nanostructures through Self-Assembling Mechanisms and Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Puglisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of innovative architectures for memory storage and energy conversion devices are at the forefront of current research efforts driving us towards a sustainable future. However, issues related to the cost, efficiency, and reliability of current technologies are still severely limiting their overtake of the standard designs. The use of ordered nanostructured silicon is expected to overcome these limitations and push the advancement of the alternative technologies. Specifically, self-assembling of block copolymers has been recognized as a promising and cost-effective approach to organize silicon nanostructures. This work reviews some of the most important findings on block copolymer self-assembling and complements those with the results of new experimental studies. First of all, a quantitative analysis is presented on the ordering and fluctuations expected in the synthesis of silicon nanostructures by using standard synthesis methods like chemical vapour deposition. Then the effects of the several parameters guiding the ordering mechanisms in the block copolymer systems, such as film thickness, molecular weight, annealing conditions, solvent, and substrate topography are discussed. Finally, as a proof of concept, an in-house developed example application to solar cells is presented, based on silicon nanostructures resulting from self-assembling of block copolymers.

  6. Strong white light emission from a processed porous silicon and its photoluminescence mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karacali, T.; Cicek, K.

    2011-01-01

    We have prepared various porous silicon (PS) structures with different surface conditions (any combination of oxidation, carbonization as well as thermal annealing) to increase the intensity of photoluminescence (PL) spectrum in the visible range. Strong white light (similar to day-light) emission was achieved by carrying out thermal annealing at 1100 deg. C after surface modification with 1-decene of anodic oxidized PS structures. Temperature-dependent PL measurements were first performed by gradually increasing the sample temperature from 10 to 300 K inside a cryostat. Then, we analyzed the measured spectrum of all prepared samples. After the analysis, we note that throughout entire measured spectrum, only two main peaks corresponding to blue and green-orange emission lines (which can be interpreted by quantum size effect and/or configuration coordinate model) were seem to be predominant for all temperature range. To further reveal and analysis these peaks, finally, measured data were inputted into the formula of activation energy of thermal excitation. We found that activation energies of blue and green-orange lines were approximately 49.3 and 44.6 meV, respectively. - Highlights: →Light emitting devices based on silicon technology are of great interest in illumination and display applications. → We have achieved strong white light (similar to day-light) emission from porous silicon. → The most important impact of carbonization on porous silicon and post annealing is the enhancement of room temperature luminescence.

  7. The role of non-elastic nuclear processes for intermediate-energy protons in silicon targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hormaza, Joel Mesa, E-mail: jmesa@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Garcia, Cesar E., E-mail: cgarcia@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Havana (Cuba); Arruda Neto, Joao D.T.; Rodrigues, Tulio E., E-mail: arruda@if.usp.br, E-mail: tulio@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Schelin, Hugo R.; Denyak, Valery, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Paschuck, Sergei A.; Evseev, Ivan, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: evseev@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The transportation of energetic ions in bulk matter is of direct interest in several areas including shielding against ions originating from either space radiations or terrestrial accelerators, cosmic ray propagation studies in galactic medium, or radiobiological effects resulting from the work place or clinical exposures. For carcinogenesis, terrestrial radiation therapy, and radiobiological research, knowledge of beam composition and interactions is necessary to properly evaluate the effects on human and animal tissues. For the proper assessment of radiation exposures both reliable transport codes and accurate input parameters are needed. In the last years efforts have been increasing in order to develop more effective models to describe and predict the damages induced by radiation in electronic devices. In this sense, the interaction of protons with those devices, particularly which operate in space, is a topic of paramount importance, mainly because although the majority of them are made with silicon, experimental data on p+Si nuclear processes is very sparse. In this work we have used a new quite sophisticated Monte Carlo multicollisional intranuclear cascade (MCMC) code for pre-equilibrium emission, plus de-excitation of residual nucleus by two ways: evaporation of particles (mainly nucleons, but also composites) and possibly fragmentation/fission in the case of heavy residues, in order to study some observable of nuclear interaction of protons between 100-200 MeV in a {sup 28}Si target. The code has been developed with very recent improvements that take into account Pauli blocking effects in a novel and more precise way, as well as a more rigorous energy balance, an energy stopping time criterion for pre-equilibrium emission and the inclusion of deuteron, triton and 3He emissions in the evaporation step, which eventually concurs with fragmentation/break-up stage. The fragment mass distributions, as well as the multiplicities and the spectra of secondary

  8. The role of non-elastic nuclear processes for intermediate-energy protons in silicon targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormaza, Joel Mesa; Garcia, Cesar E.; Arruda Neto, Joao D.T.; Rodrigues, Tulio E.; Paschuck, Sergei A.; Evseev, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The transportation of energetic ions in bulk matter is of direct interest in several areas including shielding against ions originating from either space radiations or terrestrial accelerators, cosmic ray propagation studies in galactic medium, or radiobiological effects resulting from the work place or clinical exposures. For carcinogenesis, terrestrial radiation therapy, and radiobiological research, knowledge of beam composition and interactions is necessary to properly evaluate the effects on human and animal tissues. For the proper assessment of radiation exposures both reliable transport codes and accurate input parameters are needed. In the last years efforts have been increasing in order to develop more effective models to describe and predict the damages induced by radiation in electronic devices. In this sense, the interaction of protons with those devices, particularly which operate in space, is a topic of paramount importance, mainly because although the majority of them are made with silicon, experimental data on p+Si nuclear processes is very sparse. In this work we have used a new quite sophisticated Monte Carlo multicollisional intranuclear cascade (MCMC) code for pre-equilibrium emission, plus de-excitation of residual nucleus by two ways: evaporation of particles (mainly nucleons, but also composites) and possibly fragmentation/fission in the case of heavy residues, in order to study some observable of nuclear interaction of protons between 100-200 MeV in a 28 Si target. The code has been developed with very recent improvements that take into account Pauli blocking effects in a novel and more precise way, as well as a more rigorous energy balance, an energy stopping time criterion for pre-equilibrium emission and the inclusion of deuteron, triton and 3He emissions in the evaporation step, which eventually concurs with fragmentation/break-up stage. The fragment mass distributions, as well as the multiplicities and the spectra of secondary particles

  9. 15th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Extended Abstracts and Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B. L.

    2005-11-01

    The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 15th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells & Modules: Materials and Processes, held in Vail, CO, August 7-10, 2005. This meeting provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The workshop addressed the fundamental properties of PV silicon, new solar cell designs, and advanced solar cell processing techniques. A combination of oral presentations by invited speakers, poster sessions, and discussion sessions reviewed recent advances in crystal growth, new cell designs, new processes and process characterization techniques, and cell fabrication approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands. The theme of this year's meeting was 'Providing the Scientific Basis for Industrial Success.' Specific sessions during the workshop included: Advances in crystal growth and material issues; Impurities and defects in Si; Advanced processing; High-efficiency Si solar cells; Thin Si solar cells; and Cell design for efficiency and reliability module operation. The topic for the Rump Session was ''Si Feedstock: The Show Stopper'' and featured a panel discussion by representatives from various PV companies.

  10. Micro-Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the characterization of silicon carbide in power semiconductor material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biasio, M.; Kraft, M.; Schultz, M.; Goller, B.; Sternig, D.; Esteve, R.; Roesner, M.

    2017-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide band-gap semi-conductor material that is used increasingly for high voltage power devices, since it has a higher breakdown field strength and better thermal conductivity than silicon. However, in particular its hardness makes wafer processing difficult and many standard semi-conductor processes have to be specially adapted. We measure the effects of (i) mechanical processing (i.e. grinding of the backside) and (ii) chemical and thermal processing (i.e. doping and annealing), using confocal microscopy to measure the surface roughness of ground wafers and micro-Raman spectroscopy to measure the stresses induced in the wafers by grinding. 4H-SiC wafers with different dopings were studied before and after annealing, using depth-resolved micro-Raman spectroscopy to observe how doping and annealing affect: i.) the damage and stresses induced on the crystalline structure of the samples and ii.) the concentration of free electrical carriers. Our results show that mechanical, chemical and thermal processing techniques have effects on this semiconductor material that can be observed and characterized using confocal microscopy and high resolution micro Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Modeling of hydrogen passivation process of silicon for solar cells applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznicki, Z.T.; Ciach, R.; Gorley, P.M.; Voznyy, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, results of investigation of evolution equations' system describing hydrogen passivation of silicon are presented. Using Lie group theory the classification of invariant solutions and initial system reduction to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is carried out for admissible infinitesimal operators under constant hydrogen atoms diffusivity in the sample. Possibility of analytical solution of passivation problem is shown. Analysis of system behavior taking into account diffusion and dissociation mechanisms is performed. It is ascertained that free hydrogen atoms diffusion in the sample and 'defect-hydrogen' dissociation spoil passivation. Analytical dependences obtained make it possible to predict spatial and time defect distribution under hydrogen passivation of silicon depending on experimental conditions

  12. Combination of gettering and etching in multicrystalline silicon used in solar cells processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimassi, W.; Bouaicha, M.; Nouri, H.; Ben Nasrallah, S.; Bessais, B.

    2006-01-01

    Undesired impurities can be removed away from multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers by combining porous silicon (PS) formation and heat treatments. The gettering procedure used in this work is based on the formation of a PS film at both back and front sides of the mc-Si wafers, followed by a heat treatment. The latter was achieved in an infrared furnace at different temperatures and during various periods. We show that when the based material undergoes such a gettering, the electrical properties (short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, serial and shunt resistances) and the electronic parameters (diffusion length and grain boundary recombination velocity) of the corresponding solar cells can be improved only if some regions of the wafers are etched. Compared to reference cells based on untreated wafers, the diffusion length and grain boundary recombination velocity of solar cells fabricated from gettered and etched samples was improved by about 30% and reduced by a factor of 10, respectively

  13. The role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report and papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.Y.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of a workshop hold on August 24--26, 1992. Session 1 of the conference discussed characteristics of various commercial photovoltaic silicon substrates, the nature of impurities and defects in them, and how they are related to the material growth. Session 2 on point defects reviewed the capabilities of theoretical approaches to determine equilibrium structure of defects in the silicon lattice arising from transitional metal impurities and hydrogen. Session 3 was devoted to a discussion of the surface photovoltaic method for characterizing bulk wafer lifetimes, and to detailed studies on the effectiveness of various gettering operations on reducing the deleterious effects of transition metals. Papers presented at the conference are also included in this summary report.

  14. Investigating the Effect of Thermal Annealing Process on the Photovoltaic Performance of the Graphene-Silicon Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifei Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-silicon (Gr-Si Schottky solar cell has attracted much attention recently as promising candidate for low-cost photovoltaic application. For the fabrication of Gr-Si solar cell, the Gr film is usually transferred onto the Si substrate by wet transfer process. However, the impurities induced by this process at the graphene/silicon (Gr/Si interface, such as H2O and O2, degrade the photovoltaic performance of the Gr-Si solar cell. We found that the thermal annealing process can effectively improve the photovoltaic performance of the Gr-Si solar cell by removing these impurities at the Gr/Si interface. More interestingly, the photovoltaic performance of the Gr-Si solar cell can be improved, furthermore, when exposed to air environment after the thermal annealing process. Through investigating the characteristics of the Gr-Si solar cell and the properties of the Gr film (carrier density and sheet resistance, we point out that this phenomenon is caused by the natural doping effect of the Gr film.

  15. Optimization of Magnetically Driven Directional Solidification of Silicon Using Artificial Neural Networks and Gaussian Process Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dropka, N.; Holeňa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 471, 1 August (2017), s. 53-61 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01251S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : computer simulation * fluid flows * magnetic fields * directional solidification * semiconducting silicon Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016

  16. 18th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Workshop Proceedings, 3-6 August 2008, Vail, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B. L.

    2008-09-01

    The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 18th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells & Modules: Materials and Processes, held in Vail, CO, August 3-6, 2008. This meeting provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The theme of this year's meeting was 'New Directions for Rapidly Growing Silicon Technologies.'

  17. Novel processing of bioglass ceramics from silicone resins containing micro- and nano-sized oxide particle fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, L; Bernardo, E; Colombo, P; Cacciotti, I; Bianco, A; Bellucci, D; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2014-08-01

    Highly porous scaffolds with composition similar to those of 45S5 and 58S bioglasses were successfully produced by an innovative processing method based on preceramic polymers containing micro- and nano-sized fillers. Silica from the decomposition of the silicone resins reacted with the oxides deriving from the fillers, yielding glass ceramic components after heating at 1000°C. Despite the limited mechanical strength, the obtained samples possessed suitable porous architecture and promising biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics, as testified by preliminary in vitro tests. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of thermal plasma process of composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide production from zircon concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Z.G.; Stefanovic, P.Lj.; Pavlovic; Pavlovic, Z.N.; Zivkovic, N.V.

    2000-01-01

    Improved zirconium ceramics and composites have been invented in an effort to obtain better resistance to ablation at high temperature. These ceramics are suitable for use as thermal protection materials on the exterior surfaces of spacecraft, and in laboratory and industrial environments that include flows of hot oxidizing gases. Results of thermodynamic consideration of the process for composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide ultrafine powder production from ZrSiO 4 in argon thermal plasma and propane-butane gas as reactive quenching reagents are presented in the paper. (author)

  19. 16th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Program, Extended Abstracts, and Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B. L.

    2006-08-01

    The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 16th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes held August 6-9, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. The workshop addressed the fundamental properties of PV-Si, new solar cell designs, and advanced solar cell processing techniques. It provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The Workshop Theme was: "Getting more (Watts) for Less ($i)". A combination of oral presentations by invited speakers, poster sessions, and discussion sessions reviewed recent advances in crystal growth, new cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and cell fabrication approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands. The special sessions included: Feedstock Issues: Si Refining and Purification; Metal-impurity Engineering; Thin Film Si; and Diagnostic Techniques.

  20. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  1. Silicon Regulates Potential Genes Involved in Major Physiological Processes in Plants to Combat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinaya Manivannan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si, the quasi-essential element occurs as the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Biological importance of Si in plant kingdom has become inevitable particularly under stressed environment. In general, plants are classified as high, medium, and low silicon accumulators based on the ability of roots to absorb Si. The uptake of Si directly influence the positive effects attributed to the plant but Si supplementation proves to mitigate stress and recover plant growth even in low accumulating plants like tomato. The application of Si in soil as well as soil-less cultivation systems have resulted in the enhancement of quantitative and qualitative traits of plants even under stressed environment. Silicon possesses several mechanisms to regulate the physiological, biochemical, and antioxidant metabolism in plants to combat abiotic and biotic stresses. Nevertheless, very few reports are available on the aspect of Si-mediated molecular regulation of genes with potential role in stress tolerance. The recent advancements in the era of genomics and transcriptomics have opened an avenue for the determination of molecular rationale associated with the Si amendment to the stress alleviation in plants. Therefore, the present endeavor has attempted to describe the recent discoveries related to the regulation of vital genes involved in photosynthesis, transcription regulation, defense, water transport, polyamine synthesis, and housekeeping genes during abiotic and biotic stress alleviation by Si. Furthermore, an overview of Si-mediated modulation of multiple genes involved in stress response pathways such as phenylpropanoid pathway, jasmonic acid pathway, ABA-dependent or independent regulatory pathway have been discussed in this review.

  2. Effects of a modular two-step ozone-water and annealing process on silicon carbide graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Matthew J., E-mail: matthew.webb@cantab.net; Lundstedt, Anna; Grennberg, Helena [Department of Chemistry—BMC, Uppsala University, Box 576, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Polley, Craig; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Dirscherl, Kai [DFM—Danish Fundamental Metrology, Matematiktorvet 307, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Burwell, Gregory; Guy, Owen J. [College of Engineering, Faraday Tower, Singleton Park, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Palmgren, Pål [VG Scienta Scientific AB, Box 15120, Vallongatan 1, SE-750 15 Uppsala (Sweden); Yakimova, Rositsa [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-08-25

    By combining ozone and water, the effect of exposing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide to an aggressive wet-chemical process has been evaluated after high temperature annealing in ultra high vacuum. The decomposition of ozone in water produces a number of oxidizing species, however, despite long exposure times to the aqueous-ozone environment, no graphene oxide was observed after the two-step process. The systems were comprehensively characterized before and after processing using Raman spectroscopy, core level photoemission spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy together with low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In spite of the chemical potential of the aqueous-ozone reaction environment, the graphene domains were largely unaffected raising the prospect of employing such simple chemical and annealing protocols to clean or prepare epitaxial graphene surfaces.

  3. Numerical modelling of surface waves generated by low frequency electromagnetic field for silicon refinement process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geža, V.; Venčels, J.; Zāģeris, Ģ.; Pavlovs, S.

    2018-05-01

    One of the most perspective methods to produce SoG-Si is refinement via metallurgical route. The most critical part of this route is refinement from boron and phosphorus, therefore, approach under development will address this problem. An approach of creating surface waves on silicon melt’s surface is proposed in order to enlarge its area and accelerate removal of boron via chemical reactions and evaporation of phosphorus. A two dimensional numerical model is created which include coupling of electromagnetic and fluid dynamic simulations with free surface dynamics. First results show behaviour similar to experimental results from literature.

  4. Dry Phosphorus silicate glass etching and surface conditioning and cleaning for multi-crystalline silicon solar cell processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagilik, Ahmed S.

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to the wet chemical etching method, dry chemical etching processes for Phosphorus silicate glass [PSG} layer removal using Trifluormethane/Sulfur Hexafluoride (CHF 3 / SF 6 ) gas mixture in commercial silicon-nitride plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (SiN-PECVD) system is applied. The dependence of the solar cell performance on the etching temperature is investigated and optimized. It is found that the SiN-PECVD system temperature variation has a significant impact on the whole solar cell characteristics. A dry plasma cleaning treatment of the Si wafer surface after the PSG removal step is also investigated and developed. The cleaning step is used to remove the polymer film which is formed during the PSG etching using both oxygen and hydrogen gases. By applying an additional cleaning step, the polymer film deposited on the silicon wafer surface after PSG etching is eliminated. The effect of different plasma cleaning conditions on solar cell performance is investigated. After optimization of the plasma operating conditions, the performance of the solar cell is improved and the overall gain in efficiency of 0.6% absolute is yielded compared to a cell without any further cleaning step. On the other hand, the best solar cell characteristics can reach values close to that achieved by the conventional wet chemical etching processes demonstrating the effectiveness of the additional O 2 /H 2 post cleaning treatment.(author)

  5. 3D active edge silicon sensors: Device processing, yield and QA for the ATLAS-IBL production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Vià, Cinzia; Boscardil, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, GianFranco; Darbo, Giovanni; Fleta, Celeste; Gemme, Claudia; Giacomini, Gabriele; Grenier, Philippe; Grinstein, Sebastian; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Christopher; Kok, Angela; La Rosa, Alessandro; Micelli, Andrea; Parker, Sherwood; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pohl, David-Leon; Povoli, Marco; Vianello, Elisa; Zorzi, Nicola; Watts, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    3D silicon sensors, where plasma micromachining is used to etch deep narrow apertures in the silicon substrate to form electrodes of PIN junctions, were successfully manufactured in facilities in Europe and USA. In 2011 the technology underwent a qualification process to establish its maturity for a medium scale production for the construction of a pixel layer for vertex detection, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) at the CERN-LHC ATLAS experiment. The IBL collaboration, following that recommendation from the review panel, decided to complete the production of planar and 3D sensors and endorsed the proposal to build enough modules for a mixed IBL sensor scenario where 25% of 3D modules populate the forward and backward part of each stave. The production of planar sensors will also allow coverage of 100% of the IBL, in case that option was required. This paper will describe the processing strategy which allowed successful 3D sensor production, some of the Quality Assurance (QA) tests performed during the pre-production phase and the production yield to date.

  6. 3D active edge silicon sensors: Device processing, yield and QA for the ATLAS-IBL production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Vià, Cinzia, E-mail: cinzia.da.via@cern.ch [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Boscardil, Maurizio [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, FBK-CMM, Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, GianFranco [DISI, Università degli Studi di Trento and INFN, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Darbo, Giovanni [INFN Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-14146 Genova (Italy); Fleta, Celeste [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona E-08193 (Spain); Gemme, Claudia [INFN Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-14146 Genova (Italy); Giacomini, Gabriele [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, FBK-CMM, Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Grenier, Philippe [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grinstein, Sebastian [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE) and ICREA, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) E-08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Hansen, Thor-Erik [SINTEF MiNaLab, Blindern, N-0314 Oslo (Norway); Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Christopher [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kok, Angela [SINTEF MiNaLab, Blindern, N-0314 Oslo (Norway); La Rosa, Alessandro [CERN CH 1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Micelli, Andrea [Tne University of Udine and INFN, via del Cotonificio 108, 33100 Udine (Italy); Parker, Sherwood [University of Hawaii, c/o Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pellegrini, Giulio [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona E-08193 (Spain); Pohl, David-Leon [Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bonn, Nußallee 12 D-53115, Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Povoli, Marco [DISI, Università degli Studi di Trento and INFN, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); and others

    2013-01-21

    3D silicon sensors, where plasma micromachining is used to etch deep narrow apertures in the silicon substrate to form electrodes of PIN junctions, were successfully manufactured in facilities in Europe and USA. In 2011 the technology underwent a qualification process to establish its maturity for a medium scale production for the construction of a pixel layer for vertex detection, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) at the CERN-LHC ATLAS experiment. The IBL collaboration, following that recommendation from the review panel, decided to complete the production of planar and 3D sensors and endorsed the proposal to build enough modules for a mixed IBL sensor scenario where 25% of 3D modules populate the forward and backward part of each stave. The production of planar sensors will also allow coverage of 100% of the IBL, in case that option was required. This paper will describe the processing strategy which allowed successful 3D sensor production, some of the Quality Assurance (QA) tests performed during the pre-production phase and the production yield to date.

  7. 10th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes: Extended Abstracts and Papers from the Workshop, Copper Mountain Resort; August 14-16, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Gee, J.; Kalejs, J.; Saitoh, R.; Stavola, M.; Swanson, D.; Tan, T.; Weber, E.; Werner, J.

    2000-08-11

    The 10th Workshop provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and non-photovoltaic fields. Discussions included the various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon-their properties, the dynamics during device processing, and their application for developing low-cost processes for manufacturing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Sessions and panel discussions also reviewed thin-film crystalline-silicon PV, advanced cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and future manufacturing requirements to meet the ambitious expansion goals described in the recently released US PV Industry Roadmap. The Workshop also provided an excellent opportunity for researchers in private industry and at universities to recognize a mutual need for future collaborative research. The three-day workshop consisted of presentations by invited speakers, followed by discussion sessions. In addition, there was two poster sessions presenting the latest research and development results. The subjects discussed included: solar cell processing, light-induced degradation, gettering and passivation, crystalline silicon growth, thin-film silicon solar cells, and impurities and defects. Two special sessions featured at this workshop: advanced metallization and interconnections, and characterization methods.

  8. Top-gate microcrystalline silicon TFTs processed at low temperature (<200 deg. C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboundji, A.; Coulon, N.; Gorin, A.; Lhermite, H.; Mohammed-Brahim, T.; Fonrodona, M.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J.

    2005-01-01

    N-type as well P-type top-gate microcrystalline silicon thin film transistors (TFTs) are fabricated on glass substrates at a maximum temperature of 200 deg. C. The active layer is an undoped μc-Si film, 200 nm thick, deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor. The drain and source regions are highly phosphorus (N-type TFTs) or boron (P-type TFTs)-doped μc-films deposited by HW-CVD. The gate insulator is a silicon dioxide film deposited by RF sputtering. Al-SiO 2 -N type c-Si structures using this insulator present low flat-band voltage,-0.2 V, and low density of states at the interface D it =6.4x10 10 eV -1 cm -2 . High field effect mobility, 25 cm 2 /V s for electrons and 1.1 cm 2 /V s for holes, is obtained. These values are very high, particularly the hole mobility that was never reached previously

  9. Sprayed and Spin-Coated Multilayer Antireflection Coating Films for Nonvacuum Processed Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Uzum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the simple and cost-effective methods, spin-coated ZrO2-polymer composite/spray-deposited TiO2-compact multilayer antireflection coating film was introduced. With a single TiO2-compact film on the surface of a crystalline silicon wafer, 5.3% average reflectance (the reflectance average between the wavelengths of 300 nm and 1100 nm was observed. Reflectance decreased further down to 3.3% after forming spin-coated ZrO2 on the spray-deposited TiO2-compact film. Silicon solar cells were fabricated using CZ-Si p-type wafers in three sets: (1 without antireflection coating (ARC layer, (2 with TiO2-compact ARC film, and (3 with ZrO2-polymer composite/TiO2-compact multilayer ARC film. Conversion efficiency of the cells improved by a factor of 0.8% (from 15.19% to 15.88% owing to the multilayer ARC. Jsc was improved further by 2 mA cm−2 (from 35.3 mA cm−2 to 37.2 mA cm−2 when compared with a single TiO2-compact ARC.

  10. Influence of silicon concentration on linear contraction process of Al-Si binary alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mutwil

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of shrinkage phenomena during solidification and cooling of aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloys (AlSi5, AlSi7, AlSi9, AlSi11, AlSi12.5, AlSi18, AlSi21 have been conducted. A vertical shrinkage rod casting with circular cross-section (constant or fixed: tapered has been used as a test sample. By constant cross-section a test channel mould was parted and allowed a constrained contraction to examine. No parted test channel mould was tapered and allowed an unconstrained contraction to investigate. In the experiments the dimensions changes of solidifying test bar and the test mould have been registered, what has allowed to explain a mechanism of pre-shrinkage extension of solidifying metals and alloys. Registered time dependence of the test bar and the test mould dimension changes have shown, that so-called pre-shrinkage extension has been by mould thermal extension caused. The investigation results have also shown that time- and temperature dependences of shrinkage of Al-Si alloys have been on silicon concentration depended.

  11. Process induced sub-surface damage in mechanically ground silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yu; De Munck, Koen; Teixeira, Ricardo Cotrin; Swinnen, Bart; De Wolf, Ingrid; Verlinden, Bert

    2008-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microcopy, atomic force microscopy and preferential etching were used to characterize the sub-surface damage induced by the rough and fine grinding steps used to make ultra-thin silicon wafers. The roughly and ultra-finely ground silicon wafers were examined on both the machined (1 0 0) planes and the cross-sectional (1 1 0) planes. They reveal similar multi-layer damage structures, consisting of amorphous, plastically deformed and elastically stressed layers. However, the thickness of each layer in the roughly ground sample is much higher than its counterpart layers in the ultra-finely ground sample. The residual stress after rough and ultra-fine grinding is in the range of several hundreds MPa and 30 MPa, respectively. In each case, the top amorphous layer is believed to be the result of sequential phase transformations (Si-I to Si-II to amorphous Si). These phase transformations correspond to a ductile grinding mechanism, which is dominating in ultra-fine grinding. On the other hand, in rough grinding, a mixed mechanism of ductile and brittle grinding causes multi-layer damage and sub-surface cracks

  12. Primary processes and ionic reactions in the chemistry of recoiling silicon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Boo, B.H.; Stewart, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Hot atom chemistry has permitted the elucidation of the chemistry of free atoms, and these include the polyvalent atoms of refractory group 14 elements, that is, carbon, silicon and germanium. Since no more than two bonds are formed normally in a single reactive collision of free atoms, the study on the chemistry of atoms like C, Si and Ge that require the formation of more than two bonds to saturate their chemical valence necessarily involves the study of reactive intermediates. By the studies on the chemistry of recoiling 31 Si atoms, the mechanistic conclusions reached are reported. The most important unanswered questions concerning the reaction of recoiling 31 Si atoms in the systems are shown, and progress has been made toward the answering. By using tetramethyl silane as a trapping agent for silicon ions, it has been established that the reaction of 31 Si ions contributes significantly to the formation of products in recoil systems. The studies by various researchers on this theme are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Evaluation of selected chemical processes for production of low-cost silicon, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, J. M., Jr.; Browning, M. F.; Wilson, W. J.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Potential designs for an integrated fluidized-bed reactor/zinc vaporizer/SiCl4 preheater unit are being considered and heat-transfer calculations have been initiated on versions of the zinc vaporizer section. Estimates of the cost of the silicon prepared in the experimental facility have been made for projected capacities of 25, 50, 75, and 100 metric ton of silicon. A 35 percent saving is obtained in going from 25 metric ton/year to the 50 metric ton/year level. This analysis, coupled with the recognition that use of two reactors in the 50 metric ton/year version allows for continued operation (at reduced capacity) with one reactor shut down, has resulted in a recommendation for adoption of an experimental facility capacity of 50 metric ton/year or greater. At this stage, the change to a larger size facility would not increase the design costs appreciably. In the experimental support program, the effects of seed bed particle size and depth were studied, and operation of the miniplant with a new zinc vaporizer was initiated, revealing the need for modification of the latter.

  14. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  15. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Volume 1: Characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R. B.; Blais, P. D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R. E.; Mollenkopf, H. C.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. Discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, conventional solar cell I-V techniques, and descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are presented and discussed. The tabulated data include lists of impurity segregation coefficients, ingot impurity analyses and estimated concentrations, typical deep level impurity spectra, photoconductive and open circuit decay lifetimes for individual metal-doped ingots, and a complete tabulation of the cell I-V characteristics of nearly 200 ingots.

  16. Re-defining failure envelopes for silicon carbide composites based on damage process analysis by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    A silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite is a promising candidate for a fusion DEMO blanket. To develop design codes in practical use of them, strength anisotropy is an important issue to be clarified and therefore this study aimed to evaluate the failure behavior of the SiC/SiC composites to provide a strength map. For this purpose, detailed tensile, compressive and in-plane shear failure behaviors were evaluated by the acoustic emission (AE) technique for a plain–weave (P/W) chemically vapor-infiltration (CVI) SiC/SiC composite. The AE results distinguished damage accumulation processes by separately discussing localized variations of power within a time series by wavelet analysis. Of particular emphasis is that matrix cracking occurred prior to the proportional limit stress (PLS) by both tensile and compressive tests. This is because the rough-surface of SiC fibers resulted in the strong frictional stress at the fiber/matrix (F/M) interface, showing linearity in the stress–strain curve beyond the actual matrix cracking stress (i.e., possibly no sliding of the fibers at the F/M interface). In this paper, an updated failure envelope was provided by referring the true matrix cracking stresses as more realistic and reasonable failure criteria

  17. Re-defining failure envelopes for silicon carbide composites based on damage process analysis by acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Takashi, E-mail: nozawa.takashi67@jaea.go.jp; Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-10-15

    A silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite is a promising candidate for a fusion DEMO blanket. To develop design codes in practical use of them, strength anisotropy is an important issue to be clarified and therefore this study aimed to evaluate the failure behavior of the SiC/SiC composites to provide a strength map. For this purpose, detailed tensile, compressive and in-plane shear failure behaviors were evaluated by the acoustic emission (AE) technique for a plain–weave (P/W) chemically vapor-infiltration (CVI) SiC/SiC composite. The AE results distinguished damage accumulation processes by separately discussing localized variations of power within a time series by wavelet analysis. Of particular emphasis is that matrix cracking occurred prior to the proportional limit stress (PLS) by both tensile and compressive tests. This is because the rough-surface of SiC fibers resulted in the strong frictional stress at the fiber/matrix (F/M) interface, showing linearity in the stress–strain curve beyond the actual matrix cracking stress (i.e., possibly no sliding of the fibers at the F/M interface). In this paper, an updated failure envelope was provided by referring the true matrix cracking stresses as more realistic and reasonable failure criteria.

  18. Fabrication of a 77 GHz Rotman Lens on a High Resistivity Silicon Wafer Using Lift-Off Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Attaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of a high resistivity silicon based microstrip Rotman lens using a lift-off process has been presented. The lens features 3 beam ports, 5 array ports, 16 dummy ports, and beam steering angles of ±10 degrees. The lens was fabricated on a 200 μm thick high resistivity silicon wafer and has a footprint area of 19.7 mm × 15.6 mm. The lens was tested as an integral part of a 77 GHz radar where a tunable X band source along with an 8 times multiplier was used as the RF source and the resulting millimeter wave signal centered at 77 GHz was radiated through a lens-antenna combination. A horn antenna with a downconverter harmonic mixer was used to receive the radiated signal and display the received signal in an Advantest R3271A spectrum analyzer. The superimposed transmit and receive signal in the spectrum analyzer showed the proper radar operation confirming the Rotman lens design.

  19. Improving the Quality of the Deteriorated Regions of Multicrystalline Silicon Ingots during General Solar Cell Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shan-Shan; Wang Lei; Yang De-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of wafers and solar cells from the border of a multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) ingot, which contain deteriorated regions, is investigated. It is found that the diffusion length distribution of minority carriers in the cells is uniform, and high efficiency of the solar cells (about 16%) is achieved. It is considered that the quality of the deteriorated regions could be improved to be similar to that of adjacent regions. Moreover, it is indicated that during general solar cell fabrication, phosphorus gettering and hydrogen passivation could significantly improve the quality of deteriorated regions, while aluminum gettering by RTP could not. Therefore, it is suggested that the border of a mc-Si ingot could be used to fabricate high efficiency solar cells, which will increase mc-Si utilization effectively. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  20. Fabrication process for CMUT arrays with polysilicon electrodes, nanometre precision cavity gaps and through-silicon vias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due-Hansen, J; Poppe, E; Summanwar, A; Jensen, G U; Breivik, L; Wang, D T; Schjølberg-Henriksen, K; Midtbø, K

    2012-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs) can be used to realize miniature ultrasound probes. Through-silicon vias (TSVs) allow for close integration of the CMUT and read-out electronics. A fabrication process enabling the realization of a CMUT array with TSVs is being developed. The integrated process requires the formation of highly doped polysilicon electrodes with low surface roughness. A process for polysilicon film deposition, doping, CMP, RIE and thermal annealing that resulted in a film with sheet resistance of 4.0 Ω/□ and a surface roughness of 1 nm rms has been developed. The surface roughness of the polysilicon film was found to increase with higher phosphorus concentrations. The surface roughness also increased when oxygen was present in the thermal annealing ambient. The RIE process for etching CMUT cavities in the doped polysilicon gave a mean etch depth of 59.2 ± 3.9 nm and a uniformity across the wafer ranging from 1.0 to 4.7%. The two presented processes are key processes that enable the fabrication of CMUT arrays suitable for applications in for instance intravascular cardiology and gastrointestinal imaging. (paper)

  1. Ion-implanted capacitively coupled silicon strip detectors with integrated polysilicon bias resistors processed on a 100 mm wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hietanen, I.; Lindgren, J.; Orava, R.; Tuuva, T.; Voutilainen, M.; Brenner, R.; Andersson, M.; Leinonen, K.; Ronkainen, H.

    1991-01-01

    Double-sided silicon strip detectors with integrated coupling capacitors and polysilicon resistors have been processed on a 100 mm wafer. A detector with an active area of 19x19 mm 2 was connected to LSI readout electronics and tested. The strip pitch of the detector is 25 μm on the p-side and 50 μm on the n-side. The readout pitch is 50 μm on both sides. The number of readout strips is 774 and the total number of strips is 1161. On the p-side a signal-to-noise of 35 has been measured using a 90 Sr β-source. The n-side has been studied using a laser. (orig.)

  2. Study of edge effects in the breakdown process of p sup + on n-bulk silicon diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Militaru, O; Bozzi, C; Rold, M D; Dell'Orso, R; Dutta, S; Messineo, A; Mihul, A; Tonelli, G; Verdini, P G; Wheadon, R; Xie, Z

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the role of the n sup + edge implants in the breakdown process of p sup + on n-bulk silicon diodes. Laboratory measurements and simulation studies are presented on a series of test structures aimed at an optimization of the design in the edge region. The dependence of the breakdown voltage on the geometrical parameters of the devices is discussed in detail. Design rules are extracted for the use of n sup + -layers along the scribe line to avoid surface conduction of current generated by the exposed edges. The effect of neutron irradiation has been studied up to a fluence of 1.8x10 sup 1 sup 5 cm sup - sup 2.

  3. Effect of substrate bias on deposition behaviour of charged silicon nanoparticles in ICP-CVD process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seung-Wan; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Seong, Dae-Jin; You, Shin-Jae; Seo, Byong-Hoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a substrate bias on the deposition behaviour of crystalline silicon films during inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) was analysed by consideration of non-classical crystallization, in which the building block is a nanoparticle rather than an individual atom or molecule. The coexistence of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles in the plasma and their role in Si film deposition are confirmed by applying bias voltages to the substrate, which is sufficiently small as not to affect the plasma potential. The sizes of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles captured on a carbon membrane and imaged using TEM are, respectively, 2.7–5.5 nm and 6–13 nm. The film deposited by positively charged nanoparticles has a typical columnar structure. In contrast, the film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has a structure like a powdery compact with the deposition rate about three times higher than that for positively charged nanoparticles. All the films exhibit crystallinity even though the substrate is at room temperature, which is attributed to the deposition of crystalline nanoparticles formed in the plasma. The film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has the highest crystalline fraction of 0.84. (paper)

  4. Commercial power silicon devices as possible routine dosimeters for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuochi, P.G.; Lavalle, M.; Gombia, E.; Mosca, R.; Kovacs, A.V.; Hargittai, P.; Vitanza, A.; Patti, A.

    2001-01-01

    The use of silicon devices as possible radiation dosimeters has been investigated in this study. A bipolar power transistor in TO126 plastic packaging has been selected. Irradiations, with doses in the range from 50 Gy up to 5 kGy, have been performed at room temperature using different radiation sources ( 60 Co g source, 2.5, 4 and 12 MeV electron accelerators). Few irradiations with g rays were also done at different temperatures. A physical parameter, T, related to the charge carrier lifetime, has been found to change as a function of irradiation dose. This change is radiation energy dependent. Long term stability of the electron irradiated transistors has been checked by means of a reliability test ('high temperature reverse bias', HTRB) at 150 deg. C for 1000 h. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been performed on the irradiated devices to identify the recombination centres introduced by the radiation treatment. The results obtained confirm that these transistors could be used as routine radiation dosimeters in a certain dose range. More work needs to be done particularly with g rays in the low dose region (50-200 Gy) and with low energy electrons. (author)

  5. 11th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes, Extended Abstracts and Papers, 19-22 August 2001, Estes Park, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.

    2001-08-16

    The 11th Workshop will provide a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and non-photovoltaic fields. Discussions will include the various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon--their properties, the dynamics during device processing, and their application for developing low-cost processes for manufacturing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Sessions and panel discussions will review impurities and defects in crystalline-silicon PV, advanced cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and future manufacturing demands. The workshop will emphasize some of the promising new technologies in Si solar cell fabrication that can lower PV energy costs and meet the throughput demands of the future. The three-day workshop will consist of presentations by invited speakers, followed by discussion sessions. Topics to be discussed are: Si Mechanical properties and Wafer Handling, Advanced Topics in PV Fundamentals, Gettering and Passivation, Impurities and Defects, Advanced Emitters, Crystalline Silicon Growth, and Solar Cell Processing. The workshop will also include presentations by NREL subcontractors who will review the highlights of their research during the current subcontract period. In addition, there will be two poster sessions presenting the latest research and development results. Some presentations will address recent technologies in the microelectronics field that may have a direct bearing on PV.

  6. Optimisation of a combined transient-ion-drift/rapid thermal annealing process for copper detection in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belayachi, A.; Heiser, T.; Schunck, J.P.; Bourdais, S.; Bloechl, P.; Huber, A.; Kempf, A

    2003-09-15

    The transient ion drift (TID) technique has been recently proposed for copper trace detection in silicon. Cu atoms may be present either in the vicinity of the Si surface or within the volume. In the latter case they are either gathered at secondary defects or form precipitates believed to be silicides. In order to become detectable by TID Cu atoms must be put into the highly mobile interstitial state. Depending on the initial configuration of the Cu/Si system different physical mechanisms may enable Cu atoms to become 'TID active'. In this work we study the Cu activation process using rapid thermal processing (RTP) in an attempt to minimise the thermal budget required to achieve a complete activation. Both, surface and volume contaminated samples are investigated. During RTP treatments the activation of surface Cu atoms is found to proceed significantly faster than during standard furnace anneal. We tentatively attribute this behaviour to the UV light exposure associated with the RTP, which may enhance the release of copper atoms from the surface. The dissolution kinetics of the Cu precipitates occurring during RTPs are found to be only limited by Cu diffusion. The RTP/TID process is used to study the low temperature reaction path of supersaturated Cu. If prior to the RTP process, Cu atoms are chemically removed from the surface or near surface region, TID measures only the residual bulk Cu atoms. Our results show that out-diffusion and near-surface precipitation are reducing mostly the copper supersaturation.

  7. DOE applied to study the effect of process parameters on silicon spacing in lost foam Al-Si-Cu alloy casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayganpour, A; Izman, S; Idris, M H; Jafari, H

    2012-01-01

    Lost foam casting as a relatively new manufacturing process is extensively employed to produce sound complicated castings. In this study, an experimental investigation on lost foam casting of an Al-Si-Cu aluminium cast alloy was conducted. The research was aimed in evaluating the effect of different pouring temperatures, slurry viscosities, vibration durations and sand grain sizes on eutectic silicon spacing of thin-wall castings. A stepped-pattern was used in the study and the focus of the investigations was at the thinnest 3 mm section. A full two-level factorial design experimental technique was used to plan the experiments and afterwards identify the significant factors affecting casting silicon spacing. The results showed that pouring temperature and its interaction with vibration time have pronounced effect on eutectic silicon phase size. Increasing pouring temperature coarsened the eutectic silicon spacing while the higher vibration time diminished coarsening effect. Moreover, no significant effects on silicon spacing were found with variation of sand size and slurry viscosity.

  8. Fiscal 2000 achievement report. Development of energy use rationalization-oriented silicon manufacturing process (Development of silicon substrate manufacturing technology for high-quality solar cell); 2000 nendo shin energy sangyo gijutsu sogo kaihatsu kiko kyodo kenkyu gyomu seika hokokusho. Energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu (Kohinshitsu taiyodenchiyou silicon kiban seizo gijutsu no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Research and development was conducted for enhancing productivity and energy conservation by rendering continuous and automatic the electromagnetic casting process for manufacturing polycrystalline silicon substrates for solar cells. In the manufacture of ingots for substrates by continuous electromagnetic casting, the chuck type system for feeding power to the melt plasma was replaced by a roller type system, and the power feeding position was moved to the high temperature region. Also, an on-line ingot slicing technique was established. In the manufacture of substrates at a slicing rate of 300 {mu}m/minute, productivity of 115,000 wafers/month, yield of 98%, and thickness tolerance of 30 {mu}m were achieved. A high-speed cleaning technique was developed using a jet stream, by which the cleaning time was reduced to 5 minutes and the slurry recovery rate was elevated to 95%. Based on these, substrate-related costs in the case of 100 MW/year production was calculated, which resulted in a cost of 98.8 yen/wafer (target: 103.3 yen/wafer) for manufacturing 15 cm square substrates from ingots and in a 15 cm square substrate slicing and cleaning cost of 135.1 yen/wafer (target: 135.4 yen/wafer). (NEDO)

  9. Silicon dioxide etching process for fabrication of micro-optics employing pulse-modulated electron-beam-excited plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Keigo; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Hori, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    Silicon dioxide etching process employing a pulse-modulated electron-beam-excited plasma (EBEP) has been developed for a fabrication process of optical micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMSs). Nonplanar dielectric materials were etched by using self-bias induced by the electron beam generating the plasma. In order to investigate the effect of pulse modulation on electron beam, plasma diagnostics were carried out in the EBEP employing C 4 F 8 gas diluted with Ar gas by using a Langmuir single probe and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It was found that the pulse-modulated EBEP has an excellent potential to reduce the plasma-induced thermal damage on a photoresist film on a substrate to get the uniform etching and the anisotropic SiO 2 etching in comparison with the conventional EBEP. The pulse-modulated EBEP enabled us to get the high etch rate of SiO 2 of 375 nm/min without any additional bias power supply. Furthermore, the microfabrication on the core area of optical fiber was realized. These results indicate that the pulse-modulated EBEP will be a powerful tool for the application to optical MEMS process

  10. Processes controlling silicon isotopic fractionation in a forested tropical watershed: Mule Hole Critical Zone Observatory (Southern India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riotte, Jean; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Zambardi, Thomas; Audry, Stéphane; Barboni, Doris; Anupama, Krishnamurthy; Prasad, Srinivasan; Chmeleff, Jérôme; Poitrasson, Franck; Sekhar, Muddu; Braun, Jean-Jacques

    2018-05-01

    Assessing the dynamics of the silica cycle in the critical zone remains challenging, particularly within the soil, where multiple processes are involved. To improve our understanding of this cycle in the Tropics, and more specifically the role played by vegetation, we combined elemental Si mass balance with the δ30Si signatures of the compartments involved in the water-plant-rock interactions of a tropical forested watershed, Mule Hole (Southern India). To accomplish this, we analysed (1) the δ30Si values of present-day litter phytoliths from tree leaves and grass, as well as soil amorphous silica (ASi); (2) the Si isotope fractionation induced by phytolith dissolution; (3) the silicon mass balance inferred from isotopes at the soil-plant scale; and (4) the consistency between water sources and the δ30Si signatures in the ephemeral stream. The δ30Si values of present-day litter phytoliths and soil ASi vary within a narrow range of 1.10-1.40‰ for all samples, but two deep vertisol samples which likely trapped phytoliths from different vegetation growing under more humid conditions, as indicated by pollen analysis. A homogeneous signature of litter is a minimum condition for using δ30Si as a proxy for the litter/phytolith source of Si. However, litter-ash dissolution experiments demonstrate that the incipient dissolution of phytoliths fractionates Si isotopes, with the preferential dissolution of 28Si over 30Si yielding δ30Si values as low as -1.41‰. Values close to the whole-sample signatures, i.e., above 1‰, were recovered in the solution after a few hours of water-ash interaction. At the soil-plant scale, the average δ30Si value of soil-infiltrating solutions is slightly lighter than the average phytolith signature, which suggests phytoliths as the source of soil dissolved Si. The isotopic budget of dissolved Si within the soil layer, which was obtained based on previous elemental fluxes, is imbalanced. Equilibrating the isotopic budget would imply

  11. The influence of punching process on residual stress and magnetic domain structure of non-oriented silicon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hao, Linpo; Yi, Jingwen; Zhang, Xianglin; Luo, Zhonghan; Chen, Shenglin; Li, Rongfeng

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of punching process on residual stress and magnetic domain structure. The residual stress in non-oriented silicon steel after punching process was measured by nanoindentation. The maximum depth was kept constant as 300 nm during nanoindentation. The material around indentation region exhibited no significant pile-up deformation. The calculation of residual stress was based on the Suresh theoretical model. Our experimental results show that residual compressive stress was generated around the sheared edge after punching. The width of residual stress affected zone by punching was around 0.4–0.5 mm. After annealing treatment, the residual stress was significantly decreased. Magnetic domain structure was observed according to the Bitter method. The un-annealed sample exhibited complicated domain patterns, and the widths of the magnetic domains varied between 3 µm and 8 µm. Most of the domain patterns of the annealed sample were 180°-domains and 90°-domains, and the widths of the domains decreased to 1–3 µm. - Highlights: • The residual stress distribution on sheared edge was measured. • The residual compressive stress was generated around the sheared edge. • The width of residual stress affected zone was about 0.4–0.5 mm. • The shape and width of the domain structure would be changed by annealing.

  12. Optimization of process parameter variations on leakage current in in silicon-oninsulator vertical double gate mosfet device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Kaharudin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of optimizing input process parameters on leakage current (IOFF in silicon-on-insulator (SOI Vertical Double-Gate,Metal Oxide Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET by using L36 Taguchi method. The performance of SOI Vertical DG-MOSFET device is evaluated in terms of its lowest leakage current (IOFF value. An orthogonal array, main effects, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and analysis of variance (ANOVA are utilized in order to analyze the effect of input process parameter variation on leakage current (IOFF. Based on the results, the minimum leakage current ((IOFF of SOI Vertical DG-MOSFET is observed to be 0.009 nA/µm or 9 ρA/µm while keeping the drive current (ION value at 434 µA/µm. Both the drive current (ION and leakage current (IOFF values yield a higher ION/IOFF ratio (48.22 x 106 for low power consumption application. Meanwhile, polysilicon doping tilt angle and polysilicon doping energy are recognized as the most dominant factors with each of the contributing factor effects percentage of 59% and 25%.

  13. Impact of process parameters on the structural and electrical properties of metal/PZT/Al2O3/silicon gate stack for non-volatile memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Jha, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Rajat Kumar; Singh, B. R.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present the structural and electrical properties of the Al2O3 buffer layer on non-volatile memory behavior using Metal/PZT/Al2O3/Silicon structures. Metal/PZT/Silicon and Metal/Al2O3/Silicon structures were also fabricated and characterized to obtain capacitance and leakage current parameters. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT::35:65) and Al2O3 films were deposited by sputtering on the silicon substrate. Memory window, PUND, endurance, breakdown voltage, effective charges, flat-band voltage and leakage current density parameters were measured and the effects of process parameters on the structural and electrical characteristics were investigated. X-ray data show dominant (110) tetragonal phase of the PZT film, which crystallizes at 500 °C. The sputtered Al2O3 film annealed at different temperatures show dominant (312) orientation and amorphous nature at 425 °C. Multiple angle laser ellipsometric analysis reveals the temperature dependence of PZT film refractive index and extinction coefficient. Electrical characterization shows the maximum memory window of 3.9 V and breakdown voltage of 25 V for the Metal/Ferroelectric/Silicon (MFeS) structures annealed at 500 °C. With 10 nm Al2O3 layer in the Metal/Ferroelectric/Insulator/Silicon (MFeIS) structure, the memory window and breakdown voltage was improved to 7.21 and 35 V, respectively. Such structures show high endurance with no significant reduction polarization charge for upto 2.2 × 109 iteration cycles.

  14. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  15. Fiscal 2000 achievement report. Development of energy use rationalization-oriented silicon manufacturing process (Survey and study of analysis of commercialization of solar-grade silicon material manufacturing technology); 2000 nendo shin energy sangyo gijutsu sogo kaihatsu kiko kyodo kenkyu gyomu seika hokokusho. Energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu (Taiyodenchiyou silicon genryo seizo gijutsu no jitsuyoka kaiseki ni kansuru chosa kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The trend of technology development, problems harbored therein, trend of the market, and the like were investigated for supporting the development of technologies for the mass production and commercialization of solar-grade silicon materials. Concerning the future of production enhancement and cost reduction in the manufacture of polycrystalline silicon solar cells, studies were made from the technological viewpoint. The results are shown below. It is estimated that approximately 4,500 tons of material silicon will be necessary in 2005 and 6,500-10,700 tons in 2010. Since the melting purification method of NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) now under development step by step toward commercialization as well as the conventional source will provide the necessary amount of material silicon, it is inferred that the development of solar cells will go on without any restraint originating in the semiconductor industry. With the commercialization of the technologies so far developed and the development/commercialization of the fast-acting high-performance solar cell technology, probabilities are high that the polycrystalline silicon solar cell manufacturing cost in 2010 will be as low as to be on the 100 yen/W (93-118 yen/W) level which is the level now held up as the goal. (NEDO)

  16. Achievement report for fiscal 1999 on the development of silicon manufacturing process rationalizing energy utilization. Research and study on analysis to put silicon raw material manufacturing technology for solar cells into practical use; 1999 nendo energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Taiyo denchi silicon genryo seizo gijutsu no jitsuyoka kaiseki ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In order to support the development and practical application of a mass production technology for manufacturing silicon raw materials for solar cells, research and study were performed on trends of developing the related technologies, and movements in markets and industries. This paper reports the achievements thereof in fiscal 1999. Markets for solar cells are growing favorably, and the worldwide solar cell production in 1999 was 200 MWp, of which 80% or more is occupied by crystalline silicon solar cell. While development of the manufacturing technology for SOG-Si mass-production is in the stage of operation research of pilot plants, it has been verified that problems of impurity contamination was resolved, and high-purity silicon can be manufactured. In developing the silicon scrap utilization technology and a technology to integrate silicon refinement with casting, a conversion efficiency of 14% or higher was acquired in prototype sample substrates. It has been verified that a variety of raw materials can be dealt with by using the above technology, which has a possibility of cost reduction. In developing a substrate manufacturing technology, a great progress has been made in enhancing the productivity and reducing the cost by developing the continuous casting in the electromagnetic casting and the automation technology. (NEDO)

  17. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.; Peters, Craig; Brongersma, Mark; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  18. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  19. Flat-plate solar array project process development area process research of non-CZ silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Three sets of samples were laser processed and then cell processed. The laser processing was carried out on P-type and N-type web at laser power levels from 0.5 joule/sq cm to 2.5 joule/sq cm. Six different liquid dopants were tested (3 phosphorus dopants, 2 boron dopants, 1 aluminum dopant). The laser processed web strips were fabricated into solar cells immediately after laser processing and after various annealing cycles. Spreading resistance measurements made on a number of these samples indicate that the N(+)P (phosphorus doped) junction is approx. 0.2 micrometers deep and suitable for solar cells. However, the P(+)N (or P(+)P) junction is very shallow ( 0.1 micrometers) with a low surface concentration and resulting high resistance. Due to this effect, the fabricated cells are of low efficiency. The maximum efficiency attained was 9.6% on P-type web after a 700 C anneal. The main reason for the low efficiency was a high series resistance in the cell due to a high resistance back contact.

  20. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task: Establishment of the feasibility of a process capable of low-cost, high volume production of silane (step 1) and the pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon (step 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, W. C.; Cheung, H.; Farrier, E. G.; Morihara, H.

    1977-01-01

    A quartz fluid bed reactor capable of operating at temperatures of up to 1000 C was designed, constructed, and successfully operated. During a 30 minute experiment, silane was decomposed within the reactor with no pyrolysis occurring on the reactor wall or on the gas injection system. A hammer mill/roller-crusher system appeared to be the most practical method for producing seed material from bulk silicon. No measurable impurities were detected in the silicon powder produced by the free space reactor, using the cathode layer emission spectroscopic technique. Impurity concentration followed by emission spectroscopic examination of the residue indicated a total impurity level of 2 micrograms/gram. A pellet cast from this powder had an electrical resistivity of 35 to 45 ohm-cm and P-type conductivity.

  1. Effect of initial porosity on mechanical properties of C/SiC composites fabricated by silicon melt infiltration process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, D.S.; Son, D.Y. [Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Eng., Dong-Eui Univ., Busan (Korea); Lee, S.P. [Dept. of Mechanical Eng., Dong-Eui Univ., Busan (Korea); Park, H.S.; Kim, K.S. [Dreaming and Challenging Co., Changwon (Korea); Jeon, J.H. [Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Changwon (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    Four kinds of raw C/C composites with a density between 1.25{proportional_to}1.66 g/cm{sup 3} were used in order to investigate the effect of the initial porosity of C/C composites on mechanical properties of liquid silicon infiltrated C/SiC composites. The microstructure observation, image analysis and flexural strength test of the composites were performed. The density and microstructural changes with the variation of the initial porosity was discussed in the terms of the infiltration behavior of liquid silicon and the reaction between liquid silicon and matrix carbon. (orig.)

  2. Numerical Simulation of Shear Slitting Process of Grain Oriented Silicon Steel using SPH Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdal Łukasz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical cutting allows separating of sheet material at low cost and therefore remains the most popular way to produce laminations for electrical machines and transformers. However, recent investigations revealed the deteriorating effect of cutting on the magnetic properties of the material close to the cut edge. The deformations generate elastic stresses in zones adjacent to the area of plastically deformed and strongly affect the magnetic properties. The knowledge about residual stresses is necessary in designing the process. This paper presents the new apprach of modeling residual stresses induced in shear slitting of grain oriented electrical steel using mesh-free method. The applications of SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics methodology to the simulation and analysis of 3D shear slitting process is presented. In experimental studies, an advanced vision-based technology based on digital image correlation (DIC for monitoring the cutting process is used.

  3. Advanced diffusion system for low contamination in-line rapid thermal processing of silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biro, D.; Preu, R.; Schultz, O.; Peters, S.; Huljic, D.M.; Zickermann, D.; Schindler, R.; Luedemann, R.; Willeke, G. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    A novel diffusion system for in-line rapid thermal diffusion is presented. The lamp-heated furnace has a low thermal mass and a metal free transport system based on the walking beam principle. The furnace has been used to process first solar cells with lightly and highly doped emitters respectively. Solar cells with shallow lightly doped emitters show that the emitters processed in the new device can be well passivated. Shallow emitters with sheet resistances of up to 40/sq. have been contacted successfully by means of screen printing and firing through a SiN{sub x} antireflection coating. (author)

  4. Low cost solar array project silicon materials task. Development of a process for high capacity arc heater production of silicon for solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental verification system for the production of silicon via the arc heater-sodium reduction of SiCl4 was designed, fabricated, installed, and operated. Each of the attendant subsystems was checked out and operated to insure performance requirements. These subsystems included: the arc heaters/reactor, cooling water system, gas system, power system, Control & Instrumentation system, Na injection system, SiCl4 injection system, effluent disposal system and gas burnoff system. Prior to introducing the reactants (Na and SiCl4) to the arc heater/reactor, a series of gas only-power tests was conducted to establish the operating parameters of the three arc heaters of the system. Following the successful completion of the gas only-power tests and the readiness tests of the sodium and SiCl4 injection systems, a shakedown test of the complete experimental verification system was conducted.

  5. Silicon Valley's Processing Needs versus San Jose State University's Manufacturing Systems Processing Component: Implications for Industrial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, Samuel C.

    2004-01-01

    Manufacturing professionals within universities tend to view manufacturing systems from a global perspective. This perspective tends to assume that manufacturing processes are employed equally in every manufacturing enterprise, irrespective of the geography and the needs of the people in those diverse regions. But in reality local and societal…

  6. Low Cost Solar Array Project. Feasibility of the silane process for producing semiconductor-grade silicon. Final report, October 1975-March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The commercial production of low-cost semiconductor-grade silicon is an essential requirement of the JPL/DOE (Department of Energy) Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project. A 1000-metric-ton-per-year commercial facility using the Union Carbide Silane Process will produce molten silicon for an estimated price of $7.56/kg (1975 dollars, private financing), meeting the DOE goal of less than $10/kg. Conclusions and technology status are reported for both contract phases, which had the following objectives: (1) establish the feasibility of Union Carbide's Silane Process for commercial application, and (2) develop an integrated process design for an Experimental Process System Development Unit (EPSDU) and a commercial facility, and estimate the corresponding commercial plant economic performance. To assemble the facility design, the following work was performed: (a) collection of Union Carbide's applicable background technology; (b) design, assembly, and operation of a small integrated silane-producing Process Development Unit (PDU); (c) analysis, testing, and comparison of two high-temperature methods for converting pure silane to silicon metal; and (d) determination of chemical reaction equilibria and kinetics, and vapor-liquid equilibria for chlorosilanes.

  7. Low cost solar array project: Cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Meniscus coates tests, back junction formation using a new boron containing liquid, tests of various SiO2 and boron containing liquids, pelletized silicon for replenishment during web growth, and ion implantation compatibility/feasibility study are discussed.

  8. Magnetic losses reduction in grain oriented silicon steel by pulse and continuous fiber laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryshynets, Ivan; Kováč, František; Puchý, Viktor; Šebek, Martin; Füzer, Ján; Kollár, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The present paper shows the impact of different laser scribing conditions on possible reduction of magnetic losses in grain oriented electrical steel sheets. The experimental Fe-3%Si steel was taken from industrial line after final box annealing. The surface of investigated steel was subjected to fiber laser processing using both pulse and continuous scribing regimes in order to generate residual thermal stresses inducing the magnetic domains structure refinement. The magnetic losses of experimental samples before and after individual laser scribing regimes were tested in AC magnetic field with 50Hz frequency and induction of 1.5T. The most significant magnetic losses reduction of 38% was obtained at optimized conditions of continuous laser scribing regime. A semi quantitative relationship has been found between the domain patterns and the used fiber laser processing.

  9. Magnetic losses reduction in grain oriented silicon steel by pulse and continuous fiber laser processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Petryshynets

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper shows the impact of different laser scribing conditions on possible reduction of magnetic losses in grain oriented electrical steel sheets. The experimental Fe-3%Si steel was taken from industrial line after final box annealing. The surface of investigated steel was subjected to fiber laser processing using both pulse and continuous scribing regimes in order to generate residual thermal stresses inducing the magnetic domains structure refinement. The magnetic losses of experimental samples before and after individual laser scribing regimes were tested in AC magnetic field with 50Hz frequency and induction of 1.5T. The most significant magnetic losses reduction of 38% was obtained at optimized conditions of continuous laser scribing regime. A semi quantitative relationship has been found between the domain patterns and the used fiber laser processing.

  10. Preliminary reduction of chromium ore using Si sludge generated in silicon wafer manufacturing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung W.-G.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to promote the recycling of by-product from Si wafer manufacturing process and to develop environment-friend and low cost process for ferrochrome alloy production, a basic study was performed on the preliminary reduction reaction between chromium ore and the Si sludge, comprised of SiC and Si particles, which is recovered from the Si wafer manufacturing process for the semiconductor and solar cell industries. Pellets were first made by mixing chromium ore, Si sludge, and some binders in the designed mixing ratios and were then treated at different temperatures in the 1116°C–1388°C range in an ambient atmosphere. Cordierite and SiO2 were confirmed to be formed in the products after the reduction. Additionally, metal particles were observed in the product with Fe, Cr, and Si components. It is found that temperatures above 1300°C are necessary for the reduction of the chromium ore by the Si sludge. The reduction ratio for Fe was evaluated quantitatively for our experimental conditions, and the proper mixing ratio was suggested for the pre-reduction of the chromium ore by the Si sludge. This study provides basic information for the production of ferrochrome alloys on the pre-reduction of chromium ore using Si sludge.

  11. Effect of processing on fracture toughness of silicon carbide as determined by Vickers indentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Christine M.; Dutta, Sunil

    1989-01-01

    Several alpha-SiC materials were processed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and by sintering an alpha-SiC powder containing boron and carbon. Several beta-SiC materials were processed by HIPing a beta-SiC powder with boron and carbon additions. The fracture toughnesses K(sub 1c) of these beta- and alpha-SiC materials were estimated from measurements of Vickers indentations. The three formulas used to estimate K(sub 1c) from the indentation fracture patterns resulted in three ranges of K(sub 1c) estimates. Furthermore, each formula measured the effects of processing differently. All three estimates indicated that fine-grained HIPed alpha-SiC has a higher K(sub 1c) than coarsed-grained sintered alpha-SiC. Hot isostatically pressed beta-SiC, which had an ultrafine grain structure, exhibited a K(sub 1c) comparable to that of HIPed alpha-SiC.

  12. Development of an Indium Bump Bond Process for Silicon Pixel Detectors at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Brönnimann, C; Gobrecht, J; Heising, S; Horisberger, M; Horisberger, R P; Kästli, H C; Lehmann, J; Rohe, T; Streuli, S; Broennimann, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    The hybrid pixel detectors used in the high energy physics experiments currently under construction use a three dimensional connection technique, the so-called bump bonding. As the pitch below 100um, required in these applications, cannot be fullfilled with standard industrial processes (e.g. the IBM C4 process), an in-house bump bond process using reflown indium bumps was developed at PSI as part of the R&D for the CMS-pixel detector. The bump deposition on the sensor is performed in two subsequent lift-off steps. As the first photolithographic step a thin under bump metalization (UBM) is sputtered onto bump pads. It is wettable by indium and defines the diameter of the bump. The indium is evaporated via a second photolithographic step with larger openings and is reflown afterwards. The height of the balls is defined by the volume of the indium. On the readout chip only one photolithographic step is carried out to deposit the UBM and a thin indium layer for better adhesion. After mating both parts a seco...

  13. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  14. Evaluation of Selected Chemical Processes for Production of Low-cost Silicon, Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, J. M.; Browning, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    Refinements of the design of the 50 MT/year Experimental Process System Development Unit were made and competitive bids were received from mechanical, electrical, and structural contractors. Bids on most of the equipment were received and cataloged. Emergency procedures were defined to counter a variety of contingencies disclosed in operations and safety reviews. Experimental work with an electrolytic cell for zinc chloride disclosed no significant increase in power efficiency by steps taken to increase electrolyte circulation. On the basis of materials compatibility and permeability tests, 310 stainless steel was chosen for the shell of the fluidized-bed reactor and SiC-coated graphite for the liner.

  15. Directionally Solidified Aluminum - 7 wt% Silicon Alloys: Comparison of Earth and International Space Station Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N,; Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, R. S.; Erdman, Robert; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Primary dendrite arm spacings of Al-7 wt% Si alloy directionally solidified in low gravity environment of space (MICAST-6 and MICAST-7: Thermal gradient approx. 19 to 26 K/cm, Growth speeds varying from 5 to 50 microns/s show good agreement with the Hunt-Lu model. Primary dendrite trunk diameters of the ISS processed samples show a good fit with a simple analytical model based on Kirkwood s approach, proposed here. Natural convection, a) decreases primary dendrite arm spacing. b) appears to increase primary dendrite trunk diameter.

  16. Transformational silicon electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-02-25

    In today\\'s traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  17. Determination of silicon in biomass and products of pyrolysis process via high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadi, Flávio V; Prodanov, Caroline; Boschetti, Wiliam; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2018-03-01

    Thermochemical processes can convert the biomass into fuels, such as bio-oil. The biomass submitted to pyrolysis process, such as fibers, are generally rich in silicon, an element that can lead to damages in an engine when there is high concentration in a fuel. High-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) is an interesting alternative for Si determination in the products and byproducts of the pyrolysis process because, besides the flame (F) and graphite furnace (GF) atomizers, it has enhanced the application of direct analysis of solid samples (SS) within GF. This study aimed the development of methods to determine Si in biomass samples, their products and byproducts using HR-CS AAS. A high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer contrAA 700 equipped with F and GF atomizers was used throughout the study. HR-CS F AAS (λ = 251.611nm, 1 detection pixel, N 2 O/C 2 H 2 flame) was used to evaluate Si content in biomass and ash, after a microwave-assisted acid digestion with HNO 3 and HF. HR-CS GF AAS (T pyr = 1400°C, T atom = 2650°C) has evaluated Si in pyrolysis water and bio-oil at 251.611nm, and in peach pit biomass and ash at 221.174nm using SS, both wavelengths with 1 detection pixel. Rhodium (300μg) was applied as permanent modifier and 10μgPd + 6μg Mg were pipetted onto the standards/samples at each analysis. Three different biomass samples were studied: palm tree fiber, coconut fiber and peach pit, and three certified reference materials (CRM) were used to verify the accuracy of the methods. The figures of merit were LOD 0.09-20mgkg -1 , and LOQ 0.3-20mgkg -1 , considering all the methods. There were no significant differences between the CRM certified values and the determined ones, using a Student t-test with a confidence interval of 95% (n = 5). Si concentration ranged from 0.11-0.92% mm -1 , 1.1-1.7mgkg -1 , 3.3-13mgkg -1 , and 0.41-1.4%mm -1 , in biomass, bio-oil, pyrolysis water and ash, respectively

  18. Mass-Spectrometric Studies of Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes of Organic Silicon Compounds Containing Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Takashi; Ansari, S. G.; Yoneyama, Koji; Nakajima, Teppei; Masuda, Atsushi; Matsumura, Hideki; Nakamura, Megumi; Umemoto, Hironobu

    2006-02-01

    The mechanism of catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) processes for hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and trisdimethylaminosilane (TDMAS), which are used as source gases to prepare SiNx or SiCxNy films, was studied using three different mass spectrometric techniques: ionization by Li+ ion attachment, vacuum-ultraviolet radiation and electron impact. The results for HMDS show that Si-N bonds dissociate selectively, although Si-C bonds are weaker, and (CH3)3SiNH should be one of the main precursors of deposited films. This decomposition mechanism did not change when NH3 was introduced, but the decomposition efficiency was slightly increased. Similar results were obtained for TDMAS.

  19. Planar nucleation and crystallization in the annealing process of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yimin; Chen Zhenhua; Chen Ding

    2010-01-01

    According to thermodynamic and kinetic theory, considering the variation of bulk free energy and superficial energy after nucleation as well as the migration of atoms, we study systematically the planar nucleation and crystallization that relate to two possible transition mechanisms in the annealing process of ion implanted Si: (1) liquid/solid transition: the critical nucleation work is equal to half the increased superficial energy and inversely proportional to the supercooling ΔT. Compared with bulk nucleation, the radius of the critical nucleus decreases by half, and the nucleation rate attains its maximum at T = T m /2. (2) amorphous/crystalline transition: the atoms contained in the critical nucleus and situated on its surface, as well as critical nucleation work, are all directly proportional to the height of the nucleus, and the nucleation barrier is equal to half the superficial energy too. In addition, we take SiGe semiconductor as a specific example for calculation; a value of 0.03 eV/atom is obtained for the elastic strain energy, and a more reasonable result can be gotten after taking into account its effect on transition Finally, we reach the following conclusion as a result of the calculation: for the annealing of ion implanted Si, no matter what the transition method is-liquid or solid planar nucleation-the recrystallization process is actually carried out layer by layer on the crystal substrate, and the probability of forming a 'rod-like' nucleus is much larger than that of a 'plate-like' nucleus. (semiconductor materials)

  20. Surface microstructure and cell biocompatibility of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite coating on titanium substrate prepared by a biomimetic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Erlin; Zou Chunming; Yu Guoning

    2009-01-01

    Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) coatings with 0.14 to 1.14 at.% Si on pure titanium were prepared by a biomimetic process. The microstructure characterization and the cell compatibility of the Si-HA coatings were studied in comparison with that of hydroxyapatite (HA) coating prepared in the same way. The prepared Si-HA coatings and HA coating were only partially crystallized or in nano-scaled crystals. The introduction of Si element in HA significantly reduced P and Ca content, but densified the coating. The atom ratio of Ca to (P + Si) in the Si-HA coatings was in a range of 1.61-1.73, increasing slightly with an increase in the Si content. FTIR results displayed that Si entered HA in a form of SiO 4 unit by substituting for PO 4 unit. The cell attachment test showed that the HA and Si-HA coatings exhibited better cell response than the uncoated titanium, but no difference was observed in the cell response between the HA coating and the Si-HA coatings. Both the HA coating and the Si-HA coatings demonstrated a significantly higher cell growth rate than the uncoated pure titanium (p < 0.05) in all incubation periods while the Si-HA coating exhibited a significantly higher cell growth rate than the HA coating (p < 0.05). Si-HA with 0.42 at.% Si presented the best cell biocompatibility in all of the incubation periods. It was suggested that the synthesis mode of HA and Si-HA coatings in a simulated body environment in the biomimetic process contribute significantly to good cell biocompatibility

  1. Controlled Directional Solidification of Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Comparison Between Samples Processed on Earth and in the Microgravity Environment Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Tewari, Surendra N.; Erdman, Robert G.; Poirier, David R.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the international "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys" (MICAST) program is given. Directional solidification processing of metals and alloys is described, and why experiments conducted in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are expected to promote our understanding of this commercially relevant practice. Microstructural differences observed when comparing the aluminum - 7 wt% silicon alloys directionally solidified on Earth to those aboard the ISS are presented and discussed.

  2. A numerical study of the influence of feeding polycrystalline silicon granules on melt temperature in the continuous Czochralski process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Naoki; Kida, Michio; Arai, Yoshiaki; Sahira, Kensho

    1993-09-01

    Temperature change was simulated using a solid body rotating melt model when solid polycrystalline silicon granules were supplied to a melt in a double-crucible method. Only heat conduction was considered in the analysis. The influence of the crucible rotation rates and of the initial temperature of the supplied silicon was investigated systematically and quantitatively. The influence of the crucible rotation rate was stronger than expected, which suggests that the crucible rotation rate cannot be lowered too much because of the possibility of the melt solidifying between the inner and outer crucibles.

  3. Study of the processes of degradation of the optical properties of mesoporous and macroporous silicon upon exposure to simulated solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitskii, V. S., E-mail: lev-vladimir@yandex.ru [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation); Lenshin, A. S., E-mail: lenshinas@phys.vsu.ru; Seredin, P. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Terukov, E. I. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The effect of solar radiation on the surface composition of mesoporous and macroporous silicon is studied by infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence measurements in order to analyze the possibility of using these materials as a material for solar-power engineering. The studies are conducted in the laboratory environment, with the use of a solar-radiation simulator operating under conditions close to the working conditions of standard silicon solar cells. The studies show that, in general, the materials meet the requirements of solar-power engineering, if it is possible to preclude harmful effects associated with the presence of heat-sensitive and photosensitive bonds at the nanomaterial surface by standard processing methods.

  4. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  5. Silicon photonics fundamentals and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Deen, M Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The creation of affordable high speed optical communications using standard semiconductor manufacturing technology is a principal aim of silicon photonics research. This would involve replacing copper connections with optical fibres or waveguides, and electrons with photons. With applications such as telecommunications and information processing, light detection, spectroscopy, holography and robotics, silicon photonics has the potential to revolutionise electronic-only systems. Providing an overview of the physics, technology and device operation of photonic devices using exclusively silicon and related alloys, the book includes: * Basic Properties of Silicon * Quantum Wells, Wires, Dots and Superlattices * Absorption Processes in Semiconductors * Light Emitters in Silicon * Photodetectors , Photodiodes and Phototransistors * Raman Lasers including Raman Scattering * Guided Lightwaves * Planar Waveguide Devices * Fabrication Techniques and Material Systems Silicon Photonics: Fundamentals and Devices outlines ...

  6. Towards Cost-Effective Crystalline Silicon Based Flexible Solar Cells: Integration Strategy by Rational Design of Materials, Process, and Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabry, Rabab R.

    2017-01-01

    . However, silicon is a brittle material with a fracture strains <1%. Highly flexible Si-based solar cells are available in the form thin films which seem to be disadvantageous over thick Si solar cells due to the reduction of the optical absorption

  7. Detachment of Tertiary Dendrite Arms during Controlled Directional Solidification in Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Observations from Ground-based and Microgravity Processed Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Erdman, Robert; Van Hoose, James R.; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Electron Back Scattered Diffraction results from cross-sections of directionally solidified aluminum 7wt% silicon alloys unexpectedly revealed tertiary dendrite arms that were detached and mis-oriented from their parent arm. More surprisingly, the same phenomenon was observed in a sample similarly processed in the quiescent microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in support of the joint US-European MICAST investigation. The work presented here includes a brief introduction to MICAST and the directional solidification facilities, and their capabilities, available aboard the ISS. Results from the ground-based and microgravity processed samples are compared and possible mechanisms for the observed tertiary arm detachment are suggested.

  8. Proof of concept of an epitaxy-free layer-transfer process for silicon solar cells based on the reorganisation of macropores upon annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depauw, V.; Gordon, I.; Beaucarne, G.; Poortmans, J.; Mertens, R.; Celis, J.-P.

    2009-01-01

    To answer the challenge of less expensive renewable electricity, the photovoltaics community is focusing on producing thinner silicon solar cells. A few years ago, in the field of silicon-on-nothing structures, micron-thick monocrystalline layers suspended over their parent wafer were produced by high-temperature annealing of specific arrays of macropores. Those macropores reorganise into one single void and leave a thin overlayer on top. Since this method may be an inexpensive way of fabricating high-quality silicon films, this paper investigates its potential for photovoltaic applications. In particular, we investigated if large surfaces can be produced and transferred to foreign substrates with this method. We fabricated basic solar cells, without rear-surface passivation, on 5 cm x 5 cm-large and 1-μm-thick films transferred to glass, that showed energy-conversion efficiencies up to 2.6%. These cells demonstrate the feasibility of the presented concept as a layer-transfer process for solar-cell application. After formation by annealing, the film is only barely attached to its parent wafer, but can still safely be handled provided that any abrupt gas flow or pumping to vacuum is avoided. After transfer and permanent bonding, the sample can be handled as any bulk wafer.

  9. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence in silicon oxide films rich in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman M, D.; Piters, T. M.; Aceves M, M.; Berriel V, L. R.; Luna L, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we determined the fluorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) creation spectra of silicon rich oxide films (SRO) with three different silicon excesses. To study the TL of SRO, 550 nm of SRO film were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition technique on N-type silicon substrates with resistivity in the order of 3 to 5 Ω-cm with silicon excess controlled by the ratio of the gases used in the process, SRO films with Ro= 10, 20 and 30 (12-6% silicon excess) were obtained. Then, they were thermally treated in N 2 at high temperatures to diffuse and homogenize the silicon excess. In the fluorescence spectra two main emission regions are observed, one around 400 nm and one around 800 nm. TL creation spectra were determined by plotting the integrated TL intensity as function of the excitation wavelength. (Author)

  10. Development of an In-Line Minority-Carrier Lifetime Monitoring Tool for Process Control during Fabrication of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Annual Subcontract Report, June 2003 (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, R. A.

    2004-04-01

    Under the PV Manufacturing R&D subcontract''Development of an In-Line, Minority-Carrier Lifetime Monitoring Tool for Process Control during Fabrication of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells'', Sinton Consulting developed prototypes for several new instruments for use in the manufacture of silicon solar cells. These instruments are based on two families of R&D instruments that were previously available, an illumination vs. open-circuit-voltage technique and the quasi-steady state RF photoconductance technique for measuring minority-carrier lifetime. Compared to the previous instruments, the new prototypes are about 20 times faster per measurement, and have automated data analysis that does not require user intervention even when confronted by challenging cases. For example, un-passivated multi-crystalline wafers with large variations in lifetime and trapping behavior can be measured sequentially without error. Five instruments have been prototyped in this project to date, including a block tester for evaluating cast or HEM silicon blocks, a CZ ingot tester, an FZ boule tester for use with long-lifetime silicon, and an in-line sample head for measuring wafers. The CZ ingot tester and the FZ boule tester are already being used within industry and there is interest in the other prototypes. For each instrument, substantial R&D work was required in developing the device physics and analysis as well as for the hardware. This work has been documented in a series of application notes and conference publications, and will result in significant improvements for both the R&D and the industrial types of instruments.

  11. Ninth Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes: Extended Abstracts and Papers of the Workshop, 9-11 August 1999, Breckenridge, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Gee, J.; Kalejs, J.; Saitoh, R.; Stavola, M.; Swanson, D.; Tan, T.; Weber, E.; Werner, J.

    2000-08-04

    Since 1997, the PV sales have exceeded 100 MW/yr with > 85% of the production coming from silicon photovoltaics (Si-PV). As the PV demands increase in the new millennium, there will be a host of challenges to Si-PV. The challenges will arise in developing strategies for cost reduction, increased production, higher throughput per manufacturing line, new sources of low-cost Si, and introduction of new manufacturing processes for cell fabrication. At the same time, newer thin-film technologies, based on CdTe and CIS, will come on board posing new competition. With these challenges come new opportunities for the Si-PV-to detach itself from the microelectronics industry, to embark on an aggressive program in thin-film Si solar cells, and to try new approaches to process monitoring. The 9th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes addressed these issues in a number of sessions. In addition to covering the usual topics of impurity gettering, defects, passivation, and solar cell processing, there were sessions on poly feedstock, mechanical properties of Si, metallization, and process monitoring.

  12. Geometrical (Degree 0 Modelling of a FP3+3×RTR+MP3 Type Parallel Topology Robotic Guiding Device, Using the „Pair of Frames” (PF Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calin Miclosina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometrical (degree 0 model of a parallel topology robotic guiding device represents the position-orientation matrix of the mobile platform (MP versus the fixed one (FP; this model refers to generalized displacements. The kinematical scheme of a FP3+3×RTR+MP3 type mechanism is presented, as well as the manner of choice of the attached pair of frames (PF to the links. In the case of direct geometrical modelling, for certain displacements of the actuated translational joints, the position-orientation matrix of the mobile platform versus the fixed one is determined. For inverse geometrical modelling, the position-orientation matrix of MP versus FP is known and the displacements of the actuated translational joints are determined.

  13. Light emitting structures porous silicon-silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monastyrskii, L.S.; Olenych, I.B.; Panasjuk, M.R.; Savchyn, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    The research of spectroscopic properties of porous silicon has been done. Complex of photoluminescence, electroluminescence, cathodoluminescence, thermostimulated depolarisation current analyte methods have been applied to study of geterostructures and free layers of porous silicon. Light emitting processes had tendency to decrease. The character of decay for all kinds of luminescence were different

  14. Nanostructured silicon for thermoelectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranz, A.; Kähler, J.; Waag, A.; Peiner, E.

    2011-06-01

    Thermoelectric modules convert thermal energy into electrical energy and vice versa. At present bismuth telluride is the most widely commercial used material for thermoelectric energy conversion. There are many applications where bismuth telluride modules are installed, mainly for refrigeration. However, bismuth telluride as material for energy generation in large scale has some disadvantages. Its availability is limited, it is hot stable at higher temperatures (>250°C) and manufacturing cost is relatively high. An alternative material for energy conversion in the future could be silicon. The technological processing of silicon is well advanced due to the rapid development of microelectronics in recent years. Silicon is largely available and environmentally friendly. The operating temperature of silicon thermoelectric generators can be much higher than of bismuth telluride. Today silicon is rarely used as a thermoelectric material because of its high thermal conductivity. In order to use silicon as an efficient thermoelectric material, it is necessary to reduce its thermal conductivity, while maintaining high electrical conductivity and high Seebeck coefficient. This can be done by nanostructuring into arrays of pillars. Fabrication of silicon pillars using ICP-cryogenic dry etching (Inductive Coupled Plasma) will be described. Their uniform height of the pillars allows simultaneous connecting of all pillars of an array. The pillars have diameters down to 180 nm and their height was selected between 1 micron and 10 microns. Measurement of electrical resistance of single silicon pillars will be presented which is done in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with nanomanipulators. Furthermore, measurement of thermal conductivity of single pillars with different diameters using the 3ω method will be shown.

  15. Rapid thermal process by RF heating of nano-graphene layer/silicon substrate structure: Heat explosion theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinder, M.; Pelleg, J.; Meerovich, V.; Sokolovsky, V.

    2018-03-01

    RF heating kinetics of a nano-graphene layer/silicon substrate structure is analyzed theoretically as a function of the thickness and sheet resistance of the graphene layer, the dimensions and thermal parameters of the structure, as well as of cooling conditions and of the amplitude and frequency of the applied RF magnetic field. It is shown that two regimes of the heating can be realized. The first one is characterized by heating of the structure up to a finite temperature determined by equilibrium between the dissipated loss power caused by induced eddy-currents and the heat transfer to environment. The second regime corresponds to a fast unlimited temperature increase (heat explosion). The criterions of realization of these regimes are presented in the analytical form. Using the criterions and literature data, it is shown the possibility of the heat explosion regime for a graphene layer/silicon substrate structure at RF heating.

  16. Effect of oxygen on the processes of ion beam synthesis of buried SiC layers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, V.V.; Valakh, M.Ya.; Klyuj, N.I.; Mel'nik, V.P.; Romanyuk, A.B.; Romanyuk, B.N.; Yukhimchuk, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of Si-structures with buried silicon carbide (SiC) layers created by high dose carbon implantation into Cz-Si or Fz-Si wafers followed by high-temperature annealing were studied by Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Effect of additional oxygen implantation on the peculiarities of SiC layer formation was also studied. It was shown that under the same implantation and post-implantation annealing conditions the buried SiC layers are more effectively formed in Cz-Si or in Si subjected to additional oxygen implantation. Thus, oxygen in silicon promotes the SiC layer formation due to SiO x precipitate creation and accommodation of the crystal volume in the region where SiC phase is formed

  17. 12th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes: Extended Abstracts and Papers, August 11-14, 2002, Breckenridge, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B. L.

    2002-08-01

    The 12th Workshop will provide a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. Discussions will include various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon-their properties, the dynamics during processing, and their application for developing low-cost processes for manufacturing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. The workshop will emphasize some of the promising new technologies in Si solar cell fabrication that can lower PV energy costs and meet the production demands of the future. It will also provide an excellent opportunity for researchers, in private industry and at universities, to prioritize mutual needs for future collaborative research. Sessions and panel discussions will review recent advances in crystal growth, new cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and manufacturing approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands . Some presentations will address recent technologies in the microelectronics field that may have a direct bearing on PV. The three-day workshop will consist of presentations by invited speakers, followed by discussion sessions. In addition, there will be two poster sessions presenting the latest research and development results.

  18. Effect of the temperature and dew point of the decarburization process on the oxide subscale of a 3% silicon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesar, Maria das Gracas M.M. E-mail: gracamelo@acesita.com.br; Mantel, Marc J

    2003-01-01

    The oxide subscale formed on the decarburization annealing of 3% Si-Fe was investigated using microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. It was found that the morphology as well as the molecular structure of the subscale are affected by temperature and dew point. The results suggest that there is an optimum level of internal oxidation and an optimum fayalite/silica ratio in the subscale to achieve a oriented grain silicon steel having a continuous and smooth ceramic film and low core loss.

  19. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    CERN Document Server

    Beetz, C P; Steinbeck, J; Lemieux, B; Winn, D R

    2000-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of approx 0.5 to approx 25 mu m, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200 deg. C, also compatible with high-temperature brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposite...

  20. Towards Cost-Effective Crystalline Silicon Based Flexible Solar Cells: Integration Strategy by Rational Design of Materials, Process, and Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabry, Rabab R.

    2017-11-30

    The solar cells market has an annual growth of more than 30 percent over the past 15 years. At the same time, the cost of the solar modules diminished to meet both of the rapid global demand and the technological improvements. In particular for the crystalline silicon solar cells, the workhorse of this technology. The objective of this doctoral thesis is enhancing the efficiency of c-Si solar cells while exploring the cost reduction via innovative techniques. Contact metallization and ultra-flexible wafer based c-Si solar cells are the main areas under investigation. First, Silicon-based solar cells typically utilize screen printed Silver (Ag) metal contacts which affect the optimal electrical performance. To date, metal silicide-based ohmic contacts are occasionally used for the front contact grid lines. In this work, investigation of the microstructure and the electrical characteristics of nickel monosilicide (NiSi) ohmic contacts on the rear side of c-Si solar cells has been carried out. Significant enhancement in the fill factor leading to increasing the total power conversion efficiency is observed. Second, advanced classes of modern application require a new generation of versatile solar cells showcasing extreme mechanical resilience. However, silicon is a brittle material with a fracture strains <1%. Highly flexible Si-based solar cells are available in the form thin films which seem to be disadvantageous over thick Si solar cells due to the reduction of the optical absorption with less active Si material. Here, a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology based integration strategy is designed where corrugation architecture to enable an ultra-flexible solar cell module from bulk mono-crystalline silicon solar wafer with 17% efficiency. This periodic corrugated array benefits from an interchangeable solar cell segmentation scheme which preserves the active silicon thickness and achieves flexibility via interdigitated back contacts. These cells

  1. Low cost silicon solar array project. Task 1: Establishment of the feasibility of a process capable of low cost, high volume production of silane, SiH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, W. C.; Mui, J. Y. P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the redistribution of dichlorosilane and trichlorosilane vapor over a tertiary amine ion exchange resin catalyst were investigated. The hydrogenation of SiCl4 to form HSiCl3 and the direct synthesis of H2SiCl2 from HCl gas and metallurgical silicon metal were also studied. The purification of SiH4 using activated carbon adsorbent was studied along with a process for storing SiH4 absorbed on carbon. The latter makes possible a higher volumetric efficiency than compressed gas storage. A mini-plant designed to produce ten pounds per day of SiH4 is described.

  2. Review article: silicon carbide. Structure, properties and processing Artigo revisão: carbeto de silício, estrtutura, propriedades e processamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Izhevskyi

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of considerable interest in the development of liquid phase sintered structural and high-temperature ceramics on the base of silicon carbide, a comprehensive review of the data on structure, properties and the known methods of processing of silicon carbide seems timely. The most striking feature of silicon carbide is its polytypism, i.e. formation of a great number of different structural modifications without any change in composition. Although this feature of silicon carbide was extensively studied, no systematic up to date analysis was done. However, polytypism and the tendency of the polytypes to undergo structural transformations at working temperatures may lead to uncontrollable modification of the materials properties, and therefore needs to be fully understood. Furthermore, the recently developed liquid phase sintering technique for silicon carbide densification is of an undoubtful interest and the overview of the results achieved until present time may provide some guidelines for the ceramists.Em vista do considerável interesse no desenvolvimento de cerâmicas estruturais e para aplicações em alta temperatura, é oportuna uma revisão quanto a estrutura, propriedades e métodos conhecidos de processamento de cerâmicas a base de carbeto de silício sinterizados via fase líquida. A característica mais interessante do carbeto de silício é o seu politipismo, isto é, a formação de um grande número modificações estruturais para uma mesma composição. Embora este fenômeno venha sendo extensivamente estudado, não se tem até o momento, uma análise sistemática do mesmo, o que seria de extrema importância, uma vez que o politipismo e a tendência à transformação estrutural destes politipos em temperaturas típicas de trabalho podem levar a incontroláveis modificações nas propriedades do material. Além disso, os recentes avanços obtidos na densificação do carbeto de silício através da técnica de sinteriza

  3. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  4. Numerical analysis of thermal stress and dislocation density distributions in large size multi-crystalline silicon ingots during the seeded growth process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Hoai Thu; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Hu, Chieh; Chen, Chun-Hung; Huang, Yen-Hao; Lin, Huang-Wei; Yu, Andy; Hsu, Bruce

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a global transient numerical simulation of silicon growth from the beginning of the solidification process until the end of the cooling process is carried out modeling the growth of an 800 kg ingot in an industrial seeded directional solidification furnace. The standard furnace is modified by the addition of insulating blocks in the hot zone. The simulation results show that there is a significant decrease in the thermal stress and dislocation density in the modified model as compared to the standard one (a maximal decrease of 23% and 75% along the center line of ingot for thermal stress and dislocation density, respectively). This modification reduces the heating power consumption for solidification of the silicon melt by about 17% and shortens the growth time by about 2.5 h. Moreover, it is found that adjusting the operating conditions of modified model to obtain the lower growth rate during the early stages of the solidification process can lower dislocation density and total heater power.

  5. Highly efficient silicon light emitting diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Minh, P.; Holleman, J.; Wallinga, Hans

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication, using standard silicon processing techniques, of silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap. The improved efficiency had been explained by the spatial confinement of charge carriers due to a

  6. Floating Silicon Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  7. The construction of a process line for high efficiency silicon solar cells under clean-room conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberle, A.; Faller, C.; Grille, T.; Glunz, S.; Kamerewerd, F.J.; Kopp, J.; Knobloch, J.; Klussmann, S.; Lauby, E.; Noel, A.; Paul, O.; Schaeffer, E.; Schubert, U.; Seitz, S.; Sterk, S.; Voss, B.; Warta, W.; Wettling, W.

    1992-08-01

    The aim of this research project was to plan, construct and test a clean-room technology laboratory for the manufacturing of silicon solar cells with 20% efficiency (1.5AM). In addition to the establishment of the laboratory, there existed the case of establishing the material and technological fundamentals of high-efficiency solar cells, testing and optimizing all stages of production as well as constructing test stands for accompanying characterisation work. The following final report describes the construction of the laboratory and characterisation systems, the material elements of high-efficiency solar cells as well as the most important results of solar cell production and optimisation. (orig./BWI) [de

  8. THE IMPACT OF THE METHOD OF UNDERLAY SURFACE PROCESSING ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF DEFECTS IN EPITAXIAL COMPOSITIONS IN THE COURSE OF SILICON PHOTO-TRANSDUCERS PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Nikonova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For the production of silicon photo-transducers (PhT the acquisition of epitaxial compositions (EC with high resistivity of working layer. One of the main parameters characterizing the quality of EC is the density of dislocation and other structural defects. Great impact on the development of defects during epitaxial growth is produced by the quality of underlay preparation before that. Multiple research of relatively thin (less than 20-30 microns epitaxial layers demonstrated, that contamination or damages of underlay surface cause the development of defects of wrapping, counterparts, macroscopic protuberances in the growing layer. During inverted epitaxy there are no high requirements as for structural perfection of epitaxial layer as far as in PhT, produced on the basis of EC for which inverted silicon structures (ISS serve with the working layer of mono-crystal substrate. Therefore in inverted epitaxy it is the problem of the development in the course of defects growth not in epitaxial layer, but in underlay, that becomes the major one. The processes of the development of defects in underlay in the course of growing thick (approximately 300 microns epitaxial layer are scarcely researched by now. Scientists sustained the idea that when using dislocation-free underlays for growing in the working layer of ISS there are dislocations with the density of 103 sm-2 and more. Thus, investigation of the factors that determine the development of dislocations in underlay in the process of epitaxy, has now gained great practical value.

  9. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  10. Electron beam silicon purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, Anatoly [SIA ' ' KEPP EU' ' , Riga (Latvia); Kravtsov, Alexey [' ' KEPP-service' ' Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Purification of heavily doped electronic grade silicon by evaporation of N-type impurities with electron beam heating was investigated in process with a batch weight up to 50 kilos. Effective temperature of the melt, an indicative parameter suitable for purification process characterization was calculated and appeared to be stable for different load weight processes. Purified material was successfully approbated in standard CZ processes of three different companies. Each company used its standard process and obtained CZ monocrystals applicable for photovoltaic application. These facts enable process to be successfully scaled up to commercial volumes (150-300 kg) and yield solar grade silicon. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Flexible Thermoelectric Generators on Silicon Fabric

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the development of a Thermoelectric Generator on Flexible Silicon Fabric is explored to extend silicon electronics for flexible platforms. Low cost, easily deployable plastic based flexible electronics are of great interest for smart textile, wearable electronics and many other exciting applications. However, low thermal budget processing and fundamentally limited electron mobility hinders its potential to be competitive with well established and highly developed silicon technology. The use of silicon in flexible electronics involve expensive and abrasive materials and processes. In this work, high performance flexible thermoelectric energy harvesters are demonstrated from low cost bulk silicon (100) wafers. The fabrication of the micro- harvesters was done using existing silicon processes on silicon (100) and then peeled them off from the original substrate leaving it for reuse. Peeled off silicon has 3.6% thickness of bulk silicon reducing the thermal loss significantly and generating nearly 30% more output power than unpeeled harvesters. The demonstrated generic batch processing shows a pragmatic way of peeling off a whole silicon circuitry after conventional fabrication on bulk silicon wafers for extremely deformable high performance integrated electronics. In summary, by using a novel, low cost process, this work has successfully integrated existing and highly developed fabrication techniques to introduce a flexible energy harvester for sustainable applications.

  12. Investigation of Toshiba 130nm CMOS process as a possible candidate for active silicon sensors in HEP and X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yunan; Hemperek, Tomasz; Kishishita, Testsuichi; Krueger, Hans; Rymaszewski, Piotr; Wermes, Norbert [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Following the advances of commercial semiconductor manufacturing technologies there has recently been an increased interest within experimental physics community in applying CMOS manufacturing processes to developing active silicon sensors. Possibility of applying high voltage bias combined with high resistivity substrate allows for better depletion of sensor and therefore quicker and more efficient charge collection. One of processes that accommodates those features is Toshiba 130 nm CMOS technology (CMOS3E). Within our group a test chip was designed to examine the suitability of this technology for physics experiment (both for HEP and X-ray imaging). Design consisted of 4 pixel matrices with total of 12 different pixel flavors allowing for evaluation of various pixel geometries and architectures in terms of depletion depth, noise performance, charge collection efficiency, etc. During this talk initial outcome of this evaluation is presented, starting with brief introduction to technology itself, followed by results of TCAD simulations, description of final design and first measurements results.

  13. Silicon Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, Thaddeus D. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States); Carroll, Malcolm S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Silicon is a promising material candidate for qubits due to the combination of worldwide infrastructure in silicon microelectronics fabrication and the capability to drastically reduce decohering noise channels via chemical purification and isotopic enhancement. However, a variety of challenges in fabrication, control, and measurement leaves unclear the best strategy for fully realizing this material’s future potential. In this article, we survey three basic qubit types: those based on substitutional donors, on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures, and on Si/SiGe heterostructures. We also discuss the multiple schema used to define and control Si qubits, which may exploit the manipulation and detection of a single electron charge, the state of a single electron spin, or the collective states of multiple spins. Far from being comprehensive, this article provides a brief orientation to the rapidly evolving field of silicon qubit technology and is intended as an approachable entry point for a researcher new to this field.

  14. The evolution of FDA policy on silicone breast implants: a case study of politics, bureaucracy, and business in the process of decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palley, H A

    1995-01-01

    The central issue facing federal regulation of breast implants is that while such devices are not functionally necessary or needed for survival, the side effects may be harmful and have not been proven unharmful. The Medical Device Amendments of 1976 appear to require such evidence prior to the FDA permitting the unrestricted marketing of these devices. However, only recently have such requirements been imposed by the FDA. The author examines the FDA's decision-making process, particularly as applied to silicone breast implants, and the factors that appears to have affected such decisions. In pursuing this study, the activities of a number of interest-group actors, as well as congressional responses and the role of federal bureaucratic actors, were examined. In 1992, the FDA established a regulatory protocol that effectively withdrew most silicone breast implants from the market for the purpose of breast augmentation and allows for the monitoring of the impact of new implants on women's health. This increase concern for determining the safety of breast implants is due to a number of factors, which are examined in this article.

  15. Industrial Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhaus, Dirk-Holger; Münzer, Adolf

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, around 86% of all wafer-based silicon solar cells were produced using screen printing to form the silver front and aluminium rear contacts and chemical vapour deposition to grow silicon nitride as the antireflection coating onto the front surface. This paper reviews this dominant solar cell technology looking into state-of-the-art equipment and corresponding processes for each process step. The main efficiency losses of this type of solar cell are analyzed to demonstrate the future e...

  16. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to "fill in the blanks" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the current developmental states of the devices. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang R. Fahrner is a professor at the University of Hagen, Germany and Nanchang University, China.

  17. Gelcasting of SiC/Si for preparation of silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.P.; Tsinghua University, Beijing,; Cheng, Y.B.; Lu, J.W.; Huang, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper, gelcasting of aqueous slurry with coarse silicon carbide(1mm) and fine silicon particles was investigated to fabricate silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide materials. Through the examination of influence of different polyelectrolytes on the Zeta potential and viscosity of silicon and silicon carbide suspensions, a stable SiC/Si suspension with 60 vol% solid loading could be prepared by using polyelectrolyte of D3005 and sodium alginate. Gelation of this suspension can complete in 10-30 min at 60-80 deg C after cast into mold. After demolded, the wet green body can be dried directly in furnace and the green strength will develop during drying. Complex shape parts with near net size were prepared by the process. Effects of the debindering process on nitridation and density of silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide were also examined. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  18. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Bowers, John E.

    2010-01-01

    A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  19. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Bowers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  20. Silicon Alloying On Aluminium Based Alloy Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    2002-01-01

    Silicon alloying on surface of aluminium based alloy was carried out using electron beam. This is performed in order to enhance tribological properties of the alloy. Silicon is considered most important alloying element in aluminium alloy, particularly for tribological components. Prior to silicon alloying. aluminium substrate were painted with binder and silicon powder and dried in a furnace. Silicon alloying were carried out in a vacuum chamber. The Silicon alloyed materials were assessed using some techniques. The results show that silicon alloying formed a composite metal-non metal system in which silicon particles are dispersed in the alloyed layer. Silicon content in the alloyed layer is about 40% while in other place is only 10.5 %. The hardness of layer changes significantly. The wear properties of the alloying alloys increase. Silicon surface alloying also reduced the coefficient of friction for sliding against a hardened steel counter face, which could otherwise be higher because of the strong adhesion of aluminium to steel. The hardness of the silicon surface alloyed material dropped when it underwent a heating cycle similar to the ion coating process. Hence, silicon alloying is not a suitable choice for use as an intermediate layer for duplex treatment

  1. Low-cost Solar Array Project. Feasibility of the Silane Process for Producing Semiconductor-grade Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of Union Carbide's silane process for commercial application was established. An integrated process design for an experimental process system development unit and a commercial facility were developed. The corresponding commercial plant economic performance was then estimated.

  2. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Amorphous Tandem Thin-Film Silicon Modules Produced by A Roll-to-Roll Process on Plastic Foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couty, P.; Duchamp, Martial; Söderström, K.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement of the photo-current is expected when amorphous silicon solar cells are grown on a ZnO texture. A full understanding of the relationship between cell structure and electrical performance is essential for the rapid development of high efficiency VHF-tandem cells on textured substrates...... a control-lost of shape fidelity is used to smooth the texture and make it compatible with subsequent layer growth. Then, we present the electrical performances of the most promising reference solar cell single junction which was obtained on a roll-to-roll foil. Finally, a tandem amorphous/amorphous Si....... At first, we present the systematic study where amorphous cells are grown on ZnO based textures. For varying the texture, the same original master LPCVD ZnO was successively transferred to nickel molds and finally transferred to the plastic foil by roll-to-roll process. From TEM images, we show how...

  3. In situ study of the growth and degradation processes in tetragonal lysozyme crystals on a silicon substrate by high-resolution X-ray diffractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, M. V.; Prosekov, P. A.; Marchenkova, M. A.; Blagov, A. E.; D'yakova, Yu. A.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu.; Pisarevskii, Yu. V.; Kondratev, O. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of an in situ study of the growth of tetragonal lysozyme crystals by high-resolution X-ray diffractometry are considered. The crystals are grown by the sitting-drop method on crystalline silicon substrates of different types: both on smooth substrates and substrates with artificial surface-relief structures using graphoepitaxy. The crystals are grown in a special hermetically closed crystallization cell, which enables one to obtain images with an optical microscope and perform in situ X-ray diffraction studies in the course of crystal growth. Measurements for lysozyme crystals were carried out in different stages of the crystallization process, including crystal nucleation and growth, developed crystals, the degradation of the crystal structure, and complete destruction.

  4. Effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of silicon carbide composites fabricated by nano-infiltration and transient eutectic-phase process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Hinoki, T.; Shimoda, K.; Ozawa, K.; Katoh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Unidirectional silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites fabricated by a nano-infiltration and transient eutectic-phase (NITE) process were irradiated with neutrons at 830°C to 5.9 dpa, and at 1270°C to 5.8 dpa. The in-plane and trans-thickness tensile and the inter-laminar shear properties were evaluated at ambient temperature. The mechanical characteristics, including the quasi-ductile behavior, the proportional limit stress, and the ultimate tensile strength, were retained subsequent to irradiation. Analysis of the stress–strain hysteresis loop indicated the increased fiber/matrix interface friction and the decreased residual stresses. The inter-laminar shear strength exhibited a significant decrease following irradiation. (author)

  5. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-01-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  6. Black silicon method X: a review on high speed and selective plasma etching of silicon with profile control: an in-depth comparison between Bosch and cryostat DRIE processes as a roadmap to next generation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H V; De Boer, M J; Unnikrishnan, S; Louwerse, M C; Elwenspoek, M C

    2009-01-01

    An intensive study has been performed to understand and tune deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) processes for optimum results with respect to the silicon etch rate, etch profile and mask etch selectivity (in order of priority) using state-of-the-art dual power source DRIE equipment. The research compares pulsed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. Bosch technique) and mixed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. cryostat technique). In both techniques, an inhibitor is added to fluorine-based plasma to achieve directional etching, which is formed out of an oxide-forming (O 2 ) or a fluorocarbon (FC) gas (C 4 F 8 or CHF 3 ). The inhibitor can be introduced together with the etch gas, which is named a mixed-mode DRIE process, or the inhibitor can be added in a time-multiplexed manner, which will be termed a pulsed-mode DRIE process. Next, the most convenient mode of operation found in this study is highlighted including some remarks to ensure proper etching (i.e. step synchronization in pulsed-mode operation and heat control of the wafer). First of all, for the fabrication of directional profiles, pulsed-mode DRIE is far easier to handle, is more robust with respect to the pattern layout and has the potential of achieving much higher mask etch selectivity, whereas in a mixed-mode the etch rate is higher and sidewall scalloping is prohibited. It is found that both pulsed-mode CHF 3 and C 4 F 8 are perfectly suited to perform high speed directional etching, although they have the drawback of leaving the FC residue at the sidewalls of etched structures. They show an identical result when the flow of CHF 3 is roughly 30 times the flow of C 4 F 8 , and the amount of gas needed for a comparable result decreases rapidly while lowering the temperature from room down to cryogenic (and increasing the etch rate). Moreover, lowering the temperature lowers the mask erosion rate substantially (and so the mask selectivity improves). The pulsed-mode O 2 is FC-free but shows only tolerable anisotropic results at

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Black silicon method X: a review on high speed and selective plasma etching of silicon with profile control: an in-depth comparison between Bosch and cryostat DRIE processes as a roadmap to next generation equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H V; de Boer, M J; Unnikrishnan, S; Louwerse, M C; Elwenspoek, M C

    2009-03-01

    An intensive study has been performed to understand and tune deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) processes for optimum results with respect to the silicon etch rate, etch profile and mask etch selectivity (in order of priority) using state-of-the-art dual power source DRIE equipment. The research compares pulsed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. Bosch technique) and mixed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. cryostat technique). In both techniques, an inhibitor is added to fluorine-based plasma to achieve directional etching, which is formed out of an oxide-forming (O2) or a fluorocarbon (FC) gas (C4F8 or CHF3). The inhibitor can be introduced together with the etch gas, which is named a mixed-mode DRIE process, or the inhibitor can be added in a time-multiplexed manner, which will be termed a pulsed-mode DRIE process. Next, the most convenient mode of operation found in this study is highlighted including some remarks to ensure proper etching (i.e. step synchronization in pulsed-mode operation and heat control of the wafer). First of all, for the fabrication of directional profiles, pulsed-mode DRIE is far easier to handle, is more robust with respect to the pattern layout and has the potential of achieving much higher mask etch selectivity, whereas in a mixed-mode the etch rate is higher and sidewall scalloping is prohibited. It is found that both pulsed-mode CHF3 and C4F8 are perfectly suited to perform high speed directional etching, although they have the drawback of leaving the FC residue at the sidewalls of etched structures. They show an identical result when the flow of CHF3 is roughly 30 times the flow of C4F8, and the amount of gas needed for a comparable result decreases rapidly while lowering the temperature from room down to cryogenic (and increasing the etch rate). Moreover, lowering the temperature lowers the mask erosion rate substantially (and so the mask selectivity improves). The pulsed-mode O2 is FC-free but shows only tolerable anisotropic results at -120 °C. The

  8. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow......In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping...

  9. Silicon Processors Using Organically Reconfigurable Techniques (SPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-19

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0132 SILICON PROCESSORS USING ORGANICALLY RECONFIGURABLE TECHNIQUES ( SPORT ) Dennis Prather UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE Final Report 05...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Silicon Processes for Organically Reconfigurable Techniques ( SPORT ) 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0363 5c...Contract: Silicon Processes for Organically Reconfigurable Techniques ( SPORT ) Contract #: FA9550-10-1-0363 Reporting Period: 1 July 2010 – 31 December

  10. Achievement Report for fiscal 1997 on developing a silicon manufacturing process with reduced energy consumption. Development of technology to manufacture high quality solar cell silicon substrates; 1997 nendo energy shiyo gorika silicon seizo process kaihatsu. Kohinshitsu taiyo denchiyo silicon kiban seizo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    It is intended to establish an energy saving type mass production technology to manufacture solar cell substrates by using the electromagnetic casting process. This paper describes the achievements in fiscal 1997. Preliminary experiments were performed for high-performance slicing processing and post-slicing rinsing to reduce the cost by enhancing productivity in the slicing process. Since there is a problem of mixing of contaminating raw materials due to diversification in raw materials, resistance and impurity concentration must be determined on each raw material as the materials for the Czochralski method. Then, the raw materials are sorted out referring to the determination results, and they can be used for the electromagnetic casting process upon optimizing them. As a result of having sliced an ingot of 15-cm square with a length of 40 cm by using a mass-production wire saw, an accuracy of 22.8 {mu}m was attained as intra-face variance when the required cutting time was 476 minutes and the substrate thickness is 348 {mu}, thus having obtained prospect for achieving the standard. Development was made on a water jetting rough cleaning machine to separate and remove slurries (oil and grinding particles) from the substrates after slicing, and an arm robot to accommodate substrates into cassettes, which provided processing velocity of 9 second per substrate. A problem of raising the speed remains to be solved. (NEDO)

  11. Development of Radiation Hard Radiation Detectors, Differences between Czochralski Silicon and Float Zone Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Tuominen, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop radiation hard silicon detectors. Radiation detectors made ofsilicon are cost effective and have excellent position resolution. Therefore, they are widely used fortrack finding and particle analysis in large high-energy physics experiments. Silicon detectors willalso be used in the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment that is being built at the LHC (LargeHadron Collider) accelerator at CERN (European Organisation for Nuclear Research). This work wasdone in the CMS programme of Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP).Exposure of the silicon material to particle radiation causes irreversible defects that deteriorate theperformance of the silicon detectors. In HIP CMS Programme, our approach was to improve theradiation hardness of the silicon material with increased oxygen concentration in silicon material. Westudied two different methods: diffusion oxygenation of Float Zone silicon and use of high resistivityCzochralski silicon.We processed, characterised, tested in a parti...

  12. Using a novel spectroscopic reflectometer to optimize a radiation-hardened submicron silicon-on-sapphire CMOS process; Utilisation d'une nouvelle reflectometrie spectroscopique pour optimiser un procede de fabrication CMOS/SOS durci aux radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, N.T.; Zawaideh, E.; Vu, T.Q.; Warren, G.; Mead, D. [Raytheon Systems company, Microelectronics Div., Newport Beach, California (United States); Li, G.P.; Tsai, C.S. [California Univ., School of Engineering, Newport Beach, CA (United States)

    1999-07-01

    A radiation-hardened sub-micron silicon-on-sapphire CMOS process is monitored and optimized using a novel optical technique based on spectroscopic reflectometry. Quantitative measurements of the crystal quality, surface roughness, and device radiation hardness show excellent correlation between this technique and the Atomic Force Microscopy. (authors)

  13. Quasimetallic silicon micromachined photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temelkuran, B.; Bayindir, Mehmet; Ozbay, E.; Kavanaugh, J. P.; Sigalas, M. M.; Tuttle, G.

    2001-01-01

    We report on fabrication of a layer-by-layer photonic crystal using highly doped silicon wafers processed by semiconductor micromachining techniques. The crystals, built using (100) silicon wafers, resulted in an upper stop band edge at 100 GHz. The transmission and defect characteristics of these structures were found to be analogous to metallic photonic crystals. We also investigated the effect of doping concentration on the defect characteristics. The experimental results agree well with predictions of the transfer matrix method simulations

  14. Effect of cutting temperature on hardness of SiC and diamond in the nano-cutting process of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiachun; Li, Yuntao; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Lv, Maoqiang

    2016-10-01

    In the process of cutting silicon by natural diamond tools, groove wear happens on the flank face of cutting tool frequently.Scholars believe that one of the wear reasons is mechanical scratching effect by hard particles like SiC. To reveal the mechanical scratching mechanism, it is essential to study changes in the mechanical properties of hard particles and diamond, especially the effect of cutting temperature on hardness of diamond and hard particles. Molecular dynamics (MD) model that contact-zone temperature between tool and workpiece was calculated by dividing zone while nano-cutting monocrystalline silicon was established, cutting temperature values in different regions were computed as the simulation was carried out.On this basis, the models of molecular dynamics simulation of SiC and diamond were established separately with setting the initial temperature to room temperature. The laws of length change of C-C bond and Si-C bond varing with increase of simulation temperature were studied. And drawing on predecessors' research on theoretical calculation of hardness of covalent crystals and the relationship between crystal valence electron density and bond length, the curves that the hardness of diamond and SiC varing with bond length were obtained. The effect of temperature on the hardness was calculated. Results show that, local cutting temperature can reach 1300K.The rise in cutting temperature leaded to a decrease in the diamond local atomic clusters hardness,SiC local atomic clusters hardness increased. As the cutting temperature was more than 1100K,diamond began to soften, the local clusters hardness was less than that of SiC.

  15. Effects of silicon and thermo-mechanical process on microstructure and properties of Cu–10Ni–3Al–0.8Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Leinuo; Li, Zhou; Zhang, Zheming; Dong, Qiyi; Xiao, Zhu; Lei, Qian; Qiu, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu–10Ni–3Al–0.8Si alloy with ultra-high strength was designed. • The addition of silicon hindered the precipitation of large NiAl phase. • Tensile strength and electrical conductivity were 1180 MPa and 18.1% IACS. • Nano-scale Ni 2 Si and Ni 3 Al improved the strength and electrical conductivity. - Abstract: Cu–10Ni–3Al–0.8Si alloy with ultra-high strength was designed and its microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy. The alloy went through a set of thermo-mechanical process: solution treated at 950 °C for 4 h, then cold-rolled by 50% and aged at 450 °C for 8 h, followed by 60% cold-rolling and aging at 450 °C for 8 h. After these treatment, the tensile strength was 1180 MPa, yield strength was 1133 MPa and electrical conductivity was 18.1% IACS, respectively. The comprehensive properties, especially the electrical conductivity of the designed alloy, were much higher than those of traditional Cu–Ni–Al alloys. The addition of silicon in the designed alloy hindered the precipitation of large-scale NiAl phase and improved the strength of the alloy. The orientation relationships between δ-Ni 2 Si, Ni 3 Al precipitates and copper matrix were: [001] Cu ‖[001] Ni 3 Al ‖[001] δ ,(110) Cu ‖(110) Ni 3 Al ‖(010) δ ,(11 ¯ 0) Cu ‖ (11 ¯ 0) Ni 3 Al ||(100) δ , respectively

  16. Selfsupported epitaxial silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarovici, D.; Popescu, A.

    1975-01-01

    The methods of removing the p or p + support of an n-type epitaxial silicon layer using electrochemical etching are described. So far, only n + -n junctions have been processed. The condition of anodic dissolution for some values of the support and layer resistivity are given. By this method very thin single crystal selfsupported targets of convenient areas can be obtained for channeling - blocking experiments

  17. Silicon nanostructures produced by laser direct etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Dirac, Paul Andreas Holger; Petersen, Jon Wulff

    1995-01-01

    A laser direct-write process has been applied to structure silicon on a nanometer scale. In this process, a silicon substrate, placed in a chlorine ambience, is locally heated above its melting point by a continuous-wave laser and translated by high-resolution direct-current motor stages. Only...

  18. Development of an SU-8 MEMS process with two metal electrodes using amorphous silicon as a sacrificial material

    KAUST Repository

    Ramadan, Khaled S.; Nasr, Tarek Adel Hosny; Foulds, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    method using XeF2, which alleviates release-based stiction problems related to MEMS applications. In this work, an SU-8 MEMS process was developed using ;-Si as a sacrificial layer. Two conductive metal electrodes were integrated in this process to allow

  19. Vibrational modes of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabra, M.; Naddaf, M.

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of theoretical and experimental investigations, the origin of room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from porous silicon is found to related to chemical complexes constituted the surface, in particular, SiHx, SiOx and SiOH groups. Ab initio atomic and molecular electronic structure calculations on select siloxane compounds were used for imitation of infrared (IR) spectra of porous silicon. These are compared to the IR spectra of porous silicon recorded by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). In contrast to linear siloxane, the suggested circular siloxane terminated with linear siloxane structure is found to well-imitate the experimental spectra. These results are augmented with EDX (energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy) measurements, which showed that the increase of SiOx content in porous silicon due to rapid oxidation process results in considerable decrease in PL peak intensity and a blue shift in the peak position. (author)

  20. Highly flexible indium zinc oxide electrode grown on PET substrate by cost efficient roll-to-roll sputtering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong-Seok; Kim, Han-Ki; Jeong, Soon-Wook; Cho, Woon-Jo

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of flexible indium zinc oxide (IZO) electrode grown on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates using a specially designed roll-to-roll (RTR) sputtering system for use in flexible optoelectronics. It was found that both electrical and optical properties of the flexible IZO electrode were critically dependent on the DC power and Ar/O 2 flow ratio during the roll-to-roll sputtering process. At optimized conditions (constant working pressure of 3 mTorr, Ar/O 2 flow ratio of Ar at only 30 sccm, DC power 800 W and rolling speed at 0.1 cm/s) the flexible IZO electrode exhibits a sheet resistance of 17.25 Ω/sq and an optical transmittance of 89.45% at 550 nm wavelength. Due to the low PET substrate temperature, which is effectively maintained by cooling drum system, all IZO electrodes showed an amorphous structure regardless of the DC power and Ar/O 2 flow ratio. Furthermore, the IZO electrodes grown at optimized condition exhibited superior flexibility than the conventional amorphous ITO electrodes due to its stable amorphous structure. This indicates that the RTR sputter grown IZO electrode is a promising flexible electrode that can substitute for the conventional ITO electrode, due to its low resistance, high transparency, superior flexibility and fast preparation by the RTR process.

  1. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  2. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  3. Microencapsulation of silicon cavities using a pulsed excimer laser

    KAUST Repository

    Sedky, Sherif M.; Tawfik, Hani H.; Ashour, Mohamed; Graham, Andrew B.; Provine, John W.; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Xixiang; Howe, Roger T.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel low thermal-budget technique for sealing micromachined cavities in silicon. Cavities are sealed without deposition, similar to the silicon surface-migration sealing process. In contrast to the 1100°C furnace anneal

  4. Research on the Effects of Process Parameters on Surface Roughness in Wet-Activated Silicon Direct Bonding Base on Orthogonal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei NIE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness is a very important index in silicon direct bonding and it is affected by processing parameters in the wet-activated process. These parameters include the concentration of activation solution, holding time and treatment temperature. The effects of these parameters were investigated by means of orthogonal experiments. In order to analyze the wafer roughness more accurately, the bear ratio of the surface was used as the evaluation index. From the results of the experiments, it could be concluded that the concentration of the activation solution affected the roughness directly and the higher the concentration, the lower the roughness. Holding time did not affect the roughness as acutely as that of the concentration, but a reduced activation time decreased the roughness perceptibly. It was also discovered that the treatment temperature had a weak correlation with the surface roughness. Based on these conclusions, the parameters of concentration, temperature and holding time were optimized respectively as NH4OH:H2O2=1:1 (without water, 70 °C and 5 min. The results of bonding experiments proved the validity of the conclusions of orthogonal experiments.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9711

  5. Effect of Rapid Thermal Processing on Light-Induced Degradation of Carrier Lifetime in Czochralski p-Type Silicon Bare Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhlane, Y.; Bouhafs, D.; Khelifati, N.; Belhousse, S.; Menari, H.; Guenda, A.; Khelfane, A.

    2016-11-01

    The electrical properties of Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) p-type boron-doped bare wafers have been investigated after rapid thermal processing (RTP) with different peak temperatures. Treated wafers were exposed to light for various illumination times, and the effective carrier lifetime ( τ eff) measured using the quasi-steady-state photoconductance (QSSPC) technique. τ eff values dropped after prolonged illumination exposure due to light-induced degradation (LID) related to electrical activation of boron-oxygen (BO) complexes, except in the sample treated with peak temperature of 785°C, for which the τ eff degradation was less pronounced. Also, a reduction was observed when using the 830°C peak temperature, an effect that was enhanced by alteration of the wafer morphology (roughness). Furthermore, the electrical resistivity presented good stability under light exposure as a function of temperature compared with reference wafers. Additionally, the optical absorption edge shifted to higher wavelength, leading to increased free-carrier absorption by treated wafers. Moreover, a theoretical model is used to understand the lifetime degradation and regeneration behavior as a function of illumination time. We conclude that RTP plays an important role in carrier lifetime regeneration for Cz-Si wafers via modification of optoelectronic and structural properties. The balance between an optimized RTP cycle and the rest of the solar cell elaboration process can overcome the negative effect of LID and contribute to achievement of higher solar cell efficiency and module performance.

  6. Effect of aluminum and silicon reactants and process parameters on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    In this report, the effects of aluminum and silicon reactants, process soak time and the initial calcine particle size on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of the high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are investigated. The waste form characteristics include density, total and normalized elemental leach rates, and microstructure. Glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a pre-compacted mixture of pilot plant fluorinel-sodium calcine, Al, and Si metal powders at 1050 degrees C, 20,000 psi for 4 hours. One of the formulations with 2 wt % Al was HIPed for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours at the same temperature and pressure. The calcine particle size range include as calcined particle size smaller than 600 μm (finer than -30 mesh, or 215 μm Mass Median Diameter, MMD) and 180 μm (finer than 80 mesh, or 49 μm MMD)

  7. Evaluation of custom-designed lateral power transistors in a silicon-on-insulator process in a synchronous buck converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okumus, Sinan; Fan, Lin; Nour, Yasser

    2018-01-01

    Most of todays power converters are based on power semiconductors, which are built in vertical power semiconductor processes. These devices result in limited packaging possibilities, which lead to physically long galvanic connections and therefore high external electromagnetic fields. These fields...

  8. Bainitic transformation during the two-step quenching and partitioning process in a medium carbon steel containing silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.Y.; Lu, X.W. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wu, X.C.; Min, Y.A. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jin, X.J., E-mail: jin@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-09-15

    Research highlights: In this paper, SEM and TEM were used to characterize microstructure of Q and P steels with different partitioning time at 300 deg. C. The interesting phenomena were discovered and discussed: 1.Lower bainite (bainitic ferrite plus {epsilon}-carbide) rather than carbide-free bainite was observed during partitioning process. 2.The mechanical properties of Q and P steels can be tailored and adjusted through balance volume fraction of retained austenite and lower bainite during partitioning process. 3.The final amount of austenite was influenced by the transformation kinetics of lower bainite during partitioning process. According to the analysis, it can be concluded that associated with carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite, lower bainite transformation inevitably occurred. More importantly, lower bainite transformation seriously affected the mechanical properties of Q and P steels and final amount of austenite. - Abstract: A study of 40SiMnNiCr steel subjected to a two-step quenching and partitioning process (Q and P) is presented. The result suggests that strength variation of Q and P steels during the two-step Q and P process was a cumulative effect of increase of retained austenite fraction, decrease of carbon supersaturation of virgin martensite, and particularly much of lower bainite formation. A trade-off between high strength and good ductility of two-step Q and P steels can be tailored and adjusted by controlling lower bainite fraction. The final amount of austenite was influenced by the transformation kinetics of lower bainite during the partitioning process.

  9. Bainitic transformation during the two-step quenching and partitioning process in a medium carbon steel containing silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.Y.; Lu, X.W.; Wu, X.C.; Min, Y.A.; Jin, X.J.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: In this paper, SEM and TEM were used to characterize microstructure of Q and P steels with different partitioning time at 300 deg. C. The interesting phenomena were discovered and discussed: 1.Lower bainite (bainitic ferrite plus ε-carbide) rather than carbide-free bainite was observed during partitioning process. 2.The mechanical properties of Q and P steels can be tailored and adjusted through balance volume fraction of retained austenite and lower bainite during partitioning process. 3.The final amount of austenite was influenced by the transformation kinetics of lower bainite during partitioning process. According to the analysis, it can be concluded that associated with carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite, lower bainite transformation inevitably occurred. More importantly, lower bainite transformation seriously affected the mechanical properties of Q and P steels and final amount of austenite. - Abstract: A study of 40SiMnNiCr steel subjected to a two-step quenching and partitioning process (Q and P) is presented. The result suggests that strength variation of Q and P steels during the two-step Q and P process was a cumulative effect of increase of retained austenite fraction, decrease of carbon supersaturation of virgin martensite, and particularly much of lower bainite formation. A trade-off between high strength and good ductility of two-step Q and P steels can be tailored and adjusted by controlling lower bainite fraction. The final amount of austenite was influenced by the transformation kinetics of lower bainite during the partitioning process.

  10. Processing of n{sup +}/p{sup −}/p{sup +} strip detectors with atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} field insulator on magnetic Czochralski silicon (MCz-si) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Härkönen, J., E-mail: jaakko.harkonen@helsinki.fi [Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland); Tuovinen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Microsystems and Nanoelectronics (Finland); Luukka, P.; Gädda, A.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Arsenovich, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland); Junkes, A. [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg (Germany); Wu, X. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Microsystems and Nanoelectronics (Finland); Picosun Oy, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo Finland (Finland); Li, Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2016-08-21

    Detectors manufactured on p-type silicon material are known to have significant advantages in very harsh radiation environment over n-type detectors, traditionally used in High Energy Physics experiments for particle tracking. In p-type (n{sup +} segmentation on p substrate) position-sensitive strip detectors, however, the fixed oxide charge in the silicon dioxide is positive and, thus, causes electron accumulation at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. As a result, unless appropriate interstrip isolation is applied, the n-type strips are short-circuited. Widely adopted methods to terminate surface electron accumulation are segmented p-stop or p-spray field implantations. A different approach to overcome the near-surface electron accumulation at the interface of silicon dioxide and p-type silicon is to deposit a thin film field insulator with negative oxide charge. We have processed silicon strip detectors on p-type Magnetic Czochralski silicon (MCz-Si) substrates with aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin film insulator, grown with Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) method. The electrical characterization by current–voltage and capacitance−voltage measurement shows reliable performance of the aluminum oxide. The final proof of concept was obtained at the test beam with 200 GeV/c muons. For the non-irradiated detector the charge collection efficiency (CCE) was nearly 100% with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of about 40, whereas for the 2×10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} proton irradiated detector the CCE was 35%, when the sensor was biased at 500 V. These results are comparable with the results from p-type detectors with the p-spray and p-stop interstrip isolation techniques. In addition, interestingly, when the aluminum oxide was irradiated with Co-60 gamma-rays, an accumulation of negative fixed oxide charge in the oxide was observed.

  11. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  12. Processing and first characterization of detectors made with high resistivity n- and p-type Czochralski silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzi, M.; Bisello, D.; Borrello, L.; Borchi, E.; Boscardin, M.; Candelori, A.; Creanza, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; DePalma, M.; Dittongo, S.; Focardi, E.; Khomenkov, V.; Litovchenko, A.; Macchiolo, A.; Manna, N.; Menichelli, D.; Messineo, A.; Miglio, S.; Petasecca, M.; Piemonte, C.; Pignatel, G.U.; Radicci, V.; Ronchin, S.; Scaringella, M.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Tosi, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design, manufacturing and first characterisation of pad diodes, test structures and microstrip detectors processed with high resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz) p- and n-type Si. The pre-irradiation study on newly processed microstrip detectors and test structures show a good overall quality of the processed wafers. After irradiation with 24 GeV/c protons up to 4x10 14 cm -2 the characterisation of n-on-p and p-on-n MCz Si sensors with the C-V method show a decrease of the full depletion voltage and no space charge sign inversion. Microscopic characterisation has been performed to study the role of thermal donors in Czochralski Si. No evidence of thermal donor activation was observed in n-type MCz Si detectors if contact sintering was performed at a temperature lower than 380 deg. C and the final passivation oxide was omitted

  13. Effects of thermal budget in n-type bifacial solar cell fabrication processes on effective lifetime of crystalline silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomihisa Tachibana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of residual C on cell properties are investigated from the view point of thermal budget in the n-type bifacial cell processes. Implied Voc obtained from wafers with same Oi concentration depend on the thermal budgets decreases as the Cs concentration increases. The Voc values vary depending on the wafer with different growth cooling rate. To analyze the effect of thermal budget correspond to solar cell fabrication process, CZ wafers with almost the same Oi concentrations are prepared. One of the wafers with relatively high residual Cs concentration shows the longer lifetime than the initial value after the 950 oC annealing step. On the other hand, the lifetime of a wafer with relatively low Cs concentration dramatically decreased by the same process due to the O segregation. These results suggest that it is important to choose appropriate wafer specification, starting with feedstock material, for increasing the solar cell efficiency.

  14. Comparative evaluation of clinical efficacy of β-tri calcium phosphate (Septodont-RTR TM alone and in combination with platelet rich plasma for treatment of intrabony defects in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyostna Pinipe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the clinical outcome by comparing β-tri calcium phosphate (Septodont RTR TM along with platelet rich plasma (PRP and β-tri calcium phosphate (β-TCP alone in intrabony defects, by clinical evaluation in a 6-month analysis. Methodology: Ten patients participated in the study. Using a split-mouth design, interproximal bony defects were surgically treated with either platelet rich plasma (PRP combined with β-tri calcium phosphate (β-TCP or β-TCP alone. Plaque Index (PI, Gingival Index, Probing Pocket Depth (PPD, Clinical Attachment Level (CAL were recorded 6 months after surgery. Results: At 6 months after therapy, the PRP combined with β-TCP group showed mean PPD reduction of 2.50, CAL mean gain of 2.60 + 1.43. The β-TCP group showed mean PPD reduction of 2.80 mm, mean CAL gain of 2.60 mm. On intra-group comparison, there was greater PPD reduction and CAL gain at 6 months in both the groups. In intergroup comparison of PRP/β-TCP and β-TCP alone, there was no statistical significant difference observed. (P = 0.55, and 0.87 for PPD and CAL gain. Conclusion: Both therapies resulted in significant PPD reduction, CAL gain. The present study shows that treatment of intrabony periodontal defects with combination of PRP and β-TCP does not have additional improvements when compared with β-TCP alone within 6 months follow-up.

  15. Efficiency Enhancement of Silicon Solar Cells by Porous Silicon Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenijus SHATKOVSKIS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon solar cells produced by a usual technology in p-type, crystalline silicon wafer were investigated. The manufactured solar cells were of total thickness 450 mm, the junction depth was of 0.5 mm – 0.7 mm. Porous silicon technologies were adapted to enhance cell efficiency. The production of porous silicon layer was carried out in HF: ethanol = 1 : 2 volume ratio electrolytes, illuminating by 50 W halogen lamps at the time of processing. The etching current was computer-controlled in the limits of (6 ÷ 14 mA/cm2, etching time was set in the interval of (10 ÷ 20 s. The characteristics and performance of the solar cells samples was carried out illuminating by Xenon 5000 K lamp light. Current-voltage characteristic studies have shown that porous silicon structures produced affect the extent of dark and lighting parameters of the samples. Exactly it affects current-voltage characteristic and serial resistance of the cells. It has shown, the formation of porous silicon structure causes an increase in the electric power created of solar cell. Conversion efficiency increases also respectively to the initial efficiency of cell. Increase of solar cell maximum power in 15 or even more percent is found. The highest increase in power have been observed in the spectral range of Dl @ (450 ÷ 850 nm, where ~ 60 % of the A1.5 spectra solar energy is located. It has been demonstrated that porous silicon technology is effective tool to improve the silicon solar cells performance.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.3.2428

  16. Engineering scale development of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnsorg, R.W.; Hollar, W.E. Jr.; Lau, S.K. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.; Ko, F.K.; Schatz, K. [Advanced Product Development, Bristol, PA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    As reinforcements for composites, VLS SiC fibrils have attractive mechanical properties including high-strength, high modulus, and excellent creep resistance. To make use of their excellent mechanical properties in a composite, a significant volume fraction (>10%) of aligned, long fibrils (>2 mm) needs to be consolidated in the ceramic matrix. The fibrils must be processed into an assembly that will allow for composite fabrication while maintaining fibril alignment and length. With Advanced Product Development (APD) as the yam fabrication subcontractor, Carborundum investigated several approaches to achieve this goaL including traditional yam-forming processes such as carding and air-vortex spinning and nontraditional processes such as tape forming and wet casting. Carborundum additionally performed an economic analysis for producing 500 and 10,000 pounds of SiC fibrils annually using both conservative and more aggressive processing parameters. With the aggressive approach, the projected costs for SiC fibril production for 500 and 10,000 pounds per year are $1,340/pound and $340/pound, respectively.

  17. Photonic integration and photonics-electronics convergence on silicon platform

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jifeng; Baba, Toshihiko; Vivien, Laurent; Xu, Dan-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Silicon photonics technology, which has the DNA of silicon electronics technology, promises to provide a compact photonic integration platform with high integration density, mass-producibility, and excellent cost performance. This technology has been used to develop and to integrate various photonic functions on silicon substrate. Moreover, photonics-electronics convergence based on silicon substrate is now being pursued. Thanks to these features, silicon photonics will have the potential to be a superior technology used in the construction of energy-efficient cost-effective apparatuses for various applications, such as communications, information processing, and sensing. Considering the material characteristics of silicon and difficulties in microfabrication technology, however, silicon by itself is not necessarily an ideal material. For example, silicon is not suitable for light emitting devices because it is an indirect transition material. The resolution and dynamic range of silicon-based interference de...

  18. Strained silicon as a new electro-optic material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Andersen, Karin Nordström; Borel, Peter Ingo

    2006-01-01

    For decades, silicon has been the material of choice for mass fabrication of electronics. This is in contrast to photonics, where passive optical components in silicon have only recently been realized1, 2. The slow progress within silicon optoelectronics, where electronic and optical...... functionalities can be integrated into monolithic components based on the versatile silicon platform, is due to the limited active optical properties of silicon3. Recently, however, a continuous-wave Raman silicon laser was demonstrated4; if an effective modulator could also be realized in silicon, data...... processing and transmission could potentially be performed by all-silicon electronic and optical components. Here we have discovered that a significant linear electro-optic effect is induced in silicon by breaking the crystal symmetry. The symmetry is broken by depositing a straining layer on top...

  19. Development and Evaluation of Die Materials for Use in the Growth of Silicon Ribbons by the Inverted Ribbon Growth Process. Task 2: LSSA Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M. T.; Berkman, S.; Moss, H. I.; Cullen, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Several ribbon growth experiments were performed from V-shaped dies coated with CVD Si3N4. The most significant result was the ability to perform five consecutive growth runs from the same die without mechanical degradation of the die through temperature cycling. The die was made from vitreous carbon coated with CVD Si3N4. Silicon oxynitride, Si2N2O, was examined with respect to thermal stability in contact with molten silicon. The results of X-ray analysis indicate that this material is converted to both alpha - and beta-Si3N4 in the presence of molten silicon. Experiments on the stability of CVD SiOxNy shoe that this material can be maintained in contact with molten silicon (sessile drop test) for greater than 30 h at 1450 C without total decompositon. These layers are converted mainly to beta-Si3N4.

  20. Silicon oxide barrier films deposited on PET foils in pulsed plasmas: influence of substrate bias on deposition process and film properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steves, S; Bibinov, N; Awakowicz, P; Ozkaya, B; Liu, C-N; Ozcan, O; Grundmeier, G

    2013-01-01

    A widely used plastic for packaging, polyethylene terephtalate (PET) offers limited barrier properties against gas permeation. For many applications of PET (from food packaging to micro electronics) improved barrier properties are essential. A silicon oxide barrier coating of PET foils is applied by means of a pulsed microwave driven low-pressure plasma. While the adjustment of the microwave power allows for a control of the ion production during the plasma pulse, a substrate bias controls the energy of ions impinging on the substrate. Detailed analysis of deposited films applying oxygen permeation measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy are correlated with results from plasma diagnostics describing the deposition process. The influence of a change in process parameters such as gas mixture and substrate bias on the gas temperature, electron density, mean electron energy, ion energy and the atomic oxygen density is studied. An additional substrate bias results in an increase in atomic oxygen density up to a factor of 6, although plasma parameter such as electron density of n e = 3.8 ± 0.8 × 10 17 m −3 and electron temperature of k B T e = 1.7 ± 0.1 eV are unmodified. It is shown that atomic oxygen densities measured during deposition process higher than n O = 1.8 × 10 21 m −3 yield in barrier films with a barrier improvement factor up to 150. Good barrier films are highly cross-linked and show a smooth morphology. (paper)

  1. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  2. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  3. Complementary X-ray and neutron radiography study of the initial lithiation process in lithium-ion batteries containing silicon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Fu, E-mail: fu.sun@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institute of Material Science and Technologies, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Markötter, Henning [Institute of Material Science and Technologies, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Manke, Ingo; Hilger, André [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Alrwashdeh, Saad S. [Institute of Material Science and Technologies, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mu' tah University, P.O. Box 7, Al-Karak 61710 Jordan (Jordan); Kardjilov, Nikolay [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Banhart, John [Institute of Material Science and Technologies, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • A radiography cell for in operando X-ray radiography was designed and built. • A self-assembled CR2032 coin cell was built for in operando neutron radiography. • In operando X-ray and neuron radiography were conducted by using Si electrode half cells. - Abstract: Complementary in operando X-ray radiography and neutron radiography measurements were conducted to investigate and visualize the initial lithiation in silicon-electrode lithium-ion batteries. By means of X-ray radiography, a significant volume expansion of Si particles and the Si electrode during the first discharge was observed. In addition, many Si particles were found that never undergo electrochemical reactions. These findings were confirmed by neutron radiography, which, for the first time, showed the process of Li alloying with the Si electrode during initial lithiation. These results demonstrate that complementary X-ray and neutron radiography is a powerful tool to investigate the lithiation mechanisms inside Si-electrode based lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Development of advanced Czochralski Growth Process to produce low cost 150 KG silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The goals in this program for advanced czochralski growth process to produce low cost 150 kg silicon ingots from a single crucible for technology readiness are outlined. To provide a modified CG2000 crystal power capable of pulling a minimum of five crystals, each of approximately 30 kg in weight, 150 mm diameter from a single crucible with periodic melt replenishment. Crystals to have: resistivity of 1 to 3 ohm cm, p-type; dislocation density below 1- to the 6th power per cm; orientation (100); after growth yield of greater than 90%. Growth throughput of greater than 2.5 kg per hour of machine operation using a radiation shield. Prototype equipment suitable for use as a production facility. The overall cost goal is $.70 per peak watt by 1986. To accomplish these goals, the modified CG2000 grower and development program includes: (1) increased automation with a microprocessor based control system; (2) sensors development which will increase the capability of the automatic controls system, and provide technology transfer of the developed systems.

  5. Preparation and characterization of hybrid materials of epoxy resin type bisphenol a with silicon and titanium oxides by sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo C, A.; Osuna A, J. G., E-mail: acc.carrillo@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Blvd. Venustiano Carranza y Jose Cardenas Valdes, 25000 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    Hybrid materials were synthesized from epoxy resins as a result bisphenol type A-silicon oxide and epoxy resin bisphenol type A-titanium oxide were obtained. The synthesis was done by sol-gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate (Teos) and titanium isopropoxide (I Ti) as inorganic precursors. The molar ratio of bisphenol A to the inorganic precursors was the studied variable. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nature of the materials was demonstrated through thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy. In both systems, as the amount of alkoxide increased, the bands described above were more defined. This behavior indicates the interactions between the resin and the alkoxides. Hybrids with Teos showed a smoother and homogeneous surface in its entirety, without irregularities. Hybrids with titanium isopropoxide had low roughness. Both Teos and I Ti hybrids showed a decrease on the atomic weight percentage of carbon due to a slight reduction of the organic part on the surface. (Author)

  6. Preparation and characterization of hybrid materials of epoxy resin type bisphenol a with silicon and titanium oxides by sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo C, A.; Osuna A, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid materials were synthesized from epoxy resins as a result bisphenol type A-silicon oxide and epoxy resin bisphenol type A-titanium oxide were obtained. The synthesis was done by sol-gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate (Teos) and titanium isopropoxide (I Ti) as inorganic precursors. The molar ratio of bisphenol A to the inorganic precursors was the studied variable. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nature of the materials was demonstrated through thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy. In both systems, as the amount of alkoxide increased, the bands described above were more defined. This behavior indicates the interactions between the resin and the alkoxides. Hybrids with Teos showed a smoother and homogeneous surface in its entirety, without irregularities. Hybrids with titanium isopropoxide had low roughness. Both Teos and I Ti hybrids showed a decrease on the atomic weight percentage of carbon due to a slight reduction of the organic part on the surface. (Author)

  7. Antireflection/Passivation Step For Silicon Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Gerald T.; Kachare, Akaram H.; Daud, Taher

    1988-01-01

    New process excludes usual silicon oxide passivation. Changes in principal electrical parameters during two kinds of processing suggest antireflection treatment almost as effective as oxide treatment in passivating cells. Does so without disadvantages of SiOx passivation.

  8. The influence of carrier density and doping type on lithium insertion and extraction processes at silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McSweeney, W.; Lotty, O.; Glynn, C.; Geaney, H.; Holmes, J.D.; O’Dwyer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Li + insertion and extraction characteristics at n-type and p-type Si(100) electrodes with different carrier density and doping type are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and constant current measurements. The insertion and extraction potentials are demonstrated to vary with cycling and the occurrence of an activation effect is shown in n-type electrodes where the charge capacity and voltammetric currents are found to be much higher than p-type electrodes. A rate-dependent redox process influenced by the surface region electronic density, which influences the magnitude of cyclic voltammetry current is found at Si(100) surface regions during Li insertion and extraction. At p-type Si(100) surface regions, a thin, uniform film forms at lower currents, while also showing a consistently high (>70%) Coulombic efficiency for Li extraction. The p-type Si(100) surface region does not undergo crack formation after deintercalation and the amorphization was demonstrated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman scattering demonstrate that highly doped n-type Si(100) retains Li as a silicide and converts to an amorphous phase as a two-step phase conversion process. The findings show the succinct dependence of Li insertion and extraction processes for uniformly doped Si(100) single crystals and how the doping type and its effect on the semiconductor-solution interface dominate Li insertion and extraction, composition, crystallinity changes and charge capacity

  9. Processing, adhesion and electrical properties of silicon steel having non-oriented grains coated with silica and alumina sol-gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, D.C.L.; Orefice, R.L.; Vasconcelos, W.L.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon steels having non-oriented grains are usually coated with a series of inorganic or organic films to be used in electrical applications. However, the commercially available coatings have several disadvantages that include poor adhesion to the substrates, low values of electrical resistance and degradation at higher temperatures. In this work, silica and alumina sol-gel films were deposited onto silicon steel in order to evaluate the possibility of replacing the commercially available coatings by these sol-gel derived materials. Silica and alumina sol-gel coatings were prepared by dipping silicon steel samples into hydrolyzed silicon or aluminum alkoxides. Samples coated with sol-gel films were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Adhesion between silicon steel and sol-gel films was measured by using several standard adhesion tests. Electrical properties were evaluated by the Franklin method. Results showed that homogeneous sol-gel films can be deposited onto silicon steel. Thicknesses of the films could be easily managed by altering the speed of deposition. The structure of the films could also be tailored by introducing additives, such as nitric acid and N,N-dimethyl formamide. Adhesion tests revealed a high level of adhesion between coatings and metal. The Franklin test showed that sol-gel films can produce coated samples with electrical resistances suitable for electrical applications. Electrical properties of the coated samples could also be manipulated by altering the structure of the sol-gel films or by changing the thickness of them

  10. Development and evaluation of die materials for use in the growth of silicon ribbons by the inverted ribbon growth process, task 2. LSSA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M. T.; Berkman, S.; Moss, H. S.; Cullen, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    The results of emission spectroscopic analysis indicate that molten silicon can remain in contact with hot-pressed Si3N4 (99.2 percent theoretical density) for prolonged periods without attaining the impurity content level of the nitride. Although MgO was used as binder, Mg was not found present in the silicon sessile drop in quantities much above the level initially present in the silicon source material. Preliminary experiments with EFG-type dies coated with CVD Si3N4 or CVD SiOxNy indicate that capillary rise does not occur readily in these dies. The same was found to be true of hot-pressed and reaction-sintered Si3N4 obtained commercially. However, when dies were formed by depositing CVD layers on shaped silicon slabs, a column of molten silicon was maintained in each CVD die while being heated in contact with a crucible of molten silicon. Preliminary wetting of dies appears necessary for EFG growth. Several ribbon growth experiments were performed from V-shaped dies.

  11. Update on scribe–cleave–passivate (SCP) slim edge technology for silicon sensors: Automated processing and radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadeyev, V., E-mail: fadeyev@ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ely, S.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Christophersen, M.; Phlips, B.F. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7654, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Southwest Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Pellegrini, G.; Rafi, J.M.; Quirion, D. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [INFN and University of Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive, 18, 38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Casse, G. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, O. Lodge Laboratory, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Metcalfe, J.; Seidel, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC 07 4220, 1919 Lomas Boulevard NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); and others

    2014-11-21

    We pursue scribe–cleave–passivate (SCP) technology for making “slim edge” sensors. The goal is to reduce the inactive region at the periphery of the devices while maintaining their performance. In this paper we report on two aspects of the current efforts. The first one involves fabrication options for mass production. We describe the automated cleaving tests and a simplified version of SCP post-processing of n-type devices. Another aspect is the radiation resistance of the passivation. We report on the radiation tests of n- and p-type devices with protons and neutrons.

  12. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetz, Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert; Steinbeck, John; Lemieux, Bryan; Winn, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of ∼0.5 to ∼25 μm, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200 deg. C, also compatible with high-temperature brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposited or nucleated in the channels or the first strike surface. Results on resistivity, secondary emission and gain are presented

  13. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  14. Phosphorous Doping of Nanostructured Crystalline Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Steckel, André

    Nano-textured silicon, known as black silicon (bSi), is attractive with excellent photon trapping properties. bSi can be produced using simple one-step fabrication reactive ion etching (RIE) technique. However, in order to use bSi in photovoltaics doping process should be developed. Due to high s...

  15. Process and device integration for silicon tunnel FETs utilizing isoelectronic trap technology to enhance the ON current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takahiro; Asai, Hidehiro; Fukuda, Koichi; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    A tunnel FET (TFET) is a candidate replacement for conventional MOSFETs to realize low-power LSI. The most significant issue with the practical application of TFETs concerns their low tunneling current. Si is an indirect-gap material with a low band-to-band tunneling probability and is not favored for the channel. However, a new technology has recently been proposed to enhance the tunneling current in Si-TFETs by utilizing isoelectronic trap (IET) technology. IET technology provides an innovative approach to realizing low-power LSI with TFETs. In this paper, state-of-the-art research on Si-TFETs with IET technology from the viewpoint of process and device integration is reviewed.

  16. Amorphous SiO {sub x} nanowires grown on silicon (100) substrates via rapid thermal process of nanodiamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Xingbo [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang Lei [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Deren [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)]. E-mail: mseyang@zju.edu.cn

    2006-05-01

    Rapid thermal process (RTP) has been carried out on the deposited nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films. The RTP treatments performed at 800 and 1200 deg. C have been shown to exert prominent influence on the morphology and structure of the NCD films. The loss of material at grain boundaries has been observed at both 800 and 1200 deg. C RTP treatments. Large-scale amorphous SiO {sub x} nanowires with diameters of 30-50 nm and length up to 10 {mu}m were synthesized after RTP treatment at 1200 deg. C for 60 s. The synthesized nanowires were characterized in detail by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and energy-dispersed X-ray spectrometry analysis. A possible growth mechanism has been proposed to explain the observed phenomenon.

  17. Transformation of medical grade silicone rubber under Nd:YAG and excimer laser irradiation: First step towards a new miniaturized nerve electrode fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupas-Bruzek, C.; Robbe, O.; Addad, A.; Turrell, S.; Derozier, D.

    2009-01-01

    Medical grade silicone rubber, poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used biomaterial. Like for many polymers, its surface can be modified in order to change one or several of its properties which further allow this surface to be functionalized. Laser-induced surface modification of PDMS under ambient conditions is an easy and powerful method for the surface modification of PDMS without altering its bulk properties. In particular, we profit from both UV laser inducing surface modification and of UV laser micromachining to develop a first part of a new process aiming at increasing the number of contacts and tracks within the same electrode surface to improve the nerve selectivity of implantable self sizing spiral cuff electrodes. The second and last part of the process is to further immerse the engraved electrode in an autocatalytic Pt bath leading in a selective Pt metallization of the laser irradiated tracks and contacts and thus to a functionalized PDMS surface. In the present work, we describe the different physical and chemical transformations of a medical grade PDMS as a function of the UV laser and of the irradiation conditions used. We show that the ablation depths, chemical composition, structure and morphology vary with (i) the laser wavelength (using an excimer laser at 248 nm and a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm), (ii) the conditions of irradiation and (iii) the pulse duration. These different modified properties are expected to have a strong influence on the nucleation and growth rates of platinum which govern the adhesion and the thickness of the Pt layer on the electrodes and thus the DC resistance of tracks.

  18. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  19. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancu, Dan [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wood, Benjamin [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Genovese, Sarah [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Westendorf, Tiffany [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Perry, Robert [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Spiry, Irina [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Farnum, Rachael [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wilson, Paul [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Chen, Wei [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); McDermott, John [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Doherty, Mark [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Rainka, Matt [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Miebach, Barbara [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2017-08-03

    GE Global Research has developed, over the last 8 years, a platform of cost effective CO2 capture technologies based on a non-aqueous aminosilicone solvent (GAP-1m). As demonstrated in a previous funded DOE project (DE-FE0007502), the GAP-1m solvent has increased CO2 working capacity, lower volatility and corrosivity than the benchmark aqueous amine technology. The current report describes the cooperative program between GE Global Research (GE GRC), and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to design, construct, and operate a pilot-scale process using GAP-1m solvent to demonstrate its performance at 0.5 MWe. (i) Performance of the GAP-1m solvent was demonstrated in a 0.5 MWe pilot with real flue gas for over 900 hrs. of operation using two alternative desorption designs: a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR), and a Steam Stripper Column (SSC). The CSTR is a one-stage separation unit with reduced space requirements, and capital cost. The alternative is a multi-stage separation column, with improved desorption efficiency. Testing the two desorber options allowed us to identify the most cost effective, and space efficient desorber solution. (ii) CSTR Campaign: The CSTR desorber unit was designed, fabricated and integrated with the pilot solvent test unit (PSTU), replacing the PSTU Steam Stripper Column at NCCC. Solvent management and waste water special procedures were implemented to accommodate operation of the non-aqueous solvent in the PSTU. Performance of the GAP-1m solvent with the CSTR was demonstrated for over 500 hrs. while varying temperature of the desorption (230 – 265 oF), solvent circulation rate (GAP-1m : CO2 (molar) = 1.5 – 4), and flue gas flow rates (0.2 – 0.5 MWe). Solvent carry-over in the CO2 product was minimized by maintaining water content below 5 wt.%, and desorption pressure at 7 psig. CO2 capture efficiency achieved was 95% at 0.25 MWe (GAP-1m : CO2 = 4 (molar

  20. Knudsen pump produced via silicon deep RIE, thermal oxidation, and anodic bonding processes for on-chip vacuum pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Toan, Nguyen; Inomata, Naoki; Trung, Nguyen Huu; Ono, Takahito

    2018-05-01

    This work describes the fabrication and evaluation of the Knudsen pump for on-chip vacuum pumping that works based on the principle of a thermal transpiration. Three AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers are integrated into small chambers with a size of 5 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  0.4 mm for the pump’s evaluation. Knudsen pump is fabricated using deep RIE (reactive ion etching), wet thermal oxidation and anodic bonding processes. The fabricated device is evaluated by monitoring the quality (Q) factor of the integrated cantilevers. The Q factor of the cantilever is increased from 300 -1150 in cases without and with a temperature difference approximately 25 °C between the top (the hot side at 40 °C) and bottom (the cold side at 15 °C) sides of the fabricated device, respectively. The evacuated chamber pressure of around 10 kPa is estimated from the Q factor of the integrated cantilevers.

  1. Investigations of processes of mixing in fabrication of carbonaceous materials and materials of silicon carbide by means of tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagner, K.; Bruchin, F.; Ritter, I.; Grech, T.; Tsimmermann, V.; Ebert, G.

    1979-01-01

    A necessary condition for production of carbonic and SiC materials is providing for good mixing of liquid and solid components. Some experiments have been done by application of the method of radioactive marking of one of the components to be mixed for the purpose of investigation of the mixing process in an installation with capacity up to 2000 kg. Marking by the bromine-82 - naphthalene has been found to be suitable. The state of mixture is characterized by the homogeneity of radioactivity distribution which can be determined by measurement of gamma-radiation of series of samples. The mass of sample is from 1 to 100 g, depending on the volume of mixer. Besides it, fine distribution of components was determined by the contact autoradiography of flat surfaces of samples. The results of investigations give possibility to establish technological time of mixing, to compare different mixers and technologies of mixing as well as to determine behaviour of the mixed components. Recommendations have been developed on standardization of this method. Necessary means of radiation protection have been described [ru

  2. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Morales, I.

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO 2 as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 deg C and 60 deg C, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  3. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for transient thermal fields: Computational methodology and application to the submicrosecond laser processes in implanted silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisicaro, G; Pelaz, L; Lopez, P; La Magna, A

    2012-09-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation of damaged solids promotes ultrafast nonequilibrium kinetics, on the submicrosecond scale, leading to microscopic modifications of the material state. Reliable theoretical predictions of this evolution can be achieved only by simulating particle interactions in the presence of large and transient gradients of the thermal field. We propose a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method for the simulation of damaged systems in the extremely far-from-equilibrium conditions caused by the laser irradiation. The reference systems are nonideal crystals containing point defect excesses, an order of magnitude larger than the equilibrium density, due to a preirradiation ion implantation process. The thermal and, eventual, melting problem is solved within the phase-field methodology, and the numerical solutions for the space- and time-dependent thermal field were then dynamically coupled to the KMC code. The formalism, implementation, and related tests of our computational code are discussed in detail. As an application example we analyze the evolution of the defect system caused by P ion implantation in Si under nanosecond pulsed irradiation. The simulation results suggest a significant annihilation of the implantation damage which can be well controlled by the laser fluence.

  4. Cryogenic plasma-processed silicon microspikes as a high-performance anode material for lithium ion-batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Joe; Luais, Erwann; Wolfman, Jérôme; Tillocher, Thomas; Dussart, Rémi; Tran-Van, Francois; Ghamouss, Fouad

    2017-10-01

    Micro- or nano-structuring is essential in order to use Si as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. In the present study, we attempted to use Si wafers with a spiky microstructure (SMS), the so-called black-Si, prepared by a cryogenic reactive ion etching process with an SF6/O2 gas mixture, for Li half-cells. The SMS with various sizes of spikes from 2.0 μm (height) × 0.2 μm (width) to 21 μm × 1.0 μm was etched by varying the SF6/O2 gas flow ratio. An anode of SMS of 11 μm-height in average showed stable charge/discharge capacity and Coulombic efficiency higher than 99% for more than 300 cycles, causing no destruction to any part of the Si wafer. The spiky structure turned columnar after cycles, suggesting graded lithiation levels along the length. The present results suggest a strategy to utilize a wafer-based Si material for an anode of a lithium ion battery durable against repetitive lithiation/delithiation cycles.

  5. Processing and application properties of silicon-doped titanium aluminides; Formgebungs- und Anwendungseigenschaften silizidhaltiger TiAl-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanta, G. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2001-07-01

    Submicrocrystalline intermetallic/ceramic composites based on the system Ti-Al-Si are prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent powder consolidation. Finely dispersed silicides prevent coarsening of the {gamma}-TiAl matrix during hot-forming. Therefore, the deformation temperatures can be reduced by about 200 C compared to conventional titanium aluminides. After a subsequent coarsening heat treatment, creep properties comparable to those of conventional TiAl based alloys (1.10{sup -9} s{sup -1} at 700 C) are achieved. This study demonstrates that microstructure design allows for favorable processing properties without compromises regarding the desired application properties. (orig.) [German] Zur Untersuchung des technischen Anwendungspotenzials submikrokristalliner Werkstoffe werden silizidhaltige {gamma}-TiAl-Basislegierungen durch Hochenergiemahlen und heissisostatisches Pressen hergestellt. Bei der industriellen Formgebung ermoeglicht die durch Silizide stabilisierte feine Mikrostruktur eine deutliche Temperaturabsenkung von 200 C im Vergleich zu den fuer Titanaluminide ueblichen Prozesstemperaturen. Nach einer anschliessend durchgefuehrten Gefuegeumwandlung werden Kriechgeschwindigkeiten gemessen, die mit 1.10{sup -9} s{sup -1} bei 700 C im Bereich der Werte schmelzmetallurgisch hergestellter TiAl-Legierungen liegen. Eine gezielte Mikrostrukturgestaltung ermoeglicht somit eine deutliche Verbesserung der Umformeigenschaften unter Beibehaltung der guenstigen Eigenschaften fuer Hochtemperaturanwendungen. (orig.)

  6. Studies on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon-molybdenum alloys in porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon-1.7 and 3.2 at percent molybdenum alloys into porous carbon preforms have been carried out by process modeling, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and melt infiltration experiments. These results indicate that the initial pore volume fraction of the porous carbon preform is a critical parameter in determining the final composition of the raction-formed silicon carbide and other residual phases. The pore size of the carbon preform is very detrimental to the exotherm temperatures due to liquid silicon-carbon reactions encountered during the reactive melt infiltration process. A possible mechanism for the liquid silicon-porous (glassy) carbon reaction has been proposed. The composition and microstructure of the reaction-formed silicon carbide has been discussed in terms of carbon preform microstructures, infiltration materials, and temperatures.

  7. Room temperature plasma oxidation: A new process for preparation of ultrathin layers of silicon oxide, and high dielectric constant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, J.C.; Estrada, M.; Baez, H.; Cerdeira, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present basic features and oxidation law of the room temperature plasma oxidation (RTPO), as a new process for preparation of less than 2 nm thick layers of SiO 2 , and high-k layers of TiO 2 . We show that oxidation rate follows a potential law dependence on oxidation time. The proportionality constant is function of pressure, plasma power, reagent gas and plasma density, while the exponent depends only on the reactive gas. These parameters are related to the physical phenomena occurring inside the plasma, during oxidation. Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors fabricated with these layers are characterized by capacitance-voltage, current-voltage and current-voltage-temperature measurements. Less than 2.5 nm SiO 2 layers with surface roughness similar to thermal oxide films, surface state density below 3 x 10 11 cm -2 and current density in the expected range for each corresponding thickness, were obtained by RTPO in a parallel-plate reactor, at 180 mW/cm 2 and pressure range between 9.33 and 66.5 Pa (0.07 and 0.5 Torr) using O 2 and N 2 O as reactive gases. MOS capacitors with TiO 2 layers formed by RTPO of sputtered Ti layers are also characterized. Finally, MOS capacitors with stacked layers of TiO 2 over SiO 2 , both layers obtained by RTPO, were prepared and evaluated to determine the feasibility of the use of TiO 2 as a candidate for next technology nodes

  8. GaN microring waveguide resonators bonded to silicon substrate by a two-step polymer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Ryohei; Sasaki, Takashi; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2018-03-20

    Using a polymer bonding technique, GaN microring waveguide resonators were fabricated on a Si substrate for future hybrid integration of GaN and Si photonic devices. The designed GaN microring consisted of a rib waveguide having a core of 510 nm in thickness, 1000 nm in width, and a clad of 240 nm in thickness. A GaN crystalline layer of 1000 nm in thickness was grown on a Si(111) substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition using a buffer layer of 300 nm in thickness for the compensation of lattice constant mismatch between GaN and Si crystals. The GaN/Si wafer was bonded to a Si(100) wafer by a two-step polymer process to prevent it from trapping air bubbles. The bonded GaN layer was thinned from the backside by a fast atom beam etching to remove the buffer layer and to generate the rib waveguides. The transmission characteristics of the GaN microring waveguide resonators were measured. The losses of the straight waveguides were measured to be 4.0±1.7  dB/mm around a wavelength of 1.55 μm. The microring radii ranged from 30 to 60 μm, where the measured free-spectral ranges varied from 2.58 to 5.30 nm. The quality factors of the microring waveguide resonators were from 1710 to 2820.

  9. Non-invasive thermal profiling of silicon wafer surface during RTP using acoustic and signal processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ahmed Rashid

    Among the great physical challenges faced by the current front-end semiconductor equipment manufacturers is the accurate and repeatable surface temperature measurement of wafers during various fabrication steps. Close monitoring of temperature is essential in that it ensures desirable device characteristics to be reliably reproduced across various wafer lots. No where is the need to control temperature more pronounced than it is during Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) which involves temperature ramp rates in excess of 200°C/s. This dissertation presents an elegant and practical approach to solve the wafer surface temperature estimation problem, in context of RTP, by deploying hardware that acquires the necessary data while preserving the integrity and purity of the wafer. In contrast to the widely used wafer-contacting (and hence contaminating) methods, such as bonded thermocouples, or environment sensitive schemes, such as light-pipes and infrared pyrometry, the proposed research explores the concept of utilizing Lamb (acoustic) waves to detect changes in wafer surface temperature, during RTP. Acoustic waves are transmitted to the wafer via an array of quartz rods that normally props the wafer inside an RTP chamber. These waves are generated using piezoelectric transducers affixed to the bases of the quartz rods. The group velocity of Lamb waves traversing the wafer surface undergoes a monotonic decrease with rise in wafer temperature. The correspondence of delay in phase of the received Lamb waves and the ambient temperature, along all direct paths between sending and receiving transducers, yields a psuedo real-time thermal image of the wafer. Although the custom built hardware-setup implements the above "proof-of-concept" scheme by transceiving acoustic signals at a single frequency, the real-world application will seek to enhance the data acquistion. rate (>1000 temperature measurements per seconds) by sending and receiving Lamb waves at multiple frequencies (by

  10. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  11. Black Silicon formation using dry etching for solar cells applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murias, D.; Reyes-Betanzo, C.; Moreno, M.; Torres, A.; Itzmoyotl, A.; Ambrosio, R.; Soriano, M.; Lucas, J.; Cabarrocas, P. Roca i

    2012-01-01

    A study on the formation of Black Silicon on crystalline silicon surface using SF 6 /O 2 and SF 6 /O 2 /CH 4 based plasmas in a reactive ion etching (RIE) system is presented. The effect of the RF power, chamber pressure, process time, gas flow rates, and gas mixtures on the texture of silicon surface has been analyzed. Completely Black Silicon surfaces containing pyramid like structures have been obtained, using an optimized mask-free plasma process. Moreover, the Black Silicon surfaces have demonstrated average values of 1% and 4% for specular and diffuse reflectance respectively, feature that is suitable for the fabrication of low cost solar cells.

  12. Laser wafering for silicon solar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-01-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W p (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs (∼20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions (∼50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 (micro)m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  13. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  14. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  15. Electrical properties of pressure quenched silicon by thermal spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, S.Y.; Gambino, R.J.; Sampath, S.; Herman, H.

    2007-01-01

    High velocity thermal spray deposition of polycrystalline silicon film onto single crystal substrates, yields metastable high pressure forms of silicon in nanocrystalline form within the deposit. The phases observed in the deposit include hexagonal diamond-Si, R-8, BC-8 and Si-IX. The peculiar attribute of this transformation is that it occurs only on orientation silicon substrate. The silicon deposits containing the high pressure phases display a substantially higher electrical conductivity. The resistivity profile of the silicon deposit containing shock induced metastable silicon phases identified by X-ray diffraction patterns. The density of the pressure induced polymorphic silicon is higher at deposit/substrate interface. A modified two-layer model is presented to explain the resistivity of the deposit impacted by the pressure induced polymorphic silicon generated by the thermal spraying process. The pressure quenched silicon deposits on the p - silicon substrate, with or without metastable phases, display the barrier potential of about 0.72 eV. The measured hall mobility value of pressure quenched silicon deposits is in the range of polycrystalline silicon. The significance of this work lies in the fact that the versatility of thermal spray may enable applications of these high pressure forms of silicon

  16. Extrinsic doping in silicon revisited

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2010-06-17

    Both n-type and p-type doping of silicon is at odds with the charge transfer predicted by Pauling electronegativities and can only be reconciled if we no longer regarding dopant species as isolated atoms but rather consider them as clusters consisting of the dopant and its four nearest neighbor silicon atoms. The process that gives rise to n-type and p-type effects is the charge redistribution that occurs between the dopant and its neighbors, as we illustrate here using electronic structure calculations. This view point is able to explain why conventional substitutional n-type doping of carbon has been so difficult.

  17. Extrinsic doping in silicon revisited

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Chroneos, Alexander; Grimes, R. W.; Schuster, Cosima

    2010-01-01

    Both n-type and p-type doping of silicon is at odds with the charge transfer predicted by Pauling electronegativities and can only be reconciled if we no longer regarding dopant species as isolated atoms but rather consider them as clusters consisting of the dopant and its four nearest neighbor silicon atoms. The process that gives rise to n-type and p-type effects is the charge redistribution that occurs between the dopant and its neighbors, as we illustrate here using electronic structure calculations. This view point is able to explain why conventional substitutional n-type doping of carbon has been so difficult.

  18. Porosity-dependent fractal nature of the porous silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani, N.; Dariani, R. S., E-mail: dariani@alzahra.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Alzahra University, Tehran, 1993893973 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Porous silicon films with porosity ranging from 42% to 77% were fabricated by electrochemical anodization under different current density. We used atomic force microscopy and dynamic scaling theory for deriving the surface roughness profile and processing the topography of the porous silicon layers, respectively. We first compared the topography of bare silicon surface with porous silicon and then studied the effect of the porosity of porous silicon films on their scaling behavior by using their self-affinity nature. Our work demonstrated that silicon compared to the porous silicon films has the highest Hurst parameter, indicating that the formation of porous layer due to the anodization etching of silicon surface leads to an increase of its roughness. Fractal analysis revealed that the evolution of the nanocrystallites’ fractal dimension along with porosity. Also, we found that both interface width and Hurst parameter are affected by the increase of porosity.

  19. HRTEM analysis of the nanostructure of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Palma, R.J.; Pascual, L.; Landa-Canovas, A.R.; Herrero, P.; Martinez-Duart, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The nanometric structure of porous silicon makes this material to be very suitable for its use in many different fields, including optoelectronics and biological applications. In the present work, the structure of porous silicon was investigated in detail by means of cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image processing, together with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The structure of the Si/porous silicon interface and that of the silicon nanocrystals that compose porous silicon have been analyzed in detail. A strong strain contrast in the Si/porous silicon interface caused by high stresses was observed. Accordingly, dislocation pairs are found to be a possible mechanism of lattice matching between porous silicon and the Si substrate. Finally, high relative concentration of oxygen in the porous silicon layer was observed, together with low relative electron concentration in the conduction band when compared to Si

  20. Implantation damage in silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation, is an attractive technique for producing doped layers in silicon devices but the implantation process involves disruption of the lattice and defects are formed, which can degrade device properties. Methods of minimizing such damage are discussed and direct comparisons made between implantation and diffusion techniques in terms of defects in the final devices and the electrical performance of the devices. Defects are produced in the silicon lattice during implantation but they are annealed to form secondary defects even at room temperature. The annealing can be at a low temperature ( 0 C) when migration of defects in silicon in generally small, or at high temperature when they can grow well beyond the implanted region. The defect structures can be complicated by impurity atoms knocked into the silicon from surface layers by the implantation. Defects can also be produced within layers on top of the silicon and these can be very important in device fabrication. In addition to affecting the electrical properties of the final device, defects produced during fabrication may influence the chemical properties of the materials. The use of these properties to improve devices are discussed as well as the degradation they can cause. (author)

  1. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  2. Production of technical silicon and silicon carbide from rice-husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Issagulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article there are studied physical and chemical properties of silicon-carbonic raw material – rice-husk, thermophysical characteristics of the process of rice-husk pyrolysis in nonreactive and oxidizing environment; structure and phase composition of products of the rice-husk pyrolysis in interval of temperatures 150 – 850 °С and high temperature pyrolysis in interval of temperatures 900 – 1 500 °С. There are defined the silicon-carbon production conditions, which meet the requirements applicable to charging materials at production of technical silicon and silicon carbide.

  3. Effects of silicon, copper and iron on static and dynamic properties of alloy 206 (aluminum-copper) in semi-solids produced by the SEED process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Alain

    The advantages of producing metal parts by rheocasting are generally recognised for common foundry alloys of Al-Si. However, other more performing alloys in terms of mechanical properties could have a great interest in specialized applications in the automotive industry, while remaining competitive in the forming. Indeed, the growing demand for more competitive products requires the development of new alloys better suited to semi-solid processes. Among others, Al-Cu alloys of the 2XX series are known for their superior mechanical strength. However, in the past, 2XX alloys were never candidates for pressure die casting. The main reason is their propensity to hot tearing. Semi-solid processes provide better conditions for molding with the rheological behavior of dough and molding temperatures lower reducing this type of defect. In the initial phase, this research has studied factors that reduce hot tearing susceptibility of castings produced by semi-solid SEED of alloy 206. Subsequently, a comparative study on the tensile properties and fatigue was performed on four variants of the alloy 206. The results of tensile strength and fatigue were compared with the specifications for applications in the automotive industry and also to other competing processes and alloys. During this study, several metallurgical aspects were analyzed. The following main points have been validated: i) the main effects of compositional variations of silicon, iron and copper alloy Al-Cu (206) on the mechanical properties, and ii) certain relationships between the mechanism of hot cracking and the solidification rate in semi-solid. Parts produced from the semi-solid paste coming from the SEED process combined with modified 206 alloys have been successfully molded and achieved superior mechanical properties than the requirements of the automotive industry. The fatigue properties of the two best modified 206 alloys were higher than those of A357 alloy castings and are close to those of the

  4. A new view of microcrystalline silicon: The role of plasma processing in achieving a dense and stable absorber material for photovoltaic applicationsv

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bugnon, G.; Parascandolo, G.; Söderström, T.; Cuony, P.; Despeisse, M.; Hänni, S.; Holovský, Jakub; Meillaud, F.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 17 (2012), s. 3665-3671 ISSN 1616-301X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : solar cell * microcrystalline silicon * nanoporous Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 9.765, year: 2012 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adfm.201200299/pdf

  5. 1366 Project Silicon: Reclaiming US Silicon PV Leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Adam [1366 Technologies, Bedford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-16

    1366 Technologies’ Project Silicon addresses two of the major goals of the DOE’s PV Manufacturing Initiative Part 2 program: 1) How to reclaim a strong silicon PV manufacturing presence and; 2) How to lower the levelized cost of electricity (“LCOE”) for solar to $0.05-$0.07/kWh, enabling wide-scale U.S. market adoption. To achieve these two goals, US companies must commercialize disruptive, high-value technologies that are capable of rapid scaling, defensible from foreign competition, and suited for US manufacturing. These are the aims of 1366 Technologies Direct Wafer ™ process. The research conducted during Project Silicon led to the first industrial scaling of 1366’s Direct Wafer™ process – an innovative, US-friendly (efficient, low-labor content) manufacturing process that destroys the main cost barrier limiting silicon PV cost-reductions: the 35-year-old grand challenge of making quality wafers (40% of the cost of modules) without the cost and waste of sawing. The SunPath program made it possible for 1366 Technologies to build its demonstration factory, a key and critical step in the Company’s evolution. The demonstration factory allowed 1366 to build every step of the process flow at production size, eliminating potential risk and ensuring the success of the Company’s subsequent scaling for a 1 GW factory to be constructed in Western New York in 2016 and 2017. Moreover, the commercial viability of the Direct Wafer process and its resulting wafers were established as 1366 formed key strategic partnerships, gained entry into the $8B/year multi-Si wafer market, and installed modules featuring Direct Wafer products – the veritable proving grounds for the technology. The program also contributed to the development of three Generation 3 Direct Wafer furnaces. These furnaces are the platform for copying intelligently and preparing our supply chain – large-scale expansion will not require a bigger machine but more machines. SunPath filled the

  6. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Haefner, Petra; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT), made up from silicon micro-strip detectors is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, one of the experiments at CERN LHC. The completed SCT is in very good shape: 99.3% of the SCT strips are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specifications. In the talk the current status of the SCT will be reviewed. We will report on the operation of the detector and observed problems, with stress on the sensor and electronics performance. TWEPP Summary In December 2009 the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) recorded the first proton- proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV and this was followed by the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV in March 2010. The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, made up from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signal from the strips is processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data i...

  7. Ion beam studied of silicon oxynitride and silicon nitroxide thin layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oude Elferink, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    In this the processes occurring during high temperature treatments of silicon oxynitride and silicon oxide layers are described. Oxynitride layers with various atomic oxygen to nitrogen concentration ration (O/N) are considered. The high energy ion beam techniques Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection and nuclear reaction analysis have been used to study the layer structures. A detailed discussion of these ion beam techniques is given. Numerical methods used to obtain quantitative data on elemental compositions and depth profiles are described. The electrical compositions and depth profiles are described. The electrical properties of silicon nitride films are known to be influenced by the behaviour of hydrogen in the film during high temperature anneling. Investigations of the behaviour of hydrogen are presented. Oxidation of silicon (oxy)nitride films in O 2 /H 2 0/HCl and nitridation of silicon dioxide films in NH 3 are considered since oxynitrides are applied as an oxidation mask in the LOCOS (Local oxidation of silicon) process. The nitridation of silicon oxide layers in an ammonia ambient is considered. The initial stage and the dependence on the oxide thickness of nitrogen and hydrogen incorporation are discussed. Finally, oxidation of silicon oxynitride layers and of silicon oxide layers are compared. (author). 76 refs.; 48 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Fiscal 1983 Sunshine Program achievement report. Development for practical application of photovoltaic system (Verification of experimental low cost silicon refining - Development of technology for chlorosilane hydrogen-reduction process); 1983 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Tei cost silicon jikken seisei kensho (Chlorosilane no suiso kangen kotei no gijutsu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-03-01

    The effort aims to develop a reactor and its peripheral devices and process management technology therefor and to develop chlorosilane hydrogen-reduction process technology as part of the endeavors to develop a low cost production process for silicon for photovoltaic cells for the purpose of building a model plant capable of approximately 10 tons/year in terms of SOG (spin on glass) silicon. A study is made of ten operations (total reaction time of 2,264 hours), and it turns out that the electric power consumption efficiency is near the initially planned value. The yield of Si is, however, but 16.5% which is lower than the initially planned value of 20%. The value is elevated to 18% by raising the reactor temperature. To prevent overcleaning, a reactor with its internal walls experimentally coated with SiC is tested. The problems with devices other than the reactor tube are extraction rendered difficult by anomalously grown granules and processing devices choked by Si powder contained in waste gas after reaction. The first problem is settled by modifying the extraction tube but the other still needs a remedy. The produced granules are found to be high in quality. The seed producing roll crusher is operated for a total of 92 hours yielding 857kg in total. (NEDO)

  9. Silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp fabrication by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2007-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp employing edge lithography in combination with silicon nitride deposition is presented. The fabrication process is based on conventional photolithography an weg etching methods. Nanoridges with width dimension of sub-20 nm were fabricated by edge

  10. Fabrication of a silicon oxide stamp by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride for nanoimprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of a stamp reinforced with silicon nitride is presented for its use in nanoimprint lithography. The fabrication process is based on edge lithography using conventional optical lithography and wet anisotropic etching of 110 silicon wafers. SiO2 nano-ridges of 20 nm in width were

  11. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  12. Process and Information Tracking of Polycrystalline silicon Ingot for Solar Cell%铸锭多晶硅电池生产流程及信息跟踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦富强; 乔卉莹

    2014-01-01

    Si-based photovoltaic materials account for a large proportion in the field of new energy, in which polycrystalline silicon ingot for solar cell is the main type. Many procedures must be used for production of the poly-crystalline silicon solar cell, therefore, accurate recording and tracking information of stuff and procedures play an im-portant role in technical improvement. In this paper, process and information tracking of every procedure in produc-tion of polycrystalline silicon solar cell are discussed, and easy encountered problems in information tracking are ana-lyzed.%在新能源开发利用领域硅基光伏材料占有较大比重,其中铸锭多晶硅光伏电池是当前太阳能电池的主要品种。生产多晶硅电池需要经历众多的加工工序,准确有序记录和跟踪物料流向及各工序相关信息是工艺研究和技术改进的基础。就铸锭多晶硅电池片生产流程及各工序信息跟踪问题进行了论述,并对实施信息跟踪时易出现的问题进行了分析。

  13. Mechanically flexible optically transparent silicon fabric with high thermal budget devices from bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-05-30

    Today’s information age is driven by silicon based electronics. For nearly four decades semiconductor industry has perfected the fabrication process of continuingly scaled transistor – heart of modern day electronics. In future, silicon industry will be more pervasive, whose application will range from ultra-mobile computation to bio-integrated medical electronics. Emergence of flexible electronics opens up interesting opportunities to expand the horizon of electronics industry. However, silicon – industry’s darling material is rigid and brittle. Therefore, we report a generic batch fabrication process to convert nearly any silicon electronics into a flexible one without compromising its (i) performance; (ii) ultra-large-scale-integration complexity to integrate billions of transistors within small areas; (iii) state-of-the-art process compatibility, (iv) advanced materials used in modern semiconductor technology; (v) the most widely used and well-studied low-cost substrate mono-crystalline bulk silicon (100). In our process, we make trenches using anisotropic reactive ion etching (RIE) in the inactive areas (in between the devices) of a silicon substrate (after the devices have been fabricated following the regular CMOS process), followed by a dielectric based spacer formation to protect the sidewall of the trench and then performing an isotropic etch to create caves in silicon. When these caves meet with each other the top portion of the silicon with the devices is ready to be peeled off from the bottom silicon substrate. Release process does not need to use any external support. Released silicon fabric (25 μm thick) is mechanically flexible (5 mm bending radius) and the trenches make it semi-transparent (transparency of 7%). © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  14. Mechanically flexible optically transparent silicon fabric with high thermal budget devices from bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Sevilla, Galo T.

    2013-01-01

    Today’s information age is driven by silicon based electronics. For nearly four decades semiconductor industry has perfected the fabrication process of continuingly scaled transistor – heart of modern day electronics. In future, silicon industry will be more pervasive, whose application will range from ultra-mobile computation to bio-integrated medical electronics. Emergence of flexible electronics opens up interesting opportunities to expand the horizon of electronics industry. However, silicon – industry’s darling material is rigid and brittle. Therefore, we report a generic batch fabrication process to convert nearly any silicon electronics into a flexible one without compromising its (i) performance; (ii) ultra-large-scale-integration complexity to integrate billions of transistors within small areas; (iii) state-of-the-art process compatibility, (iv) advanced materials used in modern semiconductor technology; (v) the most widely used and well-studied low-cost substrate mono-crystalline bulk silicon (100). In our process, we make trenches using anisotropic reactive ion etching (RIE) in the inactive areas (in between the devices) of a silicon substrate (after the devices have been fabricated following the regular CMOS process), followed by a dielectric based spacer formation to protect the sidewall of the trench and then performing an isotropic etch to create caves in silicon. When these caves meet with each other the top portion of the silicon with the devices is ready to be peeled off from the bottom silicon substrate. Release process does not need to use any external support. Released silicon fabric (25 μm thick) is mechanically flexible (5 mm bending radius) and the trenches make it semi-transparent (transparency of 7%). © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  15. Silicon heterojunction transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.; Oh-uchi, N.; Hayashi, H.; Yamoto, H.

    1979-01-01

    SIPOS (Semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon) which is used as a surface passivation layer for highly reliable silicon devices constitutes a good heterojunction for silicon. P- or B-doped SIPOS has been used as the emitter material of a heterojunction transistor with the base and collector of silicon. An npn SIPOS-Si heterojunction transistor showing 50 times the current gain of an npn silicon homojunction transistor has been realized by high-temperature treatments in nitrogen and low-temperature annealing in hydrogen or forming gas

  16. The chemistry of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Rochow, E G; Emeléus, H J; Nyholm, Ronald

    1975-01-01

    Pergamon Texts in Organic Chemistry, Volume 9: The Chemistry of Silicon presents information essential in understanding the chemical properties of silicon. The book first covers the fundamental aspects of silicon, such as its nuclear, physical, and chemical properties. The text also details the history of silicon, its occurrence and distribution, and applications. Next, the selection enumerates the compounds and complexes of silicon, along with organosilicon compounds. The text will be of great interest to chemists and chemical engineers. Other researchers working on research study involving s

  17. Silicon Microspheres Photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpenguzel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrophotonic integrated circuits (EPICs), or alternatively, optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEICs) are the natural evolution of the microelectronic integrated circuit (IC) with the addition of photonic capabilities. Traditionally, the IC industry has been based on group IV silicon, whereas the photonics industry on group III-V semiconductors. However, silicon based photonic microdevices have been making strands in siliconizing photonics. Silicon microspheres with their high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGMs), are ideal candidates for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications in the standard near-infrared communication bands. In this work, we will discuss the possibility of using silicon microspheres for photonics applications in the near-infrared

  18. Fiscal 1982 Sunshine Program achievement report. Development for practical application of photovoltaic system (Verification of experimental low cost silicon refining - Development of technology for chlorosilane hydrogen-reduction process); 1982 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Tei cost silicon jikken seisei kensho (Chlorosilane no suiso kangen kotei no gijutsu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-03-01

    The effort aims to develop a reactor and its peripheral devices and process management technology therefor and to develop chlorosilane hydrogen-reduction process technology as part of the endeavors to develop a low cost production process for silicon for photovoltaic cells for the purpose of building a model plant capable of approximately 10 tons/year in terms of SOG (spin on glass) silicon. The installation of a 10 tons/year class model plant for SOG-Si production is completed in July 1982. Flaws are removed after a test run, and four reactions are accomplished without damage on the reactor tube in the period from February-end to March-beginning marking 550 hours of operation in total. Thanks to the four operations, 1,086kg of granules are experimentally produced and an electric power consumption rate of 30.6KWH/kg Si is achieved, control of the flowing particle amount by reactor differential pressure is accomplished and the same of the yield by recovered silane liquid composition analysis, and essence is seized of operation control technologies. In an experimental apparatus for seed production, Si is crushed by a roll crusher and then subjected to separation by a quartz-made air elutriator. A high yield of 130kg is obtained after crushing for 75 hours. (NEDO)

  19. Application of hydrogen-plasma technology for property modification of silicon and producing the silicon-based structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.K.; Mazanik, A.V.; Ul'yashin, A.G.; Dzhob, R; Farner, V.R.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of atomic hydrogen on the properties of Czochralski-grown single crystal silicon as well as polycrystalline shaped silicon have been investigated. It was established that the buried defect layers created by high-energy hydrogen or helium ion implantation act as a good getter centers for hydrogen atoms introduced in silicon in the process of hydrogen plasma hydrogenation. Atomic hydrogen was shown to be active as a catalyzer significantly enhancing the rate of thermal donors formation in p-type single crystal silicon. This effect can be used for n-p- and p-n-p-silicon based device structures producing [ru

  20. Development of an In-line Minority-Carrier Lifetime Monitoring Tool for Process Control during Fabrication of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 2 August 2002-15 November 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this subcontract over its two-phase, two-year duration was to design and develop improvements to the existing Sinton Consulting R&D minority-carrier lifetime testers. The improvements enable the possibilities for performing various in-line diagnostics on crystalline silicon wafers and cells for solar cell manufacturing lines. This facilitates manufacturing optimization and improved process control. The scope of work for Phase I was to prototype industrial applications for the improved instruments. A small-sample-head version of the instrument was designed and developed in this effort. This new instrument was complemented by detailed application notes detailing the productive use of minority-carrier lifetime measurements for process optimization and routine process control. In Phase II, the results from the first year were applied to design new instruments for industrial applications. These instruments were then characterized and documented. We report here on four new instruments, each optimized for a specific application as demanded by industrial customers. The documentation for these instruments was very technical and involved considerable R&D. Applications were developed that applied the latest in R&D on industrial silicon materials. By investigating the compromises that would be necessary to measure industrial material directly without the sample preparation that is commonly done for good research, we were able to develop several very innovative applications that can now be done directly in the production line for process control.

  1. On the potential of Hg-Photo-CVD process for the low temperature growth of nano-crystalline silicon (Topical review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barhdadi, A.

    2005-08-01

    Mercury-Sensitized Photo-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (Hg-Photo-CVD) technique opens new possibilities for reducing thin film growth temperature and producing novel semiconductor materials suitable for the future generation of high efficiency thin film solar cells onto low cost flexible plastic substrates. This paper provides an overview of this technique, with the emphasis on its potential in low temperature elaboration of nano-crystalline silicon for the development of thin films photovoltaic technology. (author)

  2. Porous silicon technology for integrated microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Jin Zheng

    With the development of micro systems, there is an increasing demand for integrable porous materials. In addition to those conventional applications, such as filtration, wicking, and insulating, many new micro devices, including micro reactors, sensors, actuators, and optical components, can benefit from porous materials. Conventional porous materials, such as ceramics and polymers, however, cannot meet the challenges posed by micro systems, due to their incompatibility with standard micro-fabrication processes. In an effort to produce porous materials that can be used in micro systems, porous silicon (PS) generated by anodization of single crystalline silicon has been investigated. In this work, the PS formation process has been extensively studied and characterized as a function of substrate type, crystal orientation, doping concentration, current density and surfactant concentration and type. Anodization conditions have been optimized for producing very thick porous silicon layers with uniform pore size, and for obtaining ideal pore morphologies. Three different types of porous silicon materials: meso porous silicon, macro porous silicon with straight pores, and macro porous silicon with tortuous pores, have been successfully produced. Regular pore arrays with controllable pore size in the range of 2mum to 6mum have been demonstrated as well. Localized PS formation has been achieved by using oxide/nitride/polysilicon stack as masking materials, which can withstand anodization in hydrofluoric acid up to twenty hours. A special etching cell with electrolytic liquid backside contact along with two process flows has been developed to enable the fabrication of thick macro porous silicon membranes with though wafer pores. For device assembly, Si-Au and In-Au bonding technologies have been developed. Very low bonding temperature (˜200°C) and thick/soft bonding layers (˜6mum) have been achieved by In-Au bonding technology, which is able to compensate the potentially

  3. Calcinosis Cutis Long after Rhinoplasty with Silicone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Honda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoplasty is a plastic surgery procedure to reconstruct the nose. Silicone alloplastic materials are most widely used as implants for rhinoplasty, but calcification on the surface occurs with long-term usage. Herein, we report a case of gruel-like calcification approximately 50 years after silicone implant rhinoplasty. In this case, calcification on the silicone surface might have transformed into gruel-like deposits, which presented as a subcutaneous mass at the dorsal area of the nose. The precise mechanism is unclear; a pH change in the tissue might have occurred during the process of inflammation, leading to the dissolution of calcified deposits.

  4. Quantum conductance in silicon quantum wires

    CERN Document Server

    Bagraev, N T; Klyachkin, L E; Malyarenko, A M; Gehlhoff, W; Ivanov, V K; Shelykh, I A

    2002-01-01

    The results of investigations of electron and hole quantum conductance staircase in silicon quantum wires are presented. The characteristics of self-ordering quantum wells of n- and p-types, which from on the silicon (100) surface in the nonequilibrium boron diffusion process, are analyzed. The results of investigations of the quantum conductance as the function of temperature, carrier concentration and modulation degree of silicon quantum wires are given. It is found out, that the quantum conductance of the one-dimensional channels is observed, for the first time, at an elevated temperature (T >= 77 K)

  5. Methods To Determine the Silicone Oil Layer Thickness in Sprayed-On Siliconized Syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, Viviane; Germershaus, Oliver; Steinberg, Henrik; Dreher, Sascha; Grauschopf, Ulla; Funke, Stefanie

    2018-01-01

    The silicone lubricant layer in prefilled syringes has been investigated with regards to siliconization process performance, prefilled syringe functionality, and drug product attributes, such as subvisible particle levels, in several studies in the past. However, adequate methods to characterize the silicone oil layer thickness and distribution are limited, and systematic evaluation is missing. In this study, white light interferometry was evaluated to close this gap in method understanding. White light interferometry demonstrated a good accuracy of 93-99% for MgF 2 coated, curved standards covering a thickness range of 115-473 nm. Thickness measurements for sprayed-on siliconized prefilled syringes with different representative silicone oil distribution patterns (homogeneous, pronounced siliconization at flange or needle side, respectively) showed high instrument (0.5%) and analyst precision (4.1%). Different white light interferometry instrument parameters (autofocus, protective shield, syringe barrel dimensions input, type of non-siliconized syringe used as base reference) had no significant impact on the measured average layer thickness. The obtained values from white light interferometry applying a fully developed method (12 radial lines, 50 mm measurement distance, 50 measurements points) were in agreement with orthogonal results from combined white and laser interferometry and 3D-laser scanning microscopy. The investigated syringe batches (lot A and B) exhibited comparable longitudinal silicone oil layer thicknesses ranging from 170-190 nm to 90-100 nm from flange to tip and homogeneously distributed silicone layers over the syringe barrel circumference (110- 135 nm). Empty break-loose (4-4.5 N) and gliding forces (2-2.5 N) were comparably low for both analyzed syringe lots. A silicone oil layer thickness of 100-200 nm was thus sufficient for adequate functionality in this particular study. Filling the syringe with a surrogate solution including short

  6. 3D characterisation of tool wear whilst diamond turning silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Durazo-Cardenas, Isidro Sergio; Shore, Paul; Luo, X.; Jacklin, T.; Impey, S. A.; Cox, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nanometrically smooth infrared silicon optics can be manufactured by the diamond turning process. Due to its relatively low density, silicon is an ideal optical material for weight sensitive infrared (IR) applications. However, rapid diamond tool edge degradation and the effect on the achieved surface have prevented significant exploitation. With the aim of developing a process model to optimise the diamond turning of silicon optics, a series of experimental trials were devi...

  7. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  8. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin, Chin-Che; Mendis, Suwan; Chew, Kerlit; Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin; Atabaev, Bakhtiyar; Adedeji, Victor; Rusli

    2010-01-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  9. Ion beam figuring of silicon aspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmler, Marcel; Zeuner, Michael; Luca, Alfonz; Dunger, Thoralf; Rost, Dirk; Kiontke, Sven; Krüger, Marcus

    2011-03-01

    Silicon lenses are widely used for infrared applications. Especially for portable devices the size and weight of the optical system are very important factors. The use of aspherical silicon lenses instead of spherical silicon lenses results in a significant reduction of weight and size. The manufacture of silicon lenses is more challenging than the manufacture of standard glass lenses. Typically conventional methods like diamond turning, grinding and polishing are used. However, due to the high hardness of silicon, diamond turning is very difficult and requires a lot of experience. To achieve surfaces of a high quality a polishing step is mandatory within the manufacturing process. Nevertheless, the required surface form accuracy cannot be achieved through the use of conventional polishing methods because of the unpredictable behavior of the polishing tools, which leads to an unstable removal rate. To overcome these disadvantages a method called Ion Beam Figuring can be used to manufacture silicon lenses with high surface form accuracies. The general advantage of the Ion Beam Figuring technology is a contactless polishing process without any aging effects of the tool. Due to this an excellent stability of the removal rate without any mechanical surface damage is achieved. The related physical process - called sputtering - can be applied to any material and is therefore also applicable to materials of high hardness like Silicon (SiC, WC). The process is realized through the commercially available ion beam figuring system IonScan 3D. During the process, the substrate is moved in front of a focused broad ion beam. The local milling rate is controlled via a modulated velocity profile, which is calculated specifically for each surface topology in order to mill the material at the associated positions to the target geometry. The authors will present aspherical silicon lenses with very high surface form accuracies compared to conventionally manufactured lenses.

  10. Fiscal 1984 Sunshine Program achievement report. Development for practical application of photovoltaic system (Verification of experimental low cost silicon refining - Development of technology for chlorosilane hydrogen-reduction process); 1984 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Tei cost silicon jikken seisei kensho (chlorosilane no suiso kangen kotei no gijutsu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-03-01

    In fiscal 1984, studies are conducted for long-time stabilized operation of the device (extension of reactor tube service life, elimination of flaws in the granule extraction process, control of deposited silicon), improved granule quality (measures to deal with Cu pollution), cost reduction (improvement on yield of silicon after reaction, reduction in electric power consumption rate), and so forth. The results are found to be satisfactory in outline. The problem of strengthening the reactor tube material itself remains to be solved, however, with many knotty issues to settle before practical application. In the effort to deliberate these difficulties, as many as 4,377 hours (reaction hours) in total are spent in fiscal 1984. During the operation, 8.3 tons of granules are produced of which approximately 7 tons are fed to the next stage of processing. The quality of granules produced in this way is stable thanks to efforts to prevent pollution and to prolong continuous reaction time, and is found to satisfy NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) specifications. Furthermore, the cast cell and the ribbon cell using thus-produced granules achieve photoelectric conversion rates of 10% and 9%, respectively, thereby meeting the target goal of 9%. (NEDO)

  11. Solar cells with gallium phosphide/silicon heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnon, Maxime; Varache, Renaud; Descazeaux, Médéric; Quinci, Thomas; Martin, Mickaël; Baron, Thierry; Muñoz, Delfina

    2015-09-01

    One of the limitations of current amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells is electrical and optical losses in the front transparent conductive oxide and amorphous silicon layers that limit the short circuit current. We propose to grow a thin (5 to 20 nm) crystalline Gallium Phosphide (GaP) by epitaxy on silicon to form a more transparent and more conducting emitter in place of the front amorphous silicon layers. We show that a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) is still necessary to laterally collect the current with thin GaP emitter. Larger contact resistance of GaP/TCO increases the series resistance compared to amorphous silicon. With the current process, losses in the IR region associated with silicon degradation during the surface preparation preceding GaP deposition counterbalance the gain from the UV region. A first cell efficiency of 9% has been obtained on ˜5×5 cm2 polished samples.

  12. Silicon nanowire hot carrier electroluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, M. du, E-mail: monuko@up.ac.za; Joubert, T.-H.

    2016-08-31

    Avalanche electroluminescence from silicon pn junctions has been known for many years. However, the internal quantum efficiencies of these devices are quite low due to the indirect band gap nature of the semiconductor material. In this study we have used reach-through biasing and SOI (silicon-on-insulator) thin film structures to improve the internal power efficiency and the external light extraction efficiency. Both continuous silicon thin film pn junctions and parallel nanowire pn junctions were manufactured using a custom SOI technology. The pn junctions are operated in the reach-through mode of operation, thus increasing the average electric field within the fully depleted region. Experimental results of the emission spectrum indicate that the most dominant photon generating mechanism is due to intraband hot carrier relaxation processes. It was found that the SOI nanowire light source external power efficiency is at least an order of magnitude better than the comparable bulk CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) light source. - Highlights: • We investigate effect of electric field on silicon avalanche electroluminescence. • With reach-through pn junctions the current and carrier densities are kept constant. • Higher electric fields increase short wavelength radiation. • Higher electric fields decrease long wavelength radiation. • The effect of the electric field indicates intraband transitions as main mechanism.

  13. Neuromorphic photonic networks using silicon photonic weight banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alexander N; de Lima, Thomas Ferreira; Zhou, Ellen; Wu, Allie X; Nahmias, Mitchell A; Shastri, Bhavin J; Prucnal, Paul R

    2017-08-07

    Photonic systems for high-performance information processing have attracted renewed interest. Neuromorphic silicon photonics has the potential to integrate processing functions that vastly exceed the capabilities of electronics. We report first observations of a recurrent silicon photonic neural network, in which connections are configured by microring weight banks. A mathematical isomorphism between the silicon photonic circuit and a continuous neural network model is demonstrated through dynamical bifurcation analysis. Exploiting this isomorphism, a simulated 24-node silicon photonic neural network is programmed using "neural compiler" to solve a differential system emulation task. A 294-fold acceleration against a conventional benchmark is predicted. We also propose and derive power consumption analysis for modulator-class neurons that, as opposed to laser-class neurons, are compatible with silicon photonic platforms. At increased scale, Neuromorphic silicon photonics could access new regimes of ultrafast information processing for radio, control, and scientific computing.

  14. A Mechanochemical Approach to Porous Silicon Nanoparticles Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca De Stefano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon samples have been reduced in nanometric particles by a well known industrial mechanical process, the ball grinding in a planetary mill; the process has been extended to crystalline silicon for comparison purposes. The silicon nanoparticles have been studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, gas porosimetry and transmission electron microscopy. We have estimated crystallites size from about 50 nm for silicon to 12 nm for porous silicon. The specific surface area of the powders analyzed ranges between 100 m2/g to 29 m2/g depending on the milling time, ranging from 1 to 20 h. Electron microscopy confirms the nanometric size of the particles and reveals a porous structure in the powders obtained by porous silicon samples which has been preserved by the fabrication conditions. Chemical functionalization during the milling process by a siloxane compound has also been demonstrated.

  15. Dislocation dynamics of web type silicon ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Jr, O W; Tsai, C T; DeAngelis, R J

    1987-03-01

    Silicon ribbon grown by the dendritic web process passes through a rapidly changing thermal profile in the growth direction. This rapidly changing profile induces stresses which produce changes in the dislocation density in the ribbon. A viscoplastic material response function (Haasen-Sumino model) is used herein to calculate the stresses and the dislocation density at each point in the silicon ribbon. The residual stresses are also calculated.

  16. Solidification and properties of photovoltaic silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    Strenuous efforts are being made to develop an economical process for purifying liquid metallurgical-grade silicon, in response to the growing shortages in high-purity silicon for use in manufacturing photovoltaic cells. A research project is studying this issue at C.E. Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France, co-funded by ADEME (the French Environment and Energy Management Agency) and CEA-INSTN (French Atomic Energy Commission National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology). (authors)

  17. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ELECTROPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SILICON-SILICON DIOXIDE INTERFACE USING PROBE ELECTROMETRY METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. А. Pilipenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of submicron design standards into microelectronic industry and a decrease of the gate dielectric thickness raise the importance of the analysis of microinhomogeneities in the silicon-silicon dioxide system. However, there is very little to no information on practical implementation of probe electrometry methods, and particularly scanning Kelvin probe method, in the interoperational control of real semiconductor manufacturing process. The purpose of the study was the development of methods for nondestructive testing of semiconductor wafers based on the determination of electrophysical properties of the silicon-silicon dioxide interface and their spatial distribution over wafer’s surface using non-contact probe electrometry methods.Traditional C-V curve analysis and scanning Kelvin probe method were used to characterize silicon- silicon dioxide interface. The samples under testing were silicon wafers of KEF 4.5 and KDB 12 type (orientation <100>, diameter 100 mm.Probe electrometry results revealed uniform spatial distribution of wafer’s surface potential after its preliminary rapid thermal treatment. Silicon-silicon dioxide electric potential values were also higher after treatment than before it. This potential growth correlates with the drop in interface charge density. At the same time local changes in surface potential indicate changes in surface layer structure.Probe electrometry results qualitatively reflect changes of interface charge density in silicon-silicon dioxide structure during its technological treatment. Inhomogeneities of surface potential distribution reflect inhomogeneity of damaged layer thickness and can be used as a means for localization of interface treatment defects.

  19. Silicon-Rich Silicon Carbide Hole-Selective Rear Contacts for Crystalline-Silicon-Based Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Josua; Wyss, Philippe; Jeangros, Quentin; Allebé, Christophe; Niquille, Xavier; Debrot, Fabien; Despeisse, Matthieu; Haug, Franz-Josef; Löper, Philipp; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-12-28

    The use of passivating contacts compatible with typical homojunction thermal processes is one of the most promising approaches to realizing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In this work, we investigate an alternative rear-passivating contact targeting facile implementation to industrial p-type solar cells. The contact structure consists of a chemically grown thin silicon oxide layer, which is capped with a boron-doped silicon-rich silicon carbide [SiC x (p)] layer and then annealed at 800-900 °C. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the thin chemical oxide layer disappears upon thermal annealing up to 900 °C, leading to degraded surface passivation. We interpret this in terms of a chemical reaction between carbon atoms in the SiC x (p) layer and the adjacent chemical oxide layer. To prevent this reaction, an intrinsic silicon interlayer was introduced between the chemical oxide and the SiC x (p) layer. We show that this intrinsic silicon interlayer is beneficial for surface passivation. Optimized passivation is obtained with a 10-nm-thick intrinsic silicon interlayer, yielding an emitter saturation current density of 17 fA cm -2 on p-type wafers, which translates into an implied open-circuit voltage of 708 mV. The potential of the developed contact at the rear side is further investigated by realizing a proof-of-concept hybrid solar cell, featuring a heterojunction front-side contact made of intrinsic amorphous silicon and phosphorus-doped amorphous silicon. Even though the presented cells are limited by front-side reflection and front-side parasitic absorption, the obtained cell with a V oc of 694.7 mV, a FF of 79.1%, and an efficiency of 20.44% demonstrates the potential of the p + /p-wafer full-side-passivated rear-side scheme shown here.

  20. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Iacopi, Francesca; Wood, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices. (paper)

  1. "Silicon millefeuille": From a silicon wafer to multiple thin crystalline films in a single step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, David; Trifonov, Trifon; Garín, Moisés; Alcubilla, Ramon

    2013-04-01

    During the last years, many techniques have been developed to obtain thin crystalline films from commercial silicon ingots. Large market applications are foreseen in the photovoltaic field, where important cost reductions are predicted, and also in advanced microelectronics technologies as three-dimensional integration, system on foil, or silicon interposers [Dross et al., Prog. Photovoltaics 20, 770-784 (2012); R. Brendel, Thin Film Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells (Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany 2003); J. N. Burghartz, Ultra-Thin Chip Technology and Applications (Springer Science + Business Media, NY, USA, 2010)]. Existing methods produce "one at a time" silicon layers, once one thin film is obtained, the complete process is repeated to obtain the next layer. Here, we describe a technology that, from a single crystalline silicon wafer, produces a large number of crystalline films with controlled thickness in a single technological step.

  2. Making Porous Luminescent Regions In Silicon Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, Robert W.; Jones, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    Regions damaged by ion implantation stain-etched. Porous regions within single-crystal silicon wafers fabricated by straightforward stain-etching process. Regions exhibit visible photoluminescence at room temperature and might constitute basis of novel class of optoelectronic devices. Stain-etching process has advantages over recently investigated anodic-etching process. Process works on both n-doped and p-doped silicon wafers. Related development reported in article, "Porous Si(x)Ge(1-x) Layers Within Single Crystals of Si," (NPO-18836).

  3. Chiral silicon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, E.; Fahlteich, J.; Hoeche, Th.; Wagner, G.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2006-01-01

    Glancing angle ion beam assisted deposition is used for the growth of amorphous silicon nanospirals onto [0 0 1] silicon substrates in a temperature range from room temperature to 475 deg. C. The nanostructures are post-growth annealed in an argon atmosphere at various temperatures ranging from 400 deg. C to 800 deg. C. Recrystallization of silicon within the persisting nanospiral configuration is demonstrated for annealing temperatures above 800 deg. C. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the silicon samples prior and after temperature treatment

  4. Fabrication of functional structures on thin silicon nitride membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkels, P.; Tjerkstra, R.W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Brugger, J.P.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    A process to fabricate functional polysilicon structures above large (4×4 mm2) thin (200 nm), very flat LPCVD silicon rich nitride membranes was developed. Key features of this fabrication process are the use of low-stress LPCVD silicon nitride, sacrificial layer etching, and minimization of

  5. Influence of the Surface Layer on the Electrochemical Deposition of Metals and Semiconductors into Mesoporous Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubenko, E. B., E-mail: eugene.chubenko@gmail.com; Redko, S. V.; Sherstnyov, A. I.; Petrovich, V. A.; Kotov, D. A.; Bondarenko, V. P. [Belarusian State University of Information and RadioElectronics (Belarus)

    2016-03-15

    The influence of the surface layer on the process of the electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors into porous silicon is studied. It is shown that the surface layer differs in structure and electrical characteristics from the host porous silicon bulk. It is established that a decrease in the conductivity of silicon crystallites that form the surface layer of porous silicon has a positive effect on the process of the filling of porous silicon with metals and semiconductors. This is demonstrated by the example of nickel and zinc oxide. The effect can be used for the formation of nanocomposite materials on the basis of porous silicon and nanostructures with a high aspect ratio.

  6. Influence of the Surface Layer on the Electrochemical Deposition of Metals and Semiconductors into Mesoporous Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubenko, E. B.; Redko, S. V.; Sherstnyov, A. I.; Petrovich, V. A.; Kotov, D. A.; Bondarenko, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the surface layer on the process of the electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors into porous silicon is studied. It is shown that the surface layer differs in structure and electrical characteristics from the host porous silicon bulk. It is established that a decrease in the conductivity of silicon crystallites that form the surface layer of porous silicon has a positive effect on the process of the filling of porous silicon with metals and semiconductors. This is demonstrated by the example of nickel and zinc oxide. The effect can be used for the formation of nanocomposite materials on the basis of porous silicon and nanostructures with a high aspect ratio.

  7. Porous silicon: Synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddaf, M.; Awad, F.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of porous silicon by electrochemical etching method of both p and n-type single crystal silicon wafers in HF based solutions has been performed by using three different modes. In addition to DC and pulsed voltage, a novel etching mode is developed to prepare light-emitting porous silicon by applying and holding-up a voltage in gradient steps form periodically, between the silicon wafer and a graphite electrode. Under same equivalent etching conditions, periodic gradient steps voltage etching can yield a porous silicon layer with stronger photoluminescence intensity and blue shift than the porous silicon layer prepared by DC or pulsed voltage etching. It has been found that the holding-up of the applied voltage during the etching process for defined interval of time is another significant future of this method, which highly affects the blue shift. This can be used for tailoring a porous layer with novel properties. The actual mechanism behind the blue shift is not clear exactly, even the experimental observation of atomic force microscope and purist measurements in support with quantum confinement model. It has been seen also from Fourier Transform Infrared study that interplays between O-Si-H and Si-H bond intensities play key role in deciding the efficiency of photoluminescence emission. Study of relative humidity sensing and photonic crystal properties of pours silicon samples has confirmed the advantages of the new adopted etching mode. The sensitivity at room temperature of porous silicon prepared by periodic gradient steps voltage etching was found to be about 70% as compared to 51% and 45% for the porous silicon prepared by DC and pulsed voltage etching, respectively. (author)

  8. Porous silicon: Synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddaf, M.; Awad, F.

    2006-06-01

    Formation of porous silicon by electrochemical etching method of both p and n-type single crystal silicon wafers in HF based solutions has been performed by using three different modes. In addition to DC and pulsed voltage, a novel etching mode is developed to prepare light-emitting porous silicon by applying and holding-up a voltage in gradient steps form periodically, between the silicon wafer and a graphite electrode. Under same equivalent etching conditions, periodic gradient steps voltage etching can yield a porous silicon layer with stronger photoluminescence intensity and blue shift than the porous silicon layer prepared by DC or pulsed voltage etching. It has been found that the holding-up of the applied voltage during the etching process for defined interval of time is another significant future of this method, which highly affects the blue shift. This can be used for tailoring a porous layer with novel properties. The actual mechanism behind the blue shift is not clear exactly, even the experimental observation of atomic force microscope and purist measurements in support with quantum confinement model. It has been seen also from Fourier Transform Infrared study that interplays between O-Si-H and Si-H bond intensities play key role in deciding the efficiency of photoluminescence emission. Study of relative humidity sensing and photonic crystal properties of pours silicon samples has confirmed the advantages of the new adopted etching mode. The sensitivity at room temperature of porous silicon prepared by periodic gradient steps voltage etching was found to be about 70% as compared to 51% and 45% for the porous silicon prepared by DC and pulsed voltage etching, respectively. (author)

  9. Studies of the dependence on oxidation thermal processes of effects on the electrical properties of silicon detectors by fast neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Kraner, H.W.

    1991-11-01

    High resistivity silicon detectors along with MOS capacitors made on five silicon dioxides with different thermal conditions (975 degree C to 1200 degree C) have been exposed to fast neutron irradiation up to the fluence of a few times 10 14 n/cm 2 . New measurement techniques such as capacitance-voltage (C-V) of MOS capacitors and current-voltage (I-V) of back to back diodes (p + -n - - p + if n - is not inverted to p) or resistors (p + -p-p + if inverted) have been introduced in this study in monitoring the possible type-inversion (n→p) under high neutron fluence. No type-inversion in the material underneath SiO 2 and the p + contact has been observed so far in this work for detectors made on the five oxides up to the neutron fluence of a few times 10 13 n/cm 2 . However, it has been found that detectors made on higher temperature oxides (T≤ 1100 degree C) exhibit less leakage current increase at high neutron fluence (φ ≤ 10 13 n/cm 2 )

  10. Silicon carbide modified carbon materials. Formation of nanocrystalline SiC from thermochemical processes in the system coal tar pitch/poly(carbosilane)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czosnek, C.; Janik, J.F.; Olejniczak, Z. [Stanislaw Staszic University of Mining & Meterology, AGH, Krakow (Poland)

    2002-12-01

    Poly(carbosilane) or PCS, (-CH{sub 2}-SiH(CH{sub 3})-){sub n}, is used as a Si-bearing precursor in combination with a coal tar pitch to study thermally induced transformations toward SiC-modified carbon composites. Following mixing of the components in the molten pitch at 160{sup o}C, the mixture is heated under argon atmosphere at 500{sup o}C yielding a solid carbonizate that is further subjected to separate pyrolysis experiments at 1300{sup o}C or 1650{sup o}C. At temperatures up to 500{sup o}C, the PCS reacts with suitable pitch components as well as undergoing decomposition reactions. At higher temperatures, clusters of prevailingly nanocrystalline beta-SiC are confirmed after the 1650{sup o}C pyrolysis step with indications that the formation of the compound starts at 1300{sup o}C. Si-29 MAS NMR, XRD, FT-IR, XPS, and elemental analysis are used to characterize each pyrolysis step, especially, from the viewpoint of transformation of silicon species to silicon carbide in the carbon matrix evolved from the pitch.

  11. Morphology and stress study of nanostructured porous silicon as a substrate for PbTe thin films growth by electrochemical process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Renata Borges Miranda

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon layers (PSL were produced by stain etching from a HF:HNO3 500:1 mixture with etching time varying in the range of 1 up to 10 min. The samples have presented nanometric porosity as a function of etching time, characteristic of heavily doped p type silicon. The residual stress and the correlation length of the layers were obtained through the analysis of the micro-Raman spectra using a phonon confinement model including a term to account for the amorphous phase. The residual compressive stress tends to increase as expected due to the contribution of smaller crystallites to be more representative as the etching time increases. PbTe thin films were electrodeposited on PSL from aqueous alkaline solutions of Pb(CH3COO2, disodium salt of ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and TeO2 by galvanostatic and potentiostatic method. It was also obtained nanostructured PbTe thin films with polycrystalline morphology evidenced by X-ray Diffraction (XRD spectra. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM analysis has demonstrated good films reproducibility with an average grain size of 100 nm.

  12. Subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Sautter, Ken; Davis, Robert C; Linford, Matthew R

    2009-02-03

    Here we present a straightforward patterning technique for silicon: subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS). In this method, a stencil mask is placed above a silicon surface. Radio-frequency plasma oxidation of the substrate creates a pattern of thicker oxide in the exposed regions. Etching with HF or KOH produces very shallow or much higher aspect ratio features on silicon, respectively, where patterning is confirmed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The oxidation process itself is studied under a variety of reaction conditions, including higher and lower oxygen pressures (2 and 0.5 Torr), a variety of powers (50-400 W), different times and as a function of reagent purity (99.5 or 99.994% oxygen). SOMS can be easily executed in any normal chemistry laboratory with a plasma generator. Because of its simplicity, it may have industrial viability.

  13. Semiconductors and semimetals oxygen in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Shimura, Fumio

    1994-01-01

    This volume reviews the latest understanding of the behavior and roles of oxygen in silicon, which will carry the field into the ULSI era from the experimental and theoretical points of view. The fourteen chapters, written by recognized authorities representing industrial and academic institutions, cover thoroughly the oxygen related phenomena from the crystal growth to device fabrication processes, as well as indispensable diagnostic techniques for oxygen.Key Features* Comprehensive study of the behavior of oxygen in silicon* Discusses silicon crystals for VLSI and ULSI applications* Thorough coverage from crystal growth to device fabrication* Edited by technical experts in the field* Written by recognized authorities from industrial and academic institutions* Useful to graduate students, scientists in other disciplines, and active participants in the arena of silicon-based microelectronics research* 297 original line drawings

  14. High Efficiency, Low Cost Solar Cells Manufactured Using 'Silicon Ink' on Thin Crystalline Silicon Wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, H.

    2011-03-01

    Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink high efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.

  15. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  16. Inorganic Glue Enabling High Performance of Silicon Particles as Lithium Ion Battery Anode

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng; Hu, Liangbing; Wu, Hui; Choi, Jang Wook; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    overcome the pulverization problem, however these nano-engineered silicon anodes usually involve very expensive processes and have difficulty being applied in commercial lithium ion batteries. In this study, we report a novel method using amorphous silicon

  17. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelrod, Ekaterina; Urbach, Benayahu; Sa'ar, Amir; Feldman, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Dielectric measurements accompanied by infrared absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to investigate the electrical and optical properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). As opposed to non-oxidized PS, only high temperature relaxation processes could be resolved for oxidized PS. Two relaxation processes have been observed. The first process is related to dc-conductivity that dominates at high temperatures and low frequencies. After subtraction of dc-conductivity we could analyse a second high-temperature relaxation process that is related to interface polarization induced by charge carriers trapped at the host matrix-pore interfaces. We found that, while the main effect of the oxidation on the PL appears to be a size reduction in the silicon nanocrystals that gives rise to a blue shift of the PL spectrum, its main contribution to the dielectric properties turns out to be blocking of transport channels in the host tissue and activation of hopping conductivity between silicon nanocrystals

  18. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelrod, Ekaterina [Department of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Urbach, Benayahu [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Sa' ar, Amir [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feldman, Yuri [Department of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

    2006-04-07

    Dielectric measurements accompanied by infrared absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to investigate the electrical and optical properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). As opposed to non-oxidized PS, only high temperature relaxation processes could be resolved for oxidized PS. Two relaxation processes have been observed. The first process is related to dc-conductivity that dominates at high temperatures and low frequencies. After subtraction of dc-conductivity we could analyse a second high-temperature relaxation process that is related to interface polarization induced by charge carriers trapped at the host matrix-pore interfaces. We found that, while the main effect of the oxidation on the PL appears to be a size reduction in the silicon nanocrystals that gives rise to a blue shift of the PL spectrum, its main contribution to the dielectric properties turns out to be blocking of transport channels in the host tissue and activation of hopping conductivity between silicon nanocrystals.

  19. Densification of silicon and zirconium carbides by a new process: spark plasma sintering; Densification des carbures de silicium et de zirconium par un procede innovant: le spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillard, F

    2006-12-15

    Materials research for suitable utilization in 4. generation nuclear plants needs new ways to densify testing components. Two carbides, silicon and zirconium carbide seems to be the most suitable choice due to their mechanical, thermal and neutron-transparency properties against next nuclear plant specifications. Nevertheless one main difficulty remains, which is densifying them even at high temperature. Spark Plasma Sintering a new metal-, ceramic- and composite-sintering process has been used to densify both SiC and ZrC. Understanding bases of mass transport mechanisms in SPS have been studied. Composites and interfaces have been processed and analyzed. This manuscript reports original results on SiC and ZrC ceramics sintered with commercial powder started, without additives. (author)

  20. Periodically poled silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.